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1

[Tooth extraction and anticoagulants  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to show the possibility of extracting teeth without modifying the anticoagulant treatment (anti-platelet and anti-vitamin K agents). MATERIAL AND METHOD: Two hundred patients underwent dental extraction from May 2003 to July 2006 without modifying their anticoagulant treatment; only 137 of them were hospitalized. Most of the teeth were extracted under local anesthesia, and hemostatic pad were inserted in the sockets without suture. RESULTS: One thousand (and) sixteen extractions were performed with bleeding disorders in 4%, successfully resolved by using local hemostatics. DISCUSSION: Modifying an anticoagulant treatment is a thrombo-embolic complication risk factor. Performing tooth extraction according to our protocol decreases this risk and bleeding complications, thus proving the validity of our technique.

Persac S; Boland FX; Lavis JF; Tardif A

2007-06-01

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Alternative transoral approach for intranasal tooth extraction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Intranasal ectopic eruption is an uncommon condition. Even if an intranasal tooth can be completely asymptomatic, sometimes a variety of nasal signs and symptoms may be associated, ranging from mild nasal congestion to recurrent epistaxis and purulent rhinorrhea. As a consequence, surgical removal is often required. Endoscopic extraction of the intranasal tooth has been reported to present several advantages with respect to traditional surgical approaches and thus recommended as routine treatment in such cases. However, when a tooth is impacted next to the nasal floor, an alternative approach could be needed. We suggest an alternative transoral approach to perform extraction of intranasal teeth, aimed at avoiding excessive bone removal to reach the nasal floor area and preventing the complications related to traditional intraoral buccal or palatal approach. It could represent a reliable alternative to traditional removal in the Oral Surgery Department.

Sammartino G; Trosino O; Perillo L; Cioffi A; Marenzi G; Mortellaro C

2011-09-01

3

Alternative transoral approach for intranasal tooth extraction.  

Science.gov (United States)

Intranasal ectopic eruption is an uncommon condition. Even if an intranasal tooth can be completely asymptomatic, sometimes a variety of nasal signs and symptoms may be associated, ranging from mild nasal congestion to recurrent epistaxis and purulent rhinorrhea. As a consequence, surgical removal is often required. Endoscopic extraction of the intranasal tooth has been reported to present several advantages with respect to traditional surgical approaches and thus recommended as routine treatment in such cases. However, when a tooth is impacted next to the nasal floor, an alternative approach could be needed. We suggest an alternative transoral approach to perform extraction of intranasal teeth, aimed at avoiding excessive bone removal to reach the nasal floor area and preventing the complications related to traditional intraoral buccal or palatal approach. It could represent a reliable alternative to traditional removal in the Oral Surgery Department. PMID:21959476

Sammartino, Gilberto; Trosino, Oreste; Perillo, Letizia; Cioffi, Andrea; Marenzi, Gaetano; Mortellaro, Carmen

2011-09-01

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Sonosurgery for atraumatic tooth extraction: a clinical report.  

Science.gov (United States)

The preservation of an intact labial plate during tooth extraction is a critical determinant of whether an immediate implant can be placed and is also an important predictor of the esthetic result. The purpose of this clinical report was to present a method for atraumatic tooth extraction by using an air-driven sonic instrument with specially designed inserts. This surgical technique provides the clinician with an efficient method for atraumatic tooth extraction and preservation of an intact labial plate. PMID:23217465

Papadimitriou, Dimitrios E V; Geminiani, Alessandro; Zahavi, Thomas; Ercoli, Carlo

2012-12-01

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Necessity of analgesics prescription after tooth extraction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction. For patients and surgeons, pain and discomfort associated with dento-alveolar surgery can be a frightening prospect. This study was aimed to check whether prescription of analgesics is necessary or not after simple extraction of the mandibular third molars. Material and methods. Seventy-six dental outpatients undergoing uncomplicated extraction of both mandibular third molars teeth served as subjects. After extraction on the first side, patients received either naproxen sodium 550 mg orally or a placebo. The order of the drugs was reversed during extraction on side two. The postoperative pain was scored with a six-point category rating scala. The obtained data were analyzed with Mann-Whitney U-test. Results. The sum of the pain intensity for hours 2 through 8 was less for the group that received sodium naproxen. For hours 8-24, the sum of the pain intensity was less for the placebo group but this difference was not statistically different. Conclusion. This study shows that uncomplicated tooth extraction did not cause a significant postoperative pain and there was no need to prescribe analgesics for such cases.

Tozoglu Sinan; Gungormus Metin; Buyukkurt Cemil M.; Yavuz Selim M.

2009-01-01

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Minimally-invasive tooth extraction: doorknobs and strings revisited!  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

References to 'atraumatic' tooth extraction pervade the recent dental literature. This has been largely driven by the increasing demand for bone preservation as osseo-integrated implants increasingly become a mainstay for dental prosthetic rehabilitation. This article introduces the reader to the concept of vertical tooth removal, which aims to avoid socket expansion and thereby minimize trauma to alveolar bone during tooth extraction. Several systems have recently become available and we present our experience with the Benex extractor in particular. Clinical Relevance: Clinicians should be aware of minimally invasive extraction techniques, their indications and potential advantages.

Saund D; Dietrich T

2013-05-01

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[Ridge preservation after tooth extraction: what do we know today].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Following tooth removal, varying amounts of bone resorption take place due to qualitative and quantitative changes that occur at the alveolar bone around the extraction site. Alveolar bone is a tooth dependent structure and therefore, after a tooth is extracted, dimensional bone reduction takes place both, horizontally and vertically resulting in changes that may lead to esthetic and functional problems. Such deformities of the alveolar ridge may compromise future implant placement as well as esthetic results when a fixed partial denture is constructed in a visible area. In order to preserve ridge dimensions following tooth extraction, particularly where future implant placement is planned, ridge/socket preservation is recommended. Ridge/socket preservation is any procedure undertaken at the time of or following an extraction that is designed to minimize external resorption of the ridge and maximize bone formation within the socket. In certain situations it not advisable to perform ridge preservation at the time of tooth extraction thus, preservation is delayed by few weeks (6-8). This paper reviews the various socket/ridge preservation techniques and the diverse materials used to fill those deficient tissues or prevent their collapse. Scientific literature review is discussed.

Chackartchi T; Stabholz A

2013-04-01

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Endoscopic Extraction of the Impacted Wisdom Tooth from Maxillary Sinus  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We described a case of laterally situated impacted wisdom tooth extraction in maxillary sinus using an endoscopic endonasal approach. The technique was shown to be an adequate alternative to a traumatic transmaxillary approach earlier applied in such cases.

R.A. Larin; A.V. Kuzmin; U.A. Rylkin

2013-01-01

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A review on alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONTEXT: The question that clinicians face is whether the use of bone replacement grafts and/or barrier membranes enhance their ability to provide for the future placement of a dental implant or to maximize ridge dimensions following the extraction of a tooth versus no additional treatments. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The evidence was obtained by search of Entrez PubMed and manual search of The International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, Clinical Oral Implant Research, The Journal of Periodontology, The Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and The Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry. Key search words included Guided Bone Regeneration, Dental Extraction, Tooth Extraction, Bone Replacement Graft, Alveolar Ridge. The years of search included from January 2011 through February 2012. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The recurring theme was that there was considerable heterogeneity to study designs, time periods, and methods of evaluation. This created great difficulty in trying to answer with good high-quality evidence questions about the techniques and materials to be used for maximizing regeneration at the time of tooth extraction or in which situations this ought to be used. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be consensus from the reviewed literature supporting ridge preservation techniques as a whole. Multiple studies demonstrated less ridge resorption occurring when alveolar ridge preservation procedures were used versus the placement of no graft material in fresh alveolar sockets. The analysis did not show any grafting materials demonstrating a clear benefit over any others or that a barrier membrane is necessary. The evidence is also too premature about whether socket preservation efforts require primary closure. In the emerging area of growth factors, there is no high-quality evidence to either support or refute their use. BACKGROUND: Tooth extraction is one of the most widely performed procedures in dentistry today and it has been historically well documented that this procedure may induce significant dimensional changes of the alveolar ridge. The dilemma that clinicians face is how to manage tooth extractions to provide for the future placement of a dental implant or to maximize ridge dimensions for the fabrication of a fixed or removable prosthesis. If performed inadequately, the resulting deformity can be a considerable obstacle to the esthetic, phonetic, and functional results that both our patients and we clinicians expect at this current time.

Horowitz R; Holtzclaw D; Rosen PS

2012-09-01

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Distinctive Tooth Extraction Socket Healing: Bisphosphonate vs. Parathyroid Hormone Therapy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Osteoporotic patients who receive tooth extractions are typically on either oral bisphosphonate or parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy. As of yet, the consequence of these therapies on hard and soft tissue healing in the oral cavity is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in the therapeutic effect on tooth extraction wound healing between bisphosphonate and PTH therapies. Methods: Maxillary second molars were extracted in Sprague Dawley rats (n=30) and either bisphosphonate (zoledronate), PTH, or saline (control) was administered for 10 days (n=10/group). Hard tissue healing was evaluated by microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Collagen, blood vessels (BV), inflammatory cell infiltration, and cathepsin K expression were assessed in soft tissue using immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunoblotting. Results: Both therapies significantly increased bone fill and suppressed vertical bone loss. However, considerably more devital bone was observed in the sockets of rats on zoledronate vs. control. While zoledronate increased the numbers of BVs, the total BV area in soft tissue was significantly smaller than in control. PTH therapy increased osteoblastic bone formation and suppressed osteoclasts. PTH therapy promoted soft tissue maturation by suppressing inflammation and stimulating collagen deposition. Conclusion: Zoledronate therapy deters while PTH therapy promotes hard and soft tissue healing in the oral cavity and both therapies prevent vertical bone loss. PMID:23688101

Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Mecano, Rodan B; Tanoue, Ryuichiro; Koi, Kiyono; Yamashita, Junro

2013-05-20

11

Osteitis pubis ameliorated after tooth extraction: a case report.  

Science.gov (United States)

Osteitis pubis is a non-infective inflammation of the symphysis pubis, which is known to be associated with trauma, athletic exertion, urological or gynecological surgery, or with rheumatic conditions such as seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In this report, we describe a case of osteitis pubis whose symptoms were completely ameliorated following tooth extraction attributable to periodontitis. A 57-year-old female patient developed osteitis pubis, presenting with pain in the groin area with an elevated Creactive protein (CRP; 4.4 mg/dl) and radiological erosive changes in symphysis pubis. Prednisolone (5 mg/day) and etodolac were prescribed, but the patient's symptoms improved only partially and remained persistent. One year from the patient's first visit, three teeth were extracted due to severe chronic periodontitis, which she had been suffering from for years. Soon after the above tooth extraction, her symptoms appeared completely resolved, and the patient's CRP was decreased to nearly normal levels in 4 weeks. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing analysis revealed a positive result for HLA-A11, A24, and B54. Because HLA-B54 cross-reacts with HLA-B27, the patient's osteitis pubis was considered to be a form of reactive arthritis associated with periodontitis. PMID:23599946

Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Iwamoto, Yukihide

2010-04-15

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Osteitis pubis ameliorated after tooth extraction: a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Osteitis pubis is a non-infective inflammation of the symphysis pubis, which is known to be associated with trauma, athletic exertion, urological or gynecological surgery, or with rheumatic conditions such as seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In this report, we describe a case of osteitis pubis whose symptoms were completely ameliorated following tooth extraction attributable to periodontitis. A 57-year-old female patient developed osteitis pubis, presenting with pain in the groin area with an elevated Creactive protein (CRP; 4.4 mg/dl) and radiological erosive changes in symphysis pubis. Prednisolone (5 mg/day) and etodolac were prescribed, but the patient's symptoms improved only partially and remained persistent. One year from the patient's first visit, three teeth were extracted due to severe chronic periodontitis, which she had been suffering from for years. Soon after the above tooth extraction, her symptoms appeared completely resolved, and the patient's CRP was decreased to nearly normal levels in 4 weeks. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing analysis revealed a positive result for HLA-A11, A24, and B54. Because HLA-B54 cross-reacts with HLA-B27, the patient's osteitis pubis was considered to be a form of reactive arthritis associated with periodontitis.

Fukushi J; Nakashima Y; Iwamoto Y

2013-03-01

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Iatrogenic nasolacrimal duct obstruction following tooth extraction in a cat.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A 10-year-old DSH cat was referred for a dental evaluation and extraction procedure. Subsequently, the animal developed an acute onset of ocular discharge. Ophthalmologic examination revealed presence of unilateral ocular mucoid discharge leading to a diagnosis of epiphora secondary to nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Dacryocystorhinography was performed and confirmed the presence of a nasolacrimal duct obstruction, presumably acquired after an invasive dental procedure. Additionally, a vinyl cast in situ study of the nasolacrymal apparatus was performed to demonstrate the route of the nasolacrimal duct in the cat and its relationship to oral dental structures. This report documents an unusual case in which excessive inflammation/edema following tooth extraction caused acute epiphora secondary to extraluminal compression of the distal nasolacrimal duct.

Paiva SC; Froes TR; Lange RR; Machado M; Pachaly JR; Montiani-Ferreira F

2013-01-01

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Subcutaneous emphysema as a complication of tooth extraction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication in dentistry, which may lead to diagnostic errors and inadequate therapy. A 17 years old female patient, in whom the separation of tooth roots was performed by the use of air-powered drill during the extraction of the first right lower molar, is presented in this paper. During the intervention, swelling of the right half of the face and the lower eyelid suddenly occurred, accompanied with simultaneous feeling of choking, and pressure in the neck and chest. Because of the suspicion of the allergic reaction, the patient was administered antihistaminic agent, together with parenteral corticosteroid, and was sent to an institution where she was treated as an in-patient. During hospitalization, subcutaneous emphysema of the face and neck was diagnosed by physical and x-ray examination. The emphysema completely disappeared after the use of oxygen and antibiotics.

Vaci? Aca

2004-01-01

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Controlling mechanical undesirable side effects with a tooth indicated for extraction: free anchorage.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This manuscript describes the use of a tooth indicated for extraction due to orthodontic reasons as an anchorage aid to receive undesirable side effects caused by orthodontic uprighting of a contralateral molar tooth. The mandibular right second molar was mesially tipped as a result of loss of the adjacent first molar. Since the treatment plan involved extraction of the mandibular left first premolar, undesirable side effects associated with the molar uprighting movement were transferred to this tooth. Once the second molar was vertical, the premolar was extracted and the treatment continued. The results suggest that treatment time can be reduced if undesirable orthodontic mechanical side effects can be directed to a tooth whose extraction is indicated.

Monini Ada C; Gandini LG Jr; Gandini MR; Leite GM; Vianna AP

2013-01-01

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Investigation of eleven cases of tooth-extraction after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Patients with tooth-extraction after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were divided into a group with sutured wound of tooth-extraction socket, and a group with open wound and their clinical course was compared and was discussed. Osteonecrosis due to radiation occurred after tooth-extraction in all patients with open wound. However, clinical course of patients with sutured wound was well. It was also clarified by roentgenogram that a new growth of the bone was delayed in patients with sutured wound more than in patients with general tooth-extraction, and that there were some cases in which the whole tooth-extraction socket was not covered with new bone even after 8 to 12 months after tooth-extraction. Antibiotics were administered in an adult dose or in more than an adult dose until sutured wound was supposed to be cured. Two of 6 patients with sutured wound were given antibiotics from before the operation and other 4 patients were given from immediately after the operation. There was not a difference between doses per a day for patients with sutured wound and for those with open wound. One of 5 patients with open wound was given antibiotics from before the operation, and other 4 patients were given from immediately after the operation. The longest administration period was 8 months. (Tsunoda, M.)

1979-01-01

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[Clinical evaluation of influence of aspirin on post-operative bleeding after tooth extraction in the elderly].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of continuation of aspirin before tooth extraction in the elderly. METHODS: The patients enrolled in this study were the elderly requiring a single non-impacted tooth extraction. 300 elderly outpatients used lidocaine local infiltration anesthesia, 200 patients without using aspirin before tooth extraction served as control groupI, 100 patients with prolong use of aspirin before tooth extraction as observation groupI. 300 elderly outpatients used compound articaine local infiltration anesthesia, 200 patients without using aspirin before tooth extraction served as control groupII, 100 patients with prolong use of aspirin before tooth extraction as observation groupII.Bleedings at 5, 10, 30 min, 24 h after tooth extraction were observed and the relationship between postoperative bleeding and intake of aspirin was analyzed. RESULTS: There was no significant difference at 5, 10, 30 min, 24 h in postoperative bleeding after extraction between control groupI and observation group. The incidence of bleeding of observation groupII after tooth extraction at 5 min was higher than that of control groupII and there was no significant difference at 10, 30 min, 24 h between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Continuation of aspirin have no influence on postoperative bleeding. Therefore we suggest that there was no indication to discontinue aspirin for the elderly before a single non-impacted tooth extraction.

Wang WY; Cui NH; Wang EB; Zhang W

2013-05-01

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Osteopathic manipulative treatment to resolve head and neck pain after tooth extraction.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pain is a common occurrence after tooth extraction and is usually localized to the extraction site. However, clinical experience shows that patients may also have pain in the head or neck in the weeks after this procedure. The authors present a case representative of these findings. In the case, cranial and cervical somatic dysfunction in a patient who had undergone tooth extraction was resolved through the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case emphasizes the need to include a dental history when evaluating head and neck pain as part of comprehensive osteopathic medical care. The case can also serve as a foundation for a detailed discussion regarding how to effectively incorporate osteopathic manipulative treatment into primary care practice for patients who present with head or neck pain after tooth extraction. PMID:22802546

Meyer, Patricia M; Gustowski, Sharon M

2012-07-01

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Osteopathic manipulative treatment to resolve head and neck pain after tooth extraction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Pain is a common occurrence after tooth extraction and is usually localized to the extraction site. However, clinical experience shows that patients may also have pain in the head or neck in the weeks after this procedure. The authors present a case representative of these findings. In the case, cranial and cervical somatic dysfunction in a patient who had undergone tooth extraction was resolved through the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case emphasizes the need to include a dental history when evaluating head and neck pain as part of comprehensive osteopathic medical care. The case can also serve as a foundation for a detailed discussion regarding how to effectively incorporate osteopathic manipulative treatment into primary care practice for patients who present with head or neck pain after tooth extraction.

Meyer PM; Gustowski SM

2012-07-01

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Biosynthesis of tooth germ proteins in vitro: a fast quantitative extraction of amelogenins from intact hamster molar tooth germs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A three step extraction procedure was carried out on intact hamster molar tooth germs in vitro labelled with 32PO4 and/or 3H-proline, in order to quantify separately the synthesis of dentine matrix (collagen) and the proline rich enamel matrix proteins. The extraction was based on the high solubility of the proline rich enamel matrix proteins compared with the relatively insoluble dentine matrix collagens. Pretreatment with 10% trichloroacetic acid (step 1) demineralized and removed the non-incorporated amino acids and/or small sized peptides. A consecutive water extraction (step 2) removed a large percentage of the phosphorylated amelogenins as assessed by SDS-urea-polyacrylamide-electrophoresis and amino acid analyses. Collagenase digestibility data showed that only small amounts of collagens were present in this extract. Further extraction with 10% formic acid (step 3) released only small amounts of amelogenins from the explants but also increased contamination with collagens and another predominantly low molecular components. Most of the 3H-activity remaining in the residues was found in the collagenase labile material and was considered to be an appropriate measure for production of dentine collagens. On the other hand, the residues also contained small amounts of 3H-labelled material with the same electrophoretic mobility as amelogenins but had much more 32P-activity than the amelogenins derived from the water and formic acid extracts. It is suggested that this material in the residues probably contains the crystal bound enamel matrix proteins.

Bronckers AL; van Elk R; Lyaruu DM; Wöltgens JH

1984-09-01

 
 
 
 
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Alveolar ridge resorption after tooth extraction: A consequence of a fundamental principle of bone physiology  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available It is well established that tooth extraction is followed by a reduction of the buccolingual as well as the apicocoronal dimension of the alveolar ridge. Different measures have been taken to avoid this bone modelling process, such as immediate implant placement and bone grafting, but in most cases with disappointing results. One fundamental principle of bone physiology is the adaptation of bone mass and bone structure to the levels and frequencies of strain. In the present article, it is shown that the reduction of the alveolar ridge dimensions after tooth extraction is a natural consequence of this physiological principle.

Stig Hansson; Anders Halldin

2012-01-01

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Forensic interpretation of the maxillary tuberosity fracture caused by tooth extraction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background. Maxillary tuberosity during teeth extraction can occur in dental practice. The aim of this paper was to present a case of the maxillary tuberosity fracture occurred during tooth extraction, which was the subject of the forensic expertise. Case report. The maxillary tuberosity fracture created during the extraction of the upper molar was neither timely nor adequately managed by the doctor who started extraction. After the treatment at the specialist institution, the patient sued the doctor for the criminal offense of negligent treatment. The task of the expert was to give a professional answer to the question whether the doctor, who caused a maxillary tuberosity fracture during the tooth extraction, acted negligently and applied inadequate treatment. Conclusion. The maxillary tuberosity fracture during molar extraction may be its complication. If it is diagnosed promptly, immediately and adequately managed, there is no possibility for negligence action.

Puzovi? Dragana; ?oli? Snježana

2010-01-01

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Plasticity of the cortical dentition representation after tooth extraction in naked mole-rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber) have a large cortical representation of their behaviorally important front teeth, accounting for 30% of primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Here we investigated the plasticity of this dental representation after the extraction of a single lower tooth. The representation of the contralateral lower incisor normally accounts for approximately 15% of somatosensory cortex in mole-rats. In five mole-rats the lower right incisor was extracted on either postnatal day 7 or 21. After 5-8 months the deprived tooth zone in S1 was investigated with multiunit microelectrode recordings. The results revealed a dramatic reorganization of the orofacial representation in SI. Neurons in the cortical lower tooth representation were responsive to tactile inputs from surrounding orofacial structures, including the contralateral upper incisor, ipsilateral lower incisor, tongue, chin, gums, and buccal pad. Neurons in the former lower tooth zone had complex receptive fields that often encompassed multiple sensory surfaces surrounding the extracted tooth in the periphery. These results suggest that the representation of the dentition in mammals is capable of significant reorganization after the loss of sensory inputs from the teeth. These data parallel findings in the somatosensory hand area of primates after deafferentation where cortex can become activated by a mixture of widely spaced surrounding sensory surfaces (e.g., chin and upper arm). PMID:15776439

Henry, Erin C; Marasco, Paul D; Catania, Kenneth C

2005-04-25

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Plasticity of the cortical dentition representation after tooth extraction in naked mole-rats.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber) have a large cortical representation of their behaviorally important front teeth, accounting for 30% of primary somatosensory cortex (SI). Here we investigated the plasticity of this dental representation after the extraction of a single lower tooth. The representation of the contralateral lower incisor normally accounts for approximately 15% of somatosensory cortex in mole-rats. In five mole-rats the lower right incisor was extracted on either postnatal day 7 or 21. After 5-8 months the deprived tooth zone in S1 was investigated with multiunit microelectrode recordings. The results revealed a dramatic reorganization of the orofacial representation in SI. Neurons in the cortical lower tooth representation were responsive to tactile inputs from surrounding orofacial structures, including the contralateral upper incisor, ipsilateral lower incisor, tongue, chin, gums, and buccal pad. Neurons in the former lower tooth zone had complex receptive fields that often encompassed multiple sensory surfaces surrounding the extracted tooth in the periphery. These results suggest that the representation of the dentition in mammals is capable of significant reorganization after the loss of sensory inputs from the teeth. These data parallel findings in the somatosensory hand area of primates after deafferentation where cortex can become activated by a mixture of widely spaced surrounding sensory surfaces (e.g., chin and upper arm).

Henry EC; Marasco PD; Catania KC

2005-04-01

25

Verification of the mechanostat theory in mandible remodeling after tooth extraction: animal study and numerical modeling.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Bone tissue is capable of remodeling in response to environmental and physiological conditions. Mechanical loading is thought to be one of the most important environmental factors, affecting bone status. Mechanostat theory, which classifies bone behavior on the basis of the mechanical strain, has been vastly applied in cases of long bones. The present study surveyed the applicability of mechanostat theory in interpretation and anticipation of structural changes of the mandible due to tooth extraction, through experimental measurements and numerical modeling. The mandibular left first molar tooth of a 2-year-old male mongrel dog was extracted. Computed tomography (CT) images of the mandible were taken before, immediately after, and 1 year after extraction. Finite element models were constructed from the CT images and analyzed to evaluate the von Mises strain distribution within the mandible, specifically near the extraction site. Marked resorption around the extraction site and significant height reductions in the buccal and lingual ridges around the socket were observed one year after tooth removal. The deep socket made by extraction was filled and replaced by a smooth surface through bone remodeling in response to masticatory loading. Resultant strain analyses revealed a noticeable decline in strain level around the socket after tooth extraction, which activated bone remodeling according to mechanostat theory. At 1-year post-extraction, the strain magnitudes had increased significantly to near pre-extraction values. Alterations in the strain magnitudes along the mesio-distal axis were quantified for each stage and compared with the Mechanostat predefined regions. The FE results were surveyed in combination with the ridge height reductions, along the mesio-distal direction. Strain contours of the post-extraction stages were compatible with predictions by mechanostat theory. These findings validate the ability of mechanostat theory to describe mandible remodeling and predict post-extraction structural changes that occur near the extraction site. These results could be applied in dental treatment planning and implant design.

Mahnama A; Tafazzoli-Shadpour M; Geramipanah F; Mehdi Dehghan M

2013-04-01

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Effects of alendronate on bone healing after tooth extraction in rats.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Tooth extraction has been identified as an important risk factor for bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the effects of alendronate on healing of the extraction socket and on interdental alveolar bone after tooth extraction in rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Animals were injected subcutaneously with vehicle or alendronate for 3-4 weeks before the first mandibular molar was extracted and these treatments were continued during post-extraction periods of 10, 21, 35 and 70 days. Mandibles were processed to evaluate healing of the extraction socket and adjacent alveolar bone by assessing bone formation, bone resorption and vascularity by histomorphometric techniques. RESULTS: Alendronate decreased new woven bone formation, blood vessel area, perimeter and number in the extraction socket at 10 days postextraction, but not at later time points. Furthermore, alendronate-treated rats had increased interdental alveolar bone volume and height only at 10 days postextraction. In addition, a 2.5-fold increase in the percentage of empty osteocyte lacunae was found in alveolar bone of alendronate-treated rats only at 10 days postextraction. CONCLUSIONS: Alendronate transiently decreases bone formation and vascularity in the extraction socket and delays the removal of interdental alveolar bone after tooth extraction in rats.

Aguirre JI; Altman MK; Vanegas SM; Franz SE; Bassit AC; Wronski TJ

2010-10-01

27

Effects of alendronate on bone healing after tooth extraction in rats.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Oral Diseases (2010) doi: 10.1111/j.1601-0825.2010.01677.x Objectives: Tooth extraction has been identified as an important risk factor for bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the effects of alendronate on healing of the extraction socket and on interdental alveolar bone after tooth extraction in rats. Materials and methods: Animals were injected subcutaneously with vehicle or alendronate for 3-4 weeks before the first mandibular molar was extracted and these treatments were continued during post-extraction periods of 10, 21, 35 and 70 days. Mandibles were processed to evaluate healing of the extraction socket and adjacent alveolar bone by assessing bone formation, bone resorption and vascularity by histomorphometric techniques. Results: Alendronate decreased new woven bone formation, blood vessel area, perimeter and number in the extraction socket at 10 days postextraction, but not at later time points. Furthermore, alendronate-treated rats had increased interdental alveolar bone volume and height only at 10 days postextraction. In addition, a 2.5-fold increase in the percentage of empty osteocyte lacunae was found in alveolar bone of alendronate-treated rats only at 10 days postextraction. Conclusions: Alendronate transiently decreases bone formation and vascularity in the extraction socket and delays the removal of interdental alveolar bone after tooth extraction in rats.

Aguirre JI; Altman MK; Vanegas SM; Franz SE; Bassit AC; Wronski TJ

2010-05-01

28

Tooth extractions in intravenous bisphosphonate-treated patients: a refined protocol.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The aim of this prospective hospital-based study was to refine a surgical protocol for tooth extractions in patients with a history of intravenous use of a potent bisphosphonate by modifying a previously reported protocol to produce a significantly shortened operating time. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prospective patients with a follow-up of at least 4 months were included. Tooth extractions were performed without a vestibular split-thickness flap; healing was stimulated by filling the extraction site with autologous plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF System, BTI Biotechnology Institute, Vitoria, Spain). Local and systemic infection control was obtained with dental hygiene and antibiotic therapy. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients participated in the study. Two hundred two tooth extractions were performed. Differences between the present and previous protocols (the previous protocol used a vestibular flap) were analyzed and the surgical time proved significantly shorter for the present approach (P = .00). CONCLUSIONS: The proposed surgical protocol appears to be a better choice for patients treated with intravenous bisphosphonates who need tooth extraction, because it seems to be faster and simpler than the previously reported successful protocol.

Scoletta M; Arata V; Arduino PG; Lerda E; Chiecchio A; Gallesio G; Scully C; Mozzati M

2013-06-01

29

Assessing the association between bisphosphonate exposure and delayed mucosal healing after tooth extraction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Tooth extraction in patients exposed to bisphosphonates (BPs) is considered a risk factor for osteonecrosis. The authors evaluated the time to mucosal healing and frequency of osteonecrosis after tooth extraction in participants exposed to BPs. METHODS: The authors compared wound healing after tooth extraction in participants exposed to BPs with that in control participants who had not been exposed to BPs. Variables included age, sex, type of BP therapy (oral or intravenous), BP exposure time and C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) test results. The authors followed up patients weekly or biweekly until healing was complete. They used multivariable analyses to model time to healing in the presence of covariates, and estimates provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for all variables in the model. RESULTS: The authors enrolled 53 participants with BP exposure and 39 control participants. Postextraction healing was significantly longer in participants exposed to BPs (P < .001) than it was in control participants. One patient (1.9 percent) developed osteonecrosis. A Cox proportional hazards model in which the authors controlled for age, sex and CTX values showed that BP exposure alone significantly (adjusted HR, 0.27; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.16-0.48) increased mucosal healing time. CONCLUSIONS: The study results showed that postextraction healing was impaired in patients exposed to BPs. CTX values were not associated with delayed healing after tooth extraction. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Postextraction healing was delayed in patients receiving BP therapy. However, the risk of developing osteonecrosis was low.

Migliorati CA; Saunders D; Conlon MS; Ingstad HK; Vaagen P; Palazzolo MJ; Herlofson BB

2013-04-01

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Parathyroid hormone related to bone regeneration in grafted and nongrafted tooth extraction sockets in rats.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The quality and quantity of bone formed in tooth extraction sockets impact implant therapy. Therefore, the establishment of a new approach to enhance bone formation and to minimize bone resorption is important for the success of implant therapy. In this study, we investigated whether intermittent parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy enhanced bone formation in grafted sockets. METHODS: Tooth extractions of the maxillary first molars were performed in rats, and the sockets were grafted with xenograft. Intermittent PTH was administered either for 7 days before extractions, for 14 days after extractions, or both. The effect of PTH therapy on bone formation in the grafted sockets was assessed using microcomputed tomography at 14 days after extractions. RESULTS: PTH therapy for 7 days before extractions was not effective to augment bone fill, whereas PTH therapy for 14 days after operation significantly augmented bone formation in the grafted sockets. CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent PTH therapy starting right after tooth extractions significantly enhanced bone fill in the grafted sockets, suggesting that PTH therapy can be a strong asset for the success of the ridge preservation procedure.

Kuroshima S; Al-Salihi Z; Yamashita J

2013-02-01

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Effect of irradiation on wound healing after tooth extraction in the rachitic rats  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To observe the histopathological changes following irradiation on the wound healing after tooth extraction in the rachitic rats. In order to carry out this study, the rats were divided into four groups: Group 1 (normal diet/non-irradiation group), Group 2 (normal diet/irradiation group), Group 3 (rachitogenic diet/non-irradiation group), and Group 4 (rachitogenic diet/irradiation group). Rachitic changes were induced with rachitogenic diet No. 2 (high calcium, low phosphorus, and Vitamin D deficient diet) for 5 weeks. After the extraction of both maxillary first molars of the rats in Group 2 and 4, the head and neck of the rats were irradiated with single absorbed dose of 10 Gy. The rats were sacrificed at the 1st, 5th, 10th, and 15th day after tooth extraction. The specimens including the extraction wound were sectioned, stained with the hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome method and examined under the light microscope. In the Group 2, the amount of newly formed bone trabeculae on the periphery of extraction socket and osteoblastic activity were reduced. In the Group 3, epithelial fusion was not revealed on the 5th day after toothe extraction and growth rate of osteoid formation was reduced. In the Group 4, necrotized tissue at the outer surface of extraction socket and destructive changes on the alveolar bones were noted on the 10th day. Epithelial fusion was not revealed and large amounts of osteoclast were noted on alveolar bone on the 15th day. The healing process of wound after tooth extraction was retarded by irradiation and especially in the rachitic rats.

2002-01-01

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Relief from cluster headaches following extraction of an ipsilateral infected tooth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A 60-year-old man with a 7-year history of cluster headaches was seen by an oral surgeon for evaluation of pain in the left upper second molar ipsilateral to the side affected by the headaches. During extraction of the tooth, infection, decay, and inflammation were discovered. Since the extraction in November 2008, the patient has experienced one episode of cluster headaches as of April 2013.

Hoffman MR; McCulloch TM

2013-06-01

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Assessment of general pre and postoperative anxiety in patients undergoing tooth extraction: a prospective study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Our aim was to analyse the amount of anxiety and fear felt before, immediately after, and one week after, dental extraction. We studied 70 patients (35 men and 35 women (mean (SD) age 43 (±10) years), who were listed for dental extraction under local anaesthesia in a private clinic that specialised in oral surgery. Patients were evaluated on 3 consecutive occasions: immediately preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and 7 days later. Each patient's anxiety was measured using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spanish version), the Modified Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the Dental Fear Survey. There were significant differences in the STAI-Trait scale between before and 7 days after extraction (p=0.04), and in the MDAS between before and immediately after extraction (p=0.02), and between immediately after and 7 days after extraction (p=<0.001). The DFS also differed between before and immediately after extraction (p=0.002), and between immediately and 7 days after extraction (p<0.001). Dental anxiety immediately after tooth extraction may be influenced by operative techniques (type of anaesthesia, duration of operation, or position of tooth extracted), but anxiety at 7 days after extraction is not.

López-Jornet P; Camacho-Alonso F; Sanchez-Siles M

2013-01-01

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Histometric study of socket healing after tooth extraction in rats treated with diclofenac  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate if diclofenac administration interferes with the time course of alveolar wound healing in rats. Forty-two Wistar rats were used, 21 rats received 10 mg/kg/day of diclofenac one day before and 4 days after extraction of the right maxillary incisors and 21 rats received saline. The animals were sacrificed 7, 14 and 21 days after tooth extraction. Progressive new bone formation and a decrease in the volume fraction of blood clot and connective tissue from 1 to 3 weeks after tooth extraction was quantified using the histometric point-counting method. Diclofenac treatment caused a significant delay in new bone formation in association with an impairment of blood clot remission/organization.

Yugoshi Luciana Ibara; Sala Miguel Angel; Brentegani Luiz Guilherme; Carvalho Teresa Lúcia Lamano

2002-01-01

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A Comparison of Equivalent Doses of Lidocaine and Articaine in Maxillary Posterior Tooth Extractions: Case Series  

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Full Text Available Objectives: Local anaesthesia is the standard of care during dental extractions. With the advent of newer local anesthetic agents, it is often difficult for the clinician to decide which agent would be most efficacious in a given clinical scenario. This study assessed the efficacy of equal-milligram doses of lidocaine and articaine in achieving surgical anaesthesia of maxillary posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Material and Methods: This case-series evaluated a total of 41 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a maxillary posterior tooth. Patients randomly received an infiltration of either 3.6 mL (72 mg) 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1.8 mL (72 mg) 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in the buccal fold and palatal soft tissue adjacent to the tooth. After 10 minutes, initial anaesthesia of the tooth was assessed by introducing a sterile 27-gauge needle into the gingival tissue adjacent to the tooth, followed by relief of the gingival cuff. Successful treatment was considered to have occurred when the tooth was extracted with no reported pain. Data was analyzed with the Fisher’s exact test, unpaired t-test and normality test. Results: Twenty-one patients received lidocaine and 20 received articaine. Forty of the 41 patients achieved initial anaesthesia 10 minutes after injection: 21 after lidocaine and 19 after articaine (P = 0.488). Pain-free extraction was accomplished in 33 patients: 19 after lidocaine and 14 after articaine buccal and palatal infiltrations (P = 0.226). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in efficacy between equivalent doses of lidocaine and articaine in the anaesthesia of maxillary posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

Christopher C. Friedl; Jill Bashutski; Navid Rashidi

2012-01-01

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A study on the effects of electron beam irradiation on tooth extraction wound healing in rats  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The wound of the upper jaw 3 days after the first molar tooth extraction in female rats was exposed to 1,500 rads (Group 2) and 2,000 rads (Group 3) of the 10 MeV electron beams, and its pathohistological changes were compared with those of rats with the tooth extraction alone (control group). In the control group, the tooth extraction wound was covered with epithelium 10 days later and new bones were formed 17 days later. Wound healing with the epithelium was seen in all irradiated rats 24 days later. The formation of the new teeth was seen 24 days later in the Group 2 and 38 days later in Group 3. Cell infiltration under the epithelial layers was still observed in some of the Group 3, although the wound was covered with epithelium, and the new bone covering the extraction wound was formed 38 days later. Healing was prolonged in Group 3, as compared with that in Group 2. (Namekawa, K.).

1983-01-01

37

Facial vertical changes among patients treated by Edgewise orthodontic technique along with tooth extraction  

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Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tooth extraction is a common technique in orthodontics and most of the specialists believe that this technique is able to change the facial appearance. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate facial vertical changes in orthodontic patients following tooth extraction. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients, after their growth spurt, with CLI malocclusion all treated by a specific orthodontist through Edgewise technique along with the extraction of four first premolars were chosen. Lateral cephalograms of patients, before and after treatment were compared and facial vertical changes and teeth were studied. Results: Anterior and posterior facial heights were increased during treatment. Despite the limited use of intermaxillary elastics, teeth were extruded. The most increase in facial heights was observed in the lower third of face. Patients with longer faces before treatment showed more extrusion of mandibular molars as well as more increase of mandibular slope. Conclusion: Tooth extraction in orthodontic treatments can not guarantee the decrease or even non-increase of facial height. Among patients with long faces, it is particularly suggested to refrain from the application of extrusive orthodontic forces.

Heravi F.; Sahafian Sh

2004-01-01

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Alveolar ridge reduction after tooth extraction in adolescents: an animal study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The mechanism for tooth extraction induced residual alveolar ridge reduction (RRR) during adolescence is poorly understood. This study investigated the alveolar bone morphology, growth, resorption and functional loading at normal and extraction sites using an adolescent pig model. DESIGN: Sixteen 3-month-old pigs were divided into two groups - immediate post-extraction (IE) and 6-week post-extraction (SE). The IE group received an extraction of one deciduous mandibular molar, immediately followed by a final experiment to record masseter muscle EMGs and strains from the buccal surface of the extraction and contralateral non-extraction sites during function (mastication). The SE group was given the same tooth extraction, then kept for 6 weeks before the same final functional recording as the IE group. Both groups also received baseline (pre-extraction) EMGs and fluorescent vital stains 10 and 3 days before the final functional recording. Immediately after the final functional recording, animals were euthanized and alveolar bone specimens from extraction and contralateral non-extraction sites were collected and used to analyse alveolar bone morphology, apposition and resorption based on fluorescent and hematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections. RESULTS: At control sites (IE-extraction, IE-non-extraction and SE-non-extraction), the alveolar ridges grew gingivally and buccally. Bone formation characterized the buccal surface and lingual bundle bone, whereas resorption characterized the lingual surface and buccal bundle bone. The SE-extraction sites showed three major alterations: convergence of the buccal and lingual gingival crests, loss of apposition on the lingual bundle bone, and decelerated growth at the entire buccal surface. These alterations likely resulted from redirected crestal growth as part of the socket healing process, loss of tongue pressure to the lingual side of the teeth which normally provides mechanical stimulation for dental arch expansion, and masticatory underloading during the initial post-extraction period, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the initial phase of RRR in adolescents is a product of modified growth, not resorption, possibly because of decreased mechanical stimulation at the extraction site.

Sun Z; Herring SW; Tee BC; Gales J

2013-07-01

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Effects of local and whole body irradiation on appearance of osteoclasts during wound healing of tooth extraction sockets in rats  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We examined effects of local and whole body irradiation before tooth extraction on appearance and differentiation of osteoclasts in the alveolar bone of rat maxillary first molars. Wistar rats weighting 100 g were divided into three groups: non-irradiation group, local irradiation group, and whole body irradiation group. In the local irradiation group, a field made with lead blocks was placed over the maxillary left first molar tooth. In the whole body irradiation group, the animals were irradiated in cages. Both groups were irradiated at 8 Gy. The number of osteoclasts around the interradicular alveolar bone showed chronological changes common to non-irradiated and irradiated animals. Several osteoclasts appeared one day after tooth extraction, and the maximal peak was observed 3 days after extraction. Local irradiation had no difference from non-irradiated controls. In animals receiving whole body irradiation, tooth extraction one day after irradiation caused smaller number of osteoclasts than that 7 day after irradiation during the experimental period. Whole body-irradiated rats had small osteoclasts with only a few nuclei and narrow resorption lacunae, indicating deficiency of radioresistant osteoclast precursor cells. Injection of intact bone marrow cells to whole body-irradiated animals immediately after tooth extraction recovered to some content the number of osteoclasts. These findings suggest that bone resorption in the wound healing of alveolar socket requires radioresistant, postmitotic osteoclast precursor cells from hematopoietic organs, but not from local sources around the alveolar socket, at the initial phase of wound healing. (author)

2007-01-01

40

Fitting complete dentures after multiple tooth extraction in a patient with severe dementia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Complete dentures were constructed after tooth extraction for a 71-year-old uncommunicative patient with Alzheimer's disease. Although she had never previously used them, her husband requested the fitting of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures. Thirteen teeth were extracted under local anesthesia and intravenous sedation (IVS), followed by impression-making under IVS. Denture fabrication and adjustment were carried out under mild physical restraint. A tissue conditioner was applied to the fitting surface of the denture base followed by regular denture adjustments. The time required for the patient to eat a meal decreased from 90 minutes without dentures to 30 minutes with dentures due to an improvement in swallowing. Important factors in the successful fitting and use of dentures in this patient were the use of IVS to control behavior during treatment, the treatment plan focused on painless denture use, and oral care by the patient's husband. PMID:17990477

Fujisawa, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, Atsuro; Muramatsu, Masumi; Kimura, Yukifumi; Kurozumi, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Sano, Hidehiko; Totsuka, Yasunori; Fukushima, Kazuaki

 
 
 
 
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Analysis of tooth movement in extraction cases using three-dimensional reverse engineering technology.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Despite inherent errors, cephalometric superimpositions are currently the most widely used means for assessing sagittal and vertical tooth movements. The purpose of this study was to compare three-dimensional (3D) digital model superimposition with cephalometric superimposition. The material was collected from initial and final maxillary casts and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 30 patients (6 males, 24 females, mean age 17.7 years) who underwent orthodontic treatment with extraction of permanent teeth. Each pair of cephalograms was traced and superimposed according to Ricketts' four-step method. 3D scanning of the maxillary dental casts was performed using INUS dental scanning solution(R), which consists of a 3D scanner, an autoscan system, and 3D reverse modelling software. The 3D superimposition was carried out using the surface-to-surface matching (best-fit method) function of the autoscan system. The antero-posterior movement of the maxillary first molar and central incisor was evaluated cephalometrically and on 3D digital models. To determine whether any difference existed between the two measuring techniques, paired t-tests and correlation analysis were undertaken. The results revealed no statistical differences between the mean incisor and molar movements as assessed cephalometrically or by 3D model superimposition. These findings suggest that the 3D digital orthodontic model superimposition technique used in this study is clinically as reliable as cephalometric superimposition for assessing orthodontic tooth movements.

Cha BK; Lee JY; Jost-Brinkmann PG; Yoshida N

2007-08-01

42

Analysis of tooth movement in extraction cases using three-dimensional reverse engineering technology.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite inherent errors, cephalometric superimpositions are currently the most widely used means for assessing sagittal and vertical tooth movements. The purpose of this study was to compare three-dimensional (3D) digital model superimposition with cephalometric superimposition. The material was collected from initial and final maxillary casts and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 30 patients (6 males, 24 females, mean age 17.7 years) who underwent orthodontic treatment with extraction of permanent teeth. Each pair of cephalograms was traced and superimposed according to Ricketts' four-step method. 3D scanning of the maxillary dental casts was performed using INUS dental scanning solution(R), which consists of a 3D scanner, an autoscan system, and 3D reverse modelling software. The 3D superimposition was carried out using the surface-to-surface matching (best-fit method) function of the autoscan system. The antero-posterior movement of the maxillary first molar and central incisor was evaluated cephalometrically and on 3D digital models. To determine whether any difference existed between the two measuring techniques, paired t-tests and correlation analysis were undertaken. The results revealed no statistical differences between the mean incisor and molar movements as assessed cephalometrically or by 3D model superimposition. These findings suggest that the 3D digital orthodontic model superimposition technique used in this study is clinically as reliable as cephalometric superimposition for assessing orthodontic tooth movements. PMID:17513876

Cha, Bong Kuen; Lee, Jae Yong; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Yoshida, Noriaki

2007-05-19

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Experimental study on bone mineral determination in the wound healing process after tooth extraction by 125I-photon absorptiometry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A study was carried out by 125I-photon absorptiometry in tooth extraction wounds of dogs to determine the bone mineral content of the mandibular premolar region. The bone mineral content of excised mandibles was measured on the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 56th, and the 84th day, respectively, after tooth extraction. These were then compared with the values obtained by photodensitometry and by histological findings. The bone mineral content obtained by 125I-photon absorptiometry varied within a range of 0.270 and 0.720 g/cm2, over a period of 84-days. The highest mineral content value was noted in the apical site. Lower values were noted in the central site and with still lower values in the marginal site. In each case the bone mineral content which deacreased on the 3rd and 7th day after extraction tended to increase gradually thereafter. On the 56th and 84th day after tooth extraction, an increase in bone mineral in the margical site and a deacrease in the apical site was observed. This observation indicated that homogenization of the bone mineral occurred in the tooth extraction wound. Bone changes in the histological findings related to the healing process and the changes of values obtained by photodensitometry coincided with the changes shown in 125I-photon absorptiometry. (author).

