WorldWideScience

Sample records for caveolin-1 regulates shear

  1. Phospho-Caveolin-1 Mediates Integrin-Regulated Membrane Domain Internalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Miguel A.; Alderson, Nazilla B.; Grande-García, Araceli; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Schwartz, Martin A.; Kiosses, William B.; Anderson, Richard G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Growth of normal cells is anchorage-dependent because signalling through multiple pathways including Erk, PI 3-kinase and Rac requires integrin-mediated cell adhesion 1. Components of these pathways localize to low density, cholesterol-rich domains in the plasma membrane named “lipid rafts” 2,3 or “cholesterol enriched membrane microdomains” (CEMM) 4. We previously reported that integrin-mediated adhesion regulates CEMM trafficking such that cell detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM) triggers CEMM internalisation and clearance from the plasma membrane 5. We now report that this internalisation is mediated by dynamin-2 and caveolin-1. Internalisation requires phosphorylation of caveolin-1 on tyrosine 14. A shift in localisation of phospho-caveolin-1 from focal adhesions to caveolae induces CEMM internalisation upon cell detachment, which mediates inhibition of Erk, PI 3-kinase and Rac. These data define a novel molecular mechanism for growth and tumour suppression by caveolin-1. PMID:16113676

  2. Rosiglitazone ameliorates diffuse axonal injury by reducing loss of tau and up-regulating caveolin-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-lin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosiglitazone up-regulates caveolin-1 levels and has neuroprotective effects in both chronic and acute brain injury. Therefore, we postulated that rosiglitazone may ameliorate diffuse axonal injury via its ability to up-regulate caveolin-1, inhibit expression of amyloid-beta precursor protein, and reduce the loss and abnormal phosphorylation of tau. In the present study, intraperitoneal injection of rosiglitazone significantly reduced the levels of amyloid-beta precursor protein and hyperphosphorylated tau (phosphorylated at Ser 404 (p-tau (S 404 , and it increased the expression of total tau and caveolin-1 in the rat cortex. Our results show that rosiglitazone inhibits the expression of amyloid-beta precursor protein and lowers p-tau (S 404 levels, and it reduces the loss of total tau, possibly by up-regulating caveolin-1. These actions of rosiglitazone may underlie its neuroprotective effects in the treatment of diffuse axonal injury.

  3. Caveolin-1-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMANUELA FELLEY-BOSCO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species are now widely recognized as important players contributing both to cell homeostasis and the development of disease. In this respect nitric oxide (NO is no exception. The discussion here will center on regulation of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS for two reasons. First, only iNOS produces micromolar NO concentrations, amounts that are high by comparison with the picomolar to nanomolar concentrations resulting from Ca2+-controlled NO production by endothelial eNOS or neuronal nNOS. Second, iNOS is not constitutively expressed in cells and regulation of this isoenzyme, in contrast to endothelial eNOS or neuronal nNOS, is widely considered to occur at the transcriptional level only. In particular, we were interested in the possibility that caveolin-1, a protein that functions as a tumor suppressor in colon carcinoma cells (Bender et al., 2002; this issue, might regulate iNOS activity. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a post-transcriptional mechanism controlling iNOS protein levels that involves caveolin-1-dependent sequestration of iNOS within a detergent-insoluble compartment. Interestingly, despite the high degree of conservation of the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain binding motif within all NOS enzymes, the interaction detected between caveolin-1 and iNOS in vitro is crucially dependent on presence of a caveolin-1 sequence element immediately adjacent to the scaffolding domain. A model is presented summarizing the salient aspects of these results. These observations are important in the context of tumor biology, since down-regulation of caveolin-1 is predicted to promote uncontrolled iNOS activity, genotoxic damage and thereby facilitate tumor development in humans

  4. Caveolin-1 regulates genomic action of the glucocorticoid receptor in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffer, Melanie E; Chandran, Uma R; Luthra, Soumya; Volonte, Daniela; Galbiati, Ferruccio; Garabedian, Michael J; Monaghan, A Paula; DeFranco, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    While glucocorticoids (GCs) are used clinically to treat many conditions, their neonatal and prenatal usage is increasingly controversial due to reports of delayed adverse outcomes, especially their effects on brain development. Such alterations may reflect the impact of GCs on neural progenitor/stem cell (NPSC) function. We previously demonstrated that the lipid raft protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was required for rapid GC signaling in embryonic mouse NPSCs operating through plasma membrane-bound glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). We show here that genomic GR signaling in NPSCs requires Cav-1. Loss of Cav-1 impacts the transcriptional response of many GR target genes (e.g., the serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 gene) that are likely to mediate the antiproliferative effects of GCs. Microarray analysis of wild-type C57 or Cav-1-deficient NPSCs identified approximately 100 genes that are differentially regulated by GC treatment. These changes in hormone responsiveness in Cav-1 knockout NPSCs are associated with the loss of GC-regulated phosphorylation of GR at serine 211 but not at serine 226. Chromatin recruitment of total GR to regulatory regions of target genes such as Fkbp-5, RhoJ, and Sgk-1, as well as p211-GR recruitment to Sgk-1, are compromised in Cav-1 knockout NPSCs. Cav-1 is therefore a multifunctional regulator of GR in NPSCs influencing both rapid and genomic action of the receptor to impact cell proliferation.

  5. Regulation of Caveolin-1 Expression Determines Early Brain Edema After Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kang-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Ja-Hae; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Lee, Min-Cheol; Lee, Hong-Joon; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Most patients with cerebral infarction die of brain edema because of the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in ischemic tissue. Caveolins (a group of proteins) are key modulators of vascular permeability; however, a direct role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in the regulation of BBB permeability during ischemic injury has yet to be identified. Cav-1 expression was measured by immunoblotting after photothrombotic ischemia. A direct functional role of Cav-1 in cerebral edema and BBB permeability during cerebral ischemia was investigated by genetic manipulation (gene disruption and re-expression) of Cav-1 protein expression in mice. There was a significant correlation between the extent of BBB disruption and the Cav-1 expression. In Cav-1-deficient (Cav-1(-/-)) mice, the extent of BBB disruption after cerebral ischemia was increased compared with wild-type (Cav-1(+/+)) mice, whereas the increase in cerebral edema volume was ameliorated by lentiviral-mediated re-expression of Cav-1. Furthermore, Cav-1(-/-) mice had significantly higher degradation of tight junction proteins and proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase than Cav-1(+/+) mice. Conversely, re-expression of Cav-1 in Cav-1(-/-) mice restored tight junction protein expression and reduced matrix metalloproteinase proteolytic activity. These results indicate that Cav-1 is a critical determinant of BBB permeability. Strategies for regulating Cav-1 represent a novel therapeutic approach to controlling BBB disruption and subsequent neurological deterioration during cerebral ischemia. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Intestinal epithelial cell caveolin 1 regulates fatty acid and lipoprotein cholesterol plasma levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Jessica P; Shen, Meng-Chieh; Quinlivan, Vanessa; Anderson, Jennifer L; Farber, Steven A

    2017-03-01

    Caveolae and their structural protein caveolin 1 (CAV1) have roles in cellular lipid processing and systemic lipid metabolism. Global deletion of CAV1 in mice results in insulin resistance and increases in atherogenic plasma lipids and cholesterol, but protects from diet-induced obesity and atherosclerosis. Despite the fundamental role of the intestinal epithelia in the regulation of dietary lipid processing and metabolism, the contributions of CAV1 to lipid metabolism in this tissue have never been directly investigated. In this study the cellular dynamics of intestinal Cav1 were visualized in zebrafish and the metabolic contributions of CAV1 were determined with mice lacking CAV1 in intestinal epithelial cells (CAV1 IEC-KO ). Live imaging of Cav1-GFP and fluorescently labeled caveolae cargos shows localization to the basolateral and lateral enterocyte plasma membrane (PM), suggesting Cav1 mediates transport between enterocytes and the submucosa. CAV1 IEC-KO mice are protected from the elevation in circulating fasted low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol associated with a high-fat diet (HFD), but have increased postprandial LDL cholesterol, total free fatty acids (FFAs), palmitoleic acid, and palmitic acid. The increase in circulating FAs in HFD CAV1 IEC-KO mice is mirrored by decreased hepatic FAs, suggesting a non-cell-autonomous role for intestinal epithelial cell CAV1 in promoting hepatic FA storage. In conclusion, CAV1 regulates circulating LDL cholesterol and several FA species via the basolateral PM of enterocytes. These results point to intestinal epithelial cell CAV1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower circulating FFAs and LDL cholesterol, as high levels are associated with development of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Regulation of Cripto-1 Signaling and Biological Activity by Caveolin-1 in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, Caterina; Strizzi, Luigi; Mancino, Mario; Watanabe, Kazuhide; Gonzales, Monica; Hamada, Shin; Raafat, Ahmed; Sahlah, Lawson; Chang, Cindy; Sotgia, Federica; Normanno, Nicola; Lisanti, Michael; Salomon, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Human and mouse Cripto-1 (CR-1/Cr-1) proteins play an important role in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis. In this study, we examined the relationship between Cripto-1 and caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a membrane protein that acts as a tumor suppressor in the mammary gland. Cripto-1 was found to interact with Cav-1 in COS7 cells and mammary epithelial cells. Using EpH4 mouse mammary epithelial cells expressing Cr-1 (EpH4 Cr-1) or Cr-1 and Cav-1 (EpH4 Cr-1/Cav-1), we demonstrate that Cav-1 exp...

  8. Caveolin-1 in the regulation of cell metabolism: a cancer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Zeribe Chike; Ebert, Matthias Philip; Dooley, Steven; Meyer, Christoph

    2016-11-16

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is an oncogenic membrane protein associated with endocytosis, extracellular matrix organisation, cholesterol distribution, cell migration and signaling. Recent studies reveal that CAV1 is involved in metabolic alterations - a critical strategy adopted by cancer cells to their survival advantage. Consequently, research findings suggest that CAV1, which is altered in several cancer types, influences tumour development or progression by controlling metabolism. Understanding the molecular interplay between CAV1 and metabolism could help uncover druggable metabolic targets or pathways of clinical relevance in cancer therapy. Here we review from a cancer perspective, the findings that CAV1 modulates cell metabolism with a focus on glycolysis, mitochondrial bioenergetics, glutaminolysis, fatty acid metabolism, and autophagy.

  9. Co-regulation of cell polarization and migration by caveolar proteins PTRF/Cavin-1 and caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Hill

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 and caveolae are differentially polarized in migrating cells in various models, and caveolin-1 expression has been shown to quantitatively modulate cell migration. PTRF/cavin-1 is a cytoplasmic protein now established to be also necessary for caveola formation. Here we tested the effect of PTRF expression on cell migration. Using fluorescence imaging, quantitative proteomics, and cell migration assays we show that PTRF/cavin-1 modulates cellular polarization, and the subcellular localization of Rac1 and caveolin-1 in migrating cells as well as PKCα caveola recruitment. PTRF/cavin-1 quantitatively reduced cell migration, and induced mesenchymal epithelial reversion. Similar to caveolin-1, the polarization of PTRF/cavin-1 was dependent on the migration mode. By selectively manipulating PTRF/cavin-1 and caveolin-1 expression (and therefore caveola formation in multiple cell systems, we unveil caveola-independent functions for both proteins in cell migration.

  10. Cholesterol and phytosterols differentially regulate the expression of caveolin 1 and a downstream prostate cell growth-suppressor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifere, Godwin O.; Equan, Anita; Gordon, Kereen; Nagappan, Peri; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to show the distinction between the apoptotic and anti-proliferative signaling of phytosterols and cholesterol enrichment in prostate cancer cell lines, mediated by the differential transcription of caveolin-1, and N-myc downstream regulated gene1 (NDRG1), a pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor suppressor. Methods PC-3 and DU145 cells were treated with sterols (cholesterol and phytosterols) for 72 h, followed by trypan blue dye exclusion measurement of necrosis and cell growth measured with a Coulter counter. Sterol induction of cell growth-suppressor gene expression was evaluated by mRNA transcription using RT-PCR, while cell cycle analysis was performed by FACS analysis. Altered expression of Ndrg1 protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Apoptosis was evaluated by real time RT-PCR amplification of P53, Bcl-2 gene and its related pro- and anti-apoptotic family members. Results Physiological doses (16 µM) of cholesterol and phytosterols were not cytotoxic in these cells. Cholesterol enrichment promoted cell growth (Pphytosterols significantly induced growth-suppression (Pphytosterols decreased mitotic subpopulations. We demonstrated for the first time that cholesterols concertedly attenuated the expression of caveolin-1(cav-1) and NDRG1 genes in both prostate cancer cell lines. Phytosterols had the opposite effect by inducing overexpression of cav-1, a known mediator of androgen-dependent signals that presumably control cell growth or apoptosis. Conclusions Cholesterol and phytosterol treatment differentially regulated the growth of prostate cancer cells and the expression of p53 and cav-1, a gene that regulates androgen-regulated signals. These sterols also differentially regulated cell cycle arrest, downstream pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor-suppressor, NDRG1 suggesting that cav-1 may mediate pro-apoptotic NDRG1 signals. Elucidation of the mechanism for sterol modulation of growth and apoptosis signaling

  11. SMAD-independent down-regulation of caveolin-1 by TGF-β: effects on proliferation and survival of myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Yan Y; Cui, Zongbin; Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Rangarajan, Sunad; Kurundkar, Ashish; Antony, Veena B; Thannickal, Victor J

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediates growth-inhibitory effects on most target cells via activation of the canonical SMAD signaling pathway. This growth-inhibitory activity may be coupled with cellular differentiation. Our studies demonstrate that TGF-β1 inhibits proliferation of primary, non-transformed human lung fibroblasts in association with the induction of myofibroblast differentiation. Differentiated myofibroblasts maintain the capacity to proliferate in response to exogenous mitogenic stimuli and are resistant to serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. These proliferative and anti-apoptotic properties of myofibroblasts are related, in part, to the down-regulation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) by TGF-β1. Cav-1 down-regulation is mediated by early activation of p38 MAPK and does not require SMAD signaling. In contrast, myofibroblast differentiation is dependent on activation of the SMAD pathway, but not on p38 MAPK. Thus, combinatorial signaling by TGF-β1 of myofibroblast differentiation and down-regulation of Cav-1 by SMAD and p38 MAPK pathways, respectively, confer proliferative and apoptosis-resistant properties to myofibroblasts. Selective targeting of this SMAD-independent, p38-MAPK/Cav-1-dependent pathway is likely to be effective in the treatment of pathological conditions characterized by TGF-β signaling and myofibroblast activation.

  12. Curcumin ameliorates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of podocytes in vivo and in vitro via regulating caveolin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-na; Chen, Zhi-xin; Liu, Xiang-chun; Liu, Hai-ying; Guan, Guang-ju; Liu, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is recognized to play a key role in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Curcumin, the main active component of turmeric extracted from the roots of the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported for its anti-fibrotic effects in kidney fibrosis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of curcumin in reversing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes in vivo and in vitro. In vivo streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats received vehicle or curcumin, and podocytes were treated with high glucose (HG) in the presence or absence of curcumin in vitro. And we investigated the effect of curcumin on HG-induced phosphorylation of cav-1 on the stability cav-1 and β-catenin using immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy analysis. Curcumin treatment dramatically ameliorated metabolic parameters, renal function, morphological parameters in diabetic rats. We found that HG treatment led to significant down-regulation of p-cadherin and synaptopodin, as well as remarkable up-regulation of α-SMA and FSP-1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, curcumin inhibited HG-induced caveolin-1 (cav-1) Tyr(14) phosphorylation associating with the suppression of stabilization of cav-1 and β-catenin. In summary, these findings suggest that curcumin prevents EMT of podocytes, proteinuria, and kidney injury in DN by suppressing the phosphorylation of cav-1, and increasing stabilization of cav-1 and β-catenin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Metronomic Ceramide Analogs Inhibit Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer through Up-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Thrombospondin-1 and Down-regulation of Cyclin D1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Bocci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of metronomic ceramide analogs and their relevant molecular mechanisms. METHODS: Human endothelial cells [human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC] and pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1 and MIA PaCa-2 were treated with the ceramide analogs (C2, AL6, C6, and C8, at low concentrations for 144 hours to evaluate any antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects and inhibition of migration and to measure the expression of caveolin-1 (CAV-1 and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 mRNAs by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Assessment of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and of CAV-1 and cyclin D1 protein expression was performed by ELISA. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD gemcitabine was compared against metronomic doses of the ceramide analogs by evaluating the inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 subcutaneous tumor growth in nude mice. RESULTS: Metronomic ceramide analogs preferentially inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells. Low concentrations of AL6 and C2 caused a significant inhibition of HUVEC migration. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation were significantly decreased after metronomic ceramide analog treatment. Such treatment caused the overexpression of CAV-1 and TSP-1 mRNAs and proteins in endothelial cells, whereas cyclin D1 protein levels were reduced. The antiangiogenic and antitumor impact in vivo of metronomic C2 and AL6 regimens was similar to that caused by MTD gemcitabine. CONCLUSIONS: Metronomic C2 and AL6 analogs have antitumor and antiangiogenic activity, determining the up-regulation of CAV-1 and TSP-1 and the suppression of cyclin D1.

  14. Curcumin Decreases Hyperphosphorylation of Tau by Down-Regulating Caveolin-1/GSK-3β in N2a/APP695swe Cells and APP/PS1 Double Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jieyun; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Chen; Teng, Zhipeng; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Caveolin-1, the marker protein of membranal caveolae, is not only involved in cholesterol regulation, but also participates in the cleavage of amyloid [Formula: see text]-protein precursor (APP) and the generation of [Formula: see text]-amyloid peptide. It has been reported to be tightly related with Tau. In our previous studies, curcumin has been confirmed to play a neuroprotective role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its effects on Caveolin-1, Tau and their correlation, and the mechanism is still unknown. As such, in the present study, N2a/WT cells, N2a/APP695swe cell and six-month-old APP/PS1 double transgenic mice were enrolled. After curcumin treatment, the expression of Caveolin-1, Tau and their relationship was detected, and the potential mechanisms were explored. The results showed that in the N2a/APP695swe cells, curcumin not only decreased the number of caveolae, but also made their membrane to be thinner; and curcumin could decreased the expression of phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau(ser404)/Tau) and Caveolin-1 ([Formula: see text]), but the expression of phosphorylated GSK-3[Formula: see text] (P-GSK-3[Formula: see text]/GSK-3[Formula: see text] was increased ([Formula: see text]). In APP/PS1 transgenic mice, the same results were observed. Taken together, our data suggest that curcumin may play an important role in AD via reducing Caveolin-1, inactivating GSK-3[Formula: see text] and inhibiting the abnormal excessive phosphorylation of Tau, which will provide a new theory for AD treatment with curcumin.

  15. Down-regulation of Connexin43 expression reveals the involvement of caveolin-1 containing lipid rafts in human U251 glioblastoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Clarhaut, Jonathan; Lamiche, Coralie; Cronier, Laurent; Mesnil, Marc; Defamie, Norah

    2012-11-01

    Glioblastoma cells are characterized by high proliferation and invasive capacities. Tumor development has been associated with a decrease of gap-junctional intercellular communication, but the concrete involvement of gap junction proteins, connexins, remains elusive since they are also suspected to promote cell invasion. In order to better understand how connexins control the glioma cell phenotype, we studied the consequences of inhibiting the intrinsic expression of the major astrocytic connexin, Connexin43, in human U251 glioblastoma cells by the shRNA strategy. The induced down-regulation of Cx43 expression has various effects on the U251 cells such as increased clonogenicity, angiogenesis and decreased adhesion on specific extracellular matrix proteins. We demonstrate that the invasion capacity measured in vitro and ex vivo correlates with Cx43 expression level. For the first time in a cancer cell context, our work demonstrates that Cx43 cofractionates, colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with a lipid raft marker, caveolin-1 and that this interaction is inversely correlated to the level of Cx43. This localization of Cx43 in these lipid raft microdomains regulates both homo- and heterocellular gap junctional communications (respectively between U251 cells, or between U251 cells and astrocytes). Moreover, the adhesive and invasive capacities are not dependent, in our model, on Cav-1 expression level. Our results tend to show that heterocellular gap junctional communication between cancer and stroma cells may affect the behavior of the tumor cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cx43 controls the tumor phenotype of glioblastoma U251 cells and in particular, invasion capacity, through its localization in lipid rafts containing Cav-1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Palmitoylation of caveolin-1 in endothelial cells is post-translational but irreversible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, M. O.; Fox, P. L.

    2001-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a palmitoylated protein involved in assembly of signaling molecules in plasma membrane subdomains termed caveolae and in intracellular cholesterol transport. Three cysteine residues in the C terminus of caveolin-1 are subject to palmitoylation, which is not necessary for caveolar targeting of caveolin-1. Protein palmitoylation is a post-translational and reversible modification that may be regulated and that in turn may regulate conformation, membrane association, protein-protein interactions, and intracellular localization of the target protein. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of [(3)H]palmitate incorporation into caveolin-1 in aortic endothelial cells. The linkage of palmitate to caveolin-1 was hydroxylamine-sensitive and thus presumably a thioester bond. However, contrary to expectations, palmitate incorporation was blocked completely by the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin. In parallel experiments to show specificity, palmitoylation of aortic endothelial cell-specific nitric-oxide synthase was unaffected by these reagents. Inhibitors of protein trafficking, brefeldin A and monensin, blocked caveolin-1 palmitoylation, indicating that the modification was not cotranslational but rather required caveolin-1 transport from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi to the plasma membrane. In addition, immunophilin chaperones that form complexes with caveolin-1, i.e. FK506-binding protein 52, cyclophilin A, and cyclophilin 40, were not necessary for caveolin-1 palmitoylation because agents that bind immunophilins did not inhibit palmitoylation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that caveolin-1 palmitoylation is essentially irreversible because the release of [(3)H]palmitate was not significant even after 24 h. These results show that [(3)H]palmitate incorporation is limited to newly synthesized caveolin-1, not because incorporation only occurs during synthesis but because the continuous presence of palmitate on caveolin-1 prevents

  17. The Oxidative Stress-Induced Increase in the Membrane Expression of the Water-Permeable Channel Aquaporin-4 in Astrocytes Is Regulated by Caveolin-1 Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongshan Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The reperfusion of ischemic brain tissue following a cerebral stroke causes oxidative stress, and leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Apart from inflicting oxidative damage, the latter may also trigger the upregulation of aquaporin 4 (AQP4, a water-permeable channel expressed by astroglial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, and contribute to edema formation, the severity of which is known to be the primary determinant of mortality and morbidity. The mechanism through which this occurs remains unknown. In the present study, we have attempted to address this question using primary astrocyte cultures treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as a model system. First, we showed that H2O2 induces a significant increase in AQP4 protein levels and that this is inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC. Second, we demonstrated using cell surface biotinylation that H2O2 increases AQP4 cell-surface expression independently of it’s increased synthesis. In parallel, we found that caveolin-1 (Cav1 is phosphorylated in response to H2O2 and that this is reversed by the Src kinase inhibitor 4-Amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl-7-(t-butylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2. PP2 also abrogated the H2O2-induced increase in AQP4 surface levels, suggesting that  the phosphorylation of tyrosine-14 of Cav1 regulates  this  process. We  further  showed  that dominant-negative Y14F and phosphomimetic Y14D mutants caused a decrease and increase in AQP4 membrane expression respectively, and that the knockdown of Cav1 inhibits the increase in AQP4 cell-surface, expression following H2O2 treatment. Together, these findings suggest that oxidative stress-induced Cav1 phosphorylation modulates AQP4 subcellular distribution and therefore may indirectly regulate AQP4-mediated water transport.

  18. Interaction of caveolin-1 with Ku70 inhibits Bax-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafei Zou

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1, the structural protein component of caveolae, acts as a scaffolding protein that functionally regulates signaling molecules. We show that knockdown of caveolin-1 protein expression enhances chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis and inhibits long-term survival of colon cancer cells. In vitro studies demonstrate that caveolin-1 is a novel Ku70-binding protein, as shown by the binding of the scaffolding domain of caveolin-1 (amino acids 82-101 to the caveolin-binding domain (CBD of Ku70 (amino acids 471-478. Cell culture data show that caveolin-1 binds Ku70 after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Mechanistically, we found that binding of caveolin-1 to Ku70 inhibits the chemotherapeutic drug-induced release of Bax from Ku70, activation of Bax, translocation of Bax to mitochondria and apoptosis. Potentiation of apoptosis by knockdown of caveolin-1 protein expression is greatly reduced in the absence of Bax expression. Finally, we found that overexpression of wild type Ku70, but not a mutant form of Ku70 that cannot bind to caveolin-1 (Ku70 Φ→A, limits the chemotherapeutic drug-induced Ku70/Bax dissociation and apoptosis. Thus, caveolin-1 acts as an anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells by binding to Ku70 and inhibiting Bax-dependent cell death.

  19. Caveolin-1 as a novel indicator of wound-healing capacity in aged human corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Ji Heon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Yeo, Eui-Ju; Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Excess caveolin-1 has been reported to play a role in age-dependent hyporesponsiveness to growth factors in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesized that caveolin-1-dependent hyporesponsiveness to growth factors in aged corneal epithelial cells might be responsible for delayed wound healing in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated corneal wound-healing time by vital staining using fluorescein after laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK). We compared wound-healing times in young, middle-aged and elderly patients. We also examined caveolin-1 levels and other aging markers, such as p53 and p21, in the corneal epithelium. Elderly patients generally had higher caveolin-1 levels in the corneal epithelia than young patients. There were, however, variations among individuals with increased caveolin-1 in some young patients and decreased levels in some elderly patients. Wound-healing time after LASEK correlated well with the corneal caveolin-1 status. Therefore, we suggest that caveolin-1 status might be responsible for delayed wound healing in elderly patients after LASEK. Caveolin-1 status might be a regulator for wound-healing capacity and a novel target for in vivo adjustment.

  20. Cooperative Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Caveolin-1 in Regulating the Vascular Response to Low Nitric Oxide-High Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiovascular Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pojoga, Luminita H; Yao, Tham M; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Reslan, Ossama M; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Gordon H; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-10-01

    Aldosterone interacts with mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) to stimulate sodium reabsorption in renal tubules and may also affect the vasculature. Caveolin-1 (cav-1), an anchoring protein in plasmalemmal caveolae, binds steroid receptors and also endothelial nitric oxide synthase, thus limiting its translocation and activation. To test for potential MR/cav-1 interaction in the vasculature, we investigated if MR blockade in cav-1-replete or -deficient states would alter vascular function in a mouse model of low nitric oxide (NO)-high angiotensin II (AngII)-induced cardiovascular injury. Wild-type (WT) and cav-1 knockout mice (cav-1(-/-)) consuming a high salt diet (4% NaCl) received Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (0.1-0.2 mg/ml in drinking water at days 1-11) plus AngII (0.7-2.8 mg/kg per day via an osmotic minipump at days 8-11) ± MR antagonist eplerenone (EPL) 100 mg/kg per day in food. In both genotypes, blood pressure increased with L-NAME + AngII. EPL minimally changed blood pressure, although its dose was sufficient to block MR and reverse cardiac expression of the injury markers cluster of differentiation 68 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in L-NAME+AngII treated mice. In aortic rings, phenylephrine and KCl contraction was enhanced with EPL in L-NAME+AngII treated WT mice, but not cav-1(-/-) mice. AngII-induced contraction was not different, and angiotensin type 1 receptor expression was reduced in L-NAME + AngII treated WT and cav-1(-/-) mice. In WT mice, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was enhanced with L-NAME + AngII treatment and reversed with EPL. Acetylcholine relaxation in cav-1(-/-) mice was greater than in WT mice, not modified by L-NAME + AngII or EPL, and blocked by ex vivo L-NAME, 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), or endothelium removal, suggesting the role of NO-cGMP. Cardiac endothelial NO synthase was increased in cav-1(-/-) versus WT mice, further increased with L-NAME + AngII, and not affected by EPL

  1. Divergent expression and roles for caveolin-1 in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines with varying invasive ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Huimin; Jia Li; Wang Shujing; Wang Hongmei; Chu Haiying; Hu Yichuan; Cao Jun; Zhang Jianing

    2006-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is the major component protein of caveolae and associated with a lot of cellular events such as endocytosis, cholesterol homeostasis, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. The majority of results suggest that caveolin-1 might not only act as a tumor suppressor gene but also a promoting metastasis gene. In this study, the divergent expression and roles of caveolin-1 were investigated in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines Hca-F, Hca-P, and Hepa1-6, which have high, low, and no metastatic potential in the lymph nodes, as compared with normal mouse liver cell line IAR-20. The results showed that expression of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein along with the amount of caveolae number in Hca-F cells was higher than that in Hca-P cells, but was not detectable in Hepa1-6 cells. When caveolin-1 expression in Hca-F cells was down-regulated by RNAi approach, Hca-F cells proliferation rate in vitro declined and the expression of lymphangiogenic factor VEGFA in Hca-F decreased as well. Furthermore, in vivo implantation assay indicated that reduction of caveolin-1 expression in Hca-F prevented the lymphatic metastasis tumor burden of Hca-F cells in 615 mice. These results suggest that caveolin-1 facilities the lymphatic metastasis ability of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells via regulation tumor cell growth and VEGFA expression

  2. Caveolin-1 sensitizes rat pituitary adenoma GH3 cells to bromocriptine induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Mu-Chiou

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactinoma is the most frequent pituitary tumor in humans. The dopamine D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine has been widely used clinically to treat human breast tumor and prolactinoma through inhibition of hyperprolactinemia and induction of tumor cell apoptosis, respectively, but the molecular mechanism of bromocriptine induction of pituitary tumor apoptosis remains unclear. Caveolin-1 is a membrane-anchored protein enriched on caveolae, inverted flask-shaped invaginations on plasma membranes where signal transduction molecules are concentrated. Currently, caveolin-1 is thought to be a negative regulator of cellular proliferation and an enhancer of apoptosis by blocking signal transduction between cell surface membrane receptors and intracellular signaling protein cascades. Rat pituitary adenoma GH3 cells, which express endogenous caveolin-1, exhibit increased apoptosis and shrinkage after exposure to bromocriptine. Hence, the GH3 cell line is an ideal model for studying the molecular action of bromocriptine on prolactinoma. Results The expression of endogenous caveolin-1 in GH3 cells was elevated after bromocriptine treatment. Transiently expressed mouse recombinant caveolin-1 induced apoptosis in GH3 cells by enhancing the activity of caspase 8. Significantly, caveolin-1 induction of GH3 cell apoptosis was sensitized by the administration of bromocriptine. Phosphorylation of caveolin-1 at tyrosine 14 was enhanced after bromocriptine treatment, suggesting that bromocriptine-induced phosphorylation of caveolin-1 may contribute to sensitization of apoptosis in GH3 cells exposed to bromocriptine. Conclusion Our results reveal that caveolin-1 increases sensitivity for apoptosis induction in pituitary adenoma GH3 cells and may contribute to tumor shrinkage after clinical bromocriptine treatment.

  3. Expression of caveolin-1 in the early phase of beta-TCP implanted in dog mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cherng-Tzeh; Bhawal, Ujjal K; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kuboyama, Noboru; Chang, Wei-Jen; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2013-07-01

    Caveolin is an essential and signature protein of caveolae. Caveolin-1 participates in signal transduction processes by acting as a scaffolding protein that concentrates, organizes and functional regulates signalling molecules within caveolar membranes. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) has been widely used for scaffold in tissue engineering due to its high biodegradability, osteoconductivity, easy manipulation, and lack of histotoxicity. To better understand the role of caveolin-1 in bone homeostasis and response to β-TCP scaffold, β-TCP was implanted into the dog mandible defects in beagle dogs, and gene expression profiles were examined focused on the molecular components involved in caveolin-1 regulation. Here we showed the quantitative imageology analysis characterized using in vivo micro-computed tomography (CT) images at 4 and 7 days after β-TCP implanted in dog mandibles. The bone reformation by using the β-TCP scaffolds began within 4 days of surgery, and was healing well at 7 days after surgery. Higher mRNA level of caveolin-1 was observed in β-TCP-implanted Beagle dog mandibles compared with controls at day 4 and day 7 post-surgery. The enhancement of caveolin-1 by β-TCP was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. We further revealed increased Smad7 and Phospho Stat3 expression in β-TCP-implanted specimens. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhancement of caveolin-1 play an important role in accelerating bone formation by β-TCP. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Role of Caveolin 1 in HIV Infection and Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergia, Ayalew

    2017-05-26

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is a major component of the caveolae structure and is expressed in a variety of cell types including macrophages, which are susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Caveolae structures are present in abundance in mechanically stressed cells such as endothelial cells and adipocytes. HIV infection induces dysfunction of these cells and promotes pathogenesis. Cav-1 and the caveolae structure are believed to be involved in multiple cellular processes that include signal transduction, lipid regulation, endocytosis, transcytosis, and mechanoprotection. Such a broad biological role of Cav-1/caveolae is bound to have functional cross relationships with several molecular pathways including HIV replication and viral-induced pathogenesis. The current review covers the relationship of Cav-1 and HIV in respect to viral replication, persistence, and the potential role in pathogenesis.

  5. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Mao

    Full Text Available Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3 activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50% of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%, and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations. In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  6. Oxidative stress induces caveolin 1 degradation and impairs caveolae functions in skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Mougeolle

    Full Text Available Increased level of oxidative stress, a major actor of cellular aging, impairs the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle and leads to the reduction in the number and size of muscle fibers causing sarcopenia. Caveolin 1 is the major component of caveolae, small membrane invaginations involved in signaling and endocytic trafficking. Their role has recently expanded to mechanosensing and to the regulation of oxidative stress-induced pathways. Here, we increased the amount of reactive oxidative species in myoblasts by addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at non-toxic concentrations. The expression level of caveolin 1 was significantly decreased as early as 10 min after 500 μM H2O2 treatment. This reduction was not observed in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that caveolin 1 was rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In spite of caveolin 1 decrease, caveolae were still able to assemble at the plasma membrane. Their functions however were significantly perturbed by oxidative stress. Endocytosis of a ceramide analog monitored by flow cytometry was significantly diminished after H2O2 treatment, indicating that oxidative stress impaired its selective internalization via caveolae. The contribution of caveolae to the plasma membrane reservoir has been monitored after osmotic cell swelling. H2O2 treatment increased membrane fragility revealing that treated cells were more sensitive to an acute mechanical stress. Altogether, our results indicate that H2O2 decreased caveolin 1 expression and impaired caveolae functions. These data give new insights on age-related deficiencies in skeletal muscle.

  7. Inhibitors caveolin-1 and protein kinase G show differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    protein interactions with caveolin-1 before extracellular activating signals release it for nitric oxide (NO) production. Smooth muscle protein kinase G (PKG) is a down-stream effector of NO signaling for relaxation of vascular smooth muscle cells ...

  8. Caveolar fatty acids and acylation of caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Cai

    Full Text Available Caveolae are cholesterol and sphingolipids rich subcellular domains on plasma membrane. Caveolae contain a variety of signaling proteins which provide platforms for signaling transduction. In addition to enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, caveolae also contain a variety of fatty acids. It has been well-established that acylation of protein plays a pivotal role in subcellular location including targeting to caveolae. However, the fatty acid compositions of caveolae and the type of acylation of caveolar proteins remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the fatty acids in caveolae and caveolin-1 bound fatty acids.Caveolae were isolated from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. The caveolar fatty acids were extracted with Folch reagent, methyl esterificated with BF3, and analyzed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS. The caveolin-1 bound fatty acids were immunoprecipitated by anti-caveolin-1 IgG and analyzed with GC/MS.In contrast to the whole CHO cell lysate which contained a variety of fatty acids, caveolae mainly contained three types of fatty acids, 0.48 µg palmitic acid, 0.61 µg stearic acid and 0.83 µg oleic acid/caveolae preparation/5 × 10(7 cells. Unexpectedly, GC/MS analysis indicated that caveolin-1 was not acylated by myristic acid; instead, it was acylated by palmitic acid and stearic acid.Caveolae contained a special set of fatty acids, highly enriched with saturated fatty acids, and caveolin-1 was acylated by palmitic acid and stearic acid. The unique fatty acid compositions of caveolae and acylation of caveolin-1 may be important for caveolae formation and for maintaining the function of caveolae.

  9. Phenotypic Modulation of Mesenteric Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Type 2 Diabetic Rats is Associated with Decreased Caveolin-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alicia Carrillo-Sepulveda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Diabetes-induced vascular complications are associated with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC phenotypic modulation, switching from a contractile to a synthetic-proliferative phenotype. Loss of caveolin-1 is involved with proliferation of VSMCs. We tested the hypothesis that mesenteric VSMCs from type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat undergo phenotypic modulation and it is linked to decreased caveolin-1 expression. Methods: VSMCs were isolated from mesenteric arteries from GK rats and age-matched control Wistar rats. Western blotting was used to determine expression of target proteins such as caveolin-1, calponin (marker of differentiation, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, marker of proliferation. In addition, we measured intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production using H2DCF-DA and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 by western blotting in VSMCs from GK stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin upregulated in diabetes. Results: Mesenteric VSMCs from diabetic GK rats exhibited decreased caveolin-1 and calponin expression and increased PCNA expression compared to control. Increased levels of ROS and phospho-ERK1/2 expression were also found in GK VSMCs. LPS augmented ROS and phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels to a greater extent in GK VSMCs than in control. Likewise, high glucose decreased caveolin-1 and calponin expression, increased PCNA expression and augmented ROS production in control mesenteric VSMCs. Conclusion: These results suggest that mesenteric VSMCs from diabetic GK rats undergo phenotypic modulation and it is associated with decreased caveolin-1 expression. These alterations may be due to enhanced inflammatory stimuli and glucose levels present in diabetic milieu.

  10. Association between Caveolin-1 expression and pathophysiological progression of femoral nerves in diabetic foot amputation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Min

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pathological changes of femoral nerves and the levels of caveolin-1 in diabetic foot amputation patients with neuropathy, and evaluate the association between caveolin-1 and neuropathy development.

  11. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M.; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P. A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies (“humming bird”) compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells. PMID:23592983

  12. Caveolin-1 as a biomarker to predict therapeutic effect of low-frequency ultrasound combined with SonoVue on prostate cancer in nude mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiping; Nan, Shuliang; Bai, Wenkun; Shen, E; Hu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    to the control (p SonoVue. Down-regulating the expression of caveolin-1 is likely a potential biomarker of response to ultrasound and SonoVue treatment in prostate cancer mouse model.

  13. Caveolin-1 expression in benign and malignant lesions of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiesel Ludwig

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caveolin-1 is thought to have an important impact on both signal transduction and mediation of intracellular processes. Furthermore, it has been suggested that Caveolin-1 may contribute to certain steps of carcinogenesis in various types of cancer. We examined the potential clinical relevance of Caveolin-1 in normal, benign and malignant breast tissue specimens. Methods Using tissue microarray (TMA technology cases of invasive breast cancer, DCIS, benign breast disease (i.e. fibroadenoma, sclerosing adenosis, ductal hyperplasia and radial scar and normal breast tissue were evaluated for Caveolin-1 expression. Immunohistochemical staining with an anti-Caveolin-1-antibody was performed. Staining intensity was quantified semiquantitatively. In invasive lesions staining results were correlated with clinical and pathological data. Results No Caveolin-1 expression was observed in epithelial cells of normal breast tissue (n = 5, benign breast disease (n = 295 and DCIS (n = 108. However, Caveolin-1 expression was found in 32 of 109 cases of invasive breast carcinomas (29.4%. Caveolin-1 expression in invasive breast cancer could neither be correlated with survival parameters such as overall or disease-free survival nor with established clinical and pathological markers. Conclusion In this study we demonstrated expression of Caveolin-1 in one third of invasive breast cancers. A significant increase in Caveolin-1 expression was observed comparing invasive breast cancer to both benign breast tissue and non-invasive breast cancer. Since inhibitors of Caveolin-1 signalling are available, targeting Caveolin-1 in breast cancer may represent a potential option for future breast cancer treatment.

  14. Caveolin-1 Is Enriched in the Peroxisomal Membrane of Rat Hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, Jannes; Rembacz, Krzysztof P.; van den Heuvel, Fiona A. J.; Woudenberg-Vrenken, Titia E.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Geuken, Mariska; Hoekstra, Mark; Deelman, Leo E.; Enrich, Carlos; Henning, Rob H.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    Caveolae are a subtype of cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains/rafts that are routinely detected as vesicles pinching off from the plasma membrane. Caveolin-1 is an essential component of caveolae. Hepatic caveolin-1 plays an important role in liver regeneration and lipid metabolism. Expression

  15. Characterization of physiochemical properties of caveolin-1 from normal and prion-infected human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangzhu; Shen, Pingping; Wang, Zerui; Dang, Johnny; Adornato, Alise; Zou, Lewis S; Dong, Zhiqian; Yuan, Jue; Feng, Jiachun; Cui, Li; Zou, Wen-Quan

    2017-08-15

    Caveolin-1 is a major component protein of the caveolae-a type of flask shaped, 50-100 nm, nonclathrin-coated, microdomain present in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells. Caveolin-1 functions as a scaffolding protein to organize and concentrate signaling molecules within the caveolae, which may be associated with its unique physicochemical properties including oligomerization, acquisition of detergent insolubility, and association with cholesterol. Here we demonstrate that caveolin-1 is detected in all brain areas examined and recovered in both detergent-soluble and -insoluble fractions. Surprisingly, the recovered molecules from the two different fractions share a similar molecular size ranging from 200 to 2,000 kDa, indicated by gel filtration. Furthermore, both soluble and insoluble caveolin-1 molecules generate a proteinase K (PK)-resistant C-terminal core fragment upon the PK-treatment, by removing ˜36 amino acids from the N-terminus of the protein. Although it recognizes caveolin-1 from A431 cell lysate, an antibody against the C-terminus of caveolin-1 fails to detect the brain protein by Western blotting, suggesting that the epitope in the brain caveolin-1 is concealed. No significant differences in the physicochemical properties of caveolin-1 between uninfected and prion-infected brains are observed.

  16. Nanoscale imaging of caveolin-1 membrane domains in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Gabor

    Full Text Available Light microscopy enables noninvasive imaging of fluorescent species in biological specimens, but resolution is generally limited by diffraction to ~200-250 nm. Many biological processes occur on smaller length scales, highlighting the importance of techniques that can image below the diffraction limit and provide valuable single-molecule information. In recent years, imaging techniques have been developed which can achieve resolution below the diffraction limit. Utilizing one such technique, fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM, we demonstrated its ability to construct super-resolution images from single molecules in a living zebrafish embryo, expanding the realm of previous super-resolution imaging to a living vertebrate organism. We imaged caveolin-1 in vivo, in living zebrafish embryos. Our results demonstrate the successful image acquisition of super-resolution images in a living vertebrate organism, opening several opportunities to answer more dynamic biological questions in vivo at the previously inaccessible nanoscale.

  17. Inhibition of c-Src protects paraquat induced microvascular endothelial injury by modulating caveolin-1 phosphorylation and caveolae mediated transcellular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; He, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying paraquat induced acute lung injury (ALI) is still not clear. C-Src plays an important role in the regulation of microvascular endothelial barrier function and the pathogenesis of ALI. In the present study, we found that paraquat induced cell toxicity and an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelium. Paraquat exposure also induced significant increase of caveolin-1 phosphorylation, caveolae trafficking and albumin permeability in endothelial monolayers. C-Src depletion by siRNA significantly attenuate paraquat induced cell toxicity, caveolin-1 phosphorylation, caveolae formation and endothelial hyperpermeability. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) failed to protect endothelial monolayers against paraquat induced toxicity. Thus, our findings suggest that paraquat exposure increases paracellular endothelial permeability by increasing caveolin-1 phosphorylation in a c-Src dependant manner. The depletion of c-Src might protect microvascular endothelial function by regulating caveolin-1 phosphorylation and caveolae trafficking during paraquat exposure, and might have potential therapeutic effects on paraquat induced ALI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Caveolin-1 Is Necessary for Hepatic Oxidative Lipid Metabolism: Evidence for Crosstalk between Caveolin-1 and Bile Acid Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Fernández-Rojo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1 have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1−/− mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1−/− mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1 hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2 nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP and bile acid signaling.

  19. [Cloning and characterization of Caveolin-1 gene in pigeon, Columba livia domestica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Li; Wang, Xing-Guo; Gu, Zhi-Liang

    2010-10-01

    Caveolins, a class of principal proteins forming the structure of caveolae in plasmalemma, were encoded by caveolins gene family. Caveolin-1 gene is a member of caveolins gene family. In the present study, a full-length of 2605 bp caveolin-1 cDNA sequence in Columba livia domestica, which included a 537 bp complete ORF encoding a 178 amino acids long putative peptide, were obtained by using RT-PCR and RACE technique. The Columba livia domestica caveolin-1 CDS shared 80.1% - 93.4% homology with Bos taurus, Canis lupus familiaris, Gallus gallus and Rattus norvegicus. Meanwhile, the putative amino acid sequence of Columba livia domestica caveolin-1 shared 85.4% - 97.2% homology with the above species. The semi-quantity RT-PCR revealed that Caveolin-1 expressions were detectable in all the Columba livia domestica tissues and the expressional level of caveolin-1 gene was high in adipose, medium in various muscles, low in liver. These results demonstrated that Caveolin-1 gene was potentially involved in some metabolic pathways in adipose and muscle.

  20. Oxidative stress inhibits caveolin-1 palmitoylation and trafficking in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parat, Marie-Odile; Stachowicz, Rafal Z.; Fox, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    During normal and pathological conditions, endothelial cells (ECs) are subjected to locally generated reactive oxygen species, produced by themselves or by other vessel wall cells. In excess these molecules cause oxidative injury to the cell but at moderate levels they might modulate intracellular signalling pathways. We have investigated the effect of oxidative stress on the palmitoylation and trafficking of caveolin-1 in bovine aortic ECs. Exogenous H2O2 did not alter the intracellular localization of caveolin-1 in ECs. However, metabolic labelling experiments showed that H2O2 inhibited the trafficking of newly synthesized caveolin-1 to membrane raft domains. Several mechanisms potentially responsible for this inhibition were examined. Impairment of caveolin-1 synthesis by H2O2 was not responsible for diminished trafficking. Similarly, the inhibition was independent of H2O2-induced caveolin-1 phosphorylation as shown by the markedly different concentration dependences. We tested the effect of H2O2 on palmitoylation of caveolin-1 by the incorporation of [3H]palmitic acid. Exposure of ECs to H2O2 markedly inhibited the palmitoylation of caveolin-1. Comparable inhibition was observed after treatment of cells with H2O2 delivered either as a bolus or by continuous delivery with glucose and glucose oxidase. Kinetic studies showed that H2O2 did not alter the rate of caveolin-1 depalmitoylation but instead decreased the 'on-rate' of palmitoylation. Together these results show for the first time the modulation of protein palmitoylation by oxidative stress, and suggest a cellular mechanism by which stress might influence caveolin-1-dependent cell activities such as the concentration of signalling proteins and cholesterol trafficking.

  1. Caveolin-1 as a Novel Indicator of Wound-Healing Capacity in Aged Human Corneal Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Rhim, Ji Heon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Yeo, Eui-Ju; Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Excess caveolin-1 has been reported to play a role in age-dependent hyporesponsiveness to growth factors in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesized that caveolin-1–dependent hyporesponsiveness to growth factors in aged corneal epithelial cells might be responsible for delayed wound healing in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated corneal wound-healing time by vital staining using fluorescein after laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK). We compared wound-healing times in young, middle-aged a...

  2. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter

  3. Caveolin-1 expression as a prognostic marker in triple negative breast cancers of Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Joe; Thike, Aye Aye; Ikeda, Murasaki; Lim, Jeffrey Chun Tatt; Lee, Bernett; Nakamura, Seigo; Iqbal, Jabed; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2018-02-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are defined by their lack of oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Although heterogeneous, the majority are aggressive and treatment options are limited. Caveolin acts as tumour suppressor or promoter depending on the cancer type. In this study, we aimed to determine if the expression levels of the candidate biomarker caveolin-1 on stromal or tumour cells were associated with clinicopathological parameters and disease outcomes in TNBCs from an ethnically diverse cohort of Asian women. Tumour specimens from 699 women with TNBC were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis of the frequency and intensity of caveolin-1 expression in tumour and stromal cells. A subset of 141 tumour samples also underwent Nanostring measurement of CAV1 mRNA. Results were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and disease outcomes. Expression of caveolin-1 in stromal cells was observed in 14.4% of TNBC cases. TNBCs of the basal-like phenotype (85% of samples) were significantly more likely to exhibit stromal cell caveolin-1 expression (p=0.028), as were those with a trabecular growth pattern (p=0.007). Lack of stromal caveolin-1 expression in both TNBCs and those with the basal-like phenotype was significantly associated with worse overall survival (p=0.009 and p=0.026, respectively): accordingly, increasing mRNA levels of CAV1 in TNBC samples predicted better overall survival. Caveolin-1 expression on TNBC tumour cells was not associated with clinical outcome. Stromal, but not tumoural, caveolin-1 expression is significantly associated with survival in Asian women with TNBC. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Expression of Caveolin 1 is enhanced by DNA demethylation during adipocyte differentiation. status of insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ortega, Sara; Varela-Guruceaga, Maider; Milagro, Fermín Ignacio; Martínez, José Alfredo; de Miguel, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Caveolin 1 (Cav-1) is an essential constituent of adipocyte caveolae which binds the beta subunit of the insulin receptor (IR) and is implicated in the regulation of insulin signaling. We have found that, during adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells the promoter, exon 1 and first intron of the Cav-1 gene undergo a demethylation process that is accompanied by a strong induction of Cav-1 expression, indicating that epigenetic mechanisms must have a pivotal role in this differentiation process. Furthermore, IR, PKB-Akt and Glut-4 expression are also increased during the differentiation process suggesting a coordinated regulation with Cav-1. Activation of Cav-1 protein by phosphorylation arises during the differentiation process, yet in fully mature adipocytes insulin is no longer able to significantly increase Cav-1 phosphorylation. However, these long-term differentiated cells are still able to respond adequately to insulin, increasing IR and PKB-Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. The activation of Cav-1 during the adipocyte differentiation process could facilitate the maintenance of insulin sensitivity by these fully mature adipocytes isolated from additional external stimuli. However, under the influence of physiological conditions associated to obesity, such as chronic inflammation and hypoxia, insulin sensitivity would finally be compromised.

