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1

Oncology nursing care standards  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Oncology nursing as a specialised nursing discipline has no published nursing care standards for South Africa. The purpose of this study was to formulate oncology nursing standards for a particular research hospital A specific approach was used and the oncology nursing experts in the research hospital compiled and formulated the standards. Group discussions and critical debating of the standards followed. The standards were ratified by means of verbal consensus between the experts and professional nurses in the oncology unit. These standards could serve as a guide to ensure quality oncology nursing care. National validation of the standards is recommended

A.M. de Kleijn; M.E. Muller

1991-01-01

2

Using standardized patient with immediate feedback and group discussion to teach interpersonal and communication skills to advanced practice nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Interpersonal and communication skills (IPCS) are essential for advanced practice nursing (APN) in our increasingly complex healthcare system. The Standardized Patient (SP) is a promising innovative pedagogy in medical and healthcare education; however, its effectiveness for teaching IPCS to graduate nursing students remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: We examined the effectiveness of using SP with SP feedback and group discussion to teach IPCS in graduate nursing education. DESIGN: Randomized-controlled study. PARTICIPANTS: First-year APN students in Taiwan. METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (SP assessments with SP feedback and group discussion) or control (SP assessments only) group. There were two outcome indicators: IPCS and student learning satisfaction (SLS). The IPCS were assessed before and after the study in interviews with the SPs. SLS was measured when the study ended. RESULTS: All participants expressed high SLS (94.44%) and showed significant (p ? 0.025) improvements on IPCS total scores, interviewing, and counseling. However, there were no significant differences between groups. Qualitative feedback from encounters with SPs is described. CONCLUSIONS: Using SPs to teach IPCS to APN students produced a high SLS. The students learned and significantly improved their IPCS by interviewing SPs, but future studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of SP feedback and group discussions.

Lin EC; Chen SL; Chao SY; Chen YC

2013-06-01

3

[Teaching of nursing administration: the nurses' experience  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to disclose the nurses comprehension about the Nursing Administration discipline taught in the Nursing graduation course of the Nursing School of São Paulo University. We have followed the phenomenology as the methodological way, and MARTINS; BICUDO were taken as the basic authors and main axis of the research. Being guided by this referencial, we have done this study together with eight nurses and we could do a description and comprehension speeches trying to bring out the meaning of what was understood about their phenomenon studied. From the phenomenological analysis of the nurses' reports appeared the possibilities an limits of the teaching of this discipline.

Gaidzinski RR; Leite MM; Takahashi RT

1998-04-01

4

[Teaching of nursing administration: the nurses' experience].  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to disclose the nurses comprehension about the Nursing Administration discipline taught in the Nursing graduation course of the Nursing School of São Paulo University. We have followed the phenomenology as the methodological way, and MARTINS; BICUDO were taken as the basic authors and main axis of the research. Being guided by this referencial, we have done this study together with eight nurses and we could do a description and comprehension speeches trying to bring out the meaning of what was understood about their phenomenon studied. From the phenomenological analysis of the nurses' reports appeared the possibilities an limits of the teaching of this discipline. PMID:9668880

Gaidzinski, R R; Leite, M M; Takahashi, R T

1998-04-01

5

Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking  

Science.gov (United States)

The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

Clark, Doris A.

2010-01-01

6

Teaching holistic nursing using clinical simulation: A pedagogical essay  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Major nursing organizations that set standards for nursing practice and education emphasize the holistic nature of nursing practice. The patient-centered approach to holistic healing requires specialized knowledge, skills, and attitudes that move the student from focusing on the patient as an individual with physiological and/or psychological problems to a person on a healing journey. Strategies that foster the development of such knowledge, skills, and attitudes are necessary to prepare students to provide holistic care. Clinical simulation, an active teaching/learning strategy is effective for teaching holistic nursing practice. This pedagogical essay presents a holistic nursing clinical simulation scenario and grading rubric.

Mary Ann Cordeau

2012-01-01

7

Adopting nursing health record standards.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The exploratory investigation described in this paper tried to identify and acknowledge the added value created by the adoption of nursing practice standards. It did so using a case study in a large Portuguese hospital. Following a literature review, five assumptions were proposed. Subsequently, a survey was developed and administered to a sample of nursing staff at the hospital in question. Our results confirmed all but our final assumption, leading to the conclusion that the adoption of standards is beneficial to nursing practice.

Rocha A; Rocha B

2013-08-01

8

Nursing service management standards  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The nursing service manager is responsible and accountable for quality nursing service management to facilitate optimal attainment of the goals/objectives and outcomes within the context and scope of health service delivery of the health care organisation.

Opsomming

Marie Muller

9

Online teaching efficacy of nurse faculty.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to examine variables that affect nurse faculty self-efficacy levels and participation in online teaching. Specifically, this study sought to understand how teaching experience and preparatory experiences might correlate with high or low self-efficacy perceptions of online teaching in the domains of student engagement, instructional strategies, classroom management, and use of computers. The 32-item Michigan Nurse Educators Sense of Efficacy for Online Teaching instrument was used to measure online teaching efficacy through a Web-based survey that collected data from a cross-section of Michigan nurse educators employed at public accredited higher education institutions. Findings revealed that the 140 nurse educators in this study had "some" to "quite a bit" of online teaching efficacy. High online teaching efficacy scores correlated positively with mastery and preparatory experiences. Primarily, the highest levels of online teaching efficacy resulted after teaching at least three online courses. This study has implications for nurse administrators interested in growing online offerings in their schools. For nurse educators, important motivating variables include the use of satisfactory preparatory experiences and release time through the third online teaching experience. These experiences are related to higher online teaching efficacy that correlates to participation in online teaching.

Robinia KA; Anderson ML

2010-05-01

10

Online teaching efficacy of nurse faculty.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine variables that affect nurse faculty self-efficacy levels and participation in online teaching. Specifically, this study sought to understand how teaching experience and preparatory experiences might correlate with high or low self-efficacy perceptions of online teaching in the domains of student engagement, instructional strategies, classroom management, and use of computers. The 32-item Michigan Nurse Educators Sense of Efficacy for Online Teaching instrument was used to measure online teaching efficacy through a Web-based survey that collected data from a cross-section of Michigan nurse educators employed at public accredited higher education institutions. Findings revealed that the 140 nurse educators in this study had "some" to "quite a bit" of online teaching efficacy. High online teaching efficacy scores correlated positively with mastery and preparatory experiences. Primarily, the highest levels of online teaching efficacy resulted after teaching at least three online courses. This study has implications for nurse administrators interested in growing online offerings in their schools. For nurse educators, important motivating variables include the use of satisfactory preparatory experiences and release time through the third online teaching experience. These experiences are related to higher online teaching efficacy that correlates to participation in online teaching. PMID:20488426

Robinia, Kristi A; Anderson, Mary L

11

Nursing specialty knowledge as expressed by standardized nursing languages.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To describe how nursing specialty knowledge is demonstrated in nursing records by use of standardized nursing languages. METHODS: A cross-sectional review of nursing records (N = 265) in four specialties. FINDINGS: The most common nursing diagnoses represented basic human needs of patients across specialties. The nursing diagnoses and related interventions represented specific knowledge in each specialty. Sixty-three nursing diagnoses (nine appeared in four specialties) and 168 nursing interventions were used (24 appeared in four specialties). CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that standardized nursing languages are capable of distinguishing between specialties. Further studies with large data sets are needed to explore the relationships between nursing diagnoses and nursing interventions in order to make explicit the knowledge that nurses use in their nursing practice. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nursing data in clinical practice must be stored and retrievable to support clinical decision making, advance nursing knowledge, and the unique perspective of nursing.

Thoroddsen A; Ehnfors M; Ehrenberg A

2010-04-01

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Nursing service management standards  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The nursing service manager is responsible and accountable for quality nursing service management to facilitate optimal attainment of the goals/objectives and outcomes within the context and scope of health service delivery of the health care organisation. OpsommingDie verpleegdiensbestuur is verantwoordelik en aanspreeklik vir gehalte-verpleegdiensbestuur om optimale bereiking van doelwitte/doelstellings en uitkomste binne die konteks en omvang van gesondheidsdienslewering in ‘n gesondheidsdiens te fasiliteer. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Marie Muller

2000-01-01

13

Who Will Teach the Nurses?  

Science.gov (United States)

In 1999, most deans of nursing schools that belonged to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported that they did not have a faculty shortage. By 2005, however, 75 percent of U.S. nursing schools cited faculty shortages as the major reason for denying admission to qualified students. The average age of nurse educators holding PhDs is…

LaRocco, Susan A.

2006-01-01

14

[Cost teaching in graduate nursing schools].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present study intends to analyse the implement of content related to Costs in the Management Applied to Nursing subject in Graduate Nursing Schools in Sao Paulo State. The descriptive, exploratory associative study with a quantitative approach was put into effect in 28 professionals at the Nursing Schools. The results demonstrated that 19 (67.86%) professors teach that subject in graduation. No statistically significant correlation or association has been found among Cost Teaching, the Number of Post Graduation staff and the type of Institutions they work for (Public or Private).

Francisco IM; Castilho V

2004-09-01

15

[Teaching nursing: 20 years at the university  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

During the twenty years in which nursing has been taught as a university subject field, its teaching methods have undergone two stages: a first one about ten years long in which the change produced in the orientation toward nursing care originated a conceptual and methodological whirlwind advancing the profession in a way which had never before occurred; and a second stage in which the conceptual waters tend to subdue and the first doubts begin to appear about whether or not the profession is walking down the right path. This article proposes to serve as a reflection on the twenty year history of Nursing as a university subject field as well as to reflect on how we can construct the future on this base, not only in nursing studies themselves and the manner of teaching these studies, but in the profession as a whole. The author presented this as a conference at the Spanish Association of Nursing Teachers' XVIII "Working Days" Conference.

de la Torre Fernández-Trujillo J

1999-11-01

16

Nursing informatics: scope and standards of practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The American Nurses Association published the third iteration of its nursing informatics scope and standards of practice in 2008. This work reflects the significant evolution of the specialty from the original scope of practice statement published in 1994 and the first nursing informatics standards of practice in 1995. Although the definition of nursing informatics remains essentially unchanged from that presented in 2001, the inclusion of "wisdom" reflects today's emerging mandate for evidence-based practice and decision support resources for the knowledge worker.

Bickford CJ

2009-01-01

17

Teaching caring in nursing: a needs assessment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Despite the fact that caring is the heart of nursing, there is growing evidence that nurses are not as effective as they ought to be in their caring role. This signifies that more attention needs to be given to the teaching of caring. The aim of this study was to pave the way to initiate the process of research on teaching caring, by suggesting priority areas. The needs assessment design was used for the study. Five steps were involved to achieve the aims. The first was to explore the nature and meaning of caring as presented in the literature. The second was to review completed research on aspects of caring within the nursing context. The third was to investigate the position of caring in the present nursing education system. The fourth was to investigate ways of promoting the teaching of caring as advocated in the literature and the final step based on inferences made from the first four steps was to suggest priority areas for research on teaching caring in nursing.

Hilla Brink

1990-01-01

18

[Teaching nursing administration through health education].  

Science.gov (United States)

This article analyzes a teaching experience in the course of Nursing Administration at a Federal University, with fourth-year students majoring in Nursing. Based on the conception by which unit and care managements are associated, since nurses who manage funds should typically aim at the assistance process and cannot lose sight of the assistance quality, students built a health education proposal to be developed with adolescents at a public school by integrating basic health unit, school, and university. Through this work, students were able to associate theory and practice by carrying out an exercise comprehending planning, decision-making, leadership, teamwork, evaluation, and control. PMID:15603498

Greco, Rosangela Maria

19

[Teaching nursing administration through health education].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article analyzes a teaching experience in the course of Nursing Administration at a Federal University, with fourth-year students majoring in Nursing. Based on the conception by which unit and care managements are associated, since nurses who manage funds should typically aim at the assistance process and cannot lose sight of the assistance quality, students built a health education proposal to be developed with adolescents at a public school by integrating basic health unit, school, and university. Through this work, students were able to associate theory and practice by carrying out an exercise comprehending planning, decision-making, leadership, teamwork, evaluation, and control.

Greco RM

2004-07-01

20

[Graduate nursing teaching at Unicamp: policies and practices].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The authors analyse teaching at the graduate nursing program from Unicamp (SP), starting from the introduction of a new curriculum in 1997, in accordance to the curricular standards taken from Federal Law concerning education. In theory, the changes implemented subvert the established order. It has been a hard task to operate curricular reform in a public university that is experiencing a financial and management crisis--reflections of a neoliberal ideology in public education policies, which increasingly values scientific production to the detriment of initiatives toward quality teaching. The difficulties found demanded some considerations and the proposition of seven fundamental thesis in order to subsidize problem analysis and guide necessary interventions. Among them, the theme Policies and Practice in nursing teaching is focused in this text.

Nozawa MR; Kirschbaum DI; da Silva MA; Silva EM

2003-11-01

 
 
 
 
21

Innovative approach to teaching communication skills to nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study assessed the effectiveness of a learner-centered simulation intervention designed to improve the communication skills of preprofessional sophomore nursing students. An innovative teaching strategy in which communication skills are taught to nursing students by using trained actors who served as standardized family members in a clinical learning laboratory setting was evaluated using a two-group posttest design. In addition to current standard education, the intervention group received a formal training session presenting a framework for communication and a 60-minute practice session with the standardized family members. Four domains of communication-introduction, gathering of information, imparting information, and clarifying goals and expectations-were evaluated in the control and intervention groups in individual testing sessions with a standardized family member. The intervention group performed better than the control group in all four tested domains related to communication skills, and the difference was statistically significant in the domain of gathering information (p = 0.0257).

Zavertnik JE; Huff TA; Munro CL

2010-02-01

22

Innovative approach to teaching communication skills to nursing students.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study assessed the effectiveness of a learner-centered simulation intervention designed to improve the communication skills of preprofessional sophomore nursing students. An innovative teaching strategy in which communication skills are taught to nursing students by using trained actors who served as standardized family members in a clinical learning laboratory setting was evaluated using a two-group posttest design. In addition to current standard education, the intervention group received a formal training session presenting a framework for communication and a 60-minute practice session with the standardized family members. Four domains of communication-introduction, gathering of information, imparting information, and clarifying goals and expectations-were evaluated in the control and intervention groups in individual testing sessions with a standardized family member. The intervention group performed better than the control group in all four tested domains related to communication skills, and the difference was statistically significant in the domain of gathering information (p = 0.0257). PMID:19810670

Zavertnik, Jean Ellen; Huff, Tanya A; Munro, Cindy L

2010-02-04

23

Nursing research: historical background and teaching information strategies.  