1987-01-01

44

Promoting effects of thymosin ?4 on granulation tissue and new bone formation after tooth extraction in rats.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of thymosin ?4 (TB4) on wound healing after tooth extraction in rats. STUDY DESIGN: After extraction of the rats' mandibular first molar teeth, a synthetic partial peptide of TB4 was injected intraperitoneally at the time of extraction and every day thereafter for 6 days. Control subjects for the treatment received identical amounts of phosphate-buffered saline solution in the same manner. Histologic analysis, apoptosis assay, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed. RESULTS: The overall data showed that TB4 treatment suppressed apoptosis and inflammation; it accelerated the process of wound healing, including new bone formation. CONCLUSIONS: The findings demonstrated not only the usefulness of the TB4 partial peptide in wound healing of tooth extraction sockets, but also its potential application for bone regeneration and osteogenesis in bone and bone-related tissues.

Matsuo K; Akasaki Y; Adachi K; Zhang M; Ishikawa A; Jimi E; Nishihara T; Hosokawa R

2011-08-01

45

Ectopic Intranasal Tooth  

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Full Text Available The intranasal tooth is a rare clinical phenomenon that has unclear etiology. It may result to rhinolith with deposition calcium and organic materials around the ectopic nasal tooth. In this report we presended 43-year-old female who had ectopic nasal tooth which seems to be rhinolith .Diagnose of ectopic nasal tooth was determined by radiological examination and it was extracted by endoscopically.

Ediz Yorganc?lar

2008-01-01

46

TOOTH PASTE  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

FIELD: medicine, stomatology. SUBSTANCE: the present innovation deals with curative- prophylactic tooth pastes. The suggested tooth paste contains silicon dioxide, glycerol or sorbitol, Na- carboxymethylcellulose, sodium laurylsulfate, sodium fluoride or monofluorophosphate, calcium carbonate or glycerophosphate, extract obtained out of Siberian larch resin, conservant, saccharin or xylite, fragrance, food dyeing substance, water. All the components are taken in certain quantitative content. The suggested paste is of caries-prophylactic, antiphlogistic, antiparodontium, hemostatic and antiseptic action, affects microcirculation processes by enhancing the trophics of parodontium tissues. EFFECT: higher whitening action. 1 cl, 5 ex, 2 tbl

SITNIKOV I A

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An innovative approach to chair side provisional replacement of an extracted anterior tooth with Fiber Reinforced Ribbon Composite for space maintenance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An immediate replacement of an extracted anterior tooth may contribute to patients comfort, treatment acceptance and expectations of future treatment. However, fabrication of custom made restoration in the anterior region of the mouth through a removable or fixed may result in an esthetic compromise for patients during fabrication period. Chair side tooth replacement is an excellent short term option and one of the method is application of fiber reinforced composite resin technology. Though this method is used for reinforcing permanent tooth its use for primary teeth has not been reported. This article presents an innovative, affordable chair side procedure in which ribbon multipurpose bondable reinforcement ribbon is used to replace a single extracted tooth using patients own tooth.

Srinivas N CH; Jayanthi M; Shanthan

2011-01-01

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Immediate Implants Placed in Infected and Noninfected Sites after Atraumatic Tooth Extraction and Placement with Ultrasonic Bone Surgery.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Only a few reports deal with implants placed in infected postextraction sites. PURPOSE: Survival rates of a cohort of immediate implants cases placed in acute and chronically infected sites were compared with a cohort of noninfected ones while (1) tooth extraction and osteotomy sites were prepared with a piezosurgery device and (2) ultrasonication was applied to abate the bacterial charge at infected sites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-six patients received 168 immediate implants distributed into three groups: noninfected (85), acute (36), and chronically (47) infected sites. Atraumatic extraction and implant osteotomy were performed with an ultrasonic surgery device without flap elevation. All sites received the same medication and surgical protocol; infected sites were ultrasonicated during 30?seconds at 72?W. Kaplan-Meyer survival rates were calculated at 1 year. RESULTS: The 1-year survival rates of the noninfected, chronically, and acute infected groups were 98.8, 100, and 94.4%, respectively. The differences were not statistically significant. No implant was lost after loading. All teeth and roots could be extracted in one piece. Drilling at extraction sockets was uncomplicated, without skidding. CONCLUSIONS: Implant survival rates might be similar in infected and noninfected sites when infected sites receive standard medical and surgical treatment and are ultrasonicated. Atraumatic tooth/root extraction and implant placement can be reliably performed with piezoelectric surgery.

Blus C; Szmukler-Moncler S; Khoury P; Orrù G

2013-07-01

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Risk of laryngeal edema and facial swellings after tooth extraction in patients with hereditary angioedema with and without prophylaxis with C1 inhibitor concentrate: a retrospective study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Tooth extractions may trigger clinical symptoms of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH). The aim of this study was to determine how many tooth extractions were followed by symptoms of HAE-C1-INH in patients with and without preoperative short-term prophylaxis with C1 inhibitor concentrate. STUDY DESIGN: Tooth extractions and clinical symptoms of HAE-C1-INH were determined from clinical record files of 171 patients with HAE-C1-INH. RESULTS: Facial swelling or potentially life-threatening laryngeal edema, or both, occurred in 124/577 tooth extractions (21.5%) without prophylaxis. Similar symptoms occurred in a fewer proportion of patients undergoing extractions (16/128; 12.5%) after short-term prophylaxis with C1 inhibitor concentrate. The graded dose-response relationship was significant at P < .05. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term prophylaxis with C1 inhibitor concentrate significantly reduces the risk of HAE-C1-INH symptoms after tooth extraction. In some patients, however, facial swellings and laryngeal edema symptoms may occur despite prophylaxis.

Bork K; Hardt J; Staubach-Renz P; Witzke G

2011-07-01

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Comparison of the effectiveness of two different bone substitute materials for socket preservation after tooth extraction: a controlled clinical study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two bone substitute materials for socket preservation after tooth extraction. Extraction sockets in 10 patients were filled with either inorganic bovine bone material (Bio-Oss) or with synthetic material consisting of hydroxyapatite and silicon dioxide (NanoBone). Extraction sockets without filling served as the control. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented protocol for socket preservation and that the choice of a suitable bone substitute material is crucial. The dimensions of the alveolar ridge were significantly better preserved with Bio-Oss than with NanoBone or without treatment. Bio-Oss treatment resulted in better bone quality and quantity for successful implant placement.

Shakibaie-M B

2013-03-01

51

Tooth Discoloration  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth Discoloration What Is It? Symptoms Diagnosis Expected Duration Prevention Treatment When To Call a Professional Prognosis ... on the surface or by changes in the tooth material. There are three main types of tooth ...

52

Tooth Numbering  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth Numbering If you were trying to tell your dentist which tooth was giving you problems, chances are you'd ... be 2 instead of 1, acknowledging the missing tooth. If you've had teeth removed or teeth ...

53

Atraumatic tooth extraction and immediate implant placement with Piezosurgery: evaluation of 40 sites after at least 1 year of loading.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper presents ultrasonic surgery (ie, Piezosurgery) as a new, relevant, and predictable method for performing atraumatic tooth extraction and subsequent implant site preparation. Forty noninfected teeth or roots were extracted in 23 patients and replaced immediately with implants. Extraction consisted of cutting the fibers of the periodontal ligament with vibrating tips of up to 10 mm in depth; the teeth or roots were mobilized afterward with an elevator. All teeth/roots were removed without fracture. Implant osteotomies were performed using conical tips of increasing diameters. During implant placement, notching of the apical third of the palatal wall or the interradicular bridge was performed without complication due to uncontrolled movements of the instrument. After a mean healing period of 2.4 months, all implants were osseointegrated and have been successfully loaded for at least 12 months. By implementing Piezosurgery, extraction can be atraumatic and implant placement can be predictable and undemanding compared to the use of burs, which can lead to instruments slipping during the procedure.

Blus C; Szmukler-Moncler S

2010-08-01

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EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY PSEUDOANEURYSM AND INTERNAL JUGULER VEIN THROMBOSIS FOLLOWING TOOTH EXTRACTION IN A CASE OF BEHÇET’S DISEASE  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Behçet’s disease is a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown cause, presenting with vasculitis. Complications such as pseudoaneurysm or thrombosis may be seen due to major vein and artery involvement in addition to vasculitis causing clinical manifestations. Major artery complications are seen most commonly in the aorta, pulmonary, femoral, subclavian or carotid artery. The involvement of an extracranial artery, particularly the external carotid artery is uncommon in the literature. In our case, the clinical and radiologic findings of a young male Behçet patient with an external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm and internal jugular vein thrombosis following tooth extraction is presented together with the relevant literature. No such complication of Behçet’s disease following a dental manipulation has previously been reported in the literature. .

Figen Palab?y?k; Arda Kayhan; Esra Karaçay; Ercan ?nci; Tan Cimilli

2009-01-01

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Alveolar bony crest preservation at implants installed immediately after tooth extraction: an experimental study in the dog.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To evaluate the influence of deproteinized bovine bone mineral in conjunction with a collagen membrane, at implants installed into sockets in a lingual position immediately after tooth extraction, and presenting initial horizontal residual buccal defects <2 mm. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The pulp tissue of the mesial roots of (4)P(4) was removed in six Labrador dogs, and the root canals were filled with gutta-percha and cement. Flaps were elevated, and the buccal and lingual alveolar bony plates were exposed. The premolars were hemi-sectioned, and the distal roots were removed. Implants were installed in a lingual position and with the margin flush with the buccal bony crest. After installation, defects resulted at about 1.7 mm in width at the buccal aspects, both at the test and control sites. Only in the left site (test), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) particles were placed into the defect concomitantly with the placement of a collagen membrane. A non-submerged healing was allowed. RESULTS: After 3 months of healing, one implant was found not integrated and was excluded from the analysis together with the contralateral control implant. All remaining implants were integrated into mature bone. The bony crest was located at the same level of the implant shoulder, both at the test and control sites. At the buccal aspect, the most coronal bone-to-implant contact was located at a similar distance from the implant margin at the test (1.7 ± 1.0 mm) and control (1.6 ± 0.8 mm) sites, respectively. Only small residual DBBM particles were found at the test sites. CONCLUSION: The placement of an implant in a lingual position into a socket immediately after tooth extraction may favor a low exposure of the buccal implant surface. The use of DBBM particles, concomitantly with a collagen membrane, did not additionally improve the outcome obtained at the control sites.

Favero G; Botticelli D; Favero G; García B; Mainetti T; Lang NP

2013-01-01

56

Case series of 589 tooth extractions in patients under bisphosphonates therapy. Proposal of a clinical protocol supported by Nd:YAG low-level laser therapy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Trauma during dental surgery is a predisposing factor for bisphosphonates (BP)-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ). However, about 40% of cases of BRONJ are not related to dental invasive procedures, being probably associated to endodontic or periodontal infections. Extraction of non-treatable teeth is considered a reliable choice, to improve symptoms and to reduce the risk of BRONJ. Here we report our experience of tooth extractions in patients under oral or intravenous BP therapy. Study Design: Two-hundred and seventeen patients (38 males, 179 females; mean age 68.72 ± 11.26 years, range 30 to 83 years) under BP therapy received 589 tooth extractions at the Unit of Oral Medicine, Pathology and Laser-assisted Surgery of the University of Parma, Italy, between June 2006 and December 2010. Ninety five patients were under BP therapy for oncological disease (multiple myeloma (MM): 23; bone metastases (BM): 72) and 122 patients for non oncological diseases: 119 osteoporosis (OP), 2 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 1 Paget's disease (PD). The mean duration of BP was of 35 months. Antibiotic treatment was administered three days before and 2 weeks after tooth extractions. Patients were additionally treated with low level laser therapy (LLLT) through Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm - power 1.25 W; frequency 15 Hz; fibre diameter: 320 ?m), 5 application of 1 minute each. Patients were evaluated 3 days and once a week for 2 months after the extractions and every time they received LLLT. Mean follow-up was 15 months (ranging from 4 to 31 months). Results: In a total of 589 extractions (285 mandibular, 304 maxillary) performed, a minimal bone exposure was observed in 5 cases, treated with Er:YAG laser vaporization and than healed. Conclusions: Our experience supports the hypothesis that the association of antibiotic treatment and LLLT can be effective in preventing ONJ after tooth extractions in patients under BPT. PMID:23524436

Vescovi, P; Meleti, M; Merigo, E; Manfredi, M; Fornaini, C; Guidotti, R; Nammour, S

2013-07-01

57

Root resection under the surgical field employed for extraction of impacted tooth and management of external resorption.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This case report illustrates determination of prognosis and immediate resection carried out, before completing the endodontic therapy, during the surgery employed for managing a nonperiodontal problem. This case showed external pressure resorption in the distobuccal root of maxillary second molar caused by the impingement of impacted third molar. Extraction of third molar was decided when healing was not seen, despite initiating endodontic therapy in second molar. Following elevation of flap and extraction of third molar, the poor prognosis due to severe bone loss around the resorbed root was evident. But due to strategic value of second molar, it was found beneficial to employ resection. Therefore, immediate resection was carried out in the same surgical field before the completion of endodontic therapy. This prevented the need for another surgical entry with its associated trauma to carry out resection separately later. Resection followed by the completion of endodontic therapy and full crown assisted in salvaging the remaining functional portion of the tooth and prevented the occurrence of distal extension with its potential drawbacks.

Pai AV; Khosla M

2012-07-01

58

Tooth Disorders  

Science.gov (United States)

... made of a hard, bonelike material. Inside the tooth are nerves and blood vessels. You need your ... These include eating, speaking and even smiling. But tooth disorders are nothing to smile about. They include ...

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Comparative Study of Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen and Combination Effects for Pain Relief Following Tooth Extraction in Children under Local Anesthesia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: It is clear that tooth extraction is painful. Different drugs with various functions have been used in order to relieve the pain after extraction. Ibuprofen is a non-narcotic analgesic and acetaminophen is considered as one of the most consumption anti-inflammatory drugs and is administrated to relieve moderate to severe pains. Our purpose is comparing the effects of acetaminophen, ibuprofen and combination of them to relieve the teeth pain due to extraction under local anesthesia. Materials & Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, we divided 105 children (6-11 years old) referred to pediatrics ward of dental faculty of Hamadan University into 3 groups of 35 after getting their parent's consents, taking, their history and weighing them. Group1: received acetaminophen syrup with dose of 15mg/kg, group2: received ibuprofen syrup with dose of 5 mg/kg, and group3 received acetaminophen syrup with dose of 7.5mg/kg and ibuprofen syrup with dose of 2.5mg/kg. . One hour before and 15 min after tooth extraction, severity of their pain was evaluated according to table(CHEOPS).Drug effects in every group was studied by c2 , t-test and Mann Whitney U test. Results: Age average of the children under survey in the group of acetaminophen syrup was 8.62±1.81 years old and in the group of ibuprofen syrup was 8.45±1.68 years old, and in the group of acetaminophen with ibuprofen was equal with 8.71±1.27 years old. Sex combination of the under survey children in the group of acetaminophen syrup was 51.4% / 48.6% (female/male), in the group of ibuprofen syrup was 51.4%/48.6%, and in the group of acetaminophen syrup with ibuprofen syrup was 65.7%/34.3%. Grade average of toothache immediately after extraction in the group treated with acetaminophen syrup was 33.19 and, in group treated with ibuprofen syrup equaled 37.81, and in the group treated with acetaminophen syrup with ibuprofen syrup was 47.86. Grade average of toothache 15 min after extraction in the group 1 was 35.1, in the second group was 35.9, and in the third group was 40.83.Conclusion: The group received ibuprofen syrup and in the group received acetaminophen syrup in comparison with the group received acetaminophen with ibuprofen on the instant and 15 min after extraction showed much more relieved effect (P<0.05). No meaningful statistic differences were observed between the group received acetaminophen I5 mg/kg and the group received ibuprofen 5 mg/kg.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4):5-9)

Z. Pahlavani; F. Eghbalian; F. Zeraati; Z. Torabikhah

2012-01-01

60

[Local haemostasis with an adhesive cyanoacrylate-coated membrane following tooth extraction in patients under anticoagulant or anti-platelet therapy].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Assessment of a local hemostasis with a compressive, extemporaneous gutter glued to the alveolar crest after tooth avulsion in patients under anticoagulant and/or platelet aggregation inhibitors, and economical impact of this technique. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Ninety-seven tooth extractions were performed in patients under AVK and/or anti-platelet drugs. The interventions were consecutive and concerned 251 teeth (138 different alveolar sites). The extraction alveolus was protected by an absorbable oxycellulose membrane coated with sterilized cyanoacrylate adhesive for medical use. This procedure was used with all patients, whatever the hemorrhagic risk (the only inclusion criterion was INR less than 4 for patients under AVK). All procedures were performed under local anesthesia. RESULTS: There was one hemorrhagic complication (0.72%) due to mechanical gutter destruction by an antagonist tooth. The adhesive did not run, there was no tissue necrosis, and no wound infection requiring gutter removal. DISCUSSION: This local hemostasis procedure is reliable. It may be an alternative to substitution of heparin, without or with hospitalization. This procedure, requiring modification of treatment, greatly decreases healthcare costs. Contra-indications include the presence of an antagonist tooth harmful for the gutter, and patients with impaired consciousness or tongue dyspraxia.

Lesca C; Boumendjel S; Boumendjel M; Hefied M; Ben Ismail S; Bonnefous D

2012-06-01

 
 
 
 
61

[Tooth extraction in surgical orthodontic treatment of malformations of the facial mass  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In the present article the Authors take under consideration the most important role of the presurgical orthodontic treatment from the point of view of the orthodontic techniques which aim to improve the occlusion. The authors, therefore describe the different faces, and they focalize the fact that the therapy may frequently require extractions to resolve serious crowdings of the teeth. They take also care of the maxillo facial skeleton alterations, to decide on extracting and about the ratio between the space available and required in the different cases.

Silvestri A; Spagnuolo A; Deli M

1989-03-01

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[Tooth extraction in surgical orthodontic treatment of malformations of the facial mass].  

Science.gov (United States)

In the present article the Authors take under consideration the most important role of the presurgical orthodontic treatment from the point of view of the orthodontic techniques which aim to improve the occlusion. The authors, therefore describe the different faces, and they focalize the fact that the therapy may frequently require extractions to resolve serious crowdings of the teeth. They take also care of the maxillo facial skeleton alterations, to decide on extracting and about the ratio between the space available and required in the different cases. PMID:2700214

Silvestri, A; Spagnuolo, A; Deli, M

63

Tooth ankylosis: Orthodontic implications.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Tooth ankylosis is a condition, which may lead to an occlusal abnormality. The etiology is unknown although different and often contradicting opinions have been presented. It prevails on primary teeth, characterized by progressive infraocclusion. Ankylosis on permanent teeth is less frequent and is associated with trauma and impaction. Management of the affected tooth ranges from simple observation to extraction. A protocol assisting in the proper diagnosis and treatment is presented.

P. Panos

2003-01-01

64

Use of viscera extract from hybrid catfish (Clarias macrocephalus × Clarias gariepinus) for the production of protein hydrolysate from toothed ponyfish (Gazza minuta) muscle.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Proteolytic activity of viscera extract from hybrid catfish (Clarias macrocephalus × Clarias gariepinus) was studied. The optimal pH and temperature were 9.0 and 50°C, respectively, when toothed ponyfish (Gazza minuta) muscle was used as a substrate. When viscera extract from hybrid catfish was used for the production of protein hydrolysate from toothed ponyfish muscle, extract concentration, reaction time, and fish muscle/buffer ratio affected the hydrolysis and nitrogen recovery (NR) (p<0.05). Optimum conditions for toothed ponyfish muscle hydrolysis were 3.5% hybrid catfish viscera extract, 15 min reaction time and fish muscle/buffer ratio of 1:3 (w/v). High correlation between the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and NR (R(2)=0.974) was observed. Freeze-dried hydrolysate had a high protein content (89.02%, dry weight basis) and it was brownish yellow in colour (L(?)=63.67, a(?)=6.33, b(?)=22.41). The protein hydrolysate contained a high amount of essential amino acids (48.22%) and had arginine and lysine as the dominant amino acids.

Klomklao S; Kishimura H; Benjakul S

2013-01-01

65

Finite element analysis of the effect of force directions on tooth movement in extraction space closure with miniscrew sliding mechanics.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Miniscrews placed in bone have been used as orthodontic anchorage in extraction space closure with sliding mechanics. The movement patterns of the teeth depend on the force directions. To move the teeth in a desired pattern, the appropriate direction of force must be selected. The purpose of this article is to clarify the relationship between force directions and movement patterns. METHODS: By using the finite element method, orthodontic movements were simulated based on the remodeling law of the alveolar bone. The power arm length and the miniscrew position were varied to change the force directions. RESULTS: When the power arm was lengthened, rotation of the entire maxillary dentition decreased. The posterior teeth were effective for preventing rotation of the anterior teeth through an archwire. In cases of a high position of a miniscrew, bodily tooth movement was almost achieved. The vertical component of the force produced intrusion or extrusion of the entire dentition. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limits of the method, the mechanical simulations demonstrated the effect of force direction on movement patterns.

Kojima Y; Kawamura J; Fukui H

2012-10-01

66

Extrações dentárias em Ortodontia: avaliação de elementos de diagnóstico/ Tooth extraction in orthodontics: an evaluation of diagnostic elements  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Algumas más oclusões exigem do ortodontista capacidade de diagnóstico para decidir pela melhor maneira de tratar o paciente. O objetivo dos autores deste artigo foi apresentar casos clínicos e discutir alguns elementos de diagnóstico utilizados na elaboração do plano de tratamento, auxiliando na decisão de extrair dentes. Foi dada ênfase em cada elemento de diagnóstico: aspectos relacionados à cooperação, discrepância de modelo, discrepância cefalométrica (more) e perfil facial, idade esquelética (crescimento) e relações anteroposteriores, assimetrias dentárias, padrão facial e patologias. Sugere-se que a associação dos aspectos citados é importante para a decisão correta. Todavia, algumas vezes, uma característica, por si só, pode definir o plano de tratamento. Abstract in english Certain malocclusions require orthodontists to be capable of establishing a diagnosis in order to determine the best approach to treatment. The purpose of this article was to present clinical cases and discuss some diagnostic elements used in drawing up a treatment plan to support tooth extraction. All diagnostic elements have been highlighted: Issues concerning compliance, model discrepancy, cephalometric discrepancy and facial profile, skeletal age (growth) and anteropo (more) sterior relationships, dental asymmetry, facial pattern and pathologies. We suggest that sound decision-making is dependent on the factors mentioned above. Sometimes, however, one single characteristic can, by itself, determine a treatment plan.

Ruellas, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira; Ruellas, Ricardo Martins de Oliveira; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Rogério Lacerda dos

2010-06-01

67

Extrações dentárias em Ortodontia: avaliação de elementos de diagnóstico Tooth extraction in orthodontics: an evaluation of diagnostic elements  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Algumas más oclusões exigem do ortodontista capacidade de diagnóstico para decidir pela melhor maneira de tratar o paciente. O objetivo dos autores deste artigo foi apresentar casos clínicos e discutir alguns elementos de diagnóstico utilizados na elaboração do plano de tratamento, auxiliando na decisão de extrair dentes. Foi dada ênfase em cada elemento de diagnóstico: aspectos relacionados à cooperação, discrepância de modelo, discrepância cefalométrica e perfil facial, idade esquelética (crescimento) e relações anteroposteriores, assimetrias dentárias, padrão facial e patologias. Sugere-se que a associação dos aspectos citados é importante para a decisão correta. Todavia, algumas vezes, uma característica, por si só, pode definir o plano de tratamento.Certain malocclusions require orthodontists to be capable of establishing a diagnosis in order to determine the best approach to treatment. The purpose of this article was to present clinical cases and discuss some diagnostic elements used in drawing up a treatment plan to support tooth extraction. All diagnostic elements have been highlighted: Issues concerning compliance, model discrepancy, cephalometric discrepancy and facial profile, skeletal age (growth) and anteroposterior relationships, dental asymmetry, facial pattern and pathologies. We suggest that sound decision-making is dependent on the factors mentioned above. Sometimes, however, one single characteristic can, by itself, determine a treatment plan.

Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas; Ricardo Martins de Oliveira Ruellas; Fábio Lourenço Romano; Matheus Melo Pithon; Rogério Lacerda dos Santos

2010-01-01

68

Esthetic evaluation of single-tooth Morse taper connection implants placed in fresh extraction sockets or healed sites.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to compare the esthetic outcome of single implants placed in fresh extraction sockets with those placed in fully healed sites of the anterior maxilla. This retrospective study was based on data from patients treated with single-tooth Morse taper connection implants placed in fresh extraction sockets and in fully healed sites of the anterior maxilla. Only single implant treatments were considered with both neighboring teeth present. Additional prerequisites for immediate implant treatment were intact socket walls and a thick gingival biotype. The esthetic outcome was objectively rated using the pink esthetic/white esthetic score (PES/WES). The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the PES and the WES between the 2 groups. Twenty-two patients received an immediate implant, and 18 patients had conventional implant surgery. The mean follow-up was 31.09 months (SD 5.57; range 24-46) and 34.44 months (SD 7.10; range 24-48) for immediately and conventionally inserted implants, respectively. No implants were lost. All implants fulfilled the success criteria. The mean PES/WES was 14.50 (SD 2.52; range 9-19) and 15.61 (SD 3.20; range 8-20) for immediately and conventionally placed implants, respectively. Immediate implants had a mean PES of 7.45 (SD 1.62; range 4-10) and a mean WES of 7.04 (SD 1.29; range 5-10). Conventional implants had a mean PES of 7.83 (SD 1.58; range 4-10) and a mean WES of 7.77 (SD 1.66; range 4-10). The difference between the 2 groups was not significant. Immediate and conventional single implant treatment yielded comparable esthetic outcomes.

Mangano FG; Mangano C; Ricci M; Sammons RL; Shibli JA; Piattelli A

2013-04-01

69

Calcium dynamics in the healing of tooth extraction sockets in mice evaluated using 45Ca-autoradiography and Electron Probe Micro Analysis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The calcium distribution in tooth extraction sockets of mice was examined using 45-Calcium autoradiography (ARG) and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA). Mice were divided into 8 groups (n=8) according to the number of days (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 20 respectively) after extraction. Frozen sections were taken from mice on each experimental day after injection of 45-Calcium (RI). The process of formation of new bone was observed using ARG. An ultimate analysis was performed by EPMA. Histological analysis was performed with toluidine blue- and alizarin red S-staining. In toluidine blue-staining, an osteoblast was found along the socket wall at 4 days and non-calcified periodontal ligament was recognized until 5 days after extraction. In alizarin red S-staining, new bone was recognized separated from the socket wall at 4 days after extraction. 45Ca-labeling was detected strongly in the periosteum of the mandible, the surface of cement and periodontal ligament in control animals. 45Ca-labeling was moved from the bottom to the top of the tooth extraction socket during the period from 1 to 5 days after extraction, but in the periodontal ligament lower than in the granulation tissue. 45Ca-labeling was detected in the socket at 7, 10 and 20 days. At 4 days, calcium phosphate was observed in the central portion of the socket using EPMA. 45Ca-labeling showed deposition of calcium phosphate for alveolar bone and new bone. These results suggest that the granulation tissue may be involved in the initial calcification in the tooth extraction socket and lead to the formation of new bone in it. (author)

2006-01-01

70

Effect of pine bark extract on bond strength of brackets bonded to bleached human tooth enamel.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract Aim. The purpose was to investigate the effect of pine bark (proanthocyanidin, natural antioxidant) solution on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded with composite resin to human enamel after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (HP). Materials and methods. Sixty recently extracted premolars were divided into an experimental group (n = 45), which was bleached with 40% HP, and a control group (n = 15), which was not bleached. The experimental group was further divided into three sub-groups. Specimens in group IB (n = 15) were bonded immediately after bleaching; specimens in group SA (n = 15) were bleached, then treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and then bonded; group PB specimens (n = 15) were bleached, then treated with 5% pine bark solution and bonded. The specimens were debonded with Universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index was calculated. Results. No significant differences in shear bond strength were noted when the pine bark treated group was compared with the control group and sodium ascorbate group (p > 0.05). Treating the bleached enamel surface with 10% sodium ascorbate or 5% pine bark solution reverses the SBS reduction. Conclusion. So, as a natural antioxidant and less hazardous, clinicians can choose pine bark solution instead of sodium ascorbate.

Aksakalli S; Ileri Z; Karacam N

2013-05-01

71

Tooth - abnormal colors  

Science.gov (United States)

Discolored teeth; Tooth discoloration; Tooth pigmentation ... Many different things can cause tooth discoloration. The change in color may affect the entire tooth, or just appear as spots or lines in the tooth enamel. ...

72

Efeito comparativo entre clonixinato de lisina e paracetamol no controle da dor pós-exodontia/ Comparison between lysine and paracetamol for post tooth extraction pain control  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A exodontia é praticada desde os primórdios da humanidade como forma de resolver cirurgicamente os problemas dentários. Porém, como todo procedimento cirúrgico, ela promove um processo inflamatório reacional que se apresenta clinicamente com dor. Muitos fármacos têm sido usados no intuito de minimizar o desconforto pós-operatório, porém um protocolo para o seu controle ainda não está estabelecido. Este estudo teve como objetivo aval (more) iar o efeito analgésico do clonixinato de lisina e paracetamol no controle de dor pós-exodontia. MÉTODO: Estudo duplamente encoberto e randomizado com 40 pacientes atendidos no Ambulatório de Cirurgia I no Departamento de Odontologia da Universidade Federal de Sergipe (DOD/UFS) que necessitaram de extrações por via alveolar em hemiarcadas diferentes utilizando clonixinato de lisina (125 mg) três vezes ao dia ou paracetamol (750 mg) quatro vezes ao dia, ambos por três dias no pós-operatório. A dor foi avaliada nas primeiras 24 e 48h com o uso da escala analógica visual. Os dados foram submetidos aos testes estatísticos t de Student e de Friedman. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças estatisticamente significantes entre idade, em relação aos gêneros e em relação à intensidade da dor. CONCLUSÃO: Tanto o clonixinato de lisina como o paracetamol foi eficaz para o controle da dor pós-exodontia. Abstract in english BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tooth extraction is practiced since the early days of mankind to surgically solve dental problems. However, as any surgical procedure, it promotes an inflammatory reaction with clinical presentation of pain. Several drugs have been used to minimize postoperative discomfort; however there is still no established protocol for its control. This study aimed at evaluating the analgesic effect of lysine and paracetamol to control post tooth extraction (more) pain. METHOD: Double blind randomized study with 40 patients seen by the Surgical Outpatient Setting I, Dentistry Department, Federal University of Sergipe (DOD/UFS), who needed alveolar extractions in different hemiarcades using lysine (125 mg) three times a day or paracetamol (750 mg) four times a day, both during three postoperative days. Pain was evaluated at 24 and 48 hours with the visual analog scale. Data were submitted to Student's t and Friedman statistical tests. RESULTS: There have been no statistically significant differences in age, gender and pain intensity. CONCLUSION: Both lysine and paracetamol were effective to control post tooth extraction pain.

Amorim, Klinger de Souza; Ayres, Lucas Celestino Guerzet; Cunha, Rafael Soares da; Souza, Liane Maciel de Almeida; Paixao, Mônica Silveira; Groppo, Francisco

2012-12-01

73

Histometric study of socket healing after tooth extraction in rats treated with diclofenac/ Estudo histométrico do reparo alveolar após extração dental em ratos tratados com diclofenaco  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O objetivo do presente trabalho foi investigar se a administração de diclofenaco interfere no processo de reparo alveolar em ratos. Foram utilizados 42 ratos Wistar, dos quais 21 receberam 10mg/kg/dia de diclofenaco e o restante solução salina. Os animais foram submetidos a extração dos incisivos superiores direito, e sacrificados 7, 14 e 21 dias após a avulsão dental. A formação progressiva de osso e a redução do volume de coágulo sangüíneo e tecido conjun (more) tivo no período de 1 a 3 semanas após a extração dental foram quantificadas através do método histométrico de contagem de pontos. O tratamento com o diclofenaco causou significante atraso na neo-formação óssea, associado a um atraso na organização e remissão do coágulo sangüíneo. Abstract in english The purpose of the present study was to investigate if diclofenac administration interferes with the time course of alveolar wound healing in rats. Forty-two Wistar rats were used, 21 rats received 10 mg/kg/day of diclofenac one day before and 4 days after extraction of the right maxillary incisors and 21 rats received saline. The animals were sacrificed 7, 14 and 21 days after tooth extraction. Progressive new bone formation and a decrease in the volume fraction of blood (more) clot and connective tissue from 1 to 3 weeks after tooth extraction was quantified using the histometric point-counting method. Diclofenac treatment caused a significant delay in new bone formation in association with an impairment of blood clot remission/organization.

Yugoshi, Luciana Ibara; Sala, Miguel Angel; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme; Carvalho, Teresa Lúcia Lamano

2002-01-01

74

Zoledronic acid delays wound healing of the tooth extraction socket, inhibits oral epithelial cell migration, and promotes proliferation and adhesion to hydroxyapatite of oral bacteria, without causing osteonecrosis of the jaw, in mice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates such as zoledronic acid (ZOL) and pamidronate have been widely and successfully used for the treatment of cancer patients with bone metastases and/or hypercalcemia. Accumulating recent reports have shown that cancer patients who have received these bisphosphonates occasionally manifest bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) following dental treatments, including tooth extraction. However, little is known about the pathogenesis of BRONJ to date. Here, to understand the underlying pathogenesis of BRONJ, we examined the effects of ZOL on wound healing of the tooth extraction socket using a mouse tooth extraction model. Histomorphometrical analysis revealed that the amount of new bone and the numbers of blood vessels in the socket were significantly decreased in ZOL-treated mice compared to control mice. Consistent with these results, ZOL significantly inhibited angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor in vivo and the proliferation of endothelial cells in culture in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, etidronate, a non-nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, showed no effects on osteogenesis and angiogenesis in the socket. ZOL also suppressed the migration of oral epithelial cells, which is a crucial step for tooth socket closure. In addition, ZOL promoted the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to hydroxyapatite and the proliferation of oral bacteria obtained from healthy individuals, suggesting that ZOL may increase the bacterial infection. In conclusion, our data suggest that ZOL delays wound healing of the tooth extraction socket by inhibiting osteogenesis and angiogenesis. Our data also suggest that ZOL alters oral bacterial behaviors. These actions of ZOL may be relevant to the pathogenesis of BRONJ.

Kobayashi Y; Hiraga T; Ueda A; Wang L; Matsumoto-Nakano M; Hata K; Yatani H; Yoneda T

2010-03-01

75

Tooth Injuries (For Parents)  

Science.gov (United States)

... With Us: Social Media Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Tooth Injuries KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Emergencies > Tooth ... next to the injury site. If a Permanent Tooth is Chipped or Broken Collect all the pieces ...

76

Tooth Colored Fillings  

Science.gov (United States)

... Accredited and General Member Dental Patients ? Cosmetic Procedures ? Tooth Colored Fillings Tooth Colored Fillings In the past, teeth were filled ... becoming the preferred approach. Dentists are using more tooth-like materials (composite resins and porcelains) that are ...

77

Cracked Tooth Syndrome  

Science.gov (United States)

Cracked Tooth Syndrome What Is It? Symptoms Diagnosis Expected Duration Prevention Treatment When To Call a Professional Prognosis Additional ... gum. These small cracks are known as "cracked tooth syndrome." Cracked tooth syndrome is most common in ...

78

[Vivisection studies on the effects of unilateral tooth extraction on growth of the skull and masticatory musculature. I. Overall skull, orbita, zygomatic arch, rear skull (author's transl)  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Skull growth is affected by numerous factors, including dentition. Animal experiments have assumed considerable importance in connection with such studies. This series of publications deals with the response of the skull skeleton and masticatory muscles to extraction of each emerging tooth in the right half of the jaws of Vietnamese belly pigs. The animals were slaughtered at various ages ranging from 6 to 12 months, throughout an important phase of post-natal skull development. Biomathematical methods were used to analyse the macerated skull and the masticatory musculature. Linear differential equations have proved useful for describing growth processes. The 1st report deals with the distances measured for the overall and rear skull, the orbita and the zygomatic arch. Differences between the right and left sides are slight with respect to these distances. Significant differences were found only in the range of the front part of the zygomatic arch during the 6th, 7th, 8th, 11th and 12th month of life.

Otto B; Schumacher GH; Fanghänel J

1980-01-01

79

Multifunctional tooth cleaner  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The multifunctional tooth cleaner includes a brush handle, a tooth brushing part with bristles in one end of the handle, and a characterized tooth picking part in the other end of the handle. The tooth picking part has a thick end capable of being combined to the handle and the other end being one toothpick. The tooth picking part may be bent and is produced with EPDM. The present invention has the advantages of both tooth brush and toothpick and convenient carrying about, and the tooth picking part has high strength and less deformation.

CHEN MINGHUA

80

[Vivisection studies on the effects of unilateral tooth extraction on growth of the skull amd masticatory musculature (author's transl)  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Following up on the 1st part of this cycle of publications, the 2nd Bulletin deals with investigations on upper and lower jaw growth in the Vietnamese belly pig after extracting all teeth as they appeared in the right half of the jaw. The results showed characteristic changes on the side of the extraction compared with the skull on the other side. They also show clearly that the effects of unilateral loss of teeth on the development of the bony part of the chewing apparatus are very local. This is made evident by analysis distances measured for the 3rd and 4th upper jaw widths and the 2nd vertical height of the bottom jaw. In contrast to other authors, we found no changes in the longitudinal and lateral development of the bottom jaw. Due to the slight degree of development of the alveolar process of the bottom jaw in the region of the 1st permanent molar, a significant reduction in surface area was found when removing the 2nd molars, which was performed usually at an early point, only in the group slaughtered after 12 months.

Otto B; Fanghänel J; Schumacher GH

1981-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Tooth formation - delayed or absent  

Science.gov (United States)

Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... appearance, or tooth absence. Delayed or absent tooth formation can result from many different conditions, including: Apert ...

82

Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)  

Science.gov (United States)

... NIDCR Home > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

83

Surfaces of the Tooth  

Science.gov (United States)

... to the various sides and surfaces of a tooth. Learn them, and next time your dentist's words ... more sense. Here's how dentists refer to the tooth's surfaces: Buccal or facial or labial — This is ...

84

Tooth Abfraction Lesions  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth Abfraction Lesions What Is It? Symptoms Diagnosis Expected Duration Prevention Treatment When To Call a Professional ... affect the enamel , the outer layer of the tooth. In severe cases, the dentin and cementum layers ...

85

Replacing a Missing Tooth  

Science.gov (United States)

... and palate are often born with a missing tooth, most often the lateral incisor (immediately next to ... will be involved in dealing with the missing tooth? Several dental specialists will be most important in ...

86

Single-Tooth Implants  

Science.gov (United States)

Single-Tooth Implants When Are They Used? How Do They Work? The Implant Process Caring for Your Implants What ... and right of the two front teeth. Single-tooth implants can be used in people who are ...

87

Cavities/Tooth Decay  

Science.gov (United States)

... be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Cavities/tooth decay By Mayo Clinic staff Original Article: http:// ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination ...

88

Effect of acemannan, an extracted polysaccharide from Aloe vera, on BMSCs proliferation, differentiation, extracellular matrix synthesis, mineralization, and bone formation in a tooth extraction model.  

Science.gov (United States)

Aloe vera is a traditional wound healing medicine. We hypothesized acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera gel, could affect bone formation. Primary rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were treated with various concentrations of acemannan. New DNA synthesis, VEGF, BMP-2, alkaline phosphatase activity, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin expression, and mineralization were determined by [(3)H] thymidine incorporation assay, ELISA, biochemical assay, western blotting, and Alizarin Red staining, respectively. In an animal study, mandibular right incisors of male Sprague-Dawley rats were extracted and an acemannan treated sponge was placed in the socket. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, the mandibles were dissected. Bone formation was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and histopathological examination. The in vitro results revealed acemannan significantly increased BMSC proliferation, VEGF, BMP-2, alkaline phosphatase activity, bone sialoprotein and osteopontin expression, and mineralization. In-vivo results showed acemannan-treated groups had higher bone mineral density and faster bone healing compared with untreated controls. A substantial ingrowth of bone trabeculae was observed in acemannan-treated groups. These data suggest acemannan could function as a bioactive molecule inducing bone formation by stimulating BMSCs proliferation, differentiation into osteoblasts, and extracellular matrix synthesis. Acemannan could be a candidate natural biomaterial for bone regeneration. PMID:23315202

Boonyagul, Sani; Banlunara, Wijit; Sangvanich, Polkit; Thunyakitpisal, Pasutha

2013-01-12

89

Intracranial supernumerary tooth  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Case report of an accidentally diagnosed supernumerary tooth in the superior orbital fissure. Computed tomography (CT) contributed with a more precise localization of the tooth being situated between the orbit and the brain. CT also showed that there was no cyst or other pathological process around the supernumerary tooth, which is plausible and frequently reported in the literature. (orig.).

1984-01-01

90

Fractured tooth (image)  

Science.gov (United States)

A tooth can be chipped or fractured during an accident or a bad fall. A tooth that is chipped or not badly fractured can usually be handled on a nonemergency basis. A tooth that is badly fractured may have exposed nerve ...

91

Intracranial supernumerary tooth  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Case report of an accidentally diagnosed supernumerary tooth in the superior orbital fissure. Computed tomography (CT) contributed with a more precise localization of the tooth being situated between the orbit and the brain. CT also showed that there was no cyst or other pathological process around the supernumerary tooth, which is plausible and frequently reported in the literature.

Sjoeberg, S.; Loerinc, P.

1984-12-01

92

Replantation of tooth involved in dentigerous cyst: a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: Dentigerous cyst (DC) is a disembriogenetic lesion. The cyst wall encloses the crown of an impacted tooth. Several therapeutic approaches have been mentioned in the literature for management of this lesion. Case Report This article describes the management of an adolescent with a mandibular DC surgically treated with extraction of the tooth, enucleation of the cyst and replantation of the permanent tooth involved. Final outcome shows complete healing of the bone socket with eruption of a vital tooth. No orthodontic traction was required. No recurrence was detected at the radiographic follow-up at 12 months, thus confirming the success of this therapeutic approach. After a 7-year follow-up period the tooth responded positively to the vitality test. Clinical Implications: In selected cases surgical enucleation of the lesion without loss of involved tooth, might be considered as a viable treatment to obtain healing of the lesion, spontaneous eruption of the tooth and physiological restoration of bone.

Picciotti M; Divece L; Parrini S; Pettini M; Lorenzini G

2012-12-01

93

Multilobed mesiodens: a supernumerary tooth with unusual morphology.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

An 8-year-old boy came with a chief complaint of an abnormally shaped tooth situated in upper front teeth region. On examination a supernumerary tooth with multiple lobes was present palatally to the maxillary right permanent central incisor. The morphology of the tooth crown was found to be unusual due to the presence of five lobes in the crown portion. Because of the supernumerary tooth, the permanent right central incisor was displaced labially. Radiographic examination showed a completely formed supernumerary tooth with dilacerated root. On the basis of clinical and radiographic examination, the supernumerary tooth was diagnosed as multilobed mesiodens. Since patient expressed dissatisfaction with the presence of supernumerary tooth, it was decided to extract this mesiodens followed by orthodontic treatment for alignment of labially placed maxillary right permanent central incisor.

Dave B; Patel J; Swadas M; Mallikarjuna R

2013-01-01

94

Multilobed mesiodens: a supernumerary tooth with unusual morphology.  