  5. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dan Shi,1,* Yan Liu,1,* Ronggang Xi,1 Wei Zou,2 Lijun Wu,3 Zhiran Zhang,1 Zhongyang Liu,1 Chao Qu,1 Baoli Xu,1 Xiaobo Wang1 1Department of Pharmacy, The 210th Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, 2College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, Liaoning, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the t(9;22 (q34;q11-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs have been prepared with an average particle size of <100 nm in a previous work. Compared with coarse realgar, the realgar NPs have higher bioavailability. As a principal constituent protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1 participates in regulating various cellular physiological and pathological processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during

  6. Caveolin-2 associates with intracellular chlamydial inclusions independently of caveolin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norkin Leonard C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid raft domains form in plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells by the tight packing of glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Caveolae are invaginated structures that form in lipid raft domains when the protein caveolin-1 is expressed. The Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that replicate entirely within inclusions that develop from the phagocytic vacuoles in which they enter. We recently found that host cell caveolin-1 is associated with the intracellular vacuoles and inclusions of some chlamydial strains and species, and that entry of those strains depends on intact lipid raft domains. Caveolin-2 is another member of the caveolin family of proteins that is present in caveolae, but of unknown function. Methods We utilized a caveolin-1 negative/caveolin-2 positive FRT cell line and laser confocal immunofluorescence techniques to visualize the colocalization of caveolin-2 with the chlamydial inclusions. Results We show here that in infected HeLa cells, caveolin-2, as well as caveolin-1, colocalizes with inclusions of C. pneumoniae (Cp, C. caviae (GPIC, and C. trachomatis serovars E, F and K. In addition, caveolin-2 also associates with C. trachomatis serovars A, B and C, although caveolin-1 did not colocalize with these organisms. Moreover, caveolin-2 appears to be specifically, or indirectly, associated with the pathogens at the inclusion membranes. Using caveolin-1 deficient FRT cells, we show that although caveolin-2 normally is not transported out of the Golgi in the absence of caveolin-1, it nevertheless colocalizes with chlamydial inclusions in these cells. However, our results also show that caveolin-2 did not colocalize with UV-irradiated Chlamydia in FRT cells, suggesting that in these caveolin-1 negative cells, pathogen viability and very likely pathogen gene expression are necessary for the acquisition of caveolin-2 from the Golgi. Conclusion Caveolin-2 associates with the chlamydial

  7. Src-mediated caveolin-1 phosphorylation affects the targeting of active Src to specific membrane sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb-Abraham, Efrat; Shvartsman, Dmitry E.; Donaldson, John C.; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Gutman, Orit; Martin, G. Steven; Henis, Yoav I.

    2013-01-01

    Src interactions with the plasma membrane are an important determinant of its activity. In turn, Src activity modulates its association with the membrane through binding of activated Src to phosphotyrosylated proteins. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a major component of caveolae, is a known Src phosphorylation target, and both were reported to regulate cell transformation. However, the nature of Src-Cav-1 interactions, a potential mechanism of their coregulation, remained unclear. Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching beam-size analysis, coimmunoprecipitation, quantitative imaging, and far-Western studies with cells expressing wild type, as well as structural and activity mutants of Src–green fluorescent protein and Cav-1–monomeric red fluorescent protein, to measure their interactions with the membrane and with each other. We show dynamic Src–plasma membrane interactions, which are augmented and stabilized by Cav-1. The mechanism involves phosphorylation of Cav-1 at Tyr-14 by Src and subsequent binding of the Src SH2 domain to phospho–Cav-1, leading to accumulation of activated Src in focal adhesions. This novel Cav-1 function potentially modulates focal adhesion dynamics. PMID:24131997

  8. Stromal and Epithelial Caveolin-1 Both Confer a Protective Effect Against Mammary Hyperplasia and Tumorigenesis : Caveolin-1 Antagonizes Cyclin D1 Function in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Terence M.; Sotgia, Federica; Lee, Hyangkyu; Hassan, Ghada; Di Vizio, Dolores; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Capozza, Franco; Mercier, Isabelle; Rui, Hallgeir; Pestell, Richard G.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in breast cancer onset and progression, with a focus on epithelial-stromal interactions, ie, the tumor microenvironment. Cav-1 is highly expressed in adipocytes and is abundant in mammary fat pads (stroma), but it remains unknown whether loss of Cav-1 within mammary stromal cells affects the differentiated state of mammary epithelia via paracrine signaling. To address this issue, we characterized the development of the mammary ductal system ...

  9. The significance of caveolin-1 expression in parietal epithelial cells of Bowman's capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostalska-Nowicka, D; Nowicki, M; Zachwieja, J; Kasper, M; Witt, M

    2007-11-01

    To analyse the expression of caveolin-1 in normal human kidney and during diseases leading to nephrotic syndrome in children and to compare its pattern with those observed in control samples, both human and animal. The study group was composed of 104 children diagnosed with minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), lupus glomerulonephritis (LGN) and Schönlein-Henoch glomerulopathy (SH). The research protocol employed direct immunohistochemical assay with the use of mono- and polyclonal antibodies against caveolins. Kidney samples of Wistar rats, wild-type mice and caveolin-1-deficient mice were also analysed. In the control human samples, caveolin-1 was most abundant in the muscle layer of blood vessels and parietal epithelial cells (PECs). Its expression in PECs was significantly lower in children diagnosed with FSGS and LGN than in those with MCD, SH or in controls. In the control animal tissues, except for knock-out mice, caveolin-1 was present in distal convoluted tubules, PECs, endothelial cells and muscle. Caveolae are extremely stable elements of PECs and can be excluded from their cell membrane only in response to the dramatic cell reconstruction observed in FSGS and LGN.

  10. Electroacupuncture Exerts Neuroprotection through Caveolin-1 Mediated Molecular Pathway in Intracerebral Hemorrhage of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is one of the most devastating types of stroke. Here, we aim to demonstrate that electroacupuncture on Baihui (GV20 exerts neuroprotection for acute ICH possibly via the caveolin-1/matrix metalloproteinase/blood-brain barrier permeability pathway. The model of ICH was established by using collagenase VII. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: Sham-operation group, Sham electroacupuncture group, and electroacupuncture group. Each group was further divided into 4 subgroups according to the time points of 6 h, 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after ICH. The methods were used including examination of neurological deficit scores according to Longa’s scale, measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability through Evans Blue content, in situ immunofluorescent detection of caveolin-1 in brains, western blot analysis of caveolin-1 in brains, and in situ zymography for measuring matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 activity in brains. Compared with Sham electroacupuncture group, electroacupuncture group has resulted in a significant improvement in neurological deficit scores and in a reduction in Evans Blue content, expression of caveolin-1, and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 at 6 h, 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after ICH (P<0.05. In conclusion, the present results suggested that electroacupuncture on GV20 can improve neurological deficit scores and reduce blood-brain barrier permeability after ICH, and the mechanism possibly targets caveolin-1/matrix metalloproteinase/blood-brain barrier permeability pathway.

  11. Increased P2X7R expression in atrial cardiomyocytes of caveolin-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, K; Pfleger, C; Linge, A; Sim, J A; Surprenant, A; Steinbronn, N; Strasser, R H; Kasper, M

    2010-07-01

    It has recently been shown in epithelial cells that the ATP-gated ion channel P2X7R is in part, associated with caveolae and colocalized with caveolin-1. In the present study of the mouse heart, we show for the first time, using immunohistochemistry and cryoimmunoelectron microscopy, that P2X7R is expressed in atrial cardiomyocytes and in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, but not in the ventricle cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, biochemical data indicate the presence of two forms of P2X7R, the classical glycosylated 80 kDa isoform and a protein with the molecular weight of 56 kDa, in both cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells of the mouse heart. The functionality of both proteins in heart cells is still unclear. In cardiac tissue homogenates derived from caveolin-1 deficient mice (cav-1(-/-)), an increase of the P2Xrx7 mRNA and P2X7R protein (80 kDa) was found, particularly in atrial samples. In addition, P2rx7(-/-) mice showed enhanced protein levels of caveolin-1 in their atrial tissues. Although the details of cellular mechanisms that underlie the relationship between caveolin-1 and P2X7R in atrial cardiomyocytes and the electrophysiological consequences of the increased P2X7R expression in atrial cells of cav-1(-/-) mice remain to be elucidated, the cardiomyopathy detectable in cav-1(-/-) mice is possibly related to a disturbed crosstalk between P2X7R and caveolin-1 in different heart cell populations.

  12. Caveolin-1 serves as a negative effector in senescent human gingival fibroblasts during Fusobacterium nucleatum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S H; Cho, S-H; Song, J-E; Kim, S; Oh, S S; Jung, S; Cho, K A; Lee, T-H

    2017-06-01

    It is well established that aging is associated with increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a well-known bacterial species that plays a central bridging role between early and late colonizers in the human oral cavity. Further, the ability of F. nucleatum to invade gingival fibroblasts (GFs) is critical to the development of periodontal diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the age-related infection of GFs by F. nucleatum remain unknown. We used young (fourth passage) and senescent (22nd passage) GFs to investigate the mechanisms of F. nucleatum infection in aged GFs and first observed increased invasion of F. nucleatum in senescent GFs. We also found that the co-localization of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a protein marker of aging, with F. nucleatum and the knockdown of Cav-1 in GFs reduced F. nucleatum invasion. Additionally, F. nucleatum infection triggered the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of NADPH oxidase in GFs, but senescent GFs exhibited significantly lower levels of NADPH oxidase activity and ROS production compared with young GFs in both the uninfected and infected conditions. Also, senescent GFs exhibited a decline in proinflammatory cytokine production and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation following F. nucleatum infection. Interestingly, the knockdown of Cav-1 in senescent GFs increased NADPH oxidase activity and caused the upregulation of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 and the phosphorylation of ERK. Collectively, the increased expression of Cav-1 might play a critical role in F. nucleatum invasion and could hinder the host response in senescent GFs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The role of Caveolin-1 in Lipid Droplets and their Biogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Chevrot, Guillaume; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2018-01-01

    We address unresolved questions of the energetics and mechanism of Lipid Droplet (LD) biogenesis, and of the role of Caveolins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and in mature LDs. LDs are eukaryotic repositories of neutral lipids, which are believed to be synthesised in the ER. We investigate...... the effects of a curvature-inducing protein, caveolin-1, on the formation and structure of a spontaneously aggregated triolein (TO) lipid lens in a flat lipid bilayer using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. A truncated form of Caveolin-1 (Cav1) localises on the interface between the spontaneously formed...... is in the LD core, the distribution of both neutral lipids in the LD core, and of phospholipids on the engulfing monolayer are altered significantly. Our simulations provide an unprecedented molecular description of the distribution and dynamics of various lipid species in both mature LDs and in the nascent LD...

  14. Androgen Receptor Localizes to Plasma Membrane by Binding to Caveolin-1 in Mouse Sertoli Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassical androgen signaling pathway translates signals into alterations in cellular function within minutes, and this action is proposed to be mediated by an androgen receptor (AR localized to the plasma membrane. This study was designed to determine the mechanism underlying the membrane association of androgen receptor in TM4 cells, a mouse Sertoli cell line. Western blot analysis indicated testosterone-induced AR translocation to the cell membrane. Data from coimmunoprecipitation indicated that AR is associated with caveolin-1, and testosterone enhanced this association. Knockdown of caveolin-1 by shRNA decreased the amount of AR localized to membrane fraction and prevented AR membrane trafficking after being exposed to testosterone at physiological concentration. The palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate decreased AR membrane localization in basal condition and completely blocked testosterone-induced AR translocation to membrane fraction. These data suggested that AR localized to membrane fraction by binding with caveolin-1 through palmitoylation of the cysteine residue. This study provided a new evidence for AR membrane localization and its application for clarifying the nonclassical signaling pathway of androgens.

  15. Elevated hydrostatic pressure enhances the motility and enlarges the size of the lung cancer cells through aquaporin upregulation mediated by caveolin-1 and ERK1/2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Y-C; Jheng, J-R; Pan, H-J; Liao, W-Y; Lee, C-H; Kuo, P-L

    2017-02-09

    The mechanical characteristics presented in cancer microenvironment are known to have pivotal roles in cancer metastasis, which accounts for the leading cause of death from malignant tumors. However, while a uniformly distributed high interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is a common feature in solid tumors, the effects of high IFP on the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells remain obscure. Using cell-culture devices that simulated increased IFP conditions by applying hydrostatic pressure (HP) ranging from 0 to 20 mm Hg to the cells, we found that the elevated HPs increased the migration speeds, invasiveness, cell volume, filopodial number and aquaporin-1 (AQP1), Snail and vinculin expression levels, as well as phosphorylation of caveolin-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), in the lung cancer cells CL1-5 and A549. The increases of migration speed and cell volume correlated temporally with the increase of AQP1 expression. The elevated HP-induced migration acceleration was hindered by AQP1 knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation using the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD98059 abrogated the elevated HP-induced AQP1 upregulation and migration acceleration in the cancer cells. Caveolin-1 knockdown by siRNA transfection attenuated the HP-induced, ERK1/2-depedent AQP1 upregulation and migration acceleration. Further biochemical studies revealed that the caveolin-1 activation-driven ERK1/2 signaling is mediated by Akt1/2 phosphorylation. By contrast, the elevated HPs had negligible effects on the migration speed and volume of normal bronchial epithelial cells. These results disclose a novel mechanism relating high IFP to the invasiveness of cancer cells and highlight potential targets to impede cancer spreading.

  16. Caveolin-1 influences human influenza A virus (H1N1 multiplication in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemgård Gun-Viol

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The threat of recurring influenza pandemics caused by new viral strains and the occurrence of escape mutants necessitate the search for potent therapeutic targets. The dependence of viruses on cellular factors provides a weak-spot in the viral multiplication strategy and a means to interfere with viral multiplication. Results Using a motif-based search strategy for antiviral targets we identified caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a putative cellular interaction partner of human influenza A viruses, including the pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1 strains of swine origin circulating from spring 2009 on. The influence of Cav-1 on human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 virus replication was determined in inhibition and competition experiments. RNAi-mediated Cav-1 knock-down as well as transfection of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant results in a decrease in virus titre in infected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK, a cell line commonly used in basic influenza research as well as in virus vaccine production. To understand the molecular basis of the phenomenon we focussed on the putative caveolin-1 binding domain (CBD located in the lumenal, juxtamembranal portion of the M2 matrix protein which has been identified in the motif-based search. Pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that caveolin-1 binds to M2. The data suggest, that Cav-1 modulates influenza virus A replication presumably based on M2/Cav-1 interaction. Conclusion As Cav-1 is involved in the human influenza A virus life cycle, the multifunctional protein and its interaction with M2 protein of human influenza A viruses represent a promising starting point for the search for antiviral agents.

  17. Elafin Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension via Caveolin-1–Dependent Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Nils P.; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Gu, Mingxia; Li, Caiyun G.; Li, Hai; Kaschwich, Mark; Diebold, Isabel; Hennigs, Jan K.; Kim, Ki-Yoon; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Wang, Lingli; Cao, Aiqin; Sa, Silin; Jiang, Xinguo; Stockstill, Raymond W.; Nicolls, Mark R.; Zamanian, Roham T.; Bland, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, impaired bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2) signaling, and increased elastase activity. Synthetic elastase inhibitors reverse experimental pulmonary hypertension but cause hepatotoxicity in clinical studies. The endogenous elastase inhibitor elafin attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in mice, but its potential to improve endothelial function and BMPR2 signaling, and to reverse severe experimental pulmonary hypertension or vascular pathology in the human disease was unknown. Objectives: To assess elafin-mediated regression of pulmonary vascular pathology in rats and in lung explants from patients with pulmonary hypertension. To determine if elafin amplifies BMPR2 signaling in pulmonary artery endothelial cells and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Methods: Rats with pulmonary hypertension induced by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blockade and hypoxia (Sugen/hypoxia) as well as lung organ cultures from patients with pulmonary hypertension were used to assess elafin-mediated reversibility of pulmonary vascular disease. Pulmonary arterial endothelial cells from patients and control subjects were used to determine the efficacy and mechanism of elafin-mediated BMPR2 signaling. Measurements and Main Results: In Sugen/hypoxia rats, elafin reduced elastase activity and reversed pulmonary hypertension, judged by regression of right ventricular systolic pressure and hypertrophy and pulmonary artery occlusive changes. Elafin improved endothelial function by increasing apelin, a BMPR2 target. Elafin induced apoptosis in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and decreased neointimal lesions in lung organ culture. In normal and patient pulmonary artery endothelial cells, elafin promoted angiogenesis by increasing pSMAD-dependent and -independent BMPR2 signaling. This was linked mechanistically to augmented interaction of BMPR2 with caveolin-1 via

  18. Hepatic caveolin-1 is enhanced in Cyp27a1/ApoE double knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Escher, Geneviève; Zurkinden, Line; Mistry, H; Mansour, Y; Rohrbach, B; Vogt, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Sterol 27?hydroxylase (CYP27A1) is involved in bile acid synthesis and cholesterol homoeostasis. Cyp27a1 (?/?)/Apolipoprotein E (?/?) double knockout mice (DKO) fed a western diet failed to develop atherosclerosis. Caveolin?1 (CAV?1), the main component of caveolae, is associated with lipid homoeostasis and has regulatory roles in vascular diseases. We hypothesized that liver CAV?1 would contribute to the athero?protective mechanism in DKO mice. Cyp27a1 (+/+)/ApoE (?/?) (ApoE KO), Cyp27a1 (+/...

  19. Effects of high glucose on caveolin-1 and insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ortega, Sara; Varela-Guruceaga, Maider; Martínez, J Alfredo; de Miguel, Carlos; Milagro, Fermín I

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes exposed to high glucose concentrations exhibit impaired metabolic function, including an increase of oxidative and proinflammatory factors that might favor the development of insulin resistance. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a key mediator of the insulin transduction pathway whose expression is significantly enhanced during adipocyte differentiation. In this work, we studied the effects of high glucose concentration on the regulation of Cav-1 expression and activation and its relation to the insulin signaling pathway during the adipogenic process and in long-term differentiated adipocytes. Both, long-term high glucose exposure during adipogenesis and short-term glucose incubation of mature adipocytes, promoted triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. The short-term exposure of mature adipocytes to high glucose significantly reduced the sensitivity to insulin of Cav-1, insulin receptor (IR) and potein kinase B (AKT-2) phosphorylation, as well as insulin-induced deoxyglucose uptake. Adipocytes differentiated in the presence of high glucose lost Cav-1 and IR response to insulin-stimulated phosphorylation, but maintained the insulin sensitivity of AKT-2 phosphorylation and deoxyglucose uptake. Although long-term high glucose exposure increased DNA methylation in Cav-1 promoter, Cav-1 expression was not affected. Moreover, these cells showed an increase of Cav-1, IR and AKT-2 protein content, pointing to an adaptive response induced by the long-term high glucose exposure.

  20. Microparticle-Induced Activation of the Vascular Endothelium Requires Caveolin-1/Caveolae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Andrews

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are small membrane fragments shed from normal as well as activated, apoptotic or injured cells. Emerging evidence implicates MPs as a causal and/or contributing factor in altering normal vascular cell phenotype through initiation of proinflammatory signal transduction events and paracrine delivery of proteins, mRNA and miRNA. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which MPs influence these events. Caveolae are important membrane microdomains that function as centers of signal transduction and endocytosis. Here, we tested the concept that the MP-induced pro-inflammatory phenotype shift in endothelial cells (ECs depends on caveolae. Consistent with previous reports, MP challenge activated ECs as evidenced by upregulation of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 expression. ICAM-1 upregulation was mediated by activation of NF-κB, Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. This response was absent in ECs lacking caveolin-1/caveolae. To test whether caveolae-mediated endocytosis, a dynamin-2 dependent process, is a feature of the proinflammatory response, EC's were pretreated with the dynamin-2 inhibitor dynasore. Similar to observations in cells lacking caveolin-1, inhibition of endocytosis significantly attenuated MPs effects including, EGFR phosphorylation, activation of NF-κB and upregulation of ICAM-1 expression. Thus, our results indicate that caveolae play a role in mediating the pro-inflammatory signaling pathways which lead to EC activation in response to MPs.

  1. The different functions and clinical significances of caveolin-1 in human adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu P

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pin Fu,1 Fuchun Chen,2 Qi Pan,2 Xianda Zhao,1 Chen Zhao,1 William Chi-Shing Cho,3 Honglei Chen1,4 1Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 2Department of Thoracosurgery, Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital of Wenling, Wenling, Zhejiang, 3Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong, 4Department of Pathology, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Hubei, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a major structural protein of caveolae, is an integral membrane protein which plays an important role in the progression of carcinoma. However, whether Cav-1 acts as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor still remains controversial. For example, the tumor-promoting function of Cav-1 has been found in renal cancer, prostate cancer, tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, lung SCC and bladder SCC. In contrast, Cav-1 also plays an inhibitory role in esophagus adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma and cutaneous SCC. The role of Cav-1 is still controversial in thyroid cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, oral SCC, laryngeal SCC, head and neck SCC, esophageal SCC and cervical SCC. Besides, it has been reported that the loss of stromal Cav-1 might predict poor prognosis in breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, oral SCC and esophageal SCC. However, the accumulation of stromal Cav-1 has been found to be promoted by the progression of tongue SCC. Taken together, Cav-1 seems playing a different role in different cancer subtypes even of the same organ, as well as acting differently in the same cancer subtype of different organs. Thus, we hereby explore the functions of Cav-1 in human adenocarcinoma and SCC from the perspective of clinical significances and pathogenesis. We envision that novel targets may come with the further investigation of Cav-1 in carcinogenesis

  2. Effect of TNF-Alpha on Caveolin-1 Expression and Insulin Signaling During Adipocyte Differentiation and in Mature Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Palacios-Ortega

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α-mediated chronic low-grade inflammation of adipose tissue is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is the central component of adipocyte caveolae and has an essential role in the regulation of insulin signaling. The effects of TNF-α on Cav-1 expression and insulin signaling during adipocyte differentiation and in mature adipocytes were studied. Methods: 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated (21 days in the presence TNF-α (10 ng/mL and mature adipocytes were also treated with TNF-α for 48 hours. Cav-1 and insulin receptor (IR gene methylation were determined as well as Cav-1, IR, PKB/AKT-2 and Glut-4 expression and activation by real time RT-PCR and western blot. Baseline and insulin-induced glucose uptake was measured by the 2-[C14]-deoxyglucose uptake assay. Results: TNF-α slowed down the differentiation program, hindering the expression of some insulin signaling intermediates without fully eliminating insulin-mediated glucose uptake. In mature adipocytes, TNF-α did not compromise lipid-storage capacity, but downregulated the expression of the insulin signaling intermediates, totally blocking insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Insulin sensitivity correlated with the level of activated phospho-Cav-1 in both situations, strongly suggesting the direct contribution of Cav-1 to the maintenance of this physiological response. Conclusion: Cav-1 activation by phosphorylation seems to be essential for the maintenance of an active and insulin-sensitive glucose uptake.

  3. Loss of stromal caveolin-1 expression: a novel tumor microenvironment biomarker that can predict poor clinical outcomes for pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Shan

    Full Text Available AIMS: Cancer development and progression is not only associated with the tumor cell proliferation but also depends on the interaction between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment. A new understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment suggests that the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1 as a key regulator may become a potential therapy target. This study aims to elucidate whether stromal Cav-1 expression in pancreatic cancer can be a strong prognosis biomarker. METHODS: Tissue samples from 45 pancreatic cancer patients were studied. Parenchyma and stroma were separated and purified using laser capture microdissection. Stromal Cav-1 expression was measured from pancreatic cancer, paraneoplastic, and normal tissue using immunohistochemistry. We analyzed the correlation of stromal Cav-1 expression with clinicopathologic features and prognostic indicators, such as tumor marker HER-2/neu gene. RESULTS: Specimens from six patients (13.3% showed high levels of stromal Cav-1 staining, those from eight patients (17.8% showed a lower, intermediate level of staining, whereas those from 31 patients (68.9% showed an absence of staining. Cav-1 expression in cancer-associated fibroblasts was lower than that in paracancer-associated and in normal fibroblasts. Stromal Cav-1 loss was associated with TNM stage (P = 0.018, lymph node metastasis (P = 0.014, distant metastasis (P = 0.027, and HER-2/neu amplification (P = 0.007. The relationships of age, sex, histological grade, and tumor size with stromal Cav-1 expression were not significant (P>0.05. A negative correlation was found between circulating tumor cells and stromal Cav-1 expression (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The loss of stromal Cav-1 in pancreatic cancer was an independent prognostic indicator, thus suggesting that stromal Cav-1 may be an effective therapeutic target for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  4. Reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and caveolin 1 promotes invasive phenotype in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyda Korhan

    Full Text Available c-Met, the receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, overexpressed and deregulated in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC. Caveolin 1 (CAV1, a plasma membrane protein that modulates signal transduction molecules, is also overexpressed in HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate biological and clinical significance of co-expression and activation of c-Met and CAV1 in HCC. We showed that c-Met and CAV1 were co-localized in HCC cells and HGF treatment increased this association. HGF-triggered c-Met activation caused a concurrent rise in both phosphorylation and expression of CAV1. Ectopic expression of CAV1 accelerated c-Met signaling, resulted in enhanced migration, invasion, and branching-morphogenesis. Silencing of CAV1 downregulated c-Met signaling, and decreased migratory/invasive capability of cells and attenuated branching morphogenesis. In addition, activation and co-localization of c-Met and CAV1 were elevated during hepatocarcinogenesis. In conclusion reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and CAV1 promoted oncogenic signaling of c-Met contributed to the initiation and progression of HCC.

  5. Reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and caveolin 1 promotes invasive phenotype in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Peyda; Erdal, Esra; Kandemiş, Emine; Cokaklı, Murat; Nart, Deniz; Yılmaz, Funda; Can, Alp; Atabey, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    c-Met, the receptor for Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), overexpressed and deregulated in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). Caveolin 1 (CAV1), a plasma membrane protein that modulates signal transduction molecules, is also overexpressed in HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate biological and clinical significance of co-expression and activation of c-Met and CAV1 in HCC. We showed that c-Met and CAV1 were co-localized in HCC cells and HGF treatment increased this association. HGF-triggered c-Met activation caused a concurrent rise in both phosphorylation and expression of CAV1. Ectopic expression of CAV1 accelerated c-Met signaling, resulted in enhanced migration, invasion, and branching-morphogenesis. Silencing of CAV1 downregulated c-Met signaling, and decreased migratory/invasive capability of cells and attenuated branching morphogenesis. In addition, activation and co-localization of c-Met and CAV1 were elevated during hepatocarcinogenesis. In conclusion reciprocal activating crosstalk between c-Met and CAV1 promoted oncogenic signaling of c-Met contributed to the initiation and progression of HCC.

  6. Caveolin-1 expression level in cancer associated fibroblasts predicts outcome in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianda Zhao

    Full Text Available AIMS: Altered expression of epithelial or stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is observed in various types of human cancers. However, the clinical significance of Cav-1 expression in gastric cancer (GC remains largely unknown. The present study aims to explore the clinicopathological significance and prognostic value of both tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs Cav-1 in GC. METHODS AND RESULTS: Quantum dots immunofluorescence histochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Cav-1 in 20 cases of gastritis without intestinal metaplasia (IM, 20 cases of gastritis with IM and 286 cases of GC. Positive rates of epithelial Cav-1 in gastritis without IM, gastritis with IM and GC showed a decreasing trend (P = 0.012. Low expression of Cav-1 in CAFs but not in tumor cells was an independent predictor of poor prognosis in GC patients (P = 0.034 and 0.005 respectively in disease free survival and overall survival. Cav-1 level in tumor cells and CAFs showed no significant correlation with classic clinicopathological features. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of epithelial Cav-1 may promote malignant progression and low CAFs Cav-1 level herald worse outcome of GC patient, suggesting CAFs Cav-1 may be a candidate therapeutic target and a useful prognostic marker of GC.

  7. Caveolin-1 expression in oral lichen planus, dysplastic lesions and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Aslani, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    Caveolin-1(Cav-1), the main part of caveolae structure, is supposed to play a role in pathogenesis of many human tumors. Since oral lichen planus (OLP) is considered as a potential premalignant disease, this study evaluated Cav-1 expression in OLP in comparison with benign hyperkeratosis, dysplastic epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), to investigate its possible role in pathogenesis and malignant transformation of OLP. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, immunohistochemical expression of Cav-1 in the epithelial component and stroma was evaluated in 81 samples, including 12 cases of hyperkeratosis, 24 OLP, 22 epithelial dysplasia, and 23 OSCC samples. Correlations between Cav-1 expression and clinicopathological variables were evaluated statistically. Positive Cav-1 staining was found in 58% of OLP, 91% of hyperkeratosis, 100% of epithelial dysplasia, and 95% of OSCC samples. OSCC showed the highest Cav-1 expression and OLP had the lowest (P=0.001). The intensity of staining was significantly increased in stepwise manner from OLP to OSCC (P=0.001). Expression of Cav-1 was related to the grade of samples in OSCC and dysplastic samples (P=0.04). Based on the findings, it was concluded that Cav-1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of OLP and carcinogenesis of SCC, but its role in malignant transformation of OLP is not confirmed. Further studies are needed to evaluate its potential therapeutic function in OLP and SCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic Value of Metastatic Tumoral Caveolin-1 Expression in Patients with Resected Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der Sheng Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1, as the main component of caveolae, has complex roles in tumourigenesis in human malignancies. We investigated Cav-1 in primary and metastatic tumor cells of gastric cancer (GC and its association with clinical outcomes. Methods. We retrieved 145 cases of GC who had undergone curative gastrectomy. The expression levels of Cav-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and its association with clinicopathological parameters and patient survival was analyzed. Results. High expression of Cav-1 protein of the GC in the stomach and metastatic lymph node was 12.4% (18/145 and 16.5% (15/91. In the multivariate analysis, tumoral Cav-1 protein in metastatic lymph node showed prognostic significance for relapse-free survival (RFS, HR, 3.934; 95% CI, 1.882–8.224; P=0.001 and cancer-specific survival outcome (CSS, HR, 2.681; 95% CI, 1.613–8.623; P=0.002. Among the GCs with metastatic lymph node, it remained as a strong indicator of poor prognosis for RFS (HR, 3.136; 95% CI, 1.444–6.810; P=0.004 and CSS (HR, 2.509; 95% CI, 1.078–5.837; P=0.032. Conclusion. High expression of tumoral Cav-1 protein in metastatic lymph node is associated with unfavorable prognosis of curative resected GC, indicating the potential of novel prognostic markers.

  9. Hepatic caveolin-1 is enhanced in Cyp27a1/ApoE double knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurkinden, Line; Mansour, Yosef T; Rohrbach, Beatrice; Vogt, Bruno; Mistry, Hiten D; Escher, Geneviève

    2016-10-01

    Sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) is involved in bile acid synthesis and cholesterol homoeostasis. Cyp27a1 (-/-) / Apolipoprotein E (-/-) double knockout mice (DKO) fed a western diet failed to develop atherosclerosis. Caveolin-1 (CAV-1), the main component of caveolae, is associated with lipid homoeostasis and has regulatory roles in vascular diseases. We hypothesized that liver CAV-1 would contribute to the athero-protective mechanism in DKO mice. Cyp27a1 (+/+) / ApoE (-/-) (ApoE KO), Cyp27a1 (+/-) / ApoE (-/-) (het), and DKO mice were fed a western diet for 2 months. Atherosclerotic plaque and CAV-1 protein were quantified in aortas. Hepatic Cav-1 mRNA was assessed using qPCR, CAV-1 protein by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Total hepatic and plasma cholesterol was measured using chemiluminescence. Cholesterol efflux was performed in RAW264.7 cells, using mice plasma as acceptor. CAV-1 protein expression in aortas was increased in endothelial cells of DKO mice and negatively correlated with plaque surface ( P CYP27A1, CAV-1 overexpression might have an additional athero-protective role by partly overcoming the defect in CYP27A1-mediated cholesterol efflux.

  10. Alterations in Caveolin-1 Expression and Receptor-Operated Ca2+ Entry in the Aortas of Rats with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ping Mu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Alterations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i underlie the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is the primary functional protein associated with caveolae, which are invaginations in the plasma membrane, and is a regulator of [Ca2+]i signaling. Caveolae and Cav-1 increase the activity of store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCC in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs, and these enhancing effects were more pronounced in rats with pulmonary hypertension (PH. Classical transient receptor potential (TRPC proteins are highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, and these proteins form functional receptor-operated Ca2+ channels (ROCC and SOCC in PASMCs. Previous studies suggested that functional and structural changes in aortas might occur during the pathological process of PH. Our data demonstrated that Cav-1 and TRPC were also abundant in the aorta smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs of PH rats. However, previous PH research primarily focused on Ca2+ channels in pulmonary arteries, but not functional changes in Ca2+ channels in aortas. The contribution of Cav-1 of AoSMCs to alterations of Ca2+ signaling in aortic functions during the pathological process of PH has not been fully characterized. Therefore, this study investigated alterations in Cav-1 expression and the relationship of these changes to Ca2+ channels in AoSMCs of PH rats. Methods: The present study examined physiological caveolae and Cav-1 expression and characterized the function of altered Cav-1 expression in rat aortas with PH. Results: The appearance of caveolae with Cav-1 expression increased significantly in the aortas of rats with PH, but TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression was not altered. In vitro experiments demonstrated that caveolae contributed to phenylephrine, endothelin-1, and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG-induced aortic vasoreactivity, but KCl and cyclopiazonic acid had no effect, which suggests the vital

  11. Caveolin-1: Functional Insights into Its Role in Muscarine- and Serotonin-Induced Smooth Muscle Constriction in Murine Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keshavarz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased bronchoconstrictor response is a hallmark in the progression of obstructive airway diseases. Acetylcholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin are the major bronchoconstrictors. There is evidence that both cholinergic and serotonergic signaling in airway smooth muscle (ASM involve caveolae. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 (cav-1, a structural protein of caveolae, plays an important regulatory role in ASM contraction. We analyzed airway contraction in different tracheal segments and extra- and intrapulmonary bronchi in cav-1 deficient (cav-1−/− and wild-type mice using organ bath recordings and videomorphometry of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD treated and non-treated precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. The presence of caveolae was investigated by electron microscopy. Receptor subtypes driving 5-HT-responses were studied by RT-PCR and videomorphometry after pharmacological inhibition with ketanserin. Cav-1 was present in tracheal epithelium and ASM. Muscarine induced a dose dependent contraction in all airway segments. A significantly higher Emax was observed in the caudal trachea. Although, caveolae abundancy was largely reduced in cav-1−/− mice, muscarine-induced airway contraction was maintained, albeit at diminished potency in the middle trachea, in the caudal trachea and in the bronchus without changes in the maximum efficacy. MCD-treatment of PLCS from cav-1−/− mice reduced cholinergic constriction by about 50%, indicating that cholesterol-rich plasma domains account for a substantial portion of the muscarine-induced bronchoconstriction. Notably, cav-1-deficiency fully abrogated 5-HT-induced contraction of extrapulmonary airways. In contrast, 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was fully maintained in cav-1-deficient intrapulmonary bronchi, but desensitization upon repetitive stimulation was enhanced. RT-PCR analysis revealed 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as the most prevalent subtypes in the airways. The

  12. Domain-Specific Partitioning of Uterine Artery Endothelial Connexin43 and Caveolin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampey, Bryan C; Morschauser, Timothy J; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Magness, Ronald R

    2016-10-01

    Uterine vascular adaptations facilitate rises in uterine blood flow during pregnancy, which are associated with gap junction connexin (Cx) proteins and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In uterine artery endothelial cells (UAECs), ATP activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in a pregnancy (P)-specific manner that is dependent on Cx43 function. Caveolar subcellular domain partitioning plays key roles in ATP-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and nitric oxide production. Little is known regarding the partitioning of Cx proteins to caveolar domains or their dynamics with ATP treatment. We observed that Cx43-mediated gap junction function with ATP stimulation is associated with Cx43 repartitioning between the noncaveolar and caveolar domains. Compared with UAECs from nonpregnant (NP) ewes, levels of ATP, PGI2, cAMP, NOx, and cGMP were 2-fold higher (PLucifer yellow dye transfer, a response abrogated by Gap27, but not Gap 26, indicating involvement of Cx43, but not Cx37. Confocal microscopy revealed domain partitioning of Cx43 and caveolin-1. In pregnant UAECs, LC/MS/MS analysis revealed only Cx43 in the caveolar domain. In contrast, Cx37 was located only in the noncaveolar pool. Western analysis revealed that ATP increased Cx43 distribution (1.7-fold; P=0.013) to the caveolar domain, but had no effect on Cx37. These data demonstrate rapid ATP-stimulated repartitioning of Cx43 to the caveolae, where endothelial nitric oxide synthase resides and plays an important role in nitric oxide-mediated increasing uterine blood flow during pregnancy. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Enhanced caveolin-1 expression increases migration, anchorage-independent growth and invasion of endometrial adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Valdivia, Natalia; Bravo, Denisse; Huerta, Hernán; Henriquez, Soledad; Gabler, Fernando; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen; Calderon, Claudia; Owen, Gareth I.; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) has been implicated both in tumor suppression and progression, whereby the specific role appears to be context dependent. Endometrial cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the female genital tract; however, little is known about the role of CAV1 in this disease. Here, we first determined by immunohistochemistry CAV1 protein levels in normal proliferative human endometrium and endometrial tumor samples. Then using two endometrial cancer cell lines (ECC: Ishikawa and Hec-1A) we evaluated mRNA and protein levels of CAV1 by real time qPCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The role of CAV1 expression in ECC malignancy was further studied by either inducing its expression in endometrial cancer cells with the tumor promotor 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (4β-TPA) or decreasing expression using short-hairpin RNA constructs, and then evaluating the effects of these changes on ECC proliferation, transmigration, matrigel invasion, and colony formation in soft agar. Immunohistochemical analysis of endometrial epithelia revealed that substantially higher levels of CAV1 were present in endometrial tumors than the normal proliferative epithelium. Also, in Ishikawa and Hec-1A endometrial cancer cells CAV1 expression was readily detectable. Upon treatment with 4β-TPA CAV1 levels increased and coincided with augmented cell transmigration, matrigel invasion, as well as colony formation in soft agar. Reduction of CAV1 expression using short-hairpin RNA constructs ablated these effects in both cell types whether treated or not with 4β-TPA. Alternatively, CAV1 expression appeared not to modulate significantly proliferation of these cells. Our study shows that elevated CAV1, observed in patients with endometrial cancer, is linked to enhanced malignancy of endometrial cancer cells, as evidenced by increased migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1477-5) contains

  14. Anti-neoplastic drugs increase caveolin-1-dependent migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Valdivia, Natalia I; Calderón, Claudia C; Díaz, Jorge E; Lobos-González, Lorena; Sepulveda, Hugo; Ortíz, Rina J; Martinez, Samuel; Silva, Veronica; Maldonado, Horacio J; Silva, Patricio; Wehinger, Sergio; Burzio, Verónica A; Torres, Vicente A; Montecino, Martín; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2017-12-19

    Expression of the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) enhances migration and invasion of metastatic cancer cells. Yet, CAV1 also functions as a tumor suppressor in early stages of cancer, where expression is suppressed by epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, we sought to identify stimuli/mechanisms that revert epigenetic CAV1 silencing in cancer cells and evaluate how this affects their metastatic potential. We reasoned that restricted tissue availability of anti-neoplastic drugs during chemotherapy might expose cancer cells to sub-therapeutic concentrations, which activate signaling pathways and the expression of CAV1 to favor the acquisition of more aggressive traits. Here, we used in vitro [2D, invasion] and in vivo (metastasis) assays, as well as genetic and biochemical approaches to address this question. Colon and breast cancer cells were identified where CAV1 levels were low due to epigenetic suppression and could be reverted by treatment with the methyltransferase inhibitor 5'-azacytidine. Exposure of these cells to anti-neoplastic drugs for short periods of time (24-48 h) increased CAV1 expression through ROS production and MEK/ERK activation. In colon cancer cells, increased CAV1 expression enhanced migration and invasion in vitro via pathways requiring Src-family kinases, as well as Rac-1 activity. Finally, elevated CAV1 expression in colon cancer cells following exposure in vitro to sub-cytotoxic drug concentrations increased their metastatic potential in vivo . Therefore exposure of cancer cells to anti-neoplastic drugs at non-lethal drug concentrations induces signaling events and changes in transcription that favor CAV1-dependent migration, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, this may occur in the absence of selection for drug-resistance.

  15. Soy protein isolate down-regulates caveolin-1 expression to suppress osteoblastic cell senescence pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been suggested that the beneficial effects of soy protein isolate (SPI) on bone quality might be due to either stimulation of estrogenic signaling via isoflavones or through a novel and as yet characterized non-estrogenic pathway. We report here that SPI-fed rat serum inhibited osteoblastic c...

  16. Caveolin-1 and CDC42 mediated endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bohmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine is a rapidly growing field in nanotechnology, which has great potential in the development of new therapies for numerous diseases. For example iron oxide nanoparticles are in clinical use already in the thermotherapy of brain cancer. Although it has been shown, that tumor cells take up these particles in vitro, little is known about the internalization routes. Understanding of the underlying uptake mechanisms would be very useful for faster and precise development of nanoparticles for clinical applications. This study aims at the identification of key proteins, which are crucial for the active uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by HeLa cells (human cervical cancer as a model cell line. Cells were transfected with specific siRNAs against Caveolin-1, Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin, PIP5Kα and CDC42. Knockdown of Caveolin-1 reduces endocytosis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (SCIONs between 23 and 41%, depending on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles and the experimental design. Knockdown of CDC42 showed a 46% decrease of the internalization of PEGylated SPIONs within 24 h incubation time. Knockdown of Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin and PIP5Kα caused no or only minor effects. Hence endocytosis in HeLa cells of iron oxide nanoparticles, used in this study, is mainly mediated by Caveolin-1 and CDC42. It is shown here for the first time, which proteins of the endocytotic pathway mediate the endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells in vitro. In future studies more experiments should be carried out with different cell lines and other well-defined nanoparticle species to elucidate possible general principles.

  17. Expression dynamics of caveolin-1 in fibroblasts of newborn rats with chronic lung disease and its impact on lung fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Fu, Jian-Hua; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the changes of caveolin-1 in lung fibroblasts in newborn Wistar rats when exposed to hyperoxic conditions, as well as lung fibroblasts cell cycle. One hundred newborn Wistar rats were randomly divided (50 rats/group) into experimental and control groups, exposed to hyperoxic conditions or normal air, respectively. The fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) in the experimental group was 90%, whereas this value was 21% in the control group. Lung fibroblasts were collected on days 3, 7, and 14 of the experiment. Caveolin-1 expression dynamics in lung fibroblasts was assayed in each group by immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to assess the proportions of lung fibroblasts at different stages of the cell cycle. On day 3, no significant difference in caveolin-1 expression was observed between the hyperoxic and control groups; however, on days 7 and 14, caveolin-1 expression was significantly lower in the hyperoxic group than in the control (Pfibroblasts in G0/G1 phase in the hyperoxic group decreased compared to that of the control group on day 7, while the proportion of S-phase cells increased (Pfibroblasts proliferated and caveolin-1 expression decreased.

  18. Exercise-Induced Changes in Caveolin-1, Depletion of Mitochondrial Cholesterol, and the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Swelling in Rat Skeletal Muscle but Not in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Jozef Flis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction in cholesterol in mitochondria, observed after exercise, is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 plays an essential role in the regulation of cellular cholesterol metabolism and is required by various signalling pathways. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged swimming on the mitochondrial Cav-1 concentration; additionally, we identified the results of these changes as they relate to the induction of changes in the mitochondrial swelling and cholesterol in rat skeletal muscle and liver. Male Wistar rats were divided into a sedentary control group and an exercise group. The exercised rats swam for 3 hours and were burdened with an additional 3% of their body weight. After the cessation of exercise, their quadriceps femoris muscles and livers were immediately removed for experimentation. The exercise protocol caused an increase in the Cav-1 concentration in crude muscle mitochondria; this was related to a reduction in the cholesterol level and an inhibition of mitochondrial swelling. There were no changes in rat livers, with the exception of increased markers of oxidative stress in mitochondria. These data indicate the possible role of Cav-1 in the adaptive change in the rat muscle mitochondria following exercise.

  19. Sex-dependent expression of caveolin 1 in response to sex steroid hormones is closely associated with development of obesity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (CAV1 is a conserved group of structural membrane proteins that form special cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich compartments, especially in adipocytes. Recently, it has been reported that CAV1 is an important target protein in sex hormone-dependent regulation of various metabolic pathways, particularly in cancer and diabetes. To clarify distinct roles of CAV1 in sex-dependent obesity development, we investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD and sex steroid hormones on CAV1 expression in adipose tissues of male and female rats. Results of animal experiments revealed that estrogen (17-β-estradiol, E2 and androgen (dihydrotestosterone, DHT had opposite effects on body weight gain as well as on the regulation of CAV1, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 in adipose tissues. Furthermore, sex hormone receptors and aromatase were differentially expressed in a sex-dependent manner in response to E2 and DHT treatments. In vivo data were confirmed using 3T3-L1 and HIB1B cell lines, where Cav1 knock down stimulated lipogenesis but suppressed sex hormone receptor signaling proteins. Most importantly, co-immunoprecipitation enabled the identification of previously unrecognized CAV1-interacting mitochondrial or lipid oxidative pathway proteins in adipose tissues. Taken together, current data showed that CAV1 may play important preventive role in the development of obesity, with more prominent effects in females, and proved to be an important target protein for the hormonal regulation of adipose tissue metabolism by manipulating sex hormone receptors and mitochondrial oxidative pathways. Therefore, we can report, for the first time, the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of sex steroid hormones in the sex-dimorphic regulation of CAV1.

  20. Protective Effect of Ginsenoside Rg1 on Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats: Involvement of Caveolin-1 and TGF-β1 Signal Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Heqin; Huang, Feng; Ma, Wenzhuo; Zhao, Zhenghang; Zhang, Haifang; Zhang, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease with poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Panax Notoginseng Saponins (PNS), extracted from Panax Notoginseng as a traditional Asian medicine, displayed a significant anti-fibrosis effect in liver and lung. However, whether Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), an important and active ingredient of PNS, exerts anti-fibrotic activity on IPF still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Rg1 on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Bleomycin (5 mg/kg body weight) was intratracheally administrated to male rats. Rg1 (18, 36 and 72 mg/kg) was orally administered on the next day after bleomycin. Lungs were harvested at day 7 and 28 for the further experiments. Histological analysis revealed that bleomycin successfully induced pulmonary fibrosis, and that Rg1 restored the histological alteration of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF), significantly decreased lung coefficient, scores of alveolitis, scores of PF as well as contents of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in a dose-dependent manner in PF rats. Moreover, Rg1 increased the expression levels of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) mRNA and protein, lowered the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) mRNA and protein in the lung tissues of PF rats. These data suggest that Rg1 exhibits protective effect against bleomycin-induced PF in rats, which is potentially associated with the down-regulation of TGF-β1 and up-regulation of Cav-1.

  1. Qi-Dong-Huo-Xue-Yin Inhibits Inflammation in Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Toll-Like Receptor 4/Caveolin-1 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ying Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a critical illness with no current effective treatment. Caveolin-1 indirectly activates inflammation-associated signaling pathways by inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. This induces an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, which are involved in the pathogenesis of ALI. The compound Chinese prescription Qi-Dong-Huo-Xue-Yin (QDHXY is efficacious for ALI treatment via an anti-inflammatory effect; however, the exact underlying mechanism is unknown. Therefore, we explored the protective effect of QDHXY against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced ALI in mice. Histopathological changes in mouse lung tissues were studied. Furthermore, alterations in the serum levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were investigated. The levels of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-α, interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-1β, and interferon-γ-induced protein 10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured. Additionally, the expression levels of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, caveolin-1, and eNOS were assessed. QDHXY significantly reduced lung infiltration with inflammatory cells and the production of serum pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, caveolin-1, and MyD88 but not eNOS. These indicate that QDHXY significantly improved the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, possibly by inhibiting the caveolin-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, QDHXY may be a potential treatment for ALI.