Science.gov (United States)

The expansion of research-based literature is one of the foremost goals of the nursing profession. Linked to this goal are the utilization and further development of nursing libraries. This paper discusses some historical factors that have influenced nursing literature. It presents a model for teaching graduate nursing students the relationship between research and library information skills.

Sarkis, J M; Conners, V L

1986-01-01

24

Training for teaching professional nurses in the view of teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A vast number of technical and professional nursing courses were introduced in Brazil in the last decade, motivated mainly by the PROFAE - Qualification Project for Nursing Area Workers, from the Brazilian Health Ministry. Therefore, a new work field was opened for recent graduated nursing bachelors, who became professors in these technical and professional courses. This study, aligned with Practical Pedagogic research and its relation with educational formation, focused on the Standard School in Campo Grande/ MS nursing teachers' performance, analyzing their pedagogic academic and practice background. This study has a qualitative and descriptive-explanatory approach, and focuses on a sixteen teachers group, graduated in different institutions, including bachelors and licensed nurses. The data was collected through a questionnaire organized in three stages, focusing on the formation, professional practice, and the teacher's perception regarding its teaching experience. By analyzing the content obtained, the information extracted suggested that almost all teachers had a very general formation, and that they did not consider enough the initial formation as a preparation for a satisfactory performance in teaching, mainly because of a lack of classes about teachers development. The professional and educational experience, along with the permanent education possibility were considered decisive elements to the teaching learning development. In addition, it was evident that teachers, specially the ones in the beginning of their careers, were usually influenced by a professor who had a significant impact along their formation. Although teaching is seen as a salary complement, part of the survey participants considered it as a source of professional satisfaction, more effective than the nursing practice, due to its autonomy. It is also noticeable the difficulty this group has in building a professional identity, due to the lack of an adequate professional teaching preparation. Few teachers express a more elaborate comprehension of the "competencies education", however it is possible to identify some change indicators, due to their interest in learning the constructivist method, the globalized education and the professional competencies development. These are continuous change factors, probably stimulated by the paradigm changes in the nursing education and in the advances this movement has promoted in the legislation area.

Marcos Antonio Ferreira Júnior,Josefa Aparecida Gonçalves Grígoli

2010-01-01

25

Nursing care plan standardized breastfeeding  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The superiority of human milk in feeding the human infant is incontestable. Breastmilk is a living food can´t be copied and is supported by numerous arguments in support of excellence, both biological and anthropometric or economic. Despite it, has been a significant decline in this practice. Scientific advances, sociological changes and the lack f health personnel have contributed to this expense. Currently, both the WHO and UNICEF cone try relaunching excusive breastfeeding as feeding the infant until 6 months of life. Initiatives whit the Baby Friendly Hospital or the Strategic Plan for the Protection, Promotion and Support of Breastfeeding trying to promote the recognition of breastfeeding as irrefutable cornerstone for optimal growth and development of our children.Goal: Unify care criteria and actions to promote breastfeeding initiation and maintenance of the same, improving communication between professionals and between them and patients.Methodology: Care Development Plan following the NANDA taxonomies, NOC, NIC.Conclusions: Standardized work promotes decision making and performance of nursing staff to develop a happy breastfeeding.

Susana de la Flor Picado; Ana Belén Hernández López

2013-01-01

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Standards to assure quality in nursing research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The focus of this article is quality assurance in nursing research. Due to well established problems regarding the education of nursing research and increasing pressure to take responsibility for the quality of all educational activities, departments of nursing are obliged to initiate action; to assure quality in nursing research. A nursing department functions within a well-defined external context. The external context comprises of various aspects such as rolplayer expectations and current educational and professional legislation. Standards are the basic components of any quality assurance system (Booyens, 1996:305). Standards give direction to the practitioner and must be compiled within the context of the country’s cultural, philosophical and ethical value systems, as well as its social economic and political development.

SCD Zeelie

2003-01-01

27

Standardized nursing classification systems: necessary, but not sufficient, for representing what nurses do.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The American Nurses Association Steering Committee on Databases to Support Nursing Practice has recognized three standardized nursing intervention classification systems. Because each of these classifications systems focuses on encoding informational abstractions of nursing actions, rather than prov...

Henry, S. B.; Mead, C. N.

28

Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

Yildirim D; Yildirim A; Timucin A

2007-07-01

29

Growing nurse leaders: an undergraduate teaching assistant program.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In today's complex health care system, leader behaviors are critical for all nurses. The undergraduate teaching assistant (TA) program empowers students to develop leadership behaviors through a collaborative mentoring model. This successful program enables undergraduate students to collaborate with faculty and graduate TAs in co-teaching large classes. The collaborative mentoring, structured class, and ongoing support provide fertile ground for growing nurse leaders.

Chandler GE

2005-12-01

30

Assessing Teaching Med-Nursing Physics Replacing Introductory Physics in Nursing College  

Science.gov (United States)

The introductory physics is taught by a physics teacher who integrated nursing technique with the text in the nursing format, in nursing language and demonstrating in class the operation of nursing instruments, with lecture support from a nursing teacher. This is teaching med-nursing physics. The null hypothesis is rejected under the alternative hypothesis that teaching med-nursing physics is superior than teaching traditional introductory physics in the nursing college of the study university, by a traditional trained physics teacher. The study design is a case group comparing with 6 groups of controls, who from 24and 5-year-discipline systems are taking or took the introductory physics. The superiority testing is relied on the accessment form that has 10 questions on the introductory physics, and 10 questions on nursing technique. The SAS procedure of GLM has been employed for the 1-way ANOVA on the 20 accessment questions, under scoring systems.

Wang, Wen-Ruey; Lin, Y.; Chen, K.

2006-12-01

31

Nursing research: historical background and teaching information strategies.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The expansion of research-based literature is one of the foremost goals of the nursing profession. Linked to this goal are the utilization and further development of nursing libraries. This paper discusses some historical factors that have influenced nursing literature. It presents a model for teach...

Sarkis, J M; Conners, V L

32

Broken communication in nursing can kill: teaching communication is vital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing communication is vital to quality and safe nursing care. Evidence continues to increase that communication breakdowns are responsible for medication errors, unnecessary costs, and inadequate patient care. Nursing students can be taught enhanced communication skills during clinical conferences using innovative teaching strategies, examples of which are described in this article.

Judd M

2013-01-01

33

Broken communication in nursing can kill: teaching communication is vital.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing communication is vital to quality and safe nursing care. Evidence continues to increase that communication breakdowns are responsible for medication errors, unnecessary costs, and inadequate patient care. Nursing students can be taught enhanced communication skills during clinical conferences using innovative teaching strategies, examples of which are described in this article. PMID:23798248

Judd, Maureen

2013-01-01

34

NICU nurse educators: what evidence supports your teaching strategies?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

One of our roles as nurse educators is to teach best practices related to patient care. However, have you ever stopped to think about what evidence supports your teaching strategies? Just as our patients deserve care that is based on the best available evidence, our learners also deserve education that is based on evidence.1-3 With so many advances in knowledge, technology, and even life itself, it is interesting that education has changed very little over the past 100 years. A study among 946 nurse educators documented that most teach the way they were taught.4 In addition, even after learning new strategies, educators often continue teaching in the manner they are most comfortable. However, this trend is beginning to change. Nurse educators are becoming increasingly aware of and willing to try new and innovative teaching strategies. Educators are also seeking out evidence-based teaching strategies and are becoming more involved in nursing education research.

Pilcher J

2013-07-01

35

NICU nurse educators: what evidence supports your teaching strategies?  

Science.gov (United States)

One of our roles as nurse educators is to teach best practices related to patient care. However, have you ever stopped to think about what evidence supports your teaching strategies? Just as our patients deserve care that is based on the best available evidence, our learners also deserve education that is based on evidence.1-3 With so many advances in knowledge, technology, and even life itself, it is interesting that education has changed very little over the past 100 years. A study among 946 nurse educators documented that most teach the way they were taught.4 In addition, even after learning new strategies, educators often continue teaching in the manner they are most comfortable. However, this trend is beginning to change. Nurse educators are becoming increasingly aware of and willing to try new and innovative teaching strategies. Educators are also seeking out evidence-based teaching strategies and are becoming more involved in nursing education research. PMID:23835547

Pilcher, Jobeth

36

Teaching critical appraisal skills for nursing research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice is a major focus in nursing, yet the literature continues to document a research-practice gap. Reasons for this gap stem partly from a lack of skills to critique and synthesize the literature, a lack of search skills and difficulty in understanding research articles, and limited knowledge of research by nursing professionals. METHOD: An innovative and quality driven subject to improve critical appraisal and critical thinking skills was developed for the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Indigenous Health at the University of Wollongong, based on formative research with postgraduate students and supervisors. Through face-to-face and online teaching modules students worked through a structured process of analysing the key aspects of published papers using structured analysis tools for each study design. RESULTS: Pre and post surveys of students found improvements in perceived knowledge of all key skills of critical appraisal. External independent evaluation determined that it was a high quality subject showing many hallmarks of good assessment practice and good practice in use of information and communication technology (ICT) in support of the learning outcomes.

Jones SC; Crookes PA; Johnson KM

2011-09-01

37

Standardized training in nurse model travel clinics.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: International travel plays a significant role in the emergence and redistribution of major human diseases. The importance of travel medicine clinics for preventing morbidity and mortality has been increasingly appreciated, although few studies have thus far examined the management and staff training strategies that result in successful travel-clinic operations. Here, we describe an example of travel-clinic operation and management coordinated through the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. This program, which involves eight separate clinics distributed statewide, functions both to provide patient consult and care services, as well as medical provider training and continuing medical education (CME). METHODS: Initial training, the use of standardized forms and protocols, routine chart reviews and monthly continuing education meetings are the distinguishing attributes of this program. An Infectious Disease team consisting of one medical doctor (MD) and a physician assistant (PA) act as consultants to travel nurses who comprise the majority of clinic staff. RESULTS: Eight clinics distributed throughout the state of Utah serve approximately 6,000 travelers a year. Pre-travel medical services are provided by 11 nurses, including 10 registered nurses (RNs) and 1 licensed practical nurse (LPN). This trained nursing staff receives continuing travel medical education and participate in the training of new providers. All nurses have completed a full training program and 7 of the 11 (64%) of clinic nursing staff serve more than 10 patients a week. Quality assurance measures show that approximately 0.5% of charts reviewed contain a vaccine or prescription error which require patient notification for correction. CONCLUSION: Using an initial training program, standardized patient intake forms, vaccine and prescription protocols, preprinted prescriptions, and regular CME, highly trained nurses at travel clinics are able to provide standardized pre-travel care to international travelers originating from Utah.

Sofarelli TA; Ricks JH; Anand R; Hale DC

2011-01-01

38

Teaching nursing psychomotor skills in a fundamentals laboratory: a literature review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: The aim of this article is to determine the most effective methods of teaching psychomotor skills. BACKGROUND: Research has pointed to a gap between nursing practice and nursing education. Due to a number of conditions, nursing students are learning basic skills in laboratories, rather than clinical settings. METHOD: A literature review was conducted to evaluate studies published since 1995 that compared alternative and traditional methods of teaching skills to novice nursing students. RESULTS: Of the 13 studies found, most assessed computer-related methods. A few examined alternatives, such as the use of standardized patients, high-fidelity manikins, and a mental-imaging technique. CONCLUSION: Based on this limited evidence, it appears that teaching methods providing access to online interactive materials were significantly more effective than others.Three studies found that a combination of traditional lecture and demonstration methods plus computer use was more effective than either method alone.

McNett S

2012-09-01

39

Evaluating teaching effectiveness in nursing education:An Iranian perspective  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this study was to determine the perceptions of Iranian nurse educators and students regarding the evaluation of teaching effectiveness in university-based programs. Methods An exploratory descriptive design was employed. 143 nurse educators in nursing faculties from the three universities in Tehran, 40 undergraduate, and 30 graduate students from Tehran University composed the study sample. In addition, deans from the three nursing faculties were interviewed. A researcher-developed questionnaire was used to determine the perceptions of both faculty and students about evaluating the teaching effectiveness of nurse educators, and an interview guide was employed to elicit the views of deans of faculties of nursing regarding evaluation policies and procedures. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric statistics to identify similarities and differences in perceptions within the Iranian nurse educator group and the student group, and between these two groups of respondents. Results While faculty evaluation has always been a major part of university based nursing programs, faculty evaluation must be approached more analytically, objectively, and comprehensively to ensure that all nursing educators receive the fairest treatment possible and that the teaching-learning process is enhanced. Conclusion Educators and students stressed that systematic and continuous evaluation as well as staff development should be the primary goals for the faculty evaluation process. The ultimate goals is the improvement of teaching by nurse educators.

Salsali Mahvash

2005-01-01

40

Evaluating teaching effectiveness in nursing education: an Iranian perspective.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The main objective of this study was to determine the perceptions of Iranian nurse educators and students regarding the evaluation of teaching effectiveness in university-based programs. METHODS: An exploratory descriptive design was employed. 143 nurse educators in nursing faculties from the three universities in Tehran, 40 undergraduate, and 30 graduate students from Tehran University composed the study sample. In addition, deans from the three nursing faculties were interviewed. A researcher-developed questionnaire was used to determine the perceptions of both faculty and students about evaluating the teaching effectiveness of nurse educators, and an interview guide was employed to elicit the views of deans of faculties of nursing regarding evaluation policies and procedures. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric statistics to identify similarities and differences in perceptions within the Iranian nurse educator group and the student group, and between these two groups of respondents. RESULTS: While faculty evaluation has always been a major part of university based nursing programs, faculty evaluation must be approached more analytically, objectively, and comprehensively to ensure that all nursing educators receive the fairest treatment possible and that the teaching-learning process is enhanced. CONCLUSION: Educators and students stressed that systematic and continuous evaluation as well as staff development should be the primary goals for the faculty evaluation process. The ultimate goals is the improvement of teaching by nurse educators.