Science.gov (United States)

An 8-year-old boy came with a chief complaint of an abnormally shaped tooth situated in upper front teeth region. On examination a supernumerary tooth with multiple lobes was present palatally to the maxillary right permanent central incisor. The morphology of the tooth crown was found to be unusual due to the presence of five lobes in the crown portion. Because of the supernumerary tooth, the permanent right central incisor was displaced labially. Radiographic examination showed a completely formed supernumerary tooth with dilacerated root. On the basis of clinical and radiographic examination, the supernumerary tooth was diagnosed as multilobed mesiodens. Since patient expressed dissatisfaction with the presence of supernumerary tooth, it was decided to extract this mesiodens followed by orthodontic treatment for alignment of labially placed maxillary right permanent central incisor. PMID:23391956

Dave, Bhavna; Patel, Jalark; Swadas, Milan; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

2013-02-06

95

Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1) Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2) Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

Divya Bhat

2011-01-01

96

Automating digital leaf measurement: the tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many species of plants produce leaves with distinct teeth around their margins. The presence and nature of these teeth can often help botanists to identify species. Moreover, it has long been known that more species native to colder regions have teeth than species native to warmer regions. It has therefore been suggested that fossilized remains of leaves can be used as a proxy for ancient climate reconstruction. Similar studies on living plants can help our understanding of the relationships. The required analysis of leaves typically involves considerable manual effort, which in practice limits the number of leaves that are analyzed, potentially reducing the power of the results. In this work, we describe a novel algorithm to automate the marginal tooth analysis of leaves found in digital images. We demonstrate our methods on a large set of images of whole herbarium specimens collected from Tilia trees (also known as lime, linden or basswood). We chose the genus Tilia as its constituent species have toothed leaves of varied size and shape. In a previous study we extracted c.1600 leaves automatically from a set of c.1100 images. Our new algorithm locates teeth on the margins of such leaves and extracts features such as each tooth's area, perimeter and internal angles, as well as counting them. We evaluate an implementation of our algorithm's performance against a manually analyzed subset of the images. We found that the algorithm achieves an accuracy of 85% for counting teeth and 75% for estimating tooth area. We also demonstrate that the automatically extracted features are sufficient to identify different species of Tilia using a simple linear discriminant analysis, and that the features relating to teeth are the most useful.

Corney DP; Tang HL; Clark JY; Hu Y; Jin J

2012-01-01

97

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease  

Science.gov (United States)

... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease? Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most common inherited neurological ... France, and Howard Henry Tooth in Cambridge, England. CMT, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy ( ...

98

SPRING-TOOTH HARROW  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

FIELD: machine building. ^ SUBSTANCE: proposed spring-tooth harrow consists of flat spring draw-bars and vertical cylindrical teeth attached thereto. The cylindrical tooth lower face is cut at 5-10 to horizontal plane, and attached to the round leg. The tooth vertical axis features a through hole with its diametre equal to that of the said leg. The latter enters the hole for the depth of Gh=2 to 3 Dt, where Dt is the tooth diametre. The tooth top features a blind hole arranged at the distance Lh.=1.618 d, where d is the leg diametre, from the tooth top edge and perpendicular to the vertical axis of tooth symmetry. Aforesaid hole receives attachment element to be threaded therein and made up of the upper threaded cylindrical and lower conical parts. The latter enters the appropriate conical hole made in the leg bottom. The length of the said attachment element is smaller than the round leg diametre. The tooth top features the outer surface groove arranged so that its horizontal axis of symmetry is aligned with the lengthwise axis of symmetry of aforesaid threaded blind hole. The top end face of the attachment element features the groove with its width and thickness those of the lock spring ring arranged in the groove, along the tooth outer surface. The tooth enters the attachment element groove. The taper of the attachment element lower end equals that of the round leg hole. The lengthwise axis of symmetry of aforesaid hole lies in parallel to the direction of motion. This hole is made on the tooth side opposite the direction of motion. ^ EFFECT: reduced forces of friction on teeth end faces, higher repairability. ^ 1 dwg

BURKOV LEV NIKOLAEVICH

99

[Tooth regeneration in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)].  

Science.gov (United States)

The first inferior molar has been extracted, a part of its being reimplanted or not. A new molar of normal form regenerated, apparently from the apex of the tooth germ, in all cases in which the alveolus was left free or implanted with a tooth freagment deprived of pulpa. PMID:145296

Stephan, F; Artis, J P; Lanot, R

1977-01-01

100

[Tooth regeneration in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The first inferior molar has been extracted, a part of its being reimplanted or not. A new molar of normal form regenerated, apparently from the apex of the tooth germ, in all cases in which the alveolus was left free or implanted with a tooth freagment deprived of pulpa.

Stephan F; Artis JP; Lanot R

1977-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Nasal tooth: case report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Ectopic tooth is not uncommon and usually occurs in the palate and maxillary sinus. We report a case of ectopic tooth located in the nasal cavity, a rare site. The mass depicted by CT was highly attenuated, and central lucency was observed.

Park, Si Hyun; Kim, Ji Hye; Hwang, Hee Young; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Chol Heui [Gachon Medical School, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

2002-12-01

102

TOOTH PASTE BINDER COMPOSITION  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A tooth paste binder composition particularly suited for tube tooth paste, which is obtained by adding microfibrillated cellulose suspension to carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt, and homogeneously mixing and dehydrating the mixture. Toothpaste containing this binder has excellent shape retention, extrudability, and washability and, in addition, it can be stored at high temperatures and applied to salt-containing formulations.

FUKUI Yoshitaka

103

The role of enamel crystallography on tooth shade.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Tooth shade is influenced by a combination of extrinsic-stains that are adsorbed to the enamel surface and by its intrinsic-shade resulting from the interaction of light with tooth structures. This study was designed to investigate how the variations in enamel ultrastructure may affect tooth optical properties. METHODS: One-hundred extracted teeth were collected from adult patients attending McGill-Undergraduate Dental Clinics. Shade-spectrophotometry, FTIR and XRD were used to assess tooth shade, enamel chemical composition and crystallography. The data obtained was analysed for Pearson correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: Tooth shade parameters varied dramatically within the studied population. Pearson correlation analysis demonstrated that tooth hue was associated with enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal size (R = -0.358; B = -0.866; P = 0.007), tooth chroma was associated with enamel HA carbonization (R = -0.419; B = -99.06; P = 0.005), and tooth lightness was associated with both enamel HA crystal size (R = -0.313; B = -1.052; P = 0.019) and the degree of HA carbonization (R = -0.265; B=-57.95; P = 0.033). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the size of enamel HA crystals and the relative content of mineral carbonate were the most important predictors for tooth shade lightness (P = 0.018) and chroma (P=0.008), respectively. In contrast, enamel organic content had no correlation with tooth shade. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study we have revealed that the tooth shade is regulated by the size of their HA enamel crystals. On the other hand, variation in the degree of enamel HA carbonization can also affect the tooth shade. These findings are of great relevance in dentistry since it provides better understanding of tooth aesthetics.

Eimar H; Marelli B; Nazhat SN; Abi Nader S; Amin WM; Torres J; de Albuquerque RF Jr; Tamimi F

2011-12-01

104

Cyst in the pulp of an intact human immature tooth: Case report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to histologically present and analyze a cyst in the pulp of an intact human immature tooth as a rare case in dental practice. The cyst was discovered in the left upper first premolar of a 9 year old following tooth extraction for orthodontic reasons. Presence of this cyst in an immature tooth may impair the pulp integrity and the tooth on the whole, so early and adequate diagnosis is essential.

Vojinovi? Jovan; Vojinovi? Olivera; Vu?eti? Mirjana

2004-01-01

105

TOOTH COATING MATERIAL  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: A tooth coating material is provided to easily and clearly check coating state by irradiating UV ray or visible ray. CONSTITUTION: A tooth coating material contains 0.1-3 weight% of fluorescence. The tooth coating material also contains 0.5-20 weight% of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate complex(CPP-ACP) and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium fluoride phosphate complex(CPP-ACFP) 5-70 weight% of coating polymer 5-70 weight% of organic solvent containing alcohol 0.01-10 weight% of fluorine compound and 0.1-20 weight% of thickening agent.

HINOURA KO; KATO SHINICHI

106

Metal tooth-like surgical templates for tooth autotransplantation in adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to suggest a way to fabricate surgical templates to assist the surgeon in preparing the recipient socket when performing premolar autotransplantation. METHODS: Premolars used previously for extractions of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts were used in this study as archetype of models for tooth transplantation. Eighty-four mandibular and maxillary first and second extracted premolars were reviewed. All teeth were extracted for orthodontic reasons. From these teeth, eight teeth were selected to serve as archetype of models in which all the other teeth were at equal size or smaller in maximum 2 mm in M-D or B-L dimension. These teeth were sent to dental technician to perform identical archetype stainless steel templates. During autotransplantation immediately following donor tooth extraction, the appropriate template is chosen out of the toothlike stainless steel surgical templates and the donor tooth is then immediately replaced in its socket. This enables the surgeon to prepare the recipient site without manipulating the donor tooth and thus preventing damage to the PDL cells of the donor tooth. Only after the recipient site had been prepared to the appropriate size and shape according to the template, the donor tooth is removed from its socket, immediately placed at the recipient site and splinted as recommended. CONCLUSIONS: The advantage of the presented metal tooth-like surgical templates described in this study is that a set of stents has been produced by replicating different common shape adolescent premolars that reflect the biological variation in size and shape of these teeth.

Ashkenazi M; Levin L

2013-06-01

107

Single tooth odontodysplasia. Case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Odontodysplasia (ghost tooth) is an uncommon, nonhereditary developmental condition of unknown origin, affecting both mesodermal and ectodermal elements of the dental organ. To our knowledge, this case is unique in that it is only the second reported case of odontodysplasia affecting a single tooth. Based on clinical, radiographic and histologic findings, we diagnosed this tooth as a ghost tooth.

Zilo JA; Ringler D; Mandel L

2013-06-01

108

TOOTH COATING COMPOSITION  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To provide a tooth coating composition capable of maintaining dental caries preventing effects of CPP-ACP, such as recalcification effect and demineralization-inhibiting effect, for a long period of time, a tooth coating composition is made not to contain water, but to include (a) 0.5 to 20% by weight of a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate complex (CPP-ACP) and/or a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium fluoride phosphate complex (CPP-ACFP), (b) 5 to 70% by weight of a coating film-forming polymer, (c) 5 to 70% by weight of an organic solvent selected so as to contain alcohol, (d) 0.01 to 10% by weight of a fluorine compound, and (e) 0.1 to 20% by weight of a thickener, the tooth coating composition being used by coating on a tooth.

KATO SHINICHI; SATO TAKUYA

109

Tooth coating material  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To easily confirm a coating state and covering state of a tooth and coating material on a tooth, the tooth coating material is made to be visually confirmable clearer than surrounding teeth by irradiating a fluorescent agent therein with an ultraviolet or visible ray by a dental light irradiator to excite the fluorescent agent, for example, the tooth coating material containing no water, but including: 0.5 to 20% by weight of a caseinphosphopeptide-amorphouscalciumphosphate complex (CPP-ACP) and/or a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium fluoride phosphate complex (CPP-ACFP), 5 to 70% by weight of a covering film- forming polymer, 5 to 70% by weight of an organic solvent selected so as to contain alcohol, 0.01 to 10% by weight of a fluorine compound, 0.1 to 20% by weight of a thickener, and 0.1 to 3% by weight of the fluorescent agent.

HINOURA KO; KATO SHINICHI

110

Saw-tooth cardiomyopathy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We present an unusual case of cardiomyopathy in a two month old male infant with a grade-I systolic murmur. Echocardiographic examination disclosed left ventricular (LV), dysplasia with saw-tooth like inwards myocardial projections extending from the lateral walls towards the LV cavity. There was mild LV systolic dysfunction with apical hypokinesia. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated in detail these cross bridging muscular projections originating from the inferior interventricular septum and lateral LV wall, along with areas of hypokinesis at the LV septum and apex in a noncoronary distribution, without any late gadolinium enhancement. We have termed this condition saw-tooth cardiomyopathy because of the very characteristic appearance.

Davlouros PA; Danias PG; Karatza AA; Kiaffas MG; Alexopoulos D

2009-01-01

111

White Spot (Early Tooth Decay)  

Science.gov (United States)

... TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Health Oral Complications of ... Sorted by ... > Children's Oral Health White Spot Early tooth decay Share This Page Facebook External link – please ...

112

Histological comparison of healing following tooth extraction with ridge preservation using enamel matrix derivatives versus Bio-Oss Collagen: a pilot study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The goal of the present clinical study was to evaluate new bone formation in human extraction sockets augmented with enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and Bio-Oss Collagen. Patients with symmetrical single-rooted teeth in the bilateral quadrants of the upper jaw condemned for extraction participated in this study. Following extraction, the sockets (20 sockets) were randomly augmented using either EMD or Bio-Oss Collagen. After 3 months of healing, bone biopsies were obtained and prepared for histological analyses. Dental implants were then placed. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) readings were obtained for each implant at the time of surgery and at 1 and 3 months postoperatively. The mean new bone formation was 34.57±25.67% in the EMD sites and 28.80±16.14% in the Bio-Oss Collagen sites. There was no significant difference between the groups. The ISQ values were significantly higher for the implants placed in the EMD sites at the first and third months, but no significant differences were observed in the ISQ values for the implants placed in the Bio-Oss Collagen sites. The augmentation of the extraction sockets with EMD or Bio-Oss Collagen leads to similar behaviour in bone regeneration.

Alkan EA; Parlar A; Yildirim B; Sengüven B

2013-07-01

113

Method for producing false tooth or tooth guard  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

An impression of the tooth (8) is taken with a solidifiable material from which the false tooth is moulded and joined to the existing tooth which is previously subjected to abrasive treatment. The impression material totally encloses the surface of the tooth destined for subsequent treatment. The hollow cavity between the remaining tooth substance and the impression material is filled with a low-viscous false-tooth material. A container space in a deep-drawing cap for the impression material has an open end with an opening guided over a tooth. The opening is closed by a film. Another opening spaced apart from the container-opening is closed by a membrane.

SAUERESSIG KILIAN

114

Limited evidence to demonstrate that the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy reduces the incidence of osteoradionecrosis in irradiated patients requiring tooth extraction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

SELECTION CRITERIA: The search covered Medline from January 1948 through March 2008. The subject search by the authors used the following key phrases: Prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen (HBO); preventing osteoradionecrosis (ORN); HBO; ORN; HBO and ORN; HBO, ORN, and dental extractions; HBO and dental extractions; ORN and dental extractions; prophylactic HBO and dental extractions. The authors used EndNote 8.01 (Thomson Reuters, Philadelphia, PA) to perform the search, to import reference data, and to manage the imported references. The electronic search yielded 696 articles. Following further review, which evaluated for compliance to inclusion criteria and data quality, 14 articles were selected for assessment. KEY STUDY FACTOR: The efficacy of HBO use in irradiated patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The presence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). MAIN RESULTS: The authors assessed the quality of the 14 studies in their review using separate criteria for observational studies (cohort and case-control) and for randomizedcontroltrials (RCT). Therewas only 1RCTamongthe 14studies selected. Among the observational studies, 5 articles specified the type of cancer. Among these 6 studies, only 2 studies evaluated patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Another article assessed patients with cancer of the oral cavity, the oropharynx, and the face. Eight articles did not provide any information about the type of cancer. In 7 of the 14 studies, no HBO was used. Of the remaining 7 that had HBO, 4 used the protocol of Marx et al(1): 20 dives of 90 minutes each, breathing 100% humidified oxygen at 2.4 atm of absolute pressure before surgery, and 10 dives after surgery. Three studies did not mention the specific protocol. The use of antibiotics as adjunctive therapy was noted in 7 studies: 4 studies used antibiotics preoperatively and postoperatively, and only 3 studies used antibiotics postoperatively. Of the 14 articles, 10 articles reported a definition of ORN. Six articles described ORN as exposed bone that had been irradiated and had been present for 3 to 6 months. In another study, the bone necrosis was described as developing in 2 forms: minor, as a series of small sequestra that separated spontaneously after periods of weeks or months, and major, where necrosis involved the entire thickness of the jaw with pathologic fracture inevitable. Information provided on the method of extraction used was limited, with only 3 of the 14 reports stating the method (nonsurgical or atraumatic extraction). Primary closure was attempted or used in 3 studies, whereas 2 noted that primary closure was not used. Five studies did not indicate either the method of extraction or whether there was primary closure. The only one randomized, prospective, controlled trial in this systematic review-Marx et al(1)-compared the incidence of ORN in head-and neck-irradiated patients who required dental extractions. They had 2 groups: one group received prophylactic HBO, whereas the other group received antibiotics. The HBO group had a lower incidence of ORN compared with the antibiotic group (5.4% vs 29.9%). In the cohort and observational studies, the occurrence rate of ORN in the prophylactic HBO patients was in the range from 0% to 11% (median, 4.1%), whereas in the non-HBO patients the range was from 0% to 29.9% (median, 7.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The systematic review by the authors did not identify any reliable evidence to either support or refute the efficacy of HBO in the prevention of postextraction ORN to irradiated patients. As a result, additional controlled clinical trials will be needed to address this important question.

Chuang SK

2012-09-01

115

An electron spin resonance system for in-vivo human tooth dosimetry  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry system for an in-vivo human tooth has been developed to measure, without extraction, the cumulative radiation dose in a tooth. The system consists of a TE{sub 102} cavity with an aperture at the end plate, a Nd-B-Fe (Neomax) oral magnet and a commercial ESR spectrometer. The front molar is attached to the aperture of the cavity to detect radicals created by radiation in the tooth enamel. Optimum dosimetry conditions were investigated using an extracted human tooth. (author).

Ishii, Hiroshi; Ikeya, Motoji (Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Dept. of Physics)

1990-05-01

116

Tooth coating composition  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To provide a tooth coating composition capable of maintaining dental caries preventing effects of CPP-ACP, such as recalcification effect and demineralization-inhibiting effect, for a long period of time, a tooth coating composition is made not to contain water, but to include (a) 0.5 to 20% by weight of a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate complex (CPP-ACP) and/or a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium fluoride phosphate complex (CPP-ACFP), (b) 5 to 70% by weight of a coating film- forming polymer, (c) 5 to 70% by weight of an organic solvent selected so as to contain alcohol, (d) 0.01 to 10% by weight of a fluorine compound, and (e) 0.1 to 20% by weight of a thickener.

KATO SHINICHI; SATO TAKUYA

117

Three tooth kinematic coupling  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01

118

Clinical and esthetic outcomes of single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and esthetic outcomes of 10 consecutive single-tooth implant restorations in the anterior maxilla. A specific treatment protocol consisting of (1) atraumatic extraction of the failing tooth, (2) placement of an SLActive bone-level implant with simul...

Furze, D; Byrne, A; Donos, N; Mardas, N

119

Tooth loss in aggressive periodontitis: a systematic review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is thought to have a faster rate of progression than chronic periodontitis (CP). However, there is a lack of studies systematically investigating disease progression and tooth loss in AgP. A systematic search of the literature was conducted by two independent reviewers for longitudinal studies including patients with AgP (previously known as 'periodontosis', 'juvenile' or 'early-onset' periodontitis) indicating measures of disease progression. Ovid MEDLINE(®) and Embase databases were searched for at least 5-year longitudinal human studies in AgP patients. In total, 16 studies were included in the review, from an initial search of 1,601 titles. Heterogeneity was detected for disease definition and clinical data reporting; hence meta-analysis was feasible only for the objective measure 'tooth loss'. The average tooth loss for all AgP cases was 0.09 (95% C.I. = 0.06-0.16) per patient-year. The corresponding values by diagnosis were 0.05, 0.14, and 0.12 tooth loss per patient-year, respectively, for LAgP, GAgP, and un-specified AgP. For studies reporting tooth loss during the 'observational period' (excluding extractions at initial therapy), the average tooth loss for AgP was 0.09 per patient-year. High heterogeneity was detected for these analyses. In conclusion, most studies report good long-term stability of treated AgP cases. PMID:23955159

Nibali, L; Farias, B C; Vajgel, A; Tu, Y K; Donos, N

2013-08-16

120

Tooth Loss in Aggressive Periodontitis: A Systematic Review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is thought to have a faster rate of progression than chronic periodontitis (CP). However, there is a lack of studies systematically investigating disease progression and tooth loss in AgP. A systematic search of the literature was conducted by two independent reviewers for longitudinal studies including patients with AgP (previously known as 'periodontosis', 'juvenile' or 'early-onset' periodontitis) indicating measures of disease progression. Ovid MEDLINE(®) and Embase databases were searched for at least 5-year longitudinal human studies in AgP patients. In total, 16 studies were included in the review, from an initial search of 1,601 titles. Heterogeneity was detected for disease definition and clinical data reporting; hence meta-analysis was feasible only for the objective measure 'tooth loss'. The average tooth loss for all AgP cases was 0.09 (95% C.I. = 0.06-0.16) per patient-year. The corresponding values by diagnosis were 0.05, 0.14, and 0.12 tooth loss per patient-year, respectively, for LAgP, GAgP, and un-specified AgP. For studies reporting tooth loss during the 'observational period' (excluding extractions at initial therapy), the average tooth loss for AgP was 0.09 per patient-year. High heterogeneity was detected for these analyses. In conclusion, most studies report good long-term stability of treated AgP cases.

Nibali L; Farias BC; Vajgel A; Tu YK; Donos N

2013-08-01

 
 
 
 
121

Results after wisdom tooth transplantation. A retrospective study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Wisdom tooth transplants offer youth the possibility of biologically fixed tooth replacement in cases of premolar agenesis or premature loss of a molar. In the present study, 57 transplants of third molars were reviewed and evaluated retrospectively on preoperative findings (root growth stages, extraction sites, indication for transplantation), on postoperative clinical findings (local gingivitis, periodontal probing values, tooth mobility, percussion sound and percussion pain) and on radiological findings (tertiary build-up of dentin, osseous periradicular conditions, progress of root growth). Only the transplants which healed with a vital pulp and in a periodontally healthy state were considered successful. Upper and lower wisdom teeth having 50% to 75% root growth progression were transplanted. The postoperative follow-up observation period averaged 26.4 months. The success of a wisdom tooth transplantation was not influenced by the root growth stage (p = 1), the extraction location of wisdom teeth (p = 0.45), or the feasibility for a transplantation (p = 0.56). Three teeth showed pulpal necrosis with apical periodontitis and were counted as failures. The success rate was rather high with 54 out of 57 transplants (94.7%), therefore wisdom tooth transplantations, with careful selection of a suitable graft and its gentle removal, can be described as a good predictable treatment. PMID:23640290

Schütz, Silvio; Beck, Isabelle; Kühl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

2013-01-01

122

Results after wisdom tooth transplantation. A retrospective study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Wisdom tooth transplants offer youth the possibility of biologically fixed tooth replacement in cases of premolar agenesis or premature loss of a molar. In the present study, 57 transplants of third molars were reviewed and evaluated retrospectively on preoperative findings (root growth stages, extraction sites, indication for transplantation), on postoperative clinical findings (local gingivitis, periodontal probing values, tooth mobility, percussion sound and percussion pain) and on radiological findings (tertiary build-up of dentin, osseous periradicular conditions, progress of root growth). Only the transplants which healed with a vital pulp and in a periodontally healthy state were considered successful. Upper and lower wisdom teeth having 50% to 75% root growth progression were transplanted. The postoperative follow-up observation period averaged 26.4 months. The success of a wisdom tooth transplantation was not influenced by the root growth stage (p = 1), the extraction location of wisdom teeth (p = 0.45), or the feasibility for a transplantation (p = 0.56). Three teeth showed pulpal necrosis with apical periodontitis and were counted as failures. The success rate was rather high with 54 out of 57 transplants (94.7%), therefore wisdom tooth transplantations, with careful selection of a suitable graft and its gentle removal, can be described as a good predictable treatment.

Schütz S; Beck I; Kühl S; Filippi A

2013-01-01

123

Processo de reparo em feridas de extração dentária em camundongos tratados com o complexo Symphytum officinale e Calendula officinallis Process of repair in tooth extraction sores in treated mice with Symphytum officinale and Calendula officinallis compound  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Medicamentos homeopáticos como o Symphytum officinalle e a Calendula officinallis são dotados de propriedades anti-sépticas, antiinflamatória, cicatrizantes e também agem como promotores da consolidação de fraturas ósseas. Neste trabalho, uniram-se esses dois medicamentos similares em um complexo para verificar o seu efeito no reparo em feridas de extração dentária em camundongos. O complexo Symphytum officinalle e Calendula officinallis nas potências de 6CH e 3CH, respectivamente, foi ministrado por via oral ao grupo tratado durante 5 dias antes e após a extração do incisivo superior direito. No grupo controle, administraram-se 5ml de álcool etílico a 70% diluídos em 30 ml de soro fisiológico. Após a proservação, os animais foram sacrificados, a maxila direita separada da esquerda, fixada e processada para inclusão em parafina. Após a microtomia, os cortes obtidos foram corados pela H/E. A análise histológica mostrou que, tanto no grupo controle como no tratado, o alvéolo dentário estava preenchido por tecido de granulação e tecido ósseo neoformado, com graus variáveis de maturação, rico em osteócitos. No entanto, nos animais tratados, o processo de reparo em feridas após extração dentária do incisivo superior direito mostrou um avanço progressivo de neoformação óssea mais acentuado quando comparado ao grupo controle, em tempos equivalentes. Estes resultados enfatizam as propriedades biológicas do complexo Symphytum officinalle e Calendula officinallis e sua possível utilização como recurso terapêutico na Odontologia.Homeopathic medicines as Symphytum officinale and Calendula officinallis are endowed with antiseptic, antiphlogistic and cicatrizant properties and promoter of the consolidation of bone fracture. This research combined these two similar medicines in a compound to examine its action in the repair of tooth extraction sores in mice. The compound Symphytum offic. and Calendula offic. at the respective potencys of 6CH and 3CH was orally administered to the treated group during 5 days before and after the extraction of the rigth upper incisor. To the control group were administered 5 ml of ethylic alchol 70% diluted in 30 ml of physiologic serum. After a period of expectation, the animals were sacrificed, the right maxila was separated of the left maxila, this was fixed and the laboratories techniques were realized for inclusion in paraffin. After that, the piece was cut in the microtome, and the laminas were dyed by H/E. The analysis showed that the control and treated group exhibited the dental alveolus fulfilled with granulation tissue and neoformed bone tissue with variable degrees of maturation, abundant in osteocites. However, at the treated animal the healing process of the sore after the extraction of the rigth upper incisor showed a bone neoformation very pronounced when compared with the control group at equivalent times. Those results showed the biological properties of the compound Symphytum offic. and Calendula offic. and its utilization as a therapeutical help in Odontology.

Eleny BALDUCCI-ROSLINDO; Karina Gonzales SILVÉRIO; Daniela Mercaldi MALAGOLI

1999-01-01

124

Regional odontodysplasia: a case of progressive tooth development.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Regional odontodysplasia (RO) is considered a relatively rare dental anomaly despite increasing numbers of case reports in recent years. It usually presents as a localized anomaly in tooth development affecting a few adjacent teeth in a single maxillary or mandibular quadrant. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncommon case of regional odotodysplasia involving noncontiguous mandibular teeth, crossing the midline in a male patient, and showing progressive normalization of tooth anatomy over a period of 6 years. Typically, teeth affected with RO become pulpally involved early on and are either extracted or endodontically treated. Such reports of automatic normalization over time in RO is supportive of a more conservative treatment approach.

Ganguly R; Ramesh A

2012-04-01

125

Tooth preservation or implant placement: A systematic review of long-term tooth and implant survival rates.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: For the past few decades, dental implants have served as reliable replacements for missing teeth. However, there is an increasing trend toward replacing diseased teeth with dental implants. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors conducted a systematic review of long-term survival rates of teeth and implants. They searched the MEDLINE database for relevant publications up to March 2013. They considered studies in which investigators assessed the long-term effectiveness of dental implants or that of tooth preservation. They included only studies that had follow-up periods of 15 years or longer. RESULTS: The authors selected 19 articles for inclusion. Investigators in nine studies assessed the tooth survival rate, whereas investigators in 10 studies assessed the implant survival rate. When comparing the overall long-term (that is, 15 years or more) tooth loss rate with that of implants, the authors observed rates ranging between 3.6 and 13.4 percent and 0 and 33 percent for teeth and implants, respectively. They could not perform a meta-analysis because of the substantial differences between the studies. Practical Implications. The results of this systematic review show that implant survival rates do not exceed those of compromised but adequately treated and maintained teeth, supporting the notion that the decision to extract a tooth and place a dental implant should be made cautiously. Even when a tooth seems to be compromised and requires treatment to be maintained, implant treatment also might require additional surgical procedures that might pose some risks as well. Furthermore, a tooth can be extracted and replaced at any time; however, extraction is a definitive and irreversible treatment.

Levin L; Halperin-Sternfeld M

2013-10-01

126

Efecto In Vitro de las Bebidas Refrescantes sobre la Mineralización de la Superficie del Esmalte Dentario de Piezas Permanentes Extraídas/ In Vitro Effect of Refreshing Drinks on the Mineralization of Tooth Enamel Surface in Extracted Permanent Dental Pieces  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el efecto de las bebidas refrescantes sobre la mineralización de la superficie del esmalte de piezas dentarias permanentes extraídas. Para esto se realizó un estudio experimental donde la muestra correspondió a 50 cortes de premolares permanentes extraídos en estado íntegro, estos fueron distribuidos en tres grupos de estudio mediante asignación aleatoria: bebidas gaseosas, jugos y néctares, y aguas minerales purificadas (more) y saborizadas más un grupo control. Los dientes fueron lavados y almacenados en saliva artificial a 4°C. A todos los cortes dentarios se les midió la mineralización con el equipo Diagnodent 2095 (Kavo®) antes de iniciar la exposición, la cual correspondió a un minuto en el tipo de bebida según grupo, seguido por tres minutos en saliva artificial, ciclo que se repitió cinco veces en un tiempo de 20 minutos. Este procedimiento se realizó una vez al día, por un mes y para cada día se utilizaron nuevas bebidas refrescantes. Una vez finalizado se volvió a medir la mineralización para luego realizar las comparaciones entre grupos. El grupo de bebidas gaseosas provocó una mayor desmineralización en la superficie del esmalte dentario (p=0,000), seguido del grupo de jugos y néctares (p=0,000). El grupo de aguas minerales saborizadas y purificadas no provocaron efectos sobre la mineralización de la superficie del esmalte. Por lo tanto, sólo el grupo de gaseosas y jugos provocaron un efecto desmineralizador en la superficie del esmalte de las piezas dentarias, siendo la Coca-cola® la que produjo mayor efecto seguido de la Coca-cola light® y luego el Kapo®. Abstract in english The aim of this study was to determine the effect of refreshing drinks on the mineralization of tooth enamel surface in extracted permanent dental pieces. For this an experimental study was conducted where the sample was composed by 50 permanent premolars extracted as an entire piece. These pieces were randomly distributed in three study groups: soft drinks, juices and nectars, and purified and flavored mineral waters, in addition to a control group. The teeth were carefu (more) lly washed and stored in artificial saliva at 4 C. Before starting the exposure to refreshing drinks, all dental slices were tested in order to measure their baseline mineralization using the Diagnodent 2095 equipment (Kavo®). The exposition consisted in one minute of contact with the drink corresponding to each group, followed of three minutes in artificial saliva. This cycle was repeated 5 times in 20 minutes time. This procedure was carried out once daily, for one month, and every day new refreshing drinks were used. Once the assay finished, the premolar mineralization was measured again, in order to make comparisons between groups. The soft drinks group caused the highest demineralization on the teeth enamel surface (p=0.000), followed by the juices and nectars group (p=0.000). In the purified and flavored mineral waters group, no effects were found on the mineralization of the enamel surface. A demineralizing effect on the enamel surface of dental pieces was observed only in the groups of soft drinks and juices, where Coca-Cola® caused the highest effect, followed by Coca-Cola light® and then Kapo®.

Moreno Ruiz, Ximena; Narváez Carrasco, Carmen Gloria; Bittner Schmidt, Verónica

2011-08-01

127

[Erosions of hard tooth substance].  

Science.gov (United States)

Lemon juice was applied to intact and eroded tooth surfaces in vivo to demonstrate the development of erosions based on morphological changes. Under the influence of the fruit acid the protecting pellicles are removed and the enamel demonstrates the typical etch lesion with a honeycomb surface structure. In the dentin the acid works mainly on the peritubular area. Abrasive brushing techniques wear down the already damaged tooth surfaces. PMID:2630280

Noack, M J

1989-07-01

128

[Erosions of hard tooth substance  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Lemon juice was applied to intact and eroded tooth surfaces in vivo to demonstrate the development of erosions based on morphological changes. Under the influence of the fruit acid the protecting pellicles are removed and the enamel demonstrates the typical etch lesion with a honeycomb surface structure. In the dentin the acid works mainly on the peritubular area. Abrasive brushing techniques wear down the already damaged tooth surfaces.

Noack MJ

1989-07-01

129

[Fundamental and practical study for DNA analysis using tooth as a source of DNA  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Degree of degradation and the yield of DNA extracted from dental pulp tissues were examined on the tooth samples (n = 50) stored at room temperature and the method of DNA extraction from tooth hard tissues was also investigated. The DNA samples obtained were also applied to forensic odontological material examination including DNA fingerprinting using a probe Myo and VNTR (variable number of tandem repeat) analysis in D4S43 locus by PCR. The amount of DNA obtained from the dental pulp tissue of a single tooth varied approximately from 3 to 40 micrograms. In most cases, high molecular weight DNA was still present in samples stored at room temperature for at least 336 days. When the dental pulp tissue samples were less than 5 mg in weight, the amount DNA extracted was usually less than 10 micrograms, however when the samples were more than 5 mg in weight, the amount of DNA extracted was more than 10 micrograms. No correlation was observed between the storage period of the tooth samples and the DNA extraction ratio (the amount of extracted DNA weight, micrograms/pulp weight, mg). The efficiency of DNA extraction from tooth hard tissues was investigated under different conditions using 0.005 M and 0.5 M EDTA solutions for decalcification. DNA was efficiently extracted from the tooth samples which were decalcified for one week without changing the 0.5 M EDTA solution or by changing the solution once within a week. Rapid decalcification using formic acid buffer was not suitable for DNA extraction from tooth hard tissues. Southern blot hybridization of DNA samples extracted from pulp tissues using Myo probe gave multiple bands. Finger print patterns obtained from DNA recovered from dental pulp and tooth hard tissues samples were identical, however, the number of hybridizing bands obtained from tooth hard tissues was less than that obtained from blood and dental pulp tissues. The D4S43 typing using DNA recovered from blood stains, dental pulp tissues and tooth hard tissues of the same individuals was in agreement with each other and the 184bp fragment was efficiently amplified in all the samples tested. The DNA obtained from dental pulp tissues usually contains high molecular weight DNA and was suitable for multilocus probe and PCR analysis. However, the DNA obtained from tooth hard tissues was suitable only for PCR analysis.

Hanaoka Y; Inoue M; Tsai TH; Minaguchi K

1995-02-01

130

Tooth thickness at the furcation entrance of lower molars.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Better understanding of the furcation anatomy may serve to decrease the risk of pulpal injury during rotary odontoplasty, a procedure often used in conjunction with guided tissue regeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine (i) the tooth thickness about the furcation entrance of lower molars, and (ii) whether there is a relationship between tooth thickness and patient age. 40 mandibular 1st molars (M1) (mean age = 36.2; range 10-65 years) and 40 mandibular 2nd molars (M2) (mean age = 37.9; range 14-70 years) were collected. Age, gender and furcation involvement (if any) were noted for each tooth at the time of extraction. Teeth were sectioned in half, buccal-lingual, at the furcation entrance with a rotary diamond blade. A standardized linear reference scale was placed on each experimental section and an 8 x 10 in. photograph generated. The distance from the floor of the pulp chamber to 5 predetermined sites on the root surface was calculated. The data were expressed as (a) the mean of each site and (b) the mean of each tooth (the average of the 5 points of each tooth). Analysis of covariance failed to show a relationship between thickness measurements and gender or furcation involvement. Thus, the data was subjected to simple regression analysis to determine the relationship of age with tooth and cementum thickness. This study revealed that by site, the mean measurements ranged from 2.7-3.0 mm for both M1 and M2. The single least/greatest measurements of the 5 sites were for M1: 1.6/4.7 mm and for M2: 1.8/4.2 mm. By tooth, the average distance from the pulp to the root surface was 2.83 mm (+/- 0.49) for M1 and 2.88 mm (+/- 0.44) for M2. Regression analysis of tooth thickness with age was significant for M1 only. The maximum slope of the 5 sites was approximately 0.3 mm/10 years. No relationship was found between cementum thickness and age for either tooth group. The results of this study indicate that the majority of times the pulp is 1.6-4.2 mm from the root surface in the vicinity of the furcation entrance of lower 1st and 2nd molars. Although tooth thickness in this area may increase with age, the amount is not enough to forego judicious odontoplasty on older patients.

Sterrett JD; Pelletier H; Russell CM

1996-07-01

131

Human tooth bank: sociocultural profile of a group of donors  

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Full Text Available Objective: To survey the sociocultural profile of a specific group of individuals who donated teeth to the Human Tooth Bank of Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil. Methods: The research consisted of a questionnaire containing the following information about: Patient’s age, sex, occupation, education, reason for tooth loss and intention to replace the missing tooth by means of prosthesis or implant. The questionnaire was filled out by 50 patients after having the extraction procedure performed and donating the dental organ. The data were compiled and analyzed by means of descriptive and multivariate statistics. Results: The sociocultural profile of the donor was basically composed of individuals in the age group between 30 and 50 years, with educational level ranging from zero to nine or more years of formal schooling. Caries disease was the most frequent reason for tooth loss (36%), followed by periodontal disease (34%). Of the donors analyzed, more than half did not intend to replace the tooth. Furthermore, according to the multivariate analysis, the most relevant factors for assessing the profile of donors were the variables age, orthodontic indication, caries and periodontal disease. Conclusion: This information was shown to be relevant for structuring the oral health care services, as well as in the strategy for obtaining teeth from the Public Health Units.

Mariane Moreira Poletto; Mônica Moreira; Marília Moreira Dias; Maria da Graça Kfouri Lopes; Osmir José Lavoranti; Eduardo Pizzatto

2010-01-01

132

Genetic basis of tooth agenesis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Tooth agenesis or hypodontia, failure to develop all normally developing teeth, is one of the most common developmental anomalies in man. Common forms, including third molar agenesis and hypodontia of one or more of the incisors and premolars, constitute the great majority of cases. They typically affect those teeth that develop latest in each tooth class and these teeth are also most commonly affected in more severe and rare types of tooth agenesis. Specific vulnerability of the last developing teeth suggests that agenesis reflects quantitative defects during dental development. So far molecular genetics has revealed the genetic background of only rare forms of tooth agenesis. Mutations in MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2 and EDA have been identified in familial severe agenesis (oligodontia) and mutations in many other genes have been identified in syndromes in which tooth agenesis is a regular feature. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in many genes reduce the gene dose, whereas e.g. in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) the complete inactivation of the partially redundant signaling pathway reduces the signaling centers. Although these mechanisms involve quantitative disturbances, the phenotypes associated with mutations in different genes indicate that in addition to an overall reduction of odontogenic potential, tooth class-specific and more complex mechanisms are also involved. Although several of the genes so far identified in rare forms of tooth agenesis are being studied as candidate genes of common third molar agenesis and incisor and premolar hypodontia, it is plausible that novel genes that contribute to these phenotypes will also become identified.

Nieminen P

2009-06-01

133

Genetic basis of tooth agenesis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth agenesis or hypodontia, failure to develop all normally developing teeth, is one of the most common developmental anomalies in man. Common forms, including third molar agenesis and hypodontia of one or more of the incisors and premolars, constitute the great majority of cases. They typically affect those teeth that develop latest in each tooth class and these teeth are also most commonly affected in more severe and rare types of tooth agenesis. Specific vulnerability of the last developing teeth suggests that agenesis reflects quantitative defects during dental development. So far molecular genetics has revealed the genetic background of only rare forms of tooth agenesis. Mutations in MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2 and EDA have been identified in familial severe agenesis (oligodontia) and mutations in many other genes have been identified in syndromes in which tooth agenesis is a regular feature. Heterozygous loss of function mutations in many genes reduce the gene dose, whereas e.g. in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) the complete inactivation of the partially redundant signaling pathway reduces the signaling centers. Although these mechanisms involve quantitative disturbances, the phenotypes associated with mutations in different genes indicate that in addition to an overall reduction of odontogenic potential, tooth class-specific and more complex mechanisms are also involved. Although several of the genes so far identified in rare forms of tooth agenesis are being studied as candidate genes of common third molar agenesis and incisor and premolar hypodontia, it is plausible that novel genes that contribute to these phenotypes will also become identified. PMID:19219933

Nieminen, Pekka

2009-06-15

134

Parameters of tooth enamel spin model and its application in EPR-dosimetry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The authors present a model of spin system of tooth enamel EPR spectra which include two types of parametric centres with axial anisotropy. Spectra of 126 samples of tooth enamel with absorbed dose of 4000 mGy of Co-60 gamma-radiation were investigated basing on the parameters of the model with the use of EPR PS-100X radio spectrometer. The suggested model and the results of measurement of the EPR signal noise component with PS-100X radio spectrometer were used to calculate the error of the absorbed doses in tooth enamel with least-aqua res technique. Optimal conditions for investigation of tooth enamel with EPR PS-100X radio spectrometer were determined. Sensitivity of absorbed dose measurement in tooth enamel at the level of 10-15 mGy was evaluated. The error of absorbed dose calculation was shown not to depend considerably on the degree of dentine extraction from the samples.

1995-01-01

135

p63 in tooth development.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Recent findings have shown that the development of teeth involves a complex sequence of molecular events in which the p53 family member p63 is involved. Indeed, mice lacking p63 do not have teeth and humans bearing mutations in p63 suffer developmental syndromes that affect tooth morphology and number. Several isoforms of p63 have been described: the use of two different promoters produces longer TAp63 isoforms, or shorter, 5' truncated isoforms known as ?Np63. The 3' end of primary transcripts is then subject to alternative splicing resulting in three additional isoforms: alpha (?), beta (?) and gamma (?). Tooth development relies mainly on the activity of the N-terminally truncated ?Np63 isoforms. Here we review the experimental evidence for the involvement of ?Np63 in tooth development through its ability to sustain the molecular signalling that orchestrates epithelial-mesenchymal interaction.

Rufini A; Barlattani A; Docimo R; Velletri T; Niklison-Chirou MV; Agostini M; Melino G

2011-11-01

136

p63 in tooth development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent findings have shown that the development of teeth involves a complex sequence of molecular events in which the p53 family member p63 is involved. Indeed, mice lacking p63 do not have teeth and humans bearing mutations in p63 suffer developmental syndromes that affect tooth morphology and number. Several isoforms of p63 have been described: the use of two different promoters produces longer TAp63 isoforms, or shorter, 5' truncated isoforms known as ?Np63. The 3' end of primary transcripts is then subject to alternative splicing resulting in three additional isoforms: alpha (?), beta (?) and gamma (?). Tooth development relies mainly on the activity of the N-terminally truncated ?Np63 isoforms. Here we review the experimental evidence for the involvement of ?Np63 in tooth development through its ability to sustain the molecular signalling that orchestrates epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. PMID:21787761

Rufini, Alessandro; Barlattani, Alberto; Docimo, Raffaella; Velletri, Tania; Niklison-Chirou, Maria Victoria; Agostini, Massimiliano; Melino, Gerry

2011-07-20

137

Learning about Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease  

Science.gov (United States)

... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease? Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited neurological disease characterized by a ... limbs, fingers, and toes. The first sign of CMT is generally a high arched foot or gait ...

138

Allotransplantation of tooth: a case report.  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth transplantation has attracted great interests since ancient times. A successful case of tooth allotransplantation is presented. A mandibular first premolar from the donor was implanted into the socket of maxillary central incisor Follow up after 12 months indicated good periapical healing with no resorption. Clinically, the transplantation site was free of symptoms and there was no evidence of periodontal disease or tooth mobility. This article suggests tooth transplantation as an alternative to other restorative options. PMID:23342558

Revathy, V; Suryakanth, M; Poornima, P; Subba Reddy, V V

2012-01-01

139

Allotransplantation of tooth: a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Tooth transplantation has attracted great interests since ancient times. A successful case of tooth allotransplantation is presented. A mandibular first premolar from the donor was implanted into the socket of maxillary central incisor Follow up after 12 months indicated good periapical healing with no resorption. Clinically, the transplantation site was free of symptoms and there was no evidence of periodontal disease or tooth mobility. This article suggests tooth transplantation as an alternative to other restorative options.

Revathy V; Suryakanth M; Poornima P; Subba Reddy VV

2012-01-01

140

Acute respiratory failure following traumatic tooth aspiration.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Foreign body aspiration can infrequently occur following trauma. Tooth aspiration after trauma is a rare clinical scenario. Here, we report a case in which tooth aspiration after trauma led to a presentation of acute respiratory failure with clinical findings mimicking tension pneumothorax. Successful removal of the aspirated tooth was accomplished by rigid bronchoscopy. Tooth aspiration must be considered in the list of differential diagnosis for any patient having signs or symptoms of respiratory distress following trauma especially maxillofacial trauma.

Madan K; Aggarwal AN; Bhagat H; Singh N

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1-2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development.

Whitlock JA; Richman JM

2013-06-01

142

Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development.

Whitlock, John A; Richman, Joy M

2013-01-01

143

An unusual object in the root canal of a primary tooth - a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Children often have the habit of inserting objects into their mouth. Occasionally, these objects may be accidentally ingested. This may be frightening and stressful both for the child and the parents. In most cases, children avoid informing their parents due to the fear of being punished. CASE REPORT: This article presents a case of a foreign object embedded in the tooth of a 7-year-old boy. The parents were unaware of the presence of a foreign object in their child's tooth. CONCLUSION: The tooth was extracted and the foreign body was retrieved from the canal to avoid any complications.

Pereira T; Pereira S

2013-05-01

144

Fusion of Mandibular Third Molar with Distomolar Impacted Tooth: A Case Report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Fusion is a developmental anomaly in which two tooth buds are interconnected. In fusion, teeth are joined by dentine in their developmental stage. Fusion could be between normal teeth or between a normal and a supernumerary tooth. Fusion of the posterior teeth and supernumerary ones are rare.Case Report: A 26 year old woman was referred for extraction of semi impacted third molar. Panoramic radiographs were requested for the patient. In dental radiographs, a supernumerary tooth in distal region of the third molar was observed. Teeth looked like fused teeth. After obtaining consent from the patient, teeth were removed by surgical excision.