  2. Static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation via SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Di-xian, E-mail: luodixian_2@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); First People' s Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan (China); Xia, Cheng-lai [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Third Affiliated Hospital Medical College of Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510150, Guangdong (China); Li, Jun-mu [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Xiong, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Yuan, Hao-yu [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Lusong Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhuzhou 412000, Hunan (China); TANG, Zhen-Wang; Zeng, Yixin [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Liao, Duan-fang, E-mail: dfliao66@yahoo.com.cn [Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, College of Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Department of Traditional Chinese Diagnostics, School of Pharmacy, Hunan University of Chinese Medicine, Changsha 420108, Hunan (China)

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Vertical static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. {yields} Static pressure induces SREBP-1 activation. {yields} Static pressure downregulates the expressions of caveolin-1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure also downregulates the transcription of ABCA1 by activating SREBP-1. {yields} Static pressure increases ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation by SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effect of static pressure on cholesterol accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its mechanism. Methods: Rat-derived VSMC cell line A10 treated with 50 mg/L ox-LDL and different static pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 48 h. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC; The mRNA levels of caveolin-1 and ABCA1, the protein levels of caveolin-1 SREBP-1 and mature SREBP-1 were respectively detected by RT-PCR or western blot. ALLN, an inhibitor of SREBP metabolism, was used to elevate SREBP-1 protein level in VSMCs treated with static pressure. Results: Static pressures significantly not only increase intracellular lipid droplets in VSMCs, but also elevate cellular lipid content in a pressure-dependent manner. Intracellular free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), total cholesterol (TC) were respectively increased from 60.5 {+-} 2.8 mg/g, 31.8 {+-} 0.7 mg/g, 92.3 {+-} 2.1 mg/g at atmosphere pressure (ATM, 0 mm Hg) to 150.8 {+-} 9.4 mg/g, 235.9 {+-} 3.0 mg/g, 386.7 {+-} 6.4 mg/g at 180 mm Hg. At the same time, static pressures decrease the mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1, and induce the activation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1. ALLN increases the protein level of mature SREBP-1 and decreases caveolin-1 expression, so that cellular lipid levels were

  3. Static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation via SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Di-xian; Xia, Cheng-lai; Li, Jun-mu; Xiong, Yan; Yuan, Hao-yu; TANG, Zhen-Wang; Zeng, Yixin; Liao, Duan-fang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Vertical static pressure accelerates ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. → Static pressure induces SREBP-1 activation. → Static pressure downregulates the expressions of caveolin-1 by activating SREBP-1. → Static pressure also downregulates the transcription of ABCA1 by activating SREBP-1. → Static pressure increases ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation by SREBP-1-mediated caveolin-1 downregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effect of static pressure on cholesterol accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its mechanism. Methods: Rat-derived VSMC cell line A10 treated with 50 mg/L ox-LDL and different static pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 48 h. Intracellular lipid droplets and lipid levels were assayed by oil red O staining and HPLC; The mRNA levels of caveolin-1 and ABCA1, the protein levels of caveolin-1 SREBP-1 and mature SREBP-1 were respectively detected by RT-PCR or western blot. ALLN, an inhibitor of SREBP metabolism, was used to elevate SREBP-1 protein level in VSMCs treated with static pressure. Results: Static pressures significantly not only increase intracellular lipid droplets in VSMCs, but also elevate cellular lipid content in a pressure-dependent manner. Intracellular free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol ester (CE), total cholesterol (TC) were respectively increased from 60.5 ± 2.8 mg/g, 31.8 ± 0.7 mg/g, 92.3 ± 2.1 mg/g at atmosphere pressure (ATM, 0 mm Hg) to 150.8 ± 9.4 mg/g, 235.9 ± 3.0 mg/g, 386.7 ± 6.4 mg/g at 180 mm Hg. At the same time, static pressures decrease the mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1, and induce the activation and nuclear translocation of SREBP-1. ALLN increases the protein level of mature SREBP-1 and decreases caveolin-1 expression, so that cellular lipid levels were upregulated. Conclusion: Static

  4. Detection of caveolin-3/caveolin-1/P2X7R complexes in mice atrial cardiomyocytes in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Claudia; Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Patton, Miranda; Patel, Hemal H; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2012-08-01

    Caveolae and caveolins, structural components of caveolae, are associated with specific ion channels in cardiac myocytes. We have previously shown that P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R), a ligand-gated ion channel, is increased in atrial cardiomyocytes of caveolin-1 knockout mice; however, the specific biochemical relationship of P2X7R with caveolins in the heart is not clear. The aim of this work was to study the presence of the P2X7R in atrial cardiomyocytes and its biochemical relationship to caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. Caveolin isoforms and P2X7R were predominantly localized in buoyant membrane fractions (lipid rafts/caveolae) prepared from hearts using detergent-free sucrose gradient centrifugation. Caveolin-1 knockout mice showed normal distribution of caveolin-3 and P2X7R to buoyant membranes indicating the importance of caveolin-3 to formation of caveolae. Using clear native-PAGE, we showed that caveolin-1, -3 and P2X7R contribute to the same protein complex in the membranes of murine cardiomyocytes and in the immortal cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1. Western blot analysis revealed increased caveolin-1 and -3 proteins in tissue homogenates of P2X7R knockout mice. Finally, tissue homogenates of atrial tissues from caveolin-3 knockout mice showed elevated mRNA for P2X7R in atria. The colocalization of caveolins with P2X7R in a biochemical complex and compensated upregulation of P2X7R or caveolins in the absence of any component of the complex suggests P2X7R and caveolins may serve an important regulatory control point for disease pathology in the heart.

  5. Pioglitazone, a PPARγ Agonist, Upregulates the Expression of Caveolin-1 and Catalase, Essential for Thyroid Cell Homeostasis: A Clue to the Pathogenesis of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werion, Alexis; Joris, Virginie; Hepp, Michael; Papasokrati, Lida; Marique, Lancelot; de Ville de Goyet, Christine; Van Regemorter, Victoria; Mourad, Michel; Lengelé, Benoit; Daumerie, Chantal; Marbaix, Etienne; Brichard, Sonia; Many, Marie-Christine; Craps, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple target genes involved in several metabolic pathways as well as in inflammation. The expression and cell localization of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), thyroperoxidase (TPO), and dual oxidase (DUOX), involved in extracellular iodination, is modulated by Th1 cytokines in human normal thyroid cells and in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The objectives of this study were (i) to analyze the PPARγ protein and mRNA expression at the follicular level in HT versus controls in correlation with the one of Cav-1; (ii) to study the effects of Th1 cytokines on PPARγ and catalase expression in human thyrocyte primary cultures; and (iii) to study the effects of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, on thyroxisome components (Cav-1, TPO, DUOX) and on catalase, involved in antioxidant defense. Although the global expression of PPARγ in the whole gland of patients with HT was not modified compared with controls, there was great heterogeneity among glands and among follicles within the same thyroid. Besides normal (type 1) follicles, there were around inflammatory zones, hyperactive (type 2) follicles with high PPARγ and Cav-1 expression, and inactive (type 3) follicles which were unable to form thyroxine and did not express PPARγ or Cav-1. In human thyrocytes in primary culture, Th1 cytokines decreased PPARγ and catalase expression; pioglitazone increased Cav-1, TPO, and catalase expression. PPARγ may play a central role in normal thyroid physiology by upregulating Cav-1, essential for the organization of the thyroxisome and extracellular iodination. By upregulating catalase, PPARγ may also contribute to cell homeostasis. The inhibitory effect of Th1 cytokines on PPARγ expression may be considered as a new pathogenetic mechanism for HT, and the use of PPARγ agonists could open a new therapeutic approach.

  6. Focal-adhesion targeting links caveolin-1 to a Rac1-degradation pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nethe, Micha; Anthony, Eloise C.; Fernandez-Borja, Mar; dee, Rob; Geerts, Dirk; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Deelder, André M.; Schmidt, Gudula; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Directional cell migration is crucially dependent on the spatiotemporal control of intracellular signalling events. These events regulate polarized actin dynamics, resulting in protrusion at the front of the cell and contraction at the rear. The actin cytoskeleton is regulated through signalling by

  7. Overexpression of caveolin-1 attenuates brain edema by inhibiting tight junction degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kang-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Park, Man-Seok; Lee, Eun-Bin; Lee, Jung-Kil; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Ja-Hae; Lee, Min-Cheol; Lee, Hong-Joon; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2016-10-18

    Cerebral edema from the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after cerebral ischemia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality as well as a common event in patients with stroke. Caveolins (Cavs) are thought to regulate BBB functions. Here, we report for the first time that Cav-1 overexpression (OE) decreased brain edema from BBB disruption following ischemic insult. Edema volumes and Cav-1 expression levels were measured following photothrombosis and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Endothelial cells that were transduced with a Cav-1 lentiviral expression vector were transplanted into rats. BBB permeability was quantified with Evans blue extravasation. Edema volume was determined from measures of the extravasation area, brain water content, and average fluorescence intensity after Cy5.5 injections. Tight junction (TJ) protein expression was measured with immunoblotting. Cav-1 expression levels and vasogenic brain edema correlated strongly after ischemic insult. Cav-1 expression and BBB disruption peaked 3 d after the MCAO. In addition, intravenous administration of endothelial cells expressing Cav-1 effectively increased the Cav-1 levels 3 d after the MCAO ischemic insult. Importantly, Cav-1 OE ameliorated the vasogenic edema by inhibiting the degradation of TJ protein expression in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. These results suggested that Cav-1 OE protected the integrity of the BBB mainly by preventing the degradation of TJ proteins in rats. These findings need to be confirmed in a clinical setting in human subjects.

  8. Neuron-specific caveolin-1 overexpression improves motor function and preserves memory in mice subjected to brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Junji; Schilling, Jan M; Cui, Weihua; Posadas, Edmund; Sawada, Atsushi; Alas, Basheer; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Fannon-Pavlich, McKenzie J; Mandyam, Chitra D; Roth, David M; Patel, Hemal H; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2017-08-01

    Studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that membrane/lipid rafts and caveolin (Cav) organize progrowth receptors, and, when overexpressed specifically in neurons, Cav-1 augments neuronal signaling and growth and improves cognitive function in adult and aged mice; however, whether neuronal Cav-1 overexpression can preserve motor and cognitive function in the brain trauma setting is unknown. Here, we generated a neuron-targeted Cav-1-overexpressing transgenic (Tg) mouse [synapsin-driven Cav-1 (SynCav1 Tg)] and subjected it to a controlled cortical impact model of brain trauma and measured biochemical, anatomic, and behavioral changes. SynCav1 Tg mice exhibited increased hippocampal expression of Cav-1 and membrane/lipid raft localization of postsynaptic density protein 95, NMDA receptor, and tropomyosin receptor kinase B. When subjected to a controlled cortical impact, SynCav1 Tg mice demonstrated preserved hippocampus-dependent fear learning and memory, improved motor function recovery, and decreased brain lesion volume compared with wild-type controls. Neuron-targeted overexpression of Cav-1 in the adult brain prevents hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits, restores motor function after brain trauma, and decreases brain lesion size induced by trauma. Our findings demonstrate that neuron-targeted Cav-1 can be used as a novel therapeutic strategy to restore brain function and prevent trauma-associated maladaptive plasticity.-Egawa, J., Schilling, J. M., Cui, W., Posadas, E., Sawada, A., Alas, B., Zemljic-Harpf, A. E., Fannon-Pavlich, M. J., Mandyam, C. D., Roth, D. M., Patel, H. H., Patel, P. M., Head, B. P. Neuron-specific caveolin-1 overexpression improves motor function and preserves memory in mice subjected to brain trauma. © FASEB.

  9. Roles of Caveolin-1 in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertrophy and Inward Remodeling of Cerebral Pial Arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesalma, Shaikamjad; Houwen, Frederick Keith; Baumbach, Gary L; Chan, Siu-Lung

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a major determinant of inward remodeling and hypertrophy in pial arterioles that may have an important role in stroke during chronic hypertension. Previously, we found that epidermal growth factor receptor is critical in Ang II-mediated hypertrophy that may involve caveolin-1 (Cav-1). In this study, we examined the effects of Cav-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) on Ang II-mediated structural changes in pial arterioles. Cav-1-deficient (Cav-1(-/-)), MMP9-deficient (MMP9(-/-)), and wild-type mice were infused with either Ang II (1000 ng/kg per minute) or saline via osmotic minipumps for 28 days (n=6-8 per group). Systolic arterial pressure was measured by a tail-cuff method. Pressure and diameter of pial arterioles were measured through an open cranial window in anesthetized mice. Cross-sectional area of the wall was determined histologically in pressurized fixed pial arterioles. Expression of Cav-1, MMP9, phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor, and Akt was determined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Deficiency of Cav-1 or MMP9 did not affect Ang II-induced hypertension. Ang II increased the expression of Cav-1, phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor, and Akt in wild-type mice, which was attenuated in Cav-1(-/-) mice. Ang II-induced hypertrophy, inward remodeling, and increased MMP9 expression in pial arterioles were prevented in Cav-1(-/-) mice. Ang II-mediated increases in MMP9 expression and inward remodeling, but not hypertrophy, were prevented in MMP9(-/-) mice. In conclusion, Cav-1 is essential in Ang II-mediated inward remodeling and hypertrophy in pial arterioles. Cav-1-induced MMP9 is exclusively involved in inward remodeling, not hypertrophy. Further studies are needed to determine the role of Akt in Ang II-mediated hypertrophy. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Detection of Caveolin-3/Caveolin-1/P2X7R complexes in mice atrial cardiomyocytes in vivo and in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Pfleger, Claudia; Ebeling, Georg; Bläsche, Robert; Patton, Miranda; Patel, Hemal H; Kasper, Michael; Barth, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Caveolae and caveolins, structural components of caveolae, are associated with specific ion channels in cardiac myocytes. We have previously shown that P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R), a ligand gated ion channel, is increased in atrial cardiomyocytes of caveolin-1 knockout mice; however, the specific biochemical relationship of P2X7R with caveolins in the heart is not clear. The aim of this work was to study the presence of the P2X7R in atrial cardiomyocytes and its biochemical relationship to cav...

  11. Role of Caveolin 1, E-Cadherin, Enolase 2 and PKCalpha on resistance to methotrexate in human HT29 colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selga, Elisabet; Morales Torres, Christina; Noé, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Methotrexate is one of the earliest cytotoxic drugs used in cancer therapy, and despite the isolation of multiple other folate antagonists, methotrexate maintains its significant role as a treatment for different types of cancer and other disorders. The usefulness of treatment...... validations were performed either by siRNAs or by transfection of an expression plasmid. RESULTS: Genes adjacent to the dhfr locus and included in the 5q14 amplicon were overexpressed in HT29 MTX-resistant cells. Treatment with siRNAs against those genes caused a slight reduction in cell viability in both HT...... viability and caused a decreased MTX resistance capacity. Moreover, overexpression of E-cadherin, which was found underexpressed in MTX-resistant cells, also sensitized the cells toward the chemotherapeutic agent. Combined treatments targeting siRNA inhibition of caveolin 1 and overexpression of E...

  12. Root-Securing and Brain-Fortifying Liquid Upregulates Caveolin-1 in Cell Model with Alzheimer’s Disease through Inhibiting Tau Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depei Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the effect of root-securing and brain-fortifying Liquid- (RSBFL- mediated caveolin-1 (CAV-1 on phosphorylation of Tau protein and to uncover underlying mechanisms of RSBFL for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, hippocampal neurons isolated from neonatal SD rats and cultured in DMEM-F12 medium were induced by exogenous Aβ1–42 to establish a cell model with AD. Meanwhile, pEGFP-C1-CAV1 and CAV1-shRNA plasmids were transfected into hippocampal neurons for CAV-1 overexpression and silence, respectively. The serum containing RSBFL was prepared for the intervention of AD model cells. The expression of CAV-1, GSK-3β, and p-Tau in normal hippocampal neurons and AD model cells in the presence of serum containing RSBFL was evaluated. The model hippocampal neurons with AD induced by Aβ1–42 revealed an obvious CAV-1 inhibition, enhanced GSK-3β activity, and abnormal Tau phosphorylation. In contrast, the treatment with serum containing RSBFL could upregulate CAV-1 in AD hippocampal neurons (P<0.05 with improved p-GSK-3βSer9 and reduced p-GSK-3βTyr216 (P<0.01, as well as suppressed abnormal phosphorylation of Tau protein. Therefore, RSBFL has an excellent protective effect on hippocampal neurons through increasing CAV-1 expression, inhibiting GSK-3β activity, and reducing excessive abnormal phosphorylation of Tau protein.

  13. Cellular Prion Protein and Caveolin-1 Interaction in a Neuronal Cell Line Precedes Fyn/Erk 1/2 Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Toni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that cellular prion protein (PrPc is enriched in caveolae or caveolae-like domains with caveolin-1 (Cav-1 participating to signal transduction events by Fyn kinase recruitment. By using the Glutathione-S-transferase (GST-fusion proteins assay, we observed that PrPc strongly interacts in vitro with Cav-1. Thus, we ascertained the PrPc caveolar localization in a hypothalamic neuronal cell line (GN11, by confocal microscopy analysis, flotation on density gradient, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Following the anti-PrPc antibody-mediated stimulation of live GN11 cells, we observed that PrPc clustered on plasma membrane domains rich in Cav-1 in which Fyn kinase converged to be activated. After these events, a signaling cascade through p42/44 MAP kinase (Erk 1/2 was triggered, suggesting that following translocations from rafts to caveolae or caveolae-like domains PrPc could interact with Cav-1 and induce signal transduction events.

  14. Increased monocyte/neutrophil and pro-coagulant microparticle levels and overexpression of aortic endothelial caveolin-1β in dyslipidemic sand rat, Psammomys obesus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousmaal, Mohamed El Fadel; Martínez, M Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Chabane, Kahina; Gaceb, Abderahim; Mameri, Saâdia; Giaimis, Jean; Baz, Ahsene

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effects of a high-energy diet (HED) with those of a low-energy diet (LED) on biochemical parameters, microparticle (MP) subpopulations and endothelial caveolin-1 (cav-1) protein expression in Psammomys obesus (P. obesus). After 12weeks of feeding with either the HED or LED, fasting plasma glucose and lipid parameters were measured using an enzymatic colorimetric kit while serum insulin concentration was determined with radioimmunoassay kits. MP subpopulations and cav-1 protein expression were quantified using flow cytometry and western blot analysis, respectively. We observed that the HED caused a marked increase in lipid parameters, even in normoglycemic P. obesus. The total number of circulating MPs and the numbers of platelet-, leukocyte-, and erythrocyte-derived MPs were unaltered in the HED group. However, the HED induced increases in the numbers of monocytes/neutrophils and procoagulant MPs and a decrease in the endothelial MP levels. Cav-1β protein expression and reactive oxygen species production were increased in the vascular endothelium of HED-treated P. obesus. From these findings, it is indicated that the HED exerts deleterious effects on the vascular system by increasing the monocyte/neutrophil and procoagulant MP levels, which may lead to cav-1β protein overexpression in dyslipidemic P. obesus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; Pmuscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  16. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm 2 ) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  17. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yokota, Hiroki [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Na, Sungsoo, E-mail: sungna@iupui.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  18. Shear strength estimation of the concrete beams reinforced with FRP; comparison of artificial neural network and equations of regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Akbari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, numerous experimental tests were done on the concrete beams reinforced with the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. In this way, some equations were proposed to estimate the shear strength of the beams reinforced with FRP. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN model to predict the ultimate shear strength of the beams strengthened with FRP composites. For this purpose, a database consists of 304 reinforced FRP concrete beams have been collected from the available articles on the analysis of shear behavior of these beams. The inputs to the ANN model consists of the 11 variables including the geometric dimensions of the section, steel reinforcement amount, FRP amount and the properties of the concrete, steel reinforcement and FRP materials while the output variable is the shear strength of the FRP beam. To assess the performance of the ANN model for estimating the shear strength of the reinforced beams, the outputs of the ANN are compared to those of equations of the Iranian code (Publication No. 345 and the American code (ACI 440. The comparisons between the outputs of Iran and American regulations with those of the proposed model indicates that the predictive power of this model is much better than the experimental codes. Specifically, for under study data, mean absolute relative error (MARE criteria is 13%, 34% and 39% for the ANN model, the American and the Iranian codes, respectively.

  19. Caveolin-1 scaffolding domain promotes leukocyte adhesion by reduced basal endothelial nitric oxide-mediated ICAM-1 phosphorylation in rat mesenteric venules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sulei; Zhou, Xueping; Yuan, Dong; Xu, Yanchun; He, Pingnian

    2013-11-15

    Exogenously applied caveolin-1 scaffolding domain (CAV) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory mediator-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and NO-mediated increases in microvessel permeability. However, the effect of CAV on endothelial basal NO that prevents leukocyte adhesion remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the roles of exogenously applied CAV in endothelial basal NO production, leukocyte adhesion, and adhesion-induced changes in microvessel permeability. Experiments were conducted in individually perfused rat mesenteric venules. Microvessel permeability was determined by measuring hydraulic conductivity (Lp). NO was quantified with fluorescence imaging in DAF-2-loaded vessels. Perfusing venules with CAV inhibited basal NO production without affecting basal Lp. Resuming blood flow in CAV-perfused vessels significantly increased leukocyte adhesion. The firmly adherent leukocytes altered neither basal Lp nor adherens junction integrity. Increases in Lp occurred only upon formyl-Met-Leu-Phe application that induces release of reactive oxygen species from the adherent leukocytes. The application of NO synthase inhibitor showed similar results to CAV, and NO donor abolished CAV-mediated leukocyte adhesion. Immunofluorescence staining showed increases in binding of ICAM-1 to an adhesion-blocking antibody concurrent with a Src-dependent ICAM-1 phosphorylation following CAV perfusion. Pre-perfusing vessels with anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody or a Src kinase inhibitor attenuated CAV-induced leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that the application of CAV, in addition to preventing excessive NO-mediated permeability increases, also causes reduction of basal NO and promotes ICAM-1-mediated leukocyte adhesion through Src activation-mediated ICAM-1 phosphorylation. CAV-induced leukocyte adhesion was uncoupled from leukocyte oxidative burst and microvessel barrier function, unless in the presence of a secondary stimulation.

  20. Identification and characterization of molluscan caveolin-1 ortholog from Haliotis discus discus: Possible involvement in embryogenesis and host defense mechanism against pathogenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayantha, H M V; Bathige, S D N K; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Lee, Sukkyoung; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Lee, Jehee

    2018-01-01

    Caveolins are principal membrane proteins of caveolae that play a central role in signal transduction, substrate transport, and membrane trafficking in various cell types. Numerous studies have reported the crucial role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in response to invading microbes; yet, very little is known about molluscan CAV1. In this study, we identified and characterized CAV1 ortholog from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus (HdCAV1). The cDNA sequence of HdCAV1 is 826 bp long and encodes a 127-amino acid polypeptide. Characteristic caveolin superfamily domain (Glu 3 - Lys 126 ) and two possible transmembrane domains (Cys 48 - Tyr 67 and Ile 103 - Phe 120 ) were identified in the HdCAV1 protein. Homology analysis revealed that HdCAV1 shared higher identity (>47%) with molluscans, but lower identity with other species. Phylogenetic tree constructed by the neighbor-joining (NJ) method revealed a distinct evolutionary pathway for molluscans. Transcriptional analysis by SYBR Green qPCR showed the highest expression of HdCAV1 mRNA in late veliger stage, as compared to that in other embryonic developmental stages of disk abalone. In adult animals, gill tissue showed highest HdCAV1 transcript levels under normal physiological condition. Stimulations with two bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes), viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, and two pathogen-associated molecular patterns (LPS and poly I:C) significantly modulated the expression of HdCAV1 transcripts. Collectively, these data suggest that CAV1 plays an important role in embryogenesis and host immune defense in disk abalone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A disease-associated frameshift mutation in caveolin-1 disrupts caveolae formation and function through introduction of a de novo ER retention signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Courtney A; Han, Bing; Tiwari, Ajit; Austin, Eric D; Loyd, James E; West, James D; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2017-11-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV1) is an essential component of caveolae and is implicated in numerous physiological processes. Recent studies have identified heterozygous mutations in the CAV1 gene in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the mechanisms by which these mutations impact caveolae assembly and contribute to disease remain unclear. To address this question, we examined the consequences of a familial PAH-associated frameshift mutation in CAV1 , P158PfsX22, on caveolae assembly and function. We show that C-terminus of the CAV1 P158 protein contains a functional ER-retention signal that inhibits ER exit and caveolae formation and accelerates CAV1 turnover in Cav1 -/- MEFs. Moreover, when coexpressed with wild-type (WT) CAV1 in Cav1 -/- MEFs, CAV1-P158 functions as a dominant negative by partially disrupting WT CAV1 trafficking. In patient skin fibroblasts, CAV1 and caveolar accessory protein levels are reduced, fewer caveolae are observed, and CAV1 complexes exhibit biochemical abnormalities. Patient fibroblasts also exhibit decreased resistance to a hypo-osmotic challenge, suggesting the function of caveolae as membrane reservoir is compromised. We conclude that the P158PfsX22 frameshift introduces a gain of function that gives rise to a dominant negative form of CAV1, defining a new mechanism by which disease-associated mutations in CAV1 impair caveolae assembly. © 2017 Copeland, Han, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Design optimization of scaffold microstructures using wall shear stress criterion towards regulated flow-induced erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Schellekens, Michiel; Zhou, Shiwei; Cadman, Joseph; Li, Wei; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing

    2011-08-01

    Tissue scaffolds aim to provide a cell-friendly biomechanical environment for facilitating cell growth. Existing studies have shown significant demands for generating a certain level of wall shear stress (WSS) on scaffold microstructural surfaces for promoting cellular response and attachment efficacy. Recently, its role in shear-induced erosion of polymer scaffold has also drawn increasing attention. This paper proposes a bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) approach for design of scaffold microstructure in terms of the WSS uniformity criterion, by downgrading highly-stressed solid elements into fluidic elements and/or upgrading lowly-stressed fluidic elements into solid elements. In addition to this, a computational model is presented to simulate shear-induced erosion process. The effective stiffness and permeability of initial and optimized scaffold microstructures are characterized by the finite element based homogenization technique to quantify the variations of mechanical properties of scaffold during erosion. The illustrative examples show that a uniform WSS is achieved within the optimized scaffold microstructures, and their architectural and biomechanical features are maintained for a longer lifetime during shear-induced erosion process. This study provides a mathematical means to the design optimization of cellular biomaterials in terms of the WSS criterion towards controllable shear-induced erosion.

  3. Turbulence-driven shear flow and self-regulating drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    This dissertation provides an experimental test of the basic theory of the self-regulating drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device. The work is carried out from three approaches: the first explores the statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the ZF generation, the second investigates the dynamical behavior of the DWT/ZF system and the third investigates the variation of the DWT driven ZF verses magnetic field strength and ion-neutral drag. A radially sheared azimuthally symmetric plasma flow is generated by the DWT turbulent Reynolds stress which is directly measured by a multi-tip Langmuir probe. A statistical analysis shows that the cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity components is the key factor determining the detailed Reynolds stress profile. The coincidence of the radial location of the non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent Reynolds stress and the ion saturation current, as well as the properties of the joint probability distribution function (PDF) between the radial particle flux and turbulent Reynolds stress suggest that the bursts of the particle transport appear to be associated with radial transport of azimuthal momentum as well. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale ZF. From both Langmuir probe and fast-faming imaging measurements this shear flow is found to evolve with low frequency (˜250-300Hz). The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulence-driven shear flow

  4. Self-regulation of mean flows in strongly stratified sheared turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour, Hesam; Caulfield, Colm-Cille; Peltier, W. Richard

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the near-equilibrium state of shear-driven stratified turbulence generated by the breaking of Holmboe wave instability (HWI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). We discuss DNS analyses associated with HWI under various initial conditions. We analyze the time-dependent distribution of the gradient Richardson number, Rig (z , t) associated with the horizontally-averaged velocity and density fields. We demonstrate that unlike the KHI-induced turbulence, the fully turbulent flow that is generated by HWI is robustly characterized by its high probability of Rig 0 . 2 - 0 . 25 , independent of the strength of the initial stratification and furthermore that the turbulence evolves in a 'near-equilibrium' state. The KHI-induced turbulence may become grossly 'out of equilibrium', however, and therefore decays rapidly when the initial value at the interface, Rig (0 , 0) , is closer to the critical value of 1/4; otherwise as Rig (0 , 0) -> 0 the KHI-induced turbulence is close to a state of equilibrium and hence is much more long-lived. We conjecture that stratified shear turbulence tends to adjust to a state of 'near-equilibrium' with horizontally-averaged flows characterized by a high probability of Rig <= 1 / 4 , and hence sustained turbulence over relatively long times.

  5. Laminar shear stress regulates endothelial kinin B1 receptor expression and function: potential implication in atherogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchene, Johan; Cayla, Cécile; Vessillier, Sandrine; Scotland, Ramona; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Lecomte, Florence; Syed, Irfan; Vo, Phuong; Marrelli, Alessandra; Pitzalis, Costantino; Cipollone, Francesco; Schanstra, Joost; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Hobbs, Adrian J; Perretti, Mauro; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The pro-inflammatory phenotype induced by low laminar shear stress (LSS) is implicated in atherogenesis. The kinin B1 receptor (B1R), known to be induced by inflammatory stimuli, exerts many pro-inflammatory effects including vasodilatation and leukocyte recruitment. We investigated whether low LSS is a stimulus for endothelial B1R expression and function. METHODS AND RESULTS Human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques expressed high level of B1R mRNA and protein. In addition, B1R expression was upregulated in the aortic arch (low LSS region) of ApoE-/- mice fed a high fat diet compared to vascular regions of high LSS and animals fed normal chow. Of interest, a greater expression of B1R was noticed in endothelial cells from regions of low LSS in aortic arch of ApoE-/- mice. B1R was also upregulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to low LSS (0-2dyn/cm2) compared to physiological LSS (6-10dyn/cm2): an effect similarly evident in murine vascular tissue perfused ex vivo. Functionally, B1R activation increased prostaglandin and CXCL5 expression in cells exposed to low, but not physiological, LSS. IL-1β and ox-LDL induced B1R expression and function in HUVECs, a response substantially enhanced under low LSS conditions and inhibited by blockade of NFκB activation. CONCLUSION Herein, we show that LSS is a major determinant of functional B1R expression in endothelium. Furthermore, whilst physiological high LSS is a powerful repressor of this inflammatory receptor, low LSS at sites of atheroma are associated with substantial upregulation, identifying this receptor as a potential therapeutic target. CONDENSED ABSTRACT Low laminar shear stress (LSS) underlies the pro-inflammatory processes in atherogenesis. Herein, we demonstrate that whilst physiological LSS represses inflammatory kinin B1 receptor (B1R) expression/function, low atherogenic LSS is associated with profound upregulation of both in atherosclerosis in both humans and animal

  6. Shear machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astill, M.; Sunderland, A.; Waine, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A shear machine for irradiated nuclear fuel elements has a replaceable shear assembly comprising a fuel element support block, a shear blade support and a clamp assembly which hold the fuel element to be sheared in contact with the support block. A first clamp member contacts the fuel element remote from the shear blade and a second clamp member contacts the fuel element adjacent the shear blade and is advanced towards the support block during shearing to compensate for any compression of the fuel element caused by the shear blade (U.K.)

  7. miR-199a-5p Is upregulated during fibrogenic response to tissue injury and mediates TGFbeta-induced lung fibroblast activation by targeting caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lacks Lino Cardenas

    Full Text Available As miRNAs are associated with normal cellular processes, deregulation of miRNAs is thought to play a causative role in many complex diseases. Nevertheless, the precise contribution of miRNAs in fibrotic lung diseases, especially the idiopathic form (IPF, remains poorly understood. Given the poor response rate of IPF patients to current therapy, new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms controlling lung fibroblasts activation, the key cell type driving the fibrogenic process, are essential to develop new therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease. To identify miRNAs with potential roles in lung fibrogenesis, we performed a genome-wide assessment of miRNA expression in lungs from two different mouse strains known for their distinct susceptibility to develop lung fibrosis after bleomycin exposure. This led to the identification of miR-199a-5p as the best miRNA candidate associated with bleomycin response. Importantly, miR-199a-5p pulmonary expression was also significantly increased in IPF patients (94 IPF versus 83 controls. In particular, levels of miR-199a-5p were selectively increased in myofibroblasts from injured mouse lungs and fibroblastic foci, a histologic feature associated with IPF. Therefore, miR-199a-5p profibrotic effects were further investigated in cultured lung fibroblasts: miR-199a-5p expression was induced upon TGFβ exposure, and ectopic expression of miR-199a-5p was sufficient to promote the pathogenic activation of pulmonary fibroblasts including proliferation, migration, invasion, and differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-199a-5p is a key effector of TGFβ signaling in lung fibroblasts by regulating CAV1, a critical mediator of pulmonary fibrosis. Remarkably, aberrant expression of miR-199a-5p was also found in unilateral ureteral obstruction mouse model of kidney fibrosis, as well as in both bile duct ligation and CCl4-induced mouse models of liver fibrosis, suggesting that

  8. miR-199a-5p Is Upregulated during Fibrogenic Response to Tissue Injury and Mediates TGFbeta-Induced Lung Fibroblast Activation by Targeting Caveolin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courcot, Elisabeth; Roderburg, Christoph; Cauffiez, Christelle; Aubert, Sébastien; Copin, Marie-Christine; Wallaert, Benoit; Glowacki, François; Dewaeles, Edmone; Milosevic, Jadranka; Maurizio, Julien; Tedrow, John; Marcet, Brice; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Kaminski, Naftali; Barbry, Pascal; Luedde, Tom; Perrais, Michael

    2013-01-01

    As miRNAs are associated with normal cellular processes, deregulation of miRNAs is thought to play a causative role in many complex diseases. Nevertheless, the precise contribution of miRNAs in fibrotic lung diseases, especially the idiopathic form (IPF), remains poorly understood. Given the poor response rate of IPF patients to current therapy, new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms controlling lung fibroblasts activation, the key cell type driving the fibrogenic process, are essential to develop new therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease. To identify miRNAs with potential roles in lung fibrogenesis, we performed a genome-wide assessment of miRNA expression in lungs from two different mouse strains known for their distinct susceptibility to develop lung fibrosis after bleomycin exposure. This led to the identification of miR-199a-5p as the best miRNA candidate associated with bleomycin response. Importantly, miR-199a-5p pulmonary expression was also significantly increased in IPF patients (94 IPF versus 83 controls). In particular, levels of miR-199a-5p were selectively increased in myofibroblasts from injured mouse lungs and fibroblastic foci, a histologic feature associated with IPF. Therefore, miR-199a-5p profibrotic effects were further investigated in cultured lung fibroblasts: miR-199a-5p expression was induced upon TGFβ exposure, and ectopic expression of miR-199a-5p was sufficient to promote the pathogenic activation of pulmonary fibroblasts including proliferation, migration, invasion, and differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-199a-5p is a key effector of TGFβ signaling in lung fibroblasts by regulating CAV1, a critical mediator of pulmonary fibrosis. Remarkably, aberrant expression of miR-199a-5p was also found in unilateral ureteral obstruction mouse model of kidney fibrosis, as well as in both bile duct ligation and CCl4-induced mouse models of liver fibrosis, suggesting that dysregulation of mi

  9. Caveolin1 Is Required for Th1 Cell Infiltration, but Not Tight Junction Remodeling, at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Autoimmune Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Lutz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes cross vascular boundaries via either disrupted tight junctions (TJs or caveolae to induce tissue inflammation. In the CNS, Th17 lymphocytes cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB before Th1 cells; yet this differential crossing is poorly understood. We have used intravital two-photon imaging of the spinal cord in wild-type and caveolae-deficient mice with fluorescently labeled endothelial tight junctions to determine how tight junction remodeling and caveolae regulate CNS entry of lymphocytes during the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model for multiple sclerosis. We find that dynamic tight junction remodeling occurs early in EAE but does not depend upon caveolar transport. Moreover, Th1, but not Th17, lymphocytes are significantly reduced in the inflamed CNS of mice lacking caveolae. Therefore, tight junction remodeling facilitates Th17 migration across the BBB, whereas caveolae promote Th1 entry into the CNS. Moreover, therapies that target both tight junction degradation and caveolar transcytosis may limit lymphocyte infiltration during inflammation.

  10. Caveolin-1 deficiency induces a MEK-ERK1/2-Snail-1-dependent epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis during peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strippoli, Raffaele; Loureiro, Jesús; Moreno, Vanessa; Benedicto, Ignacio; Pérez Lozano, María Luisa; Barreiro, Olga; Pellinen, Teijo; Minguet, Susana; Foronda, Miguel; Osteso, Maria Teresa; Calvo, Enrique; Vázquez, Jesús; López Cabrera, Manuel; del Pozo, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a form of renal replacement therapy whose repeated use can alter dialytic function through induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and fibrosis, eventually leading to PD discontinuation. The peritoneum from Cav1-/- mice showed increased EMT, thickness, and fibrosis. Exposure of Cav1-/- mice to PD fluids further increased peritoneal membrane thickness, altered permeability, and increased the number of FSP-1/cytokeratin-positive cells invading the sub-mesothelial stroma. High-throughput quantitative proteomics revealed increased abundance of collagens, FN, and laminin, as well as proteins related to TGF-β activity in matrices derived from Cav1-/- cells. Lack of Cav1 was associated with hyperactivation of a MEK-ERK1/2-Snail-1 pathway that regulated the Smad2-3/Smad1-5-8 balance. Pharmacological blockade of MEK rescued E-cadherin and ZO-1 inter-cellular junction localization, reduced fibrosis, and restored peritoneal function in Cav1-/- mice. Moreover, treatment of human PD-patient-derived MCs with drugs increasing Cav1 levels, as well as ectopic Cav1 expression, induced re-acquisition of epithelial features. This study demonstrates a pivotal role of Cav1 in the balance of epithelial versus mesenchymal state and suggests targets for the prevention of fibrosis during PD. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. Fluid Shear Stress Regulates the Invasive Potential of Glioma Cells via Modulation of Migratory Activity and Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Henry; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Tarbell, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glioma cells are exposed to elevated interstitial fluid flow during the onset of angiogenesis, at the tumor periphery while invading normal parenchyma, within white matter tracts, and during vascular normalization therapy. Glioma cell lines that have been exposed to fluid flow forces in vivo have much lower invasive potentials than in vitro cell motility assays without flow would indicate. Methodology/Principal Findings A 3D Modified Boyden chamber (Darcy flow through collagen/cell suspension) model was designed to mimic the fluid dynamic microenvironment to study the effects of fluid shear stress on the migratory activity of glioma cells. Novel methods for gel compaction and isolation of chemotactic migration from flow stimulation were utilized for three glioma cell lines: U87, CNS-1, and U251. All physiologic levels of fluid shear stress suppressed the migratory activity of U87 and CNS-1 cell lines. U251 motility remained unaltered within the 3D interstitial flow model. Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition experiments and assays demonstrated that the glioma cells depended on MMP activity to invade, and suppression in motility correlated with downregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels. This was confirmed by RT-PCR and with the aid of MMP-1 and MMP-2 shRNA constructs. Conclusions/Significance Fluid shear stress in the tumor microenvironment may explain reduced glioma invasion through modulation of cell motility and MMP levels. The flow-induced migration trends were consistent with reported invasive potentials of implanted gliomas. The models developed for this study imply that flow-modulated motility involves mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress affecting MMP activation and expression. These models should be useful for the continued study of interstitial flow effects on processes that affect tumor progression. PMID:21637818

  12. Fluid shear stress regulates the invasive potential of glioma cells via modulation of migratory activity and matrix metalloproteinase expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Qazi

    Full Text Available Glioma cells are exposed to elevated interstitial fluid flow during the onset of angiogenesis, at the tumor periphery while invading normal parenchyma, within white matter tracts, and during vascular normalization therapy. Glioma cell lines that have been exposed to fluid flow forces in vivo have much lower invasive potentials than in vitro cell motility assays without flow would indicate.A 3D Modified Boyden chamber (Darcy flow through collagen/cell suspension model was designed to mimic the fluid dynamic microenvironment to study the effects of fluid shear stress on the migratory activity of glioma cells. Novel methods for gel compaction and isolation of chemotactic migration from flow stimulation were utilized for three glioma cell lines: U87, CNS-1, and U251. All physiologic levels of fluid shear stress suppressed the migratory activity of U87 and CNS-1 cell lines. U251 motility remained unaltered within the 3D interstitial flow model. Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP inhibition experiments and assays demonstrated that the glioma cells depended on MMP activity to invade, and suppression in motility correlated with downregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels. This was confirmed by RT-PCR and with the aid of MMP-1 and MMP-2 shRNA constructs.Fluid shear stress in the tumor microenvironment may explain reduced glioma invasion through modulation of cell motility and MMP levels. The flow-induced migration trends were consistent with reported invasive potentials of implanted gliomas. The models developed for this study imply that flow-modulated motility involves mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress affecting MMP activation and expression. These models should be useful for the continued study of interstitial flow effects on processes that affect tumor progression.

  13. Role of caveolin-1 in fibrotic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gvaramia, D.; Blaauboer, M.E.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Everts, V.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis underlies the pathogenesis of numerous diseases and leads to severe damage of vital body organs and, frequently, to death. Better understanding of the mechanisms resulting in fibrosis is essential for developing appropriate treatment solutions and is therefore of upmost importance. Recent

  14. Regulation of α1 Na/K-ATPase Expression by Cholesterol*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiliang; Li, Xin; Ye, Qiqi; Tian, Jiang; Jing, Runming; Xie, Zijian

    2011-01-01

    We have reported that α1 Na/K-ATPase regulates the trafficking of caveolin-1 and consequently alters cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane. Here, we report the reciprocal regulation of α1 Na/K-ATPase by cholesterol. Acute exposure of LLC-PK1 cells to methyl β-cyclodextrin led to parallel decreases in cellular cholesterol and the expression of α1 Na/K-ATPase. Cholesterol repletion fully reversed the effect of methyl β-cyclodextrin. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular cholesterol tr...

  15. Csk regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Ren, Zhilong; Yang, Qian; Ding, Guohua

    2016-07-01

    Increasing data have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) perpetuates podocyte injury and promotes progression to end-stage kidney disease. The mechanism underlying Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis has not been established. C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is a cytoplasmic kinase that interacts with scaffolding proteins involved in cell growth, adhesion, and polarization, and the role of Csk in regulating cellular apoptosis has gradually attracted attention. This study evaluates the role of Csk in Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis. In vivo, Wistar rats were randomly subjected to a normal saline or Ang II infusion. In vitro, we exposed differentiated mouse podocytes to Ang II. Ang II increased Csk expression and induced podocyte apoptosis, stimulated Csk translocation and binding to Caveolin-1, and stimulated decreased Fyn pY416, increased Fyn pY529, and nephrin dephosphorylation. Csk knockdown prevented Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis, reduced Fyn kinase inactivation, and increased the interaction between nephrin and the activated form of Fyn, accompanied by a reduced interaction between Csk and Caveolin-1. These findings indicate that Ang II induces podocyte injury via a Csk-dependent pathway.

  16. Effects of shear coupling on shear properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Y. Liu

    2000-01-01

    Under pure shear loading, an off-axis element of orthotropic material such as pure wood undergoes both shear and normal deformations. The ratio of the shear strain to a normal strain is defined as the shear coupling coefficient associated with the direction of the normal strain. The effects of shear coupling on shear properties of wood as predicted by the orthotropic...

  17. Regulation of alpha1 Na/K-ATPase expression by cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiliang; Li, Xin; Ye, Qiqi; Tian, Jiang; Jing, Runming; Xie, Zijian

    2011-04-29

    We have reported that α1 Na/K-ATPase regulates the trafficking of caveolin-1 and consequently alters cholesterol distribution in the plasma membrane. Here, we report the reciprocal regulation of α1 Na/K-ATPase by cholesterol. Acute exposure of LLC-PK1 cells to methyl β-cyclodextrin led to parallel decreases in cellular cholesterol and the expression of α1 Na/K-ATPase. Cholesterol repletion fully reversed the effect of methyl β-cyclodextrin. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane by compound U18666A had the same effect on α1 Na/K-ATPase. Similarly, the expression of α1, but not α2 and α3, Na/K-ATPase was significantly reduced in the target organs of Niemann-Pick type C mice where the intracellular cholesterol trafficking is blocked. Mechanistically, decreases in the plasma membrane cholesterol activated Src kinase and stimulated the endocytosis and degradation of α1 Na/K-ATPase through Src- and ubiquitination-dependent pathways. Thus, the new findings, taken together with what we have already reported, revealed a previously unrecognized feed-forward mechanism by which cells can utilize the Src-dependent interplay among Na/K-ATPase, caveolin-1, and cholesterol to effectively alter the structure and function of the plasma membrane.

  18. Remarks on impact shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepaczko, J. R.

    1998-10-01

    A review is presented on recent progress in shear testing of materials at high and very high strain rates. Some experimental techniques are discussed which allow for materials testing in shear up to 10 6 ls. More detailed informations are provided on experimental techniques based on the Modified Double Shear specimen loaded by direct impact. This technique has been applied so far to test a variety of materials, including construction, armor and inoxidable steels, and also aluminum alloys. The double shear configuration has also been applied to test sheet metals, mostly used in the automotive industry, in a wide range of strain rates. Details of both techniques, including measuring systems and elastic wave propagation in tubes, are discussed. In addition, a new experimental configuration which can be applied for experimental studies of adiabatic shear propagation and high speed machining is discussed. The role of adiabatic heating at different rates of shearing is also discussed, including transition from pure isothermal to pure adiabatic deformation. It appears that the initial impact velocity is an important parameter in development of plastic localization. Finally, a new development is discussed in determination of the Critical Impact Velocity in shear. A comparison is shown between recent experimental findings and a simple analytic estimation. The CIV in shear is a certain mode of adiabatic failure which occurs at relatively high shear velocities of adjacent material layers. Numerical simulations support the existence of the CIV in shear which can be recognized to some extent as a material constant.

  19. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  20. Role of Caveolin-1 in Prostate Cancer Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    cytokeratin staining in the glandular epithelia (Figs. 6E and F). In the urogenital tract , we noted that cav-1−/− female mice had profoundly weaker...in VEGF-stimulated angiogenic activities in ECs, we introduced cav-1 into cav-1-/- ECs either by Adcav-1 infection to the MOI 200, or by rcav-1...genetic ablation of Cav-1 delays advanced prostate tumor development in TRAMP mice. J. Biol. Chem. 10, 1074. Woodman, S.E., et al., 2004. Urogenital

  1. Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, Adrienne T.; Hayden, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT TM ). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 μM) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

  2. Shear stress induces endothelial-To-mesenchymal transition via the transcription factor Snail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, M.M. (Marwa M.); Serbanovic-Canic, J. (Jovana); Feng, S. (Shuang); Souilhol, C. (Celine); Xing, R. (Rouyu); Hsiao, S. (Sarah); Mammoto, A. (Akiko); Chen, J. (Jing); Ariaans, M. (Markus); Francis, S.E. (Sheila E.); K. van der Heiden (Kim); Ridger, V. (Victoria); P.C. Evans (Paul)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBlood flow influences atherosclerosis by generating wall shear stress, which alters endothelial cell (EC) physiology. Low shear stress induces dedifferentiation of EC through a process termed endothelial-To-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). The mechanisms underlying shear stress-regulation

  3. Plasticity Approach to Shear Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents some plastic models for shear design of reinforced concrete beams. Distinction is made between two shear failure modes, namely web crushing and crack sliding. The first mentioned mode is met in beams with large shear reinforcement degrees. The mode of crack sliding is met in non......-shear reinforced beams as well as in lightly shear reinforced beams. For such beams the shear strength is determined by the recently developed crack sliding model. This model is based upon the hypothesis that cracks can be transformed into yield lines, which have lower sliding resistance than yield lines formed...

  4. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  5. Sheared solid materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cores eventually breaks the Peierls potential leading to slow relaxations in the stress and the free energy (aging). .... Figure 1 displays the stress–strain curves at constant shear rate ˙γ applied for t > 0 in units of µ0 and τ−1 ..... In particular, the slow structural relaxations evidently arise from migration of the free volume.

  6. Shear Viscosity from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mages, Simon W; Fodor, Zoltán; Schäfer, Andreas; Szabó, Kálmán

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the transport properties of the the quark-gluon plasma is becoming increasingly important to describe current measurements at heavy ion collisions. This work reports on recent efforts to determine the shear viscosity h in the deconfined phase from lattice QCD. The main focus is on the integration of the Wilson flow in the analysis to get a better handle on the infrared behaviour of the spectral function which is relevant for transport. It is carried out at finite Wilson flow time, which eliminates the dependence on the lattice spacing. Eventually, a new continuum limit has to be carried out which sends the new regulator introduced by finite flow time to zero. Also the non-perturbative renormalization strategy applied for the energy momentum tensor is discussed. At the end some quenched results for temperatures up to 4 : 5 T c are presented

  7. Fluid shear stress stimulates osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Peng, Zhuli; Mai, Zhihui; Chen, Lin; Mao, Qin; Chen, Zheng; Chen, Qi; Liu, Limin; Wang, Yuxuan; Ai, Hong

    2014-12-01

    Fluid shear stress (FSS) is a major type of mechanical stress that is loaded on human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) during mastication and orthodontic tooth movement. This study aims to clarify the effect of FSS on the osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs and to further verify the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in this process. After isolation and characterization, hPDLCs were subjected to 2-hour FSS at 12 dynes/cm(2), and cell viability, osteogenic gene mRNA expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, secretion of Type I collagen (COL-I), and calcium deposition were assayed. The levels of phosphorylated p38 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in response to FSS were detected by Western blot, and the involvement of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in hPDLC osteogenesis under FSS was investigated using the specific MAPK inhibitors U0126 (2Z,3Z)-2,3-bis[amino(2-aminophenylthio)methylene]succinonitrile,ethanol) and SB203580 (4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-[methylsulfinyl]phenyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]pyridine). The application of FSS on hPDLCs induced an early morphologic change and rearrangement of filamentous actin. ALP activity, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of osteogenic genes, COL-I, and osteoid nodules were significantly increased by FSS. Moreover, ERK1/2 and p38 were activated in different ways after FSS exposure. U0126 and SB203580 completely blocked the FSS-induced increases in ALP activity and osteogenic gene mRNA expression and osteoid nodules formation. FSS is an effective approach for stimulating osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. The ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways are involved in this cellular process.

  8. Experiments on sheet metal shearing

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Within the sheet metal industry, different shear cutting technologies are commonly used in several processing steps, e.g. in cut to length lines, slitting lines, end cropping etc. Shearing has speed and cost advantages over competing cutting methods like laser and plasma cutting, but involves large forces on the equipment and large strains in the sheet material.Numerical models to predict forces and sheared edge geometry for different sheet metal grades and different shear parameter set-ups a...

  9. Shear Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with GFRP Shear Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heecheul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the shear capacities of concrete beams reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP plates as shear reinforcement. To examine the shear performance, we manufactured and tested a total of eight specimens. Test variables included the GFRP strip-width-to-spacing ratio and type of opening array. The specimen with a GFRP plate with a 3×2 opening array showed the highest shear strength. From the test results, the shear strength increased as the strip-width-to-strip-spacing ratio increased. Also, we used the experimental results to evaluate whether the shear strength equations of ACI 318-14 and ACI 440.1R can be applied to the design of GFRP shear reinforcement. In the results, the ACI 440 equation underestimated the experimental results more than that of ACI 318.

  10. Shear-thinning Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  11. Forflytning: shear og friktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    friktion). Formålet med filmprojektet er: At give personalet i Apopleksiafsnittet viden om shear og friktion, så det motiveres til forebyggelse. Mål At udarbejde et enkelt undervisningsmateriale til bed-side-brug Projektbeskrivelse (resume) Patienter med apopleksi er særligt udsatte for tryksår, fordi de...... ofte er immobile, har svært ved at opretholde en god siddestilling eller ligger tungt i sengen som følger efter apopleksien Hvis personalet bruger forkert lejrings-og forflytningsteknik, udsættes patienterne for shear og friktion. Målgruppen i projektet er de personer, der omgås patienterne, dvs...