Salsali M

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

[Nursing terminology standards in taiwan: current situation and trends].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing terminology standards are critical to effective nursing communications in clinical practice, education, administration, and research. Recently, the national Department of Health has promoted implementation of a standardized Taiwan electronic medical record template (TMT). The TMT provides a specific need for nursing terminology standards used in all medical facilities. In this article, we survey and compare the development of nursing terminology standards in Taiwan with that of the international community. The two principal recommendations made in this paper include 1) link Taiwan terminology standards at the education and research levels to international standards and 2) integrate localized nursing terminology into Taiwan terminology standards for use in nursing information system relational databases and electronic nursing records. We hope that the government, medical institutions, and academic organizations will pay greater attention to the standardization of local nursing terminology in order to advance nursing quality in Taiwan.

Hao TH; Lin CT; Lu SJ; Lin ZC

2009-06-01

42

Standards for nursing agencies in South Africa  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose with this research is to formulate standards for nursing agencies in South Africa. Opsomming Die doel met hierdie navorsing is om standaarde vir verpleegagentskappe in Suid-Afrika te formuleer *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Marie Muller

2001-01-01

43

Standardized nursing care plans for acute care SCI: improved documentation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adequate documentation of spinal cord injury (SCI) nursing care is necessary for evaluation of patient progress and compliance with standards of care. The objective criteria used to evaluate nursing care include the nursing data base, the care plan, and the nurses' notes. The nursing care plan reflects the needs of the SCI client and is the basis from which documentation about these needs arises. Standards for acute care SCI nursing were recently developed for the 10 designated SCI centers in Florida. To improve the documentation of these standards, neuroscience nurses at Shands Hospital developed standardized care plans that can be individualized for each SCI client. The implementation of these care plans improved documentation of the standards for acute care SCI nursing. Additional benefits included an increased awareness of the nursing diagnoses among staff nurses and improved equality of care for the SCI client.

Guin P

1990-03-01

44

Standardized nursing care plans for acute care SCI: improved documentation.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adequate documentation of spinal cord injury (SCI) nursing care is necessary for evaluation of patient progress and compliance with standards of care. The objective criteria used to evaluate nursing care include the nursing data base, the care plan, and the nurses' notes. The nursing care plan reflects the needs of the SCI client and is the basis from which documentation about these needs arises. Standards for acute care SCI nursing were recently developed for the 10 designated SCI centers in Florida. To improve the documentation of these standards, neuroscience nurses at Shands Hospital developed standardized care plans that can be individualized for each SCI client. The implementation of these care plans improved documentation of the standards for acute care SCI nursing. Additional benefits included an increased awareness of the nursing diagnoses among staff nurses and improved equality of care for the SCI client. PMID:2320992

Guin, P

1990-03-01

45

Evaluating teaching effectiveness in nursing education:An Iranian perspective  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The main objective of this study was to determine the perceptions of Iranian nurse educators and students regarding the evaluation of teaching effectiveness in university-based programs. Methods An exploratory descriptive design was employed. 143 nu...

Salsali Mahvash

46

Growing nurse leaders: an undergraduate teaching assistant program.  

Science.gov (United States)

In today's complex health care system, leader behaviors are critical for all nurses. The undergraduate teaching assistant (TA) program empowers students to develop leadership behaviors through a collaborative mentoring model. This successful program enables undergraduate students to collaborate with faculty and graduate TAs in co-teaching large classes. The collaborative mentoring, structured class, and ongoing support provide fertile ground for growing nurse leaders. PMID:16402741

Chandler, Genevieve E

2005-12-01

47

[A study on the development of standardized nursing care plans for computerized nursing service].  

Science.gov (United States)

A central issue in the development of nursing practice is to describe the phenomenon with which nursing is concerned. To identify the health problems which can be diagnosed and managed by the nurse is the first step to organize and ensure the development of nursing science. Therefore the academic world has been discussing the application of the nursing diagnosis in nursing practice as a means of improving quality of care. The objectives of this study were to develop a standardized nursing care plan for ten selected nursing diagnoses to form a database for computerized nursing service. The research approach used in the study was (1) the selection of the ten nursing diagnoses which occur most frequently on medical-surgical wards, (2) the development of a standardized nursing care plan for the ten selected nursing diagnoses, (3) application of the plan to hospitalized patients and evaluation of the content validity by the nurses, and (4) evaluation of the clinical effects after the use of the standardized nursing care plans. The subjects were 56 nurses and 395 hospitalized patients on two medical and two surgical unit. The results of this study were as follows: 1) The ten selected nursing diagnoses for the development of the standardized nursing care plans were "PAIN, SLEEP DISTURBANCE, ALTERED HEALTH MAINTENANCE, ALTERATION IN NUTRITION, ANXIETY, CONSTIPATION, ALTERED PATTERNS OF URINARY ELIMINATION, DISTURBANCE IN BODY IMAGE, POTENTIAL FOR ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE AND ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE". 2. The developed standardized nursing care plans included the nursing diagnosis, definition, defining characteristics, etiologic or related factors that contribute to the condition, recording pattern, desired outcomes and nursing orders (nursing interventions). 3. The plan was used with hospitalized patients on medical-surgical wards to test for content validity. The patient's satisfaction with the nursing care and nurses' job satisfaction were investigated to evaluate the clinical effects after the use of the standardized nursing care plans. A comparison of patient satisfaction with nursing care before and after the introduction of the standardized nursing care plans showed a statistically significant higher level of satisfaction with the standardized care plans. There was no difference in the level of job satisfaction expressed by the nursing staff before and after the standardized nursing care plans were introduced. However, when opinions about the use of the standardized nursing care plans were examined it was found that there was a positive effect on clarity in defining the nursing problems, determining nursing cost, more feasible goal setting, effective and systematic nursing records and indications for nursing research.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2290249

Kim, C J; Chun, C Y; Lim, Y S; Park, J W

1990-12-01

48

[A study on the development of standardized nursing care plans for computerized nursing service  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A central issue in the development of nursing practice is to describe the phenomenon with which nursing is concerned. To identify the health problems which can be diagnosed and managed by the nurse is the first step to organize and ensure the development of nursing science. Therefore the academic world has been discussing the application of the nursing diagnosis in nursing practice as a means of improving quality of care. The objectives of this study were to develop a standardized nursing care plan for ten selected nursing diagnoses to form a database for computerized nursing service. The research approach used in the study was (1) the selection of the ten nursing diagnoses which occur most frequently on medical-surgical wards, (2) the development of a standardized nursing care plan for the ten selected nursing diagnoses, (3) application of the plan to hospitalized patients and evaluation of the content validity by the nurses, and (4) evaluation of the clinical effects after the use of the standardized nursing care plans. The subjects were 56 nurses and 395 hospitalized patients on two medical and two surgical unit. The results of this study were as follows: 1) The ten selected nursing diagnoses for the development of the standardized nursing care plans were "PAIN, SLEEP DISTURBANCE, ALTERED HEALTH MAINTENANCE, ALTERATION IN NUTRITION, ANXIETY, CONSTIPATION, ALTERED PATTERNS OF URINARY ELIMINATION, DISTURBANCE IN BODY IMAGE, POTENTIAL FOR ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE AND ACTIVITY INTOLERANCE". 2. The developed standardized nursing care plans included the nursing diagnosis, definition, defining characteristics, etiologic or related factors that contribute to the condition, recording pattern, desired outcomes and nursing orders (nursing interventions). 3. The plan was used with hospitalized patients on medical-surgical wards to test for content validity. The patient's satisfaction with the nursing care and nurses' job satisfaction were investigated to evaluate the clinical effects after the use of the standardized nursing care plans. A comparison of patient satisfaction with nursing care before and after the introduction of the standardized nursing care plans showed a statistically significant higher level of satisfaction with the standardized care plans. There was no difference in the level of job satisfaction expressed by the nursing staff before and after the standardized nursing care plans were introduced. However, when opinions about the use of the standardized nursing care plans were examined it was found that there was a positive effect on clarity in defining the nursing problems, determining nursing cost, more feasible goal setting, effective and systematic nursing records and indications for nursing research.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Kim CJ; Chun CY; Lim YS; Park JW

1990-12-01

49

Implementation of a teaching assistant program in graduate nursing education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Identifying and educating students who have an interest and talent to be future educators is a challenge throughout academia, including nursing. The ideal scenario is to identify students early in their education and construct or scaffold a unique relationship between professor and student. The authors discuss a teaching assistant model, implemented in a nursing graduate program, which augments the education process while developing potential future nursing educators.

Goode VM; Horvath C; Jasinski D

2013-09-01

50

Complications of peritoneal dialysis: nursing care plans to document teaching.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The nurse caring for peritoneal dialysis patients deals with various complications daily. This review of complications includes a brief explanation of the physiology of the problems and recommendations for nursing actions. The goal of the nursing care plans is to facilitate documentation of ongoing teaching and review. Complications are divided into categories, each with a generic care plan. Care plans can be adapted to individual patient needs and are designed to be used during training and on a monthly basis.

Graham-Macaluso MM

1991-10-01

51

Complications of peritoneal dialysis: nursing care plans to document teaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

The nurse caring for peritoneal dialysis patients deals with various complications daily. This review of complications includes a brief explanation of the physiology of the problems and recommendations for nursing actions. The goal of the nursing care plans is to facilitate documentation of ongoing teaching and review. Complications are divided into categories, each with a generic care plan. Care plans can be adapted to individual patient needs and are designed to be used during training and on a monthly basis. PMID:1953085

Graham-Macaluso, M M

1991-10-01

52

Improving access to quality clinical nurse teaching--a partnership between Australia and Vietnam.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Until recently, standards to guide nursing education and practice in Vietnam were nonexistent. This paper describes the development and implementation of a clinical teaching capacity building project piloted in Hanoi, Vietnam. The project was part of a multi-component capacity building program designed to improve nurse education in Vietnam. Objectives of the project were to develop a collaborative clinically-based teaching model that encourages evidence-based, student-centred clinical learning. The model incorporated strategies to promote development of nursing practice to meet national competency standards. Thirty nurse teachers from two organisations in Hanoi participated in the program. These participants attended three workshops, and completed applied assessments, where participants implemented concepts from each workshop. The assessment tasks were planning, implementing and evaluating clinical teaching. On completion of the workshops, twenty participants undertook a study tour in Australia to refine the teaching model and develop an action plan for model implementation in both organisations, with an aim to disseminate the model across Vietnam. Significant changes accredited to this project have been noted on an individual and organisational level. Dissemination of this clinical teaching model has commenced in Ho Chi Minh, with further plans for more in-depth dissemination to occur throughout the country.

Harvey T; Calleja P; Thi DP

2013-06-01

53

Perception of nursing students on teaching-care integration  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the way nursing undergraduate students perceive teaching-care integration and its relation with the process of Professional formation. Methodology: this is a qualitative research conducted from September to October 2009 with nine students, male and female, attending the seventh and eighth semester of the Nursing School of a university in southern Brazil. An open and recorded survey has been used. For data analysis, Content Theme analysis has been applied. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, by accreditation number 0113.0.243.000-09. Results: the interviews led to two theme categories: perception of the students on teaching-care integration in nursing and perception of curricular practical classes and supervised internship. The students perceive integration among professors and care nurses as not effective yet, being, many times, inexistent. The also pointed the importance of the role of the educator as a facilitator of the relationship and integration with the nursing team. Conclusions: Teaching-care integration is not a vivid reality; however there are principles of change that indicate the possibility of establishing relationships that optimize professional formation. Descriptors: service of teaching-care integration; nursing; nursing students.

Marlene Gomes Terra, Taís Vicari, Annie Jeanninne Bisso Lacchini, Helena Carolina Noal, Carolina Fajardo Valente Pagliarin Brüggemann

2010-01-01

54

The cookie experiment revisited: broadened dimensions for teaching nursing research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nurse educators face the ongoing challenge of presenting increasingly complex nursing research methods to undergraduate and graduate students. The cookie experiment, a unique teaching strategy developed more than a decade ago by Thiel, has been refined and expanded to include hands-on quantitative and qualitative components while also serving as a way to lessen students'phobias about research. This creative and effective teaching strategy provides a user-friendly format that can be adapted as needed to present both basic and complex research concepts. The authors present this teaching strategy and discuss its applicability to undergraduate and graduate courses.

Morrison-Beedy D; Côté-Arsenault D

2000-11-01

55

The cookie experiment revisited: broadened dimensions for teaching nursing research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nurse educators face the ongoing challenge of presenting increasingly complex nursing research methods to undergraduate and graduate students. The cookie experiment, a unique teaching strategy developed more than a decade ago by Thiel, has been refined and expanded to include hands-on quantitative and qualitative components while also serving as a way to lessen students'phobias about research. This creative and effective teaching strategy provides a user-friendly format that can be adapted as needed to present both basic and complex research concepts. The authors present this teaching strategy and discuss its applicability to undergraduate and graduate courses. PMID:16646186

Morrison-Beedy, D; Côté-Arsenault, D

56

Developing the nursing care plans using the "master file of standardized nursing practice terminology" in Japan.  

Science.gov (United States)

A common language in nursing facilitates better communication among nurses and healthcare team, assuring better nursing care, hence better patient outcomes. As we developed and disseminated the standardized terminology of nursing which provided nurses with a set of terms to describe nursing observations and nursing actions, we developed a certain number of nursing care plans using the terms in it. The nursing care plans included those for the patients requiring medical (pharmaceutical)/surgical procedures or the patients showing some signs and symptoms. Generally, nurses found that the nursing care plans were useful and flexible enough to allow for the modification according to the needs of each individual patient. In conclusion, the nursing care plans based on the standardized terminology showed its relevance to the clinical settings. PMID:23920989

Wako, Fumiko; Tsuru, Satoko; Omori, Miho; Watanabe, Chitose; Uchiyama, Makiko; Asada, Miwa; Inoue, Kikumi

2013-01-01

57

Developing the nursing care plans using the "master file of standardized nursing practice terminology" in Japan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A common language in nursing facilitates better communication among nurses and healthcare team, assuring better nursing care, hence better patient outcomes. As we developed and disseminated the standardized terminology of nursing which provided nurses with a set of terms to describe nursing observations and nursing actions, we developed a certain number of nursing care plans using the terms in it. The nursing care plans included those for the patients requiring medical (pharmaceutical)/surgical procedures or the patients showing some signs and symptoms. Generally, nurses found that the nursing care plans were useful and flexible enough to allow for the modification according to the needs of each individual patient. In conclusion, the nursing care plans based on the standardized terminology showed its relevance to the clinical settings.