Jamileh Beygom Taheri; Somayeh Babaee; Fatemeh Bagheri; Somayyeh Azimi

145

Tooth Avulsion in the School Setting  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth avulsions occur when a tooth is displaced from its socket. Tooth avulsions are common dental injuries that may occur before, during, or after school. Therefore, it is essential that school nurses be well prepared to intervene when such a dental emergency arises. It is also imperative that school nurses and school personnel are fully equipped…

Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

2005-01-01

146

EVALUATION OF SELECTED GIN SAW TOOTH DESIGNS  

Science.gov (United States)

Toothed saws have been used to separate cotton fiber from the seed for over 200 years. There have been many saw tooth designs developed over the years. Most of these designs were developed by trial and error. A complete and scientific analysis of tooth design has never been done. It is not known...

147

Stem cells for tooth engineering  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

G Bluteau; H-U Luder; C De Bari; TA Mitsiadis

2008-01-01

148

Acute apical periodontitis and vertical root fracture of the same tooth: a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Vertical root fracture is a frequent complication in endodontically treated teeth and usually leads to extraction of the affected tooth. Differential diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with periodontal and endodontic disease. This case report describes the diagnosis and clinical and radiographic features of apical periodontitis and vertical root fracture of the same tooth, which were separated by an interval of several years. Vertical root fracture of the mesial root was diagnosed with the help of an exploratory flap and microscopic observation.

Touré B; Boucher Y

2013-01-01

149

[Laboratory evaluation of tooth whitening agents in hydroxyapatite samples.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The paper presents laboratory model for evaluation of the effectiveness of tooth whitening agents on pure and technical hydroxyapatite (HAP) samples. HAP samples were exposed in distilled water, and colour measurements were taken after coloration in tea extract and using of "Blend-a-med delicate bleaching" ("Procter & Gamble", Germany) toothpaste. The proposed laboratory model allows imitating discoloration by food dye (tea) and measure the whitening toothpaste effect by significant change in colour characteristics in the CIE L*a*b* system.

Poiurovskaia II; D'iakonenko EE; Pozharkova ME

2013-01-01

150

Immediate Implant in Management of Anterior Missing Tooth  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Immediate implant placement after extraction has become a favored treatment protocol with many clinicians worldwide. There are many advantages to this protocol, amongst them; shortened treatment time, placement of the implant in sound bone that constitutes the socket wall, placement trajectory guidance by the socket and preservation of bone volume. This case report describes the management of an anterior missing tooth using immediate implant. The result was good, which further validate the use of this technique for suitable patient management.

Harinath Reddy S; Raja Babu P; Madhukar N; Nagendrababu K

2010-01-01

151

[Research advances in tooth agenesis].  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth agenesis constitutes one of the most common developmental anomalies in man. Oligodontia is defined as congenital absence of six or more teeth. Based on the studies of our team in cooperation with Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics in the past five years, this article reviews the current research progress in clinical phenotypes and case collection, epidemiological investigation and etiological genetic studies of oligodontia. The symptoms of oligodontia were classified into syndromic and non-syndromic according to the occurrence of tooth agenesis with or without systemic developmental defects. As for the advancement of theories and techniques of molecular genetics, a number of gene mutations have been identified to be the direct etiological factors causing some specified diseases, especially those with developmental defects. Here, this article summarized the outcomes of molecular genetic study of some cases we collected. Of the systemic oligondontia patients, a new four-base-deletion mutation in PITX2 was identified in a large kindred with typical symptoms of Rieger Syndrome; four different gene mutations in ED1 casing X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal displasia were found in five nucleus families. Compared with the former, non-syndromic oligodontia has more genetic heterogeneity rather than some specific virulence gene. PAX9 and MSX1 are the identified genes associated with family tooth agenesis without systemic syndrome. Also, in our research, three gene mutations in CBFA1 were detected in four cleidocranial dysplasia families, which is a systemic developmental disease including the symptoms of tooth eruption abnormality and accessory teeth. PMID:17304318

Feng, Hai-lan; Zhang, Xiao-xia; Wu, Hua

2007-02-18

152

Periodontal regeneration after tooth autotransplantation.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

. Olomouc : -, 2008 - (Bezdi?ková, M.; Molíková, R.). s. 163-163 ISBN 978-80-244-2061-5.[Morphology 2008. Lojda Symposium on Histochemistry /45./. 08.09.2008-10.09.2008, Olomouc]Grant CEP: GA ?R GC524/08/J032Výzkumný zám?r: CEZ:AV0Z50450515Klí?ová slova: tooth autotransplantationKód oboru RIV: FF - ORL, oftalmologie, stomatologie

Štembírek, JanG; Kanovská, K.; Navrátil, M.; Pokorná, M.; Roubalíková, L.; Míšek, Ivan

153

Relationship of smoking and smokeless tobacco use to tooth loss in a central Indian population.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The present study was conducted to determine the patterns of tooth loss among subjects with different tobacco- related habits and compare it with non-users of tobacco. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1075 patients over the age of 14 years attending the Department of Periodontics, People's College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal, India from May to September 2009 were included in the study. Besides name, age and gender, information regarding tobacco habits was recorded through interviews. Based on the tobacco habits, the patients were grouped into 4 categories: group 1 (non-users of tobacco), group 2 (smokers only), group 3 (smokeless tobacco users only) and group 4 (users of both smoking and smokeless tobacco). Tooth loss was determined by clinical examination of all permanent teeth excluding the third molars. Tooth loss included missing or extracted teeth as well as teeth indicated for extraction due to periodontal disease, dental caries or wasting diseases. Prevalence and mean tooth loss for whole dentition, maxillary and mandibular arches were compared between the 4 groups. The chi-square test and one-way ANOVA were used for comparing the prevalence and mean tooth loss, respectively, between different groups. RESULTS: The overall prevalence and mean tooth loss, respectively, for different groups were as follows: group 1: 28.3% and 0.85; group 2: 56.1% and 1.97; group 3: 58.7% and 2.38; group 4: 56.7% and 2.48 (P < 0.001 for both prevalence and mean tooth loss). The prevalence and mean tooth loss, respectively, for the maxillary arch for the different groups were: group 1: 15.3% and 0.32; group 2: 43% and 1.24; group 3: 34.3% and 0.91; group 4: 45.4% and 1.26 (P < 0.001 for both prevalence and mean tooth loss). The prevalence and mean tooth loss, respectively, for the mandibular arch for the different groups were: group 1: 22.3% and 0.52; group 2: 33.6% and 0.73; group 3: 50.9% and 1.48; group 4: 48.5% and 1.23 (P < 0.001 for both prevalence and mean tooth loss). CONCLUSION: When compared to non-users of tobacco, tooth loss was greater among subjects who consumed tobacco. In India, where consumption of tobacco in different forms is very common, public health programmes need to be implemented to increase public awareness regarding the adverse effects of tobacco on oral health.

Anand PS; Kamath KP; Shekar BR; Anil S

2012-01-01

154

[Influence of ambient light and adjacent tooth in anterior tooth color measurement].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of different intensity and directions of ambient light and adjacent tooth in anterior tooth color measurement by using colorimeter. METHODS: Fiber lite MI-150 was used as ambient illuminant and it irradiated from three or twelve o'clock direction through 45 degrees angle above. The light magnitude 0, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 W were applied in this experiment. The values of CIE L* a* b* were measured by Minolta Chroma meter CR-321 colorimeter on the center labial surface of ten extracted human maxillary central incisors with or without adjacent teeth, then those data were analyzed statistically by using SPSS 11.5. RESULTS: Neither different intensities nor different directions of ambient light could influence the results of color measurement by using Minolta Chroma meter CR-321 colorimeter, so did the adjacent teeth whether those were exist or not. CONCLUSION: There is no influence of ambient light and adjacent teeth in the color measurement of anterior teeth under this experiment condition, and Minolta Chroma meter CR-321 colorimeter can be used to measure the color directly aside the chair with light.

Wang SQ; Sean SL; Wu Z; Li Y; Ma JF

2007-10-01

155

[Management for displacement of a tooth into the floor of the mouth].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Displacement of a (part of a) radix or in some cases a part of a tooth into the floor of the mouth can occur during the extraction of a tooth in the mandibula. Possible causes of this are a lingual perforation of the radices or an inappropriate surgical technique. Leaving a fragment in situ in the floor of the mouth can lead to pain, swelling and trismus as a result of infection and/or spontaneous displacement of the fragment. We advise that the tooth or radix be removed as soon as possible. When experience is lacking in the removal of a tooth or radix from the floor of the mouth it is sensible to refer the patient to an oral surgeon. We also advise prescribing antibiotics in order to prevent infection.

Mast-Kramer H; van der Wal KG

2010-09-01

156

[Management for displacement of a tooth into the floor of the mouth].  

Science.gov (United States)

Displacement of a (part of a) radix or in some cases a part of a tooth into the floor of the mouth can occur during the extraction of a tooth in the mandibula. Possible causes of this are a lingual perforation of the radices or an inappropriate surgical technique. Leaving a fragment in situ in the floor of the mouth can lead to pain, swelling and trismus as a result of infection and/or spontaneous displacement of the fragment. We advise that the tooth or radix be removed as soon as possible. When experience is lacking in the removal of a tooth or radix from the floor of the mouth it is sensible to refer the patient to an oral surgeon. We also advise prescribing antibiotics in order to prevent infection. PMID:20968103

Mast-Kramer, H; van der Wal, K G H

2010-09-01

157

Regional odontodysplasia: a case of progressive tooth development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Regional odontodysplasia (RO) is considered a relatively rare dental anomaly despite increasing numbers of case reports in recent years. It usually presents as a localized anomaly in tooth development affecting a few adjacent teeth in a single maxillary or mandibular quadrant. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncommon case of regional odotodysplasia involving noncontiguous mandibular teeth, crossing the midline in a male patient, and showing progressive normalization of tooth anatomy over a period of 6 years. Typically, teeth affected with RO become pulpally involved early on and are either extracted or endodontically treated. Such reports of automatic normalization over time in RO is supportive of a more conservative treatment approach. PMID:22918107

Ganguly, R; Ramesh, A

158

Rock bit cutter tooth design and analysis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The finite element method was used to analyze the stresses in a rock bit cutter tooth under applied loads. Detailed finite element models were constructed to allow accurate descriptions of the structural material properties of a tooth design which includes carburization and hard metal application. Numerical solutions were obtained for investigating stress concentrations and plastic region growths in a cutter tooth when loaded beyond its yield point. It was found that the finite element method can be a powerful tool for improving the performance of a cutter tooth. Design objectives can be achieved through parametric studies of stress level variations against geometry and material property changes on a computer system.

Feng, C.C.; Schumacher, P.W.

1983-01-01

159

Saw tooth patello - Femoral arthritis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Four patients with an unusual form of patello-femoral arthritis are described. The characteristic feature of the condition is an erosive 'saw tooth' pattern characteristically seen on both sides of the joint. Radiologically, this pattern is best seen on the skyline view. The other principal features are a lamellar-like pattern on slightly oblique lateral views, a smooth supra patellar erosion of the femur seen on the lateral view and cortical ridging of the lateral femoral condyle seen 'en face' on the AP projection. A possible mechanism to account for the radiological features is proposed. Anbarasu, A., Loughran, C.F. (2000). Clinical Radiology 55, 767-769.

2000-01-01

160

Postmenopausal osteoporosis and tooth loss.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine relation between tooth loss and general body bone mineral density in postmenopausal female who were seeking for prosthetic treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: There were included 79 women in this study (age from 49-81 years, mean age 62.9 years) with partial tooth loss. For all patients bone mineral density measurements for lumbar spine and both femoral necks by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (Lunar DEXA DPX-NT, GE Medical Systems) were performed. Based on DEXA results patients were divided into 3 groups: normal bone density (T-score ?-1.0), osteopenia (T-score from -1.0 till -2.5) and osteoporosis (T-score ?-2.5). Dental investigation was performed to detect existing teeth. ANOVA analysis of variance was used to determine relationship between different variables by group. To test correlation between different values Pearson correlation was used. RESULTS: The number of teeth in different bone mineral density groups is almost similar. There are no statistically significant differences between groups according the number of the all teeth present and according the number of teeth in maxilla and mandible. There is no significant correlation between the number of the teeth and DEXA readings, except there is weak correlation between the number of maxillary posterior teeth and bone mineral density in femoral neck. CONCLUSION: There is no correlation between number of the teeth and general bone mineral density.

Slaidina A; Soboleva U; Daukste I; Zvaigzne A; Lejnieks A

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Tooth whitening: facts and fallacies.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Since the introduction of nightguard vital bleaching (tray bleaching) in 1989, dentistry has witnessed an astronomical rise in the interest in tooth whitening.(1) As a result, the most frequently asked question is, 'what bleaching technique works best?' Virtually all of today's whitening approaches work, because bleach is bleach. Whether a nightguard bleach is used with only 10% carbamide peroxide (which contains only 3% hydrogen peroxide), over-the-counter (OTC) whitening strips are applied containing 6% hydrogen peroxide, or an in-office bleach is employed using 25-35% hydrogen peroxide, the end results can potentially be the same. Similarity of results is possible because the mechanism of action is the same: oxidation of organic pigments or chromogens in the tooth. Granted, some bleaching approaches are more expeditious than others, owing to differences in concentration or exposure time. But as just noted, the most important factors in the efficacy of any bleaching treatment are concentration of the bleaching agent and duration of the exposure time.

Heymann HO

2005-04-01

162

Ion Channels, Channelopathies, and Tooth Formation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development.

Duan X

2013-09-01

163

Gear tooth health state monitoring based on morphological filtering and Wavelet transition  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Gear box is one of the most important transmission components in mechanical systems. Fault diagnosis and state monitoring techniques for gear box have been studied for years. But in practical, gear box usually works under varying work conditions which has not been considered in most studies. In this paper, a novel state monitoring method is proposed for monitor gear box work with varying conditions. The vibration signal is de-nosied by morphological filtering. Then gear-mesh frequency band is extracted by wavelet transform. Dimensionless time indexes are used as state monitoring features. A regularization method is proposed to calculate gear tooth health index. Simulate and experiment signal are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. The result indicates that, morphological filtering is an efficient method to de-nosie the vibration signal; wavelet transform can extract the gear-mesh frequency band; gear tooth health index can monitor gear tooth state based on vibration signal.

Huanzhi Feng; Wei Liang; Laibin Zhang; Juwei Shi

2013-01-01

164

Controlling the Number of Tooth Rows  

Science.gov (United States)

The organization and renewal capacity of teeth vary greatly among vertebrates. Mammals have only one row of teeth that are renewed at most once, whereas many nonmammalian species have multirowed dentitions and show remarkable capacity to replace their teeth throughout life. Although knowledge on the genetic basis of tooth morphogenesis has increased exponentially over the past 20 years, little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling sequential initiation of multiple tooth rows or restricting tooth development to one row in mammals. Mouse genetics has revealed a pivotal role for the transcription factor Osr2 in this process. Loss of Osr2 caused expansion of the expression domain of Bmp4, a well-known activator of tooth development, leading to the induction of supernumerary teeth in a manner resembling the initiation of a second tooth row in nonmammalian species.

Marja L. Mikkola (University of Helsinki;Institute of Biotechnology REV)

2009-08-25

165

A Radiographic method for determining the actual tooth length  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Tooth length determination is a crucial step in endodontic treatment. Traditionally, radiographs are used to confirm working length of the root length. This study was performed to evaluate the radiographic distortion (magnification) and calculate correction coefficients for the object-film distance. Ninety-six radiographs were made of eight extracted teeth (two upper first premolars, two lower first premolars, two upper first molars, and two lower first molars) by using the 16 inch long cone paralleling techniques with 1 mm interval from 5 to 16 mm tooth-film distance. The following results obtained; 1. The least mean radiographic distortion from 5 to 16 mm tooth-film distance was 2.42 {+-}0.68% (the length of mesiobuccal cusp-mesial root of lower first molars), the greatest distortion was 4.74 {+-}1.36% (the length of mesiobuccal cusp-mesiobuccal root of upper first molars). 2. The greatest correction coefficient was 0.986 (the mesiobuccal cusp-mesial root of lower molars, the lowest one was 0.937 (the mesiobuccal cusp-mesiobuccal root of upper first molars).

Nah, Kyung Soo; Cho, Bong Hae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

1995-08-15

166

A Radiographic method for determining the actual tooth length  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Tooth length determination is a crucial step in endodontic treatment. Traditionally, radiographs are used to confirm working length of the root length. This study was performed to evaluate the radiographic distortion (magnification) and calculate correction coefficients for the object-film distance. Ninety-six radiographs were made of eight extracted teeth (two upper first premolars, two lower first premolars, two upper first molars, and two lower first molars) by using the 16 inch long cone paralleling techniques with 1 mm interval from 5 to 16 mm tooth-film distance. The following results obtained; 1. The least mean radiographic distortion from 5 to 16 mm tooth-film distance was 2.42 ±0.68% (the length of mesiobuccal cusp-mesial root of lower first molars), the greatest distortion was 4.74 ±1.36% (the length of mesiobuccal cusp-mesiobuccal root of upper first molars). 2. The greatest correction coefficient was 0.986 (the mesiobuccal cusp-mesial root of lower molars, the lowest one was 0.937 (the mesiobuccal cusp-mesiobuccal root of upper first molars).

1995-01-01

167

Trace elements can influence the physical properties of tooth enamel.  

Science.gov (United States)

In previous studies, we showed that the size of apatite nanocrystals in tooth enamel can influence its physical properties. This important discovery raised a new question; which factors are regulating the size of these nanocrystals? Trace elements can affect crystallographic properties of synthetic apatite, therefore this study was designed to investigate how trace elements influence enamel's crystallographic properties and ultimately its physical properties. The concentration of trace elements in tooth enamel was determined for 38 extracted human teeth using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The following trace elements were detected: Al, K, Mg, S, Na, Zn, Si, B, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Ti. Simple and stepwise multiple regression was used to identify the correlations between trace elements concentration in enamel and its crystallographic structure, hardness, resistance to crack propagation, shade lightness and carbonate content. The presence of some trace elements in enamel was correlated with the size (Pb, Ti, Mn) and lattice parameters (Se, Cr, Ni) of apatite nanocrystals. Some trace elements such as Ti was significantly correlated with tooth crystallographic structure and consequently with hardness and shade lightness. We conclude that the presence of trace elements in enamel could influence its physical properties. PMID:24133648

Ghadimi, Elnaz; Eimar, Hazem; Marelli, Benedetto; Nazhat, Showan N; Asgharian, Masoud; Vali, Hojatollah; Tamimi, Faleh

2013-10-02

168

Dynamic influences of changing gear tooth stiffness  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

One of the principal sources of vibratory excitation of gear a system is due to the angular speed fluctuation of meshing gears due to non-linearities and profile errors and tooth and supporting bearings flexibility. The transmission error is also influenced by the varying force at the contact point of the meshing gear teeth. The varying contact force itself is influenced by the varying tooth stiffness due to change of orientation of teeth relative to each other, during the contact phase of each pair. This paper presents a simplified single degree of freedom gear system. It is assumed that one member of the gear pair is rigid and flexibility of the gear tooth is attributed only to one section of the gear system. This enables the equation to be simplified to a single degree of freedom system. The resulting non-linear equation is solved iteratively by employing a method which combines piecewise linearization for the stiffness and resulting contact orientation shift due to shaft and tooth flexibility. The contact shift will be referred as the phase shift in this report. The early finding indicates that there are significant differences between the response of the system incorporating three different tooth stiffness, namely, constant tooth stiffness, rectangular wave tooth stiffness and sinusoidal tooth stiffness. The results also implies that any design specification associated with gears has to include gear tooth influences, especially if the excitation is of a major concern. The rectangular stiffness variation which most accurately describes the tooth stiffness gives a response fluctuation, studied in the frequency domain shows that the effective natural frequencies fluctuates between certain upper and lower limits. Thus the paper suggest that any design study should consider these limits.

Morguel, O.K. [Sakarya Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Esat, I. [Brunel Univ., Uxbridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1997-07-01

169

Possibilities of ESR-spectroscopy of the tooth enamel for in vivo determination of the radiation dose  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A review of recent publications on the topic is presented. The characteristics of the tooth as an in vivo dosemeter for the assessment of the individual cumulated dose are analysed. The correlation between the intensity of ESR-signal and the dose as well as the distinguishing of the signal caused by the native crystal structure of the tooth enamel and the one induced during the previous X-ray diagnostic procedures is discussed. The possibilities for in vivo measurement (without preliminary extraction of the tooth) is also reported. 4 figs., 44 refs.

1992-01-01

170

Comparisons of debonding forces between different tooth types.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Following the introduction of the direct bonding of orthodontic brackets to enamel, numerous studies were designed to investigate the bonding characteristics of various adhesive systems. In these studies, different tooth types were used for testing including, incisors, premolars and molars. A confounding factor was related to the effect of using different tooth types on bond strength. The purpose of the present study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the enamel surface of various tooth types, while eliminating the influence of other extraneous variables such as differences in the adhesive system used and variation in the bracket base design. Sixty freshly extracted human teeth including 20 molars, 20 premolars, and 20 incisors were similarly prepared for bonding. The same orthodontic bonding system was used to bond the same type of metal brackets to all the teeth. The teeth were then stored in distilled water for 48 hours. An Instron Testing Machine was used to measure shear bond strength in Megapascals. The Analysis of Variance was used to compare the three groups. The comparisons of the shear bond strength for incisors (x=12.4+6.5 MPa), premolars (x=11.9+5.2 MPa) and third molars (x=13.1+6.2 MPa) indicted that they were not significantly different (p=0.84). In conclusion, the findings indicate that in vitro testing of bond strength is not significantly agecte.9y the use of various tooth types namely, incisors, premolars and molars. This finding suggests that investigators can use teeth that are more readily available e.g. third molars to test bond strength.

S.E Bishara; M.E. Olsen; A. Sulieman

1999-01-01

171

Saw tooth patello - Femoral arthritis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Four patients with an unusual form of patello-femoral arthritis are described. The characteristic feature of the condition is an erosive 'saw tooth' pattern characteristically seen on both sides of the joint. Radiologically, this pattern is best seen on the skyline view. The other principal features are a lamellar-like pattern on slightly oblique lateral views, a smooth supra patellar erosion of the femur seen on the lateral view and cortical ridging of the lateral femoral condyle seen 'en face' on the AP projection. A possible mechanism to account for the radiological features is proposed. Anbarasu, A., Loughran, C.F. (2000). Clinical Radiology 55, 767-769.

Anbarasu, A.; Loughran, C.F

2000-10-01

172

Pin tooth roller transmission system of granulator  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The utility model relates to a pin tooth roller transmission system of a granulator, which belongs to the field of fodder machinery and structurally comprises a reduction gearbox. A spindle is fixed into the reduction gearbox, a granulator rotor is rotationally mounted in the spindle and extends into the reduction gearbox, a large pin tooth roller disc is fixedly mounted on the periphery of the granulator rotor, a plurality of pin holes are peripherally uniformly distributed on the large pin tooth roller disc, pin teeth are fixedly mounted in the pin holes, rollers are sleeved on the pin teeth, and cycloid pinions which are meshed with the rollers are further disposed in the reduction gearbox and rotationally connected with power sources arranged on the outside of the reduction gearbox. Compared with belt transmission, gear transmission and synchronous tooth belt transmission systems in the prior art, the pin tooth roller transmission system has the advantages that the pin tooth roller transmission system is simple and compact in structure, low in manufacturing cost and convenient in repair, the requirement on processing precision of a transmission component is low, running noise of equipment is also low, and the transmission component is fine in abrasion resistance. The pin tooth roller transmission system is applicable to high-power granulators.

QIANG LI

173

Synthesis of metal ion-histidine complex functionalized mesoporous silica nanocatalysts for enhanced light-free tooth bleaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

Several metal ion-histidine complex functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were synthesized and utilized as efficient catalysts for enhanced and light-free tooth bleaching. Fe(II), Mn(II), and Cu(II) ions were successfully immobilized in histidine-functionalized MSN and their catalytic abilities against discoloration of a dye (Orange II) in both test tubes and extracted tooth models were compared and discussed. Through direct observation of test tubes and calculation of mean color changes of extracted teeth we concluded that Fe(II)-his-MSN exhibited better catalytic competence than Mn(II)-his-MSN and Cu(II)-his-MSN because of its intrinsic redox ability. In test tubes Orange II was completely degraded within 6 h when Fe(II)-his-MSN was used as the catalyst. For the extracted tooth model the presence of Fe(II)- or Mn(II)-his-MSN significantly enhanced the efficacy of tooth bleaching for three regions, the enamel, outer dentin, and inner dentin, of stained teeth compared with H(2)O(2) alone. Furthermore, unlike current tooth bleaching techniques that need an LED or laser to catalyze H(2)O(2) bleaching, we demonstrated a light-free tooth bleaching system using Fe(II)-his-MSN as an efficient and reliable catalyst. PMID:21236369

Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Huang, Li-Chun; Hong, Chen-Yu; Wang, Shy-Guey; Hsu, Wei-Hang; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Lai, Juin-Yih; Wu, Kevin C-W

2011-01-12

174

Synthesis of metal ion-histidine complex functionalized mesoporous silica nanocatalysts for enhanced light-free tooth bleaching.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Several metal ion-histidine complex functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were synthesized and utilized as efficient catalysts for enhanced and light-free tooth bleaching. Fe(II), Mn(II), and Cu(II) ions were successfully immobilized in histidine-functionalized MSN and their catalytic abilities against discoloration of a dye (Orange II) in both test tubes and extracted tooth models were compared and discussed. Through direct observation of test tubes and calculation of mean color changes of extracted teeth we concluded that Fe(II)-his-MSN exhibited better catalytic competence than Mn(II)-his-MSN and Cu(II)-his-MSN because of its intrinsic redox ability. In test tubes Orange II was completely degraded within 6 h when Fe(II)-his-MSN was used as the catalyst. For the extracted tooth model the presence of Fe(II)- or Mn(II)-his-MSN significantly enhanced the efficacy of tooth bleaching for three regions, the enamel, outer dentin, and inner dentin, of stained teeth compared with H(2)O(2) alone. Furthermore, unlike current tooth bleaching techniques that need an LED or laser to catalyze H(2)O(2) bleaching, we demonstrated a light-free tooth bleaching system using Fe(II)-his-MSN as an efficient and reliable catalyst.

Lee BS; Huang LC; Hong CY; Wang SG; Hsu WH; Yamauchi Y; Hsieh CJ; Lai JY; Wu KC

2011-05-01

175

Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

D'Emic MD; Whitlock JA; Smith KM; Fisher DC; Wilson JA

2013-01-01

176

Assessment of proprioceptive allodynia after tooth-clenching exercises  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

To (A) evaluate test-retest reliability of vibrotactile sensitivity in the masseter muscle and (B) test if (1) the vibration threshold is decreased after experimental tooth clenching, (2) intense vibrations exacerbate pain after tooth clenching, (3) pain and fatigue are increased after tooth clenching, and (4) pressure pain thresholds are decreased after tooth clenching.

Dawson, Andreas; List, Thomas

2012-01-01

177

Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-ye...

Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

178

Restoration of the maxillary anterior tooth using immediate implantation with simultaneous ridge augmentation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Atrophy is most severe during the first month of post-extraction in the anterior maxilla with the degree of horizontal bone resorption being nearly twice as high as that of vertical bone resorption. The loss of the buccal alveolar plate following tooth extraction may lead to palatal implant positioning of the implants. Thus, immediate or early implant placement in the extraction socket has been suggested, because it would reduce the time period and the number of surgical intervention and yield higher patient satisfaction compared with delayed placed implants. However, placement of an implant immediately after tooth extraction may result in a gap between the occlusal portion of the implant and the surrounding alveolar bone crest. In this case report, an implant-supported restoration which is in harmony with the surrounding hard and soft tissue was created by the immediate implant placement with ridge augmentation in anterior region with high satisfaction from the patient.

Park Jun-Beom

2010-01-01

179

Impacted supernumerary tooth in coronoid process: a case report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Impaction of tooth is a situation in which an unerupted tooth is wedged against another tooth or teeth or otherwise located so that it cannot erupt normally. The supernumerary tooth is also called as hyperdontia and defined as the condition of having additional tooth to the regular number of teeth. The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a mal-formed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary incisors. The supernumerary tooth is commonly impacted but they are frequently impacted on maxilla. Ectopic impaction of supernumerary tooth on mandibular condyle, coronoid process, ascending ramus, and pterygomandibular space is very rare condition. In this case, we report a case of impacted supernumerary tooth on mandibular sigmoid notch without definite pathologic change.

Park, Won Se; Lee, Je Ho; Park, Hyok; Jung, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog [Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15

180

Impacted supernumerary tooth in coronoid process: a case report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Impaction of tooth is a situation in which an unerupted tooth is wedged against another tooth or teeth or otherwise located so that it cannot erupt normally. The supernumerary tooth is also called as hyperdontia and defined as the condition of having additional tooth to the regular number of teeth. The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a mal-formed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary incisors. The supernumerary tooth is commonly impacted but they are frequently impacted on maxilla. Ectopic impaction of supernumerary tooth on mandibular condyle, coronoid process, ascending ramus, and pterygomandibular space is very rare condition. In this case, we report a case of impacted supernumerary tooth on mandibular sigmoid notch without definite pathologic change.

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnoea  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Complete tooth loss (edentulism) produces anatomical changes that may impair upper airway size and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether edentulism favours the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods Polysomnography w...

Bucca Caterina; Cicolin Alessandro; Brussino Luisa; Arienti Andrea; Graziano Alessandra; Erovigni Francesco; Pera Paolo

182

Lead levels among various deciduous tooth types  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The amount of lead in deciduous teeth has been used extensively as a marker for infant lead exposure and body burden. However, the pattern of lead abundances among the various tooth positions in a child's mouth appears to be non-uniform. Taken together these findings show an apparently inconsistent pattern among the tooth types. These comparisons are complicated by different research groups using different portions of the tooth. This issue is of significance to those who wish to compare the lead burden of children but have available teeth from different positions from the various children. By examining a large number of teeth from two different populations, the authors hope to explore the more universal aspects of any variability among tooth types.

Rabinowitz, M.B. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan)); Bellinger, D.; Leviton, A. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Jungder Wang (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan))

1991-10-01

183

Sports Safety: Avoiding Tooth and Mouth Injuries  

Science.gov (United States)

Sports Safety: Avoiding Tooth and Mouth Injuries A few years ago, a dental newsletter published what seemed ... the perfect dunk. In older children and adults, sports injuries are common. Dentists estimate that between 13% ...

184

About Kids' Teeth: Prevent Kids' Tooth Decay  

Science.gov (United States)

... Learn about Thumb Sucking and Pacifiers 6 – 12 Years Old From around ages 6 - 12, children ... to arrive. Learn about Preventing Kids' Tooth Decay 12 – 17 Years Old Cavities aren’t just ...

185

An eye for a tooth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To propose a possible link between dental extraction and intra-ocular complications. BACKGROUND: Several publications in medical literature describe intra-ocular complications after different dental procedures. RESULTS: Retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage following dental extraction with an appropriate anesthesia. CONCLUSION: Systemic complications following dental treatments should not be neglected and proper medical treatment must be provided as soon as possible.

Kiderman A; Tair JA

2013-03-01

186

Dose estimation by ESR on tooth enamel from two workers exposed to radiation due to the JCO accident  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry is useful to estimate the external dose for the general population as well as for occupational workers in a nuclear emergency. Three teeth were extracted from two exposed workers (A and B) related to the JCO criticality accident. Tooth enamel was carefully separated from other tooth parts and subjected to ESR dosimetry. Doses equivalent to the {gamma}-ray dose of {sup 60}Co were estimated as follows: for worker A, the buccal and lingual sides of the eighth tooth in the upper right side, 11.8{+-}3.6 and 12.0{+-}3.6 Gy, respectively; for worker B, the buccal and lingual sides of the fourth tooth in the upper right side and the fifth tooth in the upper left side, 11.3{+-}3.4 and 10.8{+-}3.3 Gy, 11.7{+-}3.5 and 11.4{+-}3.4 Gy, respectively. The estimated doses were found to be similar and not dependent on the tooth positions, whether the buccal or lingual sides in each tooth. (author)

Shiraishi, Kunio; Yonehara, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Masaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Iwasaki, Midori; Miyazawa, Chyuzo [Ohu Univ., Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan). School of Dentistry

2002-09-01

187

Dose estimation by ESR on tooth enamel from two workers exposed to radiation due to the JCO accident  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry is useful to estimate the external dose for the general population as well as for occupational workers in a nuclear emergency. Three teeth were extracted from two exposed workers (A and B) related to the JCO criticality accident. Tooth enamel was carefully separated from other tooth parts and subjected to ESR dosimetry. Doses equivalent to the ?-ray dose of 60Co were estimated as follows: for worker A, the buccal and lingual sides of the eighth tooth in the upper right side, 11.8±3.6 and 12.0±3.6 Gy, respectively; for worker B, the buccal and lingual sides of the fourth tooth in the upper right side and the fifth tooth in the upper left side, 11.3±3.4 and 10.8±3.3 Gy, 11.7±3.5 and 11.4±3.4 Gy, respectively. The estimated doses were found to be similar and not dependent on the tooth positions, whether the buccal or lingual sides in each tooth. (author)

2002-01-01

188

Fruit tooth paste and preparation method thereof  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The invention provides a fruit tooth paste, which is prepared by mixing and stirring fresh fruit juice, sorbitol, calcium carbonate, cardanol, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, saccharin sodium, essence, peppermint oil and pure water. The tooth paste is fresh and cool, has the effects of cleaning teeth, sterilizing, preventing dental calculus, preventing the formation of dental plaque, removing dental pigment, preventing dental caries, preventing and treating dental diseases, and the like, has simple production process and is convenient to operate.

SHIXIN DING

189

Device for scanning a tooth model  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The device (1) has an optical scanning unit for one or multiple saw tooth models with a scanning area (3). The scanning unit scans an area (13) with breadth between 5 millimeter and 100 millimeter. A storage unit is provided for storing the data and a unit is provided for three dimensional matching of the data. A base plate (7) is provided on which a holding unit is arranged for the saw tooth model or a model part or multiple model parts.

HOLZNER STEPHAN; WEBER GERHARD

190

Rolling tooth-like axle harrow  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The utility model discloses a rolling tooth-like axle harrow, particularly the technical field of ordinary agricultural machinery. The aim of the utility model is to provide a new harrow for agriculture in order to solve the existing problems of the prior art. The principles of scrolling, rolling and thrust work are used, and steel pipes or the angle iron is connected to form a rectangular frame. An iron roller with a plurality of thorns is arranged in the frame, the iron roller is parallel with two long sides of a rectangle, and both ends are connected with two short sides with the rolling method. The middle parts of the two long sides are provided with traction frames to form the rolling tooth-like axle harrow. More specifically, the rolling tooth-like axle harrow is composed of a tooth-like axle harrow frame, the traction frames and a rolling tooth-like axle, wherein the rolling tooth-like axle comprises the iron roller, rolling thorns and a rolling axle, and the rolling tooth-like axle is arranged in the tooth-like axle harrow frame. The rolling thorns are arranged on the outer surface of a cylinder of the iron roller, the rolling axle is arranged on both ends of the iron roller, and the rolling axle is connected with a left and a right harrow tips through flanges and connecting screws. The utility model is used for leveling soil and preserving the soil moisture of broken soil for agriculture and relevant industries.

WEI HUAWU

191

Actinomyces endogenous endophthalmitis in a cat following multiple dental extractions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

An 8-year-old, brachycephalic, mixed breed cat underwent full mouth tooth extractions for the treatment of tooth root abscessation. Subsequently, the cat developed anterior uveitis refractory to topical therapy that eventually necessitated enucleation. Actinomyces species were isolated from both the tooth root abscesses and the anterior chamber after enucleation. Histopathology of the enucleated eye revealed panophthalmitis with abundant intralesional bacteria morphologically consistent with Actinomyces. Between the time of tooth root extraction and enucleation (20 weeks), the cat was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and treated with oral steroids for inflammatory bowel syndrome. We believe this report represents a rare case of endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to dental disease, possibly precipitated by concurrent immunosuppression.

Westermeyer HD; Ward DA; Whittemore JC; Lyons JA

2013-01-01

192

Prevalence of tooth transposition in Greek population.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the prevalence of tooth transposition in a sample of Greek dental patients. STUDY DESIGN: Epidemiological study. TIME AND PLACE OF ACTION: Prefecture of Drama, time period 2001-2006. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The first author examined in her private practice 2034 consecutive patients seeking dental treatment. Patients with nationality other than Greek, individuals below 13 years of age with primary or mixed dentitions, patients without panoramic radiographs, patients with syndromes, as well as those who had more than one permanent tooth missing were excluded from the initial sample. In total, 1113 patients were assessed (288 men, 825 women) with a mean age of 36.1 years (range: 13.1-73.0 years). MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Tooth transposition was investigated my means of clinical examination through observation and palpation, as well as with radiographic examination using panoramic radiographs. Results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. RESULTS: In total, only one case was found with tooth transposition presenting complete bilateral transposition between canine - lateral incisor in the maxilla. The percentage of patients with tooth transposition in the total dental population examined was 0.09%. The prevalence of this phenomenon in females was 0.12%, whereas in males it was 0%. Men / women ratio was found 0:1. CONCLUSIONS: Tooth transposition in Greek population is rather rare, it is most often encountered in females and concerns mostly maxillary canines and lateral incisors.

Maria Hatzoudi; Moschos A. Papadopoulos

2006-01-01

193

Tooth design to avoid shearing stresses  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Teeth disposed on the bit face of a rotating bit are, angularly oriented on the sloping surface of the bit face such that a vertical loading force which is applied to each tooth vectorially sums with a wedging force exerted by the rock formation on each tooth to create a resultant force applied to the diamond cutting element included within the tooth. The angular orientation of the tooth is chosen such that the resultant force is applied to the diamond cutting element in a direction which minimizes shear stress on the element. For example, in the case where the diamond cutting element is an equilateral triangular prismatic element tangentially set on the bit face with one apical edge defined by two adjacent triangular sides outermost on the tooth, the orientation or inclination of the tooth with respect to the vertical loading force and wedge force is such that the resulting force lies near or on the disector of the dihedral angle formed by the apical edge. Similarly, the diamond cutting element is rearwardly raked in the longitudinal direction, generally parallel to the tangential motion during normal drilling as defined by the rotation of the bit, such that the vectorial sum of the vertical loading force in a reactive cutting force applies a resultant force on the diamond cutting element in a direction which minimizes shear stress, namely, in the example in a direction approximately perpendicular to one of the end faces of the triangular prismatic diamond cutting element.

Mengel, H. E.; Munzel, H.

1985-05-07

194

Optimum Design of the Involute-Cycloid Composite Tooth Profile Helical Gear  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The tooth bending and tooth contact strengths of the involute-cycloid composite tooth profile helical gear, which was developed as a non-involute tooth profile gear based on cycloid tooth profile, are directly affected by its tooth profile. The involute-cycloid composite tooth profile curve changes ...

Tutulan, Florin G.; Nagamura, Kazuteru; Ikejo, Kiyotaka; ????, ????; ?????, ????; Ikej?, Kiyotaka; ??, ??; ??, ??

195

[Experimental study on microleakage between a new nano-hydroxyapatite composite and tooth].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the marginal adaptation between the new nano-hydroxyapatite composite resin and tooth. METHODS: Thirty extracted healthy premolars were randomly assigned to three groups according to the material employed: New nano-hydroxyapatite composite resin (Group A), Karisma composite resin (Group B), and glass ionomer cement (Group C). After the thermal cycling, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye, and the depth of microleakage between the composite and tooth structure were observed. RESULTS: The microleakage depth of group A, B and C were (1.20+/-0.81), (1.94+/-0.70), and (1.73+/-0.54) mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found among the three groups (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the degree of microleakage (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: As a new dental restorative material, new nano-hydroxyapatite composite resin has good bonding performance to the tooth structure.

Zhao MM; Wang Q; Wang S; Li R

2013-06-01

196

Roles of Bmp4 during tooth morphogenesis and sequential tooth formation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Previous studies have suggested that Bmp4 is a key Msx1-dependent mesenchymal odontogenic signal for driving tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition. Whereas all tooth germs were arrested at the bud stage in Msx1(-/-) mice, we show that depleting functional Bmp4 mRNAs in the tooth mesenchyme, through neural crest-specific gene inactivation in Bmp4(f/f);Wnt1Cre mice, caused mandibular molar developmental arrest at the bud stage but allowed maxillary molars and incisors to develop to mineralized teeth. We found that expression of Osr2, which encodes a zinc finger protein that antagonizes Msx1-mediated activation of odontogenic mesenchyme, was significantly upregulated in the molar tooth mesenchyme in Bmp4(f/f);Wnt1Cre embryos. Msx1 heterozygosity enhanced maxillary molar developmental defects whereas Osr2 heterozygosity partially rescued mandibular first molar morphogenesis in Bmp4(f/f);Wnt1Cre mice. Moreover, in contrast to complete lack of supernumerary tooth initiation in Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) mice, Osr2(-/-)Bmp4(f/f);Wnt1Cre compound mutant mice exhibited formation and subsequent arrest of supernumerary tooth germs that correlated with downregulation of Msx1 expression in the tooth mesenchyme. In addition, we found that the Wnt inhibitors Dkk2 and Wif1 were much more abundantly expressed in the mandibular than maxillary molar mesenchyme in wild-type embryos and that Dkk2 expression was significantly upregulated in the molar mesenchyme in Bmp4(f/f);Wnt1Cre embryos, which correlated with the dramatic differences in maxillary and mandibular molar phenotypes in Bmp4(f/f);Wnt1Cre mice. Together, these data indicate that Bmp4 signaling suppresses tooth developmental inhibitors in the tooth mesenchyme, including Dkk2 and Osr2, and synergizes with Msx1 to activate mesenchymal odontogenic potential for tooth morphogenesis and sequential tooth formation.

Jia S; Zhou J; Gao Y; Baek JA; Martin JF; Lan Y; Jiang R

2013-01-01

197

An Alternative Efficient Technique For Thin Tooth Sectioning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The importance of tooth sectioningis realized in disasters such as earthquake, airplanecrash investigation, terror, micro leakage studies, ageestimation etc. The objective of this study was to developa simple method to make thin sections (approximately100 mm) from freshly extracted teeth.Methods: One hundred and twenty human premolarsrecently extracted for orthodontic purpose were used forthis study. The teeth were stored in 0.5% chorlaraminefor 2 weeks and were not allowed to dry at any stageof the experiment. The teeth were thoroughly washedin distilled water teeth and then were sectionedbuccolingually from crown to the root portion.Results: A detailed embedding-cutting-mountingprocedure is described. The prepared thin groundsections were then examined under a Polarised lightmicroscope for the enamel and the dentine, as well asthe caries lesions can clearly be distinguished.Conclusion: This is an effective and efficient methodfor preparation of ground sections in which the hardtissue details are preserved.

Muneer Gohar Babar; Ma Angela Gonzalez

2011-01-01

198

Tooth loss in aggressive periodontitis after active periodontal therapy: patient-related and tooth-related prognostic factors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To assess prognostic factors for tooth loss after active periodontal therapy (APT) in patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) at tooth level. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty-four patients with AgP were re-evaluated after a mean period of 10.5 years of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Two thousand and fifty-four teeth were entered into the model. The tooth-related factors including baseline bone loss, tooth location and type, furcation involvement (FI), regenerative therapy, and abutment status, as well as time of follow-up and other patient-related factors were tested for their prognostic value at tooth level. Multilevel regression analysis was performed for statistical analysis to identify factors contributing to tooth loss. RESULTS: During SPT, 113 teeth (1.34 teeth per patient) were lost. Baseline bone loss, use as abutment tooth, tooth type, and maxillary location contributed significantly to tooth loss during SPT. Molars showed the highest risk for tooth loss after APT. Moreover, time of follow-up and the patient-related factor "educational status" significantly accounted for tooth loss at tooth level. CONCLUSION: Baseline bone loss, abutment status, tooth location, and type as well as time of follow-up and educational status were detected as prognostic factors for tooth loss during SPT in patients with AgP at tooth level.

Bäumer A; Pretzl B; Cosgarea R; Kim TS; Reitmeir P; Eickholz P; Dannewitz B

2011-07-01

199

Gamma-ray dose response of ESR signals in tooth enamel of cows and mice in comparison with human teeth  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The ESR dose responses of the tooth enamel samples prepared from teeth of cow and mice were examined in comparison with that of human. The samples were prepared with combined procedures of mechanical and chemical treatments of teeth. The ESR dose response was extracted from the total ESR spectra of tooth enamel samples by a specially developed matrix method. The dosimetric signal was found to be increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples. The radiation sensitivity of cow tooth enamel was found to be close to that of human teeth while that of mouse teeth was about 25% lower. The present results indicate that, having high radiation sensitivity, cow and mouse teeth can be used for retrospective radiation dosimetry in low-dose level.

Toyoda, Shin E-mail: toyoda@dap.ous.ac.jp; Tanizawa, Honami; Romanyukha, A.A.; Miyazawa, Chuzou; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ueda, Yuji; Nitta, Yumiko

2003-10-01

200

Gamma-ray dose response of ESR signals in tooth enamel of cows and mice in comparison with human teeth  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The ESR dose responses of the tooth enamel samples prepared from teeth of cow and mice were examined in comparison with that of human. The samples were prepared with combined procedures of mechanical and chemical treatments of teeth. The ESR dose response was extracted from the total ESR spectra of tooth enamel samples by a specially developed matrix method. The dosimetric signal was found to be increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples. The radiation sensitivity of cow tooth enamel was found to be close to that of human teeth while that of mouse teeth was about 25% lower. The present results indicate that, having high radiation sensitivity, cow and mouse teeth can be used for retrospective radiation dosimetry in low-dose level.