  12. Shear Roll Mill Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    pneumatically operated paste dumper and belt conveyor system , the loss in weight feeder system , the hydraulically operated shear roll mill, the pellet...out feed belt conveyor , and the pack out system comprised of the metal detector, scale, and pack out empty and full drum roller conveyors . Page | 4...process equipment sprinkler protection systems , and the 5 psig steam supply serving the building heating and make-up air systems . It also included

  13. Designing shear-thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Arif Z.; Ewoldt, Randy H.

    2017-11-01

    Design in fluid mechanics often focuses on optimizing geometry (airfoils, surface textures, microfluid channels), but here we focus on designing fluids themselves. The dramatically shear-thinning ``yield-stress fluid'' is currently the most utilized non-Newtonian fluid phenomenon. These rheologically complex materials, which undergo a reversible transition from solid-like to liquid-like fluid flow, are utilized in pedestrian products such as paint and toothpaste, but also in emerging applications like direct-write 3D printing. We present a paradigm for yield-stress fluid design that considers constitutive model representation, material property databases, available predictive scaling laws, and the many ways to achieve a yield stress fluid, flipping the typical structure-to-rheology analysis to become the inverse: rheology-to-structure with multiple possible materials as solutions. We describe case studies of 3D printing inks and other flow scenarios where designed shear-thinning enables performance remarkably beyond that of Newtonian fluids. This work was supported by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1463203.

  14. Magnetorheological dampers in shear mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wereley, N M; Cho, J U; Choi, Y T; Choi, S B

    2008-01-01

    In this study, three types of shear mode damper using magnetorheological (MR) fluids are theoretically analyzed: linear, rotary drum, and rotary disk dampers. The damping performance of these shear mode MR dampers is characterized in terms of the damping coefficient, which is the ratio of the equivalent viscous damping at field-on status to the damping at field-off status. For these three types of shear mode MR damper, the damping coefficient or dynamic range is derived using three different constitutive models: the Bingham–plastic, biviscous, and Herschel–Bulkley models. The impact of constitutive behavior on shear mode MR dampers is theoretically presented and compared

  15. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    The report deals with the shear strength of statically indeterminate reinforced concrete beams without shear reinforcement. Solutions for a number of beams with different load and support conditions have been derived by means of the crack sliding model developed by Jin- Ping Zhang.This model is b...

  16. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  17. Improving Interlaminar Shear Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Justin

    2015-01-01

    To achieve NASA's mission of space exploration, innovative manufacturing processes are being applied to the fabrication of complex propulsion elements.1 Use of fiber-reinforced, polymeric composite tanks are known to reduce weight while increasing performance of propulsion vehicles. Maximizing the performance of these materials is needed to reduce the hardware weight to result in increased performance in support of NASA's missions. NASA has partnered with the Mississippi State University (MSU) to utilize a unique scalable approach of locally improving the critical properties needed for composite structures. MSU is responsible for the primary development of the concept with material and engineering support provided by NASA. The all-composite tank shown in figure 1 is fabricated using a prepreg system of IM7 carbon fiber/CYCOM 5320-1 epoxy resin. This is a resin system developed for out-of-autoclave applications. This new technology is needed to support the fabrication of large, all composite structures and is currently being evaluated on a joint project with Boeing for the Space Launch System (SLS) program. In initial efforts to form an all composite pressure vessel using this prepreg system, a 60% decrease in properties was observed in scarf joint regions. Inspection of these areas identified interlaminar failure in the adjacent laminated structure as the main failure mechanism. This project seeks to improve the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) within the prepreg layup by locally modifying the interply region shown in figure 2.2

  18. Fifty years of shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rodney

    2017-04-01

    We are here, of course, because 1967 saw the publication of John Ramsay's famous book. Two years later a memorable field trip from Imperial College to the Outer Hebrides saw John on a bleak headland on the coast of North Uist where a relatively undeformed metadolerite within Lewisian (Precambrian) gneisses contained ductile shear zones with metamorphic fabrics in amphibolite facies. One particular outcrop was very special - a shear zone cutting otherwise completely isotropic, undeformed metadolerite, with an incremental foliation starting to develop at 45° to the deformation zone, and increasing in intensity as it approached the shear direction. Here was proof of the process of simple shear under ductile metamorphic conditions - the principles of simple shear outlined in John Ramsay's 1967 book clearly visible in nature, and verified by Ramsay's mathematical proofs in the eventual paper (Ramsay and Graham, 1970). Later work on the Lewisian on the mainland of Scotland, in South Harris, in Africa, and elsewhere applied Ramsay's simple shear principles more liberally, more imprecisely and on larger scale than at Caisteal Odair, but in retrospect it documented what seems now to be the generality of mid and lower crustal deformation. Deep seismic reflection data show us that on passive margins hyper-stretched continental crust (whether or not cloaked by Seaward Dipping Reflectors) seems to have collapsed onto the mantle. Crustal faults mostly sole out at or above the mantle - so the Moho is a detachment- an 'outer marginal detachment', if you like, and, of course, it must be a ductile shear. On non-volcanic margins this shear zone forms the first formed ocean floor before true sea floor spreading gets going to create real oceanic crust. Gianreto Manatschal, Marcel Lemoine and others realised that the serpentinites described in parts of the Alps are exposed remnants of this ductile shear zone. Associated ophicalcite breccias tell of sea floor exposure, while high

  19. Parametric Study of Rockbolt Shear Behaviour by Double Shear Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Hagan, P. C.; Saydam, S.; Hebblewhite, B.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Failure of rockbolts as a result of shear or bending loads can often be found in underground excavations. The response of rock anchorage systems has been studied in shear, both by laboratory tests as well as numerical modelling in this study. A double shear test was developed to examine the shear behaviour of a bolt installed across two joints at different angles. To investigate the influence of various parameters in the double shear test, a numerical model of a fully grouted rockbolt installed in concrete was constructed and analysed using FLAC3D code. A number of parameters were considered including concrete strength, inclination between rockbolt and joints and rockbolt diameter. The numerical model considered three material types (steel, grout and concrete) and three interfaces (concrete-concrete, grout-concrete and grout-rockbolt). The main conclusions drawn from the study were that the level of bolt resistance to shear was influenced by rock strength, inclination angle, and diameter of the rockbolt. The numerical simulation of the bolt/grout interaction and deformational behaviour was found to be in close agreement with earlier experimental test results.

  20. SEDflume - High Shear Stress Flume

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers High Shear Stress flume (SEDflume) is designed for estimating erosion rates of fine-grained and mixed fine/coarse grained sediments...

  1. Multi Resonance Shear Mode Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    engineering in the single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMNT) system has uncovered a very unique piezoelectric shear mode. Contrary to...ABSTRACT Crystallographic engineering of single crystal relaxor-based ferroelectrics was used to design broadband, compact, high power, low frequency...utilize the d36 shear piezoelectric coefficient, which has advantages for compact low frequency sonar transducers. The d36 cut is unique in that large

  2. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  3. Shear-mediated dilation of the internal carotid artery occurs independent of hypercapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Smith, Kurt J; Carter, Howard Henry

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for shear stress as a regulator of carotid artery dilation in response to increased arterial CO2 was recently demonstrated in humans during sustained elevations in CO2 (hypercapnia); however, the relative contributions of CO2 and shear stress to this response remains unclear. We examined...... vasodilatory function and health in humans.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Shear stress dilates the internal carotid artery in humans. This vasodilatory response occurs independent of other physiological factors, as demonstrated by our transient CO2 test, and is strongly correlated to shear area under the curve. Assessing...

  4. Shear viscosity of an ordering latex suspension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vorst, A.M.; van der Vorst, B.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Aelmans, N.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    The shear viscosity of a latex which is ordered at rest is studied as a function of the shear rate and volume fraction. At low shear rates and for moderate to high volume fractions, the flow curves show dynamic yield behavior which disappears below a volume fraction of 8%. At high shear rates, the

  5. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  6. Shear stress with appropriate time-step and amplification enhances endothelial cell retention on vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haifeng; Gong, Xianghui; Jing, Xiaohui; Ding, Xili; Yao, Yuan; Huang, Yan; Fan, Yubo

    2017-11-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are sensitive to changes in shear stress. The application of shear stress to ECs has been well documented to improve cell retention when placed into a haemodynamically active environment. However, the relationship between the time-step and amplification of shear stress on EC functions remains elusive. In the present study, human umbilical cord veins endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds and were preconditioned by shear stress at different time-steps and amplifications. It is shown that gradually increasing shear stress with appropriate time-steps and amplification could improve EC retention, yielding a complete endothelial-like monolayer both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of this improvement is mediated, at least in part, by an upregulation of integrin β1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression, which contributed to fibronectin (FN) assembly enhancement in ECs in response to the shear stress. A modest gradual increase in shear stress was essential to allow additional time for ECs to gradually acclimatize to the changing environment, with the goal of withstanding the physiological levels of shear stress. This study recognized that the time-steps and amplifications of shear stress could regulate EC tolerance to shear stress and the anti-thrombogenicity function of engineered vascular grafts via an extracellular cell matrix-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway and might prevent thrombus formation in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  8. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  9. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution.

  10. SHEAR ACCELERATION IN EXPANDING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, F. M. [ZAH, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Duffy, P., E-mail: frank.rieger@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: peter.duffy@ucd.ie [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2016-12-10

    Shear flows are naturally expected to occur in astrophysical environments and potential sites of continuous non-thermal Fermi-type particle acceleration. Here we investigate the efficiency of expanding relativistic outflows to facilitate the acceleration of energetic charged particles to higher energies. To this end, the gradual shear acceleration coefficient is derived based on an analytical treatment. The results are applied to the context of the relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei. The inferred acceleration timescale is investigated for a variety of conical flow profiles (i.e., power law, Gaussian, Fermi–Dirac) and compared to the relevant radiative and non-radiative loss timescales. The results exemplify that relativistic shear flows are capable of boosting cosmic-rays to extreme energies. Efficient electron acceleration, on the other hand, requires weak magnetic fields and may thus be accompanied by a delayed onset of particle energization and affect the overall jet appearance (e.g., core, ridge line, and limb-brightening).

  11. Shear rheology of extended nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Matt K.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2010-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are presented for the shear rheology of suspensions of extended “jack”-shaped nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The shear viscosity is measured for two jack-shaped nanoparticle suspensions for volume fractions from 0.01 to 0.15 and compared to spherical nanoparticles of the same mass. Large differences, in some cases, orders of magnitude, are observed for both the equilibrium viscosity and diffusion constant as the shape of the nanoparticle is varied. The source of enhanced viscosity is the very large effective volume swept out by these extended nanoparticles which allows them to become highly entangled even at low volume fraction.

  12. Shear strength of non-shear reinforced concrete elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao linh

    1997-01-01

    . The position of the crack in which sliding takes place is determined by the crack sliding model developed by Jin-Ping Zhang. The theoretical calculations are compared with test results reported in the literature. A good agreement has been found.A simplified method to calculate the shear capacity of T...

  13. Meniscal shear stress for punching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; Meulman, Hubert N.; Herder, Just L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Experimental determination of the shear stress for punching meniscal tissue. Methods: Meniscectomy (surgical treatment of a lesion of one of the menisci) is the most frequently performed arthroscopic procedure. The performance of a meniscectomy is not optimal with the currently available

  14. In vivo shear stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, Stuart

    2011-12-01

    EC (endothelial cell) responses to shear stress generated by vascular perfusion play an important role in circulatory homoeostasis, whereas abnormal responses are implicated in vascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. ECs subjected to high shear stress in vitro alter their morphology, function and gene expression. The molecular basis for mechanotransduction of a shear stress signal, and the identity of the sensing mechanisms, remain unclear with many candidates under investigation. Translating these findings in vivo has proved difficult. The role of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) flow-dependent nitric oxide release in remodelling skeletal muscle microcirculation is established for elevated (activity, dilatation) and reduced (overload, ischaemia) shear stress, although their temporal relationship to angiogenesis varies. It is clear that growth factor levels may offer only a permissive environment, and alteration of receptor levels may be a viable therapeutic target. Angiogenesis in vivo appears to be a graded phenomenon, and capillary regression on withdrawal of stimulus may be rapid. Combinations of physiological angiogenic stimuli appear not to be additive.

  15. Shear behaviour of reinforced phyllite concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Owusu Afrifa, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phyllite concrete beams often exhibited shear with anchorage bond failure. ► Different shear design provisions for reinforced phyllite beams are compared. ► Predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams must be modified by a reduction factor. -- Abstract: The shear behaviour of concrete beams made from phyllite aggregates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading is reported. First diagonal shear crack load of beams with and without shear reinforcement was between 42–58% and 42–92% of the failure loads respectively. The phyllite concrete beams without shear links had lower post-diagonal cracking shear resistance compared to corresponding phyllite beams with shear links. As a result of hysteretic energy dissipation, limited cyclic loading affected the stiffness, strength and deformation of the phyllite beams with shear reinforcement. Generally, beams with and without shear reinforcement showed anchorage bond failure in addition to the shear failure due to high stress concentration near the supports. The ACI, BS and EC codes are conservative for the prediction of phyllite concrete beams without shear reinforcement but they all overestimate the shear strength of phyllite concrete beams with shear reinforcement. It is recommended that the predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams reinforced with steel stirrups be modified by a reduction factor of 0.7 in order to specify a high enough safety factor on their ultimate strength. It is also recommended that susceptibility of phyllite concrete beams to undergo anchorage bond failure is averted in design by the provision of greater anchorage lengths than usually permitted.

  16. Shear viscosity of the quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Ohnishi, Hiromasa; Fukutome, Takahiko

    2007-01-01

    We discuss shear viscosity of the quark matter by using Kubo formula. The shear viscosity is calculated in the framework of the quasi-particle RPA for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We obtain a formula that the shear viscosity is expressed by the quadratic form of the quark spectral function in the chiral symmetric phase. The magnitude of the shear viscosity is discussed assuming the Breit-Wigner type for the spectral function.

  17. Shear assessment of reinforced concrete slab bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.; Van der Veen, C.; Walraven, J.C.; De Boer, A.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of reinforced concrete solid slab bridges in shear is assessed by comparing the design beam shear resistance to the design value of the applied shear force due to the permanent actions and live loads. Results from experiments on half-scale continuous slab bridges are used to develop a

  18. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2005-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continuously increase the knowledge of wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... (PDF) of turbulence driven short-term extreme wind shear events, conditioned on the mean wind speed, for an arbitrary recurrence period. The model is based on an asymptotic expansion, and only a few and easily accessible parameters are needed as input. The model of the extreme PDF is supplemented...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describes the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of full-scale measurements recorded with a high sampling rate...

  19. Statistical Model of Extreme Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2004-01-01

    In order to continue cost-optimisation of modern large wind turbines, it is important to continously increase the knowledge on wind field parameters relevant to design loads. This paper presents a general statistical model that offers site-specific prediction of the probability density function...... (PDF) of turbulence driven short-term extreme wind shear events, conditioned on the mean wind speed, for an arbitrary recurrence period. The model is based on an asymptotic expansion, and only a few and easily accessible parameters are needed as input. The model of the extreme PDF is supplemented...... by a model that, on a statistically consistent basis, describe the most likely spatial shape of an extreme wind shear event. Predictions from the model have been compared with results from an extreme value data analysis, based on a large number of high-sampled full-scale time series measurements...

  20. Shear viscosity of nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, A. G.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Grygoriev, U. V.; Plujko, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Shear viscosity η is calculated for the nuclear matter described as a system of interacting nucleons with the van der Waals (VDW) equation of state. The Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation is solved in terms of the plane waves of the collective overdamped motion. In the frequent-collision regime, the shear viscosity depends on the particle-number density n through the mean-field parameter a , which describes attractive forces in the VDW equation. In the temperature region T =15 -40 MeV, a ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density s is smaller than 1 at the nucleon number density n =(0.5 -1.5 ) n0 , where n0=0.16 fm-3 is the particle density of equilibrium nuclear matter at zero temperature. A minimum of the η /s ratio takes place somewhere in a vicinity of the critical point of the VDW system. Large values of η /s ≫1 are, however, found in both the low-density, n ≪n0 , and high-density, n >2 n0 , regions. This makes the ideal hydrodynamic approach inapplicable for these densities.

  1. Prolonged application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm(2 for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis

  2. Simulations of Granular Particles Under Cyclic Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, John; Chaikin, Paul

    2012-02-01

    We perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of spherical grains subjected to cyclic, quasi-static shear in a 3D parallelepiped shear cell. This virtual shear cell is constructed out of rough, bumpy walls in order to minimize wall-induced ordering and has an open top surface to allow the packing to readily dilate or compact. Using a standard routine for MD simulations of frictional grains, we simulate over 1000 shear cycles, measuring grain displacements, the local packing density and changes in the contact network. Varying the shear amplitude and the friction coefficient between grains, we map out a phase diagram for the different types of behavior exhibited by these sheared grains. With low friction and high enough shear, the grains can spontaneously order into densely packed crystals. With low shear and increasing friction the packing remains disordered, yet the grains arrange themselves into configurations which exhibit limit cycles where all grains return to the same position after each full shear cycle. At higher shear and friction there is a transition to a diffusive state, where grains continue rearrange and move throughout the shear cell.

  3. The dynamics of a shear band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Diana; Capuani, Domenico; Bigoni, Davide

    2018-03-01

    A shear band of finite length, formed inside a ductile material at a certain stage of a continued homogeneous strain, provides a dynamic perturbation to an incident wave field, which strongly influences the dynamics of the material and affects its path to failure. The investigation of this perturbation is presented for a ductile metal, with reference to the incremental mechanics of a material obeying the J2-deformation theory of plasticity (a special form of prestressed, elastic, anisotropic, and incompressible solid). The treatment originates from the derivation of integral representations relating the incremental mechanical fields at every point of the medium to the incremental displacement jump across the shear band faces, generated by an impinging wave. The boundary integral equations (under the plane strain assumption) are numerically approached through a collocation technique, which keeps into account the singularity at the shear band tips and permits the analysis of an incident wave impinging a shear band. It is shown that the presence of the shear band induces a resonance, visible in the incremental displacement field and in the stress intensity factor at the shear band tips, which promotes shear band growth. Moreover, the waves scattered by the shear band are shown to generate a fine texture of vibrations, parallel to the shear band line and propagating at a long distance from it, but leaving a sort of conical shadow zone, which emanates from the tips of the shear band.

  4. Nucleation in Sheared Granular Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Radin, Charles; Swinney, Harry L.; Schröter, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    We present an experiment on crystallization of packings of macroscopic granular spheres. This system is often considered to be a model for thermally driven atomic or colloidal systems. Cyclically shearing a packing of frictional spheres, we observe a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed fcc and hcp symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition, initiated by homogeneous nucleation, overcomes a barrier at 64.5% volume fraction. Nucleation consists predominantly of the dissolving of small nuclei and the growth of nuclei that have reached a critical size of about ten spheres.

  5. Nucleation in Sheared Granular Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Radin, Charles; Swinney, Harry L; Schröter, Matthias

    2018-02-02

    We present an experiment on crystallization of packings of macroscopic granular spheres. This system is often considered to be a model for thermally driven atomic or colloidal systems. Cyclically shearing a packing of frictional spheres, we observe a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed fcc and hcp symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition, initiated by homogeneous nucleation, overcomes a barrier at 64.5% volume fraction. Nucleation consists predominantly of the dissolving of small nuclei and the growth of nuclei that have reached a critical size of about ten spheres.

  6. Relative viscosity of emulsions in simple shear flow: Temperature, shear rate, and interfacial tension dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We simulate an emulsion system under simple shear rates to analyze its rheological characteristics using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We calculate the relative viscosity of an emulsion under a simple shear flow along with changes in temperature, shear rate, and surfactant concentration. The relative viscosity of emulsions decreased with an increase in temperature. We observed the shear-thinning phenomena, which is responsible for the inverse proportion between the shear rate and viscosity. An increase in the interfacial tension caused a decrease in the relative viscosity of the decane-in-water emulsion because the increased deformation caused by the decreased interfacial tension significantly influenced the wall shear stress.

  7. Microstructural description of shear-thickening suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Abhinendra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic particle-scale numerical simulations are used to study the variation of microstructure with shear stress during shear thickening in dense non-Brownian suspensions. The microscale information is used to characterize the differences between the shear thickened (frictional and non-thickened (lubricated, frictionless states. Here, we focus on the force and contact networks and study the evolution of associated anisotropies with increase in shear stress. The force and contact networks are both more isotropic in the shear-thickened state than in non-thickened state. We also find that both force and structural anisotropies are rate independent for both low and high stress, while they are rate (or stress dependent for the intermediate stress range where the shear thickening occurs. This behavior is similar to the evolution of viscosity with increasing stress, showing a clear correlation between the microstructure and the macroscopic rheology.

  8. Developments in Plasticity Approach to Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with plastic methods applied to shear design of reinforced concrete beams. Emphasis is put on the recently developed crack sliding model applicable to non-shear reinforced and lightly shear reinforced beams and slabs. The model, which is an upper bound plasticity approach, takes...... into account the mechanism of crack formation followed by crack sliding. Comparisons between the model and test results are carried out. Good agreement has been found over a wide range of cases....

  9. Instability of periodic MHD shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaqarashvili, T.V.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J.L.; Belvedere, G.

    2004-01-01

    The stability of periodic MHD shear flows generated by an external transversal periodic force in magnetized plasma is studied. It is shown that the temporal behaviour of magnetosonic wave spatial Fourier harmonics in such flows is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently the harmonics with the half frequency of the shear flows grow exponentially in time. Therefore the periodic shear motions are unstable to the perturbations of compressible magnetosonic waves. The motions represent the kinetic part of the transversal oscillation in magnetized plasma. Therefore due to the instability of periodic shear motions, the transversal oscillations may quickly be damped, so transferring their energy to compressible magnetosonic perturbations

  10. Shear flow generation due to electromagnetic instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.; Sato, M.; Hamaguchi, S.; Miyato, N.

    2003-01-01

    Shear flow is the most important ingredient governing nonlinear behavior of many types of plasma instability. Electromagnetic effects on shear flow generation have been studied for an electro- magnetic drift wave called resistive drift-Alfven mode (RDAM) and a global MHD mode called resistive wall mode (RWM). For RDAM it is found that the generated shear flow stabilizes the dominant modes; however, other modes are destabilized. For RWM Maxwell stress due to magnetic fluctuations has a tendency to suppress the poloidal flow near the plasma surface, which gives almost same saturation level, since the shear flow stabilization disappears. (author)

  11. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs

  12. Caveolin-1 mediated uptake via langerin restricts HIV-1 infection in human Langerhans cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Linda M.; Ribeiro, Carla M. S.; Zijlstra-Willems, Esther M.; de Witte, Lot; Fluitsma, Donna; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Everts, Vincent; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Human Langerhans cells (LCs) reside in foreskin and vaginal mucosa and are the first immune cells to interact with HIV-1 during sexual transmission. LCs capture HIV-1 through the C-type lectin receptor langerin, which routes the virus into Birbeck granules (BGs), thereby preventing HIV-1 infection.

  13. Domain Specific Partitioning of Uterine Artery Endothelial Connexin43 and Caveolin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampey, Bryan C.; Morschauser, Timothy J.; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Magness, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine vascular adaptations facilitate rises in uterine blood flow (UBF) during pregnancy, which are associated with gap junction connexin (Cx) proteins and eNOS. In uterine artery endothelial cells (UAECs) ATP activates eNOS in a pregnancy (P) specific manner that is dependent on Cx43 function. Caveolar subcellular domain partitioning plays key roles in ATP-induced eNOS activation and NO production. Little is known regarding the partitioning of Cx proteins to caveolar domains or their dynamics upon ATP treatment. We observed that Cx43-mediated gap junction function upon ATP stimulation is associated with Cx43 re-partitioning between the non-caveolar and caveolar domains. Compared to UAECs from nonpregnant (NP) ewes, levels of ATP, PGI2, cAMP, NOx, and cGMP were 2-fold higher (Plucifer yellow dye transfer, a response abrogated by Gap27, but not Gap 26 indicating involvement of Cx43 but not Cx37. Confocal microscopy revealed domain partitioning of Cx43 and Cav-1. In P-UAECs LC/MS/MS analysis revealed only Cx43 in the caveolar domain. In contrast, Cx37 was located only in the non-caveolar pool. Western analysis revealed that ATP increased Cx43 distribution (1.7-fold;P=0.013) to the caveolar domain, but had no effect on Cx37. These data demonstrate rapid ATP-stimulated repartitioning of Cx43 to the caveolae, where eNOS resides and plays an important role in NO-mediated increasing UBF during pregnancy. PMID:27572151

  14. Temporal evolution in caveolin 1 methylation levels during human esophageal carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Zhe; Zhao, Zhenfu; Dong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaojing; Liu, Jie; Fan, Xinmin; Mori, Yuriko; Meltzer, Stephen J; Wang, Liang; Cao, Ziyi; Cheng, Yulan; Gao, Yan; Feng, Xianling; Chen, Si; Yu, Huimin; Wu, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer ranks eighth among frequent cancers worldwide. Our aim was to investigate whether and at which neoplastic stage promoter hypermethylation of CAV1 is involved in human esophageal carcinogenesis. Using real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP), we examined CAV1 promoter hypermethylation in 260 human esophageal tissue specimens. Real-time RT-PCR and qMSP were also performed on OE33 esophageal cancer cells before and after treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC). CAV1 hypermethylation showed highly discriminative ROC curve profiles, clearly distinguishing esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) from normal esophagus (NE) (EAC vs. NE, AUROC = 0.839 and p < 0.0001; ESCC vs. NE, AUROC = 0.920 and p < 0.0001). Both CAV1 methylation frequency and normalized methylation value (NMV) were significantly higher in Barrett’s metaplasia (BE), low-grade and high-grade dysplasia occurring in BE (D), EAC, and ESCC than in NE (all p < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, among 41 cases with matched NE and EAC or ESCC, CAV1 NMVs in EAC and ESCC (mean = 0.273) were significantly higher than in corresponding NE (mean = 0.146; p < 0.01, Student’s paired t-test). Treatment of OE33 EAC cells with 5-Aza-dC reduced CAV1 methylation and increased CAV1 mRNA expression. CAV1 promoter hypermethylation is a frequent event in human esophageal carcinomas and is associated with early neoplastic progression in Barrett’s esophagus

  15. Continuous shear - a method for studying material elements passing a stationary shear plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Maria; Wiwe, Birgitte; Wanheim, Tarras

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, material response to shear deformation has been studied with methods where the shear is gradually increasing from zero to the final value over a certain fixed deformation zone, e.g. in the well-known torsion test of a tube with a defined shear zone established by a machined...... circumferential groove. Normally shear in metal forming processes is of another nature, namely where the material elements move through a stationary shear zone, often of small width. In this paper a method enabling the simulation of this situation is presented. A tool for continuous shear has beeen manufactured...... and tested with AlMgSil and copper. The sheared material has thereafter been tested n plane strain compression with different orientation concerning the angle between the shear plane and the compression direction....

  16. A biaxial method for inplane shear testing. [shear strain in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, H. G.; Weller, T.

    1978-01-01

    A biaxial method for performing inplane shear tests of materials using a shear frame is described. Aluminum plate and sandwich specimens were used to characterize the uniformity of shear strain imparted by the biaxial method of loading as opposed to the uniaxial method. The inplane stiffening effect of aluminum honeycomb core was determined. Test results for (+ or - 45) graphite-epoxy laminate are presented. Some theoretical considerations of subjecting an anisotropic material to a uniform shear deformation are discussed.

  17. Rail Shear and Short Beam Shear Properties of Various 3-Dimensional (3-D) Woven Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    14 Fig. 9 Load vs. deflection curves from short beam shear experiments ..........17 Fig. 10 Short beam shear specimens cracking in tension on...Walter et al.17 Fig. 10 Short beam shear specimens cracking in tension on the bottom of the specimen Approved for public release; distribution is...unlimited. 19 Fig. 11 Short beam shear specimens cracking as viewed from the side While the 2-D base composite produced a widespread

  18. Shear thinning behaviors in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetere, F. P.; Cassetta, M.; Perugini, D.

    2017-12-01

    Studies on magma rheology are of fundamental importance to understanding magmatic processes from depth to surface. Since viscosity is one of the most important parameter controlling eruption mechanisms, as well as lava flow emplacement, a comprehensive knowledge on the evolution of magma viscosities during crystallization is required. We present new viscosity data on partly crystalized basalt, andesite and analogue lavas comparable to those erupted on Mercury's northern volcanic plains. High-temperature viscosity measurements were performed using a rotational Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the PVRG labs, in Perugia (Italy) (http://pvrg.unipg.it). The relative proportion of phases in each experimental run were determined by image analysis on BS-SEM images at different magnifications; phases are glasses, clinopyroxene, spinel, plagioclase for the basalt, plagioclase and spinel for the andesite and pure enstatite and clinopyroxenes, for the analogue Mercury's composition. Glass and crystalline fractions determined by image analysis well correlate with compositions of residual melts. In order to constrain the viscosity (η) variations as a function of crystallinity, shear rate (γ) was varied from 0.1 to 5 s-1. Viscosity vs. time at constant temperature shows a typical S-shape curve. In particular, for basaltic composition η vary from 3.1-3.8 Pa s [log η] at 1493 K and crystallinity of 19 area % as γ vary from 1.0 to 0.1 s-1; the andesite viscosity evolution is 3.2 and 3.7 Pa s [log η] as γ varies from 1 to 0.1 at 1493 K and crystal content of 17 area %; finally, Mercury's analogue composition was investigated at different temperature ranging from 1533 to 1502 K (Vetere et al., 2017). Results, for γ = 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 s-1, show viscosity variation between 2.7-4.0, 2.5-3.4 and 2.0-3.0 [log η inPa s] respectively while crystallinity vary from 9 to 27 (area %). As viscosity decreases as shear rate increases, these data points to a shear thinning behaviour

  19. Punching shear capacity of reinforced concrete slabs with headed shear studs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Linh Cao; Pop, Anamaria

    2015-01-01

    . To design shear reinforcement in slabs, on the other hand, the engineer must settle for an empirical equation. The aim of the study reported is to demonstrate that it is possible in a simple manner to design shear reinforcement in slabs based on the same rigid-plasticity foundation as for beam shear design...

  20. Another look at zonal flows: Resonance, shearing, and frictionless saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.

    2018-04-01

    We show that shear is not the exclusive parameter that represents all aspects of flow structure effects on turbulence. Rather, wave-flow resonance enters turbulence regulation, both linearly and nonlinearly. Resonance suppresses the linear instability by wave absorption. Flow shear can weaken the resonance, and thus destabilize drift waves, in contrast to the near-universal conventional shear suppression paradigm. Furthermore, consideration of wave-flow resonance resolves the long-standing problem of how zonal flows (ZFs) saturate in the limit of weak or zero frictional drag, and also determines the ZF scale. We show that resonant vorticity mixing, which conserves potential enstrophy, enables ZF saturation in the absence of drag, and so is effective at regulating the Dimits up-shift regime. Vorticity mixing is incorporated as a nonlinear, self-regulation effect in an extended 0D predator-prey model of drift-ZF turbulence. This analysis determines the saturated ZF shear and shows that the mesoscopic ZF width scales as LZ F˜f3 /16(1-f ) 1 /8ρs5/8l03 /8 in the (relevant) adiabatic limit (i.e., τckk‖2D‖≫1 ). f is the fraction of turbulence energy coupled to ZF and l0 is the base state mixing length, absent ZF shears. We calculate and compare the stationary flow and turbulence level in frictionless, weakly frictional, and strongly frictional regimes. In the frictionless limit, the results differ significantly from conventionally quoted scalings derived for frictional regimes. To leading order, the flow is independent of turbulence intensity. The turbulence level scales as E ˜(γL/εc) 2 , which indicates the extent of the "near-marginal" regime to be γL<εc , for the case of avalanche-induced profile variability. Here, εc is the rate of dissipation of potential enstrophy and γL is the characteristic linear growth rate of fluctuations. The implications for dynamics near marginality of the strong scaling of saturated E with γL are discussed.

  1. deposit, Singhbhum shear zone, eastern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Textural and compositional data of pyrites suggest that the hydrothermal fluid responsible for pre-/early-shearing mineralization evolved from Co-rich to Ni-rich and the late-/post-shearing fluid was largely depleted in minor elements. Sulphur isotope compositions of pyrite mostly furnish positive values ranging between ...

  2. Solvable groups and a shear construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freibert, Marco; Swann, Andrew Francis

    The twist construction is a geometric model of T-duality that includes constructions of nilmanifolds from tori. This paper shows how one-dimensional foliations on manifolds may be used in a shear construction, which in algebraic form builds certain solvable Lie groups from Abelian ones. We discuss...... other examples of geometric structures that may be obtained from the shear construction....

  3. Rating precast prestressed concrete bridges for shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Shear capacity of real-world prestressed concrete girders designed in the 1960s and 1970s is a concern because : AASHTO Standard Specifications (AASHTO-STD) employed the quarter-point rule for shear design, which is less : conservative for shea...

  4. Behaviour of Corroded Single Stud Shear Connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xue

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of corrosion on the static behavior of stud shear connectors was investigated. An innovative test setup for single stud shear connectors was designed and established. Two series of specimens having different stud diameters were fabricated and tested. The test specimens were firstly corroded to different corrosion rates by the electronic accelerating method. Static loading tests were then performed to obtain the load-slip curves and ultimate strengths of the corroded test specimens. The actual corrosion rates were measured from the studs obtained from the tested specimens. The test results were compared with the push out test specimens having similar corrosion rates. It is shown that the test results obtained from the single stud shear connectors are conservative compared with the corroded push test specimens, which prove the validation of the single stud shear connector test method. The effect of corrosion on the behavior of stud shear connectors was also presented.

  5. Experimental study on the adiabatic shear bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affouard, J.

    1984-07-01

    Four martensitic steels (Z50CDV5 steel, 28CND8 steel, 35NCDV16 steel and 4340 steel) with different hardness between 190 and 600 Hsub(B) (Brinell hardness), have been studied by means of dynamic compressive tests on split Hopkinson pressure bar. Microscopic observations show that the fracture are associated to the development of adiabatic shear bands (except 4340 steel with 190 Hsub(B) hardness). By means of tests for which the deformation is stopped at predetermined levels, the measurement of shear and hardness inside the band and the matrix indicates the chronology of this phenomenon: first the localization of shear, followed by the formation of adiabatic shear band and ultimatly crack initiation and propagation. These results correlated with few simulations by finite elements have permitted to suggest two mecanisms of deformation leading to the formation of adiabatic shear bands in this specific test [fr

  6. Friction of Shear-Fracture Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riikilä, T. I.; Pylväinen, J. I.; Åström, J.

    2017-12-01

    A shear fracture of brittle solids under compression undergoes a substantial evolution from the initial microcracking to a fully formed powder-filled shear zone. Experiments covering the entire process are relatively easy to conduct, but they are very difficult to investigate in detail. Numerically, the large strain limit has remained a challenge. An efficient simulation model and a custom-made experimental device are employed to test to what extent a shear fracture alone is sufficient to drive material to spontaneous self-lubrication. A "weak shear zone" is an important concept in geology, and a large number of explanations, specific for tectonic conditions, have been proposed. We demonstrate here that weak shear zones are far more general, and that their emergence only demands that a microscopic, i.e., fragment-scale, stress relaxation mechanism develops during the fracture process.

  7. Imaging Shear Strength Along Subduction Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M.; Rempel, Alan W.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-11-01

    Subduction faults accumulate stress during long periods of time and release this stress suddenly, during earthquakes, when it reaches a threshold. This threshold, the shear strength, controls the occurrence and magnitude of earthquakes. We consider a 3-D model to derive an analytical expression for how the shear strength depends on the fault geometry, the convergence obliquity, frictional properties, and the stress field orientation. We then use estimates of these different parameters in Japan to infer the distribution of shear strength along a subduction fault. We show that the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake ruptured a fault portion characterized by unusually small variations in static shear strength. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that large earthquakes preferentially rupture regions with relatively homogeneous shear strength. With increasing constraints on the different parameters at play, our approach could, in the future, help identify favorable locations for large earthquakes.

  8. Simple shear of deformable square objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2003-12-01

    Finite element models of square objects in a contrasting matrix in simple shear show that the objects deform to a variety of shapes. For a range of viscosity contrasts, we catalogue the changing shapes and orientations of objects in progressive simple shear. At moderate simple shear ( γ=1.5), the shapes are virtually indistinguishable from those in equivalent pure shear models with the same bulk strain ( RS=4), examined in a previous study. In theory, differences would be expected, especially for very stiff objects or at very large strain. In all our simple shear models, relatively competent square objects become asymmetric barrel shapes with concave shortened edges, similar to some types of boudin. Incompetent objects develop shapes surprisingly similar to mica fish described in mylonites.

  9. Imaging shear strength along subduction faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M.; Rempel, Alan W.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Subduction faults accumulate stress during long periods of time and release this stress suddenly, during earthquakes, when it reaches a threshold. This threshold, the shear strength, controls the occurrence and magnitude of earthquakes. We consider a 3-D model to derive an analytical expression for how the shear strength depends on the fault geometry, the convergence obliquity, frictional properties, and the stress field orientation. We then use estimates of these different parameters in Japan to infer the distribution of shear strength along a subduction fault. We show that the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake ruptured a fault portion characterized by unusually small variations in static shear strength. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that large earthquakes preferentially rupture regions with relatively homogeneous shear strength. With increasing constraints on the different parameters at play, our approach could, in the future, help identify favorable locations for large earthquakes.

  10. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  11. Shear Ram Verification Test Protocol (VTP) Best Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Roy A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Braun, Joseph C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A blowout preventer (BOP) is a critical component used on subsea oil and gas wells during drilling, completion, and workover operations on the U. S. outer continental shelf (OCS). The purpose of the BOP is to seal oil and gas wells, and in the case of an emergency well-control event, to prevent the uncontrolled release of hydrocarbons. One of the most important components of the BOP is the hydraulically operated blind shear ram (BSR) that shears drilling-related components, such as drill pipes, casings, tubings, and wire-related tools that may have been placed in the well. In addition to shearing these components, the BSR must form a seal to keep hydrocarbons within the well bore, even when under the highest well-fluid pressures expected. The purpose of this document is for Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide an independent view, based on current regulations, and best practices for testing and confirming the operability and suitability of BSRs under realistic (or actual) well conditions.

  12. Shear-induced APAP de-agglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llusa, Marcos; Levin, Michael; Snee, Ronald D; Muzzio, Fernando J

    2009-12-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredient agglomerates can generate many solid product regulatory compliance issues. To study the effects of shear rate, strain, type of excipient, and grade of acetaminophen (APAP) on the process of APAP de-agglomeration. A shear-controlled environment is used to expose six different blends that consist of one of three APAP grades and one of two possible types of excipient to 10 different combinations of shear rate and strain. APAP agglomerates are sifted and weighed. Finer APAP grades lead to blends with more APAP agglomerates and type of excipient only affects the de-agglomeration process for the finest APAP grade. De-agglomeration proceeds mainly as a function of strain with a minor contribution toward further de-agglomeration when larger shear rates are used. When mechanical stress (which us proportional to shear rate) overcomes interparticle forces, de-agglomeration occurs. Higher shear rates (and stress) contribute slightly to further APAP de-agglomeration. Extended exposure to stress (strain) reduces the size and the number of agglomerates. Blends with finer APAP present more agglomerates, particularly after low strain exposure. This article presents a useful method for formulation and process development. Exposing blends to higher shear rates and especially to strain mitigates APAP agglomeration in blends. Finer APAP presents more agglomerates and the type of excipient used affects the degree of APAP agglomeration.

  13. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Zachary A; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S; Mecca, Jodi M; Tucker, Christopher J; Squires, Todd M

    2014-03-11

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 10(3)-10(4) times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants.

  14. IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR MODELLING SHEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lopez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Through laboratory research performed over the past ten years, many of the critical links between fracture characteristics and hydromechanical and mechanical behaviour have been made for individual fractures. One of the remaining challenges at the laboratory scale is to directly link fracture morphology of shear behaviour with changes in stress and shear direction. A series of laboratory experiments were performed on cement mortar replicas of a granite sample with a natural fracture perpendicular to the axis of the core. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the fracture's geometry and its mechanical behaviour under shear stress and the resulting damage. Image analysis, geostatistical, stereological and directional data techniques are applied in combination to experimental data. The results highlight the role of geometric characteristics of the fracture surfaces (surface roughness, size, shape, locations and orientations of asperities to be damaged in shear behaviour. A notable improvement in shear understanding is that shear behaviour is controlled by the apparent dip in the shear direction of elementary facets forming the fracture.

  15. Shear rheology of molten crumb chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J E; Van Damme, I; Johns, M L; Routh, A F; Wilson, D I

    2009-03-01

    The shear rheology of fresh molten chocolate produced from crumb was studied over 5 decades of shear rate using controlled stress devices. The Carreau model was found to be a more accurate description than the traditional Casson model, especially at shear rates between 0.1 and 1 s(-1). At shear rates around 0.1 s(-1) (shear stress approximately 7 Pa) the material exhibited a transition to a solid regime, similar to the behavior reported by Coussot (2005) for other granular suspensions. The nature of the suspension was explored by investigating the effect of solids concentration (0.20 chocolate was then compared with the rheology of (1) a synthetic chocolate, which contained sunflower oil in place of cocoa butter, and (2) a suspension of sugar of a similar size distribution (volume mean 15 mum) in cocoa butter and emulsifier. The chocolate and synthetic chocolate showed very similar rheological profiles under both steady shear and oscillatory shear. The chocolate and the sugar suspension showed similar Krieger-Dougherty dependency on volume fraction, and a noticeable transition to a stiff state at solids volume fractions above approximately 0.5. Similar behavior has been reported by Citerne and others (2001) for a smooth peanut butter, which had a similar particle size distribution and solids loading to chocolate. The results indicate that the melt rheology of the chocolate is dominated by hydrodynamic interactions, although at high solids volume fractions the emulsifier may contribute to the departure of the apparent viscosity from the predicted trend.

  16. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    combinations of reinforcement and for variable slenderness ratios. Theoretical approaches will be evaluated and compared with the test results of several test series. The load bearing capacity of shear reinforced aircrete is highly dependent on the anchorage and bond behaviour of the shear reinforcement......Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different...

  17. Shear viscosity of liquid mixtures Mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, R

    2002-01-01

    Expressions for zeroth, second, and fourth sum rules of transverse stress autocorrelation function of two component fluid have been derived. These sum rules and Mori's memory function formalism have been used to study shear viscosity of Ar-Kr and isotopic mixtures. It has been found that theoretical result is in good agreement with the computer simulation result for the Ar-Kr mixture. The mass dependence of shear viscosity for different mole fraction shows that deviation from ideal linear model comes even from mass difference in two species of fluid mixture. At higher mass ratio shear viscosity of mixture is not explained by any of the emperical model.

  18. Problems pilots face involving wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Educating pilots and the aviation industry about wind shears presents a major problem associated with this meteorological phenomenon. The pilot's second most pressing problem is the need for a language to discuss wind shear encounters with other pilots so that the reaction of the aircraft to the wind shear encounter can be accurately described. Another problem is the flight director which gives a centered pitch command for a given angular displacement from the glide slope. It was suggested that they should instead be called flight path command and should not center unless the aircraft is actually correcting to the flight path.

  19. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  20. Turbulent shear layers in confining channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Graham; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso; Hewitt, Ian; Please, Colin; Style, Rob; Bird, Paul

    2017-11-01

    The development of shear layers are ubiquitous in a wide range of situations, from diffusers, nozzles, turbines and ducts to urban air flow and geophysical flows. In this talk we present a simple model for the development of shear layers between flows that mix in confining channels. The model, comprising two plug flow regions separated by a linear shear layer, shows good agreement with both laboratory experiments and computational turbulence modelling (at a fraction of the computation time). Such efficient models, capable of capturing and exhibiting the main characteristics of the turbulent shear layers, are expected to be useful for both modelling and design purposes. We demonstrate the latter by showing how the model can be utilised to optimise pressure recovery in diffusers with non-uniform inflows. EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Industrially Focused Mathematical Modelling, VerdErg Renewable Energy Limited, John Fell Fund (Oxford University Press).

  1. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-09-18

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  3. Recent progress in shear punch testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Toloczko, M.B.; Lucas, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The shear punch test was developed in response to the needs of the materials development community for small-scale mechanical properties tests. Such tests will be of great importance when a fusion neutron simulation device is built, since such a device is expected to have a limited irradiation volume. The shear punch test blanks a circular disk from a fixed sheet metal specimen, specifically a TEM disk. Load-displacement data generated during the test can be related to uniaxial tensile properties such as yield and ultimate strength. Shear punch and tensile tests were performed at room temperature on a number of unirradiated aluminum, copper, vanadium, and stainless steel alloys and on several irradiated aluminum alloys. Recent results discussed here suggest that the relationship between shear punch strength and tensile strength varies with alloy class, although the relationship determined for the unirradiated condition remains valid for the irradiated aluminum alloys

  4. Shear strength of clay and silt embankments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Highway embankment is one of the most common large-scale geotechnical facilities constructed in Ohio. In the past, the design of these embankments was largely based on soil shear strength properties that had been estimated from previously published e...

  5. Immiscible blend morphology after shear and elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batch, Gibson L.; Trifkovic, Milana; Hedegaard, Aaron; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2015-05-01

    This work examines the role of shear and extensional strain on immiscible blend morphology, namely domain size, orientation, and co-continuity. The domain size reduces with surface tension similar to what is observed with isolated droplets. The domain size is shown to increase with shear strain due to coalescence. Hence the best mixing is found with low shear strains, i.e. low rates of shear and short durations of time. Extensional strain (extrusion draw ratio DR) reduces phase width and thickness with a DR-0.5 dependence, suggesting the transformation to a fibrilar morphology. The critical draw ratio for morphology transformation is approximately 7, in agreement with observations by Grace for droplet breakup in elongation. Fibrilar morphology is also consistent with a large increase in strain-to-break in the drawn film and with observed creep and optical scattering behavior.

  6. Recent progress in shear punch testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Toloczko, M.B.; Lucas, G.E. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The shear punch test was developed in response to the needs of the materials development community for small-scale mechanical properties tests. Such tests will be of great importance when a fusion neutron simulation device is built, since such a device is expected to have a limited irradiation volume. The shear punch test blanks a circular disk from a fixed sheet metal specimen, specifically a TEM disk. Load-displacement data generated during the test can be related to uniaxial tensile properties such as yield and ultimate strength. Shear punch and tensile tests were performed at room temperature on a number of unirradiated aluminum, copper, vanadium, and stainless steel alloys and on several irradiated aluminum alloys. Recent results discussed here suggest that the relationship between shear punch strength and tensile strength varies with alloy class, although the relationship determined for the unirradiated condition remains valid for the irradiated aluminum alloys.

  7. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-01-01

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low (≤1.5 dyn/cm 2 ) or high (25 dyn/cm 2 ) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  8. Thermodynamics of dilute gases in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, D.; Criado-Sancho, M.

    2001-03-01

    We consider the effect of shear and normal viscous pressures on the non-equilibrium entropy of ideal gases in Couette flow. These results extend the previous ones (Bidar et al., Physica A 233 (1996) 163), where normal pressure effects were ignored. Furthermore, we analyze the non-equilibrium contributions to the chemical potential, which may be useful in the analysis of shear-induced effects on colligative properties and chemical equilibrium.

  9. Hydrodynamical fluctuations in smooth shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagelishvili, G.D.; Khujadze, G.R.; Lominadze, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    Background of hydrodynamical fluctuations in a intrinsically/stochastically forced, laminar, uniform shear flow is studied. The employment of so-called nonmodal mathematical analysis makes it possible to represent the background of fluctuations in a new light and to get more insight into the physics of its formation. The basic physical processes responsible for the formation of vortex and acoustic wave fluctuation backgrounds are analyzed. Interplay of the processes at low and moderate shear rates is described. Three-dimensional vortex fluctuations around a given macroscopic state are numerically calculated. The correlation functions of the fluctuations of physical quantities are analyzed. It is shown that there exists subspace D k in the wave-number space (k-space) that is limited externally by spherical surface with radius k ν ≡ A/ν (where A is the velocity shear parameter, ν - the kinematic viscosity) in the nonequilibrium open system under study. The spatial Fourier harmonics of vortex as well as acoustic wave fluctuations are strongly subjected by flow shear (by the open character of the system) at wave-numbers satisfying the condition k ν . Specifically it is shown that in D k : The fluctuations are non-Markovian; the spatial spectral density of energy of the vortex fluctuations by far exceeds the white-noise; the term of a new type associated to the hydrodynamical fluctuation of velocity appears in the correlation function of pressure; the fluctuation background of the acoustic waves is completely different at low and moderate shear rates (at low shear rates it is reduced in D k in comparison to the uniform (non-shear) flow; at moderate shear rates it it comparable to the background of the vortex fluctuations). The fluctuation background of both the vortex and the acoustic wave modes is anisotropic. The possible significance of the fluctuation background of vortices for the subcritical transition to turbulence and Brownian motion of small macroscopic

  10. Modeling and implementation of wind shear data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Walter

    1987-01-01

    The problems of implementing the JAWS wind shear data are discussed. The data sets are described from the view of utilizing them in an aircraft performance computer program. Then, some of the problems of nonstandard procedures are described in terms of programming the equations of aircraft motion when the effects of temporal and spatially variable winds are included. Finally, some of the computed effects of the various wind shear terms are shown.

  11. Assessment of Shear Strength in Silty Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaniak Katarzyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparison of shear strength values in silty soils from the area of Poznań, determined based on selected Nkt values recommended in literature, with values of shear strength established on the basis of Nkt values recommended by the author. Analysed silty soils are characterized by the carbonate cementation zone, which made it possible to compare selected empirical coefficients both in normally consolidated and overconsolidated soils

  12. Speckle Shearing Interferometry And Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingtang, Ke; Hongqing, Zhang; Yeling, He; Yanfu, Chang

    1983-12-01

    The paper deals with experiments made to verify the theory of bending of plates and related problems by method of speckle shearing interferometry, which is proved to be highly sensitive. Tests carried out on rubber products: (such as tires)and thin-walled containers have demonstrated the prospects of using image-shearing camera in nondestructive in-situ testing of industrial products, suggesting a potentiality still wider than that of holographic interferometry.