Wako F; Tsuru S; Omori M; Watanabe C; Uchiyama M; Asada M; Inoue K

2013-01-01

58

[The nursing process in the opinion of the nursing staff of a teaching hospital].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to describe the nursing professionals' opinion on the nursing process, in order to base the actions of the implementation of the process in our institution. This is a qualitative study, carried out during an action research with the nursing staff of a pediatric teaching hospital. The nursing process is designed as a tool to organize care and prescribe nursing care. Work routines show the technical activities. Expectations with the implementation of nursing process involve improving the quality of care. The study reinforces the importance of including members of the nursing staff in the implementation stage of the nursing process and shows the challenge of facing the tecnicists routines.

de Souza MF; dos Santos AD; Monteiro AI

2013-04-01

59

Innovative strategies for teaching nursing research in taiwan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice is imperative in clinical settings because it bridges the gap between research findings and clinical practice. Promoting nursing student interest and enthusiasm for research is therefore crucial when teaching nursing research. OBJECTIVE: The aim of thus study was to develop innovative teaching strategies that increase nursing students' interests and engagement in research. METHODS: This study employed a descriptive, pretest-posttest, quasiexperimental design with 103 participants in the experimental group and 106 in the control group. The Attitudes toward Research Questionnaire, Classroom Engagement Scale, Self-Directed Learning Instrument, Nursing Eight Core Competencies Scale, Value of Teams survey, and a research knowledge test were applied to evaluate the outcomes of the innovative teaching strategies. RESULTS: Scores for the research knowledge test were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group in posttest 1 and posttest 2. After the intervention, participants in the experimental group exhibited higher scores on attitudes toward research, eight core competencies in nursing,value of teams, classroom engagement, and self-directed learning than participants in the control group. Students in the experimental group perceived a lower degree of pressure and higher degrees of interest, enjoyment, and acceptance of the research course than students in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed that using innovative teaching strategies in nursing research courses enhances student interest and enthusiasm about evidence-based practice.

Liou SR; Cheng CY; Tsai HM; Chang CH

2013-09-01

60

Chart audit using the American Nurses Association standards of practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article describes a study using chart audits as a strategy for continuous quality improvement within a home health agency's quality improvement program. Findings are discussed using the American Nurses Association Standards of Home Health Nursing Practice as a framework.

Kendra MA; Weiker A

1996-07-01

 
 
 
 
61

A closer look at the standards for nurse anesthesia practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As part of its ongoing work, the AANA's Practice Committee reviewed the Scope and Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice, particularly focusing on the Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice. Revisions and updates were made to the standards to ensure clarity and reflect current anesthesia practice. This article highlights several of the important revisions made to the Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice, specifically focusing on the importance of documentation, updates to Standard V-Patient Monitoring, and changes to other documents affected by the updates. This is not an exhaustive discussion of all changes made to the document. The updated Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice are presented in their entirety.

Neft M; Quraishi JA; Greenier E

2013-04-01

62

Nurses' and patients' viewpoints regarding quality of nursing care in the teaching hospitals of Semnan University of Medical Sciences, 2009  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing care is an essential component of health services. Patient's health and improvement depends on the quality of nursing care. Nurses and patients views as well as their active participation for making decision have an important role in quality of services, so it must be regarded as a principle. The purpose of this research was to study nurses' and patients' viewpoints regarding quality of nursing care in teaching hospital of Semnan (Iran). Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study, 52 nurses and 300 patients from internal, surgical, gynecology and pediatric wards of Fatemieh and Amir Hospitals were selected by systematic sampling. Nursing care quality was assessed in psychotic, social and communicative aspects using a Quality Patient Care Scale questioner. The questioner had 41 questions with 3 answer choices (rarely, occasionally and usually) that marked from 1 to 3. Mean scores were calculated for all subjects and then were categorized in undesirable (less than 1.5), low desirable (1.5-2.49) and desirable (2.5-5) groups. Results: 31.6 % of patients and 92.6% of nurses evaluated psychotic-social aspect of care quality as desirable. The desirability percent for communicative aspect of care quality was 24.7% in patients and 56.8% in nurses. There was a significant statistical difference between patients and nurses views in both aspects (P<0.001). In psychosocial aspect, 73.5% of patients expressed that nurses do not introduce themselves and 77.9% of them expressed that nurses rarely introduce new patients to other patients. In communicative aspect, 42.5% of patients declared that they ensured about their secrets rarely. Conclusion: Nurses' and patients' viewpoints on quality of nursing care were different because of their various experiences and insight. Thus, re-evaluation of the quality standards of nursing care based on client approach, choosing some strategies to increase nurse-patient communication and considering psycho-social patients needs seems to be a necessity.

Masome Neishabory; Nayere Raeisdana; Raheb Ghorbani; Tahere Sadeghi

2011-01-01

63

Generational differences of baccalaureate nursing students' preferred teaching methods and faculty use of teaching methods  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing education is experiencing a generational phenomenon with student enrollment spanning three generations. Classrooms of the 21st century include the occasional Baby Boomer and a large number of Generation X and Generation Y students. Each of these generations has its own unique set of characteristics that have been shaped by values, trends, behaviors, and events in society. These generational characteristics create vast opportunities to learn, as well as challenges. One such challenge is the use of teaching methods that are congruent with nursing student preferences. Although there is a wide range of studies conducted on student learning styles within the nursing education field, there is little research on the preferred teaching methods of nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to compare the preferred teaching methods of multi-generational baccalaureate nursing students with faculty use of teaching methods. The research study included 367 participants; 38 nursing faculty and 329 nursing students from five different colleges within the Midwest region. The results of the two-tailed t-test found four statistically significant findings between Generation X and Y students and their preferred teaching methods including; lecture, listening to the professor lecture versus working in groups; actively participating in group discussion; and the importance of participating in group assignments. The results of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found seventeen statistically significant findings between levels of students (freshmen/sophomores, juniors, & seniors) and their preferred teaching methods. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching method by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of data.

Delahoyde, Theresa

64

A conceptual framework for teaching research in nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Though research is often referred to the lifeblood, hallmark or cornerstone in the development of a profession (Brink, 1996:2), teaching research in Nursing is a challenge. The challenge does not just lie in teaching the subject, but in resistance and unwillingness of students to engage in the subject. In the experience of the researcher, registered nurses identify themselves with being a nurse and a caregiver; the role of researcher has never been internalised. The challenge is to achieve the outcome envisaged, namely, nurses who are knowledgeable consumers of research as well as continuous productive scholars in their application of nursing. Research generates knowledge and knowledge is the basis of caring with excellence. Nursing is an art and a science and the science must produce the knowledge upon which the art is based. The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual framework of how to teach research in order to achieve such a successful outcome. The conceptual framework proposed in this article is based on four pillars, theoretical knowledge of research, scientific writing, psychological support and experiential learning. The importance of the research facilitator, not just as a teacher but also as a positive role model, is also described.

SCD Wright

2005-01-01

65

Practical tuberculosis teaching in nursing schools. A survey.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To analyze practical tuberculosis (TB) teaching in Nursing Schools (NS) in Brazil in 2004. Methodology: We surveyed all NS in Brazil in 2004, and sent questionnaires by mail to faculty TB teaching. Data were compiled in a database with a view to descriptive analysis. In a universe of 347 NS, 111 answered the questionnaire, which constituted the study population. Results: 75,2% of the NS are concentrated in the Southeast and South. The hour load (HL) for practical TB teaching ranges between 10 and 20 hours (42,2%). Teaching is mainly provided (89,1%) at primary care level. Practical activities focus on nursing appointments and home visits. Faculty members obtain updated knowledge on the subject through scientific events and Internet. Conclusion: The student training in TB care isn’t enough to discuss aspects of treatment, epidemiological surveillance and management.

Tereza CS Villa; Danuza R Firmino; Rubia LP Andrade; Maria EF Brunello; Mayra F Oliveira; Antônio Ruffino-Netto

2006-01-01

66

Setting standards for nursing data sets in information systems.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has established the Nursing Information and Data Set Evaluation Center (NIDSEC). The purpose of this Center is to develop and disseminate standards pertaining to information systems that support the documentation of nursing practice, and to evaluate voluntarily ...

Averill, C. B.; Zielstorff, R.; Delaney, C.; Carty, B.; Ferrell, M. J.

67

Standard for clinical/nursing unit management in South Africa  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The nursing unit manager is responsible and accountable for quality management of a clinical unit to facilitate quality nursing/midwifery care and education. The unit manager requires practice guidelines on nursing unit management, reflecting excellence and presented in the form of standards and cri...

Marie Muller

68

Matching standards and needs in doctoral education in nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The debate about the number and type of doctoral degrees required in nursing has recurred with regularity throughout the history of nursing. National discussions about the shortcomings and relevance of the PhD within general higher education circles are described. Applicability of these concerns to nursing education is discussed. In the midst of this national debate, new nursing doctoral degrees are being proposed and implemented. Emergence of these new degrees has caused many to worry about replicating at the highest degree level the current confusion about nursing preparation at the entry level. A classification of doctoral degrees in nursing is proposed along with a call for standardization of degrees.

Edwardson SR

2004-01-01

69

Dissonance in Nurse and Patient Evaluations of the Effectiveness of a Patient-Teaching Program.  

Science.gov (United States)

|A study was conducted to identify (1) patients' reactions to individual and group teaching; (2) nurses' perceptions of individual and group teaching; and (3) the results of individual and group teaching as reflected in the patient record. (CT)|

Adom, Dora; Wright, Alice Santiago

1982-01-01

70

Nursing home staffing standards and staffing levels in six countries.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This study was designed to collect and compare nurse staffing standards and staffing levels in six counties: the United States, Canada, England, Germany, Norway, and Sweden. DESIGN: The study used descriptive information on staffing regulations and policies as well as actual staffing levels for registered nurses, licensed nurses, and nursing assistants across states, provinces, regions, and countries. METHODS: Data were collected from Internet searches of staffing regulations and policies along with statistical data on actual staffing from reports and documents. Staffing data were converted to hours per resident day to facilitate comparisons across countries. FINDINGS: We found wide variations in both nurse staffing standards and actual staffing levels within and across countries, although comparisons were difficult to make due to differences in measuring staffing, the vagueness of standards, and limited availability of actual staffing data. Both the standards and levels in most countries (except Norway and Sweden) were lower than the recommended levels by experts. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the need for further attention to nurse staffing standards and levels in order to assure the quality of nursing home care. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A high quality of nursing home care requires adequate levels of nurse staffing, and nurse staffing standards have been shown to improve staffing levels.

Harrington C; Choiniere J; Goldmann M; Jacobsen FF; Lloyd L; McGregor M; Stamatopoulos V; Szebehely M

2012-03-01

71

Five Teaching Methods: A Comparative Study in Nurse Education  

Science.gov (United States)

The relative instructional effectiveness of five teaching methods, Reading, Lecture-traditional, Lecture-audiotape, Programmed Instruction and Multimedia, was studied. Comparisons were based on test scores obtained by trainee nurses on three different occasions following instruction on a topic in renal physiology. (Editor)

Tibbitts, George E.; And Others

1978-01-01

72

Development of educational software for teaching nursing management.  

Science.gov (United States)

In Brazil, the first experiences using informatics in nursing education was in 1985. In spite of the time, this area still continues lacking in relation to initiatives using the computer as a pedagogic instrument. This study aim to demonstrate the development of an educational software for teaching nursing management using interactive multimedia. The methodology was based in the three stages Model for development of CAI system. The software was developed in four modules using the Macromedia Authorware Professional v.7. As conclusion, the educational software was well accepted by the faculty members, emerging positive comments on the developed product. The texts, graphs, sound and images favoring the teach-learning process. Since the educational software is developed for educating nursing students, the next step will be to sample students to measure their satisfaction. PMID:19593001

Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Melo, Marcia Regina A C; Bernardes, Andréa; Seixas, Carlos Alberto

2009-01-01

73

Development of educational software for teaching nursing management.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In Brazil, the first experiences using informatics in nursing education was in 1985. In spite of the time, this area still continues lacking in relation to initiatives using the computer as a pedagogic instrument. This study aim to demonstrate the development of an educational software for teaching nursing management using interactive multimedia. The methodology was based in the three stages Model for development of CAI system. The software was developed in four modules using the Macromedia Authorware Professional v.7. As conclusion, the educational software was well accepted by the faculty members, emerging positive comments on the developed product. The texts, graphs, sound and images favoring the teach-learning process. Since the educational software is developed for educating nursing students, the next step will be to sample students to measure their satisfaction.

Evora YD; Melo MR; Bernardes A; Seixas CA

2009-01-01

74

The use of position statements in teaching best practices in nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The use of nursing position statements to guide nursing students' discovery of nursing practice was found to be an effective teaching strategy in preparing future clinicians. Nurse educators, seeking to develop strategies for applying research to practice, can use nursing specialty organizations' position statements to promote nursing knowledge dissemination and provide an avenue for sharing evidence-based practice. This article reports on the development of position statements, obstacles to their dissemination, and offers recommendations for nurse educators.

De Natale ML; Malloy SE

2012-11-01

75

Designing the Information Literacy Competency Standards for nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This column documents the rationale for creating information literacy competency standards for nursing based on the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education" and the three documents from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) on essential skills for nurses in baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral level education and practice. It chronicles the process of the task force which is designing the discipline specific skills and predicts the value of their use, once they are published.

Phelps SF

2013-01-01

76

Standards for the nursing care of the frail aged  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this project standards for the nursing care of the institutional care of the frail aged were formulated and then validated by groups of nurses. An instrument was then designed to measure to what extent these standards are reached. The instrument was then tested for reliability and validity in a sample o f 12 institutions in the Eastern Cape and Natal.

L.R. Uys; B.N. Hunt

1990-01-01

77

Standards to assure quality in nursing research  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The focus of this article is quality assurance in nursing research. Due to well established problems regarding the education of nursing research and increasing pressure to take responsibility for the quality of all educational activities, departments of nursing are obliged to initiate action; to ass...