2003-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Evaluation of the Effect of Corticotomy on Rate of Tooth Movement and Comparison with Conventional Method  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Reduction of orthodontic therapy treatment time is considered an important goal inthe management of malocclusion in adult patients. Corticotomy- facilitated orthodontic treatment may beconsidered an intermediate therapy between orthognatic surgry and conventional orthodontics for reducing treatment time.Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the rate of tooth movement of upper canine following corticotomy with conventional method.Materials and Methods: Ten young adult patients, 17-25 years old was selected through sequential sampling procedure in orthodontics department of Shiraz Dental School. The patients exhibited different orthodontic problems and needed extraction of premolars. Following extraction of premolars and initial phase oforthodontic treatment, corticotomy were performed unilaterally on buccual and palatal sides of extraction areaas described by Takami. The other imoperated sides were used as control. After subsiding the resultant inflammation, the activated NiTi spring was used and measurement of the amount of tooth movement wereassessed by using Rugae as reference point. The panoramic radiographs were super imposed for evaluation of canines tipping. For analyzing the results, Kolmogorou- simirnov and t.tcst were used. Results: The rate of canine tooth movement was much greater in the corticotomy sides than the unoperated (control) side (P=0.015). This was especially significant at the end of first week of tooth movement(P=0.000). Comparing the two sides, the amount of canine tipping was much lesser in corticotomy group than the control group (P=0.046). There was no significant difference concerning the anchorage loss between thetwo groups (P=0.410).Conclusion: Corticotomy procedure had a positive effect on the rate of tooth movement with less tipping of the canines comparing to conventional orthodontic treatment. To get more benefit from this procedure, it is recommended to select those patients who do not need canine alignment after premolars extraction, such asbimaxillary dento alveolar protrusions.

H.Pakshir; A.Zare Emani; B. Rahsepar

2005-01-01

202

Efficacy of various materials in recording enamel rod endings on tooth surface for personal identification.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To analyze efficacy of cellulose acetate film, cellophane tape, and light body impression material in recording enamel rod endings on tooth surface for personal identification. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surface enamel rod endings of 30 extracted teeth were recorded from the same area of the same tooth for two times using cellulose acetate film, cellophane tape, and light body impression material. Photomicrographs of enamel rod endings were taken and subjected to Verifinger standard SDK version 5.0 software for analysis. Minutiae scores of all enamel rod end patterns obtained using these three imprint materials were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Cellulose acetate film imprint showed complete enamel rod end patterns and the software was able to identify the particular tooth with the same previous identification number in subsequent recordings as well. Cellophane tape and light body rubber-base impression material imprint showed incomplete enamel rod end patterns and the software failed to identify the particular tooth with the same previous identification number in subsequent recordings. Statistical analysis revealed that cellulose acetate film recorded more number of minutiae points compared with the other imprint materials. CONCLUSION: Cellulose acetate film is a reliable material for recording enamel rod endings on tooth surface for personal identification compared with cellophane tape and light body rubber-base impression material.

Manjunath K; Sivapathasundharam B; Saraswathi T

2011-07-01

203

Preimplantation filling of tooth socket with ?-tricalcium phosphate/polylactic-polyglycolic acid (?-TCP/PLGA) root analogue: clinical and histological analysis in a patient  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction. Bone resorption is a physiological process after tooth extraction. The use of bone substitutes to fill the tooth socket is suggested to prevent bone resorption and establish good bone architecture for implant placement. A pure ß-tricalcium phosphate coated with copolymer (polylactic-polyglycolic acid) as a root analogue, is suitable for filling tooth sockets. Case report. We presented a patient successfully treated with root analogue after extraction of the right second lower premolar. Three months later, the patient was planned for the placement of six TE® ITI dental implants into the mandible. During the surgery, the biopsy of bone-like tissue from the previously treated socket was taken. All the implants were immediately loaded due to good primary stability. Histological analysis of the specimen revealed fibrous healing in the area treated with root analogue. Conclusion. The use of ß-tricalcium phosphate coated with copolymers after tooth extraction enables satisfactory bone architecture for consequent implant treatment.

Kokovi? Vladimir; Todorovi? Ljubomir

2011-01-01

204

[Tooth wear, a proposal for an evaluation system].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present-day terminology and definitions of tooth wear are not unambiguous. For diagnosing tooth wear, however, it is essential that they are unambiguous. In this article a proposal is presented for a tooth wear evaluation system with simplified definitions. This system consists ofa number of modules and can be used for various aspects of the diagnostic procedure. It can be used for the quantification of tooth wear, both for periodic screening and for the monitoring of tooth wear in individual patients. The scoring of occlusal/incisal tooth wear as well as of non-occlusal/non-incisal tooth wear is possible. The evaluative system is also suitable for determining which type of tooth wear, such as attrition, abrasion and erosion, is most likely to have caused any observed loss of hard tooth tissue.

Wetselaar P; van der Zaag J; Lobbezoo F

2011-06-01

205

Femur, rib, and tooth sample collection for DNA analysis in disaster victim identification (DVI) : a method to minimize contamination risk.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although much literature is available on DNA extraction from tissue samples to obtain the best possible genotyping results, to the best of our knowledge no written recommendations exist on how to excise or extract bone and tooth samples from a victim to facilitate this. Because the possibility of cross-contamination is high, especially when excising numerous samples under disaster conditions, it is important to minimize this risk and to keep samples in optimum condition. In this paper a standard operating procedure is proposed for collection of femur, rib, and tooth samples to aid victim identification both after mass disasters and in (single) forensic investigations.

Westen AA; Gerretsen RR; Maat GJ

2008-01-01

206

Hydroxyapatite coating on damaged tooth surfaces by immersion  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was coated on scratched areas of a human tooth and HAp disks by the immersion method in a HAp colloidal solution (<=20{mu}m of average diameter dispersed in DI water). The surface morphologies of the scratched area after immersion for 1-3 months were investigated showing that the damaged surfaces were remarkably recovered. Then, the mechanical property and chemical stability of the HAp coating layers on both specimens were determined via the Vickers hardness test and concentration measurement of extracted Ca{sup 2+} ions, respectively, after strong acidic treatment. The cellular behavior of mouse calvaria-derived pre-osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) was also examined on the HAp layers regenerated on micro-scratched HAp disks for the purpose of their potential applications on maxillofacial bone conservation and reconstruction for prosthetic dentistry, and artificial disk preparation of a vertebral column. The notable loss of Ca{sup 2+} ions under a highly acidic condition was not observed in the layers coated by HAp adsorption, indicating that the coating surface was well adhered with the original surfaces of the respective specimen. Moreover, the HAp adsorption did not adversely affect the adhesion, growth and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the coated HAp layers for up to 21 days. These results suggest that the HAp coating on the scratched areas of the tooth would be effectively applicable for the development of long-term prevention of micro-cleavage and tooth health supporters to reduce discoloration and further maxillofacial and orthopedic applications.

Lim, Byoung-Ki; Ryu, Su-Chak [Department of Nanomaterials Engineering, College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, Miryang, 607-706 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Fangfang; Koh, Kwangnak; Han, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jaebeom, E-mail: jaebeom@pusan.ac.k [Department of Nanomedical Engineering, College of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Pusan National University, Miryang, 607-706 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-04-15

207

Hydroxyapatite coating on damaged tooth surfaces by immersion  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was coated on scratched areas of a human tooth and HAp disks by the immersion method in a HAp colloidal solution (?20 ?m of average diameter dispersed in DI water). The surface morphologies of the scratched area after immersion for 1-3 months were investigated showing that the damaged surfaces were remarkably recovered. Then, the mechanical property and chemical stability of the HAp coating layers on both specimens were determined via the Vickers hardness test and concentration measurement of extracted Ca2+ ions, respectively, after strong acidic treatment. The cellular behavior of mouse calvaria-derived pre-osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) was also examined on the HAp layers regenerated on micro-scratched HAp disks for the purpose of their potential applications on maxillofacial bone conservation and reconstruction for prosthetic dentistry, and artificial disk preparation of a vertebral column. The notable loss of Ca2+ ions under a highly acidic condition was not observed in the layers coated by HAp adsorption, indicating that the coating surface was well adhered with the original surfaces of the respective specimen. Moreover, the HAp adsorption did not adversely affect the adhesion, growth and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the coated HAp layers for up to 21 days. These results suggest that the HAp coating on the scratched areas of the tooth would be effectively applicable for the development of long-term prevention of micro-cleavage and tooth health supporters to reduce discoloration and further maxillofacial and orthopedic applications.

2009-01-01

208

Forceps extraction of teeth with severe internal root resorption.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many treatment plans require a dental practitioner to maintain the entire labial cortical plate of bone when removing an anterior maxillary tooth. A tooth with an undermined root secondary to an endodontic perforation or internal (Idiopathic) resorption can present a surgical challenge to the general practitioner. This article describes a new technique for extracting a severely undermined anterior maxillary tooth while maintaining the entire labial cortex of bone.

Javaheri DS; Garibaldi JA

1997-06-01

209

Prevalence of deciduous tooth erosion in childhood.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of deciduous tooth erosion and to identify possible associations with sex, age and toothbrushing frequency in children aged 4-6 years. METHODS: The sample was drawn from attendants (n = 7058) of 57 public preschools in a Brazilian city. Tooth wear index was used to evaluate erosion. Descriptive statistical analysis consisted of the calculation of the prevalence of dental erosion; chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were performed to verify the association between dental erosion and sex, age and toothbrushing frequency. RESULTS: Two thousand and seven hundred and fifty-nine preschool students were examined. Deciduous tooth erosion was observed in 0.6% of children and its incidence did not differ between sexes. The highest prevalence was observed in children aged 6 years (58.3%) and the most affected sextants were the fourth (22.86%) and sixth (20.00%), indicating that lingual and occlusal tooth surfaces were most frequently involved. The degree of involvement was classified as incipient in 54.29% of children and moderate in 45.71%. The significance level was set at 5%. No association was found between erosion and sex, age or toothbrushing frequency. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of deciduous tooth erosion was low in Brazilian children, and this disorder is not considered a public health problem in this part of the population.

Moimaz SA; Araújo PC; Chiba FY; Garbín CA; Saliba NA

2013-08-01

210

Evaluation of effect of low level laser therapy on pain during orthodontic tooth movement in human  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Lasers with different characteristics have been used to stimulate orthodontic tooth movements and to inhibit the pain during tooth movements. Considering the contradictory finding in this respect, the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) was evaluated on the pain during orthodontic tooth movement. "nMaterials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial study, 12 patients were included with extracted upper first premolars and required canine retraction into extraction site. While in both sides canines were retracted by Niti coil spring, one side was exposed to GaAlAs laser (890nm). LLLT was done on the buccal and palatal mucosa by slow movement of probe. The patients were asked about their pain on both sides 2 days after beginning of retraction. Pain measurement was evaluated with VAS. "nResults: Pain perception in LLLT side significantly decreased (P=0.007). "nConclusion: Based on the results, single irradiation of GaAlAs laser (12J energy per tooth) can decrease pain perception.

Hosseini MH; Kamali A; Mahmoodzadeh Darbandi M

2010-01-01

211

A rat model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A recapitulates disease variability and supplies biomarkers of axonal loss in patients.  

Science.gov (United States)

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the most common inherited neuropathy and a duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene causes the most frequent subform Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. Patients develop a slowly progressive dysmyelinating and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy and distally pronounced muscle atrophy. The amount of axonal loss determines disease severity. Although patients share an identical monogenetic defect, the disease progression is strikingly variable and the impending disease course can not be predicted in individual patients. Despite promising experimental data, recent therapy trials have failed. Established clinical outcome measures are thought to be too insensitive to detect amelioration within trials. Surrogate biomarkers of disease severity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A are thus urgently needed. Peripheral myelin protein 22 transgenic rats harbouring additional copies of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene ('Charcot-Marie-Tooth rats'), which were kept on an outbred background mimic disease hallmarks and phenocopy the variable disease severity of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. Hence, we used the Charcot-Marie-Tooth rat to dissect prospective and surrogate markers of disease severity derived from sciatic nerve and skin tissue messenger RNA extracts. Gene set enrichment analysis of sciatic nerve transcriptomes revealed that dysregulation of lipid metabolism associated genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma constitutes a modifier of present and future disease severity. Importantly, we directly validated disease severity markers from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth rats in 46 patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. Our data suggest that the combination of age and cutaneous messenger RNA levels of glutathione S-transferase theta 2 and cathepsin A composes a strong indicator of disease severity in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, as quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Score. This translational approach, utilizing a transgenic animal model, demonstrates that transcriptional analysis of skin biopsy is suitable to identify biomarkers of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. PMID:22189569

Fledrich, Robert; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Schnizer, Tuuli J; Wichert, Sven P; Stassart, Ruth M; Meyer zu Hörste, Gerd; Klink, Axel; Weiss, Bernhard G; Haag, Uwe; Walter, Maggie C; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Paulus, Walter; Rossner, Moritz J; Sereda, Michael W

2011-12-20

212

A rat model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 1A recapitulates disease variability and supplies biomarkers of axonal loss in patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the most common inherited neuropathy and a duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene causes the most frequent subform Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. Patients develop a slowly progressive dysmyelinating and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy and distally pronounced muscle atrophy. The amount of axonal loss determines disease severity. Although patients share an identical monogenetic defect, the disease progression is strikingly variable and the impending disease course can not be predicted in individual patients. Despite promising experimental data, recent therapy trials have failed. Established clinical outcome measures are thought to be too insensitive to detect amelioration within trials. Surrogate biomarkers of disease severity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A are thus urgently needed. Peripheral myelin protein 22 transgenic rats harbouring additional copies of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene ('Charcot-Marie-Tooth rats'), which were kept on an outbred background mimic disease hallmarks and phenocopy the variable disease severity of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. Hence, we used the Charcot-Marie-Tooth rat to dissect prospective and surrogate markers of disease severity derived from sciatic nerve and skin tissue messenger RNA extracts. Gene set enrichment analysis of sciatic nerve transcriptomes revealed that dysregulation of lipid metabolism associated genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma constitutes a modifier of present and future disease severity. Importantly, we directly validated disease severity markers from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth rats in 46 patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A. Our data suggest that the combination of age and cutaneous messenger RNA levels of glutathione S-transferase theta 2 and cathepsin A composes a strong indicator of disease severity in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, as quantified by the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Score. This translational approach, utilizing a transgenic animal model, demonstrates that transcriptional analysis of skin biopsy is suitable to identify biomarkers of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A.

Fledrich R; Schlotter-Weigel B; Schnizer TJ; Wichert SP; Stassart RM; Meyer zu Hörste G; Klink A; Weiss BG; Haag U; Walter MC; Rautenstrauss B; Paulus W; Rossner MJ; Sereda MW

2012-01-01

213

Roentgenologic investigations for the anterior tooth length  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The author measured the length of crown, root and tooth on the films which was taken by intraoral bisecting technic with mesh plate on the films. The films were taken from the dry skulls, dentiform, same patients who had to be removed their upper incisors, and the other patients who admitted for dental care. From this serial experiment the results were made as follows: 1. By using the film and mesh plate in the oral cavity, the real tooth length can be measured easily on the film surfaces. 2. The film distortion in the oral cavity can be avoided when taking the film using the mesh plate and film together. 3. When measuring the film, length of crown was elongated and length of root was shortened. 4. When using the well-trained bisecting technic, the real tooth length can be measured directly on the intraoral film.

1972-01-01

214

Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface. PMID:23100273

Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

2012-10-25

215

Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

Cho NY; Ferracane JL; Lee IB

2013-01-01

216

[Ectopic molar tooth in the maxillary sinus].  

Science.gov (United States)

The development of intranasal ectopic teeth is rare. Although they are more commonly seen in the palate and maxillary sinus, they can also be found in the mandibular condyle, coronoid process, and nasal cavity. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a complaint of headache. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses showed a bony mass in the right maxillary sinus wall, 1 cm in size. He did not have any history of maxillofacial trauma or operation. The mass was removed via a Caldwell-Luc procedure. It looked like a tooth. Histopathologic diagnosis was made as ectopic molar tooth. The patient was asymptomatic two weeks after the operation. PMID:18187979

Altun, Hüseyin; Teker, Ay?enur Meriç; Ceran, Murat; Gedikli, Orhan

2007-01-01

217

Intranasal Tooth: Report of Three Cases.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Intranasal teeth are uncommon, with only a few reported cases in the past few decades.The clinical manifestations of an intranasal tooth are quite variable. Unilateral nasal obstructionis a common complaint, but even though nasal symptoms are present, an intranasaltooth can be an incidental finding during routine examination in patients without nasal discomfort.Although the diagnosis is not difficult to make, a complete workup that includedradiological investigations is important before any surgery is attempted. Transnasal endoscopicsurgical approaches have been described with no evidence of recurrence or complicationsin similar cases. Herein, three patients with an intranasal tooth are described, alongwith possible etiologies, potential complications, differential diagnoses and their treatments.

I-Hung Lin; Chung-Feng Hwang; Chih-Ying Su; Yi-Fen Kao; Jyh-Ping Peng

2004-01-01

218

Treatment imprudence leading to missed tooth fragment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Traumatic dental injuries (TDI) represent one of the most common oral health problems in children and adolescents. Dental trauma requires a special consideration when it accompanies soft tissue lacerations. Tooth fragments occasionally penetrate into soft tissues and may cause severe complications. This article describes the case of a 12-year-old girl with a fractured tooth fragment embedded in the lower lip for 4 months, which went unnoticed at her primary health centre. This report highlights the importance of proper radiographic diagnosis along with clinical examination after trauma in order to prevent any future complications. PMID:23606390

Barua, Pranamee; Chaudhary, Seema; Kaur, Harsimran; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

2013-04-19

219

Tooth breakage in patients injected with 224Ra  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Tooth breakage has been common among the224Ra patients, especially those injected as teenagers. The fracture of 1 or more teeth was reported by 26% (8/31) of boys and 23% (7/30) of girls injected with 224Ra at 16-20 years of age. Combining results from all age groups, the incidence of tooth fractures increased significantly with dose (P=0.01). Unlike the normal loss of permanent teeth by periodontal disease, in which the entire tooth is lost, the tooth loss following 224Ra injection was primarily from tooth resorption near the gum line causing the tooth crowns to break off easily. Eventually the tooth roots may either become incorporated into the jawbone or are resorbed and replaced with bone. These tooth fractures resembled those observed in the U.S. radium dial painters and in dogs injected with bone-seeking ?-emitters. (orig.).

1986-01-01

220

Do we really know how to evaluate tooth prognosis? A systematic review and suggested approach.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Periodontal treatment is based on tooth prognosis evaluation. Different approaches for determining tooth prognosis have been described in the literature. The vast majority are based on clinical and radiographic findings, as well as patient-related factors. The availability of various systems for assigning tooth prognosis complicates both the assignment process and the communication between clinicians regarding patient status and treatment plan. In addition, performance evaluation of several systems reveals that the accuracy of prediction differs between teeth of various conditions in most methods, as well as the factors providing significant predictive power. As a standardized prognostic classification system is still lacking, an overall evaluation based on a uniform dataset could provide an objective comparison of all methods, and help progress towards developing novel approaches. The main features of such approaches should include the selection of predictive factors, their assigned weights in accordance with different tooth conditions, and the estimated period of time applicable for reevaluation of prognosis. In this paper, we propose a different approach for prognosis evaluation, suggesting reevaluating tooth prognosis at several time points during the treatment plan, and taking into consideration some of the most important issues of patient compliance, oral hygiene, and plaque control. The suggested approach attempts to address prognosis from a different perspective, viewing the process as a dynamic and recurring evaluation embedded within each step of the treatment plan. Due to the fact that accurate tooth prognosis evaluation is still (and might forever be) unavailable, a more humble and less aggressive approach should be adopted, trying to preserve more and extract less.

Halperin-Sternfeld M; Levin L

2013-05-01

 
 
 
 
221

A Review of the Use of Dental Implants in Children with Tooth Agenesis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Several treatment modalities have so far been introduced for tooth agenesis, among which dental implants seem to be of greater importance. The prognosis of this treatment in children is not however as predictable as in adults because of issues such as higher risk of surgery in younger individuals and continuing growth of jaws after implant placement. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature and find out when it is the best time to extract deciduous teeth and place implants in young individuals with tooth agenesis.Materials and Methods: A search was made in MEDLINE on combinations of the terms ‘tooth agenesis’, ‘deciduous teeth’ and ‘dental implants’ from 1972 to 2009. Publications on the prevalence of tooth agenesis and oligodontia, persisting deciduous teeth and the long-term function of dental implants in children also were added. A total of 123 references were finally included.Results: The information currently available on the placement of dental implants in young individuals with tooth agenesis is mostly based on reports from multi-disciplinary teams and case reports.Conclusion: Implantations for young individuals should be postponed after the completion of the 15th year of age in girls and the 17th year of age in boys. Skeletal growth ought to be completed. Implantation during childhood should be restricted to those patients who may not be conventionally provided with an aesthetically and functionally satisfying prosthodontic restoration due to the large extent of their missing teeth. Key words: Dental implants, Tooth agenesis, Deciduous teeth.

A Moghareh Abed; Gh Ansari; M Tavakoli; M Adibrad

2010-01-01

222

Clinical, radiological and histological diagnoses of periapical periodontitis spreading to the adjacent tooth: A case of endodontic failure  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aims: This article describes the apical infection in endodontically treated tooth 4.5 that spread to adjacent tooth 4.4. Case Report: A 52-year-old woman was referred for the presence of radiolucency extending from tooth 4.5 and mental foramen. Spontaneous symptoms were present. Tooth 4.5 showed poor-quality endodontics. The vitality of tooth 4.4 was negative, even though no mechanical trauma had been reported, nor was caries present. Both teeth were sensitive to percussion. Endodontic re-treatment of 4.5 and endodontic treatment of 4.4 were performed in a single visit. A large amount of endodontic sealer squeezed mesially from the root of tooth 4.5, where a partial horizontal root fracture was hypothesized. 6-, 12-, and 18-month radiographic follow-ups, by both periapical and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analyses, showed incomplete osseous healing. CBCT excluded root fracture on 4.5. Local symptoms were still present. Clinical and radiological conditions led to extractions, and a cystic lesion was enucleated for histopathologic analyses. Histopathologic diagnosis was a periapical cyst. The supposed partial horizontal root fracture of 4.5 was actually a large lateral canal. Although the root canal treatments followed high standards in terms of quality, a persistent chronic infection developed histologically. The cystic lesion was one consistent reason for the unsuccessful healing of 4.5.

Luigi Cianconi; Manuele Mancini

2013-01-01

223

Double tooth in mandibular incisor region: a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Double tooth is a term used to describe connate tooth and includes both dental fusion and gemination. Fusion refers to the union of two tooth germs resulting in a single large tooth. Owing to its irregular morphology, this anomaly can cause unpleasant aesthetic appearance. The diagnosis is based on the clinical findings and radiographic examination. We hereby discuss a case of fusion in a 30-year-old woman.

Mohan RP; Verma S; Singh AK; Singh U

2013-01-01

224

A study on ESR dating characteristics of tooth enamel fossils  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The characteristics of ESR signals used in the dating of animal tooth enamel fossils have been investigated. According to the comparison of the results obtained from tooth enamel with those from pure substance and the study by positron annihilation technique, it can be concluded that the paramagnetic centers of tooth enamel is produced by PO43- ion formed F centers.

1995-01-01

225

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Tooth Decay Thumb sucking Prevent Decay Nutrition Baby Tooth Decay Is Real As soon as teeth appear ... your baby’s gums and teeth clean to prevent tooth decay, even in baby teeth. Keep Baby’s Gums ...

226

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Tooth Decay Thumb sucking Prevent Decay Nutrition Baby Tooth Decay Is Real As soon as teeth appear in ... your baby’s gums and teeth clean to prevent tooth decay, even in baby teeth. Keep Baby’s Gums and ...

227

Tooth resorption in cats : contribution of vitamin D and inflammation  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Tooth resorption affecting several teeth is a painful disease with a prevalence of up to 75% in household cats and is often accompanied by periodontitis. Tooth resorption is caused by an increased number and activity of tooth-resorbing odontoclasts, cells that share functional characteristics with b...

Vrieling, H.E.

228

[Removability of tooth deposits by cleaning with toothbrushes and toothpaste].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The abrasion strength of the exogenous pellicle (EP) was investigated in in vitro experiments on extracted human teeth. The aim of the study was to elucidate the effect of daily brushing on the EP. EP-coated tooth specimens were cleansed under in vivo-like conditions. Five toothpastes with different degrees of abrasiveness were variously diluted with artificial saliva. The evaluation was done on the transmission electron microscope. The individual toothpastes differed significantly with respect to their abrasive effect on EP, which extended from only a slight effect on EP, which extended from only a slight effect to extensive removal of the pellicle. EP abrasion was considerably reduced by increasing dilution of the pastes with artificial saliva. No changes of the EP could be observed after brushing with only the toothbrush and saliva.

Hannig M; Bössmann K

1988-03-01

229

Molecular basis of tooth germ development.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

. Ro?. 16, ?. 4 (2007), s. 39-46. ISSN 1210-4272Grant CEP: GA AV ?R KJB500450503; GA MŠk OC B23.001Výzkumný zám?r: CEZ:AV0Z50450515Klí?ová slova: tooth germ developmentKód oboru RIV: FF - ORL, oftalmologie, stomatologie

Fleischmannová, JanaG; Krej?í, P.; Matalová, Eva; Míšek, Ivan

230

Effect of endodontic sealers on tooth color.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: One of the goals of endodontic treatment is the adequate filling of the root canal,which is often done using gutta-percha and sealer. It has been reported that sealer remnants in the coronary pulp chamber cause tooth color changes. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, testing the hypothesis that sealers cause coronal color changes. METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated leaving excess sealer material in the coronary pulp chamber. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10) according to the endodontic sealer used (AH, AH Plus; EF, Endofill; EN,endome´ thasoneN; and S26, Sealer 26). Teeth were stored at 37 8C moist environment.Color coordinates (L*a*b*) were measured with a spectrophotometer before endodontic treatment(baseline-control), 24 h and 6 months after treatment. L*a*b* values were used to calculate color changes (DE). Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney-U tests. RESULTS: Color changes were observed for all groups with S26 and EN producing the greatest mean DE values after 6 months. CONCLUSION: Endodontic sealer remnants affect tooth color confirming the experimental hypothesis. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study examined the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, and observed that after 6 months, the sealers produced unacceptable color changes.

Meincke DK; Prado M; Gomes BP; Bona AD; Sousa EL

2013-08-01

231

EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

2010-01-01

232

Neuroblastoma and tooth abnormalities: a common history?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Neuroblastoma, a malignant tumor of the sympathetic nervous system and the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood, arises from embryonic neural crest cells. Tooth development begins before birth and continues for 12-14 years with the development of the third molar for several years. Abnor...

Abadie, Caroline; Lechaix, Bénédicte; Gandemer, Virginie; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

233

Gene Expression Profiling during Murine Tooth Development  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn), amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx), and enamelin (Enam) during early (pre-secretory) tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleoti...

Landin, Maria A. dos Santos Silva; Shabestari, Maziar; Babaie, Eshrat; Reseland, Janne E.; Osmundsen, Harald

234

Biodosimetry: chromosome aberration in lymphocytes and electron paramagnetic resonance in tooth enamel from atomic bomb survivors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

One hundred enamel samples isolated from extracted teeth donated by atomic bomb survivors were subjected to free radical measurement by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). Results comparing ESR with the chromosome aberration frequency in lymphocytes of the tooth donors, and with the physically estimated DS86 dose suggested that ESR data correlated more closely with chromosome data than with the estimated DS86 doses, probably because DS86 may depend on erroneous memory in some cases.

Nakamura N; Miyazawa C; Akiyama M; Sawada S; Awa AA

1996-01-01

235

Tooth-implant connection: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this review was to assess the long-term outcomes of restorations supported by implants and natural teeth with regard to complications associated with implants, teeth, and restorations, as well as the influence on these parameters of the connector type used. A net-based search in PubMed was combined with a manual search. Clinical studies, reviews, and biomechanical studies were included. Information on survival rate, complication rate, incidence of tooth intrusion, and, where applicable, type of connector used, was retrieved from the clinical studies. Force distribution and types of connectors used were retrieved from the biomechanical study. A summary of outcomes was retrieved from the reviews. A total of 25 articles were selected for inclusion in this review, including clinical studies (15), biomechanical studies (7), and reviews (3). Implant success rates ranged from 79.5%-100%. Tooth complications occurred in 5.4%-11.8% of cases. Complications in the suprastructure were observed in 5%-90% of cases. Tooth intrusion presented in a total of 0%-66% of all cases, more often in cases with nonrigid connection (0%-66%) than in cases with rigid connection (0%-44%). Biomechanical studies show a large difference in stress distribution and in dependence on the type of connector used, with most studies demonstrating that nonrigid connectors drastically reduce stress on the suprastructure while increasing forces on supporting teeth and implants. Long-term success rates for tooth-implant connections are lower than for solely implant-supported restorations with regard to prognosis for teeth, implants, and suprastructure. Use of rigid connectors leads to more favorable clinical outcomes in terms of long-term stability, occurrence of complications, and tooth intrusion. PMID:21091344

Hoffmann, Oliver; Zafiropoulos, Gregory-George

2010-11-23

236

Tooth-implant connection: a review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this review was to assess the long-term outcomes of restorations supported by implants and natural teeth with regard to complications associated with implants, teeth, and restorations, as well as the influence on these parameters of the connector type used. A net-based search in PubMed was combined with a manual search. Clinical studies, reviews, and biomechanical studies were included. Information on survival rate, complication rate, incidence of tooth intrusion, and, where applicable, type of connector used, was retrieved from the clinical studies. Force distribution and types of connectors used were retrieved from the biomechanical study. A summary of outcomes was retrieved from the reviews. A total of 25 articles were selected for inclusion in this review, including clinical studies (15), biomechanical studies (7), and reviews (3). Implant success rates ranged from 79.5%-100%. Tooth complications occurred in 5.4%-11.8% of cases. Complications in the suprastructure were observed in 5%-90% of cases. Tooth intrusion presented in a total of 0%-66% of all cases, more often in cases with nonrigid connection (0%-66%) than in cases with rigid connection (0%-44%). Biomechanical studies show a large difference in stress distribution and in dependence on the type of connector used, with most studies demonstrating that nonrigid connectors drastically reduce stress on the suprastructure while increasing forces on supporting teeth and implants. Long-term success rates for tooth-implant connections are lower than for solely implant-supported restorations with regard to prognosis for teeth, implants, and suprastructure. Use of rigid connectors leads to more favorable clinical outcomes in terms of long-term stability, occurrence of complications, and tooth intrusion.

Hoffmann O; Zafiropoulos GG

2012-04-01

237

The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the acceleration of tooth movement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: Accelerating the speed of orthodontic tooth movement should contribute to the shortening of the treatment period. This study was designed to determine whether a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) affects orthodontic tooth movement. METHODS: The canines of one side of 10 patients (mean age 23.0 ± 3.3 years) who needed canine retraction were exposed to a PEMF; the canines on the contralateral sides of the same patients were not similarly exposed. After extraction of the maxillary first premolars, both canines were retracted with coil springs. A circuit and a watch battery were used to generate a PEMF (1 Hz). The generator was embedded in a removable appliance. Foil was used to obstruct the contol group from PEMF exposure. Patients were instructed to use the device from the commencement of canine retraction, and it was removed when Class I canine relationship was achieved in either of the canines after 5.0 ± 0.6 months. The changes in the space between the maxillary canine and first molar were measured to indicate the amount of tooth movement. The canine retraction distances were compared by paired t test. Afterward, the treatment plan was continued. RESULTS: With exposure to a PEMF, canine retraction was 1.57 ± 0.83 mm more than the control group (P<.001). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that application of a PEMF can accelerate orthodontic tooth movement.

Showkatbakhsh R; Jamilian A; Showkatbakhsh M

2010-01-01

238

Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced tooth whitening: the next-generation technology.  

Science.gov (United States)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the plasma pencil (PP) device in conjunction with H2 O2 gel. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LTAPP delivered using the PP would enhance the tooth-whitening process while causing no thermal threat. METHODS: The study consisted of thirty extracted human teeth that were randomized into two groups: Group I received LTAPP plus 36% H2 O2 gel at 10, 15 and 20 min and Group II received 36% H2 O2 gel only at the same time intervals. Tooth surface temperature was measured periodically throughout the experiment using a non-contact thermometer. Digital photographs were taken pre- and post-treatment and transferred to Adobe Photoshop for comparison, using the CIELAB Color Value System. Only L* (lightness) values were evaluated in this study. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and t-test at the 0.05 level. RESULTS: The results revealed a statistically significant difference in mean CIE L* values after exposure to LTAPP plus 36% H2 O2 gel, compared with 36% H2 O2 only, in the 10- and 20-min groups (P = 0.0003 and 0.0103, respectively). The temperature in both treatment groups remained under 80°F throughout the study, which is below the thermal threat for vital tooth bleaching. CONCLUSION: Utilizing PP device in conjunction with 36% H2 O2 safely accelerates and enhances the tooth-whitening process. PMID:23773519

Claiborne, D; McCombs, G; Lemaster, M; Akman, Ma; Laroussi, M

2013-06-15

239

Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced tooth whitening: the next-generation technology.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the plasma pencil (PP) device in conjunction with H2 O2 gel. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LTAPP delivered using the PP would enhance the tooth-whitening process while causing no thermal threat. METHODS: The study consisted of thirty extracted human teeth that were randomized into two groups: Group I received LTAPP plus 36% H2 O2 gel at 10, 15 and 20 min and Group II received 36% H2 O2 gel only at the same time intervals. Tooth surface temperature was measured periodically throughout the experiment using a non-contact thermometer. Digital photographs were taken pre- and post-treatment and transferred to Adobe Photoshop for comparison, using the CIELAB Color Value System. Only L* (lightness) values were evaluated in this study. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and t-test at the 0.05 level. RESULTS: The results revealed a statistically significant difference in mean CIE L* values after exposure to LTAPP plus 36% H2 O2 gel, compared with 36% H2 O2 only, in the 10- and 20-min groups (P = 0.0003 and 0.0103, respectively). The temperature in both treatment groups remained under 80°F throughout the study, which is below the thermal threat for vital tooth bleaching. CONCLUSION: Utilizing PP device in conjunction with 36% H2 O2 safely accelerates and enhances the tooth-whitening process.

Claiborne D; McCombs G; Lemaster M; Akman M; Laroussi M

2013-06-01

240

A comparison between adipose tissue and dental pulp as sources of MSCs for tooth regeneration.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, several in vivo and in vitro comparisons were performed to test the possibility of using adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a more convenient cell source than dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), in tooth regeneration. Using an efficient, non-engineering implantation method, we first demonstrated that both implants of ADSCs and DPSCs were able to grow self-assembled new teeth in adult rabbit extraction sockets with high success rate. The stem cells were necessary because the implants grew no tooth without them. A stepwise comparison showed that the regenerated teeth from these two types of adult stem cells were living with nerves and vascular system and remarkably similar to a normal tooth in many details. Further strictly controlled, side-by-side comparisons between the two types of stem cells also showed that the expression patterns of gene markers and the broad differentiation potentials induced by specific methods in vitro were very similar. Although a few differences were found, they did not affect the tested tooth regeneration in vivo or differentiation in vitro. Furthermore, rabbit ADSCs had a higher growth rate and a better senescence resistance in culture. All these findings suggest that ADSCs, one of the richest adult stem cells in mammals, are very similar and useful as DPSCs for regenerative dentistry. PMID:21696818

Hung, Chia-Nung; Mar, Kwei; Chang, Hao-Chen; Chiang, Yi-Lun; Hu, Huai-Yun; Lai, Chia-Chi; Chu, Rei-Min; Ma, Chang M

2011-06-22

 
 
 
 
241

A comparison between adipose tissue and dental pulp as sources of MSCs for tooth regeneration.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this study, several in vivo and in vitro comparisons were performed to test the possibility of using adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a more convenient cell source than dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), in tooth regeneration. Using an efficient, non-engineering implantation method, we first demonstrated that both implants of ADSCs and DPSCs were able to grow self-assembled new teeth in adult rabbit extraction sockets with high success rate. The stem cells were necessary because the implants grew no tooth without them. A stepwise comparison showed that the regenerated teeth from these two types of adult stem cells were living with nerves and vascular system and remarkably similar to a normal tooth in many details. Further strictly controlled, side-by-side comparisons between the two types of stem cells also showed that the expression patterns of gene markers and the broad differentiation potentials induced by specific methods in vitro were very similar. Although a few differences were found, they did not affect the tested tooth regeneration in vivo or differentiation in vitro. Furthermore, rabbit ADSCs had a higher growth rate and a better senescence resistance in culture. All these findings suggest that ADSCs, one of the richest adult stem cells in mammals, are very similar and useful as DPSCs for regenerative dentistry.

Hung CN; Mar K; Chang HC; Chiang YL; Hu HY; Lai CC; Chu RM; Ma CM

2011-10-01

242

Effect of computerized delivery intraligamental injection in primary molars on their corresponding permanent tooth buds.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of developmental disturbances in permanent teeth in which buds were exposed to intraligamental injection (ILI) delivered by a computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery (C-CLAD). METHODS: The study population consisted of 78 children (age 4.1-12.8 years) who received ILI-C-CLAD to 166 primary molars. A structured form was designed to include information regarding age at treatment, gender, type of treated tooth, tooth location, type of dental treatment, and type of developmental disturbance(s) present in the associated permanent tooth. Teeth, which received regular anaesthesia or were not anaesthetized by local anaesthesia, served as controls. RESULTS: Five children had developmental defects. In C-CLAD-ILI exposed teeth, one child had two hypomaturation defects. The corresponding primary teeth were extracted. No defects were found on the control side. In two children, hypoplastic defects were found only in the control teeth (one in each child). One suffered from a dentoalveolar abscess in the corresponding primary tooth. Diffuse hypomaturation defects were found in two children on both the C-CLAD-ILI exposed and control sides. CONCLUSION: In the primary dentition, C-CLAD-ILI does not increase the danger of developmental disturbances to the underlying permanent dental bud.

Ashkenazi M; Blumer S; Eli I

2010-07-01

243

In-air micro-PIGE measurement system for fluorine analysis of the tooth  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

An in-air micro-PIGE and micro-PIXE measurement system for fluorine analysis of tooth have been developed at the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center. A proton microbeam is extracted through a thin silicon nitride window into the air and used to irradiate a tooth sample mounted on a sample stage set in air. Gamma-rays from a 19F(p,??)16O reaction and characteristic X-rays are detected with a BGO detector and a Ge X-ray detector, simultaneously. The sample stage and beam scanner allow us to analyze the tooth sample over a range of 20 mm at maximum. Spot sizes of a proton beams in air at an energy of 2.5 MeV was 4 ?m, in the case of a distance between the silicon nitride window and the sample of 0.2 mm and 13 ?m in the case of 1.7 mm. Fluorine analysis was performed over an area of about 3 mm x 3 mm of the tooth sample. One- and two-dimensional distributions of fluorine and calcium were obtained successfully. Quantitative analysis was also performed using data for measurements of reference materials Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2-2xF2x.

2007-01-01

244

Bone transport and bone graft using auto-tooth bone for alveolar cleft repair.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We herein report the application of a combination of maxillary bone transport and auto-tooth bone grafting for alveolar cleft repair using autogenous extracted teeth developed in Korea.A 9-year-old female patient suffering from unilateral cleft lip and palate was treated with this method. After sagittal interdental right-sided maxillary osteotomy was performed completely between #11 and #12 to the nasal floor, alveolar maxillary bone (#11, 21) was transported in the planned direction and the alveolar cleft was closed. At the end of the transporter activation period, soft tissue in the cleft was removed during so-called "docking surgery" using an electric knife for close bone contact at the docking site. We performed bone transporter removal and simultaneous auto-tooth bone grafting of the patient's supernumerary teeth to the docking site.Maxillary bone transport allowed for simultaneous correction of the nasal septal deviation, maxillary arch deformities, and malocclusion since the dental arch was expanded without donor sacrifice or soft tissue expansion. Auto-tooth bone grafting to the docking site allowed for repair of the bone defects of the nasal floor and alveolar cleft and resulted in a superior bone connection.A combination of maxillary bone transport and auto-tooth bone grafting to the docking site appears to be an effective approach for alveolar cleft repair.

Hara S; Mitsugi M; Kanno T; Tatemoto Y

2013-01-01

245

Bone transport and bone graft using auto-tooth bone for alveolar cleft repair.  

Science.gov (United States)

We herein report the application of a combination of maxillary bone transport and auto-tooth bone grafting for alveolar cleft repair using autogenous extracted teeth developed in Korea.A 9-year-old female patient suffering from unilateral cleft lip and palate was treated with this method. After sagittal interdental right-sided maxillary osteotomy was performed completely between #11 and #12 to the nasal floor, alveolar maxillary bone (#11, 21) was transported in the planned direction and the alveolar cleft was closed. At the end of the transporter activation period, soft tissue in the cleft was removed during so-called "docking surgery" using an electric knife for close bone contact at the docking site. We performed bone transporter removal and simultaneous auto-tooth bone grafting of the patient's supernumerary teeth to the docking site.Maxillary bone transport allowed for simultaneous correction of the nasal septal deviation, maxillary arch deformities, and malocclusion since the dental arch was expanded without donor sacrifice or soft tissue expansion. Auto-tooth bone grafting to the docking site allowed for repair of the bone defects of the nasal floor and alveolar cleft and resulted in a superior bone connection.A combination of maxillary bone transport and auto-tooth bone grafting to the docking site appears to be an effective approach for alveolar cleft repair. PMID:23348343

Hara, Shingo; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Kanno, Takahiro; Tatemoto, Yukihiro

2013-01-01

246

Tooth abnormalities in congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to present a literature review and case series report of tooth abnormalities in congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CIL-F). METHODS: Four typical cases of CIL-F are presented. Tooth abnormalities in CIL-F documented in the English literature are also reviewed. The clinical and radiological features of tooth abnormalities are summarized. RESULTS: In total, 21 cases with tooth abnormalities in CIL-F were retrieved for analysis. Accelerated tooth formation and eruption (17 cases), macrodontia (9 cases), and root hypoplasia (8 cases) were observed in CIL-F. CONCLUSION: Tooth abnormalities including accelerated tooth formation or eruption, macrodontia, and root hypoplasia are common in CIL-F.

Sun L; Sun Z; Zhu J; Ma X

2013-02-01

247

[Recent advances in molecular mechanisms of supernumerary tooth formation].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, little is relatively known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition. However, a number of mouse models are now starting to provide some insight into the mechanisms that control overall tooth number within the dentition. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of supernumerary tooth formation. Indeed, many of the molecular signaling pathways known to be involved in normal development of the tooth germ can also give rise to supernumerary teeth if inappropriately regulated. These include components of the Hedgehog, FGF, Wnt and BMP families, which may potentially play a role in human supernumerary tooth formation.

Ge LH; Wang X

2013-08-01

248

Blood lead--tooth lead relationship among Boston children  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The amount of lead in deciduous teeth has been used extensively as a marker for infant lead exposure and body burden. Elevated tooth lead levels have been seen in children who had lead poisoning. Also, on a population wide basis tooth lead levels appear to vary according to housing status and presumably lead exposure. This exposure index has been applied using varying techniques in Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Because of the neurotoxicity of lead, the tooth lead levels of retarded and normal children have been compared. Most recently, in research of lead and child development, tooth lead levels have been used as markers of past lead exposure. Despite the widespread use of tooth lead values, very little is known about the exact time course of lead deposition in tooth from blood. This report compares blood lead levels at different ages to tooth lead levels in a group of Boston children.

Rabinowitz, M.B.; Leviton, A.; Bellinger, D.C. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

1989-10-01

249

Retrospective biodosimetry with small tooth enamel samples using K-Band and X-Band  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] In an attempt to make the in vitro electron spin resonance (ESR) retrospective dosimetry of the tooth enamel a lesser invasive method, experiments using X-Band and K-Band were performed, aiming to determine conditions that could be used in cases of accidental exposures. First, a small prism from the enamel was removed and ground with an agate mortar and pestle until particles reach a diameter of approximately less than 0.5 mm. This enamel extraction process resulted in lower signal artifact compared with the direct enamel extraction performed with a diamond burr abrasion. The manual grinding of the enamel does not lead to any induced ESR signal artifact, whereas the use of a diamond burr at low speed produces a signal artifact equivalent to the dosimetric signal induced by a dose of 500 mGy of gamma irradiation. A mass of 25 mg of enamel was removed from a sound molar tooth previously irradiated in vitro with a dose of 100 mGy. This amount of enamel was enough to detect the dosimetric signal in a standard X-Band spectrometer. However using a K-Band spectrometer, samples mass between 5 and 10 mg were sufficient to obtain the same sensitivity. An overall evaluation of the uncertainties involved in the process in this and other dosimetric assessments performed at our laboratory indicates that it is possible at K-Band to estimate a 100 mGy dose with 25% accuracy. In addition, the use of K-Band also presented higher sensitivity and allowed the use of smaller sample mass in comparison with X-Band. Finally, the restoration process performed on a tooth after extraction of the 25 mg of enamel is described. This was conducted by dental treatment using photopolymerizable resin which enabled complete recovery of the tooth from the functional and aesthetic viewpoint showing that this procedure can be minimally invasive.