  13. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sophie Yang; Guillard, François; Marks, Benjy; Rognon, Pierre; Einav, Itai

    2017-06-01

    We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called "3D Stadium Shear Device" which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm) and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10-6 to 10-2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  14. Experimental study of shear rate dependence in perpetually sheared granular matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sophie Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the shear behaviour of various granular materials by conducting novel perpetual simple shear experiments over four orders of magnitude of relatively low shear rates. The newly developed experimental apparatus employed is called “3D Stadium Shear Device” which is an extended version of the 2D Stadium Shear Device [1]. This device is able to provide a non-radial dependent perpetual shear flow and a nearly linear velocity profile between two oppositely moving shear walls. Using this device, we are able to test a large variety of granular materials. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the device on glass beads (diameter 1 mm, 3 mm, and 14 mm and rice. We particularly focus on studying these materials at very low inertial number I ranging from 10−6 to 10−2. We find that, within this range of I, the friction coefficient μ of glass beads has no shear rate dependence. A particularly appealing observation comes from testing rice, where the attainment of critical state develops under much longer duration than in other materials. Initially during shear we find a value of μ similar to that found for glass beads, but with time this value decreases gradually towards the asymptotic critical state value. The reason, we believe, lies in the fact that rice grains are strongly elongated; hence the time to achieve the stable μ is primarily controlled by the time for particles to align themselves with respect to the shear walls. Furthermore, the initial packing conditions of samples also plays a role in the evolution of μ when the shear strain is small, but that impact will eventually be erased after sufficient shear strain.

  15. A new look on blood shear thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Lanotte, Luca; Fromental, Jean-Marc; Mendez, Simon; Fedosov, Dmitry; Gompper, Gerhard; Mauer, Johannes; Claveria, Viviana

    2015-11-01

    Blood is a shear-thinning fluid. At shear rates γ˙ cells (RBCs). For higher γ˙ in the range 10 - 1000 s-1 , where RBCs flow as single elements, studies demonstrated that RBCs suspended in a viscous fluid mimicking the viscosity of whole blood, deformed into ellipsoids aligned steadily in the direction of the flow, while their membrane rotated about their center of mass like a tank-tread. Such drop-like behavior seemed to explain shear-thinning. Here, using rheometers, microfluidics and simulations, we show that the dynamics of single RBCs in plasma-like fluids display a different sequence of deformation for increasing shear rates going from discocytes to successively, stomatocytes, folded stomatocytes, trilobes and tetralobes, but never ellipsoids. This result is also identical for physiological hematocrits. We correlate this shape diagram to the different regimes in blood rheology for high shear rates and propose a new-look on the interpretation of blood shear-thinning behavior.

  16. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations.

  17. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  18. Shear thinning in non-Brownian suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatté, Guillaume; Comtet, Jean; Niguès, Antoine; Bocquet, Lydéric; Siria, Alessandro; Ducouret, Guylaine; Lequeux, François; Lenoir, Nicolas; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Colin, Annie

    2018-02-14

    We study the flow of suspensions of non-Brownian particles dispersed into a Newtonian solvent. Combining capillary rheometry and conventional rheometry, we evidence a succession of two shear thinning regimes separated by a shear thickening one. Through X-ray radiography measurements, we show that during each of those regimes, the flow remains homogeneous and does not involve particle migration. Using a quartz-tuning fork based atomic force microscope, we measure the repulsive force profile and the microscopic friction coefficient μ between two particles immersed into the solvent, as a function of normal load. Coupling measurements from those three techniques, we propose that (1) the first shear-thinning regime at low shear rates occurs for a lubricated rheology and can be interpreted as a decrease of the effective volume fraction under increasing particle pressures, due to short-ranged repulsive forces and (2) the second shear thinning regime after the shear-thickening transition occurs for a frictional rheology and can be interpreted as stemming from a decrease of the microscopic friction coefficient at large normal load.

  19. Panel and planar experimental shear behavior of wood panels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Panel and planar experimental shear behavior of wood panels laminated softwood oriented OSB conditioned at different environments. ... to that measured in the case of panel shear for different environments. Keywords : oriented strand board – panel shear strength- planar shear strength - environment – moisture content ...

  20. Evaluation of size dependent design shear strength of reinforced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mate shear strengths of reinforced concrete (RC) beams without web reinforcement. The shear strength ... percentage of flexural reinforcement and depth of the beam constant) as (i) deep beams with 0. < a/d ≤ 1, (ii) ... the shear strength of deep beams when the shear span-to-depth ratio was 1.0 (Tan & Lu 1999;. Walraven ...

  1. Exponential Shear Flow of Linear, Entangled Polymeric Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Park, Kyungho; Venerus, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A previously proposed reptation model is used to interpret exponential shear flow data taken on an entangled polystyrenesolution. Both shear and normal stress measurements are made during exponential shear using mechanical means. The model iscapable of explaining all trends seen in the data......, and suggests a novel analysis of the data. This analysis demonstrates thatexponential shearing flow is no more capable of stretching polymer chains than is inception of steady shear at comparableinstantaneous shear rates. In fact, all exponential shear flow stresses measured are bounded quantitatively...

  2. MiR-21 is induced in endothelial cells by shear stress and modulates apoptosis and eNOS activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Martina; Baker, Meredith B.; Moore, Jeffrey P.; Searles, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play an important role in regulating vascular signaling and gene expression in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. miRNAs are known to have an important role in modulating EC biology, but their expression and functions in cells subjected to shear stress conditions are unknown. We sought to determine the miRNA expression profile in human ECs subjected to unidirectional shear stress and define the role of miR-21 in shear stress-induced changes in EC function. TLDA array and qRT-PCR analysis performed on HUVECs exposed to prolonged unidirectional shear stress (USS, 24 h, 15 dynes/cm 2 ) identified 13 miRNAs whose expression was significantly upregulated (p · ) production. These data demonstrate that shear stress forces regulate the expression of miRNAs in ECs, and that miR-21 influences endothelial biology by decreasing apoptosis and activating the NO · pathway. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which shear stress forces modulate vascular homeostasis.

  3. Fluid shear stress primes mouse embryonic stem cells for differentiation in a self-renewing environment via heparan sulfate proteoglycans transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Yi-Chin; Voldman, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Shear stress is a ubiquitous environmental cue experienced by stem cells when they are being differentiated or expanded in perfusion cultures. However, its role in modulating self-renewing stem cell phenotypes is unclear, since shear is usually only studied in the context of cardiovascular differentiation. We used a multiplex microfluidic array, which overcomes the limitations of macroperfusion systems in shear application throughput and precision, to initiate a comprehensive, quantitative study of shear effects on self-renewing mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), where shear stresses varying by >1000 times (0.016-16 dyn/cm(2)) are applied simultaneously. When compared with static controls in the presence or absence of a saturated soluble environment (i.e., mESC-conditioned medium), we ascertained that flow-induced shear stress specifically up-regulates the epiblast marker Fgf5. Epiblast-state transition in mESCs involves heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which have also been shown to transduce shear stress in endothelial cells. By disrupting (with sulfation inhibitors and heparinase) and partially reconstituting (with heparin) HSPG function, we show that mESCs also mechanically sense shear stress via HSPGs to modulate Fgf5 expression. This study demonstrates that self-renewing mESCs possess the molecular machinery to sense shear stress and provides quantitative shear application benchmarks for future scalable stem cell culture systems.

  4. Effect of tree roots on a shear zone: modeling reinforced shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazutoki Abe; Robert R. Ziemer

    1991-01-01

    Tree roots provide important soil reinforcement that impoves the stability of hillslopes. After trees are cut and roots begin to decay, the frequency of slope failures can increase. To more fully understand the mechanics of how tree roots reinforce soil, fine sandy soil containing pine roots was placed in a large shear box in horizontal layers and sheared across a...

  5. Comparison of direct shear and simple shear responses of municipal solid waste in USA

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Xunchang

    2017-10-25

    Although large-size simple shear (SS) testing of municipal solid waste (MSW) may arguably provide a more realistic estimate of the shear strength (τ ) of MSW than the most commonly used direct shear (DS) testing, a systematic comparison between the shear responses of MSW obtained from the two testing methods is lacking. In this study, a large-size shear device was used to test identical MSW specimens sampled in USA in DS and SS. Eight DS tests and 11 SS tests were conducted at vertical effective stresses of 50–500 kPa. The stress–displacement response of MSW in SS testing was hyperbolic and a maximum shear stress was reached, whereas a maximum shear stress was not reached in most DS tests. The τ, effective friction angle (ϕ ′) and cohesion (c ′) of MSW were obtained from DS and SS tests by using a displacement failure criterion of 40 mm. τ in SS testing was found to be equal to or lower than τ in DS testing with ratios of τ between 73 and 101%. SS testing resulted in higher ϕ ′ but lower c ′ than DS testing. The shear strength parameters were lower than those obtained in previous studies from DS tests at 55 mm displacement.

  6. Extreme model reduction of shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qawasmeh, Bashar Rafee

    The aim of this research is to develop nonlinear low-dimensional models (LDMs) to describe vortex dynamics in shear layers. A modified Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD)/Galerkin projection method is developed to obtain models at extremely low dimension for shear layers. The idea is to dynamically scale the shear layer along y direction to factor out the shear layer growth and capture the dynamics by only a couple of modes. The models are developed for two flows, incompressible spatially developing and weakly compressible temporally developing shear layers, respectively. To capture basic dynamics, the low-dimensional models require only two POD modes for each wavenumber/frequency. Thus, a two-mode model is capable of representing single-wavenumber/frequency dynamics such as vortex roll-up, and a four-mode model is capable of representing the nonlinear dynamics involving a fundamental wavenumber/frequency and its subharmonic, such as vortex pairing/merging. Most of the energy is captured by the first mode of each wavenumber/frequency, the second POD mode, however, plays a critical role and needs to be included. In the thesis, we first apply the approach on temporally developing weakly compressible shear layers. In compressible flows, the thermodynamic variables are dynamically important, and must be considered. We choose isentropic Navier-Stokes equations for simplicity, and choose a proper inner product to present both kinetic energy and thermal energy. Two cases of convective Mach numbers are studied for low compressibility and moderate compressibility. Moreover, we study the sensitivity of the compressible four-mode model to several flow parameters: Mach number, the strength of initial perturbations of the fundamental and its subharmonic, and Reynolds number. Secondly we apply the approach on spatially developing incompressible shear layers with periodicity in time. We consider a streamwise parabolic form of the Navier-Stokes equations. When we add arbitrary

  7. Stochastic parametric resonance in shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Poulin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-periodic shear flows can give rise to Parametric Instability (PI, as in the case of the Mathieu equation (Stoker, 1950; Nayfeh and Mook, 1995. This mechanism results from a resonance between the oscillatory basic state and waves that are superimposed on it. Farrell and Ioannou (1996a, b explain that PI occurs because the snap-shots of the velocity profile are subject to transient growth. If the flows were purely steady the transient growth would subside and not have any long lasting effect. However, the coupling between transient growth and the time variation of the basic state create PI. Mathematically, transient growth, and therefore PI, are due to the nonorthogonal eigenspace in the linearized system. Poulin et al. (2003 studied a time-periodic barotropic shear flow that exhibited PI, and thereby produced mixing at the interface between Potential Vorticity (PV fronts. The instability led to the formation of vortices that were stretched. A later study of an oscillatory current in the Cape Cod Bay illustrated that PI can occur in realistic shear flows (Poulin and Flierl, 2005. These studies assumed that the basic state was periodic with a constant frequency and amplitude. In this work we study a shear flow similar to that found in Poulin et al. (2003, but now where the magnitude of vorticity is a stochastic variable. We determine that in the case of stochastic shear flows the transient growth of perturbations of the snapshots of the basic state still generate PI.

  8. Piezoelectric energy harvesting through shear mode operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are excellent candidates for use in energy harvesting applications due to their high electromechanical coupling properties that enable them to convert input mechanical energy into useful electric power. The electromechanical coupling coefficient of the piezoelectric material is one of the most significant parameters affecting energy conversion and is dependent on the piezoelectric mode of operation. In most piezoceramics, the d 15 piezoelectric shear coefficient is the highest coefficient compared to the commonly used axial and transverse modes that utilize the d 33 and the d 31 piezoelectric strain coefficients. However, complicated electroding methods and challenges in evaluating the performance of energy harvesting devices operating in the shear mode have slowed research in this area. The shear deformation of a piezoelectric layer can be induced in a vibrating sandwich beam with a piezoelectric core. Here, a model based on Timoshenko beam theory is developed to predict the electric power output from a cantilever piezoelectric sandwich beam under base excitations. It is shown that the energy harvester operating in the shear mode is able to generate ∼50% more power compared to the transverse mode for a numerical case study. Reduced models of both shear and transverse energy harvesters are obtained to determine the optimal load resistance in the system and perform an efficiency comparison between two models with fixed and adaptive resistances. (paper)

  9. Examining shear processes during magma ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Wallace, P. A.; Coats, R.; Lamur, A.; Lavallée, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Lava dome eruptions are prone to rapid shifts from effusive to explosive behaviour which reflects the rheology of magma. Magma rheology is governed by composition, porosity and crystal content, which during ascent evolves to yield a rock-like, viscous suspension in the upper conduit. Geophysical monitoring, laboratory experiments and detailed field studies offer the opportunity to explore the complexities associated with the ascent and eruption of such magmas, which rest at a pivotal position with regard to the glass transition, allowing them to either flow or fracture. Crystal interaction during flow results in strain-partitioning and shear-thinning behaviour of the suspension. In a conduit, such characteristics favour the formation of localised shear zones as strain is concentrated along conduit margins, where magma can rupture and heal in repetitive cycles. Sheared magmas often record a history of deformation in the form of: grain size reduction; anisotropic permeable fluid pathways; mineral reactions; injection features; recrystallisation; and magnetic anomalies, providing a signature of the repetitive earthquakes often observed during lava dome eruptions. The repetitive fracture of magma at ( fixed) depth in the conduit and the fault-like products exhumed at spine surfaces indicate that the last hundreds of meters of ascent may be controlled by frictional slip. Experiments on a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus indicate that shear stress on a slip plane is highly velocity dependent, and here we examine how this influences magma ascent and its characteristic geophysical signals.

  10. Evaluation of shear mounted elastomeric damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, E.; Walton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Viton-70 elastomeric shear mounted damper was built and tested on a T-55 power turbine spool in the rotor's high speed balancing rig. This application of a shear mounted elastomeric damper demonstrated for the first time, the feasibility of using elastomers as the primary rotor damping source in production turbine engine hardware. The shear damper design was selected because it was compatible with actual gas turbine engine radial space constraints, could accommodate both the radial and axial thrust loads present in gas turbine engines, and was capable of controlled axial preload. The shear damper was interchangeable with the production T-55 power turbine roller bearing support so that a direct comparison between the shear damper and the production support structure could be made. Test results show that the Viton-70 elastomer damper operated successfully and provided excellent control of both synchronous and nonsynchronous vibrations through all phases of testing up to the maximum rotor speed of 16,000 rpm. Excellent correlation between the predicted and experienced critical speeds, mode shapes and log decrements for the power turbine rotor and elastomer damper assembly was also achieved.

  11. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    An electrostatic ion cyclotron instability driven by sheared velocity flow perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field is investigated in the local approximation. The dispersion equation, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter, is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and solved numerically. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (but modified by the shear) with the growth rate of the individual harmonics overlapping in wavenumber. At small values of the shear parameter, the instability exists in two branches, one at long wavelength, κρ i ∼ 0.5, and one at short wavelength, κρ i > 1.5 (κρ i is the wavenumber normalized to the ion gyroradius). At larger values of the shear parameter only the longer wavelength branch persists. The growth rate of the long wavelength mode, maximized over wavenumber and frequency, increases monotonically with the shear parameter. Properties of the instability are compared to those of Ganguli et al. obtained in the nonlocal limit

  12. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  13. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, William Dodd (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  14. Characterization of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown in a low-shear modeled microgravity environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierson Duane L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extra-cellular shear force is an important environmental parameter that is significant both medically and in the space environment. Escherichia coli cells grown in a low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG environment produced in a high aspect rotating vessel (HARV were subjected to transcriptional and physiological analysis. Results Aerobic LSMMG cultures were grown in rich (LB and minimal (MOPS + glucose medium with a normal gravity vector HARV control. Reproducible changes in transcription were seen, but no specific LSMMG responsive genes were identified. Instead, absence of shear and a randomized gravity vector appears to cause local extra-cellular environmental changes, which elicit reproducible cellular responses. In minimal media, the majority of the significantly up- or down-regulated genes of known function were associated with the cell envelope. In rich medium, most LSMMG down-regulated genes were involved in translation. No observable changes in post-culture stress responses and antibiotic sensitivity were seen in cells immediately after exposure to LSMMG. Comparison with earlier studies of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium conducted under similar growth conditions, revealed essentially no similarity in the genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated. Conclusion Comparison of these results to previous studies suggests that different organisms may dramatically differ in their responses to medically significant low-shear and space environments. Depending on their specific response, some organisms, such as Salmonella, may become preadapted in a manner that predisposes them to increased virulence.

  15. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  16. Mobility and invasiveness of metastatic esophageal cancer are potentiated by shear stress in a ROCK- and Ras-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Karen; Foran, Eilis; O'Sullivan, Gerald; Long, Aideen; Kenny, Dermot

    2006-10-01

    To metastasize, tumor cells must adopt different morphological responses to resist shear forces encountered in circulating blood and invade through basement membranes. The Rho and Ras GTPases play a critical role in regulating this dynamic behavior. Recently, we demonstrated shear-induced activation of adherent esophageal metastatic cells, characterized by formation of dynamic membrane blebs. Although membrane blebbing has only recently been characterized as a rounded mode of cellular invasion promoted through Rho kinase (ROCK), the role of shear forces in modulating membrane blebbing activity is unknown. To further characterize membrane blebbing in esophageal metastatic cells (OC-1 cell line), we investigated the role of shear in cytoskeletal remodeling and signaling through ROCK and Ras. Our results show that actin and tubulin colocalize to the cortical ring of the OC-1 cell under static conditions. However, under shear, actin acquires a punctuate distribution and tubulin localizes to the leading edge of the OC-1 cell. We show for the first time that dynamic bleb formation is induced by shear alone independent of integrin-mediated adhesion (P Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, causes a significant reduction in shear-induced bleb formation and inhibits integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-Ras colocalization at the leading edge of the cell. Direct measurement of Ras activation shows that the level of GTP-bound Ras is elevated in sheared OC-1 cells and that the shear-induced increase in Ras activity is inhibited by Y-27632. Finally, we show that shear stress significantly increases OC-1 cell invasion (P Y-27632. Together our findings suggest a novel physiological role for ROCK and Ras in metastatic cell behavior.

  17. Transversely Compressed- and Restrained Shear Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    2013-01-01

    Anchorage of FRP strengthening systems where the deformation perpendicular to the FRP material is restrained or a compressive force is applied on the strengthening, seems to provide ductility, increased utilization of the FRP and failure modes which can be controlled through the anchorage method....... This paper presents theoretical model which can predict the response of transversely compressed and restrained single- and double lap shear joints. The interface material model is based on a cohesive law in the shear-slip plane with a descending branch and a uniform frictional stress added due...... to the friction in the crack, emanating from the transverse pressure or restraint. The theoretical model is compared with experimental results from transversely compressed single- and double shear joints. Also theoretical predictions of a mechanical integrated sleeve-wedge anchorage load capacity are carried out...

  18. On shear rheology of gel propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Shai; Peretz, Arie [RAFAEL, MANOR Propulsion and Explosive Systems Division, Haifa (Israel); Natan, Benveniste [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2007-04-15

    Selected fuel, oxidizer and simulant gels were prepared and rheologically characterized using a rotational rheometer. For fuel gelation both organic and inorganic gellants were utilized, whereas oxidizers and simulants were gelled with addition of silica and polysaccharides, respectively. The generalized Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model was found to most adequately represent the gels studied. Hydrazine-based fuels, gelled with polysaccharides, were characterized as shear-thinning pseudoplastic fluids with low shear yield stress, whereas inhibited red-fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) and hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, gelled with silica, were characterized as yield thixotropic fluids with significant shear yield stress. Creep tests were conducted on two rheological types of gels with different gellant content and the results were fitted by Burgers-Kelvin viscoelastic constitutive model. The effect of temperature on the rheological properties of gel propellant simulants was also investigated. A general rheological classification of gel propellants and simulants is proposed. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.

    2013-05-29

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle\\'s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  20. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different combinat......Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different...

  1. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, H. P., E-mail: patel.harshal2@gmail.com; Thakor, P. B., E-mail: pbthakore@rediffmail.com; Prajapati, A. V., E-mail: anand0prajapati@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India); Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yas@ashd.svnit.ac.in [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  2. Mesoscale hydrodynamic modeling of a colloid in shear-thinning viscoelastic fluids under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shichen; Jiang, Run; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-07

    In order to study the dynamics of colloidal suspensions with viscoelastic solvents, a simple mesoscopic model of the solvent is required. We propose to extend the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) technique--a particle-based simulation method, which has been successfully applied to study the hydrodynamic behavior of many complex fluids with Newtonian solvent--to shear-thinning viscoelastic solvents. Here, the normal MPC particles are replaced by dumbbells with finite-extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) springs. We have studied the properties of FENE-dumbbell fluids under simple shear flow with shear rate ̇γ. The stress tensor is calculated, and the viscosity η and the first normal-stress coefficient Ψ(1) are obtained. Shear-thinning behavior is found for reduced shear rates Γ= ̇γτ>1, where τ is a characteristic dumbbell relaxation time. Here, both η and Ψ(1) display power-law behavior in the shear-thinning regime. Thus, the FENE-dumbbell fluid with MPC collisions provides a good description of viscoelastic fluids. As a first application, we study the flow behavior of a colloid in a shear-thinning viscoelastic fluid in two dimensions. A slowing down of the colloid rotation in a viscoelastic fluid compared to a Newtonian fluid is obtained, in agreement with recent numerical calculations and experimental results. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. Shear thinning and shear thickening of a confined suspension of vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Ouhra, A.; Farutin, A.; Aouane, O.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Misbah, C.

    2018-01-01

    Widely regarded as an interesting model system for studying flow properties of blood, vesicles are closed membranes of phospholipids that mimic the cytoplasmic membranes of red blood cells. In this study we analyze the rheology of a suspension of vesicles in a confined geometry: the suspension, bound by two planar rigid walls on each side, is subject to a shear flow. Flow properties are then analyzed as a function of shear rate γ ˙, the concentration of the suspension ϕ , and the viscosity contrast λ =ηin/ηout , where ηin and ηout are the fluid viscosities of the inner and outer fluids, respectively. We find that the apparent (or effective viscosity) of the suspension exhibits both shear thinning (decreasing viscosity with shear rate) or shear thickening (increasing viscosity with shear rate) in the same concentration range. The shear thinning or thickening behaviors appear as subtle phenomena, dependant on viscosity contrast λ . We provide physical arguments on the origins of these behaviors.

  4. Acute shear stress direction dictates adherent cell remodeling and verifies shear profile of spinning disk assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disk chamber or ‘spinning disk’ in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. (paper)

  5. Tailoring hydrogel surface properties to modulate cellular response to shear loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, Christoph; Schrobback, Karsten; Levett, Peter A; Lutton, Cameron; Sah, Robert L; Klein, Travis J

    2017-04-01

    Biological tissues at articulating surfaces, such as articular cartilage, typically have remarkable low-friction properties that limit tissue shear during movement. However, these frictional properties change with trauma, aging, and disease, resulting in an altered mechanical state within the tissues. Yet, it remains unclear how these surface changes affect the behaviour of embedded cells when the tissue is mechanically loaded. Here, we developed a cytocompatible, bilayered hydrogel system that permits control of surface frictional properties without affecting other bulk physicochemical characteristics such as compressive modulus, mass swelling ratio, and water content. This hydrogel system was applied to investigate the effect of variations in surface friction on the biological response of human articular chondrocytes to shear loading. Shear strain in these hydrogels during dynamic shear loading was significantly higher in high-friction hydrogels than in low-friction hydrogels. Chondrogenesis was promoted following dynamic shear stimulation in chondrocyte-encapsulated low-friction hydrogel constructs, whereas matrix synthesis was impaired in high-friction constructs, which instead exhibited increased catabolism. Our findings demonstrate that the surface friction of tissue-engineered cartilage may act as a potent regulator of cellular homeostasis by governing the magnitude of shear deformation during mechanical loading, suggesting a similar relationship may also exist for native articular cartilage. Excessive mechanical loading is believed to be a major risk factor inducing pathogenesis of articular cartilage and other load-bearing tissues. Yet, the mechanisms leading to increased transmission of mechanical stimuli to cells embedded in the tissue remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that the tribological properties of loadbearing tissues regulate cellular behaviour by governing the magnitude of mechanical deformation arising from physiological tissue

  6. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Expression of Smac/DIABLO in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Le; Sun, Liang-Liang; Meng, Xiang-Lan; Zhao, Yun; Jin, Xin

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of laminar shear stress on inhibition of apoptosis in endothelial cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were starved in medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum and 20 dyne/cm(2) shear stress. HUVECs were subjected to shear stress or incubated in a static condition and then Smac/DIABLO expression was quantified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, real-time PCR, and western blot. The effect of shear stress on the migration of Smac/DIABLO proteins was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results demonstrated that 20 dyne/cm(2) shear stress inhibited the expression of Smac/DIABLO at both the mRNA and protein levels in cultured HUVECs. Furthermore, release of Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria was induced by removal of basic fibroblast growth factor and decrease of fetal bovine serum in the medium, whereas shear stress inhibited its release under the same conditions. These results suggest that down-regulation of Smac/DIABLO may contribute to the potent antiatherosclerotic effect of shear stress by preventing endothelial cells from entering apoptosis.

  7. [Exercise-induced shear stress: Physiological basis and clinical impact].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Romero, Fernando; Saavedra, María Javiera

    2016-01-01

    The physiological regulation of vascular function is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, where an imbalance between synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is one of its main mechanisms. In this context, the shear stress is one of the most important mechanical stimuli to improve vascular function, due to endothelial mechanotransduction, triggered by stimulation of various endothelial mechanosensors, induce signaling pathways culminating in increased bioavailability of vasodilators molecules such as nitric oxide, that finally trigger the angiogenic mechanisms. These mechanisms allow providing the physiological basis for the effects of exercise on vascular health. In this review it is discussed the molecular mechanisms involved in the vascular response induced by shear stress and its impact in reversing vascular injury associated with the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in our population. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Test and Analysis of a New Ductile Shear Connection Design for RC Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new and construction-friendly shear connection for assembly of precast reinforced concrete shear wall elements. In the proposed design, the precast elements have indented interfaces and are connected by a narrow zone grouted with mortar and reinforced with overlapping U......-bar loops. Contrary to the classical shear connections, the planes of the U-bar loops are here parallel to the plane of the wall elements. This feature enables a construction-friendly installation of the elements without the risk of rebars clashing. The core of mortar inside each U-bar loop is reinforced...

  9. Analysis of the Shear Behavior of Stubby Y-Type Perfobond Rib Shear Connectors for a Composite Frame Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hyo; Kim, Kun-Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seung; Han, Oneil

    2017-11-22

    Shear connectors are used in steel beam-concrete slabs of composite frame and bridge structures to transfer shear force according to design loads. The existing Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors are designed for girder slabs of composite bridges. Therefore, the rib and transverse rebars of the conventional Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors are extremely large for the composite frames of building structures. Thus, this paper proposes stubby Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors, redefining the existing connectors, for composite frames of building structures; these were used to perform push-out tests. These shear connectors have relatively small ribs compared to the conventional Y-type perfobond rib shear connectors. To confirm the shear resistance of these stubby shear connectors, we performed an experiment by using transverse rebars D13 and D16. The results indicate that these shear connectors have suitable shear strength and ductility for application in composite frame structures. The shear strengths obtained using D13 and D16 were not significantly different. However, the ductility of the shear connectors with D16 was 45.1% higher than that of the shear connectors with D13.

  10. Purinergic signaling is required for fluid shear stress-induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genetos, Damian C., E-mail: dgenetos@ucdavis.edu [Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology, and Physiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Karin, Norman J. [Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Geist, Derik J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Donahue, Henry J. [Division of Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States); Duncan, Randall L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. We examined whether this process was under the control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-{kappa}B. Under fluid shear stress, I{kappa}B{alpha} levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in I{kappa}B{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X{sub 7} receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X{sub 7}-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-{kappa}B activity through the P2Y{sub 6} and P2X{sub 7} receptor.

  11. Inhomogeneities in sheared ultrathin lubricating films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manias, E; Hadziioannou, G; ten Brinke, G.

    1996-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations have been used to study nanoscopically confined oligomer films under shear. Beyond the well-known density layering across such films, other structural and dynamical inhomogeneities exist across such films and are discussed here. When these films

  12. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  13. Vane shear test for cohesionless soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Sik; An, Zhou; Ye, Sung-Ryol; Lee, Sae-Byeok; Chae, Kyung-Hyeon

    2015-04-01

    The vane shear test (VST) is a simple and rapid testing method for determining the undrained shear strength of cohesive soils. It has not been applied for granular soils because the failure surface was irregular and hardly determined due to their cohesionless property. In this study, the VST was used to determine the shear strength of cohesionless soils such as sand. A small laboratory vane with 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in height was inserted into sand within pressurized cell. When the vane rotates within sand, a failure surface can be assumed to be cylindrical shape because the sand is pressurized with loading frame. Dry Nakdong River sand was prepared for loose and dense conditions in the cell and the axial pressure of 50, 100, and 200 kPa was applied on the surface of sand. The relationship between measured torque and resistant force along cylindrical shape due to friction of sand was derived and the internal friction angle of sand was determined for loose and dense conditions. It was possible for the VST to determine the shear strength of sand under confined condition.

  14. Lightweight concrete modification factor for shear friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This report describes the results of a study initiated to examine the influence of concrete unit weight on the direct shear transfer across an interface of concretes cast at different times. This type of interface is common with structural precast co...

  15. Size Segregation in Sheared Jammed Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbi, Armstrong; Blair, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that granular materials can spontaneously size segregate when continuously driven. However, in jammed colloidal suspensions, this phenomenon is not well understood. Colloidal dispersions provide a unique system to study the structure and dynamics of jammed matter. In this talk, we present results of size segregation of a continuously sheared binary colloidal suspension well above point J. Our colloidal system is comprised of indexed-matched bi-disperse silica particles with diameters a = { 2 . 3 μm and 3 . 2 μm } and at ϕ 61 % , well above the colloidal glass transition. We apply a highly controlled shear at a constant shear rate through the use of a rheometer. By coupling our rheometer with a high-speed laser scanning confocal microscope, we directly image the structure and flow profiles of the suspension as it un-jams. We observe migration of the small and large species; large particles move to the top while the small particles move toward the bottom conserving the total volume fraction in all regions. Moreover, we find that an associating feature of segregation is a sustained shear band. Our results are consistent with a recently proposed void filling and squeeze expulsion mechanism. Funding is provided by NSF DMR #0847490.

  16. Shear-wave splitting and moonquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimech, J. L.; Weber, R. C.; Savage, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    Shear-wave splitting is a powerful tool for measuring anisotropy in the Earth's crust and mantle, and is sensitive to geological features such as fluid filled cracks, thin alternating layers of rock with different elastic properties, and preferred mineral orientations caused by strain. Since a shear wave splitting measurement requires only a single 3-component seismic station, it has potential applications for future single-station planetary seismic missions, such as the InSight geophysical mission to Mars, as well as possible future missions to Europa and the Moon. Here we present a preliminary shear-wave splitting analysis of moonquakes detected by the Apollo Passive Seismic Experiment. Lunar seismic data suffers from several drawbacks compared to modern terrestrial data, including severe seismic scattering, low intrinsic attenuation, 10-bit data resolution, thermal spikes, and timing errors. Despite these drawbacks, we show that it is in principle possible to make a shear wave splitting measurement using the S-phase arrival of a relatively high-quality moonquake, as determined by several agreeing measurement criteria. Encouraged by this finding, we further extend our analysis to clusters of "deep moonquake" events by stacking multiple events from the same cluster together to further enhance the quality of the S-phase arrivals that the measurement is based on.

  17. Shearing DNA for genomic library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengen, P N

    1997-07-01

    Methods and reagents is a unique monthly column that highlights current discussion in the newsgroup bionet.molibio.methds-reagnts, available on the internet. This month's column discusses the pros and cons of various techniques used to shear DNA for shotgun cloning. For details on how to partake in the newsgroup, see the accompanying box.

  18. ESTIMATION OF SHEAR STRENGTH PARAMETERS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work seeks to develop models for predicting the shear strength parameters (cohesion and angle of friction) of lateritic soils in central and southern areas of Delta State using artificial neural network modeling technique. The application of these models will help reduce cost and time in acquiring geotechnical ...

  19. Structural relaxation monitored by instantaneous shear modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1998-01-01

    time definition based on a recently proposed expression for the relaxation time, where G [infinity] reflects the fictive temperature. All parameters entering the reduced time were determined from independent measurements of the frequency-dependent shear modulus of the equilibrium liquid....

  20. Measurement of cavitation induced wall shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, R.J.; Ohl, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    The wall shear stress from cavitation bubbles collapsing close to a rigid boundary is measured with a constant temperature anemometer. The bubble is created with focused laser light, and its dynamics is observed with high-speed photography. By correlating the frames, a hydrophone signal, and the

  1. Longitudinal shear vibrations of composite poroelastic cylinders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employing Biot's theory of wave propagation in liquid saturated porous media, longitudinal shear vibrations of composite poroelastic cylinders of infinite extent are investigated. The composite poroelastic cylinder is made of two different poroelastic materials. The dilatations of liquid and solid media are zero, hence liquid ...

  2. Shear localization and microstructure in coarse grained beta titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingfeng, E-mail: biw009@ucsd.edu [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, United States of America (United States); Key Lab of Nonferrous Materials, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Wang, Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Li, Zezhou [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, United States of America (United States); Ma, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zhao, Shiteng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, United States of America (United States); Xie, Fangyu [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2016-01-15

    Adiabatic shear localization plays an important role in the deformation and failure of the coarse grained beta titanium alloy Ti-5 Al-5 Mo-5 V-1 Cr-1 Fe with grain size about 1 mm at high strain rate deformation. Hat shaped specimens with different nominal shear strains are used to induce the formation of shear bands under the controlled shock-loading experiments. The true stress in the specimens can reach about 1040 MPa where the strain is about 1.83. The whole shear localization process lasts about 35 μs. The microstructures within the shear band are investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy / electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the width of the shear bands decreases with increasing nominal shear strain, and the grains in the transition region near the shear band are elongated along the shear band, and the core of the shear band consists of the ultrafine deformed grains with width of 0.1 μm and heavy dislocations. With the aims of accommodating the imposed shear strain and maintaining neighboring grain compatibility, the grain subdivision continues to take place within the band. A fiber texture is formed in the core of the shear band. The calculated temperature rise in the shear band can reach about 722 K. Dynamic recovery is responsible for the formation of the microstructure in coarse grained beta titanium alloy.

  3. Divergent responses of chondrocytes and endothelial cells to shear stress: Cross-talk among COX-2, the phase 2 response, and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Zachary R.; Lee, Norman H.; Gao, Xiangqun; Goldring, Mary B.; Talalay, Paul; Kensler, Thomas W.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    Fluid shear exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on endothelial cells by inducing the coordinated expression of phase 2 detoxifying and antioxidant genes. In contrast, high shear is pro-apoptotic in chondrocytes and promotes matrix degradation and cartilage destruction. We have analyzed the mechanisms regulating shear-mediated chondrocyte apoptosis by cDNA microarray technology and bioinformatics. We demonstrate that shear-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 suppresses phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) activity, which represses antioxidant response element (ARE)/NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated transcriptional response in human chondrocytes. The resultant decrease in antioxidant capacity of sheared chondrocytes contributes to their apoptosis. Phase 2 inducers, and to a lesser extent COX-2-selective inhibitors, negate the shear-mediated suppression of ARE-driven phase 2 activity and apoptosis. The abrogation of shear-induced COX-2 expression by PI3-K activity and/or stimulation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway suggests the existence of PI3-K/Nrf2/ARE negative feedback loops that potentially interfere with c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 activity upstream of COX-2. Reconstructing the signaling network regulating shear-induced chondrocyte apoptosis may provide insights to optimize conditions for culturing artificial cartilage in bioreactors and for developing therapeutic strategies for arthritic disorders. PMID:16172382

  4. Dynamics of microcapsules in oscillating shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengye; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2011-11-01

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study on the dynamics of deformable capsules in sinusoidally oscillating shear flow. We consider capsules of spherical and oblate spheroid resting shapes. For spherical resting shapes, we find an identical deformation response during positive and negative vorticities. However, the deformation response becomes unequal and shows complex behavior for nonspherical resting shapes. The average elongation is higher in the retarding phase of the shear flow than in the accelerating phase. Primarily two types of dynamics are observed for nonspherical shapes: a clockwise/counter-clockwise swinging motion in response to the altering flow direction that occurs at both high and low values of shear rate amplitudes, and a continuous/unidirectional tumbling motion that occurs at intermediate values. The unidirectional tumbling motion occurs despite the fact that the time-average vorticity is zero. Such a tumbling motion is accompanied by a continuous tank-treading motion of the membrane in the opposite direction. We obtain phase diagram that shows existence of two critical shear rates and two oscillation frequencies. The unidirectional tumbling motion occurs in the intermediate range, and the clockwise/counter-clockwise swinging motion occurs otherwise. We also find that the dynamics is highly sensitive to the initial condition. A swinging is generally observed when the capsule is released aligned with the extensional or compressional axis of the shear flow, and a tumbling is observed otherwise. These results suggest the possibility of chaotic behavior of cells in time-dependent flows. We provide explanations of such complex dynamics by analyzing the coupling between the shape and angular oscillation and the imposed flow oscillation.

  5. Test and Analysis of a New Ductile Shear Connection Design for RC Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Hoang, Linh Cao; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new and construction-friendly shear connection for assembly of precast reinforced concrete shear wall elements. In the proposed design, the precast elements have indented interfaces and are connected by a narrow zone grouted with mortar and reinforced with overlapping U......-bar loops. Contrary to the classical shear connections, the planes of the U-bar loops are here parallel to the plane of the wall elements. This feature enables a construction-friendly installation of the elements without the risk of rebars clashing. The core of mortar inside each U-bar loop is reinforced...... with a transverse double T-headed bar to ensure transfer of tension between the overlapping U-bars. Push-off tests show that a significantly ductile load-displacement response can be obtained by the new solution as compared to the performance of the conventional keyed shear connection design. The influence...

  6. Shear Stress Inhibits Apoptosis of Ischemic Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiafeng Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke, to restore or increase cerebral blood flow (CBF is the most fundamental option. Laminar shear stress (LS, as an important force generated by CBF, mainly acts on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. In order to study whether LS was a protective factor in stroke, we investigated LS-intervented ischemic apoptosis of rat BMECs (rBMECs through PE Annexin V/7-AAD, JC-1 and Hoechst 33258 staining to observe the membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear dysfunction. Real-time PCR and western blot were also used to test the gene and protein expressions of Tie-2, Bcl-2 and Akt, which were respectively related to maintain membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear norm. The results showed that LS could be a helpful stimulus for ischemic rBMECs survival. Simultaneously, membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear regulation played an important role in this process.

  7. The effect of shearing rate and slope angle on the simple shear response of marine clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscontin, G.; Rutherford, C.

    2010-12-01

    The response of submarine slopes to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and local tsunami hazard. Evaluation of submarine slope stability requires characterization of soil behavior and relies on the selection of appropriate parameter values. Although the traditional simple shear device has been used to investigate cyclic loading effects on marine clay, it does not allow for complex loading conditions which often contribute to the failure on submarine slopes. Understanding the interaction between the initial shear stress, the slope angle, and the multi-directional shaking due to earthquakes or storm loading is an important aspect to understanding the failure mechanisms of submarine slope failures. The initial static driving force on the slope is combined with the dynamic loading by storms and earthquakes to create complex loading paths. Therefore, the ability to apply complex stress or strain paths is important to fully study the shear response of marine clays on submarine slopes. A new multi-directional simple shear device developed at Texas A&M University allows loading along three independent axes, two perpendicular horizontal directions to allow any stress or strain paths in the horizontal plane, and a third in the vertical direction. This device is used to investigate the response of Gulf of Mexico marine deposits to different loading conditions. To study the effect of slope angle on the shear response of the soil, samples are subjected to a shear stress during consolidation, Kα consolidation. One-dimensional monotonic and cyclic shearing of Ko consolidated specimens is used to simulate level ground conditions, whereas sloping surfaces were simulated using Kα consolidation for both monotonic and cyclic tests. The effects of shearing rate on the soil response are investigated using strain controlled tests at varying frequencies.

  8. Validation of a Perturbed-Continuum Model for Shear Localization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iyer, K; Schoenfeld, S; Casem, D; Wright, T

    2004-01-01

    .... Experiments and continuum analysis (Wright, 2002) have shown sudden stress collapse via shear localization may be related to velocity or strain rate perturbations in the vicinity of shear band initiation...

  9. Robust Kalman filter design for predictive wind shear detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Alexander D.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    Severe, low-altitude wind shear is a threat to aviation safety. Airborne sensors under development measure the radial component of wind along a line directly in front of an aircraft. In this paper, optimal estimation theory is used to define a detection algorithm to warn of hazardous wind shear from these sensors. To achieve robustness, a wind shear detection algorithm must distinguish threatening wind shear from less hazardous gustiness, despite variations in wind shear structure. This paper presents statistical analysis methods to refine wind shear detection algorithm robustness. Computational methods predict the ability to warn of severe wind shear and avoid false warning. Comparative capability of the detection algorithm as a function of its design parameters is determined, identifying designs that provide robust detection of severe wind shear.

  10. Heat Treatment of Al 7075 for Ejection Seat Shear Wire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    .... Current lots of Al 6061 could not duplicate the double shear breaking load values and so it was attempted to achieve the required double shear breaking load in the Al 7075 alloy with a stable microstructure...

  11. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    horizontal continental shelf. Measurements of bed shear stress, surface elevation and flow velocities were carried out. Periodic waves were also generated and the bed shear stresses measured over a horizontal bed were found to be comparable with the earlier...

  12. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations.

  13. Influence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator on expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Infections of the respiratory tract are a hallmark in CF. The host immune responses in CF are not adequate to eradicate pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. Dendritic cells (DC are crucial in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Changes in DC function could contribute to abnormal immune responses on multiple levels. The role of DC in CF lung disease remains unknown. Methods This study investigated the expression of CFTR gene in bone marrow-derived DC. We compared the differentiation and maturation profile of DC from CF and wild type (WT mice. We analyzed the gene expression levels in DC from naive CF and WT mice or following P. aeruginosa infection. Results CFTR is expressed in DC with lower level compared to lung tissue. DC from CF mice showed a delayed in the early phase of differentiation. Gene expression analysis in DC generated from naive CF and WT mice revealed decreased expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav1, a membrane lipid raft protein, in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Consistently, protein and activity levels of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, a negative regulator of Cav1 expression, were increased in CF DC. Following exposure to P. aeruginosa, expression of 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7 and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2, two enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism that are also regulated by SREBP, was less decreased in the CF DC compared to WT DC. Conclusion These results suggest that CFTR dysfunction in DC affects factors involved in membrane structure and lipid-metabolism, which may contribute to the abnormal inflammatory and immune response characteristic of CF.

  14. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased fuel costs, heightened environmental protection requirements, and noise abatement continue to place drag reduction at the forefront of aerospace research priorities. Unfortunately, shortfalls still exist in the fundamental understanding of boundary-layer airflow over aerodynamic surfaces, especially regarding drag arising from skin friction. For example, there is insufficient availability of instrumentation to adequately characterize complex flows with strong pressure gradients, heat transfer, wall mass flux, three-dimensionality, separation, shock waves, and transient phenomena. One example is the acoustic liner efficacy on aircraft engine nacelle walls. Active measurement of shear stress in boundary layer airflow would enable a better understanding of how aircraft structure and flight dynamics affect skin friction. Current shear stress measurement techniques suffer from reliability, complexity, and airflow disruption, thereby compromising resultant shear stress data. The state-of-the-art for shear stress sensing uses indirect or direct measurement techniques. Indirect measurements (e.g., hot-wire, heat flux gages, oil interferometry, laser Doppler anemometry, small scale pressure drag surfaces, i.e., fences) require intricate knowledge of the studied flow, restrictive instrument arrangements, large surface areas, flow disruption, or seeding material; with smaller, higher bandwidth probes under development. Direct measurements involve strain displacement of a sensor element and require no prior knowledge of the flow. Unfortunately, conventional "floating" recessed components for direct measurements are mm to cm in size. Whispering gallery mode devices and Fiber Bragg Gratings are examples of recent additions to this type of sensor with much smaller (?m) sensor components. Direct detection techniques are often single point measurements and difficult to calibrate and implement in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the wiring, packaging, and installation

  15. Relaxation of jammed colloidal suspensions after shear cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Francesca; Lasne, David; Sarcia, Régis; Hébraud, Pascal

    2006-07-01

    The dynamics of heterogeneities in a shear thickening, concentrated colloidal suspension is investigated through speckle visibility spectroscopy, a dynamic light scattering technique recently introduced [P. K. Dixon and D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 184302 (2003)]. Formation of shear-induced heterogeneities is observed in the jamming regime, and their relaxation after shear cessation is monitored as a function of the applied shear stress. The relaxation time of these heterogeneities increases when a higher stress is applied.

  16. Research Status on Bonding Behavior of Prefabricated Concrete Shear Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Shanshan

    2018-03-01

    Prefabricated shear wall structure adapts to the development and requirements of China’s residential industrialization. The key to the prefabricated concrete shear wall structure is the connection between the prefabricated members, where the reliability of the connection of the concrete joint is related to the overall performance and seismic effect of the structure. In this paper, the microstructures of the joint surface and shear properties are analysed, and the formula for calculating the shear strength of the joint is obtained.

  17. Separate structure of two branches of sheared slab ηi mode and effects of plasma rotation shear in weak magnetic shear region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiquan Li; Kishimoto, Y.; Tuda, T.

    2000-01-01

    The separate structure of two branches of the sheared slab η i mode near the minimum-q magnetic surface is analysed and the effects of plasma rotation shears are considered in the weak magnetic shear region. Results show that the separation condition depends on the non-monotonous q profile and the deviation of rational surface from the minimum-q surface. Furthermore, it is found that the diamagnetic rotation shear may suppress the perturbation of the sheared slab η i mode at one side of the minimum-q surface, the poloidal rotation shear from the sheared E-vector x B-vector flow has a similar role to the slab mode structure when it possesses a direction same as the diamagnetic shear. A plausible interrelation between the separate structures of the two branches of the sheared slab mode and the discontinuity or gap of the radially global structure of the drift wave near the minimum-q surface observed in the toroidal particle simulation (Kishimoto Y et al 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 40 A663) is discussed. It seems to support such a viewpoint: the double or/and global branches of the sheared slab η i mode near the minimum-q surface may become a bridge to connect the radially global structures of the drift wave at two sides of the minimum-q surface and the discontinuity may originate from the separate structures of these slab modes for a flatter q profile. (author)

  18. Spatially-resolved microstructure in shear banding wormlike micellar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgeson, Matthew E.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Wagner, Norman J.; Kaler, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently proposed theories for shear banding in wormlike micellar solutions (WLMs) rely on a shear-induced isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase separation as the mechanism for banding. Critical tests of such theories require spatially-resolved measurements of flow-kinematics and local mesoscale microstructure within the shear bands. We have recently developed such capabilities using a short gap Couette cell for flow-small angle neutron scattering (flow-SANS) measurements in the 1-2 plane of shear with collaborators at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. This work combines flow-SANS measurements with rheology, rheo-optics and velocimetry measurements to present the first complete spatially-resolved study of WLMs through the shear banding transition for a model shear banding WLM solution near the I-N phase boundary. The shear rheology is well-modeled by the Giesekus constitutive equation, with incorporated stress diffusion to predict shear banding. By fitting the stress diffusivity at the onset of banding, the model enables prediction of velocity profiles in the shear banded state which are in quantitative agreement with measured flow-kinematics. Quantitative analysis of the flow-SANS measurements shows a critical segmental alignment for banding and validates the Giesekus model predictions, linking segmental orientation to shear banding and providing the first rigorous evidence for the shear-induced I-N transition mechanism for shear banding

  19. Modified bond model for shear in slabs under concentrated loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.; Van der Veen, C.; De Boer, A.

    2015-01-01

    Slabs subjected to concentrated loads close to supports, as occurring for truck loads on slab bridges, are less studied than beams in shear or slab-column connections in punching. To predict the shear capacity for this case, the Bond Model for concentric punching shear was studied initially.

  20. [Biomechanic shear stress in carotid arteries and atherosclerosis development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierski, Radosław

    2003-01-01

    One of the major hemodynamic forces acting on blood vessels is shear stress, which is, the friction force between the endothelial cell surface and flowing blood. Arterial shear stress within physiologic range (15-70 dyne/cm2) induces endothelial quiescence and an atheroprotective gene expression profile. Low shear stress ( 70 dyne/cm2) induce prothrombotic state.

  1. Diagonal Cracking and Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping

    1997-01-01

    The shear failure of non-shear-reinforced concrete beams with normal shear span ratios is observed to be governed in general by the formation of a critical diagonal crack. Under the hypothesis that the cracking of concrete introduces potential yield lines which may be more dangerous than the ones...

  2. A yield criterion based on mean shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmens, W.C.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the relation between shear stress and plastic yield considering that a crystal can only deform in a limited set of directions. The shear stress in arbitrary directions is mapped for some cases showing relevant differences. Yield loci based on mean shear stress are con-

  3. Plasticity Approach to HSC Shear Wall Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lunying; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a simple theory for determining the ultimate strength of shear walls. It is based on application of the theory of perfectly plastic materials. When applied to concrete the theoretical solutions must be modified by inserting into the solutions a reduced compressive strength...... to 140 MPa and reinforcement yield strengths up to 1420 MPa. The work was carried out as a Ph.D. study by the first author, the second author supervising the study.Keywords: shear wall, plasticity, strut and tie, load-carrying capacity, concrete, reinforcement....... of concrete. The reduced strength is named the effective strength. The paper describes simple lower bound solutions. They consist of pure strut action or strut action combined with diagonal compression fields outside the struts. Near moment maximum and near supports the stress fields are modified to save...