SCD Zeelie

78

Nurses awareness of patients rights in a teaching hospital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Patients' rights observance is one of the effective measures of patients' satisfaction of health care services. We performed this study at the aim of evaluation of nurses' awareness of patients' rights in a teaching hospital in Tehran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010. In this study 156 nurses were randomly selected. Two-part questionnaire was used for data collection. The validity and reliability of questionnaire was determined and then it was distributed between subjects. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 15 using descriptive and inferential statistics. Our results showed that %58.33, %39.10 and % 2.56 of nurses have good, medium, and poor levels of awareness respectively. We observed a significant relationship between nurses awareness and work experience (P=0.008) and concurrent work in public and private hospitals (P=0.01). The most of the nurses (%95.51) were aware of "right to privacy protection and ensure confidentiality of information" and the least of them (%33.97) were aware of "right to receiving necessary information about the health care providers, the rate of tariff and insurance coverage". According to our survey it is concluded that implementation of Patients' Right Charter in this hospital is accompanied by some limitations which necessitates promotion of the nurses' awareness about patients' rights. Taken together in order to enhance nurses' awareness special measures and strategies should be considered.

Mohammad Nejad E; Begjani J; Abotalebi G; Salari A; Ehsani SR

2011-01-01

79

[Teaching nursing research at bachelor and second level degree: opinions of nursing associate professors and nursing researchers].  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing research is a systematic and very important enquiry for improving clients' quality of life and effective and efficient nursing care. National and international literature state that all nurses should have knowledge and responsibilities in research which are different in relation to their educational level. The aim of the present study was to collect opinions of the new professors in nursing about objectives, contents and methods for teaching nursing research at Bachelor and Master Degree. The sample was made of nine participants who were interviewed by twenty questions sent by e-mail. The interviews were analysed using quantitative-descriptive and qualitative-phenomenological methods (triangulation). Interviews revealed that Bachelor students should be educated to retrieve and criticise scientific literature, to apply research finding in practice and to collaborate in research studies; Master students should improve knowledge of Bachelor degree and be able to design and conduct research studies. Participants emphasised the importance of using active methodologies for teaching and to involve students in research. By analysing the literature and the results of the present study educational objectives for teaching nursing research at Bachelor and Master degree are defined. PMID:16945224

D'Aliesio, Lorella; Vellone, Ercole; Rega, Maria Luisa; Galletti, Caterina

80

[Teaching nursing research at bachelor and second level degree: opinions of nursing associate professors and nursing researchers].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing research is a systematic and very important enquiry for improving clients' quality of life and effective and efficient nursing care. National and international literature state that all nurses should have knowledge and responsibilities in research which are different in relation to their educational level. The aim of the present study was to collect opinions of the new professors in nursing about objectives, contents and methods for teaching nursing research at Bachelor and Master Degree. The sample was made of nine participants who were interviewed by twenty questions sent by e-mail. The interviews were analysed using quantitative-descriptive and qualitative-phenomenological methods (triangulation). Interviews revealed that Bachelor students should be educated to retrieve and criticise scientific literature, to apply research finding in practice and to collaborate in research studies; Master students should improve knowledge of Bachelor degree and be able to design and conduct research studies. Participants emphasised the importance of using active methodologies for teaching and to involve students in research. By analysing the literature and the results of the present study educational objectives for teaching nursing research at Bachelor and Master degree are defined.

D'Aliesio L; Vellone E; Rega ML; Galletti C

2006-04-01

 
 
 
 
81

Teaching-learning in community: the metaphor of nurse as guest.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Metaphors are creative learning devices that may illustrate novel and different meanings in teaching-learning situations. In this column, the author discusses possible meanings of the metaphor of nurse as guest in nurse-community relationships from a humanbecoming theoretical lens. Humanbecoming teaching-learning essences, paradoxes, and processes are used to illustrate potential ethical meanings and implications for nurse practice.

Milton CL

2012-04-01

82

Geriatric oncology nursing: beyond standard care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Geriatric oncology nursing is a specialization that requires unique knowledge and education to care for the older person diagnosed with cancer. Understanding principles of functioning in a multidisciplinary team setting, assessment of an older patient, and cancer-related issues are central elements of the role of the geriatric oncology nurse. Additionally, education of patients and families are important in helping the older person navigate the healthcare system. The purpose of this chapter is to review the current literature in geriatric oncology nursing.

Overcash J

2013-01-01

83

[Participating in the construction of a teaching project for nursing].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of the present paper is to report the authors' experience in the construction process of the teaching project for the Nursing Course at the Federal University of São Carlos. The study presents the course and the aspects related to the new proposal concerning the professional nurse profile, and the structure of the subjects distributed in modules are briefly reported. The collective construction and the difficulties regarding the curriculum reformulation process are placed in context. The integrated curriculum proposal should become effective in 2005, which will bring about the efforts of teachers in their search for the articulation of theory and practice without fragmentation. In order to succeed, the new teaching project will require efforts from teachers, students and the university administrative staff so that paths to overcome upcoming difficulties can be found.

Zem-Mascarenhas SH; Beretta MI

2005-12-01

84

Methodology of the problematization to teach care in pediatric nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: reflecting on the possible contributions of the Problematization Methodology to teach care in pediatric nursing. Methods: it started by the referential exposure which subsidizes this methodological proposal as well as the five phases pertaining to it: reality observation (the problem), key-points, theorization, hypotheses of solution and application to reality. Results: there was an attempt to contextualize and to problematize the pediatric scenario regarding the teaching of care in nursing, and also to reflect upon the contributions of the Problematization Methodology for the area. Conclusion: it was concluded that this method may be an important pedagogical strategy to provide educators and students, as well with a critical and creative observation of reality lived by sick children and their family in the hospital world and, therefore, to try to change it aiming at a better quality of life.

Hilda Maria Medeiros, Neila Santini de Souza, Diego Schaurich, Maria do Horto Fontoura Cartana

2008-01-01

85

Standard for clinical/nursing unit management in South Africa  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The nursing unit manager is responsible and accountable for quality management of a clinical unit to facilitate quality nursing/midwifery care and education. The unit manager requires practice guidelines on nursing unit management, reflecting excellence and presented in the form of standards and criteria in the form of a user-friendly instrument. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Marie Muller

2000-01-01

86

The Relationship of Nursing Faculty Clinical Teaching Behaviors to Student Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Clinical experience is the most important component of nursing education (Gaberson & Oermann, 2007; Walker, 2005). As part of the clinical learning environment, the clinical teaching behaviors of nursing faculty have significant potential to influence students' learning. Nurse educators have a responsibility to provide nursing students with…

Kube, Marcia L.

2010-01-01

87

Exploring the relationships between teaching, approaches to learning and critical thinking in a problem-based learning foundation nursing course.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Undergraduate nursing programmes are responsible for providing teaching and learning that develops students' knowledge, skills and attitudes in alignment with contemporary nursing standards and healthcare demands. Problem-based learning (PBL) as a pedagogy uses authentic artefacts reflecting real-world situations for students to practice problem-solving skills through collaboration with their peers. PBL was introduced in a foundation nursing course delivered in a regional university in Queensland, Australia. This paper presents the findings of a study exploring the relationships between nursing students' individual characteristics and perceptions of learning environments, teaching in PBL mode, approaches to learning, and critical thinking skill readiness. The study was guided by an ecological perspective designed to examine nursing students' ecological environments and the influences of those environments on their approaches to learning, and on critical thinking skill readiness. The results, through hierarchical linear modelling, revealed that aspects of the PBL approach to teaching influenced the approaches to learning students adopt, and thus their critical thinking skill readiness. Implications for teaching in undergraduate nursing programmes are discussed.

Martyn J; Terwijn R; Kek MY; Huijser H

2013-05-01

88

Exposure to Psychological Violence Among the Nursing Staff in a Large Teaching Hospital in Tehran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background and Aim: By providing the greatest amount of direct service to patients, nurses play an extremely valuable and unmatched role in the quality and efficiency of care and curative services. Workplace violence is regarded as one of the factors which can reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses and their interaction with patients, as well as the work efficiency of nurses and hospitals. In this study, after translating and validating tools of violence measurement in the health sector, the exposure of nurses to psychological violence was measured in a large teaching hospital in Tehran Methods and Materials: A descriptive-cross sectional design was used in this study in summer of 2009 (1387). The study population included all the nurses (n=413) working in a large teaching hospital in Tehran. The questionnaire used for collecting data was adopted from a standardized questionnaire designed jointly in 2003 by the International Labor Office, the World Health Organization, the International Council of Nurses, and the Public Services International. Analysis of the data was made using the descriptive statistical methods and the Chi square- and t-tests. Results: Sixty-nine percent of the nurses had experienced workplace violence. The most common forms of violence were verbal abuse (%64) and bullying-mobbing (%29). On the whole, 26% of the nurses had experienced both forms of violence in the previous year, while 335 had not faced any form of violence in their workplace. Nurses working in outpatient clinics and emergency wards experienced the highest number of encounters with verbal abuse. Encounters with bullying and mobbing were more common among female nurses than the male ones. Overall most of the violent behaviors were committed by patients and their relatives.Conclusion: Exposure of nurses to psychological violence is considerable and comparable to that reported by previous investigators in other countries. Thus it is highly crucial to adopt appropriate management policies aiming, particularly, at educating the medical personnel in ways of preventing and reporting violent behaviors.

E Teymoorzadeh; A Rashidian; M Arab; A Akbari Sari; M Ghasemi

2009-01-01

89

Critical care nursing orientation: a comparison of teaching methods.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In summary we have shown in this small group of 32 nurses that the PIM approach is as effective a method for critical care orientation as traditional classroom teaching. The savings in instructors' and orientees' time via PIMs result in dollar savings; but more importantly, the PIM was found by our orientees to be more satisfying. PIMs encouraged flexibility and individualized attention, and by self-pacing allowed several nurses to begin practice in the critical care setting earlier than usual. In light of the high cost of orientation, one finding that warrants further exploration is the orientee's uncertainty of remaining in critical care nursing. It is possible that as the orientee becomes socialized into the critical care setting, her values, attitudes, and commitment to remain may change over time. Future follow-up will help us to examine changing attitudes as these nurses become acclimated to the critical care setting. Head nurses and staff development instructors play a major role in preventing frustration and turnover and in creating a positive climate for growth.

Hansell HN; Foster SB

1980-11-01

90

Performance Standards for Teachers supporting Nursing Students’ Reflection Skills Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available How can nursing teachers improve students’ reflection skills? In the study performance standards for teachers were developed and validated. A ten-step procedure was followed to ensure procedural and internal validity. National competences and specific content standards for supporting nursing reflection skills development formed the foundation of a preliminary rubric framework which was piloted. Forty participants from six nursing institutes judged the developed rubric framework of eight competences covering thirty rubric attributes. They also discussed the prerequisite minimum performance level and judgmental models. These judgments and discussions resulted in consensus on the rubric framework, a cut-off score, and a conjunctive judgmental model that is convenient for assessing nursing teachers’ competences. The rubrics can be used in a teacher training program. Also institutes of nursing education can employ the rubrics as a tool for preparing and formatively assessing reflection skills.

Agaath Dekker- Groen

2012-01-01

91

The nurse’s academic formation for SUS in the perception of learning and teaching of the faculty of nursing/UERN  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The model of attention to health in Single Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde ? SUS) presupposes a human-resources policy which prepares professionals of health to guide the services and sanitary practices. The nurse, a member of health staff, takes over an important role in implementation of principles and standards of SUS, being its professional formation necessary to labor organization in this purpose. In this way this study objectifies to analyse the process of formation of the male nurse in the Politic-Pedagogical Project (Projeto Político-Pedagógico ? PPP) in the perception of learning and teaching of the Faculty of nursing – FAEN of the University of The Rio Grande do Norte State – UERN. It treats about a descriptive-exploratory study with qualitative and quantitative approach carried out with learning and teaching of the graduation nursing course. In the field research carried out between the months of november, 2006 and february, 2007, were used like instruments the documental research below PPP´s, structured interview directed to the learning and the closed questionnaire applied to the students of eighth and ninth semesters of graduation course. The results of data about the questionnaires elaborated according to National Curricular Patters (Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais ? DCN) and the Instrument of Evaluation Course of Graduation ? MEC were organized according to six lists about the profile of the learning and teaching that participate of the research; of the didactical-pedagogical organization and PPP´s objectives to the just-graduates person to the didactical-pedagogical curriculum organization. For considering the interviews it was adopted thematic analysis of content discribed in lexical analysis by informatical program ALCESTE which provided the organization of the material in five categories: daily problems of SUS consolidation versus nurse formation, dichotomies about FAEN´s nursing course of curriculum versus principles of integralization of graduating process, the just-graduated one from FAEN and its professional insertion united to SUS politic-pedagogical project and the concern about the overcoming of dichotomies of graduation process abilities and necessary competences to the SUS performing nurse. The analysis of informations deriving from documental performance and field research resulted on the verification that, in spite of good intentions, the implementation strategies showed themselves fragile to cope with the rendering of expressed ideal on PPP. There is still a great gap between what´s thought as innovating graduating process and what´s being really implemented.

Roberta Kaliny de Souza Costa; Francisco Arnoldo Nunes de Miranda

2010-01-01

92

Designing the Information Literacy Competency Standards for nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

This column documents the rationale for creating information literacy competency standards for nursing based on the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education" and the three documents from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) on essential skills for nurses in baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral level education and practice. It chronicles the process of the task force which is designing the discipline specific skills and predicts the value of their use, once they are published. PMID:23394425

Phelps, Sue F

2013-01-01

93

Bank of terms of the nursing special language in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital - descriptive study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The lack of standardization in the nursing special language has been identified as one of the main problems to overcome so that the profession can be recognized as a science. The emphasis on addressing these concerns led to the development of nursing terminologies that often do not reflect the local nursing practices, and this fact motivated the identification of professional nursing terms in a teaching hospital. Objective: To build, based on the ICNP® Seven Axes Model, a bank of terms of the nursing special language for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital, by using the terms found in the nursing records of this unit. Methodology: Descriptive research developed with the goal of contributing to the systematization of nursing care at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital. The steps followed in this research were: identification and evaluation of specialized documents; cross mapping of the identified terms with the ICNP® Version 1.0 terms; establishment of databases domain trees; development of definitions for terms not included in ICNP®, validation of the terms and definitions included in the database. Results: The results show that the 596 terms and definitions validated will enable the building of a bank of terms of the nursing special language for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, containing 226 terms that are included and 374 terms that are not included in ICNP® Version 1.0. Conclusion:  It is expected that this database will become a source for the development of ICNP® Catalogues, including sets of diagnostic statements, nursing results and interventions, which can be used to implement the systematization of nursing care in the unit in question.