2011-01-01

250

Retrospective biodosimetry with small tooth enamel samples using K-Band and X-Band  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In an attempt to make the in vitro electron spin resonance (ESR) retrospective dosimetry of the tooth enamel a lesser invasive method, experiments using X-Band and K-Band were performed, aiming to determine conditions that could be used in cases of accidental exposures. First, a small prism from the enamel was removed and ground with an agate mortar and pestle until particles reach a diameter of approximately less than 0.5 mm. This enamel extraction process resulted in lower signal artifact compared with the direct enamel extraction performed with a diamond burr abrasion. The manual grinding of the enamel does not lead to any induced ESR signal artifact, whereas the use of a diamond burr at low speed produces a signal artifact equivalent to the dosimetric signal induced by a dose of 500 mGy of gamma irradiation. A mass of 25 mg of enamel was removed from a sound molar tooth previously irradiated in vitro with a dose of 100 mGy. This amount of enamel was enough to detect the dosimetric signal in a standard X-Band spectrometer. However using a K-Band spectrometer, samples mass between 5 and 10 mg were sufficient to obtain the same sensitivity. An overall evaluation of the uncertainties involved in the process in this and other dosimetric assessments performed at our laboratory indicates that it is possible at K-Band to estimate a 100 mGy dose with 25% accuracy. In addition, the use of K-Band also presented higher sensitivity and allowed the use of smaller sample mass in comparison with X-Band. Finally, the restoration process performed on a tooth after extraction of the 25 mg of enamel is described. This was conducted by dental treatment using photopolymerizable resin which enabled complete recovery of the tooth from the functional and aesthetic viewpoint showing that this procedure can be minimally invasive.

Gomez, Jorge A. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kinoshita, Angela [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Sagrado Coracao - USC, 17011-160 Bauru, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Leonor, Sergio J. [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Belmonte, Gustavo C. [Universidade Sagrado Coracao - USC, 17011-160 Bauru, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: baffa@usp.br [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2011-09-15

251

Tooth in Ethmoid Sinus: A Case Report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Ectopic eruption of teeth occurs in a variety of locations.Commonly seen in palate and maxillary sinus, they have alsobeen reported in nasal cavity, orbit, mandibular condyle,coronoid process, and facial skin.Here, we report a rare case of recurrent sinusitis caused byectopic tooth in right ethmoid sinus and successful endoscopicremoval of it. The symptoms of the patient disappeared aftersurgery. Such case has not been yet reported in the Englishliterature.Ectopic tooth is an uncommon cause of sinusitis. It shouldbe considered in patients presenting with recurrent sinusitis unresponsiveto medical treatment. Computed tomography of thesinuses is the modality of choice for diagnosis. Endoscopic sinussurgery is the best method for management of such cases.

Mahmood Shishegar; Akbar Bayat; Tayebe Kazemei

2009-01-01

252

Mechanical strength of tooth fragment reattachment.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was static and fatigue test investigation of the strength of a tooth fragment reattached with adhesives to the tooth body. Central bovine incisor teeth were used, and standardized fragments were obtained by cutting the incisal edge of the selected teeth. All the fragments were reattached using a multistep dentine adhesive system, and the specimens were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). Group B specimens underwent a further dental treatment: a circumferential double chamfer prepared around the external cut interface was filled with light cured composite restorative resin. Static and fatigue bending tests were performed and linear elastic equations were used to analyze and compare the strength of the treated teeth. The results indicated that the static and fatigue bending properties were improved by using reinforcement with composite restorative resin. PMID:11288092

De Santis, R; Prisco, D; Nazhat, S N; Riccitiello, F; Ambrosio, L; Rengo, S; Nicolais, L

2001-06-15

253

Mechanical strength of tooth fragment reattachment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was static and fatigue test investigation of the strength of a tooth fragment reattached with adhesives to the tooth body. Central bovine incisor teeth were used, and standardized fragments were obtained by cutting the incisal edge of the selected teeth. All the fragments were reattached using a multistep dentine adhesive system, and the specimens were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). Group B specimens underwent a further dental treatment: a circumferential double chamfer prepared around the external cut interface was filled with light cured composite restorative resin. Static and fatigue bending tests were performed and linear elastic equations were used to analyze and compare the strength of the treated teeth. The results indicated that the static and fatigue bending properties were improved by using reinforcement with composite restorative resin.

De Santis R; Prisco D; Nazhat SN; Riccitiello F; Ambrosio L; Rengo S; Nicolais L

2001-06-01

254

Distribution of amelotin in mouse tooth development.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Amelotin is expressed and secreted by ameloblasts in tooth development, but amelotin distribution during enamel development is not clear. In this report, we first investigated amelotin expression in developing teeth by immunohistochemistry. Amelotin was detected in the enamel matrix at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. Amelotin was also observed at Tomes' processes on the apical ends of secretory ameloblasts. We then compared amelotin gene expression with those of amelogenin, enamelin, and ameloblastin in the mandibles of postnatal mice by RT-PCR. The expression of amelotin was detected as early as in postnatal day 0 mandibles and amelotin was coexpressed with amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin during tooth development. These data strongly suggest that amelotin is an enamel matrix protein expressed at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development.

Gao Y; Wang W; Sun Y; Zhang J; Li D; Wei Y; Han T

2010-01-01

255

Distribution of amelotin in mouse tooth development.  

Science.gov (United States)

Amelotin is expressed and secreted by ameloblasts in tooth development, but amelotin distribution during enamel development is not clear. In this report, we first investigated amelotin expression in developing teeth by immunohistochemistry. Amelotin was detected in the enamel matrix at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. Amelotin was also observed at Tomes' processes on the apical ends of secretory ameloblasts. We then compared amelotin gene expression with those of amelogenin, enamelin, and ameloblastin in the mandibles of postnatal mice by RT-PCR. The expression of amelotin was detected as early as in postnatal day 0 mandibles and amelotin was coexpressed with amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin during tooth development. These data strongly suggest that amelotin is an enamel matrix protein expressed at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. PMID:19937642

Gao, Yuguang; Wang, Wanchun; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Juanjuan; Li, Dongliang; Wei, Yahong; Han, Tingting

2010-01-01

256

Saw-tooth shaped lower hybrid waves  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A homogeneous magnetised plasma supports three types of low frequency electrostatic oscillations. Of these, lower hybrid waves across the external magnetic fields can produce enhanced particle diffusion. Non-linear propagation of a finite amplitude lower hybrid wave is investigated. It is shown that the nonlinearity associated with the ion inertial motion gives rise to wave steepening and since wave dispersion cannot compete with nonlinearity the waves evolve into a saw-tooth shaped profile (UK)

1978-05-11

257

Nasopharyngeal tooth foreign body in a dog.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

An 8-year-old Shih-tzu dog was presented with a 2-week history of cough and nasal discharge. Upon presentation, the dog had constant open-mouth breathing with stertor and blood-tinged mucopurulent nasal discharge. Oral examination revealed a missing right mandibular second premolar tooth and severe periodontal disease. Computed tomography showed a radiodense, retropharyngeal foreign body. The foreign body was removed using caudal rhinoscopy. The foreign body was the right mandibular second premolar covered by thick calculus.

Kang MH; Lim CY; Park HM

2011-01-01

258

Atomic force microscopy study of tooth surfaces.  

Science.gov (United States)

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study tooth surfaces in order to compare the pattern of particle distribution in the outermost layer of the tooth surfaces. Human teeth and teeth from a rodent (Golden hamster), from a fish (piranha), and from a grazing mollusk (chiton) with distinct feeding habits were analyzed in terms of particle arrangement, packing, and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for comparison. It was found that AFM gives high-contrast, high-resolution images and is an important tool as a source of complementary and/or new structural information. All teeth were cleaned and some were etched with acidic solutions before analysis. It was observed that human enamel (permanent teeth) presents particles tightly packed in the outer surface, whereas enamel from the hamster (continuously growing teeth) shows particles of less dense packing. The piranha teeth have a thin cuticle covering the long apatite crystals of the underlying enameloid. This cuticle has a rough surface of particles that have a globular appearance after the brief acidic treatment. The similar appearance of the in vivo naturally etched tooth surface suggests that the pattern of globule distribution may be due to the presence of an organic material. Elemental analysis of this cuticle indicated that calcium, phosphorus, and iron are the main components of the structure while electron microdiffraction of pulverized cuticle particles showed a pattern consistent with hydroxyapatite. The chiton mineralized tooth cusp had a smooth surface in an unabraded region and a very rough structure with the magnetite crystals (already known to make part of the structure) protruding from the surface. It was concluded that the structures analyzed are optimized for efficiency in feeding mechanism and life span of the teeth. PMID:10196115

Farina, M; Schemmel, A; Weissmüller, G; Cruz, R; Kachar, B; Bisch, P M

1999-03-01

259

Atomic force microscopy study of tooth surfaces.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study tooth surfaces in order to compare the pattern of particle distribution in the outermost layer of the tooth surfaces. Human teeth and teeth from a rodent (Golden hamster), from a fish (piranha), and from a grazing mollusk (chiton) with distinct feeding habits were analyzed in terms of particle arrangement, packing, and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for comparison. It was found that AFM gives high-contrast, high-resolution images and is an important tool as a source of complementary and/or new structural information. All teeth were cleaned and some were etched with acidic solutions before analysis. It was observed that human enamel (permanent teeth) presents particles tightly packed in the outer surface, whereas enamel from the hamster (continuously growing teeth) shows particles of less dense packing. The piranha teeth have a thin cuticle covering the long apatite crystals of the underlying enameloid. This cuticle has a rough surface of particles that have a globular appearance after the brief acidic treatment. The similar appearance of the in vivo naturally etched tooth surface suggests that the pattern of globule distribution may be due to the presence of an organic material. Elemental analysis of this cuticle indicated that calcium, phosphorus, and iron are the main components of the structure while electron microdiffraction of pulverized cuticle particles showed a pattern consistent with hydroxyapatite. The chiton mineralized tooth cusp had a smooth surface in an unabraded region and a very rough structure with the magnetite crystals (already known to make part of the structure) protruding from the surface. It was concluded that the structures analyzed are optimized for efficiency in feeding mechanism and life span of the teeth.

Farina M; Schemmel A; Weissmüller G; Cruz R; Kachar B; Bisch PM

1999-03-01

260

A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunhee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

1990-02-15

 
 
 
 
261

A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

1990-01-01

262

A report of an impacted primary maxillary central incisor tooth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

- Primary tooth impaction is a rare phenomenon when compared to permanent teeth impaction. The purpose of this report is to present a 5-year-old Chinese girl who exhibited impaction of tooth 51, its unusual consequence on the permanent successor tooth and its comprehensive management. Her parents revealed that at 6 months of age, the patient had fallen from her bed and struck her face on the floor; however, there were no teeth present in the oral cavity. The intraoral examinations identified a bony-like projection on the buccal aspect of the alveolus in the 51 region. Radiographic examination revealed that tooth 51 exhibited an unfavourable orientation, with the crown directed towards the palate. Therefore, the impacted tooth 51 was surgically removed, and two years later tooth 11 erupted into the oral cavity with an indentation on its incisal aspect, which resembled the crown of the primary teeth, thus giving the appearance of a tooth within a tooth or 'dens in dente'. Subsequently, enameloplasty and composite resin build-up was performed on tooth 11 for aesthetic reasons. It is very unusual to have the clinical crowns of both primary and permanent teeth in such close proximity within the alveolar bone, and the present case is a good example to emphasize that trauma to the primary teeth is of considerable importance due to the close proximity of the primary teeth to permanent tooth germs.

Anthonappa RP; Ongtengco KL; King NM

2013-01-01

263

Dental composition and artificial tooth made thereof  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A dental composition useful for an artificial tooth and an artificial tooth with use of the said dental composition by which color stability, coloring resistance and aesthetic merit can be maintained for a long period of time and which have superior characteristics such as bending strength, impact strength, hardness and wear resistance. The dental composition comprises (A) at least one monomer and/or oligomer selected from methacrylates and acrylates, (B) an uncrosslinked polymer selected from homopolymers of methacrylates, acrylates and styrene; copolymers of at least two monomers selected from methacrylates, acrylates and styrene; mixtures of the homopolymers; mixtures of the copolymers; and mixtures of the homopolymer(s) and the copolymer(s), (C) a crosslinked polymer selected from homopolymers of methacrylates, acrylates and styrene; copolymers of at least two monomers selected from methacrylates, acrylates and styrene; mixtures of the homopolymers; mixtures of the copolymers; and mixtures of the homopolymer(s) and the copolymer(s), (D) an organic and inorganic filler complex, and optionally (E) an inorganic filler. The said dental composition is used to make a dough. which is polymerized and molded into an artificial tooth.

Kawaguchi Satoshi; Hasegawa Akira

264

Digital Computer Matching of Tooth Color  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the validity of the digital photocolorimetric (PCM) method in matching the color of human teeth. First, two Vitapan Classical shade guides, each containing 16 shade guide teeth, were visually shade matched, and digital photographs of each three pair of shade guide teeth were taken in a color matching booth. Secondly, visual shade matching of the upper central incisors of 48 subjects was performed by two prosthodontists independently in a chair, using the Vitapan Classical shade guide. The three closest shade guide teeth were visually selected and ranked in order of preference, for which digital photographs were taken under ceiling daylight-corrected fluorescent lighting. All digital images were analyzed on a computer screen using software to calculate the color difference between the reference tooth and other teeth in the same digital image. The percent color matching for the shade guide teeth and human teeth was 88% and 75%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in matching the tooth color between the shade guide teeth and human teeth. The digital PCM method is valid for the range of human teeth based on the Vitapan Classical shade guide. This method enhances communication with the laboratory personnel in matching the tooth color.

Won-suk Oh; John Pogoncheff; William J. O’Brien

2010-01-01

265

Radiosterilization of tooth pastes EF, MB, LK  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The effect of decontaminating doses of gamma rays (60Co, 10 Kr - 1.5 Mr) on the quality and biological activity of tooth pastes is studied. The radioresistance factors D10 of the dominating microorganisms in the studied pastes, namely Bac. subtilis, Staph. epidermidis, S. lutea, Ps. aeruginosa, Pen. notatum, Pen. chrysogenum, Asp. niger, C. parapsilosis, are determined. Ps aeruginosa appears to show the highest radiosensitivity - D10 = 20 Kr. The irradiation in the range 500 Kr - 1.5 Mr reveals that Ps. aeruginosa are inactivated with doses of 750 Kr while the inactivation of sporebearing bacteria and grampositive microorganisms starts at doses above 1 Mr. The lower values of radioresistance factors observed as compared to that established by the authors for cosmetic preparations henna and starch are due to radiosensitizing of microorganisms in a medium with higher water content. The radiolytic effect of water causes changes in consistency, odour, taste and colour of the tooth pastes and for that reason the radiosterilization of tooth pastes is not recommended. A mathematical model for irradiation of products contaminated with a variety of microorganisms is developed. Bac. subtilis - the most frequent and radioresistant pollutant - is suggested as a standard in selecting the proper sterilization procedure and in checking the efficiency of irradiation. 3 tabs, 3 figs, 6 refs.

1989-01-01

266

Influence of musical instruments on tooth positions.  

Science.gov (United States)

A 2-year longitudinal investigation was conducted at five New York City junior high schools on 11- to 13-year-old children starting instrumental music education to determine what tooth movement, if any, resulted from the playing of certain musical instruments. Questionnaires, interviews, oral examinations, and dental casts were used at the start of instrumental study, after one year, and then after a second year. Statistically significant anterior tooth movements occurred in an overwhelming majority of the instrumentalists, while negligible movements were recorded for the controls over this period. As a result of this study, certain recommendations can be made by dentists when they are asked to suggest instruments which are dentally suited for children. In most cases they can suggest more than one instrument which would be of benefit dentally to the individual child, especially in the increase or reduction of overjet and overbite. The playing of the correct musical instrument can serve as an adjunct to the dentist or orthodontist in trying to accomplish certain tooth movements. PMID:6943935

Herman, E

1981-08-01

267

Influence of musical instruments on tooth positions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A 2-year longitudinal investigation was conducted at five New York City junior high schools on 11- to 13-year-old children starting instrumental music education to determine what tooth movement, if any, resulted from the playing of certain musical instruments. Questionnaires, interviews, oral examinations, and dental casts were used at the start of instrumental study, after one year, and then after a second year. Statistically significant anterior tooth movements occurred in an overwhelming majority of the instrumentalists, while negligible movements were recorded for the controls over this period. As a result of this study, certain recommendations can be made by dentists when they are asked to suggest instruments which are dentally suited for children. In most cases they can suggest more than one instrument which would be of benefit dentally to the individual child, especially in the increase or reduction of overjet and overbite. The playing of the correct musical instrument can serve as an adjunct to the dentist or orthodontist in trying to accomplish certain tooth movements.

Herman E

1981-08-01

268

The effect of fluoride on orthodontic tooth movement in humans. A two- and three-dimensional evaluation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: The aim of the present study was to determine whether high and low fluoride concentrations in drinking water affected the early stages of tooth movement when heavy and light orthodontic forces were applied for 4 weeks. A further aim was to compare and evaluate the resulting two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) orthodontic tooth movement. METHODS: The sample consisted of 96 maxillary upper first premolars from 48 patients who required premolar extractions as part of their orthodontic treatment. Patients were selected from two different cities in Turkey with low and high fluoride concentrations of 0.05 and 2 ppm, respectively. The patient sample was divided into four groups according to the magnitude of force applied to the first premolars and the concentration of fluoride in the public water supply; Group 1, High fluoride intake (> or = 2 ppm)-Heavy force (225 g); Group 2, Low fluoride intake (< or = 0.05 ppm)-Heavy force; Group 3, High fluoride intake-Light force (25 g); and Group 4, Low fluoride intake-Light force. A light or heavy buccal tipping orthodontic force was applied to the upper first premolars for 4 weeks. The first three palatal rugae were used for the superimposition of patient casts in a 2-D and 3-D evaluation of generated movements. RESULTS: It was found that heavy force application and fluoride intake increased the average rate of tooth movement. It was further shown that age was negatively correlated with tooth movement in the 2-D and 3-D measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The average rate of tooth movement was found to be greater in the heavy force and high fluoride intake group (Group 1HH). Age was negatively correlated with orthodontic tooth movement. Two- and three-dimensional methods were accurate for the assessment of tooth movement after four weeks of buccal tipping force application when the palatal rugae were used for superimposition.

Karadeniz EI; Gonzales C; Elekdag-Turk S; Isci D; Sahin-Saglam AM; Alkis H; Turk T; Darendeliler MA

2011-11-01

269

Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

2009-09-27

270

Herbivore tooth oxygen isotope compositions: Effects of diet and physiology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The applicability of rapid and precise laser probe analysis of tooth enamel for {delta}{sup 18}O has been verified, and the method has been applied to different modern herbivores in East Africa. Sampling and pretreatment procedures involve initial bleaching and grinding of enamel to <75 {mu}m, and elimination of adsorbed water and organic compounds with BrF{sub 5}. Typical analytical reproducibilities for 0.5-2 mg samples are {+-}0.08{per_thousand} ({+-} 1{sigma}). Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of pretreated but unanalyzed samples show no alteration compared to fresh enamel. Solid reaction products are nearly pure CaF{sub 2} with little evidence for residual O{sub 2}. Because laser probe fluorination extracts oxygen from all sites in the apatite structure (phosphate, structural carbonate, and hydroxyl), only unaltered tooth enamel ( >95% apatite) can be analyzed reliably. Different East African herbivores exhibit previously unsuspected compositional differences. Average enamel {delta}{sup 18}O values (V-SMOW) are approximately: 25{per_thousand} (goat). 27{per_thousand} (oryx), 28{per_thousand} (dikdik and zebra), 29{per_thousand} (topi), 30{per_thousand} (gerenuk), and 32{per_thousand} (gazelle). These compositions differ from generalized theoretical models, but are broadly consistent with expected isotope effects associated with differences in how much each animal (a) drinks, (b) eats C3 vs. C4 plants, and (c) pants vs. sweats. Consideration of diet, water turnover. and animal physiology will allow the most accurate interpretation of ancient teeth and targeting of environmentally-sensitive animals in paleoclimate studies. 66 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Kohn, M.J.; Valley, J.W.; Schoeninger, M.J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1996-10-01

271

Dental Extractions Using Improvised Equipment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Extracting a tooth is the final treatment for multiple dental problems. Persons who are not dentists, however, have little experience with tooth extractions. When a remote setting makes it impossible to send a patient for optimal dental treatment, the clinician may need to extract teeth, sometimes using improvised equipment. The following cases of two patients with three carious, painful molars describe such a situation. The non-dental clinicians had to improvise not only appropriate dental tools, but also personal protective equipment, a functional suction machine, medications for a dental block, a dental chair, and dental consent forms and follow-up instructions in the patients' language. In these cases, they also communicated with their patients through a translator. To prepare to do tooth extractions in remote settings, clinicians should learn and practice dental blocks and review extraction techniques before they deploy. If they must do an extraction, clinicians should use the closest approximation available to the appropriate dental tools. When done correctly, a dental extraction can take some time and should not be rushed.

Iserson KV

2013-09-01

272

Results of tooth enamel EPR dosimetry for population living in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry was used on human tooth enamel to obtain individual absorbed doses of residents of settlements in the vicinity of the Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) in Semipalatinsk region, Kazakhstan. Measured teeth were extracted according to medical indications. In total, 105 tooth enamel samples were analyzed, including eight tooth samples from control settlement Kokpekty, which is located 400 km to the Southeast from SNTS and was not subjected to any radioactive contamination. It was found that the excess doses obtained after subtraction of the contribution of natural background radiation ranged up to about 440 mGy for residents of Dolon, whose tooth enamel was formed before 1949, and do not exceed 100 mGy for younger residents. For residents of Mostik, excess doses do not exceed 100 mGy for all ages except in one resident, for whom an extremely high dose of 1250 mGy was registered. For Bodene settlement, excess doses higher than 100 mGy were obtained for two samples from the residents having enamel formed before 1949. An extremely high dose (2800±400 mGy) was obtained for one resident of Semipalatinsk City. The average excess dose for Semipalatinsk samples with enamel formation before 1949 was determined close to the average excess dose for tooth enamel samples from Dolon village.

2007-01-01

273

Dedicated high performance liquefied fiber for false tooth repair  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The invention relates to a false tooth repair special high-performance liquefied fiber. Since most of present material used as fixing material in the tooth repair is metal, which has lower stressing resistance, easy broken (the stressing resistance value of super-strong fiber is 15 times of metallic steel wire in the same size) and the metal color will replace the white of tooth, with hard operation of processing and manufacturing. The invention is a super-strong fiber woven material which has been processed with soakage via photochemical solidification binder. The invention can solve most defections of present metal material used in tooth repair. And said high-performance liquefied fiber is mainly used to produce the super-strong fiber fixing hidden false tooth (SíñF hidden false tooth).

SU HAO

274

[Immunohistochemical localization of enamelin in developing rat tooth germ].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To observe the immunohistochemical localization of enamelin in enamel formationand mineralization. METHODS: Tissue sections of the first mandibular molar tooth germ from 1, 3, 7, 10, 14 days rats after birth were prepared, expression of the enamelin protein was identified by immunohistochemical technique. RESULTS: Enamelin was found in the cytoplasm of ameloblasts in 1-10 days old rat postnatal first mandibular molar tooth germs. Enamelin appeared weakly in the tooth germs of 1 day rats. From 3 to 10 days, enamelin localized both in the cytoplasm of ameloblasts and the uncalcified enamel from the dentino-enamel junction to surfaces of the tooth. Enamelin protein was negative in the tooth germs of 14 days rats postnatally. CONCLUSION: Enamelin protein is synthesised and secreted by ameloblasts, specially localized in enamel from DEJ to surfaces of the tooth, suggesting that enamelin has important roles in enamel formation.

Lv P; Gao XJ; Gao Y; Jia HT

2007-02-01

275

ESR Dosimetry for Atomic Bomb Survivors Using Shell Buttons and Tooth Enamel  

Science.gov (United States)

Atomic bomb radiation doses to humans at Nagasaki and Hiroshima are investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) from shell buttons and tooth enamel voluntarily supplied by survivors. A shell button gives a dose of 2.1± 0.2 Gy with ESR signals at g=2.001 and g=1.997 while the signal at g=1.997 for the tooth enamel of the same person is 1.9± 0.5 Gy. Other teeth show doses from about 0.5 Gy to 3 Gy. An apparent shielding converted to a concrete thickness is given using the T65D calculated in 1965. Teeth extracted during dental treatment should be preserved for cumulative radiation dosimetry.

Ikeya, Motoji; Miyajima, Junko; Okajima, Shunzo

1984-09-01

276

Single-tooth replacement: bridge vs. implant-supported restoration.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Options for restoring a single tooth include fixed partial denture, resin-bonded restoration and single-tooth implant. In this paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these methods and factors that must be considered when choosing between them for the replacement of a single tooth. Although in some cases a fixed partial denture is the most appropriate choice, implants have the advantage of allowing preservation of the integrity of sound teeth adjacent to the edentulous area.

Hebel K; Gajjar R; Hofstede T

2000-09-01

277

Single-tooth replacement: bridge vs. implant-supported restoration.  

Science.gov (United States)

Options for restoring a single tooth include fixed partial denture, resin-bonded restoration and single-tooth implant. In this paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these methods and factors that must be considered when choosing between them for the replacement of a single tooth. Although in some cases a fixed partial denture is the most appropriate choice, implants have the advantage of allowing preservation of the integrity of sound teeth adjacent to the edentulous area. PMID:11040527

Hebel, K; Gajjar, R; Hofstede, T

2000-09-01

278

Instrumental selection of tooth color in prosthodontic rehabilitation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Tooth color selection in prosthodontics is a very important factor for successful rehabilitation. The aim of this paper was to present different instruments for tooth color selection in prosthodontic rehabilitation. Knowledge of basic principles of a complex psychophysical phenomenon such as color is of essential interest in prosthodontic therapy. Furthemore, the mechanism of physiological perception of color and available methods for an objective determination of tooth color are also presented in the paper.

?uriši? Slobodan; Mili?-Lemi? Aleksandra; Obradovi?-?uri?i? Kosovka; Popovi? Olga

2007-01-01

279

Tooth-shaped plasmonic waveguide filters with nanometeric sizes  

CERN Document Server

A novel nanometeric plasmonic filter in a tooth-shaped Metal-Insulator-Metal waveguide is proposed and demonstrated numerically. An analytic model based on the scattering matrix method is given. The result reveals that the single tooth-shaped filter has a wavelength filtering characteristic and an ultra-compact size in the length of a few hundred nanometers, compared to grating-like SPPs filters. Both analytic and simulation results show that the wavelength of the trough of the transmission has linear and nonlinear relationships with the tooth depth and the tooth width, respectively. The waveguide filter could be utilized to develop ultra-compact photonic filters for high integration.

Lin, Xianshi; 10.1364/OL.33.002874

2009-01-01

280

Tooth positioners and their effects on treatment outcome.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Malocclusion can also be corrected by means of clear removable appliances called as "tooth positioners" or "aligners". A tooth positioner is used to control settling and to minimize or eliminate relapse of the teeth after an orthodontic treatment. In this article, a complete review of the objectives, course of treatment, fabrication, and the materials used for fabrication of tooth positioners along with their importance and disadvantages were discussed. Tooth positioners did improve the overall orthodontic treatment outcome as quantified by the ABO (American Board of orthodontics) objective scoring method. But once the initial occlusal contact was achieved, the vertical movement of teeth was found to be inhibited.

Pravindevaprasad A; Therese BA

2013-07-01

 
 
 
 
281

[Research progress on gene involved in tooth agenesis].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Tooth agenesis, belonging to the abnormal tooth development, is a common disease in clinic. The disease not only affects the person's chewing function, but also influences the pronunciation, appearance and mental health. In the past, genetic linkage and molecular biology research have made clear of part of the genetic mutations' sites of the syndromic and non-syndromic tooth agenesis. Although the mechanism was not clear yet, but the important mutations are now known to be involved in many factors. Thesyndromic and non-syndromic tooth agenesis related gene are reviewed in this paper.

Li L; Zhang B; Zhao Z

2013-08-01

282

Tooth-marked small theropod bone: an extremely rare trace  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Tooth-marked dinosaur bones provide insight into feeding behaviours and biting strategies of theropod dinosaurs. The majority of theropod tooth marks reported to date have been found on herbivorous dinosaur bones, although some tyrannosaurid bones with tooth marks have also been reported. In 1988 a partial skeleton of the dromaeosaurid Saurornitholestes was collected from southern Alberta, Canada, that bore marks on one dentary. The location and morphology of the tooth marks suggests that a theropod (possible a juvenile tyrannosaurid) included a Saurornitholestes in its diet.

Jacobsen, Aase Roland

2001-01-01

283

A 10-year prospective study of single tooth implants placed in the anterior maxilla.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the biological and technical outcomes of early and delayed placed single tooth implants after 10 years of follow-up. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients who needed a single tooth replacement in the anterior maxilla were included in this study. Ten implants were placed with an early placement protocol, that is, 4 weeks after tooth extraction, whereas the other 10 implants were placed with a conventional delayed placement protocol, for example, 12 weeks after tooth extraction. At the baseline and at the annual re-examinations, pain from implant regions, mobility, plaque, mucositis, and marginal bone levels were recorded. Biological and technical complications were registered. The patients evaluated the functional and aesthetic outcomes subjectively on a visual analogue scale after 3 and 10 years. RESULTS: All implants were still in situ after 10 years. The cumulative implant survival rate was 100%. Two implant-supported crowns were remade because of ceramic fractures. The 10-year crown survival rate was 90%. No significant differences in implant survival rates were found between the early and delayed protocols, regarding plaque retention, mucositis, or marginal bone levels. After 10 years, the mean marginal bone loss at both sides of the implants was less than 1.0 mm in the two groups. During the 10-year interval, 1 patient lost more than 1.5 mm of marginal bone, 3 patients lost between 1.0 mm and 1.4 mm of bone, and 16 patients lost less than 1.0 mm of bone as an average of the mesial and distal bone loss. CONCLUSIONS: This 10-year prospective clinical trial demonstrated a 100% implant survival and a 90% crown survival. The average marginal bone level change was less than 1 mm, and there was no difference between early and delayed implant placement. Patient satisfaction with the implant-supported single crowns reduced with time.

Gotfredsen K

2012-03-01

284

Gene Expression Profiling during Murine Tooth Development.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn), amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx), and enamelin (Enam) during early (pre-secretory) tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24?h intervals, starting at the 11th embryonic day (E11.5), and up to the 7th day after birth (P7). The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx, and Enam). Microarray results where validated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), and translated proteins identified by Western-blotting. In situ localization of the Ambn, Amelx, and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially expressed (DE; p???0.05) genes. Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx, and Enam to be significant DE throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0) increasing after birth (P1-P7). Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. These mRNAs were expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx, and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western-blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around 35 genes were associated with 15 transcription factors. PMID:22866057

Landin, Maria A Dos Santos Silva; Shabestari, Maziar; Babaie, Eshrat; Reseland, Janne E; Osmundsen, Harald

2012-07-31

285

Gene Expression Profiling during Murine Tooth Development.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to describe the expression of genes, including ameloblastin (Ambn), amelogenin X chromosome (Amelx), and enamelin (Enam) during early (pre-secretory) tooth development. The expression of these genes has predominantly been studied at post-secretory stages. Deoxyoligonucleotide microarrays were used to study gene expression during development of the murine first molar tooth germ at 24?h intervals, starting at the 11th embryonic day (E11.5), and up to the 7th day after birth (P7). The profile search function of Spotfire software was used to select genes with similar expression profile as the enamel genes (Ambn, Amelx, and Enam). Microarray results where validated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), and translated proteins identified by Western-blotting. In situ localization of the Ambn, Amelx, and Enam mRNAs were monitored from E12.5 to E17.5 using deoxyoligonucleotide probes. Bioinformatics analysis was used to associate biological functions with differentially expressed (DE; p???0.05) genes. Microarray results showed a total of 4362 genes including Ambn, Amelx, and Enam to be significant DE throughout the time-course. The expression of the three enamel genes was low at pre-natal stages (E11.5-P0) increasing after birth (P1-P7). Profile search lead to isolation of 87 genes with significantly similar expression to the three enamel proteins. These mRNAs were expressed in dental epithelium and epithelium derived cells. Although expression of Ambn, Amelx, and Enam were lower during early tooth development compared to secretory stages enamel proteins were detectable by Western-blotting. Bioinformatic analysis associated the 87 genes with multiple biological functions. Around 35 genes were associated with 15 transcription factors.

Landin MA; Shabestari M; Babaie E; Reseland JE; Osmundsen H

2012-01-01

286

Impacted Primary Tooth and Tooth Agenesis: A Case Report of Monozygotic Twins  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the present report, a case of 19 year-old monozygotic twin brothers with similar tooth agenesis and impacted primary teeth is presented. Both twins (HDH, DHH) had agenesis of ten and eleven teeth (respectively), third molars excluded, consistent with oligodontia and both had four impacted primary...

Zengin, A. Zeynep; Sumer, A. Pinar; Karaarslan, Emine

287

Summary of: tooth loss and osteoporosis: to assess the association between osteoporosis status and tooth number.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Osteopenia and osteoporosis are conditions characterised by a reduction in bone mineral density. There is contradictory evidence whether osteoporotic patients have greater tooth loss than non-osteoporotic patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between tooth number and osteoporotic status, taking into account the effect of other confounding variables such as age, smoking status, alcohol consumption and the use of hormone replacement therapy. SETTING: Three hundred and fifty-nine patients were recruited from the Manchester region between March 2008 and June 2010. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Data were collected on osteoporotic status, smoking status, alcohol consumption, age and the use of hormone replacement therapy. Dental panoramic tomographs were taken for each patient and the teeth present were charted and counted. Data were analysed using SPSS software (version 19). RESULTS: Complete data was available for 333 patients. Twenty-seven percent of individuals (90) were classified as osteoporotic. There was a significant relationship between molar tooth number and osteoporotic status (p = 0.017, 95% CI -1.339 to -0.137). CONCLUSION: Clinicians should inform osteoporotic patients they may be at greater risk of tooth loss and instigate more intensive preventive regimens for these individuals.

Brunton P

2013-02-01

288

Tooth loss and osteoporosis: to assess the association between osteoporosis status and tooth number.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Osteopenia and osteoporosis are conditions characterised by a reduction in bone mineral density. There is contradictory evidence whether osteoporotic patients have greater tooth loss than non-osteoporotic patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between tooth number and osteoporotic status, taking into account the effect of other confounding variables such as age, smoking status, alcohol consumption and the use of hormone replacement therapy. SETTING: Three hundred and fifty-nine patients were recruited from the Manchester region between March 2008 and June 2010. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Data were collected on osteoporotic status, smoking status, alcohol consumption, age and the use of hormone replacement therapy. Dental panoramic tomographs were taken for each patient and the teeth present were charted and counted. Data were analysed using SPSS software (version 19). RESULTS: Complete data was available for 333 patients. Twenty-seven percent of individuals (90) were classified as osteoporotic. There was a significant relationship between molar tooth number and osteoporotic status (p = 0.017, 95% CI -1.339 to -0.137). CONCLUSION: Clinicians should inform osteoporotic patients they may be at greater risk of tooth loss and instigate more intensive preventive regimens for these individuals.

Darcey J; Horner K; Walsh T; Southern H; Marjanovic EJ; Devlin H

2013-02-01

289

Saw tooth patello--femoral arthritis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Four patients with an unusual form of patello-femoral arthritis are described. The characteristic feature of the condition is an erosive 'saw tooth' pattern characteristically seen on both sides of the joint. Radiologically, this pattern is best seen on the skyline view. The other principal features are a lamellar-like pattern on slightly oblique lateral views, a smooth supra patellar erosion of the femur seen on the lateral view and cortical ridging of the lateral femoral condyle seen 'en face' on the AP projection. A possible mechanism to account for the radiological features is proposed. Anbarasu, A., Loughran, C. F. (2000). Clinical Radiology55, 767-769.

Anbarasu A; Loughran CF

2000-10-01

290

The role of BMP4 in HERS during tooth root development  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Tooth development is regulated by reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Several morphological studies suggest that growth factors secreted from these cells regulate tooth development. These growth factors induce undifferentiated cells in the tooth germ to differentiate in...

Jung, HS; Hosoya, A; Kim, JY; Cho, SW

291

Effect of tooth isolation on laser Doppler readings.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To measure differences between single (STI) and multiple teeth isolation (MTI), pulpal blood flow (PBF) was assessed using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). METHODOLOGY: Pulpal blood flow of twenty maxillary incisors with no restorations or abnormal responses to sensitivity tests in healthy patients between 24 and 42 years of age was measured in perfusion units (PU). STI (isolation of only the tooth undergoing blood flow assessment) and MTI (isolation including the maxillary right to the maxillary left canine) recordings were taken with regular blood flow (RBF) and with local infiltration (LI) with vasoconstrictor. anova and Tukey HSD tests were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean PBF with regular blood flow conditions was significantly different between single tooth isolation [5.53 PU (SD ± 2.98)] and multiple tooth isolation [2.85 PU (SD ± 2.13)] (P < 0.01). When local anaesthesia was administered (LI), the PBF was significantly different between single tooth isolation [2.95 PU (SD ± 2.48)] and multiple tooth isolation [1.32 PU (SD ± 0.70)] (P < 0.05). Significant differences in PBF also existed between single tooth isolation under regular blood flow conditions and with local anaesthesia (P < 0.01), between single tooth isolation under regular blood flow conditions and multiple tooth isolation with local anaesthesia (P < 0.01), and between multiple tooth isolation under regular blood flow conditions and with local anaesthesia (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Pulpal blood flow measurements could be obtained with multiple teeth isolation and single tooth isolation. Multiple teeth isolation blocked signal contamination better. Single tooth isolation provided significantly different readings for regular blood flow and LI conditions and may therefore provide an option for pulpal blood flow assessment with LDF.

Setzer FC; Challagulla P; Kataoka SH; Trope M

2013-06-01

292

Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration.  

Science.gov (United States)

In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/?-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry. PMID:23422830

Fraser, Gareth J; Bloomquist, Ryan F; Streelman, J Todd

2013-02-17

293

Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/?-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry.

Fraser GJ; Bloomquist RF; Streelman JT

2013-05-01

294

Microhardness and chemical composition of human tooth  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Hardness of human tooth, both in enamel and dentin, has been measured at different sites using a Vicker's diamond. In this work we show that these values are almost constant all along the enamel and dentin thicknesses. Indentations were done from outer enamel surface to inner dentin layer, going through the enamel-dentin junction, both in transverse and longitudinal samples. Geometrical well-shape indentation uniformity was checked both with light and with scanning electron microscopes, and the chemical composition of the tooth was analyzed with characteristic X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Hardness measurements were in the range from 270 to 360 VHN for enamel and 50 to 60 VHN for dentin. Cervical zone in longitudinal section showed the lowest value while in transverse sections the highest. All the hardness values were statically significative. Tour results indicate that the difference between enamel and dentin hardness has nothing to do with the content of Na, Cl and Mg, but the percentage of organic and inorganic materials in enamel and dentin.

Maria del Pilar Gutiérrez-Salazar; Jorge Reyes-Gasga

2003-01-01

295

Hierarchical structure and biomineralization in cricket tooth  

CERN Multimedia

Cricket is a truculent insect with stiff and sharp teeth as a fighting weapon. The structure and possible biomineralization of the cricket teeth are always interested. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering techniques were used to probe the element distribution, possible crystalline structures and size distribution of scatterers in cricket teeth. Scanning electron microscope was used to observe the nanoscaled structure. The results demonstrate that Zn is the main heavy element in cricket teeth. The surface of the cricket teeth has a crystalline compound like ZnFe2(AsO4)2(OH)2(H2O)4. While, the interior of the teeth has a crystalline compound like ZnCl2, which is from the biomineralization. The ZnCl2-like biomineral forms nanoscaled microfibrils and their axial direction points at the top of tooth cusp. The microfibrils aggregate random into intermediate filaments, forming a hierarchical structure. A sketch map of the cricket tooth cusp was proposed and a d...

Xing, Xueqing; Cai, Quan; Mo, Guang; Du, Rong; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

2012-01-01

296

Intrauterine hormone effects on tooth dimensions.  

Science.gov (United States)

The human dentition is a complex adaptive system that is influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Within this system, is sexual dimorphism related to the growth promotion of the Y chromosome, or to hormonal influences, or both? This study is the first to investigate both primary and permanent tooth sizes in females from opposite-sex dizygotic (DZOS) twin pairs compared with females from dizygotic same-sex (DZSS) and monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs to indicate the influence of intrauterine male hormone, including the initial testosterone surge, on dental development. Serial dental models of the primary, mixed, and permanent dentitions of 134 females from DZOS, DZSS, and MZ twins were examined. Mesiodistal, buccolingual, crown height, and intercuspal dimensions of all primary teeth and selected permanent teeth were determined by image analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed statistically significantly larger crown size in DZOS females in both dentitions, with the crown height dimensions displaying the greatest increase in size. These findings strongly support the Twin Testosterone Transfer (TTT) hypothesis. We propose that the growth-promoting effects of the Y chromosome and intrauterine male hormone levels influence different tooth dimensions and contribute differentially to the sexual dimorphism of human teeth. PMID:23549090

Ribeiro, D C; Brook, A H; Hughes, T E; Sampson, W J; Townsend, G C

2013-04-02

297

Nephritis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: an unusual association.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A 24 years old male, who presented to us with uraemic symptoms secondary to chronic glomerulonephritis. On examination, he was found to have features of peripheral neuropathy which was confirmed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 on nerve conduction studies. Very few cases of glomerular disease, mainly focal segmental glomerulosclerosis have been associated with the Charcot-Marie-Tooth worldwide.

Baloch UT; Kiani IG; Butt GU; Masroor I; Khan SJ; Badshah M

2012-04-01

298

Characteristics of Rotary Electromagnet with Large Tooth-pitch Angle  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Since the conventional electro-mechanical converter of 2D valve had problems of step lose due to its small tooth-pitch angle, a novel rotary electromagnet with large tooth-pitch angle and coreless rotor structure was proposed. Combined with the approaches of magnetic circuit analysis, finit...

Meng Bin; Ruan Jian; Li Sheng

299

Patients' self-perceived impacts and prosthodontic needs at the time and after tooth loss  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Estudos de autopercepção têm demonstrado que a ausência de dentes pode resultar em impactos estéticos, funcionais, psicológicos e sociais, embora nem todos os indivíduos demandam por tratamento protético imediato após a perda dentária. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a percepção de pacientes submetidos a exodontia em relação a fatores associados à perda e ao tratamento protético, no momento e após a perda dos dentes. Uma amostra de conveniência de 211 p (more) acientes consecutivos foi avaliada quanto à condição clínica, autopercepção dos impactos orais e necessidade de tratamento, por meio de exame clínico e questionário, no momento e após 3 meses da exodontia. A percepção de impactos da perda dentária foi alta (21-76% no momento e 35-87% após a exodontia). Dos 72,5% pacientes que relataram pretender a reposição protética imediata apenas 8,1% realizaram o tratamento. A motivação financeira foi relatada como o maior impedimento para o tratamento. A análise univariada mostrou associação entre reposição imediata e localização anterior da perda (p=0,00) e extensão do espaço desdentado (p=0,01), entre localização da perda e limitação funcional percebida (p=0,03). O incômodo com a aparência foi relacionado à localização da perda no arco superior (p=0,02), o desejo por tratamento protético foi relacionado à extensão do espaço desdentado (p=0,05). Na maioria dos aspectos avaliados a percepção de problemas associados à perda foi maior no sexo feminino. Conclui-se que, embora a necessidade percebida de tratamento protético seja alta, fatores clínicos e sócio-econômicos são determinantes para a realização do tratamento. Abstract in english Studies on self-perception have demonstrated that tooth loss is associated with esthetic, functional, psychological and social impacts for individuals. However, not all subjects seek treatment immediately after tooth loss, even when desire for replacement is strongly expressed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of patients submitted to tooth extraction about factors associated with tooth loss and prosthodontic treatment, at the time and after extraction (more) . A convenience sample of 211 consecutive patients were clinically evaluated and answered to a questionnaire about perceived impacts and prosthodontic treatment needs. Data were collected at the time of extraction and after a 3-month time interval. Perceived impacts were high (21 to 76% at the time and 35 to 87% after extraction). From 72.5% patients who expressed intention of immediate replacement of edentulous spaces, only 8.1% had actually been treated. Financial limitation was considered the most important factor that restricted access to treatment. Bivariate statistical analysis showed association between immediate dental replacement and anterior tooth loss (p=0.00) and extension of edentulous space (p=0.01). Position of lost teeth was associated to perceived functional limitation (p=0.03). Worsened appearance was associated to tooth loss in the maxillary arch (p=0.02), and desire of prosthodontic treatment was associated to the extension of edentulous space (p=0.05). Perceived impacts were more frequent in women than men. It was concluded that although patients usually expressed prosthodontic treatment needs, clinical and financial issues are determinant factors for tooth replacement.