  4. Internal shear cracking in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an uncoupled ductile damage criterion for modelling the opening and propagation of internal shear cracks in bulk metal forming. The criterion is built upon the original work on the motion of a hole subjected to shear with superimposed tensile stress triaxiality and its overall...... performance is evaluated by means of side-pressing formability tests in Aluminium AA2007-T6 subjected to different levels of pre-strain. Results show that the new proposed criterionis able to combine simplicity with efficiency for predicting the onset of fracture and the crack propagation path for the entire...... set of test cases regardless the amount of pre-strain derived from previous upsetting under near frictionless conditions. The new proposed criterion can be easily implemented in existing finite element programs and its scope of application allows extending previous work on the opening modes in surface...

  5. Shear-dependant toroidal vortex flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani, Nariman Ashrafi; Haghighi, Habib Karimi [Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Pseudoplastic circular Couette flow in annulus is investigated. The flow viscosity is dependent on the shear rate, which directly affects the conservation equations that are solved in the present study by the spectral method in the present study. The pseudoplastic model adopted here is shown to be a suitable representative of nonlinear fluids. Unlike the previous studies, where only the square of shear rate term in the viscosity expression was considered to ease the numerical manipulations, in the present study takes the term containing the quadratic power into account. The curved streamlines of the circular Couette flow can cause a centrifugal instability leading to toroidal vortices, known as Taylor vortices. It is further found that the critical Taylor number becomes lower as the pseudoplastic effect increases. Comparison with existing measurements on pseudoplastic circular Couette flow results in good agreement.

  6. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Oliveira, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Serkiz, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  7. Implications of Orientation in Sheared Cocoa Butter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Sarah E.; Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Marangoni, Alejandro; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    We will present x-ray and mechanical studies of oriented phases of cocoa butter. The structural elements of foods play an important role in determining such things as quality and shelf stability. The specific structure and properties of cocoa butter, however, are complicated due to the ability of the cocoa butter to form crystals in six polymorphic forms. Recent work has shown that the application of shear not only accelerates the transitions to more stable polymorphs, but also causes orientation of the crystallites[1]. The implications of orientation on the structures formed under conditions of shear and cooling will be described using x-ray diffraction and mechanical measurements. 1 G. Mazzanti, S. E. Guthrie, E. B. Sirota et al., Crystal Growth & Design 3 (5), 721 (2003).

  8. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; hide

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  9. [Study of shear rate in modified airlift nitrifying bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ren-cun; Zheng, Ping

    2006-06-01

    The characteristics of shear rate in an airlift nitrifying bioreactor and its influencing factors were studied. The results showed that the shear rate was different in different sections of the bioreactor. With inlet gas flowrate at 430 approximately 2700 L x h(-1), the overall shear rate was (0.702 approximately 3.13) x 10(5) s(-1), shear rate in riser was (1.07 approximately 31.3) x 10(5) s(-1) and in gas-liquid separator was (1.12 approximately 25.0) x 10(5) s(-1), respectively. It indicates that the highest shear rates prevailed in the riser part of bioreactor. The operational variables and the bioreactor configurations exerted a significant influence on the shear level of the bioreactor. When inlet gas flowrate was raised from 1300 to 2700 L x h(-1), shear rate in riser and separator ascended first and then descended subsequently. The diameter of draft tube (d) was negatively correlated with shear rate. When the draft tube with diameter of 5.5 cm was installed, the shear rates in riser, separator and overall shear rate were 85.5%, 82.3% and 80.6%, respectively less as compared with that with diameter of 4.0 cm. The number of static mixers (N) was positively correlated with the shear rate. When d was set at 4.0 cm, with N of 10 and 39, the shear rates in riser were 6.14 and 7.97 times higher respectively, than that of conventional bioreactor. The ratio of maximum local shear rate to overall shear rate was 3.68 approximately 7.66, and the homogeneity of the shear field in airlift bioreactors could be improved if d and N were set at 5.5 cm and 10 approximately 13, respectively.

  10. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  11. Self-organization in circular shear layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, K.; Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1996-01-01

    Experiments on forced circular shear layers performed in both magnetized plasmas and in rotating fluids reveal qualitatively similar self-organization processes leading to the formation of patterns of coherent vortical structures with varying complexity. In this paper results are presented from...... both weakly nonlinear analysis and full numerical simulations that closely reproduce the experimental observations. Varying the Reynolds number leads to bifurcation sequences accompanied by topological changes in the distribution of the coherent structures as well as clear transitions in the total...

  12. Understanding Transition to Turbulence in Shear Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    state of shear-layer systems by state variables appropriate for phase- space approach. (See Section A.19 for illustration of simple two-dimensional and...three-dimensional phase spaces .) The broad learning process concludes in Chapter 3 with otherwise * inaccessible conceptualization of disturbances in...scales, they represent a plausible model for the occurrence of fine- scale intermittency which led Kolmogoroff to reconsider his universal similarity

  13. Shear rheological characterization of motor oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Scott; Winer, Ward O.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of high pressure viscosity, traction coefficient, and EHD film thickness were performed on twelve commercial automotive engine oils, a reference oil, two unformulated base oils and two unformated base oil and polymer blends. An effective high shear rate inlet viscosity was calculated from film thickness and pressure viscosity coefficient. The difference between measured and effective viscosity is a function of the polymer type and concentration. Traction measurements did not discriminate mileage formulated oils from those not so designated.

  14. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers.

  15. Structures and shear response of lipid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, P.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses our work during the last 3 years using x-ray diffraction and shear measurements to study lipid monolayers (membranes). The report is divided into: (1) structure: phase diagram of saturated fatty acid Langmuir monolayers, effect of head group interactions, studies of transferred monolayers (LB films); (2) mechanical properties: fiber=optic capillary wave probe and centrosymmetric trough, mechanical behavior of heneicosanoic acid monolayer phases

  16. Supercritical Mixing in a Shear Coaxial Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    the literature [19]. This method is implemented by Saunders and Kennelly and is available as an open source utility [20]. The details of the method...computationally expensive and yields insignificant benefit in comparison to the straight line assumption. The procedure by Saunders and Kennelly thus...dark core, outer injector flow and outer shear layer are marked on the experimental image by the dashed, closely dotted and sparsely dotted lines

  17. Magnetic field reconnexion in a sheared field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugai, M.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear development of the Petschek mode in a sheared magnetic field where there is a field component Bsub(z) along an X line is numerically studied. It is found that finite-amplitude intermediate waves, adjacent to the slow shock, may eventually stand in the quasi-steady configuration; on the other hand, the fundamental characteristics of the Petschek-mode development are scarcely influenced, either qualitatively or quantitatively, by the Bsub(z) field. (author)

  18. FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL-CELL DETACHMENT FROM GLASS - INFLUENCE OF ADHESION TIME AND SHEAR-STRESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANKOOTEN, TG; SCHAKENRAAD, JM; VANDERMEI, HC; DEKKER, A; KIRKPATRICK, CJ; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1994-01-01

    In this study, human umbilical vein and human saphenous vein endothelial cells ware seeded on glass and exposed to fluid shear in a parallel-plate flow chamber. cell retention, morphology and migration were studied as a function of shear stress and of adhesion time prior to exposure to shear.

  19. Cosmic Shear With ACS Pure Parallels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jason

    2002-07-01

    Small distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass provide a powerful method of directly measuring the amount and distribution of dark matter. Several groups have recently detected this weak lensing by large-scale structure, also called cosmic shear. The high resolution and sensitivity of HST/ACS provide a unique opportunity to measure cosmic shear accurately on small scales. Using 260 parallel orbits in Sloan textiti {F775W} we will measure for the first time: beginlistosetlength sep0cm setlengthemsep0cm setlengthopsep0cm em the cosmic shear variance on scales Omega_m^0.5, with signal-to-noise {s/n} 20, and the mass density Omega_m with s/n=4. They will be done at small angular scales where non-linear effects dominate the power spectrum, providing a test of the gravitational instability paradigm for structure formation. Measurements on these scales are not possible from the ground, because of the systematic effects induced by PSF smearing from seeing. Having many independent lines of sight reduces the uncertainty due to cosmic variance, making parallel observations ideal.

  20. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  1. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using the Grad's method we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with $\\eta/s$ obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.3$(with $\\eta/s\\approx 0.18$) and is a factor of 2-3 larger at a small coupling $\\alpha_s \\sim 0.01$. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on $\\eta/s$, except when employing a small $\\alpha_s$. On the other hand, we demonstrate th...

  2. Shear viscosity and out of equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    El, Andrej; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Using Grad’s method, we calculate the entropy production and derive a formula for the second-order shear viscosity coefficient in a one-dimensionally expanding particle system, which can also be considered out of chemical equilibrium. For a one-dimensional expansion of gluon matter with Bjorken boost invariance, the shear tensor and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s are numerically calculated by an iterative and self-consistent prescription within the second-order Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics and by a microscopic parton cascade transport theory. Compared with η/s obtained using the Navier-Stokes approximation, the present result is about 20% larger at a QCD coupling αs ∼ 0.3 (with η/s ≈ 0.18) and is a factor of 2–3 larger at a small coupling αs ∼ 0.01. We demonstrate an agreement between the viscous hydrodynamic calculations and the microscopic transport results on η/s, except when employing a small αs . On the other hand, we demonstrate that for such small αs , the gluon syst...

  3. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  4. Structural Origin of Shear Viscosity of Liquid Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-25

    The relation between the microscopic structure and shear viscosity of liquid water was analyzed by calculating the cross-correlation between the shear stress and the two-body density using the molecular dynamics simulation. The slow viscoelastic relaxation that dominates the steady-state shear viscosity was ascribed to the destruction of the hydrogen-bonding network structure along the compression axis of the shear distortion, which resembles the structural change under isotropic hydrostatic compression. It means that the shear viscosity of liquid water reflects the anisotropic destruction-formation dynamics of the hydrogen-bonding network.

  5. Dilatancy of Shear Transformations in a Colloidal Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. Z.; Jiang, M. Q.; Lu, X.; Qin, Z. X.; Huang, Y. J.; Shen, J.

    2018-01-01

    Shear transformations, as fundamental rearrangement events operating in local regions, hold the key of plastic flow of amorphous solids. Despite their importance, the dynamic features of shear transformations are far from clear, which is the focus of the present study. Here, we use a colloidal glass under shear as the prototype to directly observe the shear-transformation events in real space. By tracing the colloidal-particle rearrangements, we quantitatively determine two basic properties of shear transformations: local shear strain and dilatation (or free volume). It is revealed that the local free volume undergoes a significantly temporary increase prior to shear transformations, eventually leading to a jump of local shear strain. We clearly demonstrate that shear transformations have no memory of the initial free volume of local regions. Instead, their emergence strongly depends on the dilatancy ability of these local regions, i.e., the dynamic creation of free volume. More specifically, the particles processing the high dilatancy ability directly participate in subsequent shear transformations. These results experimentally enrich Argon's statement about the dilatancy nature of shear transformations and also shed insight into the structural origin of amorphous plasticity.

  6. Onset of shear thinning in glassy liquids: Shear-induced small reduction of effective density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple mechanism for describing the onset of shear thinning in a high-density glassy liquid. In a shear flow, along the compression axis, the overlap between neighboring particles is more enhanced than that at equilibrium, meaning that the "effective" size is reduced along this axis. On the other hand, along the extension axis perpendicular to the compression axis, the average structural configurations are stretched, but it does not indicate the expansion of the "effective" size itself. This asymmetric shear flow effect for particles results in a small reduction of the "effective" density. Because, in glass-forming liquids, the structural relaxation time τ_{α} strongly depends on the density ρ, even a very small reduction of the effective density should lead to a significant decrease of the relaxation time under shear flow. We predict that the crossover shear rate from Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow behaviors is given by γ[over ̇]_{c}=[ρ(∂τ_{α}/∂ρ)]^{-1}, which can be much smaller than 1/τ_{α} near the glass transition point. It is shown that this prediction is consistent with the results of molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Shear Capacity of C-Shaped and L-Shaped Angle Shear Connectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Tahmasbi

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the behaviour of C-shaped and L-shaped angle shear connectors embedded in solid concrete slabs. An effective finite element model is proposed to simulate the push out tests of these shear connectors that encompass nonlinear material behaviour, large displacement and damage plasticity. The finite element models are validated against test results. Parametric studies using this nonlinear model are performed to investigate the variations in concrete strength and connector dimensions. The finite element analyses also confirm the test results that increasing the length of shear connector increases their shear strength proportionately. It is observed that the maximum stress in L-shaped angle connectors takes place in the weld attachment to the beam, whereas in the C-shaped angle connectors, it is in the attached leg. The location of maximum concrete compressive damage is rendered in each case. Finally, a new equation for prediction of the shear capacity of C-shaped angle connectors is proposed.

  8. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  9. Edge-Induced Shear Banding in Entangled Polymeric Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Ewan J.; Fielding, Suzanne M.

    2018-03-01

    Despite decades of research, the question of whether solutions and melts of highly entangled polymers exhibit shear banding as their steady state response to a steadily imposed shear flow remains controversial. From a theoretical viewpoint, an important unanswered question is whether the underlying constitutive curve of shear stress σ as a function of shear rate γ ˙ (for states of homogeneous shear) is monotonic, or has a region of negative slope, d σ /d γ ˙ edge fracture." Here we show by numerical simulation that in fact even only very modest edge disturbances—which are the precursor of full edge fracture but might well, in themselves, go unnoticed experimentally—can cause strong secondary flows in the form of shear bands that invade deep into the fluid bulk. Crucially, this is true even when the underlying constitutive curve is monotonically increasing, precluding true bulk shear banding in the absence of edge effects.

  10. Shear and loading in channels: Oscillatory shearing and edge currents of superconducting vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, J. F.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-04-01

    Via computer simulations we study the motion of quantized magnetic flux-lines, or vortices, confined to a straight pin-free channel in a strong-pinning superconducting sample. We find that, when a constant current is applied across this system, a very unusual oscillatory shearing appears, in which the vortices moving at the edges of the channel periodically trail behind and then suddenly leapfrog past the vortices moving in the inner rows. For small enough driving forces, this oscillatory shearing dynamic phase is replaced by a continuous shearing phase in which the distance between initially-nearby vortices grows in time, quickly destroying the order of the lattice. An animation of this novel “oscillatory leapfrogging shear” effect of the vortex edge currents appears in http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/˜nori/channel/

  11. Probing hydrogen bond interactions in a shear thickening polysaccharide using nonlinear shear and extensional rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Aditya; Wee, May; Matia-Merino, Lara; Goh, Kelvin K T; McKinley, Gareth H

    2015-06-05

    Mamaku gum is a polysaccharide extracted from the fronds of the black tree fern found in New Zealand. The cooked pith has traditionally been used for various medicinal purposes and as a food source by the Maori people of New Zealand. It has potential applications as a thickener in the food industry and as a palliative for patients with dysphagia. Studies on the shear rheology of Mamaku gum have revealed that the gum exhibits shear thickening at a critical shear rate due to a transition from intra- to inter-molecular chain interactions upon shear-induced chain elongation. In this paper, we demonstrate that these interactions are primarily due to hydrogen bonding. We perform extensional rheology on mixtures of Mamaku gum and urea (a known disruptor of hydrogen bonds) to quantify the nature of these interactions. Capillary Breakup Extensional Rheometry (CaBER) performed on the pure Mamaku gum solutions yield plateau values of the Trouton ratio as high as ∼10(4), showing that the viscoelasticity of the gum in uniaxial elongation is much higher than in shear. For all Mamaku concentrations tested, the extensional viscosity decreases upon increasing urea concentration. Furthermore, the relaxation time decreases exponentially with increasing urea concentration. This exponential relationship is independent of the Mamaku concentration, and is identical to the relationships between urea concentration and characteristic timescales measured in nonlinear shear rheology. We show using the sticky reptation model for polymers with multiple sticker groups along the backbone how such a relationship is consistent with a linear decrease in the free energy for hydrogen bond dissociation. We then demonstrate that a time-concentration superposition principle can be used to collapse the viscoelastic properties of the Mamaku-gum/urea mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y.; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm2) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm2). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  13. An in silico framework to analyze the anisotropic shear wave mechanics in cardiac shear wave elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caenen, Annette; Pernot, Mathieu; Peirlinck, Mathias; Mertens, Luc; Swillens, Abigail; Segers, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a potential tool to non-invasively assess cardiac muscle stiffness. This study focused on the effect of the orthotropic material properties and mechanical loading on the performance of cardiac SWE, as it is known that these factors contribute to complex 3D anisotropic shear wave propagation. To investigate the specific impact of these complexities, we constructed a finite element model with an orthotropic material law subjected to different uniaxial stretches to simulate SWE in the stressed cardiac wall. Group and phase speed were analyzed in function of tissue thickness and virtual probe rotation angle. Tissue stretching increased the group and phase speed of the simulated shear wave, especially in the direction of the muscle fiber. As the model provided access to the true fiber orientation and material properties, we assessed the accuracy of two fiber orientation extraction methods based on SWE. We found a higher accuracy (but lower robustness) when extracting fiber orientations based on the location of maximal shear wave speed instead of the angle of the major axis of the ellipsoidal group speed surface. Both methods had a comparable performance for the center region of the cardiac wall, and performed less well towards the edges. Lastly, we also assessed the (theoretical) impact of pathology on shear wave physics and characterization in the model. It was found that SWE was able to detect changes in fiber orientation and material characteristics, potentially associated with cardiac pathologies such as myocardial fibrosis. Furthermore, the model showed clearly altered shear wave patterns for the fibrotic myocardium compared to the healthy myocardium, which forms an initial but promising outcome of this modeling study.

  14. The adaptor protein alpha-syntrophin regulates adipocyte lipid droplet growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisinger, Kristina; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Pohl, Rebekka; Meier, Elisabeth M.; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa, E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2016-07-01

    The scaffold protein alpha-syntrophin (SNTA) regulates lipolysis indicating a role in lipid homeostasis. Adipocytes are the main lipid storage cells in the body, and here, the function of SNTA has been analyzed in 3T3-L1 cells. SNTA is expressed in preadipocytes and is induced early during adipogenesis. Knock-down of SNTA in preadipocytes increases their proliferation. Proteins which are induced during adipogenesis like adiponectin and caveolin-1, and the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 are at normal levels in the mature cells differentiated from preadipocytes with low SNTA. This suggests that SNTA does neither affect differentiation nor inflammation. Expression of proteins with a role in cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis is unchanged. Consequently, basal and epinephrine induced lipolysis as well as insulin stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 are normal. Importantly, adipocytes with low SNTA form smaller lipid droplets and store less triglycerides. Stearoyl-CoA reductase and MnSOD are reduced upon SNTA knock-down but do not contribute to lower lipid levels. Oleate uptake is even increased in cells with SNTA knock-down. In summary, current data show that SNTA is involved in the expansion of lipid droplets independent of adipogenesis. Enhanced preadipocyte proliferation and capacity to store surplus fatty acids may protect adipocytes with low SNTA from lipotoxicity in obesity. - Highlights: • Alpha-syntrophin (SNTA) is expressed in 3T3-L1adipocytes. • SNTA knock-down in preadipocytes has no effect on adipogenesis. • Mature 3T3-L1 differentiated from cells with low SNTA form small lipid droplets. • SCD1 and MnSOD are reduced in adipocytes with low SNTA. • SCD1 knock-down does not alter triglyceride levels.

  15. Shear flow effect on ion temperature gradient vortices in plasmas with sheared magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1999-01-01

    the coupled equations for potential and pressure exhibit special tripolar vortex-like structures. For the general case, however, parallel ion dynamics is included and the equation describing the stationary ITG vortex has the structure of a nonlinear Poisson-type equation. Analytical as well as numerical...... solutions of this equation are presented for various possible cases. It is shown that, for a critical value of the velocity shear asymmetric dipolar vortices can arise which are strongly modified as a localized vortex chain at resonance. For strong velocity shear these structures are destroyed...

  16. Modeling combined tension-shear failure of ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partom, Y

    2014-01-01

    Failure of ductile materials is usually expressed in terms of effective plastic strain. Ductile materials can fail by two different failure modes, shear failure and tensile failure. Under dynamic loading shear failure has to do with shear localization and formation of adiabatic shear bands. In these bands plastic strain rate is very high, dissipative heating is extensive, and shear strength is lost. Shear localization starts at a certain value of effective plastic strain, when thermal softening overcomes strain hardening. Shear failure is therefore represented in terms of effective plastic strain. On the other hand, tensile failure comes about by void growth under tension. For voids in a tension field there is a threshold state of the remote field for which voids grow spontaneously (cavitation), and the material there fails. Cavitation depends on the remote field stress components and on the flow stress. In this way failure in tension is related to shear strength and to failure in shear. Here we first evaluate the cavitation threshold for different remote field situations, using 2D numerical simulations with a hydro code. We then use the results to compute examples of rate dependent tension-shear failure of a ductile material.

  17. Evaluation of composite shear walls behavior (parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nikkhoo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Composite shear walls which are made of a layer of steel plate with a concrete cover in one or both sides of the steel plate, are counted as the third generation of the shear walls. Nowadays, composite shear walls are widely utilized in building new resisting structures as well as rehabilitating of the existing structures in earthquake-prone countries. Despite of its advantages, use of the composite shear walls is not yet prevalent as it demands more detailed appropriate investigation. Serving higher strength, flexibility and better energy absorption, while being more economical are the main advantages of this system which has paved its path to be used in high-rise buildings, structural retrofit and reservoir tanks. In this research, channel shear connectors are utilized to connect the concrete cover to the steel plate. As a key parameter, variation in the distance of shear connectors and their arrangement on the behavior of composite shear walls has been scrutinized. In addition, the shear stiffness, flexibility, out of plane displacement and the energy absorption of the structural system has been explored. For this purpose, several structural models with different shear distances and arrangements have been investigated. The obtained results reveal that with increase in shear connectors’ distance, the wall stiffness would reduce while its lateral displacement increases up to eighty percent While the out of plane displacement of the steel plate will reduce up to three times.

  18. A New Annular Shear Piezoelectric Accelerometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bin; Kriegbaum, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the construction and performance of a recently introduced Annular Shear piezoelectric accelerometer, Type 4511. The design has insulated and double-shielded case. The accelerometer housing is made of stainless steel, AISI 316L. Piezoceramic PZ23 is used. The seismic mass...... is made of tungsten. All processes and materials comply with MIL-STD-11268. The mounted resonance frequency exceeds 40kHz. The sensitivity is 10mV/g ±5%. During the design process, the new design is evaluated and sufficiently optimized by using the Finite Element (FE) simulation before making actual...

  19. Behaviour of voids in a shear field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2009-01-01

    to a plane connecting the ends of the micro-crack is used as an approximate representation of contact stresses during frictionless sliding. In a previous study of the same problem the author applied hydrostatic pressure inside the nearly closed micro-crack to approximate contact conditions. The transverse...... surface loads used in the present analyses avoid the tendency to unrealistically elongate the voids. It is found that even though the model applied here gives significantly later occurrence of a maximum overall shear stress than that found by using hydrostatic pressure, the present model does predict...

  20. Homotopy Shear Band Solutions in Gradient Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raees, Ammarah; Xu, Hang; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2017-05-01

    Analytical shear band type solutions for finite domains are derived within the framework of gradient plasticity theory by employing the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Such types of solutions were available in the literature only for infinite domains in the nonlinear material softening regime and steady-state conditions, as well as for finite domains in the material hardening regime. HAM allows for solutions to be obtained for both hardening and softening material models, as well as for unsteady conditions periodic solutions are also derived. The HAM results are verified with numerical simulations, which show excellent agreement. Moreover, an error analysis is provided which guarantees the convergence of our series solution.

  1. Granular convection driven by shearing inertial forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Liñán, G M; Nahmad-Molinari, Y

    2006-01-01

    Convection velocity measurements in vertically vibrated granular materials are presented. The convection velocity close to the walls grows quadratically with the difference between the maximum and critical, or excess, amplitude (proposed as a dynamic parameter to describe related problems) and it is shown numerically that the average bed-bottom relative velocity during the distancing between them, grows linearly with the squared as well. This is interpreted as the signature of an inertial shearing force or momentum transfer proportional to the bed-container relative velocity, acting mainly during the bed-plate distancing part of each cycle which leads to the formation of the convective flux.

  2. Orientational ordering in sheared inelastic dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Anki; Kumaran, V; Talbot, J

    2009-09-01

    Using even driven simulations, we show that homogeneously sheared inelastic dumbbells in two dimensions are randomly orientated in the limit of low density. As the packing fraction is increased, particles first tend to orient along the extensional axis, and then as the packing fraction is further increased, the alignment shifts closer to the flow axis. The orientational order parameter displays a continuous increase with packing fraction and does not appear to exhibit a universal scaling with elongation. Except at the highest packing fractions, the orientational distribution function can be reconstructed with only the first coefficient of the Fourier expansion.

  3. Propagation of waves in shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrikant, A L

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in a theory of oscillatory and wave phenomena in hydrodynamical flows is presented in this book. A unified approach is used for waves of different physical origins. A characteristic feature of this approach is that hydrodynamical phenomena are considered in terms of physics; that is, the complement of the conventionally employed formal mathematical approach. Some physical concepts such as wave energy and momentum in a moving fluid are analysed, taking into account induced mean flow. The physical mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instability of shear flows are conside

  4. MiR-21 is induced in endothelial cells by shear stress and modulates apoptosis and eNOS activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Martina; Baker, Meredith B.; Moore, Jeffrey P. [Division of Cardiology, Emory University, 1639 Pierce Drive, WMB 319, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Searles, Charles D., E-mail: csearle@emory.edu [Division of Cardiology, Emory University, 1639 Pierce Drive, WMB 319, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, 1670 Clarimont Road, Decatur, GA 30033 (United States)

    2010-03-19

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play an important role in regulating vascular signaling and gene expression in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. miRNAs are known to have an important role in modulating EC biology, but their expression and functions in cells subjected to shear stress conditions are unknown. We sought to determine the miRNA expression profile in human ECs subjected to unidirectional shear stress and define the role of miR-21 in shear stress-induced changes in EC function. TLDA array and qRT-PCR analysis performed on HUVECs exposed to prolonged unidirectional shear stress (USS, 24 h, 15 dynes/cm{sup 2}) identified 13 miRNAs whose expression was significantly upregulated (p < 0.05). The miRNA with the greatest change was miR-21; it was increased 5.2-fold (p = 0.002) in USS-treated versus control cells. Western analysis demonstrated that PTEN, a known target of miR-21, was downregulated in HUVECs exposed to USS or transfected with pre-miR-21. Importantly, HUVECs overexpressing miR-21 had decreased apoptosis and increased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO{sup {center_dot}}) production. These data demonstrate that shear stress forces regulate the expression of miRNAs in ECs, and that miR-21 influences endothelial biology by decreasing apoptosis and activating the NO{sup {center_dot}} pathway. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which shear stress forces modulate vascular homeostasis.

  5. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein regulates insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) gene expression in prostate cancer: involvement of transcription factor Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel Sharon, Shilhav; Pozniak, Yair; Geiger, Tamar; Werner, Haim

    2016-08-09

    Prostate cancer is a major health issue in the Western world. The most common gene rearrangement in prostate cancer is the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, which results in aberrant expression of the transcription factor ERG. The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) plays a key role in cell growth and tumorigenesis, and is overexpressed in most malignancies, including prostate cancer. In this study we show that TMPRSS2-ERG mediates its tumorigenic effects through regulation of IGF1R gene expression. Silencing of T-ERG in VCaP cells resulted in downregulation of both IGF1R and Sp1, a critical IGF1R regulator. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a physical interaction between transcription factors ERG and Sp1, with potential relevance in IGF1R gene regulation. In addition, transactivation of the IGF1R gene by ERG was mediated at the level of transcription, as indicated by results of promoter assays. To identify new co-activators of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein we performed mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses. Among other interactors, we identified AP-2 complex subunit mu (AP2M1) and caveolin-1 (CAV1) in association with ERG in cell nuclei. These proteins play a mechanistic role in IGF1R internalization. Our analyses are consistent with a potential novel function of TMPRSS2-ERG as a major regulator of IGF1R gene expression. Results may impinge upon ongoing efforts to target the IGF1R in the clinics.

  6. Test and lower bound modeling of keyed shear connections in RC shear walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Harrild; Herfelt, Morten Andersen; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the ultimate behavior of a recently developed design for keyed shear connections. The influence of the key depth on the failure mode and ductility of the connection has been studied by push-off tests. The tests showed that connections with larger key inde...

  7. Distribution functions of a simple fluid under shear: Low shear rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y.V.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D.

    1999-01-01

    Anisotropic pair distribution functions for a simple, soft sphere fluid at moderate and high density under shear have been calculated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, by equilibrium molecular dynamics with a nonequilibrium potential, and by a nonequilibrium distribution function theory [H. H. Gan and B. C. Eu, Phys. Rev. A 45, 3670 (1992)] and some variants. The nonequilibrium distribution function theory consists of a nonequilibrium Ornstein-Zernike relation, a closure relation, and a nonequilibrium potential and is solved in spherical harmonics. The distortion of the fluid structure due to shear is presented as the difference between the nonequilibrium and equilibrium pair distribution functions. From comparison of the results of theory against results of equilibrium molecular dynamics with the nonequilibrium potential at low shear rates, it is concluded that, for a given nonequilibrium potential, the theory is reasonably accurate, especially with the modified hypernetted chain closure. The equilibrium molecular-dynamics results with the nonequilibrium potential are also compared against the results of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and suggest that the nonequilibrium potential used is not very accurate. In continuing work, a nonequilibrium potential better suited to high shear rates [H. H. Gan and B. C. Eu, Phys. Rev. A 46, 6344 (1992)] is being tested. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. Far-from-equilibrium sheared colloidal liquids: Disentangling relaxation, advection, and shear-induced diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Neil Y. C.

    2013-12-01

    Using high-speed confocal microscopy, we measure the particle positions in a colloidal suspension under large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Using the particle positions, we quantify the in situ anisotropy of the pair-correlation function, a measure of the Brownian stress. From these data we find two distinct types of responses as the system crosses over from equilibrium to far-from-equilibrium states. The first is a nonlinear amplitude saturation that arises from shear-induced advection, while the second is a linear frequency saturation due to competition between suspension relaxation and shear rate. In spite of their different underlying mechanisms, we show that all the data can be scaled onto a master curve that spans the equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium regimes, linking small-amplitude oscillatory to continuous shear. This observation illustrates a colloidal analog of the Cox-Merz rule and its microscopic underpinning. Brownian dynamics simulations show that interparticle interactions are sufficient for generating both experimentally observed saturations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  9. Shear rheology of lipid monolayers and insights on membrane fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Gabriel; López-Montero, Iván; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The concept of membrane fluidity usually refers to a high molecular mobility inside the lipid bilayer which enables lateral diffusion of embedded proteins. Fluids have the ability to flow under an applied shear stress whereas solids resist shear deformations. Biological membranes require both properties for their function: high lateral fluidity and structural rigidity. Consequently, an adequate account must include, in addition to viscosity, the possibility for a nonzero shear modulus. This knowledge is still lacking as measurements of membrane shear properties have remained incomplete so far. In the present contribution we report a surface shear rheology study of different lipid monolayers that model distinct biologically relevant situations. The results evidence a large variety of mechanical behavior under lateral shear flow. PMID:21444777

  10. Microalga propels along vorticity direction in a shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Using high-speed digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discover that, when encountering fluid flow shear above a threshold, unicellular green alga Dunaliella primolecta migrates unambiguously in the cross-stream direction that is normal to the plane of shear and coincides with the local fluid flow vorticity. The flow shear drives motile microalgae to collectively migrate in a thin two-dimensional horizontal plane and consequently alters the spatial distribution of microalgal cells within a given suspension. This shear-induced algal migration differs substantially from periodic rotational motion of passive ellipsoids, known as Jeffery orbits, as well as gyrotaxis by bottom-heavy swimming microalgae in a shear flow due to the subtle interplay between torques generated by gravity and viscous shear. Our findings could facilitate mechanistic solutions for modeling planktonic thin layers and sustainable cultivation of microalgae for human nutrition and bioenergy feedstock.

  11. Flexure of thick orthotropic plates by exponential shear deformation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Sayyad

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a variationally consistent exponential shear deformation theory taking into account transverse shear deformation effect is presented for the flexural analysis of thick orthotropic plates. The inplane displacement field uses exponential function in terms of thickness coordinate to include the shear deformation effect. The transverse shear stress can be obtained directly from the constitutive relations satisfying the shear stress free surface conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of the plate, hence the theory does not require shear correction factor. Governing equations and boundary conditions of the theory are obtained using the principle of virtual work. Results obtained for static flexure of simply supported orthotropic plates are compared with those of other refined theories and elasticity solution wherever applicable. The results obtained by present theory are in excellent agreement with those of exact results and other higher order theories. Thus the efficacy of the present refined theory is established.

  12. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  13. Shear and shear friction of ultra-high performance concrete bridge girders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Charles Kennan

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a new class of concrete characterized by no coarse aggregate, steel fiber reinforcement, low w/c, low permeability, compressive strength exceeding 29,000 psi (200 MPa), tensile strength ranging from 1,200 to 2,500 psi (8 to 17 MPa), and very high toughness. These properties make prestressed precast UHPC bridge girders a very attractive replacement material for steel bridge girders, particularly when site demands require a comparable beam depth to steel and a 100+ year life span is desired. In order to efficiently utilize UHPC in bridge construction, it is necessary to create new design recommendations for its use. The interface between precast UHPC girder and cast-in-place concrete decks must be characterized in order to safely use composite design methods with this new material. Due to the lack of reinforcing bars, all shear forces in UHPC girders have to be carried by the concrete and steel fibers. Current U.S. codes do not consider fiber reinforcement in calculating shear capacity. Fiber contribution must be accurately accounted for in shear equations in order to use UHPC. Casting of UHPC may cause fibers to orient in the direction of casting. If fibers are preferentially oriented, physical properties of the concrete may also become anisotropic, which must be considered in design. The current research provides new understanding of shear and shear friction phenomena in UHPC including: (1) Current AASHTO codes provide a non-conservative estimate of interface shear performance of smooth UHPC interfaces with and without interface steel. (2) Fluted interfaces can be created by impressing formliners into the surface of plastic UHPC. AASHTO and ACI codes for roughened interfaces are conservative for design of fluted UHPC interfaces.(3) A new equation for the calculation of shear capacity of UHPC girders is presented which takes into account the contribution of steel fiber reinforcement. (4) Fibers are shown to preferentially

  14. Protein kinase B/Akt activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by increasing NO production in response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Y. M.; Boo, Y. C.; Park, H.; Maland, M. C.; Patel, R.; Pritchard, K. A. Jr; Fujio, Y.; Walsh, K.; Darley-Usmar, V.; Jo, H.

    2001-01-01

    Laminar shear stress activates c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) by the mechanisms involving both nitric oxide (NO) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Because protein kinase B (Akt), a downstream effector of PI3K, has been shown to phosphorylate and activate endothelial NO synthase, we hypothesized that Akt regulates shear-dependent activation of JNK by stimulating NO production. Here, we examined the role of Akt in shear-dependent NO production and JNK activation by expressing a dominant negative Akt mutant (Akt(AA)) and a constitutively active mutant (Akt(Myr)) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). As expected, pretreatment of BAEC with the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) prevented shear-dependent stimulation of Akt and NO production. Transient expression of Akt(AA) in BAEC by using a recombinant adenoviral construct inhibited the shear-dependent stimulation of NO production and JNK activation. However, transient expression of Akt(Myr) by using a recombinant adenoviral construct did not induce JNK activation. This is consistent with our previous finding that NO is required, but not sufficient on its own, to activate JNK in response to shear stress. These results and our previous findings strongly suggest that shear stress triggers activation of PI3K, Akt, and endothelial NO synthase, leading to production of NO, which (along with O(2-), which is also produced by shear) activates Ras-JNK pathway. The regulation of Akt, NO, and JNK by shear stress is likely to play a critical role in its antiatherogenic effects.

  15. Estrogen augments shear stress-induced signaling and gene expression in osteoblast-like cells via estrogen receptor-mediated expression of beta1-integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Lee, Chih-I; Lee, Pei-Ling; Shih, Yu-Tsung; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chien, Shu; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2010-03-01

    Estrogen and mechanical forces are positive regulators for osteoblast proliferation and bone formation. We investigated the synergistic effect of estrogen and flow-induced shear stress on signal transduction and gene expression in human osetoblast-like MG63 cells and primary osteoblasts (HOBs) using activations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and expressions of c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (I) as readouts. Estrogen (17beta-estradiol, 10 nM) and shear stress (12 dyn/cm(2)) alone induced transient phosphorylations of ERK and p38 MAPK in MG63 cells. Pretreating MG63 cells with 17beta-estradiol for 6 hours before shearing augmented these shear-induced MAPK phosphorylations. Western blot and flow cytometric analyses showed that treating MG63 cells with 17beta-estradiol for 6 hrs induced their beta(1)-integrin expression. This estrogen-induction of beta(1)-integrin was inhibited by pretreating the cells with a specific antagonist of estrogen receptor ICI 182,780. Both 17beta-estradiol and shear stress alone induced c-fos and Cox-2 gene expressions in MG63 cells. Pretreating MG63 cells with 17beta-estradiol for 6 hrs augmented the shear-induced c-fos and Cox-2 expressions. The augmented effects of 17beta-estradiol on shear-induced MAPK phosphorylations and c-fos and Cox-2 expressions were inhibited by pretreating the cells with ICI 182,780 or transfecting the cells with beta(1)-specific small interfering RNA. Similar results on the augmented effect of estrogen on shear-induced signaling and gene expression were obtained with HOBs. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which estrogen augments shear stress responsiveness of signal transduction and gene expression in bone cells via estrogen receptor-mediated increases in beta(1)-integrin expression. Copyright 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Estrogen Augments Shear Stress–Induced Signaling and Gene Expression in Osteoblast-like Cells via Estrogen Receptor–Mediated Expression of β1-Integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Lee, Chih-I; Lee, Pei-Ling; Shih, Yu-Tsung; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chien, Shu; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen and mechanical forces are positive regulators for osteoblast proliferation and bone formation. We investigated the synergistic effect of estrogen and flow-induced shear stress on signal transduction and gene expression in human osetoblast-like MG63 cells and primary osteoblasts (HOBs) using activations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and expressions of c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (I) as readouts. Estrogen (17β-estradiol, 10 nM) and shear stress (12 dyn/cm2) alone induced transient phosphorylations of ERK and p38 MAPK in MG63 cells. Pretreating MG63 cells with 17β-estradiol for 6 hours before shearing augmented these shear-induced MAPK phosphorylations. Western blot and flow cytometric analyses showed that treating MG63 cells with 17β-estradiol for 6 hrs induced their β1-integrin expression. This estrogen-induction of β1-integrin was inhibited by pretreating the cells with a specific antagonist of estrogen receptor ICI 182,780. Both 17β-estradiol and shear stress alone induced c-fos and Cox-2 gene expressions in MG63 cells. Pretreating MG63 cells with 17β-estradiol for 6 hrs augmented the shear-induced c-fos and Cox-2 expressions. The augmented effects of 17β-estradiol on shear-induced MAPK phosphorylations and c-fos and Cox-2 expressions were inhibited by pretreating the cells with ICI 182,780 or transfecting the cells with β1-specific small interfering RNA. Similar results on the augmented effect of estrogen on shear-induced signaling and gene expression were obtained with HOBs. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which estrogen augments shear stress responsiveness of signal transduction and gene expression in bone cells via estrogen receptor–mediated increases in β1-integrin expression. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:19821775

  17. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Inplane shear capacity of reinforced composite masonry block walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.H.; Tseng, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe a test program performed to determine the inplane shear capacity, stiffness and ductility of composite masonry walls subjected to earthquake type loadings. Specimens were simultaneously subjected to a range of compressive loads to simulate dead load; and inplane shear loads with full load reversal to simulate the earthquake cycling load. The influence of horizontal and vertical reinforcing steel percentages on the inplane shear capacity, stiffness and ductility was also investigated. (orig./HP)

  19. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  20. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Fellinger, J.H.H.; Stark, J.; Walraven, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests showed that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. As the shear and anchorage capacity of these slabs rely on the tensile strength of the concrete, the load bearing capacity with respect to these failure modes decreases dramatically during fire due to the impact of thermal stresses. This paper presents a FE model for the shear and anchorage beha...

  1. FRP shear strengthening of RC beams and walls

    OpenAIRE

    Sas, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    The shear failure of Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP) strengthened reinforced concrete (RC) beams has not been studied to the same extent as the bending failure mechanism in the past decade. The complex nature of the shear failure mechanism just for reinforced concrete beams is still under debate among scientists and not solved yet. If we add the FRP strengthening to the already existing unknown issues, it is quite clear why attention was not focused on the shear failure of strengthened beam. ...

  2. Numerical modeling of shear stimulation in naturally fractured geothermal reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Ucar, Eren

    2018-01-01

    Shear-dilation-based hydraulic stimulations are conducted to create enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) from low permeable geothermal reservoirs, which are initially not amenable to energy production. Reservoir stimulations are done by injecting low-pressurized fluid into the naturally fractured formations. The injection aims to activate critically stressed fractures by decreasing frictional strength and ultimately cause a shear failure. The shear failure leads to a permanent ...

  3. The Effective Rheology of Natural Subduction Shear Zones: Insights from Numerical Simple Shear Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidi, Paraskevi Io; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Moreno, Marcos; Agard, Philippe; Oncken, Onno; Angiboust, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Determination of the subduction interface rheological parameters is an interesting aspect of geodynamics since it can help better understand the physical nature of plate locking and its relation to surface deformation patterns observed at different time scales (GPS displacements during the seismic cycle). Since direct rheological measurements are not possible, unfortunately, we herein try to determine the effective rheological parameters of a subduction interface using finite element modelling. We use the open source finite element code pTatin to create 2D models, starting with a homogeneous medium representing shearing at the subduction interface. We tested several boundary conditions trying to find the one that can best mimic simple shear experiments performed on rock samples. After examining different parameters including the shearing velocity, the temperature and the viscosity, we added complexity to the geometry by including a second phase. This complexity arose from field observations, where composite shear zone outcrops often characterize the subduction interface. Stronger crustal blocks embedded within a sedimentary and/or serpentinized matrix have been reported for several exhumed subduction zones. We implemented a simplified model to simulate simple shearing of a two-phase medium in order to quantify the effect of heterogeneous rheology on stress and strain localization. Preliminary results show different strength in the models depending on the block-to-matrix ratio. In order to test our methodology, we first use clast-in-matrix geometries from thin sections taken through lab experiments. In a second stage, we upscale the method to outcrop scale clast-in-matrix geometries. By sampling at different depths along exhumed former subduction interfaces, we expect to be able to provide effective friction of a natural interface. In a next step, these effective frictions will be used as input into seismic cycle deformation models in an attempt to assess the

  4. Adaptation of endothelial cells to physiologically-modeled, variable shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Uzarski

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC function is mediated by variable hemodynamic shear stress patterns at the vascular wall, where complex shear stress profiles directly correlate with blood flow conditions that vary temporally based on metabolic demand. The interactions of these more complex and variable shear fields with EC have not been represented in hemodynamic flow models. We hypothesized that EC exposed to pulsatile shear stress that changes in magnitude and duration, modeled directly from real-time physiological variations in heart rate, would elicit phenotypic changes as relevant to their critical roles in thrombosis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Here we designed a physiological flow (PF model based on short-term temporal changes in blood flow observed in vivo and compared it to static culture and steady flow (SF at a fixed pulse frequency of 1.3 Hz. Results show significant changes in gene regulation as a function of temporally variable flow, indicating a reduced wound phenotype more representative of quiescence. EC cultured under PF exhibited significantly higher endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity (PF: 176.0±11.9 nmol/10(5 EC; SF: 115.0±12.5 nmol/10(5 EC, p = 0.002 and lower TNF-a-induced HL-60 leukocyte adhesion (PF: 37±6 HL-60 cells/mm(2; SF: 111±18 HL-60/mm(2, p = 0.003 than cells cultured under SF which is consistent with a more quiescent anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic phenotype. In vitro models have become increasingly adept at mimicking natural physiology and in doing so have clarified the importance of both chemical and physical cues that drive cell function. These data illustrate that the variability in metabolic demand and subsequent changes in perfusion resulting in constantly variable shear stress plays a key role in EC function that has not previously been described.

  5. Dexamethasone intravitreal implant downregulates PDGFR-α and upregulates caveolin-1 in experimental branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cehofski, Lasse Jørgensen; Kruse, Anders; Magnusdottir, Sigriður Olga

    2018-01-01

    while the left control eye was given an identical injection without an implant. Fifteen days after BRVO and DEX implant intervention the retinas were excised and analyzed with tandem mass tag based mass spectrometry. A total of 26 significantly changed proteins were identified. Dexamethasone...... following an intervention with a dexamethasone (DEX) implant this study combined an experimental model of BRVO with proteomic techniques. In six Danish Landrace pigs experimental BRVO was induced in both eyes using argon laser. After inducing BRVO a DEX implant was injected in the right eye of each animal...

  6. Low-level shear stress promotes migration of liver cancer stem cells via the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinghui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Lingling; Song, Guanbin

    2018-04-18

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of tumour cells that have been proposed to be responsible for cancer initiation, chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. Shear stress activated cellular signalling is involved in cellular migration, proliferation and differentiation. However, little is known about the effects of shear stress on the migration of liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs). Here, we studied the effects of shear stress that are generated from a parallel plated flow chamber system, on LCSC migration and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), using transwell assay and western blot, respectively. We found that 2 dyne/cm 2 shear stress loading for 6 h promotes LCSC migration and activation of the FAK and ERK1/2 signalling pathways, whereas treatment with the FAK phosphorylation inhibitor PF573228 or the ERK1/2 phosphorylation inhibitor PD98059 suppressed the shear stress-promoted migration, indicating the involvement of FAK and ERK1/2 activation in shear stress-induced LCSC migration. Additionally, atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that shear stress lowers LCSC stiffness via the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways, suggesting that the mechanism by which shear stress promotes LCSC migration might partially be responsible for the decrease in cell stiffness. Further experiments focused on the role of the actin cytoskeleton, demonstrating that the F-actin filaments in LCSCs are less well-defined after shear stress treatment, providing an explanation for the reduction in cell stiffness and the promotion of cell migration. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress promotes LCSC migration through the activation of the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathways, which further results in a reduction of organized actin and softer cell bodies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Shear flow stabilization of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Shumlak, U.; Douglas, M.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Ruden, E.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations have indicated that shear flow may help stabilize the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding plasma z-pinches. A simple extension to a model presented in Chandrasekhar has been developed to study the linear stability of incompressible plasma subjected to both a shear flow and acceleration. The model has been used to investigate the stability plasma implosion schemes using externally imposed velocity shear which develops from the plasma flow itself. Specific parameters were chosen to represent plasma implosions driven by the Saturn and PBFA-Z, pulsed power generators at Sandia National Laboratories. Results indicate a high shear is necessary to stabilize the z-pinch implosions studied

  8. Is swimming in a shear-thinning fluid more efficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Kyle; Nganguia, Herve; Pak, On Shun

    2017-11-01

    Micro-organisms expend energy moving through complex fluids that often display shear-thinning viscosity. A motility mechanism not only needs to generate the necessary propulsion speed but also be energetically efficient. Although the efficiency of swimming is well characterized in Newtonian fluids, much less is known about this biologically relevant aspect of locomotion in shear-thinning fluids. Does the shear-thinning rheology render swimming more efficient or less? How does it alter the efficiency of different types of swimmers? We will address these fundamental questions of locomotion in a shear-thinning fluid.

  9. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph F. Dietrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s. The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed. The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France, point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France. More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies.

  10. Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 μm monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs

  11. Shear zones between rock units with no relative movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Schmeling, H.; Burchardt, S.

    2012-01-01

    Shear zones are normally viewed as relatively narrow deformation zones that accommodate relative displacement between two "blocks" that have moved past each other in opposite directions. This study reports localized zones of shear between adjacent blocks that have not moved past each other...... magma body (stoping). From the fluid dynamics point of view these shear zones can be regarded as the low Reynolds number deformation zones within the wake of a body moving through a viscous medium. While compact (aspect ratio 1:1:1) moving bodies generate axial symmetric (cone like) shear zones...

  12. Shear zones between rock units with no relative movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, Hemin; Schmeling, Harro; Burchardt, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Shear zones are normally viewed as relatively narrow deformation zones that accommodate relative displacement between two "blocks" that have moved past each other in opposite directions. This study reports localized zones of shear between adjacent blocks that have not moved past each other...... a partially molten magma body (stoping). From the fluid dynamics perspective these shear zones can be regarded as low Reynolds number deformation zones within the wake of a body moving through a viscous medium. While compact moving bodies (aspect ratio 1:1:1) generate axial symmetric (cone like) shear zones...