Maria Miriam Lima da Nóbrega; Telma Ribeiro Garcia; Renata Valéria Nóbrega; Rafaela Teotônio de Melo Araújo

2009-01-01

94

Content and completeness of care plans after implementation of standardized nursing terminologies and computerized records.  

Science.gov (United States)

The nursing process and standardized nursing terminologies are essential elements to structure nursing documentation in daily nursing information management. The aim of this study was to describe sustainability and whether and how standardized nursing terminologies, in handwritten versus preprinted versus computerized nursing care plans, changed the content and completeness of documented nursing care. Three audits of patient records were performed: a pretest (n = 291) before a yearlong implementation of standardized nursing terminologies in nursing care plans followed by two posttests: (1) 3 weeks after implementation of nursing terminologies (n = 299) and (2) 22 months after implementation of nursing terminologies and 8 months after implementation of a computerized system (n = 281) in a university hospital. Content and completeness of documented nursing care improved after implementation of standardized nursing terminologies. Documentation of nursing care plans, signs and symptoms, related factors, and nursing interventions increased, whereas mean number of nursing diagnoses per patient did not change between audits. Computerized nursing care plans had the biggest impact, with more variety of nursing diagnoses and increased documentation of signs and symptoms, related factors, and nursing interventions. The use of standardized nursing terminologies improved nursing content in the nursing care plans. Moreover, computerized nursing care plans, in comparison with handwritten and preprinted care plans, increased documentation completeness. PMID:22041791

Thoroddsen, Asta; Ehnfors, Margareta; Ehrenberg, Anna

2011-10-01

95

Content and completeness of care plans after implementation of standardized nursing terminologies and computerized records.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The nursing process and standardized nursing terminologies are essential elements to structure nursing documentation in daily nursing information management. The aim of this study was to describe sustainability and whether and how standardized nursing terminologies, in handwritten versus preprinted versus computerized nursing care plans, changed the content and completeness of documented nursing care. Three audits of patient records were performed: a pretest (n = 291) before a yearlong implementation of standardized nursing terminologies in nursing care plans followed by two posttests: (1) 3 weeks after implementation of nursing terminologies (n = 299) and (2) 22 months after implementation of nursing terminologies and 8 months after implementation of a computerized system (n = 281) in a university hospital. Content and completeness of documented nursing care improved after implementation of standardized nursing terminologies. Documentation of nursing care plans, signs and symptoms, related factors, and nursing interventions increased, whereas mean number of nursing diagnoses per patient did not change between audits. Computerized nursing care plans had the biggest impact, with more variety of nursing diagnoses and increased documentation of signs and symptoms, related factors, and nursing interventions. The use of standardized nursing terminologies improved nursing content in the nursing care plans. Moreover, computerized nursing care plans, in comparison with handwritten and preprinted care plans, increased documentation completeness.

Thoroddsen A; Ehnfors M; Ehrenberg A

2011-10-01

96

University of New Mexico College of Nursing: Teaching and Nursing Strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

As the health care professions experience continued growth, more and more people are seeking to enter the field of nursing. Nursing educators will appreciate these materials designed to engage their students. Crafted by the University of New Mexico's College of Nursing, these teaching and learning strategies help promote critical thinking and other key skills applicable to the field. There are nine sections here, including Analogy, Case Study, Debate, Jigsaw, and Role Playing. Each area contains examples (some with videos) of each activity or concept, along with information about the strategy's potential use in the classroom. The site is rounded out by a section of Selected Journal Articles, which deal with pedagogy, course development, and student engagement.

97

Using the WWW to teach undergraduate nurses clinical communication.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

On-line learning is increasingly being used in nursing education. Nevertheless, there is still insufficient evidence to demonstrate: whether students respond positively when this form of learning is used to teach relatively practical or clinical subjects; whether it is effective; and whether it is fair to students with less access to, or familiarity with, computers and the internet. In 2003, an on-line Unit on clinical communication was developed for Australian undergraduate nurses in partnership between an Australian School of Nursing and the Department of Clinical Psychology. Students were overwhelmingly positive in their evaluation of the Unit although some regretted the lack of face-to-face contact with tutors and peers. The best aspects of the Unit included the content and structure being perceived as interesting, fun and informative, the relevance of the material for them as nurses, flexibility to work independently, promotion of critical thinking and gaining an understanding of client issues. Neither their evaluation nor their final grades were related to students' age or whether they preferred on-line or traditional learning. Students who had readily available computer access, however, had better final grades. Also, students' grades were correlated with how often they accessed the Unit.

Farrell GA; Cubit KA; Bobrowski CL; Salmon P

2007-07-01

98

Using the WWW to teach undergraduate nurses clinical communication.  

Science.gov (United States)

On-line learning is increasingly being used in nursing education. Nevertheless, there is still insufficient evidence to demonstrate: whether students respond positively when this form of learning is used to teach relatively practical or clinical subjects; whether it is effective; and whether it is fair to students with less access to, or familiarity with, computers and the internet. In 2003, an on-line Unit on clinical communication was developed for Australian undergraduate nurses in partnership between an Australian School of Nursing and the Department of Clinical Psychology. Students were overwhelmingly positive in their evaluation of the Unit although some regretted the lack of face-to-face contact with tutors and peers. The best aspects of the Unit included the content and structure being perceived as interesting, fun and informative, the relevance of the material for them as nurses, flexibility to work independently, promotion of critical thinking and gaining an understanding of client issues. Neither their evaluation nor their final grades were related to students' age or whether they preferred on-line or traditional learning. Students who had readily available computer access, however, had better final grades. Also, students' grades were correlated with how often they accessed the Unit. PMID:16935394

Farrell, Gerald A; Cubit, Katrina A; Bobrowski, Christina L; Salmon, Peter

2006-08-28

99

Standard Operating Procedure: use in nursing care in hospital services.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This is a descriptive and quantitative study, carried out in three hospitals in the Northwest of São Paulo, Brazil. It aimed to verify the existence and use of Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) by nursing teams. SOPs describe each critical and sequential step of a task to ensure its expected result. A total of 261 nursing professionals participated in the study, randomly selected from different units and shifts between August and September 2006. Results indicate that 56.7% use SOPs only when they have doubts; 54.02% of the nursing technicians and auxiliaries and 62.86% of nurses do not believe the procedures are being complied with. These findings indicate the need for continuing training on SOP use and compliance by all professionals, with a view to improving nursing care.

Guerrero GP; Beccaria LM; Trevizan MA

2008-11-01

100

Innovative teaching strategy for pharmacology in psychiatric-mental health nursing: moving from content to concepts.  

Science.gov (United States)

Faculty teaching an undergraduate psychiatricmental health nursing course noted that the vast content related to psychotropic medication interventions needed to be conceptualized creatively to help students develop expertise. In this article, an innovative pedagogical approach is presented for teaching nursing students psychopharmacology by moving from content to concepts. PMID:23457714

Bonnivier, Joy F; Magoteaux, April L

2012-12-01

 
 
 
 
101

Innovative teaching strategy for pharmacology in psychiatric-mental health nursing: moving from content to concepts.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Faculty teaching an undergraduate psychiatricmental health nursing course noted that the vast content related to psychotropic medication interventions needed to be conceptualized creatively to help students develop expertise. In this article, an innovative pedagogical approach is presented for teaching nursing students psychopharmacology by moving from content to concepts.

Bonnivier JF; Magoteaux AL

2012-12-01

102

[Insertion of cost teaching in the discipline of administration applied to nursing].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objective of this text was to make theoretical rescue of the course of the undergraduate discipline Administration Applied to Nursing throughout the history of teaching of Nursing in Brazil, connecting it to the teaching of Costs. We noticed, inserted in the teaching of this discipline, many direct quotes related to the themes of Costs or Economics in Health, from the earliest curriculum in Nursing, dating back to 1890, to the National Curricular Policies of the Nursing Undergraduate Course, of 2001, in addition to indirect quotes related to management, decision taking, and advising in health projects, among others, but with no continuity.

Francisco IM; Castilho V

2006-03-01

103

The Use of Humor as a Teaching Strategy in Nursing Education  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this research study was to determine the use of humor as a teaching strategy among a sample of nurse educators employed by community colleges and universities in Northern and Central California nursing programs. The study also identified the types of humor used, how humor is used in the classroom, and nurse educators' perceptions of…

Lukehart, Dennis E.

2009-01-01

104

Teaching with Vision: Culturally Responsive Teaching in Standards-Based Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

In "Teaching with Vision," two respected scholars in teaching for social justice have gathered teachers from across the country to describe rich examples of extraordinary practice. This collection showcases the professional experience and wisdom of classroom teachers who have been navigating standards- and test-driven teaching environments in…

Sleeter, Christine E., Ed.; Cornbleth, Catherine, Ed.

2011-01-01

105

The use of standardized exit examinations in baccalaureate nursing education.  

Science.gov (United States)

To improve pass rates on the NCLEX-RN, many nursing programs have implemented progression policies that require a minimal passing score on a commercial standardized exit examination. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the controversy surrounding the use of these examinations in nursing education, including ethical, legal, cultural, socioeconomic, and technological considerations, as well as discuss their program's exit examination policy, pass rates, and recommendations for the use of exit examinations. PMID:23407201

Santo, LaTonya; Frander, Elizabeth; Hawkins, Amanda

106

The practice of teaching and learning about nursing management within the web of human interactions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The text describes a collective and participative construction of a methodological and theoretical model about the nurse’s management, which resulted from a teaching internship with students of a course in Nursing Management, using Paulo Freire as a reference. The teaching/learning process, based on dialogue and on horizontal relationships, fostered the interaction and construction of self-knowledge of both types of individuals involved in the educational process.

Dirce Backes; Alacoque Erdmann; Maria Anice da Silva; Marta Lenise do Prado

2007-01-01

107

Evaluation of nursing care standard in a neurological ward.  

Science.gov (United States)

Providing high quality of nursing care is extremely important with respect to the specific character of neurology, dealing with negative consequences of chronic and incurable diseases which often lead to disability. Quality in nursing denotes the degree of achieving the desired effects with respect to the state of health and health promoting attitudes. The precondition for the provision of quality is the development and implementation of the standards of care. The standard is an average typical model or pattern which is attainable and measurable, i.e. a basic level below which the performance is not acceptable. A standard contains the following criteria: structural (staff, technology, finance), process (provision of services), and effect measuring the effectiveness of the nursing care. The evaluation was conducted in the Neurology Ward at State Hospital No. 4 in Lublin by the assessment of the work of nurses and its effects, based on a sample of 85 patients. Evaluation was carried out by comparing the nursing standard provided in practice and the theoretical standard which covered a complete realisation of the structural criteria and partial fulfillment of process and effect criteria. This resulted in the majority of patients (61.5%) obtaining optimum functional independence. PMID:11977335

Adamczyk, K; Lorencowicz, R; Flis, D; Zajko, A; Niezbecka, J

2001-01-01

108

[Cancer nursing care education programs: the effectiveness of different teaching methods].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: In-service education affects the quality of cancer care directly. Using classroom teaching to deliver in-service education is often ineffective due to participants' large workload and shift requirements. PURPOSE: This study evaluated the learning effectiveness of different teaching methods in the dimensions of knowledge, attitude, and learning satisfaction. METHODS: This study used a quasi-experimental study design. Participants were cancer ward nurses working at one medical center in northern Taiwan. Participants were divided into an experimental group and control group. The experimental group took an e-learning course and the control group took a standard classroom course using the same basic course material. Researchers evaluated the learning efficacy of each group using a questionnaire based on the quality of cancer nursing care learning effectiveness scale. All participants answered the questionnaire once before and once after completing the course. RESULTS: (1) Post-test "knowledge" scores for both groups were significantly higher than pre-test scores for both groups. Post-test "attitude" scores were significantly higher for the control group, while the experimental group reported no significant change. (2) after a covariance analysis of the pre-test scores for both groups, the post-test score for the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group in the knowledge dimension. Post-test scores did not differ significantly from pre-test scores for either group in the attitude dimension. (3) Post-test satisfaction scores between the two groups did not differ significantly with regard to teaching methods. The e-learning method, however, was demonstrated as more flexible than the classroom teaching method. CONCLUSIONS / IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Study results demonstrate the importance of employing a variety of teaching methods to instruct clinical nursing staff. We suggest that both classroom teaching and e-learning instruction methods be used to enhance the quality of cancer nursing care education programs. We also encourage that interactivity between student and instructor be incorporated into e-learning course designs to enhance effectiveness.

Cheng YJ; Kao YH

2012-10-01

109

Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

Beard, Kenya V.

2009-01-01

110

Incorporating the nephrology nursing scope and standards of practice into clinical practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

The recently released American Nephrology Nurses' Association (ANNA) Nephrology Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, 7th edition, provides a broad foundation for defining and evaluating nephrology nursing practice. ANNA's standards present a similar approach as the American Nurses Association (ANA) 2010 standards. The ANNA Nephrology Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, 7th edition, is expanded to incorporate a section on how to use the standards in practice. This article provides an overview of the scope of practice, standards, and situations that require intervention by nephrology nurses. Samples of tools that can be used to incorporate the standards into the various situations are discussed. PMID:21928607

Gomez, Norma J; Castner, Debra; Dennison, Hazel A

111

Incorporating the nephrology nursing scope and standards of practice into clinical practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The recently released American Nephrology Nurses' Association (ANNA) Nephrology Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, 7th edition, provides a broad foundation for defining and evaluating nephrology nursing practice. ANNA's standards present a similar approach as the American Nurses Association (ANA) 2010 standards. The ANNA Nephrology Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice, 7th edition, is expanded to incorporate a section on how to use the standards in practice. This article provides an overview of the scope of practice, standards, and situations that require intervention by nephrology nurses. Samples of tools that can be used to incorporate the standards into the various situations are discussed.