Teófilo, Linéia Tavares; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues

2007-01-01

300

Factors related to the rate of orthodontically induced tooth movement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to investigate the variations of orthodontically induced tooth movement in the maxillary and mandibular arches between patients and the factors such as age, sex, and presence of an interference that might influence the amount of tooth displacement. METHODS: By using a standardized experimental orthodontic tooth movement in 30 subjects, 57 premolars were moved buccally during 8 weeks with the application of a 1-N force. Forty-four contralateral premolars not subjected to orthodontic tooth movement served as the controls. Plaster models from before and after the experimental tooth movement were digitized and superimposed to evaluate the amounts of tooth movement. Differences in tooth movement between the experimental and control groups were tested by an unpaired t test. For the experimental teeth, subject-related factors (age and sex) and tooth-related factors (location in the maxillary or mandibular dental arch, and the presence or absence of an intra-arch or interarch obstacle such as neighboring touching teeth or teeth interfering with the occlusion) were examined with analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine correlations between tooth displacement, age, sex, tooth location, and presence of an interference. RESULTS: Each subject contributed at least 2 experimental premolars and 1 control premolar. The displacement of the orthodontically moved teeth was 2.42 mm (range, 0.3-5.8 mm). Younger subjects (<16 years; n = 19; number of teeth, 36) had significantly greater amounts of tooth displacement compared with older subjects (?16 years; n = 11; number of teeth, 21): 2.6 ± 1.3 mm vs 1.8 ± 0.8 mm; P <0.01. When an interarch or intra-arch obstacle was present, the amount of tooth movement was significantly less (2.6 ± 1.3 mm vs 1.8 ± 0.8 mm) (P <0.05). Neither sex nor the location of the experimental teeth in the mandible or the maxilla had any effect. CONCLUSIONS: Younger patients showed greater tooth movement velocity than did older ones. An interarch or intra-arch obstacle decreased the amount of tooth displacement.

Dudic A; Giannopoulou C; Kiliaridis S

2013-05-01

 
 
 
 
301

Tooth agenesis: from molecular genetics to molecular dentistry.  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth agenesis may originate from either genetic or environmental factors. Genetically determined hypodontic disorders appear as isolated features or as part of a syndrome. Msx1, Pax9, and Axin2 are involved in non-syndromic hypodontia, while genes such as Shh, Pitx2, Irf6, and p63 are considered to participate in syndromic genetic disorders, which include tooth agenesis. In dentistry, artificial tooth implants represent a common solution to tooth loss problems; however, molecular dentistry offers promising solutions for the future. In this paper, the genetic and molecular bases of non-syndromic and syndromic hypodontia are reviewed, and the advantages and disadvantages of tissue engineering in the clinical treatment of tooth agenesis are discussed. PMID:18573979

Matalova, E; Fleischmannova, J; Sharpe, P T; Tucker, A S

2008-07-01

302

Fracture in teeth: a diagnostic for inferring bite force and tooth function.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Teeth are brittle and highly susceptible to cracking. We propose that observations of such cracking can be used as a diagnostic tool for predicting bite force and inferring tooth function in living and fossil mammals. Laboratory tests on model tooth structures and extracted human teeth in simulated biting identify the principal fracture modes in enamel. Examination of museum specimens reveals the presence of similar fractures in a wide range of vertebrates, suggesting that cracks extended during ingestion or mastication. The use of 'fracture mechanics' from materials engineering provides elegant relations for quantifying critical bite forces in terms of characteristic tooth size and enamel thickness. The role of enamel microstructure in determining how cracks initiate and propagate within the enamel (and beyond) is discussed. The picture emerges of teeth as damage-tolerant structures, full of internal weaknesses and defects and yet able to contain the expansion of seemingly precarious cracks and fissures within the enamel shell. How the findings impact on dietary pressures forms an undercurrent of the study.

Lee JJ; Constantino PJ; Lucas PW; Lawn BR

2011-11-01

303

The 4th international comparison on EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper presents the results of the 4th International Comparison of in vitro electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel, where the performance parameters of tooth enamel dosimetry methods were compared among sixteen laboratories from all over the world. The participating laboratories were asked to determine a calibration curve with a set of tooth enamel powder samples provided by the organizers. Nine molar teeth extracted following medical indication from German donors and collected between 1997 and 2007 were prepared and irradiated at the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen. Five out of six samples were irradiated at 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 Gy air kerma; and one unirradiated sample was kept as control. The doses delivered to the individual samples were unknown to the participants, who were asked to measure each sample nine times, and to report the EPR signal response, the mass of aliquots measured, and the parameters of EPR signal acquisition and signal evaluation. Critical dose and detection limit were calculated by the organizers on the basis of the calibration-curve parameters obtained at every laboratory. For calibration curves obtained by measuring every calibration sample three times, the mean value of the detection limit was 205 mGy, ranging from 56 to 649 mGy. The participants were also invited to provide the signal response and the nominal dose of their current dose calibration curve (wherever available), the critical dose and detection limit of which were also calculated by the organizers.

2011-01-01

304

Tooth discolouration: staining effects of various sealers and medicaments.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this investigation was to quantify the discolouration of tooth roots caused by various medicaments and sealers. The roots of extracted teeth were chemo-mechanically prepared and the smear layer removed. The roots were filled with either Multi-Cal (Pulpdent Corporation, Watertown, MA, USA), Ledermix (Lederle Laboratories, Wolfratshausen, Germany), 2% chlorhexadine acetate in polyethylene glycol (PEG), 5% clindamycin in PEG, PEG alone (as a vehicle control), sealers AH26 (De Trey Dentsply, Zurich, Switzerland), AH Plus (De Trey Dentsply), an experimental epoxy resin with zirconium dioxide (Millenium Chemicals, Rockingham, Western Australia) or Araldite (Selleys Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia). The roots were maintained at 37°C in dark humid conditions and standardised images of the coronal surfaces recorded over 12 months. Ledermix caused the most darkening of the introduced medicaments, while calcium hydroxide and the materials in PEG did not cause darkening. AH26 caused more darkening than did the other sealers. It was concluded that the use of alternatives to Ledermix and AH26 should be considered when aesthetics are important.

Thomson AD; Athanassiadis B; Kahler B; Walsh L

2012-04-01

305

Tooth discolouration: staining effects of various sealers and medicaments.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this investigation was to quantify the discolouration of tooth roots caused by various medicaments and sealers. The roots of extracted teeth were chemo-mechanically prepared and the smear layer removed. The roots were filled with either Multi-Cal (Pulpdent Corporation, Watertown, MA, USA), Ledermix (Lederle Laboratories, Wolfratshausen, Germany), 2% chlorhexadine acetate in polyethylene glycol (PEG), 5% clindamycin in PEG, PEG alone (as a vehicle control), sealers AH26 (De Trey Dentsply, Zurich, Switzerland), AH Plus (De Trey Dentsply), an experimental epoxy resin with zirconium dioxide (Millenium Chemicals, Rockingham, Western Australia) or Araldite (Selleys Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia). The roots were maintained at 37°C in dark humid conditions and standardised images of the coronal surfaces recorded over 12 months. Ledermix caused the most darkening of the introduced medicaments, while calcium hydroxide and the materials in PEG did not cause darkening. AH26 caused more darkening than did the other sealers. It was concluded that the use of alternatives to Ledermix and AH26 should be considered when aesthetics are important. PMID:22432819

Thomson, Andrew David; Athanassiadis, Basil; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence

2012-04-01

306

Collagen analysis in human tooth germ papillae  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese A matriz extracelular (MEC) tem um papel importante na regulação do crescimento e na diferenciação e organização dos tecidos. Com base nestes aspectos o objetivo do deste estudo foi analisar o colágeno, maior componente orgânico da MEC da polpa dentária, na papila de germes dentários humanos, em diferentes fases do desenvolvimento. Foram obtidos fragmentos de maxilas e mandíbulas de 9 fetos humanos com 10 a 22 semanas de vida intra-uterina, dos quais foram anal (more) isados 16 germes dentários (1 em estágio de capuz, 8 em estágio de campânula precoce e 7 em estágio de campânula tardia). Secções histológicas seriadas foram coradas com hematoxilina e eosina, tricrômico de Masson e técnica de coloração do picrosirius. Ambos os tipos de colágeno na papila dentária foram somente detectados pela técnica de coloração do picrosirius usando microscopia de luz polarizada. Colágeno tipo III foi detectado em todas as amostras. Colágeno tipo I estava presente em áreas focais da papila dental em algumas amostras. Concluiu-se que o colágeno tipo III mostrou-se um componente regular da papila de germes dentários humanos, enquanto o colágeno tipo I esteve presente em quantidade significativamente menor. Abstract in english The extracellular matrix (ECM) performs a very important role in growth regulation and tissue differentiation and organization. In view of this, the purpose of this study was to analyze the collagen, the major organic component of dental pulp ECM, in papillae of human tooth germs in different developmental phases. The maxillas and mandibles of 9 human fetuses ranging from 10 to 22 weeks of intrauterine life were removed and 16 tooth germs (1 in the cap stage, 8 in the ear (more) ly bell stage and 7 in the late bell stage) were obtained. The pieces were processed for histological analysis and stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's Trichrome and picrosirius staining technique. Both types of collagen in the dental papilla were only detected by the picrosirius staining technique under polarized light microscopy. Type III collagen was detected in all specimens. Type I collagen was present in focal areas of the dental papilla only in some specimens. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed that type III collagen is a regular component of the papillae of human tooth germs whereas type I collagen is present in a significantly lesser amount.

Abrahão, Ivete Jorge; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Katayama, Emílio; Antoniazzi, João Humberto; Segmentilli, Angelo; Marques, Márcia Martins

2006-01-01

307

Enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth en un niño Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in a child  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Se presenta el caso clínico de un niño de 7 años de edad con enfermedad de Charcot Marie Tooth, atendido en el Servicio de Rehabilitación del Hospital Infantil Norte Docente "Dr. Juan de la Cruz Martínez Maceira" de Santiago de Cuba para recibir tratamiento rehabilitador. Luego del programa terapéutico aplicado el paciente mejoró el trofismo y la fuerza muscular, disminuyeron las deformidades del pie y ocurrieron importantes cambios en la marcha, de modo que la rehabilitación oportuna evitó el tratamiento quirúrgico.The case of a 7 year-old boy with Charcot- Marie-Tooth disease, who was attended at the Rehabilitation Department of "Dr. Juan de la Cruz Martínez Maceira" Northern Teaching Children Hospital in Santiago de Cuba for rehabilitation treatment is reported. After receiving a therapeutic program the patient improved his muscle strenght and trophism, foot deformities decreased and significant changes occurred in gait, so that timely rehabilitation prevented surgical treatment.

Teresa Vidal Pérez; Katiuska Ragolta Mógrave; Hilda Alicia Jhones Cabrales; Pastor Perdomo Veranes; Manuel Uriarte Gómez

2012-01-01

308

Restoration of a vertical tooth fracture and a badly mutilated tooth using canal projection  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Management of vertically fractured tooth or a perforation frequently poses problem during endodontic management. Such teeth often need a pre-endodontic restoration prior to initiation of root canal therapy to aid in the placement of rubber dam clamp. This paper describes a simple method of placement of a pre-endodontic restoration using the canal projection technique using hollow metallic needles as sleeves.

Velmurugan N; Bhargavi N; Neelima Lakshmi; Kandaswamy D

2007-01-01

309

Abrasive Wear of Digger Tooth Steel  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The influence of silicon carbide SiC abrasive particles of 20, 30, 40, 50 and60?m size on carburized digger tooth steel was studied. Four types of steel, withdifferent hardness, were tested at two constant linear sliding speeds and undervarious loads of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50N. Tests were carried out for sliding time of0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5min. Experimental results showed that there wasconsistent reduction in abrasive wear as the hardness of the materials wasincreased. It was found that wear increased with the increase of applied load,linear sliding speed and sliding time. Also, it was noticed that the wear increasedwith increase in abrasive particle size, and the most effective size was 40 ?m.SEM observations of the worm surface showed that the cutting and ploughingwere the dominant abrasive wear mechanisms.

Hussein Sarhan sarhan, Nofal Al-Araji, Rateb Issa , Mohammad Alia

2011-01-01

310

An ectopic tooth concealing an odontogenic myxoma.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This case report presents a 13-year-old girl who attended an orthodontic clinic for an ectopic UR5. After investigation, a diagnosis of an odontogenic myxoma was made and the tumour was excised. A panoramic radiograph taken almost two years earlier for another dental problem was found to show an ectopic UR5 associated with a subtle radiolucency. Odontogenic myxomas may be of higher frequency than once thought in the paediatric population and therefore should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of any intraosseous radiolucency. Any radiolucent area associated with an unerupted tooth should be investigated further or closely followed up. Clinical Relevance: The odontogenic myxoma is a rare but potentially serious benign tumour of the jaws.

Singh P; Davies HT

2013-01-01

311

Unusual intraosseous transmigration of impacted tooth  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

[en] Transmigration of an impacted tooth through the symphyseal suture is a rare and special developmental anomaly of unknown etiology that is unique to the mandibular canine. Maxillary canine transmigration is even rarer. Transmigrated canines are particularly significant due to the aesthetic and functional importance. A maxillary lateral incisor crossing the mid-palatal suture has never been reported in the literature. The aim of this report is to present the first case of simultaneous transmigration of a lateral incisor and canine in the maxilla. The paper also reports four unusual cases of unilateral canine transmigration in the maxilla and mandible and successful eruption of one of the transmigrated mandibular canines following orthodontic traction. Etiology of transmigration and its clinical considerations are also discussed.

2012-01-01

312

Unusual intraosseous transmigration of impacted tooth  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Transmigration of an impacted tooth through the symphyseal suture is a rare and special developmental anomaly of unknown etiology that is unique to the mandibular canine. Maxillary canine transmigration is even rarer. Transmigrated canines are particularly significant due to the aesthetic and functional importance. A maxillary lateral incisor crossing the mid-palatal suture has never been reported in the literature. The aim of this report is to present the first case of simultaneous transmigration of a lateral incisor and canine in the maxilla. The paper also reports four unusual cases of unilateral canine transmigration in the maxilla and mandible and successful eruption of one of the transmigrated mandibular canines following orthodontic traction. Etiology of transmigration and its clinical considerations are also discussed.

Kumar, Santosh; Urala, Arun Srinivas; Kamath, Abhay Taranath; Jayaswal, Priyanka; Valiathan, Ashima [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (India)

2012-03-15

313

[Correlation between the phenotype and genotype of tooth agenesis patients by tooth agenesis code].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the correlation between the phenotype and genotype of tooth agenesis using the tooth agenesis code (TAC) and the traditional descriptor for missing teeth. METHODS: Patients with isolated hypodontia caused by PAX9 or MSX1 mutation reported before May 2007 were enrolled. The teeth missing rate and TAC code were recorded. The missing teeth patterns caused by the two mutations were compared. RESULTS: The teeth missing rates in each teeth positions were significantly different between maxillary and mandibular except maxillary central incisor, lateral incisor and mandibular canine, first molar (P<0.05, P<0.001). MSX1 gene mutation often led to the loss of maxillary first premolar, maxillary second premolar, and mandibular second premolar, while PAX9 gene mutation often led to the loss of the first, second, and third molars. The results were similar when analyzed either by TAC code analysis or by traditional descriptor. CONCLUSIONS: PAX9 and MSX1 gene mutation can cause different phenotypes of tooth agenesis. The TAC code can be used in the analysis of the correlation between phenotype and genotype of the missing teeth patients.

Gong Y; Feng HL; He HY; Ge YJ

2010-06-01

314

Tooth-implant connection: a bibliographic review.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to carry out a bibliographic review of all available literature addressing the issue of whether or not the connection of teeth to implants by means of a prosthesis is a viable treatment alternative. Twenty articles from a variety of sources were analyzed and classified in order to draw conclusions. Articles were classified by type and an analysis was made of the different variables considered in each study, obtaining percentages of implant survival ranging from 84.4% to 100%, prosthetic complications ranging from 80% to 90%, and the incidence of dental intrusion ranging from 0 to 5.6%. Biomechanical studies: Some articles studied models in order to assess different connections subjected to force, in which varying results were obtained. Rigid connections appeared to produce the most stress to the natural tooth, periodontal ligament and peri-implant bone; non-rigid connections reduced the stress to the bone, but increased stress to the prosthesis. Clinical studies: The results obtained were disparate. Studies in the medium or short-term show this as a viable treatment alternative, whereas some studies point to a greater risk of complications, although the use of rigid connection decreases the percentage of intrusion. Other bibliographic reviews have concluded that there is a need for more longitudinal studies on the viability of tooth-implant connection, also concluding that complications are greater when this is the chosen treatment. As a viable alternative with an acceptable success rate, this course of treatment is always associated with rigid connection rather than non-rigid connection. Although intrusion is avoided with rigid connection, this nevertheless remains inadvisable as the primary treatment choice. PMID:19767705

Hita-Carrillo, Celso; Hernández-Aliaga, Manuel; Calvo-Guirado, Jose-Luis

2010-03-01

315

Tooth-implant connection: a bibliographic review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to carry out a bibliographic review of all available literature addressing the issue of whether or not the connection of teeth to implants by means of a prosthesis is a viable treatment alternative. Twenty articles from a variety of sources were analyzed and classified in order to draw conclusions. Articles were classified by type and an analysis was made of the different variables considered in each study, obtaining percentages of implant survival ranging from 84.4% to 100%, prosthetic complications ranging from 80% to 90%, and the incidence of dental intrusion ranging from 0 to 5.6%. Biomechanical studies: Some articles studied models in order to assess different connections subjected to force, in which varying results were obtained. Rigid connections appeared to produce the most stress to the natural tooth, periodontal ligament and peri-implant bone; non-rigid connections reduced the stress to the bone, but increased stress to the prosthesis. Clinical studies: The results obtained were disparate. Studies in the medium or short-term show this as a viable treatment alternative, whereas some studies point to a greater risk of complications, although the use of rigid connection decreases the percentage of intrusion. Other bibliographic reviews have concluded that there is a need for more longitudinal studies on the viability of tooth-implant connection, also concluding that complications are greater when this is the chosen treatment. As a viable alternative with an acceptable success rate, this course of treatment is always associated with rigid connection rather than non-rigid connection. Although intrusion is avoided with rigid connection, this nevertheless remains inadvisable as the primary treatment choice.

Hita-Carrillo C; Hernández-Aliaga M; Calvo-Guirado JL

2010-03-01

316

Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnoea  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete tooth loss (edentulism) produces anatomical changes that may impair upper airway size and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether edentulism favours the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods Polysomnography was performed in 48 edentulous subjects on two consecutive nights, one slept with and the other without dentures. Upper airway size was assessed by cephalometry and by recording forced mid-inspiratory airflow rate (FIF50). Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and oral NO (oNO), were measured as markers of airway and oropharyngeal inflammation. Results The apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) without dentures was significantly higher than with dentures (17·4 ± 3·6 versus 11·0 ± 2·3. p = 0·002), and was inversely related to FIF50 (p = 0·017) and directly related to eNO (p = 0·042). Sleeping with dentures, 23 subjects (48%) had an AHI over 5, consistent with OSA, but sleeping without dentures the number of subjects with abnormal AHI rose to 34 (71%). At cephalometry, removing dentures produced a significant decrease in retropharyngeal space (from 1·522 ± 0·33 cm to 1·27 ± 0·42 cm, p = 0·006). Both morning eNO and oNO were higher after the night slept without dentures (eNO 46·1 ± 8·2 ppb versus 33·7 ± 6·3 ppb, p = 0·035, oNO 84·6 ± 13·7 ppb versus 59·2 ± 17·4 ppb, p = 0·001). Conclusion These findings suggest that complete tooth loss favours upper airway obstruction during sleep. This untoward effect seems to be due to decrease in retropharyngeal space and is associated with increased oral and exhaled NO concentration.

Bucca Caterina; Cicolin Alessandro; Brussino Luisa; Arienti Andrea; Graziano Alessandra; Erovigni Francesco; Pera Paolo; Gai Valerio; Mutani Roberto; Preti Giulio; Rolla Giovanni; Carossa Stefano

2006-01-01

317

Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities (Groups I, II and III) and indirect inlay cavities (Groups IV, V and VI) were prepared maintaining standardized dimensions: 2-mm deep pulpal floors, 1.5-mm wide gingival walls and 2-mm high axial walls. Buccolingual width of the occlusal box was established at 1/4 (Groups I and IV), 1/3 (Groups II and V) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (alpha= 0.05). 1/4-inlay cavities had higher percent mean mass loss (9.71%) than composite resin cavities with the same width (7.07%). 1/3-inlay preparations also produced higher percent mean mass loss (13.91%) than composite resin preparations with the same width (10.02%). 1/2-inlay cavities had 21.34% of mass loss versus 16.19% for the 1/2-composite resin cavities. Fracture strength means (in kgf) were: GI = 187.65; GII = 143.62; GIII = 74.10; GIV = 164.22; GV = 101.92; GVI = 50.35. Statistically significant difference (p

Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio

2007-01-01

318

Interventions for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement: a systematic review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched the databases of PubMed, Embase, Science Citation Index, CENTRAL, and SIGLE from January 1990 to August 2011 for randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of interventions on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The processes of study search, selection, and quality assessment were conducted independently in duplicate by two review authors. Original outcome data, if possible, underwent statistical pooling by using Review Manager 5. RESULTS: Through a predefined search strategy, we finally included nine eligible studies. Among them, five interventions were studied (ie, low-level laser therapy, corticotomy, electrical current, pulsed electromagnetic fields, and dentoalveolar or periodontal distraction). Six outcomes were evaluated in these studies (ie, accumulative moved distance or movement rate, time required to move tooth to its destination, anchorage loss, periodontal health, pulp vitality, and root resorption). CONCLUSION: Among the five interventions, corticotomy is effective and safe to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement, low-level laser therapy was unable to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement, current evidence does not reveal whether electrical current and pulsed electromagnetic fields are effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement, and dentoalveolar or periodontal distraction is promising in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement but lacks convincing evidence.

Long H; Pyakurel U; Wang Y; Liao L; Zhou Y; Lai W

2013-01-01

319

Anomalies of tooth formation in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

OBJECTIVE: The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia. The clinical identification of possible heterozygous females can be difficult because of the varying degrees of clinical signs caused by X-chromosome inactivation. This study is the first to elaborate on anomalies of tooth formation found in a group of hemizygous males and heterozygous females with known ED1 mutations. These tooth anomalies may be used as dental biomarkers for heterozygous females, enabling an earlier diagnosis, and therefore, better treatment and genetic counselling. METHODS: Anomalies of tooth formation were examined using panoramic radiographs, dental casts and oral photographs in hemizygous males and heterozygous females who were identified by molecular genetic analysis. The results were compared to existing controls and normative data. RESULTS: All affected males had multiple missing permanent teeth and tooth malformations. The heterozygous females had a significantly higher frequency of agenesis of permanent teeth compared to normative data. The heterozygous females had an increased prevalence of tooth malformations and reduced tooth size, especially in the mesiodistal dimension. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that observed anomalies of tooth formation may be used as dental biomarkers in the clinical identification of potentially heterozygous females. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jan

Lexner, Michala O; Bardow, Allan

2007-01-01

320

Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H?O?, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

Li Y; Greenwall L

2013-07-01

 
 
 
 
321

Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.  

Science.gov (United States)

In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H?O?, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks. PMID:23846062

Li, Y; Greenwall, L

2013-07-01

322

ATTITUDE AND KNOWLEDGE TOWARDS TOOTH AVULSION AMONG SPORTS TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Tooth avulsion is one of the commonest types of physical sport injury. Themanagement of these cases is critical in order to prevent complete loss of tooth and its subsequentconsequences. The prognosis of such avulsed tooth depends on prompt treatment. The emergencymanagement of such avulsed tooth is made by the sports teacher who is present at the sports ground. Thefirst–aid knowledge about tooth avulsion is must for the sports teacher. Aim: The objective of the presentstudy was to evaluate the knowledge about management of tooth avulsion among sports teachers inAhmednagar District. Methods: A sample of 60 sports teachers were interviewed from different schools.The data was collected using a self administered questionnaire containing seven items which wasdistributed among the sports teacher from different schools. Results: we found that 90% of the sportsteachers were not having the first-aid knowledge about the emergency management of avulsed tooth andthe benefit of timely care. This demands an effort to properly educate sports teachers about first-aidmanagement and consequently change their attitude towards dental trauma.

FAREEDI MUKRAM ALI; PRIYAYANKA BHUSHAN; MOHD INAYATULLAH KHAN; FARHEEN USTAD

2013-01-01

323

Enamel mineral content in patients with severe tooth wear.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Purpose: The amounts of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) in enamel may be crucial for maintaining its integrity and to attenuate potential environmental effects on teeth. The aim of this study was to examine whether the mineral composition of enamel could influence tooth wear. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients with severe tooth wear were compared with 20 healthy volunteers. Tooth wear was assessed using clinical examination according to the protocol of Smith and Knight. Subsequently, the maxillary central incisors of each subject were subjected to acid biopsies to assess the mineral composition in the enamel. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with an air/acetylene flame was used to analyze for Ca, Zn, and Mg. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze for Cu. Results: The concentrations of Ca and Mg in tooth enamel were comparable in the study and control groups. Zn enamel content was higher in patients with tooth wear, and Cu enamel content was lower in these patients compared with the control group. Conclusion: The differing Zn and Cu contents in tooth enamel might offer a reason for excessive tooth wear in these patients. However, the results require further, more detailed study.

Sierpinska T; Orywal K; Kuc J; Golebiewska M; Szmitkowski M

2013-09-01

324

Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

2005-01-01

325

Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo; You, Choong Hyun [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

2005-03-15

326

Tooth loss prevalence among cardiac males and females  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Objective of study was to observe differences of tooth loss prevalence in males and females with Cardiac diseases Poor oral health, tooth loss and periodontal diseases have been reported to be associated with coronary heart diseases. Studies report gender differences in prevalence of cardiac diseases and tooth loss. This paper presents gender differences of tooth loss in cardiac patients of a cardiac hospital of Lahore, Pakistan. Methodology: Age matched Cardiac males and females attending OPD of the Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC), Lahore were included in the study. Personal and health-related information were questioned and noted. Oral examination was performed for recording of missing teeth. 1200 CHD study subjects with age-range of 30 to 80 years were enrolled for study. 1045 age matched, 766 (73.30%) males and 279 (26.70%) females were examined for tooth loss. 852 (81.53%) genders had at least one tooth missing. 599 (78.19) males and 253 (90.68%) females were observed with mean tooth loss of 7.5 (SD 8.720) and 11.15 (SD 10.375)respectively statistical association among them was also significant (P= 0.000) with OR of 2.339. More subjects (76.29%) showed a loss of 1-15 teeth that I was also significant among males and females. Tooth loss was significant in age groups of 41-50 years (P=0.001) and 51-60 years (P=0.000) Gender differences of tooth loss prevalence among CHD Subjects were significant with more risk for males as compared to females. (author)

2007-01-01

327

Tooth bleaching--a critical review of the biological aspects  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Present tooth-bleaching techniques are based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent. It is applied directly, or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide peroxide. More than 90% immediate success has been reported for intracoronal bleaching of non-vital teeth, and in the period of 1-8 years' observation time, from 10 to 40% of the initially successfully treated teeth needed re-treatment. Cervical root resorption is a possible consequence of internal bleaching and is more frequently observed in teeth treated with the thermo-catalytic procedure. When the external tooth-bleaching technique is used, the first subjective change in tooth color may be observed after 2-4 nights of tooth bleaching, and more than 90% satisfactory results have been reported. Tooth sensitivity is a common side-effect of external tooth bleaching observed in 15%-78% of the patients, but clinical studies addressing the risk of other adverse effects are lacking. Direct contact with hydrogen peroxide induced genotoxic effects in bacteria and cultured cells, whereas the effect was reduced or abolished in the presence of metabolizing enzymes. Several tumor-promoting studies, including the hamster cheek pouch model, indicated that hydrogen peroxide might act as a promoter. Multiple exposures of hydrogen peroxide have resulted in localized effects on the gastric mucosa, decreased food consumption, reduced weight gain, and blood chemistry changes in mice and rats. Our risk assessment revealed that a sufficient safety level was not reached in certain clinical situations of external tooth bleaching, such as bleaching one tooth arch with 35% carbamide peroxide, using several applications per day of 22% carbamide peroxide, and bleaching both arches simultaneously with 22% carbamide peroxide. The recommendation is to avoid using concentrations higher than 10% carbamide peroxide when one performs external bleaching. We advocate a selective use of external tooth bleaching based on high ethical standards and professional judgment.

Dahl, J E; Pallesen, Ulla

2003-01-01

328

METHOD OF TREATMENT OF TOOTH CAVITY BOTTOM PERFORATION  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

FIELD: medicine stomatology. ^ SUBSTANCE: pad from woven polymer ribbon, corresponding in size to tooth cavity bottom, is placed on tooth cavity bottom. Posts are introduced into root canals through pad. Photopolymerisation is carried out, fixing posts in pad. Pad with posts is removed from cavity. Pad is moistened entirely with light-cure adhesive. Obtained construction is placed on tooth cavity bottom in such way that posts enter into root canal mouth and photopolymerised. ^ EFFECT: elimination of pore formation and ensuring reliable hermetisation. ^ 2 ex, 3 dwg

KUKUSHKIN VJACHESLAV LEONIDOVICH; KUKUSHKINA ELENA ANATOL EVNA

329

Management of a root fracture in an immature permanent tooth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A 9-year-old girl with trauma to the maxillary right permanent central incisor is reported. Clinically the tooth appeared extruded with one third of the root visible. The radiographic examination revealed a root fracture. The extruded tooth was repositioned and splinted with a heavy wire and adhesive resin, after which a resorbable collagen tissue was placed to cover the buccal region. Subsequent to the injury, swelling was observed and the patient complained of pressure pain in the periapical region of the tooth with no response to electric pulp testing. It was treated successfully with periodontal therapy and endodontic therapy with Vitapex.

Maki K; Nishioka T; Seo R; Kimura M

2005-01-01

330

A local intercomparison study of ESR dosimetry using tooth enamel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Using electron spin resonance (ESR), tooth enamel is a possible dosimeter in case of a radiation accident. To check the present status of this technique, we conducted a local intercomparison study. We irradiated several samples of tooth enamel with a 60Co source. Three institutes in Belgium and The Netherlands recorded the ESR signal of the samples. The results of the measurements and the methods used are compared. It is concluded that ESR on tooth enamel can be a useful technique in accident dosimetry, provided further research is done. (author).

1997-01-01

331

Study on differences of radiosensitivity of human tooth enamel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To study differences of radiosensitivity of human tooth enamel, 84 tooth enamel samples from 5 subjects were separated, and irradiated with radiation dose of 5 Gy from 60Co ? rays. After irradiation each sample was measured by ESR technique. Experimental results indicate that some difference in radiosensitivity exists for teeth from each subject (coefficients of variation of each subject range from 9.3% to 14.0%). Nevertheless, the mean values for all teeth of each subject among 5 subjects agree within the range of 325.77 to 386.80. It shows that the radiosensitivity of tooth enamel is basically uniform

2001-01-01

332

Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper.

Ather A; Ather H; Sheth SM; Muliya VS

2012-09-01

333

Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper.

Ather, Amber; Ather, Hunaiza; Sheth, Sanket Milan; Muliya, Vidya Saraswathi [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-15

334

Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown.  

Science.gov (United States)

Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper. PMID:23071971

Ather, Amber; Ather, Hunaiza; Sheth, Sanket Milan; Muliya, Vidya Saraswathi

2012-09-21

335

Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper.

2012-01-01

336

All-ceramic tooth-supported single crowns have acceptable 5-year survival rates.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

DATA SOURCES: The databases Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched. Additional hand searches were conducted in the journals. STUDY SELECTION: Randomised controlled trials, prospective cohort studies and retrospective studies with follow-up of 36 months or longer were included. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Data were extracted independently in duplicate. The annual core and veneer fracture rates of various tooth types were estimated and compared using Poisson regression. RESULTS: 37 studies were included; two RCTs, 25 prospective cohorts and 10 retrospective studies. Based on the calculated results, all-ceramic crowns had an acceptable overall five-year fracture rate of 4.4% irrespective of the materials used. Five-year fracture rates were significantly higher for molar crowns (8.1%) compared to premolar crowns (3.0%), and the difference between anterior (3.0%) and posterior crowns (5.4%) also achieved significance. Core fracture rates had a five-year incidence of 2.5%, and a significantly higher core fracture rate was found in the posterior region (3.9%). The overall five-year incidence of veneer fracture was 3.0%, and no clear difference was found between restored tooth types, with incidences of 2.0%, 2.5%, 1.0%, and 3.0% for incisor, canine, premolar, and molar crowns, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this study's protocol, the current evidence suggests that dental ceramic materials demonstrated acceptable five-year core and veneer fracture incidences when used for tooth-supported single crowns in both anterior and posterior segments. Higher fracture tendency for posterior crowns was the trend for all-ceramic crowns, while molar crowns showed a significantly higher fracture rate than premolar crowns. Randomised controlled trials with large sample sizes be undertaken to obtain more definitive results.

Dorri M

2013-01-01

337

Relationship between natural tooth shade and skin colour.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of skin colour and tooth shade. One hundred and twenty six individuals aging between 18 to 25 years participated in this study. Colour of the maxillary central incisors was examined by VITA easy shade. Tooth shades were assigned to four ordinal values. Nivea Beauty Protect Foundation shade sample was used as a guide to assess facial skin colour Shin colours were also assigned to four ordinal values. Spearman test revealed that there was a significant relationship between tooth shade and skin colour Total co-relation factor was 51.6% (p <0 .01). Co-relation factors were 57% for women and 27% for men (p <0 .01). The highest tooth shade prevalence belonged to the second group and the highest skin colour prevalence was also in the second skin colour group.

Nourbakhsh M; Mousavinejad N; Adli AR; Harati M

2013-06-01

338

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Learn about Thumb Sucking and Pacifiers 6 – 12 Years Old From around ages 6 - 12, children ... to arrive. Learn about Preventing Kids' Tooth Decay 12 – 17 Years Old Cavities aren’t just ...

339

Income inequality and tooth loss in the United States.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study explored the relationship between state income inequality and individual tooth loss among 386,629 adults in the United States who participated in the 2008 Behavioral and Risk Factor Surveillance System. Multilevel models were used to test the association of the state Gini coefficient with tooth loss after sequential adjustment for state- (median household income) and individual-level confounders (sex, age, race, education, and household income), as well as state- (percent receiving fluoridated water and dentist-to-population ratio) and individual-level mediators (marital status and last dental visit). The state Gini coefficient was significantly associated with tooth loss even after adjustment for state- and individual-level confounders and potential mediators (Odds Ratio, 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval, 1.05 to 1.30). This study provides support for the relationship between state income inequality and individual tooth loss in the United States.

Bernabé E; Marcenes W

2011-06-01

340

Income inequality and tooth loss in the United States.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the relationship between state income inequality and individual tooth loss among 386,629 adults in the United States who participated in the 2008 Behavioral and Risk Factor Surveillance System. Multilevel models were used to test the association of the state Gini coefficient with tooth loss after sequential adjustment for state- (median household income) and individual-level confounders (sex, age, race, education, and household income), as well as state- (percent receiving fluoridated water and dentist-to-population ratio) and individual-level mediators (marital status and last dental visit). The state Gini coefficient was significantly associated with tooth loss even after adjustment for state- and individual-level confounders and potential mediators (Odds Ratio, 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval, 1.05 to 1.30). This study provides support for the relationship between state income inequality and individual tooth loss in the United States. PMID:21508433

Bernabé, E; Marcenes, W

2011-04-20

 
 
 
 
341

Relationship between natural tooth shade and skin colour.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of skin colour and tooth shade. One hundred and twenty six individuals aging between 18 to 25 years participated in this study. Colour of the maxillary central incisors was examined by VITA easy shade. Tooth shades were assigned to four ordinal values. Nivea Beauty Protect Foundation shade sample was used as a guide to assess facial skin colour Shin colours were also assigned to four ordinal values. Spearman test revealed that there was a significant relationship between tooth shade and skin colour Total co-relation factor was 51.6% (p <0 .01). Co-relation factors were 57% for women and 27% for men (p <0 .01). The highest tooth shade prevalence belonged to the second group and the highest skin colour prevalence was also in the second skin colour group. PMID:23888526

Nourbakhsh, M; Mousavinejad, N; Adli, A R; Harati, M

2013-06-01

342

Geographic Variations in the EPR Spectrum of Tooth Enamel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The presence of stable radiation-induced radicals in the mineral component of tooth enamel allows use of this material as a biological dosemeter. Estimation of the dose absorbed in tooth enamel can be done by EPR. Generally, for the purpose of dose reconstruction, the EPR spectrum of tooth enamel is interpreted in terms of two main components. The first is a broad background signal often called the native signal centered at a g value of 2.0045. The origin of this signal is not precisely known. The second main component in the tooth enamel spectrum is purely radiation induced and can be used for retrospective dosimetry. Internal structure of the native signal and variations of its amplitude and linewidth were investigated for the samples prepared from modern teeth obtained from different geographic locations (USA and Russia). Possible reasons for the variations observed are discussed as are the potential effects of the variations on the reliability of dose estimation. (author)

1999-01-01

343

Notch signalling pathway in tooth development and adult dental cells.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Notch signalling is a highly conserved intercellular signal transfer mechanism that includes canonical and non-canonical pathways. It regulates differentiation and proliferation of stem/progenitor cells by means of para-inducing effects. Expression and activation of Notch signalling factors (receptors and ligands) are critical not only for development of the dental germ but also for regeneration of injured tissue associated with mature teeth. Notch signalling plays key roles in differentiation of odontoblasts and osteoblasts, calcification of tooth hard tissue, formation of cusp patterns and generation of tooth roots. After tooth eruption, Notch signalling can also be triggered in dental stem cells of the pulp, where it induces them to differentiate into odontoblasts, thus generating fresh dentine tissue. Other signalling pathways, such as TGF?, NF-?B, Wnt, Fgf and Shh also interact with Notch signalling during tooth development.

Cai X; Gong P; Huang Y; Lin Y

2011-12-01

344

A "saw-tooth" pattern in Parkinson's disease.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A patient with severe Parkinson's disease had a maximum inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume loop showing a "saw-tooth" pattern. It is concluded that this sign is not specific for the sleep apnea syndrome.

Schiffman PL

1985-01-01

345

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... the teeth can decay. Pacifiers dipped in sugar, honey or sweetened liquids can also lead to tooth decay since the sugar or honey can provide food for the bacteria’s acid attacks.

346

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... during life: 20 temporary baby teeth and 32 permanent adult teeth. Birth – 3 Years Old 3 ... also keep a space in the jaw for permanent teeth. If a baby tooth is lost too ...

347

Generation of Gear Tooth Surfaces by Application of CNC Machines.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study will demonstrate the importance of application of computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines in generation of gear tooth surfaces with new topology. This topology decreases gear vibration and will extend the gear capacity and service life. ...

F. L. Litvin N. X. Chen

1994-01-01

348

About Kids' Teeth: Baby Tooth Decay is Real  

Science.gov (United States)

... Learn about Thumb Sucking and Pacifiers 6 – 12 Years Old From around ages 6 - 12, children ... to arrive. Learn about Preventing Kids' Tooth Decay 12 – 17 Years Old Cavities aren’t just ...

349

Restoring Esthetics in Traumatic Tooth Fractures with all Ceramic Restorations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Earlier Metal ceramic crowns were the restorations of choice in the management of traumatic tooth fractures. However, the inherent drawbacks of metal ceramic restorations and the development of newer all ceramic alternatives have resulted in superior esthetic and functional management of these clinical situations. The following case series describes the management of traumatic tooth fractures with Zirconia based all ceramic restorations following endodontic therapy.

Mainak Kanti Saha, *Superna Ganguly Saha

2012-01-01

350

Moxel: A molar tooth voxel model for dosimetric studies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Stylized numerical models of the tooth are usually employed in qualification procedure related to Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance in long-term accidental contamination dose reconstruction. In this work a voxel model was developed from the microCT image data set of a human non contaminated molar tooth. A stylized model, reproducing the characteristics of the voxel model, was also created in order to investigate the level of accuracy that can be obtained in this kind of study.

2010-01-01

351

Management of premature primary tooth loss in the child patient.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Premature loss of primary teeth can result in a loss of arch length and have a negative effect on occlusion and alignment, often increasing the need for orthodontic treatment. Use of space maintainers can reduce the severity of problems such as crowding, ectopic eruption, tooth impaction and poor molar relationship. This article presents a review of the consequences of premature tooth loss and discusses the appliances commonly used for space maintenance.

Law CS

2013-08-01

352

Ectopic Supernumerary Tooth in Nasal Septum: A Case Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Nasal teeth eruption is a rare phenomenon. The variability of symptoms and generic history makes the diagnosis difficult. This difficulty is more challenging when the tooth is placed in the depth of septum.   Case Report: Our case is an example of this problem. Herein, we present a case of intraseptal tooth with nasal obstruction and septal deviation and recurrent sinusitis. We present preoperative imaging.   Conclusion: Great suspicion may helpful for preoperative diagnosis and good deciding.

Saleh Mohebbi; Oveis Salehi; Sedighe Ebrahimpoor

2013-01-01

353

Association Between Tooth Loss and Bone Mineral Density in Brazilian Postmenopausal Women  

Science.gov (United States)

Background To evaluate oral health in postmenopausal women and verify whether there is a correlation between tooth loss according to index of decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) and bone mineral density (BMD). Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 100 women. The DMFT and its associations with lumbar and femoral BMD (T-score and g/cm2) were assessed. Analysis of covariance and multiple logistic regression were applied and the mean and standard deviation, absolute and relative frequencies (percentages) were obtained. Results The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed significant association between the DMFT index and bone mass (T-score), compared to the young adult in L2-L4 (P = 0.0252) and in bone mass in L2-L4 (below average) in g/cm2 and in the DMFT index (P = 0.0332), and for women with bone mass below the average index DMFT was higher. Between L2-L4 below average (g/cm2) and extracted component (P = 0.0483) association was also significant because women with bone mass below the average had a greater extracted component. Conclusions Postmenopausal women with poor oral health may present reduced bone mass. There was significant association between BMD and DMFT at the L2-L4 site. Women must be advised that their good oral health, amount and quality of bone mass should also be matters of concern. Keywords Bone mineral density; Post-menopausal; Osteoporosis; Tooth loss

Henriques, Paulo Sergio Gomes; Neto, Aarao Mendes Pinto

2011-01-01

354

Effects of in-office tooth whiteners on hardness of tooth-colored restoratives.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study investigated the effects of in-office tooth whiteners on the hardness of hybrid (Spectrum TPH), polyacid-modified (Dyract AP), PRG (Reactmer) composites and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC). Twenty-seven specimens of each material were fabricated, randomly divided into three groups of nine and treated as follows--Group 1: stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for three weeks (control); Group 2: treated with carbamide peroxide (Opalescence Quick) for 30 minutes/week for three weeks; Group 3: treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide power bleach (Opalescence Xtra) for 30 minutes/week for three weeks. For Groups 2 and 3, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C during the hiatus periods. The treated specimens were subsequently subjected to microhardness testing (load = 500gf; dwell time = 15 seconds). Results were analyzed using ANOVA/Scheffe's test (p<0.05). For all treatment groups, Spectrum was significantly harder than the other materials and Reactmer was significantly harder than Dyract and Fuji II LC. The effects of in-office tooth whiteners on microhardness were material-dependent. No significant difference in hardness was observed between treatment groups for Dyract and Reactmer. For Spectrum and Fuji II LC, specimens treated with Opalescence Quick were significantly harder than those treated with Opalescence Xtra. No significant difference in hardness was observed between the control and bleached groups for all materials. The hardness of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, hybrid, polyacid-modified and PRG composites is therefore not significantly affected by the use of 35% carbamide peroxide and 35% hydrogen peroxide in-office tooth whiteners.

Yap AU; Wattanapayungkul P

2002-03-01

355

Dental crowding: the role of genetics and tooth wear.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of genetics and tooth wear in the etiology of dental crowding through the analysis of a split indigenous Amazon population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dental crowding prevalence (n ?=? 117), tooth wear (n ?=? 117), and inbreeding coefficient (n ?=? 288) were compared for both villages. A biometric investigation was performed by dental cast analysis of 55 individuals with no tooth loss. Mann-Whitney statistics, independent t-tests, and Fisher exact tests were used at P < .05. RESULTS: A high coefficient of inbreeding was confirmed in the resultant village (F ?=? 0.25, P < .001). Tooth wear was not significantly different (P ?=? .99), while a significantly higher prevalence of dental crowding was confirmed in the original village (PR ?=? 6.67, P ?=? 0.02). Forty dental arches (n ?=? 20) were examined in the new group, and only one (2.5%) had a dental crowding ? 5 mm. In the original villages, we found 20 arches (28.6%) with dental crowding. No difference was observed for tooth size, while larger dental arch dimensions explained a lower level of dental crowding in the resultant village. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings downplay the widespread influence of tooth wear, a direct evidence of what an individual ate in the past, on dental crowding and emphasize the role of heredity, exacerbated through inbreeding, in the etiology of this malocclusion.

Normando D; Almeida MA; Quintão CC

2013-01-01

356

Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) polymorphisms and tooth agenesis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Tooth agenesis is a common congenital disorder that affects almost 20% of the world's population. A number of different genes have been shown to be associated with cases of tooth agenesis including AXIN2, IRF6, FGFR1, MSX1, PAX9, and TGFA. Of particular interest is AXIN2, which was linked to two families segregating oligodontia and colorectal cancer. We studied two collections of families affected with tooth agenesis and tested them for association with AXIN2. Significant association between tooth agenesis and AXIN2 was found (p=0.02) in cases with at least one missing incisor. Our work further supports a role of AXIN2 in human tooth agenesis and for the first time suggests AXIN2 is involved in sporadic forms of common incisor agenesis. Future studies should identify which specific tooth agenesis sub-phenotypes are consequence of AXIN2 genetic variations. A sub-set of these cases could have an increased susceptibility for colon cancer or other types of tumours and this knowledge would have significant clinical implications.