  13. Results of shear studies with 241-AY-101 sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WARRANT, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Tanks Focus Area (TFA) authorized a project to study the effect of shear on the settling properties of high-level waste sludge to support retrieval programs. A series of settling studies was conducted on a composite sample of tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101) material. Comparisons were made with duplicate samples that were sheared with a tissue homogenizer and allowed to settle. Aliquots of sheared and unsheared settled solids were submitted for chemical and radiological analyses. There are five major conclusions from the study that apply to AY-101 sludge: (1) Sludge settling rates are detectably decreased after shearing of particles by means of a tissue homogenizer. A significant decrease in the settling rates was measured after 2 minutes of shearing. A smaller additional decrease in the settling rates was observed after an additional 10 minutes of shearing. (2) Sodium and Cesium appear to be present in both the liquid and solid phases of the composite sample. (3) The shearing of the solids does not appear to significantly change the distribution of the radionuclides, ( 241 Am, 90 Sr, Total Alpha, or other radionuclides), within the solids. (4) The mean particle diameter decreases after shearing with the tissue homogenizer and affects the settling rate in proportion to the square of the particle diameter. (5) The sonication of the unsheared particles produces a similar particle size reduction to that of shearing with a tissue homogenizer. It is difficult to quantitatively compare the shear produced by a mixer pump installed in a double-shell tank with that produced by the tissue homogenizer in the laboratory. On a qualitative basis, the mixing pump would be expected to have less mechanical and more hydraulic shearing effect than the tissue homogenizer. Since the particle size distribution studies indicate that (for the AY-101 solids) the breaking up of particle aggregates is the main means of particle size reduction, then the hydraulic shearing

  14. Direct Shear Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Al-Quraishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the accuracy of load-deformation behavior, failure mode, and ultimate load capacity for reinforced concrete members subjected to in-plane loadings such as corbels, wall to foundation connections and panels need shear strength behavior to be included. Shear design in reinforced concrete structures depends on crack width, crack slippage and roughness of the surface of cracks. This paper illustrates results of an experimental investigation conducted to investigate the direct shear strength of fiber normal strength concrete (NSC and reactive powder concrete (RPC. The tests were performed along a pre-selected shear plane in concrete members named push-off specimens. The effectiveness of concrete compressive strength, volume fraction of steel fiber, and shear reinforcement ratio on shear transfer capacity were considered in this study. Furthermore, failure modes, shear stress-slip behavior, and shear stress-crack width behavior were also presented in this study. Tests’ results showed that volume fraction of steel fiber and compressive strength of concrete in NSC and RPC play a major role in improving the shear strength of concrete. As expectedly, due to dowel action, the shear reinforcement is the predominant factor in resisting the shear stress. The shear failure of NSC and RPC has the sudden mode of failure (brittle failure with the approximately linear behavior of shear stress-slip relationship till failure. Using RPC instead of NSC with the same amount of steel fibers in constructing the push-off specimen result in high shear strength. In NSC, shear strength influenced by the three major factors; crack surface friction, aggregate interlock and steel fiber content if present. Whereas, RPC has only steel fiber and cracks surface friction influencing the shear strength. Due to cementitious nature of RPC in comparisons with NSC, the RPC specimen shows greater cracks width. It is observed that the Mattock model gives very satisfactory

  15. Diagonal Cracking and Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping

    1997-01-01

    The shear failure of non-shear-reinforced concrete beams with normal shear span ratios is observed to be governed in general by the formation of a critical diagonal crack. Under the hypothesis that the cracking of concrete introduces potential yield lines which may be more dangerous than the ones...... found by the usual plastic theory, a physical explanation is given for this phenomenon and a way to estimate the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams, based on the theory of plasticity, is described. The theoretical calculations are shown to be in fairly good agreement with test results from...

  16. Failure modes of low-rise shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Reed, J.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of available data concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. These data will be used to address two failure modes associated with shear wall structures. First, the data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls are examined, with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure. Second, the data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary for computing the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional

  17. Shear weakening for different lithologies observed at different saturation stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diethart-Jauk, Elisabeth; Gegenhuber, Nina

    2018-01-01

    For this study, samples from different lithologies ("Leitha"-limestone, "Dachstein"-limestone, "Haupt"-dolomite, "Bunt"-sandstone, Grey Berea sandstone, granite, quartzite and basalt) were selected. Samples were dried at 70 °C, respectively 105 °C and were saturated with brine. Mass, porosity, permeability, compressional and shear wave velocity were determined from dry and brine saturated samples at laboratory conditions, based on an individual measurement program. Shear modulus was calculated to find out, if shear weakening exists for the dataset. Shear weakening means that shear modulus of dry samples is higher than of saturated samples, but it is assumed that shear modulus is unaffected by saturation. "Dachstein"-limestone and basalt show shear weakening, quartzite samples show both weakening and hardening. Granite samples are affected by temperature, after drying with 105 °C no change can be observed anymore. "Bunt"-sandstone samples show a change in the shear modulus in a small extent, although they may contain clay minerals. The other lithologies show no effect. Explanations for carbonate samples can be the complicated pore structure, for basalt it could be that weathering creates clay minerals which are known as causes for a change of the shear modulus. Fluid viscosity can also be an important factor.

  18. Macroscopic assessment of cartilage shear: effects of counter-surface roughness, synovial fluid lubricant, and compression offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Wong, Benjamin L; Chun, June; Yoon, Yeoung C; Talke, Frank E; Sah, Robert L

    2010-06-18

    During joint articulation, cartilage is subjected to compression, shear, and sliding, mechanical factors that regulate and affect cartilage metabolism. The objective of this study was to use an in vitro material-on-cartilage shear test to elucidate the effects of counter-surface roughness (Polished, Mildly rough, and Rough), lubricants (phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and bovine synovial fluid (bSF)), and compression offset on the shearing and sliding of normal human talar cartilage under dynamic lateral displacement. Peak shear stress (sigma(xz,m)) and strain (E(xz,m)) increased with increasing platen roughness and compression offset, and were 30% higher with PBS than with bSF. Compared to PBS, bSF was more effective as a lubricant for P than for M and R platens as indicated by the higher reduction in kinetic friction coefficient (-60% vs. -20% and -19%, respectively), sigma(xz,m) (-50% vs. -14% and -17%) and E(xz,m) (-54% vs. -19% and -17%). Cartilage shear and sliding were evident for all counter-surfaces either at low compression offset (10%) or with high lateral displacement (70%), regardless of lubricant. An increase in tissue shear occurred with either increased compression offset or increased surface roughness. This material and biomechanical test system allow control of cartilage sigma(xz,m) and E(xz,m), and hence, sliding magnitude, for an imposed lateral displacement. It therefore can facilitate study of cartilage mechanobiological responses to distinct regimes of cartilage loading and articulation, such as shear with variable amounts of sliding. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laminar shear flow increases hydrogen sulfide and activates a nitric oxide producing signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Chen, Chang-Ting; Chen, Chi-Shia; Wang, Yun-Ming; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Wang, Danny Ling

    2015-09-04

    Laminar shear flow triggers a signaling cascade that maintains the integrity of endothelial cells (ECs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a new gasotransmitter is regarded as an upstream regulator of nitric oxide (NO). Whether the H2S-generating enzymes are correlated to the enzymes involved in NO production under shear flow conditions remains unclear as yet. In the present study, the cultured ECs were subjected to a constant shear flow (12 dyn/cm(2)) in a parallel flow chamber system. We investigated the expression of three key enzymes for H2S biosynthesis, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and 3-mercapto-sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Shear flow markedly increased the level of 3-MST. Shear flow enhanced the production of H2S was determined by NBD-SCN reagent that can bind to cysteine/homocystein. Exogenous treatment of NaHS that can release gaseous H2S, ECs showed an increase of phosphorylation in Akt(S473), ERK(T202/Y204) and eNOS(S1177). This indicated that H2S can trigger the NO-production signaling cascade. Silencing of CSE, CBS and 3-MST genes by siRNA separately attenuated the phosphorylation levels of Akt(S473) and eNOS(S1177) under shear flow conditions. The particular mode of shear flow increased H2S production. The interplay between H2S and NO-generating enzymes were discussed in the present study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rheometry-PIV of shear-thickening wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Santibañez, Benjamín M; Pérez-Gonzalez, José; de Vargas, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Huelsz, Guadalupe

    2006-04-25

    The shear-thickening behavior of an equimolar semidilute aqueous solution of 40 mM/L cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was studied in this work by using a combined method of rheometry and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Experiments were conducted at 27.5 degrees C with Couette, vane-bob, and capillary rheometers in order to explore a wide shear stress range as well as the effect of boundary conditions and time of flow on the creation and destruction of shear-induced structures (SIS). The use of the combined method of capillary rheometry with PIV allowed the detection of fast spatial and temporal variations in the flow kinematics, which are related to the shear-thickening behavior and the dynamics of the SIS but are not distinguished by pure rheometrical measurements. A rich-in-details flow curve was found for this solution, which includes five different regimes. Namely, at very low shear rates a Newtonian behavior was found, followed by a shear thinning one in the second regime. In the third, shear banding was observed, which served as a precursor of the SIS and shear-thickening. The fourth and fifth regimes in the flow curve were separated by a spurtlike behavior, and they clearly evidenced the existence of shear-thickening accompanied by stick-slip oscillations at the wall of the rheometer, which subsequently produced variations in the shear rate under shear stress controlled flow. Such a stick-slip phenomenon prevailed up to the highest shear stresses used in this work and was reflected in asymmetric velocity profiles with spatial and temporal variations linked to the dynamics of creation and breakage of the SIS. The presence of apparent slip at the wall of the rheometer provides an energy release mechanism which leads to breakage of the SIS, followed by their further reformation during the stick part of the cycles. In addition, PIV measurements allowed the detection of apparent slip at the wall, as well as mechanical failures in the bulk of the

  1. Lattice shear distortions in fluorite structure oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, J. Jr.; Mueller, M.H.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Crystallographic shear distortions have been observed in fluorite structure, single crystals of UO 2 and Zr(Ca)O 2 /sub-x/ by neutron-diffraction techniques. These distortions localize on the oxygen sublattice and do not require the presence of an external strain. The internal rearrangement mode in UO 2 is a transverse, zone boundary q vector = 2π/a (0.5, 0.0) deformation with amplitude 0.014 A. In Zr(Ca)O/sub 2-x/, the mode is a longitudinal, q vector = 2-/a (0,0,0.5) deformation with amplitude 0.23 A. Cation-anion elastic interactions dominate in selecting the nature of the internal distortion

  2. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Ruigrok, Elmer; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal component for S waves. More importantly, Earth's rotation leads to a slow rotation of the transverse polarization of S waves; during the propagation of S waves the particle motion behaves just like a Foucault pendulum. The polarization plane of shear waves counteracts Earth's rotation and rotates clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. The rotation rate is independent of the wave frequency and is purely geometric, like the Berry phase. Using the polarization of ScS and ScS2 waves, we show that the Foucault-like rotation of the S wave polarization can be observed. This can affect the determination of source mechanisms and the interpretation of observed SKS splitting.

  3. Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

  4. Shear sum rules at finite chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Justin R.; Jain, Sachin; Thakur, Somyadip

    2012-03-01

    We derive sum rules which constrain the spectral density corresponding to the retarded propagator of the T xy component of the stress tensor for three gravitational duals. The shear sum rule is obtained for the gravitational dual of the mathcal{N} = {4} Yang-Mills, theory of the M2-branes and M5-branes all at finite chemical potential. We show that at finite chemical potential there are additional terms in the sum rule which involve the chemical potential. These modifications are shown to be due to the presence of scalars in the operator product expansion of the stress tensor which have non-trivial vacuum expectation values at finite chemical potential.

  5. Optimal recovery from microburst wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulgund, Sandeep S.

    1993-01-01

    Severe low-altitude wind variability represents an infrequent but significant hazard to aircraft taking off or landing. During the period from 1964 to 1985, microburst wind shear was a contributing factor in at least 26 civil aviation accidents involving nearly 500 fatalities and over 200 injuries. A microburst is a strong localized downdraft that strikes the ground, creating winds that diverge radially from the impact point. The physics of microbursts have only been recently understood in detail, and it has been found that effective recovery from inadvertent encounters may require piloting techniques that are counter-intuitive to flight crews. The goal of this work was to optimize the flight path of a twin-jet transport aircraft encountering a microburst during approach to landing. The objective was to execute an escape maneuver that maintained safe ground clearance and an adequate stall margin during the climb-out portion of the trajectory.

  6. Research Advances on Fabricated Shear Wall System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Donghui; Wang, Sheng; Zhai, Yu

    2018-03-01

    With the rapid development of the construction industry, building energy consumption has been increasing, has become a problem that can not be ignored. It is imperative to develop energy-saving buildings. A new type of prefabricated shear wall is assembled and partially assembled by prefabricated parts, and some concrete is spliced together. The new structure has good integrity, seismic resistance and excellent energy saving and environmental protection performance. It reduces building energy consumption to a great extent. Therefore, the design method, manufacturing process, site assembly process and key technical problems of the system are discussed. For the construction industry gradually entered the energy conservation, environmental protection, safety and durability of sustainable development laid the foundation.

  7. Shear Adhesive Connections for Glass Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalická, K.; Horčičková, I.; Eliášová, M.

    2015-11-01

    Unique aesthetical properties of glass - not only transparency but also smooth, glossy and primarily reflective surface - give this material special importance in the contemporary architecture. In every structural application of glass it is necessary to solve the problem associated with connections between glass pane and other part from a different material or between two glass elements. Moreover, there are many types of hybrid structures that combine glass and different materials to achieve safe failure behaviour and high degree of transparency at the same time. Connection of brittle glass and reinforcing material is an essential part of these structures, where composite action between two parts is beneficially ensured by a glued joint. The current paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of mechanical characteristics of adhesives applied in planar connections under shear loading.

  8. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  9. Nonlinear evolution of layered stratified shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, Colm-Cille

    2000-11-01

    We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that such flows are unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these Taylor modes at finite amplitude through numerical simulations. Through considering the long-time evolution of such flows, we investigate how secondary instabilities, and the layered background density profile, affect merging between neighbouring Taylor billows, and alter the irreversible mixing of the background stratification as the flow undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  10. Reynolds stress and shear flow generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    2001-01-01

    The so-called Reynolds stress may give a measure of the self-consistent flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas by the small-scale turbulent fluctuations. A measurement of the Reynolds stress can thus help to predict flows, e.g. shear flows in plasmas. This may assist the understanding...... of improved confinement scenarios such as H-mode confinement regimes. However, the determination of the Reynolds stress requires measurements of the plasma potential, a task that is difficult in general and nearly impossible in hot plasmas in large devices. In this work we investigate an alternative method......, based on density measurements, to estimate the Reynolds stress, and demonstrate the validity range of this quantity, which we term the pseudo-Reynolds stress. The advantage of such a quantity is that accurate measurements of density fluctuations are much easier to obtain experimentally. Prior...

  11. Fluid shear stress induction of COX-2 protein and prostaglandin release in cultured MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts does not require intact microfilaments or microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Suzanne M; Ponik, Suzanne M; Bowen, Deidre K; Gerard, Rita; Pavalko, Fredrick M

    2004-03-01

    Cultured osteoblasts express three major types of cytoskeleton: actin microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments. The cytoskeletal network is thought to play an important role in the transmission and conversion of a mechanical stimulus into a biochemical response. To examine a role for the three different cytoskeletal networks in fluid shear stress-induced signaling in osteoblasts, we individually disrupted actin microfilaments, micro-tubules, and intermediate filaments in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts with multiple pharmacological agents. We subjected these cells to 90 min of laminar fluid shear stress (10 dyn/cm(2)) and compared the PGE(2) and PGI(2) release and induction of cyclooxygenase-2 protein to control cells with intact cytoskeletons. Disruption of actin microfilaments, microtubules, or intermediate filaments in MC3T3-E1 cells did not prevent a significant fluid shear stress-induced release of PGE(2) or PGI(2). Furthermore, disruption of actin microfilaments or microtubules did not prevent a significant fluid shear stress-induced increase in cyclooxygenase-2 protein levels. Disruption of intermediate filaments with acrylamide did prevent the fluid shear stress-induced increase in cyclooxygenase-2 but also prevented a PGE(2)-induced increase in cyclooxygenase-2. Thus none of the three major cytoskeletal networks are required for fluid shear stress-induced prostaglandin release. Furthermore, although neither actin microfilaments nor microtubules are required for fluid shear stress-induced increase in cyclooxygenase-2 levels, the role of intermediate filaments in regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression is less clear.

  12. Study on load-deflection characteristics of heavily reinforced concrete shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, R.; Chiba, O.; Hatori, T.; Yagishita, K.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty seven specimens of reinforced concrete shear walls are employed and many effective results are obtained. The outline of this experimental study, the equation to estimate the maximum shear strength, the skeleton curves and the hysteresis loops on the shear deformation, and the shear deformations at the maximum shear strength, etc. are introduced. (orig./HP)

  13. Shear thickening of Laponite suspensions with poly (ethylene oxide)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fall, A.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect of addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO) on the rheological behavior of suspensions of Laponite. Experiments were performed on mixtures of PEO and Laponite at different concentrations. These mixtures can exhibit very strong shear thickening behavior: under shear, the suspension

  14. Parametric excitation of drift waves in a sheared slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, J.; Weiland, J.

    1992-01-01

    The threshold for parametric excitation of drift waves in a sheared slab geometry is calculated for a pump wave that is a standing wave along the magnetic field, using the Hasegawa-Mima nonlinearity. The shear damping is counteracted by the parametric coupling and the eigenvalue problem is solved analytically using Taylor's strong coupling approximation. (au)

  15. Solitary drift waves in the presence of magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiss, J.D.; Horton, W.

    1982-07-01

    The two-component fluid equations describing electron drift and ion acoustic waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma are shown to possess nonlinear two-dimensional solitary wave solutions. In the presence of magnetic shear, radiative shear damping is exponentially small in L/sub s//L/sub n/ for solitary drift waves, in contrast to linear waves

  16. Midbroken Reinforced Concrete Shear Frames Due to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. U.; Cakmak, A. S.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    A non-linear hysteretic model for the response and local damage analyses of reinforced concrete shear frames subject to earthquake excitation is proposed, and, the model is applied to analyse midbroken reinforced concrete (RC) structures due to earthquake loads. Each storey of the shear frame...

  17. Large Scale Scanning Probe Microscope "Making Shear Force Scanning visible."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, E.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; van der Veen, Jan T.; van der Veen, J.T.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Wessel, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a demonstration of a scanning probe microscope with shear-force tuning fork feedback. The tuning fork is several centimeters long, and the rigid fiber is replaced by a toothpick. By scaling this demonstration to visible dimensions the accessibility of shear-force scanning and tuning fork

  18. Influence of steady shear flow on dynamic viscoelastic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rheological parameters such as loss modulus (″) and dynamic viscosity (′) do not vary significantly on superposing steady state shear with oscillatory shear in the studied range of experiment at 185°C in un-reinforced LLDPE. Kevlar fibre reinforced LLDPE and Kevlar/glass fibre reinforced LLDPE showed significant ...

  19. Structure parameter of electrorheological fluids in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jile; Tian, Yu; Meng, Yonggang

    2011-05-17

    A structure parameter, Sn = η(c)γ/τ(E), is proposed to represent the increase of effective viscosity due to the introduction of particles into a viscous liquid and to analyze the shear behavior of electrorheological (ER) fluids. Sn can divide the shear curves of ER fluids, τ/E(2) versus Sn, into three regimes, with two critical values Sn(c) of about 10(-4) and 10(-2), respectively. The two critical Sn(c) are applicable to ER fluids with different particle volume fractions φ in a wide range of shear rate γ and electric field E. When Sn fluids is mainly dominated by E and by shear rate when Sn > 10(-2). The electric current of ER fluids under E varied with shear stress in the same or the opposite trend in different shear rate ranges. Sn(c) also separates the conductivity variation of ER fluids into three regimes, corresponding to different structure evolutions. The change of Sn with particle volume fraction and E has also been discussed. The shear thickening in ER fluids can be characterized by Sn(c)(L) and Sn(c)(H) with a critical value about 10(-6). As an analogy to friction, the correspondence between τ/E(2) and friction coefficient, Sn and bearing numbers, as well as the similarity between the shear curve of ER fluids and the Stribeck curve of friction, indicate a possible friction origin in ER effect.

  20. Interfacial stresses in strengthened beam with shear cohesive zone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... This paper presents an analytical solution, based on Smith and Teng's equations, for interfacial shear and normal stresses in reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with a fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) plate. However, the shear stress–strain relationship is considered to be bilinear curve.

  1. Shear crack formation and propagation in reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short randomly distributed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber beams with different stirrup arrangements and conventional reinforced concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison. The shear crack formation mechanism of ECC...

  2. Shear jamming in granular experiments without basal friction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, H.; Dijksman, J.A.; Behringer, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Jammed states of frictional granular systems can be induced by shear strain at densities below the isostatic jamming density $(\\\\phi_c)$ . It remains unclear, however, how much friction affects this so-called shear jamming. Friction appears in two ways in this type of experiment: friction between

  3. Experimental investigation of separated shear layer from a leading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    leading edge is investigated for a range of angles of attack under different pressure gradients for a .... strate the features of separated shear layer over a semi-circular leading edge and showed that the instability ..... Figure 7. Effect of pressure gradient on the growth of shear layer detailed from the onset of separation to.

  4. Review on symmetric structures in ductile shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2017-07-01

    Symmetric structures in ductile shear zones range widely in shapes and geneses. Matrix rheology, its flow pattern, its competency contrast with the clast, degree of slip of the clast, shear intensity and its variation across shear zone and deformation temperature, and degree of confinement of clast in shear zones affects (independently) the degree of symmetry of objects. Kinematic vorticity number is one of the parameters that govern tail geometry across clasts. For example, symmetric and nearly straight tails develop if the clast-matrix system underwent dominantly a pure shear/compression. Prolonged deformation and concomitant recrystallization can significantly change the degree of symmetry of clasts. Angular relation between two shear zones or between a shear zone and anisotropy determines fundamentally the degree of symmetry of lozenges. Symmetry of boudinaged clasts too depends on competency contrast between the matrix and clast in some cases, and on the degrees of slip of inter-boudin surfaces and pure shear. Parasitic folds and post-tectonic veins are usually symmetric.

  5. Short Communications The effect of shearing pregnant ewes prior to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shearing of winter-lambing ewes prior to lambing, although effects on lamb birth mass and survival were ... The effect on lambs of shearing ewes prior to lambing in pad- docks has not been researched to the same ..... production and feed intake in unmated and mated Border Leicester x. Romney crossbred ewes shorn in ...

  6. Contrasting metamorphism across Cauvery Shear Zone, south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Palghat Cauvery Shear Zone (CSZ) is a major shear zone that possibly extends into different fragments of Gondwanaland. In the present study mafic granulites occurring on either side of the CSZ in Namakkal area, southern India are examined. Textural features recorded in the mafic granulites are crucial in elucidating ...

  7. Shear rheological properties of fresh human faeces with different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples were further tested for moisture content, total solids, volatile content, and ash content. Faecal samples were found to have a yield stress; there was a decrease in apparent viscosity with increasing shear rate. For any given shear rate, higher apparent viscosities are associated with lower moisture contents. Across a ...

  8. Ordering fluctuations in a shear-banding wormlike micellar system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelico, R.; Rossi, C. Oliviero; Ambrosone, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a first investigation about the non-linear flow properties and transient orientational-order fluctuations observed in the shear-thinning lecithin–water–cyclohexane wormlike micellar system at a concentration near to the zero-shear isotropic–nematic phase transition. From rheological...

  9. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...

  10. A refined shear deformation theory for flexure of thick beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwaraj M. Ghugal

    Full Text Available A Hyperbolic Shear Deformation Theory (HPSDT taking into account transverse shear deformation effects, is used for the static flexure analysis of thick isotropic beams. The displacement field of the theory contains two variables. The hyperbolic sine function is used in the displacement field in terms of thickness coordinate to represent shear deformation. The transverse shear stress can be obtained directly from the use of constitutive relations, satisfying the shear stress-free boundary conditions at top and bottom of the beam. Hence, the theory obviates the need of shear correction factor. Governing differential equations and boundary conditions of the theory are obtained using the principle of virtual work. General solutions of thick isotropic simply supported, cantilever and fixed beams subjected to uniformly distributed and concentrated loads are obtained. Expressions for transverse displacement of beams are obtained and contribution due to shear deformation to the maximum transverse displacement is investigated. The results of the present theory are compared with those of other refined shear deformation theories of beam to verify the accuracy of the theory.

  11. On Howard's conjecture in heterogeneous shear flow problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Howard's conjecture, which states that in the linear instability problem of inviscid heterogeneous parallel shear flow growth rate of an arbitrary unstable wave must approach zero as the wave length decreases to zero, is established in a mathematically rigorous fashion for plane parallel heterogeneous shear flows ...

  12. Nonlinear genetic-based simulation of soil shear strength parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New nonlinear solutions were developed to estimate the soil shear strength parameters utilizing linear genetic programming (LGP). The soil cohesion intercept () and angle of shearing resistance () were formulated in terms of the basic soil physical properties. The best models were selected after developing and ...

  13. Shear capacity of slabs under a combination of loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.; Van der Veen, C.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Existing solid slab bridges under a combination of wheel loads and distributed traffic loads sometimes do not fulfil the code requirements for shear. However, reinforced concrete slabs loaded close to the support are subjected to shear stresses which might result in a failure mode of combined

  14. Shear Strength of Concrete I-Beams - Contributions of Flanges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teoh, B. K.; Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of flanges to the shear strength of reinforced concrete beams has up to now either been neglected or evaluated by very simple empirical formulas. However, the contribution may sometimes be large, up to 20-30%. In this paper the flange contribution for shear reinforced I-beams has...

  15. Structural behavior of human lumbar intervertebral disc under direct shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Häussler, Kim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Wolfram, Uwe

    2015-03-18

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is a complex, flexible joint between adjacent vertebral bodies that provides load transmission while permitting movements of the spinal column. Finite element models can be used to help clarify why and how IVDs fail or degenerate. To do so, it is of importance to validate those models against controllable experiments. Due to missing experimental data, shear properties are not used thus far in validating finite element models. This study aimed to investigate the structural shear properties of human lumbar IVDs in posteroanterior (PA) and laterolateral (LL) loading directions. Fourteen lumbar IVDs (median age: 49 years) underwent direct shear in PA and LL loading directions. A custom-build shear device was used in combination with a materials testing machine to load the specimens until failure. Shear stiffness, ultimate shear force and displacement, and work to failure were determined. Each specimen was tested until complete or partial disruption. Median stiffness in PA direction was 490 N/mm and in LL direction 568 N/mm. Median ultimate shear force in the PA direction was 2,877 N and in the LL direction 3,199 N. Work to failure was 12 Nm in the PA and 9 Nm in the LL direction. This study was an experiment to subject IVDs to direct shear. The results could help us to understand the structure and function of IVDs with regard to mechanical spinal stability, and they can be used to validate finite element models of the IVD.

  16. Harvesting short rotation woody crops with a shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington Cardoso; Dana Mitchell; Tom Gallagher; Daniel. and de Souza

    2014-01-01

    A time and motion study was performed on a skid steer equipped with a 14-inch tree shear attachment. The machine was used to install initial coppice harvesting treatments on three stands across the south. The study included one willow and two cottonwood sites. The stands averaged from 2 to 4 years old. Approximately 200 trees were shear harvested from each of the...

  17. Methodology for calculating shear stress in a meandering channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung-Seop Sin

    2010-01-01

    Shear stress in meandering channels is the key parameter to predict bank erosion and bend migration. A representative study reach of the Rio Grande River in central New Mexico has been modeled in the Hydraulics Laboratory at CSU. To determine the shear stress distribution in a meandering channel, the large scale (1:12) physical modeling study was conducted in the...

  18. Shear and Anchorage Behaviour of Fire Exposed Hollow Core Slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Hollow core (HC) slabs are made of precast concrete with pretensioned strands. These slabs are popular as floor structures in offices and housing. At ambient conditions, the load bearing capacity can be dominated by four different failure modes, i.e. flexure, anchorage, shear compression and shear

  19. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.; Stark, J.; Walraven, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests showed that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. As the shear and anchorage capacity of these slabs rely on the tensile strength of the concrete,

  20. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers (presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-06-05

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites for diverse areas in the central plains (Texas to North Dakota)--Turbines hub heights are now 70-100 m above ground and Wind measurements at 70-100+ m have been rare. (2) Present conclusions about wind shear characteristics for prime wind energy development regions.

  1. Seismic strengthening of RC structures with exterior shear walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    performance of exterior RC shear walls (ESW) that are placed parallel to the building's sides. In reality, installing a shear wall to a structural system will surely ..... This study has been carried out with the financial support of State Planning Organization of Turkey with grant number BAP–08–11-DPT.2004K120760, with Middle ...

  2. Weak Weak Lensing : How Accurately Can Small Shears be Measured?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Now that weak lensing signals on the order of a percent are actively being searched for (cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, large radii in clusters...) it is important to investigate how accurately weak shears can be determined. Many systematic effects are present, and need to be

  3. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    Direct measurements of bed shear stresses (using a shear cell apparatus) generated by non-breaking solitary waves are presented. The measurements were carried out over a smooth bed in laminar and transitional flow regimes (~ 10 sup (4) < R sub (e...

  4. NONLINEAR RHEOLOGY OF POLYMER MELTS UNDER SHEAR-FLOW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subbotin, A.V.; Semenov, A.N.; Manias, E; Hadziioannou, G; ten Brinke, G.

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear theology of an unentangled polymer melt under shear flow is considered theoretically. The finite chain extensibility is taken into account explicitly. The tangential stress and the first and the second normal-stress differences are calculated as a function of shear rate gamma. It is

  5. On the nature of shear thinning in nanoscopically confined films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manias, E.; Bitsanis, I.; Hadziioannou, G.; Brinke, G. ten

    1996-01-01

    Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) computer simulations were employed to study films in nanometer confinements under shear. Focusing on the response of the viscosity, we found that nearly all the shear thinning takes place inside the solid-oligomer interface and that the adsorbed layers are

  6. Effects of irregularity and anisotropy on the propagation of shear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The propagation of shear waves differs between geo-media due to layer's structure and irregularity present in different layers. This paper studies the propagation of shear waves in a monoclinic layer with irregularity lying between two isotropic semiinfinite elastic medium. The displacement in the monoclinic layer is obtained ...

  7. Steady shear viscosity of stirred yoghurts with varying ropiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marle, M.E.; van Marle, M.E.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; de Kruif, C.G.; de Kruif, C.G.; Mellema, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stirred yogurt was viewed as a concentrated dispersion of aggregates consisting of protein particles. The steady-shear behavior of three types of stirred yogurt with varying ropiness was investigated experimentally. To describe the shear-dependent viscosity, a microrheological model was used which

  8. Deformation of footwall rock of Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phulad Shear Zone (PSZ) of Delhi Fold Belt in Rajasthan is a northeasterly striking ductile shear zone with a well developed mylonitic foliation (035/70E) and a downdip stretching lineation. The deformation in the PSZ has developed in a transpressional regime with thrusting sense of movement. The northeastern unit, i.e. ...

  9. Shear behavior of concrete beams externally prestressed with Parafil ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Ghallab

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although extensive work has been carried out investigating the use of external prestressing system for flexural strengthening, a few studies regarding the shear behavior of externally prestressed beams can be found. Five beams, four of them were externally strengthened using Parafil rope, were loaded up to failure to investigate the effect of shear span/depth ratio, external prestressing force and concrete strength on their shear behavior. Test results showed that the shear span to depth ratio has a significant effect on both the shear strength and failure mode of the strengthened beams and the presence of external prestressing force increased the ultimate load of the tested beams by about 75%. Equations proposed by different codes for both the conventional reinforced concrete beams and for ordinary prestressed beams were used to evaluate the obtained experimental results. In general, codes equations showed a high level of conservatism in predicting the shear strength of the beams. Also, using the full strength rather than half of the concrete shear strength in the Egyptian code PC-method improves the accuracy of the calculated ultimate shear strength.

  10. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Larsen, Torben J.

    of a uniform inflow. Secondly, a similar analysis was done for cases with direction shear. In each case, we derived a standard power curve (function of the wind speed at hub height) and power curves obtained with various definitions of equivalent wind speed in order to reduce the scatter due to shear. Thirdly...

  11. Effect of rock joint roughness on its cyclic shear behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Mahdi Niktabar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock joints are often subjected to dynamic loads induced by earthquake and blasting during mining and rock cutting. Hence, cyclic shear load can be induced along the joints and it is important to evaluate the shear behavior of rock joint under this condition. In the present study, synthetic rock joints were prepared with plaster of Paris (PoP. Regular joints were simulated by keeping regular asperity with asperity angles of 15°–15° and 30°–30°, and irregular rock joints which are closer to natural joints were replicated by keeping the asperity angles of 15°–30° and 15°–45°. The sample size and amplitude of roughness were kept the same for both regular and irregular joints which were 298 mm × 298 mm × 125 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Shear test was performed on these joints using a large-scale direct shear testing machine by keeping the frequency and amplitude of shear load under constant cyclic condition with different normal stress values. As expected, the shear strength of rock joints increased with the increases in the asperity angle and normal load during the first cycle of shearing or static load. With the increase of the number of shear cycles, the shear strength decreased for all the asperity angles but the rate of reduction was more in case of high asperity angles. Test results indicated that shear strength of irregular joints was higher than that of regular joints at different cycles of shearing at low normal stress. Shearing and degradation of joint asperities on regular joints were the same between loading and unloading, but different for irregular joints. Shear strength and joint degradation were more significant on the slope of asperity with higher angles on the irregular joint until two angles of asperities became equal during the cycle of shearing and it started behaving like regular joints for subsequent cycles.

  12. The DES Science Verification Weak Lensing Shear Catalogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogs for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogs of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We also detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. Furthermore, we discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogs for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees

  13. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  14. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength.

  15. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The s-α diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, ω A =V A /qR. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  17. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  18. Shear behavior of reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC) beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear and if ECC can partially or fully replace the conventional transverse steel reinforcement in beams. However, there is a lack of understanding of how the fibers affect the shear carrying capacity and deformation behavior of structural members if used either...... in combination with conventional transverse reinforcement or exclusively to provide shear resistance. The experimental investigation focuses on the influence of fibers on the shear caring capacity and the crack development in ECC beams subjected to shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short...... randomly distributed PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber beams with different stirrup spacing and reinforced concrete (RC) beams for comparison. Displacement and strain measurements taken using the ARAMIS photogrammetric data acquisition system by means of processing at high frame rate captured images of applied...

  19. Shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Lima Araújo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the mechanical behavior of shear strength of steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams. Six beams subjected to shear loading were tested until failure. Additionally, prisms were tested to evaluate fiber contribution to the concrete shear strength. Steel fibers were straight, hook-ended,35 mmlong and aspect ratio equal to 65. Volumetric fractions used were 1.0 and 2.0%. The results demonstrated a great contribution from steel fibers to shear strength of reinforced concrete beams and to reduce crack width, which can reduce the amount of stirrups in reinforced concrete structures. Beam capacity was also evaluated by empirical equations, and it was found that these equations provided a high variability, while some of them have not properly predicted the ultimate shear strength of the steel fiber-reinforced concrete beams.

  20. Study on the Critical Shear Stress of Cohesive Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei-dong; An, Jian-feng

    2017-12-01

    Since the measurements of bulk property parameters of cohesive sediments can be done easily, it is useful to relate the critical shear stress of cohesive sediments to some of these parameters. In this paper, data from two experiments are reanalysed and the dependence of the critical shear stress on bulk density, clay solid content and clay volume content is highlighted. The results from Sharif demonstrate the critical shear stress as a function of bulk density and clay solid content, while that from Kothyari and Jain indicate that the critical shear stress depends on both the clay solid content and clay volume content of cohesive sediments in the presence of gravel and air. Moreover, it is concluded a critical clay solid content exists around 18%, beyond which the critical shear stress increases rapidly with the increase of bulk density.

  1. Shear-induced inflation of coronal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimchuk, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Using numerical models of force-free magnetic fields, the shearing of footprints in arcade geometries leading to an inflation of the coronal magnetic field was examined. For each of the shear profiles considered, all of the field lines become elevated compared with the potential field. This includes cases where the shear is concentrated well away from the arcade axis, such that B(sub z), the component of field parallel to the axis, increases outward to produce an inward B(sub z) squared/8 pi magnetic pressure gradient force. These results contrast with an earlier claim, shown to be incorrect, that field lines can sometimes become depressed as a result of shear. It is conjectured that an inflation of the entire field will always result from the shearing of simple arcade configurations. These results have implications for prominence formation, the interplanetary magnetic flux, and possibly also coronal holes. 38 refs

  2. Human capability in the perception of extensional and shear viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhihong; Chen, Jianshe; Holmes, Melvin

    2017-10-01

    Shear and extensional deformation are two basic rheological phenomena which occur commonly in our daily life. Because of the very different nature of the two deformations, fluid materials may exhibit significant differences in their responses to shear and extensional forces. This work investigated the human perception of shear and extensional viscosity and tested the hypothesis that human have different discriminatory sensation mechanisms including scaling to the two deformations. A series of fluid samples were prepared using two common food thickeners, guar gum and sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC-Na). The shear and extensional flow behavior of these fluids were assessed using shear and extensional rheometers and in addition two separate sensory analysis sessions were organized to assess human sensitivity in perceiving the two viscosities. Magnitude estimation was used in the first session to assess human sensitivity in the perception of the shear and extensional viscosities and just-noticeable-difference (JND) assessment was used for the second session to identify the typical threshold of viscosity discrimination. For the participants considered, it was found that the perception of both shear and extensional viscosity follow a power law relationship i.e. Steven's law. It was also observed that the human has a greater discriminatory capacity in perceiving extensional viscosity. JND analysis showed that the human threshold in detecting shear viscosity difference was 9.33%, but only 6.20% for extensional viscosity. Shear and extensional deformation are two basic rheological properties which occur during food manipulation, mastication, deglutition executed during oral consumption and also in the processing and packaging of foods. Fluid resistance against shear and extensional deformation differ widely and whilst this has been confirmed theoretically and experimentally, a clear understanding of human perception of these properties will have beneficial returns to

  3. Experimental investigations into the shear behavior of self-compacting RC beams with and without shear reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar N. HANOON

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC is a new generation of high-performance concrete, known for its excellent deformability and high resistance to segregation and bleeding. Nonetheless, SCC may be incapable of resisting shear because the shear resistance mechanisms of this concrete are uncertain, especially the aggregate interlock mechanism. This uncertainty is attributed to the fact that SCC contains a smaller amount of coarse aggregates than normal concrete (NC does. This study focuses on the shear strength of self-compacting reinforced concrete (RC beams with and without shear reinforcement. A total of 16 RC beam specimens was manufactured and tested in terms of shear span-to-depth ratio and flexural and shear reinforcement ratio. The test results were compared with those of the shear design equations developed by ACI, BS, CAN and NZ codes. Results show that an increase in web reinforcement enhanced cracking strength and ultimate load. Shear-tension failure was the control failure in all tested beams.

  4. Comparison of bed shear under non-breaking and breaking solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    New experimental measurements of bed shear under solitary waves and solitary bores that represent tsunamis are presented. The total bed shear stress was measured directly using a shear cell apparatus. The solitary wave characteristics were measured...

  5. Edge shear flows and particle transport near the density limit of the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, R.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Nie, L.; Guo, D.; Long, T.; Ke, R.; Wu, Y.; Yuan, B.; Xu, M.; The HL-2A Team

    2018-01-01

    Edge shear flow and its effect on regulating turbulent transport have long been suspected to play an important role in plasmas operating near the Greenwald density limit n G. In this study, equilibrium profiles as well as the turbulent particle flux and Reynolds stress across the separatrix in the HL-2A tokamak are examined as nG is approached in ohmic L-mode discharges. As the normalized line-averaged density \\bar{n}_e/nG is raised, the shearing rate of the mean poloidal flow ω_sh drops, and the turbulent drive for the low-frequency zonal flow (the Reynolds power P_Re ) collapses. Correspondingly, the turbulent particle transport increases drastically with increasing collision rates. The geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) gain more energy from the ambient turbulence at higher densities, but have smaller shearing rate than low-frequency zonal flows. The increased density also introduces decreased adiabaticity which not only enhances the particle transport but is also related to reduction in the eddy-tilting and the Reynolds power. Both effects may lead to cooling of edge plasmas and therefore the onset of MHD instabilities that limit the plasma density.

  6. Characterization of the relationship between systolic shear strain and early diastolic shear strain rates: insights into torsional recoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard B; Paterson, Ian; Chow, Kelvin; Cheng-Baron, June; Scott, Jessica M; Esch, Ben T; Ennis, Daniel B; Haykowsky, Mark J

    2010-09-01

    Early diastolic left ventricular (LV) untwisting has been evaluated as a manifestation of LV recoil, reflecting the release of elastic energy stored during systole. The primary goal of this study was to characterize the relationship between systolic strain (e.g., circumferential strain and the shear strains that comprise twist) with the resulting early diastolic shear strain rates, including the rate of untwisting. A further goal was to characterize these relationships regionally from apical to basal locations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging tissue tagging was used to measure circumferential strain, global and regional (apex, mid, basal) twist (theta), and circumferential-longitudinal (epsilon(CL)) and circumferential-radial (epsilon(CR)) shear strains along with the corresponding untwisting rates (dtheta/dt) and diastolic shear strain rates (depsilon/dt) in 32 healthy males (33 +/- 7 yr). LV untwisting rates and shear strain rates measured during early diastole varied significantly with the measurement location from apex to base (P 0.05). Normalization of the untwisting rates to the peak twist (dtheta/dt(Norm) = -13.6 +/- 2.1 s(-1)) or shear strain rates to peak systolic shear strain (depsilon(CL)/dt(Norm) = -15.0 +/- 5.4 s(-1), and depsilon(CR)/dt(Norm) = -14.2 +/- 7.7 s(-1)) yielded a uniform measure of early diastolic function that was similar for all shear strain and twist components and for all locations from apex to base. These findings support a linear model of torsional recoil in the healthy heart, where diastolic shear strain rates (e.g., untwisting rates) are linearly related to the corresponding preceding systolic shear stain component. Furthermore, these findings suggest that torsional recoil is uncoupled from end-systolic volumes or the associated strains, such as circumferential strain.

  7. Function of Integrin-Linked Kinase in Modulating the Stemness of IL-6–Abundant Breast Cancer Cells by Regulating γ-Secretase–Mediated Notch1 Activation in Caveolae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Chi Hsu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and Notch signaling are important regulators of breast cancer stem cells (CSCs, which drive the malignant phenotype through self-renewal, differentiation, and development of therapeutic resistance. We investigated the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK in regulating IL-6–driven Notch1 activation and the ability to target breast CSCs through ILK inhibition. Ectopic expression/short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of ILK, pharmacological inhibition of ILK with the small molecule T315, Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence, and luciferase reporter assays were used to evaluate the regulation of IL-6–driven Notch1 activation by ILK in IL-6–producing triple-negative breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, SUM-159 and in MCF-7 and MCF-7IL-6 cells. The effects of ILK on γ-secretase complex assembly and cellular localization were determined by immunofluorescence, Western blots of membrane fractions, and immunoprecipitation. In vivo effects of T315-induced ILK inhibition on CSCs in SUM-159 xenograft models were assessed by mammosphere assays, flow cytometry, and tumorigenicity assays. Results show that the genetic knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of ILK suppressed Notch1 activation and the abundance of the γ-secretase components presenilin-1, nicastrin, and presenilin enhancer 2 at the posttranscriptional level via inhibition of caveolin-1-dependent membrane assembly of the γ-secretase complex. Accordingly, knockdown of ILK inhibited breast CSC-like properties in vitro and the breast CSC subpopulation in vivo in xenograft tumor models. Based on these findings, we propose a novel function of ILK in regulating γ-secretase–mediated Notch1 activation, which suggests the targeting of ILK as a therapeutic approach to suppress IL-6–induced breast CSCs.

  8. Regulation of iNOS-Derived ROS Generation by HSP90 and Cav-1 in Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus-Infected Swine Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meiping; Hou, Make; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Songlin; Liu, Bang; Wu, Xiaoxiong; Liu, Guoquan

    2017-08-01

    In the lungs, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is usually expressed in endothelial cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is mainly expressed in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. Both eNOS and iNOS are involved in lung inflammation. While they play several roles in lung inflammation formation and resolution, their expression and activity are also regulated by inflammatory factors. Their expression relationship in virus infection-induced lung injury is not well addressed. In this report, we analyzed expression of both eNOS and iNOS, the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and expression of their associated regulatory proteins, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1), in a swine lung injury model induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. The combination of upregulation of iNOS and downregulation of eNOS was observed in both natural and experimental PRRSV-infected lungs, while the combination is much enhanced in natural infected lungs. While NO production is much reduced in both infections, ROS was enhanced only in natural infected lungs. Moreover, HSP90 is increased in both natural and experimental infection and less Cav-1 expressed was observed only in the natural PRRSV-infected lungs. Therefore, the increased ROS generation is likely due to the increased iNOS and its unbalanced regulation by HSP90 and Cav-1, and it also likely causes higher endothelial dysfunction in clinical PRRSV-infected lungs.

  9. Nonlinear interaction of Rayleigh--Taylor and shear instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Results on the nonlinear behavior of the Rayleigh--Taylor instability and consequent development of shear flow by the shear instability [Phys. Fluids B 4, 488 (1992)] are presented. It is found that the shear flow is generated at sufficient amplitude to reduce greatly the convective transport. For high viscosity, the time-asymptotic state consists of an equilibrium with shear flow and vortex flow (with islands, or ''cat's eyes''), or a relaxation oscillation involving an interplay between the shear instability and the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in the presence of shear. For low viscosity, the dominant feature is a high-frequency nonlinear standing wave consisting of convective vortices localized near the top and bottom boundaries. The localization of these vortices is due to the smaller shear near the boundary regions. The convective transport is largest around these convective vortices near the boundary and there is a region of good confinement near the center. The possible relevance of this behavior to the H mode and edge-localized modes (ELM's) in the tokamak edge region is discussed

  10. Swinging of two-domains vesicles in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, Annie; Tusch, Simon; Khelloufi, Kamel; Leonetti, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Giant lipid vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow at low shear rates tank tread (TT) at small viscosity ratio between the inner particle volume and the external fluid, and flip or tumble (T) at large viscosity ratio. The phase diagram of motion of red blood cells is however much more complex. Swinging superimposes to TT, cells wobble and roll rather than tumble with increasing shear rate and present a shear-rate driven transition between TT to T. These features are attributed to the shear elasticity and the non spherical stress-free shape of the cell membrane, which stores shear elastic energy as a function of the relative position of its elements. We have created vesicles with a phase diagram of motion comparable to that of red blood cells by preparing membranes with two lipids and cholesterol. These membranes present two domains separated by a contact line. The line has a tension energy that depends on its relative position on the vesicle. Similarly to red blood cells, two-domains vesicles swing and wobble. An analytical model where line tension energy is added to the Keller and Skalak's model fits our experimental data without any adjustable parameter. Our experiments and model shed light on the motion of deformable particles in shear flow.

  11. Phase separating colloid polymer mixtures in shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derks, Didi; Imhof, Arnout [Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Aarts, Dirk G A L [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Bonn, Daniel [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: didi.derks@lps.ens.fr

    2008-10-08

    We study the process of phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures in the (spinodal) two-phase region of the phase diagram in shear flow. We use a counter-rotating shear cell and image the system by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. The system is quenched from an initially almost homogeneous state at very high (200 s{sup -1}) shear rate to a low shear rate {gamma}-dot. A spinodal decomposition pattern is observed. Initially, the characteristic length scale increases linearly with time. As the structure coarsens, the shear imposes a certain length scale on the structure and a clear asymmetry develops. The domains become highly stretched along the flow direction, and the domain width along the vorticity axis reaches a stationary size, which scales as approx. {gamma}-do{sup -0.35}. Furthermore, on quenching from an intermediate (6.7 s{sup -1}) to a low shear rate the elongated structures become Rayleigh unstable and break up into smaller droplets. Still, the system eventually reaches the same steady state as was found from a direct high to low shear rate quench through coarsening.

  12. Small-scale wind shear definition for aerospace vehicle design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    Rawinsonde wind profile data provide adequate wind shear information for vertical height intervals greater than 1 km. To specify wind shears for intervals below 1 km for space vehicle design, detailed wind-profile information like that provided by the FPS-16 Radar/Jimsphere system or an extrapolation procedure is required. This paper is concerned with the latter alternative. It is assumed that any realization from an ensemble of wind profiles can be represented in terms of a Fourier integral. This permits the calculation of the ensemble standard deviation and mean of the corresponding shear ensemble for any altitude and shear interval in terms of the power spectrum of the ensemble of wind profiles. The results of these calculations show that the mean and standard deviation of the wind shear ensemble, as well as the wind shear for any percentile, asymptotically behave like the vertical interval to the 0.7 power. This result is in excellent agreement with shear data from Cape Kennedy, Fla.

  13. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with sheared magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruderman, M. S.; Terradas, J.; Ballester, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities may play a relevant role in many astrophysical problems. In this work the effect of magnetic shear on the growth rate of the MRT instability is investigated. The eigenmodes of an interface and a slab model under the presence of gravity are analytically calculated assuming that the orientation of the magnetic field changes in the equilibrium, i.e., there is magnetic shear. We solve the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations in the incompressible regime. We find that the growth rate is bounded under the presence of magnetic shear. We have derived simple analytical expressions for the maximum growth rate, corresponding to the most unstable mode of the system. These expressions provide the explicit dependence of the growth rate on the various equilibrium parameters. For small angles the growth time is linearly proportional to the shear angle, and in this regime the single interface problem and the slab problem tend to the same result. On the contrary, in the limit of large angles and for the interface problem the growth time is essentially independent of the shear angle. In this regime we have also been able to calculate an approximate expression for the growth time for the slab configuration. Magnetic shear can have a strong effect on the growth rates of the instability. As an application of the results found in this paper we have indirectly determined the shear angle in solar prominence threads using their lifetimes and the estimation of the Alfvén speed of the structure.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with sheared magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruderman, M. S. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Terradas, J.; Ballester, J. L. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2014-04-20

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities may play a relevant role in many astrophysical problems. In this work the effect of magnetic shear on the growth rate of the MRT instability is investigated. The eigenmodes of an interface and a slab model under the presence of gravity are analytically calculated assuming that the orientation of the magnetic field changes in the equilibrium, i.e., there is magnetic shear. We solve the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations in the incompressible regime. We find that the growth rate is bounded under the presence of magnetic shear. We have derived simple analytical expressions for the maximum growth rate, corresponding to the most unstable mode of the system. These expressions provide the explicit dependence of the growth rate on the various equilibrium parameters. For small angles the growth time is linearly proportional to the shear angle, and in this regime the single interface problem and the slab problem tend to the same result. On the contrary, in the limit of large angles and for the interface problem the growth time is essentially independent of the shear angle. In this regime we have also been able to calculate an approximate expression for the growth time for the slab configuration. Magnetic shear can have a strong effect on the growth rates of the instability. As an application of the results found in this paper we have indirectly determined the shear angle in solar prominence threads using their lifetimes and the estimation of the Alfvén speed of the structure.