Gomez NJ; Castner D; Dennison HA

2011-07-01

112

The interplay between global standards and local practice in nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The paper assesses the extent, form, and transformation of global nursing classifications (NANDA) in a nursing practice during a period of 5 years. METHOD: A longitudinal case study was used to trace implementation, adoption and use of nursing classifications as an integral part of an electronic nursing module. A mixed method of data collection was used, including semi-structured interviews, observation and document analysis. RESULTS: A surprisingly high proportion of nursing diagnoses was consistent with the global standard, in spite of a gradual increase of user-generated concepts. This is elaborated more thoroughly through a co-constructing perspective, emphasizing how the global standard and the practice mutually shaped each other over several years. CONCLUSION: Standardization is an iterative process that is performed in close relationship with practice. The mutual interrelation between formal classifications (NANDA) and local practices are co-constructed in a dynamic interplay that evolves over time. In such a process, the use of local classifications and local strategies can be a means to bridge the gap between these two extreme points.

Meum T; Ellingsen G; Monteiro E; Wangensteen G; Igesund H

2013-05-01

113

Student feedback on teaching: some issues for consideration for nurse educators.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this paper, we outline some key points about student feedback for nurse educators to consider. For nursing students, providing feedback offers an opportunity to communicate whether relevant and effective learning has occurred. Given the importance of student feedback for the quality of learning and teaching, and the significant resources invested in it, it is essential that accurate feedback is obtained and responded to by nurse educators. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to present an overview of factors influencing the quality and reliability of student feedback of their theoretical and clinical learning experiences, and ways the feedback might be used by educators for improving teaching and career enhancement. Nurse educators need to be prepared to respond to well-intentioned feedback without undue defensiveness to ensure good and effective teaching. Ultimately, feedback systems that are well managed should benefit nursing students, nurse educators and their respective institutions.

Cleary M; Happell B; Lau ST; Mackey S

2013-02-01

114

Student feedback on teaching: some issues for consideration for nurse educators.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, we outline some key points about student feedback for nurse educators to consider. For nursing students, providing feedback offers an opportunity to communicate whether relevant and effective learning has occurred. Given the importance of student feedback for the quality of learning and teaching, and the significant resources invested in it, it is essential that accurate feedback is obtained and responded to by nurse educators. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to present an overview of factors influencing the quality and reliability of student feedback of their theoretical and clinical learning experiences, and ways the feedback might be used by educators for improving teaching and career enhancement. Nurse educators need to be prepared to respond to well-intentioned feedback without undue defensiveness to ensure good and effective teaching. Ultimately, feedback systems that are well managed should benefit nursing students, nurse educators and their respective institutions. PMID:23425381

Cleary, Michelle; Happell, Brenda; Lau, Siew Tiang; Mackey, Sandra

2013-02-01

115

[Teaching staff, student, and performance evaluation in nursing administration at nursing schools in Brazil].  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study was to analyze the theoretical references related to the performance evaluation process, establishing their correlation to different pedagogical lines. These references constitute the foundation for the analysis of data being collected and studied. This study is part of a broader project, currently in progress, whose objective is to determine how to evaluate teachers, students and achievement in courses dealing with content related to Nursing Administration at the graduate and undergraduate levels in Brazil. We hope to be contributing to a clearer and better understanding of this concrete reality, and of the performance evaluation process in light of the changes in the teaching of such courses. PMID:12483982

Kurcgant, P; Ciampone, M H; Felli, V E

2001-12-01

116

Team-based learning: an innovative approach to teaching maternal-newborn nursing care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing education programs are charged with the task of transforming the way future nurses are educated to better meet the demands of an ever-changing health care system. The tradition of lecture-based theory courses and on-site clinical experiences is slowly being replaced by evidence-based teaching formats that focus on actively engaging students in their own learning. This article describes the process of integrating a new teaching strategy-team-based learning-into a maternal-newborn nursing course at a midwestern baccalaureate nursing program.

Lubeck P; Tschetter L; Mennenga H

2013-02-01

117

Meaningful and engaging teaching techniques for student nurses: a literature review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Helping undergraduate nursing students to contextualise theory learnt in the classroom to their professional practice can be challenging for nurse educators. This article provides a critical review of contemporary literature that explores strategies and techniques that nurse educators within university settings have adopted to address this challenge. This review was conducted as part of a broader research project that involved interviewing nurse educators to explore how they attempt to make their teaching meaningful and engaging for student nurses. The data was analysed using thematic analysis and the intention is to share the wealth of ideas gleaned with other nurse educators, including in the form of an evidence-based inventory of teaching approaches found to be effective in enhancing the meaningfulness and engagement of content to nursing learners. PMID:23683818

Crookes, Kay; Crookes, Patrick A; Walsh, Kenneth

2013-05-15

118

Novice Nurse Educator Entry-Level Competency to Teach: A National Study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Expert nurse clinicians who are transitioning into academic positions after successful clinical careers often find they are unprepared to assume their new educator roles. Although nursing clinical expertise may be a necessary expectation, this knowledge is not sufficient to assume a nurse educator position. The purpose of this study was to identify essential entry-level nurse educator competencies, as reported by nurse administrators of accredited prelicensure nursing programs in the United States. Responses were categorized according to the type of academic institution housing the prelicensure nursing program and type of entry-level nurse educator position. A total of 374 program administrators representing 48 states participated, for a 44% response rate. The results indicate that administrators expect entry-level nurse educators to acquire teaching competencies prior to obtaining an entry-level position. Expected proficiency levels of competencies differed based on the position type and the academic setting. [J Nurs Educ. 2013;52(xx):xxx-xxx.].

Poindexter K

2013-09-01

119

[Assessment of quality of nursing prescriptions in public teaching hospital].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A multicenter, cross-sectional study took place from December 2009 to June 2010 and aimed to assess the quality of Nursing Prescription (NP) in two public teaching hospitals. The sample consisted of 1,307 NP and data were processed using the G-test and chi-square. The determination of the quality of NP was based on the classification indices reported in literature. Among the results, 1,083 (82.8%) correct and appropriate NP, 154 (11.8%) inadequate NP and 52 (3.9%) incomplete NP were found. In 18 (1.37%) patient charts, the NP was nonexistent. There was statistic signficance (alpha < 0.05) for incomplete and absent NP between the two hospitals (0.00), as well as inappropriate NP between age groups (0.03). It was concluded that, in the hospitals under study, the NP needs to be improved both in terms of quantity and quality.

Versa GL; Murassaki AY; da Silva LG; Vituri DW; de Mello WA; Matsuda LM

2012-06-01

120

Study of the relationship between nurses’ work environment indices and their burnout aspects in TUMS teaching hospitals  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available   Background and Aims: In a healthy organization, staff's physical and mental health is as important and considerable as production and productivity. Burnout is a result of long-term tension and stress in the job environment. Its symptoms occur when employees' power and potency is not enough for the job environment demands. Emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of personal accomplishment are three dimensions of burnout. In this survey we studied the nursing job environment considering nurses' participation in hospital affairs, foundation for quality of nursing care, managerial support and leadership, staffing/resource adequacy and collegial nurse-physician relation and their effects on nurses' burnout level.   Methods:   This survey is a cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study to review of nursing job environment on nurses' burnout dimensions in TUMS (Tehran …) general-teaching hospitals in 1386. For this study, 214 nurses (confidence interval %95, powers %80 and attrition %30) were selected randomly. Data were gathered using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Nursing Work Index(NWI) questionnaires filled in by studied nurses.   The validity of these questionnaires determined using masters' instructions. To determine the reliability of NWI questionnaire, a pilot study was conducted and its reliability coefficient (Cronbach’s alpha) was 0.88. The reliability and internal validity of MBI questionnaire had been proved in previous studies. Data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5 and Logistic regression and Chi-Square test.   Results:   Results show that hospital type and nurses' sex have effects on lack of personal accomplishment frequency and hospital type influences lack of personal accomplishment severity. Depersonalization frequency is effected negatively by decreasing foundation for quality of nursing care (OR=2.326) and lack of managerial support and leadership (OR=4.553) and limited collegial nurse-physician relation (OR=1.339). Depersonalization severity is influenced negatively by decreasing foundation for quality of nursing care (OR=3.310). Lack of managerial support and leadership (OR=2.152) effects negatively on emotional exhaustion frequency, and finally, exhaustion severity is effected negatively by lack of foundation for quality of nursing care (OR=3.838), staffing/resource adequacy (OR=2.440) and collegial nurse-physician relation (OR=2.552). Also, logistic regression results show that all mentioned relationships (given standard errors) are positive that means increasing a variable results in increasing the other variable and vice versa.   conclusion:   The type and numbers of patients refer to the studied hospitals, using flexible working models, applying new working ideas, team working, participating in hospital affairs, preparing educational and preferment opportunities for employees, providing managerial support etc. have important effects on the frequency and severity of burnout dimensions.  

M Arab; A Rahimi; L Vali; R Ravangard; A Akbari Sari

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Nurses need a standard definition of a deprivation of liberty.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The House of Commons health committee has called for an urgent review of the implementation of the deprivation of liberty safeguards. They are particularly concerned that nurses, as gatekeepers of the safeguards, often do not know when a deprivation of liberty occurs in practice. In this article the author argues that given the lack of a standard definition of what amounts to a deprivation of liberty and the introduction by the courts of often contradictory factors that nurses are required to consider when determining if a patient is being deprived of their liberty it is little wonder that confusion is common place.

Griffith R

2013-09-01

122

The attitudes and experiences of registered nurses who teach and mentor nursing students in the acute care setting  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The pedagogy of clinical learning for nursing students in acute care settings has transitioned from an apprentice model to one necessitating more dynamic interactions between clinical staff nurses and learners. Clinical nurses must provide theoretical knowledge, share clinical expertise, and model professional behavior to nursing students in an increasingly complex medical system. Our clinical learning environments encompass significant technological advances, shortened length of patient stay, and institutional climates which are often dominated by financial constraints, all which have the potential to impact the teaching and learning environment, and consequently, patient outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes and experiences of registered nurses in acute care settings who clinically teach and mentor nursing students in order to understand pedagogical strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities. Methods: A qualitative study was undertaken to explore the attitudes and experiences of registered nurses who participate in the clinical teaching and mentoring of nursing students in an acute care setting. Semi- structured interviews were carried out using a focus group format. Three models of clinical education were represented within the sample. The first model consisted of a faculty member affiliated with an institution of higher learning overseeing the clinical experiences of six to eight students on one clinical unit for approximately 14 weeks. The second model was the preceptor-based model wherein an experienced nurse is paired with a student for approximately 240 hours during a ten-week period. The third model was the “Dedicated Education Unit” (DEU). The DEU leverages unit-based clinical staff nurses in a dual role as a clinical faculty member affiliated with a university-based nursing program and utilized a one-to-one or one-to-two teacher to learner ratio. Results: Thematic content analysis was carried out between and within the focus groups.  The findings suggest that: unit-specific philosophical pedagogies highly impact the overall experiences of teacher and learner; commonly shared, clearly articulated goals are imperative; and a firmly established and refined partnership between the student’s academic institution and the health care facility may be critical to the successful outcome of the experience. Moreover, the participants articulated a perceived link between teaching students and enhanced communication on the unit, utilization of evidenced-based practice, and improved patient outcomes. Conclusion: The results presented here are based on focus group interviews with three groups of participants who are involved in the clinical education of nursing students. The six themes that emerged serve as a framework for understanding the comprehensive, time-intensive, patient-focused, and role-developmental approaches in which clinical nurses engage to support excellent clinical learning experiences for student nurses.

Linda Evans; Margaret Costello; Hallie Greenberg; Patrice K. Nicholas

2012-01-01

123

Compliance of state registered nurses to nursing standards during practice in tertiary facilities in Malawi  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the quality of practice offered by nurses to patients who underwent surgical incision into the abdomen (post-laparotomy) at tertiary hospitals (Kamuzu, Mzuzu, Queen Elizabeth and Zomba) in Malawi. The study design was descriptively cross sectional and utilized a quantitative data collection and analysis method. All available 48 registered nurses in the surgical ward of four central hospitals and 100 patients that were admitted in the ward during the time of study were recruited. A 3-point scale rating consisting of compliance (C = 1), partial compliance (C 1.0-0.5) and non compliance (C 0.5-0.0) was used to describe the nurse midwives compliance with the process standards of care. Results show that nurses in all the 4 central hospitals partially complied with assessment and planning standards. During assessment, the nurses assessed the physical aspects of care but did not assess the psychological, spiritual and cultural aspects of care. At planning the nurses assigned and delegated tasks based on the knowledge and skills of the provider selected but did not comply with factors related to safety, effectiveness and cost of care. All the facilities fully complied with implementation standard because they implemented care in a safe and appropriate manner and communicated with patients/ significant others and other health care providers. However, regarding systematic and ongoing evaluation of patients’ condition only Mzuzu Central hospital partially complied while the rest of the facilities were not compliant. All the facilities did not comply with documentation standard of care because the patient records were not legible and did not precisely depict comprehensiveness of care nor bore signatures of the implementers of the care. Results are discussed by relating the level of compliance to standards and the quality of patient care. 

Edoly Shirley Lengu; Rodwell Gundo; Alfred Maluwa; Noel Mbirimtengerenji

2013-01-01

124

Developing a teaching video on mechanical ventilation weaning to facilitate effective nursing research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article describes the process of developing a teaching video associated with conducting a nursing research study and directed at educating critical care staff nurses about the process of successfully weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. Techniques on developing the script and filming and editing the video are presented. The results of this process included staff empowerment and a teaching video used by 10 hospitals in a multi-site research project.

Birdsall C; Barker K; Setti K

1995-11-01

125

A survey of physical examination skills taught in undergraduate nursing programs: are we teaching too much?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Because content saturation is a growing concern, as reflected in the nursing literature, the content taught in undergraduate nursing curricula should be critically examined. The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional research was to determine and analyze the physical assessment content currently taught in undergraduate nursing programs. A total of 198 individuals teaching in undergraduate nursing programs completed a Web-based survey. Of the 122 skills included on the survey, 81% were reportedly being taught in most of the nursing programs. Total scores for 18 systems-based assessment categories were significantly different among associate and baccalaureate nursing programs in all but three categories: assessment of integument, breast, and female genitals. Previous research has shown that nurses use less than 25% of these same skills regularly in clinical practice, regardless of their educational preparation. Findings from this research raise questions about the breadth to which physical examination content should be taught in undergraduate nursing education.