Callahan N; Modesto A; Meira R; Seymen F; Patir A; Vieira AR

2009-01-01

357

Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) polymorphisms and tooth agenesis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Tooth agenesis is a common congenital disorder that affects almost 20% of the world's population. A number of different genes have been shown to be associated with cases of tooth agenesis including AXIN2, IRF6, FGFR1, MSX1, PAX9, and TGFA. Of particular interest is AXIN2, which was linked to two families segregating oligodontia and colorectal cancer. We studied two collections of families affected with tooth agenesis and tested them for association with AXIN2. Significant association between tooth agenesis and AXIN2 was found (p=0.02) in cases with at least one missing incisor. Our work further supports a role of AXIN2 in human tooth agenesis and for the first time suggests AXIN2 is involved in sporadic forms of common incisor agenesis. Future studies should identify which specific tooth agenesis sub-phenotypes are consequence of AXIN2 genetic variations. A sub-set of these cases could have an increased susceptibility for colon cancer or other types of tumours and this knowledge would have significant clinical implications. PMID:18790474

Callahan, N; Modesto, A; Meira, R; Seymen, F; Patir, A; Vieira, A R

2008-09-14

358

Immunoreactive evidence of beta-endorphin and methionine-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu in human tooth pulp  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

For the first time, ?-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (BE-Li) has been measured in human tooth pulp. Separation of peptides from pulp tissue was achieved by acid extraction followed by chromatographic separation through a Sep-Pak disposable cartridge. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) was performed on the peptide-rich fractions for further peptide separation. Radioreceptorassay data of the HPLC fractions was used to construct a profile of opioid-receptoractive peptides. Radioimmunoassay data provided further information. Following acute mechanical stress, a monotonic decrease in BE-Li concentrations was evident according to a four bicuspid extraction order.

1989-01-01

359

The relat ionship between denta l fluorosis and tooth fluoride concentrat ion – A study in an endemic area  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between dental fluorosis (DF) severity and fluoride [F] concentration in tooth and water in DF endemic areas. Methods: Life-long residents from two DF endemic communities were studied. Forty-five extracted teeth were collected and analyzed for DF severity and tooth [F]. Thylstrup-Ferjeskov Index (TFI) was used to measure DF severity and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for tooth [F] concentration. Water from regional wells was also collected (n=9) and analyzed for F content using specific ion F electrode. Results: Water [F] varied between 0.2ppm and 4.7ppm. TFI scores ranged from 0 to 6; [F] from 120ppm to 2,140ppm in enamel and 304ppm to 4,800ppm in dentin. No correlation was found between DF severity and [F] in enamel (rs=0.22,p=0.15) and dentin (rs=-0.19,p=0.20), nor between water [F] and [F] in enamel (rs=-0.09,p=0.65) and dentin (rs=-0.11,p=0.56). Weak correlation between DF severity and water [F] (rs=0.38,p=0.04) was found. Linear regression analysis showed that TFI couldn’t be predicted from a linear combination of the independent variables (age, enamel and dentin [F]). When enamel, dentin and water [F] were used as independent variables in the linear regression (predict DFseverity), only water [F] showed influence in DF severity (p=0.013;t=2.67). Conclusion: Even in areas of endemic DF, tooth [F] didn’t correlate with DF severity and the relationship between water [F] and DF severity was very weak. Therefore, tooth [F] may not be a goodpredictor/indicator of DF severity.

Marc Daniel Grynpas; Ron Hancock; Fabio Correia Sampaio; Hardy Limeback; Maria Vieira Saintrain; Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira

2011-01-01

360

The various Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnostic approaches and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We also discuss the emerging therapies for this hereditary neuropathy. RECENT FINDINGS: To date, numerous genes are implicated in CMT, and new genes have recently been found to be associated with this neuropathy (INF2, FBLN5, etc.). Some specific or evocative clinical signs of CMT subtypes (proteinuria with INF2 mutations, etc.) have been identified. Characteristic pathological findings, which may suggest gene mutations, are also recognized by nerve biopsy (mainly ultrastructural lesions). SUMMARY: CMT disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, with a fairly homogeneous clinical phenotype (progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, and depressed tendon reflexes). With more than 40 genes implicated, an update of the present and rather confusing classification of CMT is needed. Over the last few years, new mutated genes have been discovered. Although nerve biopsy is not routinely carried out in CMT neuropathies, it may show characteristic features, which can orientate the search for the mutated gene. There are currently no effective medications for CMT, but clinical trials are ongoing or planned.

Vallat JM; Mathis S; Funalot B

2013-10-01

 
 
 
 
361

Anterior tooth morphology and its effect on torque.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was undertaken to determine the variation in crown-root angle (CRA) of the upper incisors and canines as well as the variation in their labial contour. In addition, the influence of the variability of the labial contour and of different bracket heights on torque was evaluated. Proximal radiographs were taken of 160 extracted maxillary teeth (81 incisors and 79 canines). They were digitized and analysed with Jasc Paint Shop Pro 7TM and Mathcad 2001 Professional. The incisal edge, the centre of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the root apex were digitized to define the crown and root long axis. For all teeth the CRA was measured. At several heights of the labial surface a tangent was determined, enabling measurement of the inclination of the labial surface. The CRA had great variability, ranging from 167 to 195 degrees for the canines (mean value 183 degrees) and from 171 to 195 degrees for the incisors (average 184 degrees). The mean inclinations of the labial surfaces for the incisors varied greatly. Between 4 and 4.5 mm from the incisal edge the standard deviations (SD) were the smallest and between 2 and 4.5 mm from the incisal edge the labial surface angle differed by approximately 10 degrees. For the canines the mean inclinations of the buccal surface also varied. This angle differed by around 10 degrees between 2 and 4.5 mm from the incisal edge, but the SD were much larger than for the incisors. It can be concluded that placement of a bracket on a tooth at varying heights, still within a clinically acceptable range, results in important differences in the amount of root torque.

van Loenen M; Degrieck J; De Pauw G; Dermaut L

2005-06-01

362

Autocrine and paracrine Shh signaling are necessary for tooth morphogenesis, but not tooth replacement in snakes and lizards (Squamata).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Here we study the role of Shh signaling in tooth morphogenesis and successional tooth initiation in snakes and lizards (Squamata). By characterizing the expression of Shh pathway receptor Ptc1 in the developing dentitions of three species (Eublepharis macularius, Python regius, and Pogona vitticeps) and by performing gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrate that Shh signaling is active in the squamate tooth bud and is required for its normal morphogenesis. Shh apparently mediates tooth morphogenesis by separate paracrine- and autocrine-mediated functions. According to this model, paracrine Shh signaling induces cell proliferation in the cervical loop, outer enamel epithelium, and dental papilla. Autocrine signaling within the stellate reticulum instead appears to regulate cell survival. By treating squamate dental explants with Hh antagonist cyclopamine, we induced tooth phenotypes that closely resemble the morphological and differentiation defects of vestigial, first-generation teeth in the bearded dragon P. vitticeps. Our finding that these vestigial teeth are deficient in epithelial Shh signaling further corroborates that Shh is needed for the normal development of teeth in snakes and lizards. Finally, in this study, we definitively refute a role for Shh signaling in successional dental lamina formation and conclude that other pathways regulate tooth replacement in squamates.

Handrigan GR; Richman JM

2010-01-01

363

Autocrine and paracrine Shh signaling are necessary for tooth morphogenesis, but not tooth replacement in snakes and lizards (Squamata).  

Science.gov (United States)

Here we study the role of Shh signaling in tooth morphogenesis and successional tooth initiation in snakes and lizards (Squamata). By characterizing the expression of Shh pathway receptor Ptc1 in the developing dentitions of three species (Eublepharis macularius, Python regius, and Pogona vitticeps) and by performing gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrate that Shh signaling is active in the squamate tooth bud and is required for its normal morphogenesis. Shh apparently mediates tooth morphogenesis by separate paracrine- and autocrine-mediated functions. According to this model, paracrine Shh signaling induces cell proliferation in the cervical loop, outer enamel epithelium, and dental papilla. Autocrine signaling within the stellate reticulum instead appears to regulate cell survival. By treating squamate dental explants with Hh antagonist cyclopamine, we induced tooth phenotypes that closely resemble the morphological and differentiation defects of vestigial, first-generation teeth in the bearded dragon P. vitticeps. Our finding that these vestigial teeth are deficient in epithelial Shh signaling further corroborates that Shh is needed for the normal development of teeth in snakes and lizards. Finally, in this study, we definitively refute a role for Shh signaling in successional dental lamina formation and conclude that other pathways regulate tooth replacement in squamates. PMID:19850027

Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

2009-10-20

364

Shading of ceramic crowns using digital tooth shade matching devices.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the 1990s, there was great optimism due to the development of devices for measuring tooth shade. The frequently not so simple, visual determination of the shade of a tooth was to be done with the aid of a device which recognizes the shade and describes it accurately by reference to a color chart. However, the skepticism towards such devices was also great. It is known that the color effect frequently differs strongly when comparing a tooth from the shade guide with a metal ceramic crown, despite identical shade designation. Anyone who considers visual shade determination to be inadequate and places his hopes in digital shade matching devices will be disappointed. It is the shade-generating structures of the metal ceramic and frequently of the veneer layers that turn out to be too thin which, despite correct shade selection, cause a different color perception. Such problems have been reduced decisively with the development of fracture-proof hard porcelain caps (Vita In-Ceram) with optical characteristics similar to teeth. In addition, the Vita System 3D-Master tooth shade system developed in 1998 by Vita in cooperation with Dr. Hall from Australia, leads the practitioner to a better understanding of the primary tooth shade characteristics of "brightness (value)", "color intensity (chroma)" and "color (wave length of the visible light, hue)". These two innovations allow a more accurate estimate of the basic shade of a natural tooth (reference tooth) and the imitation in the laboratory of its natural, shade-generating structures. If digital shade measurement supplements the visual shade estimate, then a further improvement can be expected--especially in the recognition of the basic shade. Qualitative descriptions of subjective shade measurement of a natural tooth and of its imitation in the dental laboratory by ceramics can be found frequently in professional journals and publications. With digital tooth shade matching devices, which apart from the color code of the color chart also reproduce exact, colorimetric values, such work processes can be recorded quantitatively and objectively. Reports about this type of controlled shade determination and generation are found rarely in the literature, which is surprising in view of the large number of tooth shade matching devices and dental ceramic systems available. In the present paper, the influence of the individual ceramic layers on color perception is measured and described under standardized conditions. The creation of the basic shade as it results from the composition of the various ceramic layers is traced with a spectrophotometer. The Vita In-Ceram Alumina infiltration ceramic and the VitaVM7 veneer ceramic were selected as the ceramic system. MHT-SpectroShade and Vita Easyshade were used as shade matching devices. PMID:16201397

Baltzer, A; Kaufmann-Jinoian, V

2005-04-01

365

Measurement of ridge alterations following tooth removal: a radiographic study in humans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was a radiographic mesiodistal analysis of the shape of the bone crest 3 months after tooth removal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred single tooth extractions were performed on 100 patients because of orthodontic or prosthetic causes. Bite blocks were used for two radiographs: one on the day of extraction and the other after healing of the socket, 3 months later. These X-rays were used to determine: (1) the most apical distance of alveolar ridge resorption, with baseline as the line between bone-to-teeth contact (the greatest distance in bone resorption height) and (2) the mesiodistal distance (MDD) and mesial and distal angles arising after bone tissue modeling. RESULTS: Significant differences (P<0.05) emerged between the MDDs of multiple- [8 mm, 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.09, 9.90] and single-root teeth (5.60 mm, 95% CI: 4.80, 6.50). However, mesial or distal angles or the most apical distance of alveolar ridge resorption did not differ (mean distance in height=4.32 mm, 95% CI: 3.85, 4.78; mean angle=24 degrees ). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the post-extraction mesiodistal bone distance between teeth adjacent to the edentulous ridge depends on the size of the edentulous space. Nevertheless, the distance does not affect the distance in bone loss height. The distance of bone resorption height reaches a balance at the midpoint, which we consider indicative of stable healing. This resorption process must be considered when placing dental implants in fresh extraction sockets, especially in aesthetic sites, because the implant surfaces could be exposed after 3 months.

Moya-Villaescusa MJ; Sánchez-Pérez A

2010-02-01

366

Reasons for extraction of permanent teeth in general dental practices in Tehran, Iran.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this survey was to investigate the primary reason for extraction of permanent teeth, its correlations with age, gender and education level, as well as identify the important predictors for dental caries in general dental centers in Tehran, Iran. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study was conducted over a period of 6 months; its population consisted of 1,382 patients, aged 9-95 years, who underwent tooth extraction. There were 673 (47.8%) male and 709 (51.3%) female patients. The frequency distribution was calculated using the ?(2) test, ANOVA and t test for differences in mean number of extracted teeth and the logistic regression model to evaluate the variables associated with reasons for tooth extraction. RESULTS: A total of 2,620 teeth were extracted from the 1,382 patients. The highest rate (36.9%) of extraction occurred for those 41-60 years old. Males comprised 48.7% of patients but had more teeth (1,470, 55.3%) extracted than females (1,150, 43.9%). Nine hundred and thirty-six (67.7%) patients had incomplete secondary education or less. Tooth loss due to caries was 51%; periodontal disease was 14.4%; supernumerary and tooth impaction 13.9%. There was a significant association between patient characteristics (age, gender and education level) and number of teeth extracted. CONCLUSION: Dental caries and periodontal disease were the main reasons for tooth extraction in Tehran, Iran.

Jafarian M; Etebarian A

2013-01-01

367

Retrievable, tooth-implant-supported, complete-arch fixed restorations in the maxilla: a 6-year retrospective study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the survival rate of implants, abutment teeth, and suprastructures along with the management of the complications for complete-arch, semipermanent cemented tooth-implant-supported restorations in 44 maxillae. Permanent cemented copings protect the prepared teeth from caries. The metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) were cemented onto copings and implant abutments using acryl-urethane cement. Data were assessed via patient records and a final clinical examination. Six years after cementation, no implant or restoration had failed. After the extraction of two teeth and placement of an additional implant, three restorations had to be subsequently changed (89% of restorations were unchanged after 6 years). The loss of retention without tooth intrusion occurred in two restorations. All 23 restoration removals for prosthetic aftercare were non-destructive. The results of this study indicate that complete-arch, semipermanently cemented FDP rigidly connecting the maxillary teeth and implants are a reliable treatment option.

Mundt T; Heinemann F; Schwahn C; Biffar R

2012-02-01

368

Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss. PMID:23303038

Petru?iu, S A; Buiga, Petronela; Roman, Alexandra; Danciu, Theodora; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Mihu, D

2012-01-01

369

Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss.

Petru?iu SA; Buiga P; Roman A; Danciu T; Mihu CM; Mihu D

2012-01-01

370

Experimental Investigation of Sprocket Tooth Form Effect on Dynamic Tension of Silent Chain  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study's aim was to get ANSI sprocket tooth profile and involute sprocket tooth profile for effects on dynamic tension of chains in the silent chain drive, and analyse and compare the advantages and disadvantages of the different tooth profiles to choose more practical tooth profile from the two sprockets. Current collector was used to test the dynamic tension when straight sprocket and involute sprocket engaged with the same silent chain. And experimental data measured were analyzed in the amplitude domain and frequency domain. Test results indicate that the probability of tension appearing in the different numerical size and power spectral densities of load in the different frequencies of the involute tooth form are better than of straight tooth form, which show that the involute sprocket has been good working properties. In addition, taking the advantages of involute tooth profile into account in the process, the involute tooth form is recommended in universal sprocket tooth form of the actual use.

Wei Sun; Xiaolun Liu; Jianfang Liu

2012-01-01

371

Evaluation of Reasons of Permanent Teeth Extraction in Iranian People (2009)  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Everyday, many people lose their teeth because of various reasons. Knowing the reasons of tooth extraction would help officials to make decisions for helping patients saving their teeth.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the reasons of teeth extraction in dental clinics and some private offices in the city of Kerman in November 2009- February 2010.Materials and Method: In this cross-sectional study, the reasons of teeth extraction in 2076 teeth from 1500 patients selected by simple sampling from Kerman dental clinics were evaluated. Personal data such as gender, age, educational level, occupation, and family size as well as the main reason of tooth extraction (decay, periodontal diseases, prosthesis, tooth impaction, orthodontic reasons, and patient’s request) and the type of tooth were collected by a checklist. Data were analyzed in SPSS, version 11.5 using ?² test.Results: The two main reasons of tooth extraction were dental caries (43.6%) and patient request (30.6%), respectively. Overall, the first and third molars of the lower jaw were the most commonly extracted teeth. There was a significant relationship between gender and tooth extraction because of caries and orthodontic reasons ( p <0.0001). Meanwhile, the patients’ age had a significant relationship with most teeth extraction reasons ( p <0.0001). Except for patient’s request, educational level had a significant impact on other teeth extraction reasons ( p <0.0001). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the most common reasons of tooth extraction were dental caries and patient request despite their restorability. Preventive programs and routine dental examination are recommended.

Kakoei S.; Fatemian M.; Eskandari Zadeh A.; Parirokh M.; Haghdoost AA.

2012-01-01

372

The challenges of treating a fused tooth  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Este caso descreve o tratamento multidisciplinar de um incisivo lateral superior permanente fusionado a um dente supranumerário, ambos apresentando necrose pulpar e lesão periapical. Paciente compareceu ao consultório se queixando de dor, edema e mobilidade do incisivo lateral superior. O preparo endodôntico foi realizado no sentido coroa-ápice e foi colocada pasta de hidróxido de cálcio como medicação intra-canal por 15 dias. A seguir, a obturação foi realizad (more) a pela termoplastificação da guta-percha. Após 18 meses, foram realizados exames clínicos e radiográficos indicando ausência de dor e edema. Dois anos após o tratamento endodôntico, o paciente retornou para o tratamento periodontal e estético. Nove meses depois, foi realizada tomografia computadorizada e observou-se presença de defeito periodontal e lesão periapical. Foi então indicada e planejada a cirurgia paraendodôntica. O dente supranumerário foi removido e a área de comunicação com o canal radicular do incisivo lateral foi preenchida; a loja cirúrgica foi preenchida com vidro bioativo e osso orgânico bovino desmineralizado. O tecido patológico da lesão periapical foi submetido à análise histopatológica sendo diagnosticado como cisto periapical. Um ano após a cirurgia parendodôntica, uma nova tomografia computadorizada mostrou neoformação óssea na região periapical do dente em questão. Doi anos após a cirurgia, a restauração foi trocada devido à motivos estéticos e uma radiografia periapical mostrou sucesso do tratamento (5 anos após o tratamento inicial). Um correto diagnóstico e plano de tratamento multidisciplinar é essencial para o sucesso do tratamento de dentes fusionados à dentes supranumerários. Abstract in english This paper describes and discusses the multidisciplinary treatment involving a permanent maxillary lateral incisor fused to a supernumerary tooth, both presenting pulp necrosis and periapical lesion. A 15-year-old male patient sought treatment complaining of pain, swelling and mobility on the maxillary right lateral incisor. After clinical and radiographic examination, root canal preparation was performed according to the crown-down technique and a calcium hydroxide dress (more) ing was placed for 15 days. The patient returned and the definitive endodontic filling was done with thermomechanical compaction of gutta-percha and sealer. After 18 months, clinical and radiographic examinations were carried out and no pain or swelling was reported. Two years after endodontic treatment, the patient returned for periodontal and cosmetic treatments. Nine months later, a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) revealed that the previously detected periodontal defect and periapical lesion were persistent. Apical endodontic surgery was indicated. The supernumerary tooth was removed, the communicating distal surface was filled and the surgical site received bioactive glass and demineralized bovine organic bone. The pathological tissue was submitted to histopathological examination and the diagnosis was periapical cyst. One year after the apical endodontic surgery, CBCT showed bone formation at maxillary lateral incisor apical area. Two years after the surgery, the restoration was replaced due to aesthetic reasons and periapical radiograph showed success after 5 years of treatment. A correct diagnosis and establishment of an adequate treatment plan resulted in a successful management of the case.

Baratto-Filho, Flares; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Crozeta, Bruno Monguilhott; Baratto, Samantha Pugsley; Campos, Edson Alves; Tomazinho, Flavia Sens Fagundes; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

2012-01-01

373

Effect of multiple adhesive coating on microshear bond strength to primary tooth dentin.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Multiple adhesive coating is a controversial topic, especially in primary dentition that should be clarified. We evaluated the effect of multiple consecutive adhesive resin coatings on the microshear bond strength (?SBS) of composite resin to primary tooth dentin utilizing a filled (Adper Single Bond Plus) and an unfilled (Adper Single Bond) adhesive resin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty extracted primary canines were randomly allocated into two groups based on the adhesive used. Dentin occlusal surfaces were exposed and further polished on 400, 600 and 800-grit silicon-carbide paper. The surfaces were divided into two halves in the labial-lingual orientation. After etching, the adhesives were used either in double coats, or four coats on the halves of the same tooth followed by air evaporation for each layer and finally light curing. Cylinders of composite were bonded to the dentin surfaces. After 24 h shear bond testing was evaluated by Bisco tensile tester. ANOVA, Student t test and paired t test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean (standard deviation) for double coats or four coats in single bond were 31.99 (2.94) and 30.25 (2.69), while they were 29.18 (3.35) and 31.26 (2.07) in single bond plus, respectively. No significant differences were found between the double coated specimens and those receiving four coatings with both adhesives (p>0.05). Micro SBS values of Single Bond double coated specimens were significantly higher than Single Bond Plus (p=0.02). In four-coated specimens, there were no significant differences between Single Bond and Single Bond Plus (p=0.26). CONCLUSION: Applying four coats of adhesive did not improve the ?SBS to primary tooth dentin.

Malekafzali B; Ghasemi A; Torabzadeh H; Hamedani R; Tadayon N

2013-03-01

374

Success Rate of Formocresol Pulpotomy versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Human Primary Molar Tooth  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: In spite of long time and broad use of formaldehyde derivates (Fixation agent) in primary tooth pulp treatment, There is some concerns about these derivates such as variability, inconsistency success rate, mutagenicity, cytotoxicity, alergenicity, and some other potential health hazards of them. Therefore other alternative pulpotomy procedures like Bioactive glass (BAG), Glutaraldehyde (2%), Hydroxyappetite (HA), Bone dried freezed (BDF), ferric sulfate (15%), laser, Electrosurgery (ES), Bone Morphogenic proteins (BMP), recombinant protein-1 (RP1), and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) have been compared. The purpose of this clinical trial is to assess radiographic and clinical success rate of Formocresol (FC) pulpotomy in compare with MTA in human primary molar teeth. Methods: 64 molars were pulpotomized equally and randomly with mineral trioxide Aggregate and Formocresol. Prior to trial, we defined a case as failure, when one or more of the events such as external root resorption, internal root resorption, periapical and furca lucency, pain, swelling, mobility, dental abscess, or early extraction appeared. Every treated tooth was defined as successful, if any noted evident was not shown. Results: Totally, 60 teeth treatment (92.2 percent) were successful and 7.8 percent were failed. Failure and success rates for MTA group were 6.3 and 93.7 percent, respectively. Failure and success rates in FC group were 8.4 and 90.2 percent respectively. The difference between MTA and FC treatment methods was not significant (Fisher Exact test). Conclusion: Findings of this study show that mineral trioxide aggregate can be an alternative procedure for FC pulpotomy of primary tooth. Keywords: Mineral trioxide aggregate, formocresol, pulpotomy, success and failure rate.

S E Jabbarifar; A A Khademi; D Ghasemi

2004-01-01

375

Gingival papilla dimensions in anterosuperior regions adjacent to single-tooth implants.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study compared the dimensions of gingival papillae in anterosuperior areas presenting at natural teeth (teeth sites) or single-tooth implants adjacent to natural teeth (implant-tooth sites) by analyzing determined distances. A total of 45 teeth and 46 implant-tooth sites were carefully selected. Clinical evaluation consisted of visual and quantitative analyses with millimeter grids on radiographs. Implant-tooth sites showed a smaller gingival papilla dimension than tooth sites (P < .01). Both evaluated distances (contact point to bone crest and between the roots of adjacent teeth or implant platform to root of adjacent tooth) in all groups significantly influenced the presence/absence of gingival papillae (P < .01).

Perez F; Segalla JC; Marcantonio E Jr; Lauris JR; Ribeiro JG; Ferreira LP

2012-02-01

376

Intake of dairy calcium and tooth loss among Danish men and women : Dairy calcium and tooth loss  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether gender differences in tooth loss are influenced by caries risk and sources of dietary calcium intake. METHODS: This was a cohort study that included 432 Danish adults (30-60 y old) with information on dietary calcium intake in 1982 and 1983 and tooth loss from 1987 and 1988 through 1993 and 1994. Total calcium intake, estimated by a 7-d food record or a a diet history interview, was divided into dairy and non-dairy forms of calcium. RESULTS: In men, a 10-fold increase in dairy calcium intake was significantly associated with a decreased risk of tooth loss (incidence-rate ratio 0.32, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.68) even after an adjustment for tooth count in 1987 and 1988, age, education, and civil status (model 1), smoking, alcohol consumption, sucrose intake, and use of vitamin and/or mineral supplements (model 2), time since last dental visit and the presence of oral dryness (model 3), and a high Lactobacillus count (model 4). In women, dairy calcium was not statistically associated with tooth loss in the crude and adjusted models (models 1 to 3). However, the association became highly significant once the Lactobacillus count was included in model 4 (incidence-rate ratio 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.09-0.73). Non-dairy calcium was not associated with tooth loss in men and women in the fully adjusted models. CONCLUSION: Dietary calcium intake, particularly calcium from dairy products, seems to protect against loss of teeth in adult men and women. The previous gender differences found in the relation between calcium intake and tooth loss may be the result of differences in the caries risk between genders.

Adegboye, Amanda R A; Twetman, Svante

2011-01-01

377

A rat model for orthodontic translational expansive tooth movement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To present the development of an experimental model in rats for translational expansive tooth movement. SETTING AND SAMPLE: Section of Periodontology at Department of Dentistry Aarhus University. Twenty male Wistar rats in two pilot experimental settings plus seven animals without any intervention serving as controls. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The second molar (group P1) or the second and third molar (group P2) in the maxillae of the animals were moved buccally using transpalatal ?-titanium springs. In the group P2, two spring types (high force and low force) and two preangulations (0° passive or 30° torsion moment) were tested. The amount and type of tooth movement achieved and the resulting skeletal effect were assessed on microCT images, histological analysis was performed on few selected specimens. RESULTS: Expansive translational root movement amounting half a tooth width was achieved. Comparison of the amount of tooth movement at the right and left side of the maxilla showed that the expansion was rather symmetrical in the P2 group. Skeletal widening of the maxilla contributed in the P2 group to approximately one-third of the total root movement, whereas two-thirds were dental movement. CONCLUSION: With the model used in the P2 group, further research on translational expansive tooth movement and its effect on the periodontium can be pursued. In models for orthodontic expansion, it is strongly recommended to separately evaluate skeletal and dental effects.

Danz JC; Dalstra M; Bosshardt DD; Katsaros C; Stavropoulos A

2013-06-01

378

Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging  

Science.gov (United States)

We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth.

Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

2013-07-01

379

Predictors of multiple tooth loss among socioculturally diverse elderly subjects.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This study identifies clinical factors that predict multiple tooth loss in a socioculturally diverse population of older adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 193 participants from English-, Chinese-, or Punjabi-speaking communities in Vancouver, British Columbia, with low incomes and irregular use of dental services were followed for 5 years as part of a clinical trial of a 0.12% chlorhexidine mouthrinse. The participants were interviewed and examined clinically, including panoramic radiographs, at baseline and annually for 5 years. Binary logistic regression was used to test the hypothesis that there was no difference between incidence of multiple (? 3) tooth loss in older people with various biologic, behavioral, prosthodontic, and cultural variables over 5 years. RESULTS: Multiple tooth loss, which was distributed similarly among the groups in the trial, occurred in 39 (20%) participants over 5 years. The use of removable prostheses was the best predictor of loss, followed by the number of carious surfaces and number of sites with gingival attachment loss > 6 mm. The pattern of prediction was consistent across the three linguocultural groups. CONCLUSION: The use of removable dentures was the dominant predictor of multiple tooth loss in the three communities, but that tooth loss was not significantly associated with the cultural heritage of the participants.

Gonda T; MacEntee MI; Kiyak HA; Persson GR; Persson RE; Wyatt C

2013-03-01

380

41Ca - a possible neutron specific biomarker in tooth enamel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The measurement of long-lived radionuclides, produced by neutrons originating from the atomic-bomb explosions, offers the possibility to reconstruct neutron fluences to which survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed. The long-lived radionuclide, 41Ca (T1/2=103 000 years), is suggested here as a means for a retrospective determination of thermal neutron fluences, directly within the human body of a survivor. As proper material tooth enamel is proposed. The 41Ca signal in tooth enamel may be correlated with the exposure to A-bomb induced thermal neutron fluences, provided the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca is significantly lower. Therefore, tooth samples of unexposed survivors of the A-bomb explosions have been examined by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, in order to quantify the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca. Measured 41Ca/Ca ratios were confirmed to be as low as about 2 x 10-15. Thus, the A-bomb induced additional signal should be detectable for survivors at epidemiological relevant distances. Since tooth enamel had already been used as a dosemeter for gamma radiation from the A-bomb explosion, the detection of 41Ca in tooth enamel would allow, for the first time, an assessment of both, ?-ray and neutron exposures in the same biological material.

2004-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

Relation of Birth Weight with Time of First Deciduous Tooth  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The deciduous teeth play a very important role in proper alignment, placing and occlusion of permanent teeth. Calcification of deciduous teeth begins during the fourth month of fetal life, and by the end of sixth month all of the deciduous teeth have begun calcification. Eruption date is variable and timing of eruption "runs in families". Delay of deciduous teeth eruption, especially the first teeth cause nutritional problem for infant and some worries for family. In this study we compare the time of eruption of first deciduous teeth in infant with their birth weight. A total of 148 infant who born at Shariati Hospital in Tehran in 2004- 2005 consecutively entered the study. Other data such as sex, birth weight, gestational age and time of first tooth eruption were collected. The mean birth weight was 3220 ± 420 grams. 5.5% of cases were less than 2500 grams and 19.9% were over 3500 grams. The patients were followed weekly since third month of birth till the time of their first tooth eruption and the data was analyzed. The mean age of eruption of first tooth was 7.68 ± 1.84 months. The results showed a reverse linear relationship between first deciduous tooth eruption and birth weight. So delayed tooth eruption may relate to birth weight.

Sajjadian Negar; Shajari Hamideh; Kowsari ali; Mosavi Nasub ali

2009-01-01

382

Msx1 mutations: how do they cause tooth agenesis?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level.

Wang Y; Kong H; Mues G; D'Souza R

2011-03-01

383

Msx1 mutations: how do they cause tooth agenesis?  

Science.gov (United States)

Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

Wang, Y; Kong, H; Mues, G; D'Souza, R

2011-03-01

384

Failure of tooth eruption in two patients with cerebral palsy and bruxism-a 10-year follow-up: a case report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this paper was to analyze delayed tooth eruption in two children with cerebral palsy who had severe bruxism and to determine whether treatment could influence tooth eruption and alignment. Extraction of primary teeth was carried out and orthodontic treatment was considered due to severe tooth wear of primary teeth, lack of space, and development of a class III malocclusion. Analysis was based on clinical examination, photographs, radiographs, and dental casts. In both patients, early mixed dentition was delayed for more than 5 years. Calcification and root development of posterior permanent teeth corresponded with the chronological age. Root resorption of the severely abraded primary teeth and eruption of their successors were delayed or failed. Eruption of permanent teeth occurred slowly after primary teeth were extracted. Orthodontic treatment succeeded in one patient, achieving a normal overjet in combination with a successful orofacial therapy. The disturbed exfoliation of abraded primary teeth and failure of tooth eruption of the posterior teeth could be linked to the systemic pathology and to bruxism. At age 20, eruption of the canines and premolars remained questionable.

Staufer K; Hamadeh S; Gesch D

2009-07-01

385

Study on the effect of x-ray radiation on the dental extraction wounds  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Male Donryu rats were irradiated with 1,500 rad (group 2) or 2,000 rad (group 3) with a 10 MeV electron beam. Seven days later their first left upper molar (M1) was extracted, and the dental extraction wound was examined histopathologically 3, 7, 14, 21, 35, 49 and 90 days later (5 rats each day). The findings were compared with those obtained on nonirradiated rats whose M1 were also removed (group 1). Covering by epithelium was seen on all the rats in group 1 on the 7th day after tooth extraction, in group 2 on the 21st day, and in group 3 on the 49th day. The bone absorption of tooth extraction lacuna in group 2 and 3 was prominent, increasing with time, as compared with group 1. Sequester formation was particularly prominent in group 3, and in many cases the extraction lacuna was malformed. Restoration by regenerated bone was detected in group 1 on the 14th day after tooth extraction, and in group 2 on the 35th day, but it was only slight in group 3 even on the 90th day. Therefore, it was clear that irradiation of the upper jaw of rats before tooth extraction caused delayed healing of the lacuna of the extracted tooth, and that the effect was dose dependent.

Shimizu, Takefumi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo. School of Dentistry)

1982-03-01

386

Asymmetric extractions in orthodontics  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english INTRODUCTION: Extraction decisions are extremely important in during treatment planning. In addition to the extraction decision orthodontists have to choose what tooth should be extracted for the best solution of the problem and the esthetic/functional benefit of the patient. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing the literature relating the advantages, disadvantages and clinical implications of asymmetric extractions to orthodontics. METHODS: Keywords were selected in (more) English and Portuguese and the EndNote 9 program was used for data base search in PubMed, Web of Science (WSc) and LILACS. The selected articles were case reports, original articles and prospective or retrospective case-control studies concerning asymmetrical extractions of permanent teeth for the treatment of malocclusions. CONCLUSION: According to the literature reviewed asymmetric extractions can make some specific treatment mechanics easier. Cases finished with first permanent molars in Class II or III relationship in one or both sides seem not to cause esthetic or functional problems. However, diagnosis knowledge and mechanics control are essential for treatment success.

Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Araújo, Mônica Tirre de Souza

2012-04-01

387

Asymmetric extractions in orthodontics  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Extraction decisions are extremely important in during treatment planning. In addition to the extraction decision orthodontists have to choose what tooth should be extracted for the best solution of the problem and the esthetic/functional benefit of the patient. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing the literature relating the advantages, disadvantages and clinical implications of asymmetric extractions to orthodontics. METHODS: Keywords were selected in English and Portuguese and the EndNote 9 program was used for data base search in PubMed, Web of Science (WSc) and LILACS. The selected articles were case reports, original articles and prospective or retrospective case-control studies concerning asymmetrical extractions of permanent teeth for the treatment of malocclusions. CONCLUSION: According to the literature reviewed asymmetric extractions can make some specific treatment mechanics easier. Cases finished with first permanent molars in Class II or III relationship in one or both sides seem not to cause esthetic or functional problems. However, diagnosis knowledge and mechanics control are essential for treatment success.

Camilo Aquino Melgaço; Mônica Tirre de Souza Araújo

2012-01-01

388

Immediate natural tooth pontic: a viable yet temporary prosthetic solution: a patient reported outcome.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: In patients with hopeless prognosis of the anterior teeth there is still a strong desire to save them for the sake of esthetics. If not grossly carious, broken down or discolored the extracted tooth after suitable modifications can be placed back in its original site by splinting it to the adjacent stable teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen patients (10 males, 5 females) in the age range of 40-65 years with pathologically migrated, unsalvageable teeth were treated by splinting the extracted teeth immediately with the stable adjacent teeth. After 12 weeks, all the patients were explained various treatment options available for replacement of the lost teeth. The patients were asked to fill out a simple closed ended questionnaire citing the various difficulties encountered during this transitional period, selection of further treatment modalities and the reasons for their choice. The feedback obtained was then analyzed statistically. RESULTS: Hundred percent of patients were happy with the esthetics; however, 60% of them were dissatisfied with the function that it provided. The primary problem being apprehension of splint fracture and difficulty while incising and the data was found to be statistically significant (P=0.01**). All patients demanded a permanent treatment option following this with a fixed prosthesis. None of the patients were interested in the implant supported prosthesis due to cost, treatment time involved, and need for surgery. CONCLUSION: The concept of immediate pontic placement is surely a viable treatment option and promises an excellent transient esthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as enables good preparation of the extraction site for future prosthetic replacement.

Bhandari S; Chaturvedi R

2012-01-01

389

Determination of sex from tooth pulp tissue  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective This study was carried out to determine the reliability of sex determination from teeth pulp tissue. Patients and methods This study was carried on 60 maxillary and mandibular premolars and permanent molars (30 male teeth and 30 female teeth) which were indicated for extraction. The teeth were categorized into three groups of 20 each (10 from males and 10 from females).Group 1-pulp tissue from teeth examined immediately after extraction. Group 2- and Group 3-pulp tissue examined from teeth one and five month after extraction, respectively. Teeth was sectioned and pulpal cells were stained with quinacrine dihydrochloride. The cells were observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender was determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp. Results Freshly extracted teeth and for those examined one month later, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and efficiency were all 100%. Conclusion The fluorescent Y body test is shown to be a reliable, simple, and cost-effective technique for gender identification in the immediate postmortem period up to one month.

Veeraraghavan, Gajendra; Lingappa, Ashok; Shankara, Shiva Prasad; Mamatha, Gowda Panchaksharappa; Sebastian, Bastian Thattil; Mujib, Ahmed

2010-01-01

390

[In vitro cultivation of tooth germs (in mice)].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mouse molars tooth buds on the bell stage were cultured, to investigate the best medium for their maintainance and their eventual clinical use. Tooth germs were cultivated during 3 to 8 days in three different medium: Eagle basal medium (liquid medium), agar-solidified medium and chick chorioallantoic membrane. The grafts were examined by light microscopy. Mesenchymal and atypical cells were counted in experimental and control groups. Our results showed that liquid medium was the best for 3-days buds cultures. Chorioallantoic membrane and agar-solidified medium showed better results for the maintainance of bud cultures for 8-day test. The objective of this study is to maintain in vitro tooth buds cultures for future transplants. This will also provide for the possibility of a more in-depth study of normal odontogenesis.

Campos P; Wurgaft R; Montenegro MA

1989-12-01

391

Mechanochemical control of mesenchymal condensation and embryonic tooth organ formation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mesenchymal condensation is critical for organogenesis, yet little is known about how this process is controlled. Here we show that Fgf8 and Sema3f, produced by early dental epithelium, respectively, attract and repulse mesenchymal cells, which cause them to pack tightly together during mouse tooth development. Resulting mechanical compaction-induced changes in cell shape induce odontogenic transcription factors (Pax9, Msx1) and a chemical cue (BMP4), and mechanical compression of mesenchyme is sufficient to induce tooth-specific cell fate switching. The inductive effects of cell compaction are mediated by suppression of the mechanical signaling molecule RhoA, and its overexpression prevents odontogenic induction. Thus, the mesenchymal condensation that drives tooth formation is induced by antagonistic epithelial morphogens that manifest their pattern-generating actions mechanically via changes in mesenchymal cell shape and altered mechanotransduction. PMID:21924961

Mammoto, Tadanori; Mammoto, Akiko; Torisawa, Yu-suke; Tat, Tracy; Gibbs, Ashley; Derda, Ratmir; Mannix, Robert; de Bruijn, Marlieke; Yung, Chong Wing; Huh, Dongeun; Ingber, Donald E

2011-09-15

392

Mechanochemical control of mesenchymal condensation and embryonic tooth organ formation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Mesenchymal condensation is critical for organogenesis, yet little is known about how this process is controlled. Here we show that Fgf8 and Sema3f, produced by early dental epithelium, respectively, attract and repulse mesenchymal cells, which cause them to pack tightly together during mouse tooth development. Resulting mechanical compaction-induced changes in cell shape induce odontogenic transcription factors (Pax9, Msx1) and a chemical cue (BMP4), and mechanical compression of mesenchyme is sufficient to induce tooth-specific cell fate switching. The inductive effects of cell compaction are mediated by suppression of the mechanical signaling molecule RhoA, and its overexpression prevents odontogenic induction. Thus, the mesenchymal condensation that drives tooth formation is induced by antagonistic epithelial morphogens that manifest their pattern-generating actions mechanically via changes in mesenchymal cell shape and altered mechanotransduction.

Mammoto T; Mammoto A; Torisawa YS; Tat T; Gibbs A; Derda R; Mannix R; de Bruijn M; Yung CW; Huh D; Ingber DE

2011-10-01

393

Non-barotraumatic tooth fracture during scuba diving.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: When dental pain or tooth fracture occurs during diving, variations in atmospheric pressure are usually considered as etiology. CASE REPORT: We present a case of a military diver referred for dental pain which appeared during diving. Diagnoses suggested by the diving medical specialist were barodontalgia and dental barotrauma. The dental exam, however, highlighted a tooth fracture due to the in-diving use of an inappropriate mouth regulator which yielded excessive occlusal pressure on a tooth with pre-existing extensive dental restoration. DISCUSSION: This case highlights the importance of the use of an adapted mouthpiece by divers, and the need for awareness of physicians and dentists who treat divers of the implications of scuba diving on dental and oral medicine.

Gunepin M; Zadik Y; Derache F; Dychter L

2013-06-01

394

PASTES FOR IMPROVING TOOTH USING MICRO HYDROXYAPATITE POWDERS  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Tooth improving paste using hydroxyapatite powder with excellent bio-compatibility is provided to give polishability to a surface of teeth without enamel damage and remove causative bacterium of decayed teeth. Tooth improving paste using hydroxyapatite powder with excellent bio-compatibility comprises 100 parts of hydroxyapatite powder, 80-100 parts of precipitated calcium carbonate, 5-15 parts of sodium chloride, 120-180 parts of silicon dioxide and 5-10 parts of sodium monofluorophosphate by weight. The Tooth improving paste using hydroxyapatite powder with excellent bio-compatibility additionally contains 200-300 parts of purified water and co-additives. A particle size of the hydroxyapatite powder is 200(<=75mum)-635mesh(<=20mum).

RYU SU CHAK

395

Prevalence of periodontal pocketing and tooth mobility according to tooth types in Nigerians--a pilot study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of periodontal pocketing and tooth mobility according to the tooth types in the mouth. There is a paucity of knowledge concerning which tooth types are more prone to periodontal disease from the review of literature. The study sample comprised 255 subjects, age ranged 16 years to 74 years. These subjects were those referred to the Periodontology Clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, for one form of periodontal disease or the other. All the teeth were tested for periodontal pocketing using William's periodontal probe (Astir Intermedica, Kensington, London) and for tooth mobility using the Miller's Mobility Index method. The study showed that prevalence of tooth mobility is in this descending order--lower incisors, upper incisors, upper first molars, upper second molars, lower first and second molar, the premolars and lastly, the canines with the least occurrence on the upper left canines. This order is slightly different for prevalence of periodontal pocketing. The teeth most affected by pocketing were the upper second molars, followed by upper first molars, lower second molars with the least being the canines. It is suggested that exceptional care be given to these most susceptible teeth for periodontal disease in the mouth in order to prevent the development of irreversible damage of the periodontium.

Arowojolu MO

2002-06-01

396

Effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on orthodontic tooth movement.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on (1) the velocity of orthodontic tooth movement and (2) the nitric oxide levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) during orthodontic treatment. The sample consisted of 20 patients (14 girls, six boys) whose maxillary first premolars were extracted and canines distalized. A gallium-aluminum-arsenide (Ga-Al-As) diode laser was applied on the day 0, and the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days when the retraction of the maxillary lateral incisors was initiated. The right maxillary lateral incisors composed the study group (the laser group), whereas the left maxillary lateral incisors served as the control. The teeth in the laser group received a total of ten doses of laser application: five doses from the buccal and five doses from the palatal side (two cervical, one middle, two apical) with an output power of 20 mW and a dose of 0.71 J /cm(2). Gingival crevicular fluid samples were obtained on the above-mentioned days, and the nitric oxide levels were analyzed. Bonferroni and repeated measures variant analysis tests were used for statistical analysis with the significance level set at p ? 0.05. The application of low-level laser therapy accelerated orthodontic tooth movement significantly; there were no statistically significant changes in the nitric oxide levels of the gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic treatment.

Genc G; Kocadereli I; Tasar F; Kilinc K; El S; Sarkarati B

2013-01-01

397

A technique to measure the absorbed dose in human tooth enamel using EPR method  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The EPR spectrum of irradiated tooth enamel contains a multitude of signals that are divided into two categories of radiation-induced and radiation insensitive (native) signals. At lower doses the broad native signal obscures the radiation-induced signal. In this work attempt has been made to find a method to measure the radiation-induced signal other than peak-to-peak signal amplitude measurement. For this reason software was programmed to extract the data from EPR system. The average amplitude of the radiation-induced EPR signal which is defined between the known g-values can also be calculated using the software. The result of this calculations were considered as the EPR response for the tooth enamel samples irradiated from 100 to 500 mGy and was drawn as the calibration curve. The resulted data as compared to the peak-to-peak amplitude measurement method seems to be more reproducible and shows a better variation against the dose values.

Lanjanian, H. [Pasargad University of Applied Science and Technology, P.O. Box 73741-173, Saadat Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziaie, F. [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School (AMIRS), Dosimetry and Radiation Monitoring Group, P.O. Box 31485-498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: fziaie@yahoo.com; Modarresi, M. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University of Shahre-Rey Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikzad, M. [National Radiation Protection Department, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahvar, A. [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School (AMIRS), Dosimetry and Radiation Monitoring Group, P.O. Box 31485-498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Durrani, S.A. [School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2008-08-15