  15. Tensile and shear methods for measuring strength of bilayer tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shao-Yu; Li, Jian-Xin; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2017-05-15

    Both shear and tensile measurement methods have been used to quantify interfacial bonding strength of bilayer tablets. The shear method is more convenient to perform, but reproducible strength data requires careful control of the placement of tablet and contact point for shear force application. Moreover, data obtained from the shear method depend on the orientation of the bilayer tablet. Although more time-consuming to perform, the tensile method yields data that are straightforward to interpret. Thus, the tensile method is preferred in fundamental bilayer tableting research to minimize ambiguity in data interpretation. Using both shear and tensile methods, we measured the mechanical strength of bilayer tablets made of several different layer combinations of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose. We observed a good correlation between strength obtained by the tensile method and carefully conducted shear method. This suggests that the shear method may be used for routine quality test of bilayer tablets during manufacturing because of its speed and convenience, provided a protocol for careful control of the placement of the tablet interface, tablet orientation, and blade is implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassim M.N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the “scars” due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  17. Mixing by shear, dilation, swap, and diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassart, Laurence; Liu, Qihan; Suo, Zhigang

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a theory of poroviscosity for binary solutions. Subject to mechanical forces and connected to reservoirs of molecules, a binary solution evolves by concurrent flow and diffusion. Our theory generalizes the classical theory of interdiffusion by decoupling the molecular processes for flow and diffusion. We further remove the assumption of local chemical equilibrium, so that the insertion of molecular into a material element, accompanied by a change in volume, is treated as non-equilibrium process and is put on the same footing as the process of shear deformation by viscous flow. The theory of poroviscosity has an intrinsic length scale, called the poroviscous length, below which the homogenization of a composition heterogeneity is limited by viscous flow, rather than by diffusion. The theory has implications for the analysis of interdiffusion in systems that display a decoupling between flow and diffusion, such as supercooled liquids, glasses, and physical gels. We illustrate the theory with numerical examples of a layered structure and a spherical particle. We discuss the results for feature sizes below and above the poroviscous length.

  18. Microfluidic thrombosis under multiple shear rates and antiplatelet therapy doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Li

    Full Text Available The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s(-1 and therapy concentrations (0-2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0-2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA, 3.5-40 Units/L for heparin using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose. Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment.

  19. Development of a Shear Deformable Element Using the Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omar, Mohamed

    2000-01-01

    .... The effect of the shear deformation is accounted for without the need for introducing Timoshenko's shear coefficient By using the absolute coordinates, the nonlinear strain-displacement relationships...

  20. Wall shear stress hot film sensor for use in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, O D; Silin, N

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present the construction and characterization of a wall shear stress hot film sensor for use in gases made with MEMS technology. For this purpose, several associated devices were used, including a constant temperature feedback bridge and a shear stress calibration device that allows the sensor performance evaluation. The sensor design adopted here is simple, economical and is manufactured on a flexible substrate allowing its application to curved surfaces. Stationary and transient wall shear stress tests were carried on by means of the calibration device, determining its performance for different conditions.

  1. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  2. Shear viscosities of photons in strongly coupled plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di-Lun Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the shear viscosity of thermalized photons in the quark gluon plasma (QGP at weak coupling and N=4 super Yang–Mills plasma (SYMP at both strong and weak couplings. We find that the shear viscosity due to the photon–parton scattering up to the leading order of electromagnetic coupling is suppressed when the coupling of the QGP/SYMP is increased, which stems from the blue-shift of the thermal-photon spectrum at strong coupling. In addition, the shear viscosity rapidly increases near the deconfinement transition in a phenomenological model analogous to the QGP.

  3. Thermal convection of viscoelastic shear-thinning fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Khayat, Roger E; Ahmed, Zahir U

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh–Bénard convection for non-Newtonian fluids possessing both viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviours is examined. The Phan-Thien–Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation is implemented to model the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. It is found that while the shear-thinning and viscoelastic effects could annihilate one another for the steady roll flow, presence of both behaviours restricts the roll stability limit significantly compared to the cases when the fluid is either inelastic shear-thinning or purely viscoelastic with constant viscosity. (paper)

  4. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  5. Experimental measurement of granular fabric and its evolution under shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebicke, Max; Andò, Edward; Salvatore, Erminio; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Herle, Ivo

    2017-06-01

    X-ray μ computed tomography (CT) made three-dimensional in-situ imaging of natural granular materials possible. Previous work using x-ray μCT and triaxial compression tests has studied the 3D kinematics of individual grains during shear banding [1]. This works aims to supplement these measurements of kinematics with the measurement of different fabric entities, such as particle or contact orientations. It was found that the individual orientations of the different fabric entities pick up on the forming and the direction of the evolving shear band. The evolution of the anisotropy of the bulk of orientations corresponds to the macroscopic behaviour during the shearing test.

  6. High Resolution Shear Profile Measurements in Entangled Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2008-11-17

    We use confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry to visualize motion of 250-300 nm. fluorescent tracer particles in entangled polymers subject to a rectilinear shear flow. Our results show linear velocity profiles in polymer solutions spanning a wide range of molecular weights and number of entanglements (8≤Z≤56), but reveal large differences between the imposed and measured shear rates. These findings disagree with recent reports that shear banding is a characteristic flow response of entangled polymers, and instead point to interfacial slip as an important source of strain loss. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  7. Response Modification Factor of Coupled Steel Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gholamreza abdollahzadeh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research is concerned with the determination of ductility, over-strength and response modification factors of coupled steel shear wall frames. Three structural models with various numbers of stories, bay width and coupling beam height were analyzed using static pushover and incremental nonlinear dynamic analyses. The ductility, over-strength and response modification factors for the three models are determined. Tentative values of 11.1, 11.6 and 10.6 are suggested for the response modification factor of coupled steel shear wall frames with deep and medium depth coupling beams, and uncoupled steel shear wall frames, respectively in the allowable stress design method.

  8. Experimental analysis of the concrete contribution to shear strength beams without shear reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Samora

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many theories and empirical formulas for estimating the shear strength of reinforced concrete structures without transverse reinforcement. The security factor of any reinforced concrete structure, against a possible collapse, is that it does not depend on the tensile strength of the concrete and the formation of any collapse is ductile, thus giving advance warning. The cracking from tensile stress can cause breakage of the concrete and should be avoided at all cost, with the intent that any such breakage does not incur any type of failure within the structure. In the present research study, experiments were performed in order to analyze the complementary mechanisms of the shear strength of lattice beams of reinforced concrete frames without transverse reinforcement. The experimental program entails the testing of eight frames that were subjected to a simple bending process. Two concrete resistance classes for analyzing compressive strength were considered on the construction of frames, 20 MPa and 40 MPa. To resist the bending stresses, the beams of the frames are designed in domain 3 of the ultimate limit states. Different rates and diameters of longitudinal reinforcement were used, 1.32% and 1.55% with 12.5 mm diameter and 16.0 mm in longitudinal tensile reinforcement. From the obtained results, an analysis was made of the criteria already proposed for defining the norms pertinent to the portion of relevant contribution for the shear resistance mechanisms of concrete without the use of transverse reinforcement and the influence of the concrete resistance and longitudinal reinforcement rates established in the experimental numerical results.

  9. Self-shearing retentive pins: a laboratory evaluation of pin channel penetration before shearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1979-09-01

    This laboratory study determined the depth reached by self-shearing pins in dentin pin channels. Pin channels were prepared with the self-limiting shoulder twist drill for each of the four systems tested. Mean channel depth reached for the various pin systems was: Stabilok (small), 2.31 mm; Stabilok (medium), 1.78 mm; Reten Pin, 1.40 mm; and TMS (Regular), 2.04 mm. A coparison was also made by calculating the mean percent of penetration in relation to the depth of prepared pin channel: Stabilok (small), 92.50%; Stabilok (medium), 63.62%; Reten Pin, 66.67%; and TMS (Regular) 81.75%.

  10. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  11. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. I. Sinusoidally driven shear and sinusoidally driven inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, Kirill S; Dalton, Benjamin A; Daivis, Peter J; Todd, B D

    2015-06-01

    We present theoretical expressions for the density, strain rate, and shear pressure profiles in strongly inhomogeneous fluids undergoing steady shear flow with periodic boundary conditions. The expressions that we obtain take the form of truncated functional expansions. In these functional expansions, the independent variables are the spatially sinusoidal longitudinal and transverse forces that we apply in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. The longitudinal force produces strong density inhomogeneity, and the transverse force produces sinusoidal shear. The functional expansions define new material properties, the response functions, which characterize the system's nonlocal response to the longitudinal force and the transverse force. We find that the sinusoidal longitudinal force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of density inhomogeneity, also modulates the strain rate and shear pressure profiles. Likewise, we find that the sinusoidal transverse force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of sinusoidal shear flow, can also modify the density. These cross couplings between density inhomogeneity and shear flow are also characterized by nonlocal response functions. We conduct nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations to calculate all of the response functions needed to describe the response of the system for weak shear flow in the presence of strong density inhomogeneity up to the third order in the functional expansion. The response functions are then substituted directly into the truncated functional expansions and used to predict the density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles. The results are compared to the directly evaluated profiles from molecular-dynamics simulations, and we find that the predicted profiles from the truncated functional expansions are in excellent agreement with the directly computed density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles.

  12. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. I. Sinusoidally driven shear and sinusoidally driven inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, Kirill S.; Dalton, Benjamin A.; Daivis, Peter J.; Todd, B. D.

    2015-06-01

    We present theoretical expressions for the density, strain rate, and shear pressure profiles in strongly inhomogeneous fluids undergoing steady shear flow with periodic boundary conditions. The expressions that we obtain take the form of truncated functional expansions. In these functional expansions, the independent variables are the spatially sinusoidal longitudinal and transverse forces that we apply in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. The longitudinal force produces strong density inhomogeneity, and the transverse force produces sinusoidal shear. The functional expansions define new material properties, the response functions, which characterize the system's nonlocal response to the longitudinal force and the transverse force. We find that the sinusoidal longitudinal force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of density inhomogeneity, also modulates the strain rate and shear pressure profiles. Likewise, we find that the sinusoidal transverse force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of sinusoidal shear flow, can also modify the density. These cross couplings between density inhomogeneity and shear flow are also characterized by nonlocal response functions. We conduct nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations to calculate all of the response functions needed to describe the response of the system for weak shear flow in the presence of strong density inhomogeneity up to the third order in the functional expansion. The response functions are then substituted directly into the truncated functional expansions and used to predict the density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles. The results are compared to the directly evaluated profiles from molecular-dynamics simulations, and we find that the predicted profiles from the truncated functional expansions are in excellent agreement with the directly computed density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles.

  13. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization.

  14. Effect of shear span-to-depth ratio on the shear behavior of BFRP-RC deep beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamad Siyam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the shear behavior of deep concrete beams reinforced with basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP bars for flexure without web reinforcements. The experimental testing performed herein consisted of a total of 4 short beams, three of which were reinforced with BFRP and one beam was reinforced with steel bars. The primary test variable was the shear-span-to-effective-depth ratio (a/d and its influence on the beams’ mid-span deflections, shear capacity, load-deformation relationships and the failure modes.

  15. In vitro analysis of self-shearing retentive pins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, E W; Caputo, A A; Standlee, J P; Duncanson, M G

    1981-02-01

    Combining stress, analysis, microscopic examination, mechanical testing of the shear mechanism, and retention of the Reten Pin leads to the following conclusions: 1. The suggested 0.006 inch pin-channel mismatch induces high lateral and apical stresses. Microscopically, this was seen to correlate with injury to the dentin. 2. The degree of retention was increased by using a smaller pin-channel mismatch. This correlates with smaller stresses and reduced dentinal damage. 3. The shear mechanism acts in a uniform manner, with a relatively small variation from the mean. It is suggested that for the best results the manufacturer should supply larger twist drills and pins with a somewhat deeper self-shearing groove to minimize apical involvement during shearing of the handle from the pin.

  16. Drift Wave Test Particle Transport in Reversed Shear Profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.; Park, H.B.; Kwon, J.M.; Stronzzi, D.; Morrison, P.J.; Choi, D.I.

    1998-01-01

    Drift wave maps, area preserving maps that describe the motion of charged particles in drift waves, are derived. The maps allow the integration of particle orbits on the long time scale needed to describe transport. Calculations using the drift wave maps show that dramatic improvement in the particle confinement, in the presence of a given level and spectrum of E x B turbulence, can occur for q(r)-profiles with reversed shear. A similar reduction in the transport, i.e. one that is independent of the turbulence, is observed in the presence of an equilibrium radial electric field with shear. The transport reduction, caused by the combined effects of radial electric field shear and both monotonic and reversed shear magnetic q-profiles, is also investigated

  17. The combined compression and shear of a rectangular rubber block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M.; Myers, Timothy G.

    1992-09-01

    For long rectangular rubber blocks with metal plates bonded to their upper and lower surfaces, approximate force-deflection relations are obtained for the problem of combined compression (or tension) and shear. The results obtained generalise that of Klingbeil and Shield for the case of pure compression alone, as well as incorporating the well known simple shear result. However, unlike the pure compression solution, horizontal and vertical force resultants on the free surfaces cannot both be set to zero, which is a well known characteristic of simple shearing. Here the strategy is adopted of equating to zero only the horizontal force resultants on the free surfaces so that the pure compression approximation of Klingbeil and Shield emerges in the event of zero shear. The force-deflection relations so obtained are illustrated graphically.

  18. Wind shear extremes at possible offshore wind turbine locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2003-01-01

    Positive and negative short-term extreme wind shear distributions (conditioned on the mean wind speed) are determined and compared for a number of offshore sites. The analysis is based on rapidly sampled field measurements (1-8 Hz) extracted from the "Database on Wind Characteristics" (www.windda...... seems to be rather conservative for an offshore location, compared to the estimated values based on measurements.......Positive and negative short-term extreme wind shear distributions (conditioned on the mean wind speed) are determined and compared for a number of offshore sites. The analysis is based on rapidly sampled field measurements (1-8 Hz) extracted from the "Database on Wind Characteristics" (www.......winddata.com). Three different averaging periods (2, 5 and 10 seconds) are considered, and for each averaging period a relation between the resulting extreme shear distributions and the averaging time are presented. The short-term extreme shear analysis is based on different spatial distances, and extrapolation...

  19. Conjugate Shear Fractures at 'Ki Corona,' Southeast Parga Chasma, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, J. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1996-03-01

    Brittle tensile failure of Venus' surface is evident in many tectonic regimes, including as extension fractures associated with caldera collapse, radial and concentric fractures of coronae, fractures normal to folds, and fracture belts. However, evidence of brittle shear failure has been described at only two localities_intersecting fractures oblique to wrinkle ridges in Lavinia Planitia were interpreted as conjugate shear fractures by Watters, and en echelon fractures in Guinevere Planitia record dominant extension. but with a component of shear. We confirm these earlier interpretations, and recognize the widespread nature of conjugate shear fractures across the Venus surface, identifying examples at over 100 locations in varied tectonic regimes, including coronae, wrinkle-ridged plains, and fracture belts. However, we focus here on fracture and fold relations at "Ki Corona" (46.8 degrees S, 302.5 degrees E), and their implications toward corona evolution.

  20. Shear testing of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines the elements of a combined experimental/analytical methodology for accurate shear characterization of unidirectional composites in the linear and nonlinear range, with particular attention devoted to metal matrix composites. It is illustrated that consistent results can be obtained for a large class of composites from two commonly employed shear test methods currently in use by composites researchers when the influence of various factors that affect the determination of the actual shear response is properly analyzed. These factors include the effects of material anisotropy, specimen geometry, manner of load introduction, and test fixture design on the stress and deformation fields in the test section of off-axis and Iosipescu specimens. Common errors associated with the measurement of deformation fields and calculation of stress fields are discussed and quantified. Particular problems in the determination of the shear response of unidirectional boron/aluminum using the Iosipescu test are illustrated and discussed.

  1. Interaction of equal-size bubbles in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Byk, Leonid; Nir, Avinoam

    2013-04-01

    The inertia-induced forces on two identical spherical bubbles in a simple shear flow at small but finite Reynolds number, for the case when the bubbles are within each other's inner viscous region, are calculated making use of the reciprocal theorem. This interaction force is further employed to model the dynamics of air bubbles injected to a viscous fluid sheared in a Couette device at the first shear flow instability where the bubbles are trapped inside the stable Taylor vortex. It was shown that, during a long time scale, the inertial interaction between the bubbles in the primary shear flow drives them away from each other and, as a result, equal-size bubbles eventually assume an ordered string with equal separation distances between all neighbors. We report on experiments showing the dynamic evolution of various numbers of bubbles. The results of the theory are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  2. A continuum mechanics analysis of shear characterisation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko

    2018-01-01

    The shear response of fabrics and fabric reinforced materials is primarily characterised by means of Picture Frame and Bias Extension experiments. Normalisation methods have been proposed earlier to enable comparison between different measurement results. Here, a continuum mechanics based analysis

  3. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  4. Shear capacity of in service prestressed concrete bridge girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    The design of prestressed concrete bridge girders has changed significantly over the past several : decades. Specifically, the design procedure to calculate the shear capacity of bridge girders that : was used forty years ago is very different than t...

  5. Mechanotransduction signaling in podocytes from fluid flow shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tarak; Dai, Hongying; Heruth, Daniel P; Alon, Uri S; Garola, Robert E; Zhou, Jianping; Duncan, R Scott; El-Meanawy, Ashraf; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Johnson, Mark L; Savin, Virginia J; Sharma, Mukut

    2018-01-01

    Recently, we and others have found that hyperfiltration-associated increase in biomechanical forces, namely, tensile stress and fluid flow shear stress (FFSS), can directly and distinctly alter podocyte structure and function. The ultrafiltrate flow over the major processes and cell body generates FFSS to podocytes. Our previous work suggests that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-PGE 2 -PGE 2 receptor 2 (EP2) axis plays an important role in mechanoperception of FFSS in podocytes. To address mechanotransduction of the perceived stimulus through EP2, cultured podocytes were exposed to FFSS (2 dyn/cm 2 ) for 2 h. Total RNA from cells at the end of FFSS treatment, 2-h post-FFSS, and 24-h post-FFSS was used for whole exon array analysis. Differentially regulated genes ( P < 0.01) were analyzed using bioinformatics tools Enrichr and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to predict pathways/molecules. Candidate pathways were validated using Western blot analysis and then further confirmed to be resulting from a direct effect of PGE 2 on podocytes. Results show that FFSS-induced mechanotransduction as well as exogenous PGE 2 activate the Akt-GSK3β-β-catenin (Ser552) and MAPK/ERK but not the cAMP-PKA signal transduction cascades. These pathways are reportedly associated with FFSS-induced and EP2-mediated signaling in other epithelial cells as well. The current regimen for treating hyperfiltration-mediated injury largely depends on targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The present study identifies specific transduction mechanisms and provides novel information on the direct effect of FFSS on podocytes. These results suggest that targeting EP2-mediated signaling pathways holds therapeutic significance for delaying progression of chronic kidney disease secondary to hyperfiltration.

  6. Adiabatic Shear Bands in Simple and Dipolar Viscoplastic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Slock ’Jncergoing overall Simple Shearing Deformations. 4. PUBLICATIONS a) ARTICLES IN REFEREED JOURNALS 1. R. C. Batra and Y. W. Kwon ...11) (12) wmen can be viewed as a generalized von Mises yield surface when the flow stress (given oy the ngnt-hand side of (12)) at a material...since Vtarchand and Duffy observed that during the drop o( the shear stress, the nominal strain increases oy approximately 5%. The Litonski law for

  7. Effect of Particle Size on Shear Stress of Magnetorheological Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Chiranjit Sarkar; Harish Hirani

    2015-01-01

    Magnetorheological fluids (MRF), known for their variable shear stress contain magnetisable micrometer-sized particles (few micrometer to 200 micrometers) in a nonmagnetic carrier liquid. To avoid settling of particles, smaller sized (3-10 micrometers) particles are preferred, while larger sized particles can be used in MR brakes, MR clutches, etc. as mechanical stirring action in those mechanisms does not allow particles to settle down. Ideally larger sized particles provide higher shear str...

  8. Structural studies of lamellar surfactant systems under shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental studies on concentrated surfactant systems are reviewed. Particular attention is focused on the transformation from planar lamellar sheets to multilamellar vesicles. It is discussed whether both of these states are thermodynamic stable, or if the MLV is an artifact of shear...... induced factors. Recent studies includes the dependence on shear, and dependence on salt and cosurfactants, and thereby related lamellar defects. The review include moreover the demonstration that polymeric amphiphiles dramatically enhance the quality of classical surfactants. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science...

  9. A constitutive model for simple shear of dense frictional suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhinendra; Mari, Romain; Denn, Morton M.; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2018-03-01

    Discrete particle simulations are used to study the shear rheology of dense, stabilized, frictional particulate suspensions in a viscous liquid, toward development of a constitutive model for steady shear flows at arbitrary stress. These suspensions undergo increasingly strong continuous shear thickening (CST) as solid volume fraction $\\phi$ increases above a critical volume fraction, and discontinuous shear thickening (DST) is observed for a range of $\\phi$. When studied at controlled stress, the DST behavior is associated with non-monotonic flow curves of the steady-state stress as a function of shear rate. Recent studies have related shear thickening to a transition between mostly lubricated to predominantly frictional contacts with the increase in stress. In this study, the behavior is simulated over a wide range of the dimensionless parameters $(\\phi,\\tilde{\\sigma}$, and $\\mu)$, with $\\tilde{\\sigma} = \\sigma/\\sigma_0$ the dimensionless shear stress and $\\mu$ the coefficient of interparticle friction: the dimensional stress is $\\sigma$, and $\\sigma_0 \\propto F_0/ a^2$, where $F_0$ is the magnitude of repulsive force at contact and $a$ is the particle radius. The data have been used to populate the model of the lubricated-to-frictional rheology of Wyart and Cates [Phys. Rev. Lett.{\\bf 112}, 098302 (2014)], which is based on the concept of two viscosity divergences or \\textquotedblleft jamming\\textquotedblright\\ points at volume fraction $\\phi_{\\rm J}^0 = \\phi_{\\rm rcp}$ (random close packing) for the low-stress lubricated state, and at $\\phi_{\\rm J} (\\mu) < \\phi_{\\rm J}^0$ for any nonzero $\\mu$ in the frictional state; a generalization provides the normal stress response as well as the shear stress. A flow state map of this material is developed based on the simulation results.

  10. Comment on "Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity"

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 091301 (2105)] the cause of the acceleration of the present Universe has been identified with the shear viscosity of an imperfect relativistic fluid even in the absence of any bulk viscous contribution. The gist of this comment is that the shear viscosity, if anything, can only lead to an accelerated expansion over sufficiently small scales well inside the Hubble radius.

  11. Microvoid Formation during Shear Deformation of Ultrahigh Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    These speci- mens are machined from standard sized Charpy blanks. They have two narrow gage sections which are displaced simultaneously in simple shear...Figure 2). Dynamic tests were performed in a modified instrumented Charpy im- LOADING SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM pact machine. The Charpy specimen fixture was...In addition, the pendulum weight nliatic diagram ot a double linear shear specimen. h ,peclmen is w sp h rsheared " ithin the tvwo reduced sections

  12. Inflation in a shear-or curvature-dominated universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    We show that new inflation occurs even if the universe is shear-or (negative) curvature-dominated when the phase transition begins. In such situations the size of a causally coherent region, after inflation, is only slightly smaller (by powers, but not by exponential factors) than the usual result. The creation and evolution of density perturbations is unaffected. This result is marked contrast to 'old' inflation, where shear- or curvature-domination could quench inflation. (orig.)

  13. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments requirement become more important. Shear walls (Structural walls contribute significant lateral stiffness, strength, and overall ductility and energy dissipation capacity. In many structural walls a regular pattern of openings has to be provided due to various functional requirements such as to accommodate doors, windows and service ducts. Such type of openings reduces the stiffness of the shear wall to some extent depending on the shape and size of the opening. In the present parametric study, efforts are made to investigate and critically assess the effects of various size of openings in shear walls on the responses and behaviors of multi-storey buildings. The 30 storey Prototype buildings with different types of openings in shear wall with and without incorporating the volume of shear wall reduced in the boundary elements are analyzed using software E-TABS using Response spectrum method (1893(Part-1-2002 and Time history method.

  14. Modeling Shear Induced Von Willebrand Factor Binding to Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuqiao; Wei, Wei; Morabito, Michael; Webb, Edmund; Oztekin, Alparslan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2017-11-01

    Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a blood glycoprotein that binds with platelets and collagen on injured vessel surfaces to form clots. VWF bioactivity is shear flow induced: at low shear, binding between VWF and other biological entities is suppressed; for high shear rate conditions - as are found near arterial injury sites - VWF elongates, activating its binding with platelets and collagen. Based on parameters derived from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a coarse-grain molecular model to simulate bond formation probability as a function of shear rate. By introducing a binding criterion that depends on the conformation of a sub-monomer molecular feature of our model, the model predicts shear-induced binding, even for conditions where binding is highly energetically favorable. We further investigate the influence of various model parameters on the ability to predict shear-induced binding (vWF length, collagen site density and distribution, binding energy landscape, and slip/catch bond length) and demonstrate parameter ranges where the model provides good agreement with existing experimental data. Our results may be important for understanding vWF activity and also for achieving targeted drug therapy via biomimetic synthetic molecules. National Science Foundation (NSF),Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS).

  15. On the asymmetric distribution of shear-relative typhoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Si; Zhai, Shunan; Li, Tim; Chen, Zhifan

    2018-02-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42 precipitation, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Final analysis and the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) Tokyo best-track data during 2000-2015 are used to compare spatial rainfall distribution associated with Northwest Pacific tropical cyclones (TCs) with different vertical wind shear directions and investigate possible mechanisms. Results show that the maximum TC rainfall are all located in the downshear left quadrant regardless of shear direction, and TCs with easterly shear have greater magnitudes of rainfall than those with westerly shear, consistent with previous studies. Rainfall amount of a TC is related to its relative position and proximity from the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) and the intensity of water vapor transport, and low-level jet is favorable for water vapor transport. The maximum of vertically integrated moisture flux convergence (MFC) are located on the downshear side regardless of shear direction, and the contribution of wind convergence to the total MFC is far larger than that of moisture advection. The cyclonic displacement of the maximum rainfall relative to the maximum MFC is possibly due to advection of hydrometeors by low- and middle-level cyclonic circulation of TCs. The relationship between TC rainfall and the WPSH through water vapor transport and vertical wind shear implies that TC rainfall may be highly predictable given the high predictability of the WPSH.

  16. Effect of Particle Size on Shear Stress of Magnetorheological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjit Sarkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetorheological fluids (MRF, known for their variable shear stress contain magnetisable micrometer-sized particles (few micrometer to 200 micrometers in a nonmagnetic carrier liquid. To avoid settling of particles, smaller sized (3-10 micrometers particles are preferred, while larger sized particles can be used in MR brakes, MR clutches, etc. as mechanical stirring action in those mechanisms does not allow particles to settle down. Ideally larger sized particles provide higher shear stress compared to smaller sized particles. However there is need to explore the effect of particle sizes on the shear stress. In the current paper, a comparison of different particle sizes on MR effect has been presented. Particle size distributions of iron particles were measured using HORIBA Laser Scattering Particle Size Distribution Analyser. The particle size distribution, mean sizes and standard deviations have been presented. The nature of particle shapes has been observed using scanning electron microscopy. To explore the effect of particle sizes, nine MR fluids containing small, large and mixed sized carbonyl iron particles have been synthesized. Three concentrations (9%, 18% and 36% by volume for each size of particles have been used. The shear stresses of those MRF samples have been measured using ANTON PAAR MCR-102 Rheometer. With increase in volume fraction of iron particles, the MR fluids synthesized using “mixed sized particles” show better shear stress compared to the MR fluids containing “smaller sized spherical shaped particles” and “larger sized flaked shaped particles” at higher shear rate.

  17. Compressibility effects in the shear layer over a rectangular cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin; Casper, Katya Marie

    2016-10-26

    we studied the influence of compressibility on the shear layer over a rectangular cavity of variable width in a free stream Mach number range of 0.6–2.5 using particle image velocimetry data in the streamwise centre plane. As the Mach number increases, the vertical component of the turbulence intensity diminishes modestly in the widest cavity, but the two narrower cavities show a more substantial drop in all three components as well as the turbulent shear stress. Furthermore, this contrasts with canonical free shear layers, which show significant reductions in only the vertical component and the turbulent shear stress due to compressibility. The vorticity thickness of the cavity shear layer grows rapidly as it initially develops, then transitions to a slower growth rate once its instability saturates. When normalized by their estimated incompressible values, the growth rates prior to saturation display the classic compressibility effect of suppression as the convective Mach number rises, in excellent agreement with comparable free shear layer data. The specific trend of the reduction in growth rate due to compressibility is modified by the cavity width.

  18. Inelastic deformations of fault and shear zones in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1986-02-01

    Deformations during heating and cooling of three drifts in granitic rock were influenced by the presence of faults and shear zones. Thermal deformations were significantly larger in sheared and faulted zones than where the rock was jointed, but neither sheared nor faulted. Furthermore, thermal deformations in faulted or sheared rock were not significantly recovered during subsequent cooling, thus a permanent deformation remained. This inelastic response is in contrast with elastic behavior identified in unfaulted and unsheared rock segments. A companion paper indicates that deformations in unsheared or unfaulted rock were effectively modeled as an elastic response. We conclude that permanent deformations occurred in fractures with crushed minerals and fracture filling or gouge materials. Potential mechanisms for this permanent deformation are asperity readjustments during thermal deformations, micro-shearing, asperity crushing and crushing of the secondary fracture filling minerals. Additionally, modulus differences in sheared or faulted rock as compared to more intact rock would result in greater deformations in response to the same thermal loads

  19. Nanoscale dislocation shear loops at static equilibrium and finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Khanh; Capolungo, Laurent; Spearot, Douglas E.

    2017-12-01

    Atomistic simulations are used to determine the resolved shear stress necessary for equilibrium and the resulting geometry of nanoscale dislocation shear loops in Al. Dislocation loops with different sizes and shapes are created via superposition of elemental triangular dislocation displacement fields in the presence of an externally imposed shear stress. First, a bisection algorithm is developed to determine systematically the resolved shear stress necessary for equilibrium at 0 K. This approach allows for the identification of dislocation core structure and a correlation between dislocation loop size, shape and the computed shear stress for equilibrium. It is found, in agreement with predictions made by Scattergood and Bacon, that the equilibrium shape of a dislocation loop becomes more circular with increasing loop size. Second, the bisection algorithm is extended to study the influence of temperature on the resolved shear stress necessary for stability. An approach is presented to compute the effective lattice friction stress, including temperature dependence, for dislocation loops in Al. The temperature dependence of the effective lattice friction stress can be reliably computed for dislocation loops larger than 16.2 nm. However, for dislocation loops smaller than this threshold, the effective lattice friction stress shows a dislocation loop size dependence caused by significant overlap of the stress fields on the interior of the dislocation loops. Combined, static and finite temperature atomistic simulations provide essential data to parameterize discrete dislocation dynamics simulations.

  20. Investigation of sheared liquids by neutron backscattering and reflectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, M; Hock, R; Frick, B; Zabel, H

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated by neutron scattering structural and dynamical properties of water solutions of the triblock copolymer P85 under shear. To this end a shear cell that suits the requirements for neutron backscattering and another for reflectivity experiments have been built. In reflectivity measurements we find the polymer concentration (nominal concentration of 33% by weight) to vary right at the surface between 12% and 52% for hydrophilic or hydrophobic coated silicon wavers, for temperatures between 18 C and 73 C and for shear rates up to 2500 s sup - sup 1. Additional structural changes deeper in the bulk are also observed. On the backscattering instrument (IN10 at ILL) we find that the liquid appears to stick to the plates of the shear cell, implying an unusual macroscopic velocity distribution that differs from that found earlier for lubrication oils. We report further on changes of the quasielastic line width in the direction of the shear gradient for different temperatures and shear rates. (orig.)

  1. Swimming efficiency in a shear-thinning fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganguia, Herve; Pietrzyk, Kyle; Pak, On Shun

    2017-12-01

    Micro-organisms expend energy moving through complex media. While propulsion speed is an important property of locomotion, efficiency is another factor that may determine the swimming gait adopted by a micro-organism in order to locomote in an energetically favorable manner. The efficiency of swimming in a Newtonian fluid is well characterized for different biological and artificial swimmers. However, these swimmers often encounter biological fluids displaying shear-thinning viscosities. Little is known about how this nonlinear rheology influences the efficiency of locomotion. Does the shear-thinning rheology render swimming more efficient or less? How does the swimming efficiency depend on the propulsion mechanism of a swimmer and rheological properties of the surrounding shear-thinning fluid? In this work, we address these fundamental questions on the efficiency of locomotion in a shear-thinning fluid by considering the squirmer model as a general locomotion model to represent different types of swimmers. Our analysis reveals how the choice of surface velocity distribution on a squirmer may reduce or enhance the swimming efficiency. We determine optimal shear rates at which the swimming efficiency can be substantially enhanced compared with the Newtonian case. The nontrivial variations of swimming efficiency prompt questions on how micro-organisms may tune their swimming gaits to exploit the shear-thinning rheology. The findings also provide insights into how artificial swimmers should be designed to move through complex media efficiently.

  2. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  3. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  4. Shear-limited test particle diffusion in 2-dimensional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderegg, Francois; Driscoll, C. Fred; Dubin, Daniel H.E.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of test-particle diffusion in pure ion plasmas show 2D enhancements over the 3D rates, limited by shear in the plasma rotation ω E (r). The diffusion is due to 'long-range' ion-ion collisions in the quiescent, steady-state Mg + plasma. For short plasma length L p and low shear S≡r∂ω E /∂r, thermal ions bounce axially many times before shear separates them in θ, so the ions move in (r,θ) as bounce averaged 'rods' of charge (i.e. 2D point vortices). Experimentally, we vary the number of bounces over the range 0.2≤N b ≤10,000. For long plasmas with N b ≤1, we observe diffusion in quantitative agreement with the 3D theory of long-range ExB drift collisions. For shorter plasmas or lower shear, with N b >1, we measure diffusion rates enhanced by up to 100x. For exceedingly small she0ar, i.e. N b ≥1000, we observe diffusion rates consistent with the Taylor-McNamara estimates for a shear-free thermal plasma. Overall, the data shows fair agreement with Dubin's new theory of 2D diffusion in shear, which predicts an enhancement of D 2D /D 3D ≅N b up to the Taylor-McNamara limit

  5. PKC-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS at T495 regulates eNOS coupling and endothelial barrier function in response to G+ -toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available Gram positive (G+ infections make up ∼50% of all acute lung injury cases which are characterized by extensive permeability edema secondary to disruption of endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity. A primary cause of increased permeability are cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs of G+-bacteria, such as pneumolysin (PLY and listeriolysin-O (LLO which create plasma membrane pores, promoting Ca2+-influx and activation of PKCα. In human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC, pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor, ETU reduced the ability of LLO to increase microvascular cell permeability suggesting an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS-dependent mechanism. LLO stimulated superoxide production from HLMVEC and this was prevented by silencing PKCα or NOS inhibition suggesting a link between these pathways. Both LLO and PLY stimulated eNOS T495 phosphorylation in a PKC-dependent manner. Expression of a phosphomimetic T495D eNOS (human isoform resulted in increased superoxide and diminished nitric oxide (NO production. Transduction of HLMVEC with an active form of PKCα resulted in the robust phosphorylation of T495 and increased peroxynitrite production, indicative of eNOS uncoupling. To determine the mechanisms underlying eNOS uncoupling, HLMVEC were stimulated with LLO and the amount of hsp90 and caveolin-1 bound to eNOS determined. LLO stimulated the dissociation of hsp90, and in particular, caveolin-1 from eNOS. Both hsp90 and caveolin-1 have been shown to influence eNOS uncoupling and a peptide mimicking the scaffolding domain of caveolin-1 blocked the ability of PKCα to stimulate eNOS-derived superoxide. Collectively, these results suggest that the G+ pore-forming toxins promote increased EC permeability via activation of PKCα, phosphorylation of eNOS-T495, loss of hsp90 and caveolin-1 binding which collectively promote eNOS uncoupling and the production of barrier disruptive superoxide.

  6. Physics of Transitional Shear Flows Instability and Laminar–Turbulent Transition in Incompressible Near-Wall Shear Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boiko, Andrey V; Grek, Genrih R; Kozlov, Victor V

    2012-01-01

    Starting from fundamentals of classical stability theory, an overview is given of the transition phenomena in subsonic, wall-bounded shear flows. At first, the consideration focuses on elementary small-amplitude velocity perturbations of laminar shear layers, i.e. instability waves, in the simplest canonical configurations of a plane channel flow and a flat-plate boundary layer. Then the linear stability problem is expanded to include the effects of pressure gradients, flow curvature, boundary-layer separation, wall compliance, etc. related to applications. Beyond the amplification of instability waves is the non-modal growth of local stationary and non-stationary shear flow perturbations which are discussed as well. The volume continues with the key aspect of the transition process, that is, receptivity of convectively unstable shear layers to external perturbations, summarizing main paths of the excitation of laminar flow disturbances. The remainder of the book addresses the instability phenomena found at l...

  7. Physiological mechanisms of vascular response induced by shear stress and effect of exercise in systemic and placental circulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván eRodríguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Physiological vascular function regulation is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the main risk factors of cardiovascular pathology, where the imbalance between the synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is common in the development of vascular disorders in systemic and placental circulation. In the placenta, an organ without autonomic innervations, the local control of vascular tone is critical for maintenance of fetal growth and mechanisms that underlie shear stress response induced by blood flow are essential during pregnancy. In this field, shear stress induced by moderate exercise is one of the most important mechanisms to improve vascular function through nitric oxide (NO synthesis and stimulation of mechanical response of endothelial cells triggered by ion channels, caveolae, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, among others. The demand for oxygen and nutrients by tissues and organs, especially in placentation and pregnancy, determines blood flow parameters and physiological adaptations of vascular beds for covering metabolic requirements. In this regard, moderate exercise versus sedentarism shows potential benefits for improving vascular function associated with the enhancement of molecular mechanisms induced by shear stress. In this review, we collect evidence about molecular bases of physiological response to shear stress in order to highlight the relevance of moderate exercise-training for vascular health in adult and fetal life.

  8. The microstructure and rheology of a model, thixotropic nanoparticle gel under steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Kim, Jung; Kate Gurnon, A.; Wagner, Norman J., E-mail: wagnernj@udel.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Center for Neutron Science, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Eberle, Aaron P. R. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Porcar, Lionel [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 and Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-01

    The microstructure-rheology relationship for a model, thermoreversible nanoparticle gel is investigated using a new technique of time-resolved neutron scattering under steady and time-resolved large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flows. A 21 vol. % gel is tested with varying strength of interparticle attraction. Shear-induced structural anisotropy is observed as butterfly scattering patterns and quantified through an alignment factor. Measurements in the plane of flow show significant, local anisotropy develops with alignment along the compressional axis of flow, providing new insights into how gels flow. The microstructure-rheology relationship is analyzed through a new type of structure-Lissajous plot that shows how the anisotropic microstructure is responsible for the observed LAOS response, which is beyond a response expected for a purely viscous gel with constant structure. The LAOS shear viscosities are observed to follow the “Delaware-Rutgers” rule. Rheological and microstructural data are successfully compared across a broad range of conditions by scaling the shear rate by the strength of attraction, providing a method to compare behavior between steady shear and LAOS experiments. However, important differences remain between the microstructures measured at comparatively high frequency in LAOS experiments and comparable steady shear experiments that illustrate the importance of measuring the microstructure to properly interpret the nonlinear, dynamic rheological response.

  9. Degree of coupling in high-rise mixed shear walls structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple method of analysis is presented to determine the influence of single shear walls (SSW) on the degree of coupling DoC and on the peak shear demand PSD for beams of coupled shear walls (CSW) in mixed shear wall structures (MSW). Non-coupled lateral load resisting structures such as singular planar walls and ...

  10. Degree of coupling in high-rise mixed shear walls structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Coupled shear walls; degree of coupling; peak shear demand; concrete. ... The proposed graphical method is based on the continuous medium theory and allows a rapid assessment of the structural behaviour of coupled shear wall bents in mixed shear wall structures that are subject to horizontal loading.

  11. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay

    2017-07-21

    Jul 21, 2017 ... cO Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12040-017-0853-8. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East. Deccan ...... shear zone, Sutlej section-structural geology and extrusion mechanism by various combinations of simple shear, pure shear and channel flow in shifting modes; Int. J.

  12. Numerical investigation into strong axis bending shear interaction in rolled I-shaped steel sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.W.A.; Snijder, B.H.; Maljaars, J.

    2016-01-01

    Clause 6.2.8 of EN 1993-1-1 covers the design rules on bending-shear resistance, taking presence of shear into account by a reduced yield stress for the shear area. Numerical research on bending-shear interaction by means of the Abaqus Finite Element modelling soft-ware is presented. The numerical

  13. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  14. Shear layer flame stabilization sensitivities in a swirling flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Foley

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A variety of different flame configurations and heat release distributions exist in high swirl, annular flows, due to the existence of inner and outer shear layers as well a vortex breakdown bubble. Each of these different configurations, in turn, has different thermoacoustic sensitivities and influences on combustor emissions, nozzle durability, and liner heating. This paper presents findings on the sensitivities of the outer shear layer- stabilized flames to a range of parameters, including equivalence ratio, bulkhead temperature, flow velocity, and preheat temperature. There is significant hysteresis for flame attachment/detachment from the outer shear layer and this hysteresis is also described. Results are also correlated with extinction stretch rate calculations based on detailed kinetic simulations. In addition, we show that the bulkhead temperature near the flame attachment point has significant impact on outer shear layer detachment. This indicates that understanding the heat transfer between the edge flame stabilized in the shear layer and the nozzle hardware is needed in order to predict shear layer flame stabilization limits. Moreover, it shows that simulations cannot simply assume adiabatic boundary conditions if they are to capture these transitions. We also show that the reference temperature for correlating these transitions is quite different for attachment and local blow off. Finally, these results highlight the deficiencies in current understanding of the influence of fluid mechanic parameters (e.g. velocity, swirl number on shear layer flame attachment. For example, they show that the seemingly simple matter of scaling flame transition points with changes in flow velocities is not understood.

  15. Impact of shear rate modulation on vascular function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinken, Toni M; Thijssen, Dick H J; Hopkins, Nicola; Black, Mark A; Dawson, Ellen A; Minson, Christopher T; Newcomer, Sean C; Laughlin, M Harold; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2009-08-01

    Shear stress is an important stimulus to arterial adaptation in response to exercise and training in humans. We recently observed significant reverse arterial flow and shear during exercise and different antegrade/retrograde patterns of shear and flow in response to different types of exercise. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously examine flow-mediated dilation, a largely NO-mediated vasodilator response, in both brachial arteries of healthy young men before and after 30-minute interventions consisting of bilateral forearm heating, recumbent leg cycling, and bilateral handgrip exercise. During each intervention, a cuff inflated to 60 mm Hg was placed on 1 arm to unilaterally manipulate the shear rate stimulus. In the noncuffed arm, antegrade flow and shear increased similarly in response to each intervention (ANOVA; P<0.001, no interaction between interventions; P=0.71). Baseline flow-mediated dilation (4.6%, 6.9%, and 6.7%) increased similarly in response to heating, handgrip, and cycling (8.1%, 10.4%, and 8.9%, ANOVA; P<0.001, no interaction; P=0.89). In contrast, cuffed arm antegrade shear rate was lower than in the noncuffed arm for all of the conditions (P<0.05), and the increase in flow-mediated dilation was abolished in this arm (4.7%, 6.7%, and 6.1%; 2-way ANOVA: all conditions interacted P<0.05). These results suggest that differences in the magnitude of antegrade shear rate transduce differences in endothelial vasodilator function in humans, a finding that may have relevance for the impact of different exercise interventions on vascular adaptation in humans.

  16. Insulation interlaminar shear strength testing with compression and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManamy, T.J.; Brasier, J.E.; Snook, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) project identified the need for research and development for the insulation to be used in the toroidal field coils. The requirements included tolerance to a combination of high compression and shear and a high radiation dose. Samples of laminate-type sheet material were obtained from commercial vendors. The materials included various combinations of epoxy, polyimide, E-glass, S-glass, and T-glass. The T-glass was in the form of a three-dimensional weave. The first tests were with 50 x 25 x 1 mm samples. These materials were loaded in compression and then to failure in shear. At 345-MPa compression, the interlaminar shear strength was generally in the range of 110 to 140 MPa for the different materials. A smaller sample configuration was developed for irradiation testing. The data before irradiation were similar to those for the larger samples but approximately 10% lower. Limited fatigue testing was also performed by cycling the shear load. No reduction in shear strength was found after 50,000 cycles at 90% of the failure stress. Because of space limitations, only three materials were chosen for irradiation: two polyimide systems and one epoxy system. All used boron-free glass. The small shear/compression samples and some flexure specimens were irradiated to 4 x 10 9 and 2 x 10 10 rad in the Advanced Technology Reactor at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. A lead shield was used to ensure that the majority of the dose was from neutrons. The shear strength with compression before and after irradiation at the lower dose was determined. Flexure strength and the results from irradiation at the higher dose level will be available in the near future. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AN AGRICULTURAL SOIL SHEAR STRESS TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Formato

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a numerical simulation of agricultural soil shear stress tests was performed through soil shear strength data detected by a soil shearometer. We used a soil shearometer available on the market to measure soil shear stress and constructed special equipment that enabled automated detection of soil shear stress. It was connected to an acquisition data system that displayed and recorded soil shear stress during the full field tests. A soil shearometer unit was used to the in situ measurements of soil shear stress in full field conditions for different types of soils located on the right side of the Sele river, at a distance of about 1 km from each other, along the perpendicular to the Sele river in the direction of the sea. Full field tests using the shearometer unit were performed alongside considered soil characteristic parameter data collection. These parameter values derived from hydrostatic compression and triaxial tests performed on considered soil samples and repeated 4 times and we noticed that the difference between the maximum and minimum values detected for every set of performed tests never exceeded 4%. Full field shear tests were simulated by the Abaqus program code considering three different material models of soils normally used in the literature, the Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager and Cam-Clay models. We then compared all data outcomes obtained by numerical simulations with those from the experimental tests. We also discussed any further simulation data results obtained with different material models and selected the best material model for each considered soil to be used in tyre/soil contact simulation or in soil compaction studies.

  18. Shear strength of palm oil clinker concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Bashar S.; Foo, W.L.; Hossain, K.M.A.; Abdullahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Palm oil clinker can be used as lightweight aggregate for the production of structural concrete. ► The palm oil clinker concrete can be classified as lightweight concrete. ► Full scale reinforced palm oil clinker concrete beams without shear reinforcement were tested. ► The CSA based design equation can be used for the prediction of shear capacity with a limit. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental results on the shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams made of palm oil clinker concrete (POCC). Palm oil clinker (POC) is a by-product of palm oil industry and its utilization in concrete production not only solves the problem of disposing this solid waste but also helps to conserve natural resources. Seven reinforced POCC beams without shear reinforcement were fabricated and their shear behavior was tested. POCC has been classified as a lightweight structural concrete with air dry density less than 1850 kg/m 3 and a 28-day compressive strength more than 20 MPa. The experimental variables which have been considered in this study were the POCC compressive strength, shear span–depth ratio (a/d) and the ratio of tensile reinforcement (ρ). The results show that the failure mode of the reinforced POCC beam is similar to that of conventional reinforced concrete beam. In addition, the shear equation of the Canadian Standard Association (CSA) can be used in designing reinforced POCC beam with ρ ⩾ 1. However, a 0.5 safety factor should be included in the formula for ρ < 1

  19. Experimental Verification of Current Shear Design Equations for HSRC Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attaullah Shah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research on the shear capacity of HSRC (High Strength Reinforced Concrete beams is relatively very limited as compared to the NSRC (Normal Strength Reinforced Concrete beams. Most of the Building Codes determine the shear strength of HSRC with the help of empirical equations based on experimental work of NSRC beams and hence these equations are generally regarded as un-conservative for HSRC beams particularly at low level of longitudinal reinforcement. In this paper, 42 beams have been tested in two sets, such that in 21 beams no transverse reinforcement has been used, whereas in the remaining 21 beams, minimum transverse reinforcement has been used as per ACI-318 (American Concrete Institute provisions. Two values of compressive strength 52 and 61 MPa, three values of longitudinal steel ratio and seven values of shear span to depth ratio have been have been used. The beams were tested under concentrated load at the mid span. The results are compared with the equations proposed by different international building codes like ACI, AASHTO LRFD, EC (Euro Code, Canadian Code and Japanese Code for shear strength of HSRC beams.From comparison, it has been observed that some codes are less conservative for shear design of HSRC beams and further research is required to rationalize these equations.

  20. Microfluidic viscometers for shear rheology of complex fluids and biofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, William S.; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2016-01-01

    The rich diversity of man-made complex fluids and naturally occurring biofluids is opening up new opportunities for investigating their flow behavior and characterizing their rheological properties. Steady shear viscosity is undoubtedly the most widely characterized material property of these fluids. Although widely adopted, macroscale rheometers are limited by sample volumes, access to high shear rates, hydrodynamic instabilities, and interfacial artifacts. Currently, microfluidic devices are capable of handling low sample volumes, providing precision control of flow and channel geometry, enabling a high degree of multiplexing and automation, and integrating flow visualization and optical techniques. These intrinsic advantages of microfluidics have made it especially suitable for the steady shear rheology of complex fluids. In this paper, we review the use of microfluidics for conducting shear viscometry of complex fluids and biofluids with a focus on viscosity curves as a function of shear rate. We discuss the physical principles underlying different microfluidic viscometers, their unique features and limits of operation. This compilation of technological options will potentially serve in promoting the benefits of microfluidic viscometry along with evincing further interest and research in this area. We intend that this review will aid researchers handling and studying complex fluids in selecting and adopting microfluidic viscometers based on their needs. We conclude with challenges and future directions in microfluidic rheometry of complex fluids and biofluids. PMID:27478521