Giddens JF; Eddy L

2009-01-01

126

A survey of physical examination skills taught in undergraduate nursing programs: are we teaching too much?  

Science.gov (United States)

Because content saturation is a growing concern, as reflected in the nursing literature, the content taught in undergraduate nursing curricula should be critically examined. The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional research was to determine and analyze the physical assessment content currently taught in undergraduate nursing programs. A total of 198 individuals teaching in undergraduate nursing programs completed a Web-based survey. Of the 122 skills included on the survey, 81% were reportedly being taught in most of the nursing programs. Total scores for 18 systems-based assessment categories were significantly different among associate and baccalaureate nursing programs in all but three categories: assessment of integument, breast, and female genitals. Previous research has shown that nurses use less than 25% of these same skills regularly in clinical practice, regardless of their educational preparation. Findings from this research raise questions about the breadth to which physical examination content should be taught in undergraduate nursing education. PMID:19227752

Giddens, Jean Foret; Eddy, Linda

2009-01-01

127

Nursing theory and the clinical gaze: discovery in teaching theory across a cultural divide.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this column is to describe the experience of teaching nursing theory in Uganda, Africa. The author is a nurse educator from the United States, who with support of a Fulbright grant was a visiting lecturer at Uganda Christian University in Mukono, Uganda. The students were two cohorts of Ugandan graduate nursing students. The account is presented as a case study in exploring the nature, justification, and utility of theory for nurses internationally. Teaching and discussion strategies are described as well as the philosophical and theoretical frameworks for analyzing and defending the building and use of theory in nursing. A convergence of evidence leads to a recognition of implicit theory as constituting the nurse's clinical gaze.

Dunlap RK

2013-04-01

128

[Selecting methods and awaiting growth: the teaching experience of fundamental nursing practicum instructors].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: A constellation of factors accounts for teaching efficacy in the fundamental nursing practicum. Teachers play a critical role in terms of designing and executing an appropriate teaching plan, choosing effective methods, and holding appropriate teaching attitudes. It is thus extremely important that clinical teachers master the core characteristics of basic nursing practice. PURPOSE: This study aimed to illuminate the core characteristics of basic nursing practice for students for reference by clinical practicum teachers. METHODS: Qualitative research was used to identify the fundamentals of nursing practice by clinical teacher. Five focus group meetings were convened during the practice period. The researchers presided over group discussions held during the normal weekly teaching schedule and lasting approximately 2-4 hours each. The content analysis was adopted to analyze the data. RESULTS: Three major themes were proposed, including (1) student status: "novices were stymied by problems and thus improved slowly"; (2) teacher awareness: "teachers need to be aware of student capabilities, mood, and discomfort"; and (3) teaching style: "a good choice of methods should support and encourage students. CONCLUSIONS / IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: To cultivate professional nursing knowledge and self-confidence for future professional commitment, clinical teachers must first understand the characteristics and motivations of learning of their students and then select the, skills, and attitudes appropriate to provide step-by-step guidance. Communication with staffs and the preparation of atmosphere prior to nursing practice are also essential for students. Results provide insights into the technical college environment with regard to basic-level clinical nursing practice.

Lin HC; Lin CY; Chien TW; Liu KF; Chen MY; Lin WC

2013-02-01

129

The benefits of standardized nursing languages in complex adaptive systems such as hospitals.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Paperwork is a major source of frustration for hospital nurses and takes valuable time away from patient care. Studies indicate that nurses spend an estimated 13% to 28% of total shift time documenting. The growth in documentation requirements for nurses can, in part, be attributed to an exponential rise in health system complexity. Authors explore the documentation of nursing care plans from a complex adaptive system perspective and then analyze the utility of adopting a standardized nursing language. An actual case history of a nursing unit's attempt to reduce complexity, improve completion time, and increase staff satisfaction in care planning by adopting a standardized nursing language is provided to emphasize a practical application.

Clancy TR; Delaney CW; Morrison B; Gunn JK

2006-09-01

130

A peek at the revised Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The American Nurses Association will publish the revised Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice this summer. The new document focuses on outcomes, successes, change, and a global audience. This column highlights key changes within the context of nursing professional development, especially continuing nursing education.

Benedict MB; Bradley D

2010-05-01

131

Self-Efficacy and Postpartum Depression Teaching Behaviors of Hospital-Based Perinatal Nurses  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Based upon the Self-Efficacy Theory, this study examined the relationship between self-efficacy, self-efficacy-related variables, and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses. Findings revealed that teaching new mothers about postpartum depression is related to a p...

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Foltz, Melissa Pinto; Scheetz, James; Myers, John A.

132

[Interactive multimedia in nursing: a technology for teaching-learning semiology].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was aimed at examining the use of interactive multimedia for the theoretical-practical teaching of Semiology in Nursing It was developed at the Nursing School Alfredo Pinto, Universidade Federal do Estado de Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from August 2004 to June 2005, with fifth semester students. Opinion forms following the structured interview technique were used to collect the data. The results showed that nursing students think interactive multimedia is an instrument that enhances teaching, making possible the interaction of sounds and images. It represents an element directed at audiovisual senses, optimizing their performance during the patient's physical exam and care.

Gomes AV; Santiago LC

2008-03-01

133

Generational diversity in associate degree nursing students: Teaching styles and preferences in Pennsylvania  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods. Most importantly, faculty must facilitate an effective multi-generational learning environment. Research has shown that the generation to which a person belongs is likely to affect the ways in which he/she learns (Hammill, 2005). Characterized by its own attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and motivational needs, each generation also has distinct educational expectations. It is imperative, therefore, that nurse educators be aware of these differences and develop skills through which to communicate with the different generations, thereby reducing teaching/learning problems in the classroom. This is a quantitative, descriptive study that compared the teaching methods preferred by different generations of associate degree nursing students with the teaching methods that the instructors actually use. The research study included 289 participants; 244 nursing student participants and 45 nursing faculty participants from four nursing departments in colleges in Pennsylvania. Overall, the results of the study found many statistically significant findings. The results of the ANOVA test revealed eight statistically significant findings among Generation Y, Generation X and Baby boomers. The preferred teaching methods included: lecture, self-directed learning, web-based course with no class meetings, important for faculty to know my name, classroom structure, know why I am learning what I am learning, learning for the sake of learning and grade is all that matters. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching methods by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of the data.

Kitko, Jennifer V.

134

Nursing students' attitudes to health promotion to: implications for teaching practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

For several decades now the World Health Organization has indicated the need for a reorientation of the health services away from focusing solely on illness and disease to one that considers both disease prevention and health promotion. Successive publications that guide public health policy both nationally and internationally reiterate the need for health promotion and the principles of health for all to become integral to the fabric of health care delivery. The role of the nurse as health promoters is well recognized. However despite acknowledgement by professional nursing bodies and nurse educators that health promotion forms a central tenet of undergraduate nurse education curricula, there are varied approaches to teaching and learning and little formal evaluation of the consequences of approaches taken. The aims of this study are to identify current health promotion curricular content within the Irish undergraduate nursing programme context; to measure nursing students' attitudes towards health promotion and to examine nursing students' reported lifestyle behaviours.

Mooney B; Timmins F; Byrne G; Corroon AM

2011-11-01

135

Nursing students' attitudes to health promotion to: implications for teaching practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

For several decades now the World Health Organization has indicated the need for a reorientation of the health services away from focusing solely on illness and disease to one that considers both disease prevention and health promotion. Successive publications that guide public health policy both nationally and internationally reiterate the need for health promotion and the principles of health for all to become integral to the fabric of health care delivery. The role of the nurse as health promoters is well recognized. However despite acknowledgement by professional nursing bodies and nurse educators that health promotion forms a central tenet of undergraduate nurse education curricula, there are varied approaches to teaching and learning and little formal evaluation of the consequences of approaches taken. The aims of this study are to identify current health promotion curricular content within the Irish undergraduate nursing programme context; to measure nursing students' attitudes towards health promotion and to examine nursing students' reported lifestyle behaviours. PMID:21215497

Mooney, Bróna; Timmins, Fiona; Byrne, Gobnait; Corroon, Ann Marie

2011-01-06

136

Staff development sessions. A strategy to facilitate nursing staff education with limited teaching resources.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A reduction in clinical nursing educator positions resulted in the need for the Department of Nursing to continue to facilitate the professional development of nursing staff members with limited resources. In this article, the author describes a program, developed by the central Nursing Education Department at The Toronto Hospital, that was offered to clinical resource nurses, nurse managers, patient care coordinators, and preceptors. These individuals could use the information to promote the development of nursing staff members at the unit level. Several topics were presented: self-directed learning, needs assessment, behavioral objectives, lesson plans, teaching strategies, educational program evaluation, and clinical evaluation. Program evaluations were positive, and 45% of the respondents indicated they had the opportunity to apply what they learned.

Kirsivali-Farmer K

1994-07-01

137

The ethical basis of teaching spirituality and spiritual care: a survey of student nurses perceptions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: There is a professional requirement for student nurses to achieve competence in the delivery of spiritual care. However, there is no research exploring students nurses perceptions of being educated in these matters. AIM: This paper explores the ethical basis of teaching student nurses about the concepts of spirituality and spiritual care by reporting the findings from the first year of a 3 year investigation. DESIGN: An exploratory longitudinal design was used to obtain student nurses perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care as they progressed through a 3 year programme. METHOD: A questionnaire incorporating the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale was distributed to 176 pre-registration nursing students undertaking either the Advanced Diploma or Bachelor of Science degree programmes. RESULTS: A response rate of 76.7% was obtained. Findings reveal that the majority of student nurses perceived spirituality to be a universal phenomenon of a type that can be associated with existentialism. Some students were very uncertain and apprehensive about being instructed in spiritual matters. CONCLUSION: A cohort of student nurses held similar understandings of spirituality to those presented in the nursing literature. However the results also suggest an overwhelming majority felt it was wrong for spirituality to imply that some people are better than others and most were uncertain whether spirituality was related to good and evil. RELEVANCE TO NURSE EDUCATION: The investigation reveals that there are a number of ethical concerns surrounding the teaching of spirituality to student nurses that need to be resolved.

McSherry W; Gretton M; Draper P; Watson R

2008-11-01

138

[Application of standardized patients in teaching, learning and assessment].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The new German requirements for Licensure to practice medicine focus on teaching clinical skills. It will become difficult for Medical Schools to fulfil these new requirements in the training of medical students with the increasing cost effectiveness in patient care. Standardized patients can be a very useful tool in teaching clinical skills. Implementation of a standardized patients program provides a quasi-real but safe learning environment in which students can acquire skills in physical examination, history taking, interpersonal and communication skills. These skills can also be assessed in this environment.

Ortwein H; Fröhmel A; Burger W

2006-01-01

139

Effective pedagogies for teaching math to nursing students: A literature review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Improving mathematical competency and problem-solving skills in undergraduate nursing students has been an enduring challenge for nurse educators. A number of teaching strategies have been used to address this problem with varying degrees of success. This paper discusses a literature review which examined undergraduate nursing student challenges to learning math, methods used to teach math and problem-solving skills, and the use of innovative pedagogies for teaching. The literature was searched using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and Education Resource Information Center databases. Key search terms included: math*, nurs*, nursing student, calculation, technology, medication administration, challenges, problem-solving, personal response system, clickers, computer and multi-media. Studies included in the review were published in English from 1990 to 2011. Results support four major themes which include: student challenges to learning, traditional pedagogies, curriculum strategies, and technology and integrative methods as pedagogy. The review concludes that there is a need for more innovative pedagogical strategies for teaching math to student nurses. Nurse educators in particular play a central role in helping students learn the conceptual basis, as well as practical hands-on methods, to problem solving and math competency. It is recommended that an integrated approach inclusive of technology will benefit students through better performance, increased understanding, and improved student satisfaction. PMID:22922029

Hunter Revell, Susan M; McCurry, Mary K

2012-08-24

140

Effective pedagogies for teaching math to nursing students: A literature review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Improving mathematical competency and problem-solving skills in undergraduate nursing students has been an enduring challenge for nurse educators. A number of teaching strategies have been used to address this problem with varying degrees of success. This paper discusses a literature review which examined undergraduate nursing student challenges to learning math, methods used to teach math and problem-solving skills, and the use of innovative pedagogies for teaching. The literature was searched using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and Education Resource Information Center databases. Key search terms included: math*, nurs*, nursing student, calculation, technology, medication administration, challenges, problem-solving, personal response system, clickers, computer and multi-media. Studies included in the review were published in English from 1990 to 2011. Results support four major themes which include: student challenges to learning, traditional pedagogies, curriculum strategies, and technology and integrative methods as pedagogy. The review concludes that there is a need for more innovative pedagogical strategies for teaching math to student nurses. Nurse educators in particular play a central role in helping students learn the conceptual basis, as well as practical hands-on methods, to problem solving and math competency. It is recommended that an integrated approach inclusive of technology will benefit students through better performance, increased understanding, and improved student satisfaction.

Hunter Revell SM; McCurry MK

2013-11-01

 
 
 
 
141

What does an innovative teaching assignment strategy mean to nursing students?  

Science.gov (United States)

The concept of innovation in nursing education has been addressed in published literature on faculty-defined and faculty-created teaching strategies and instructional methods. In this project, innovation is defined as "using knowledge to create ways and services that are new (or perceived as new) in order to transform systems" (Pardue, Tagliareni, Valiga, Davison-Price, & Orchowsky, 2005). Studies on nursing student perceptions of innovation are limited, and it is unclear how undergraduate and graduate students conceptualize innovative learning experiences. This project explored students' perceptions of their experiences with instructor-defined, innovative teaching/learning strategies in four types of nursing education programs. Issues nurse educators should consider as they apply new techniques to their teaching are discussed. PMID:19606658

Neuman, Lois H; Pardue, Karen T; Grady, Janet L; Gray, Mary Tod; Hobbins, Bonnie; Edelstein, Jan; Herrman, Judith W

142

What does an innovative teaching assignment strategy mean to nursing students?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The concept of innovation in nursing education has been addressed in published literature on faculty-defined and faculty-created teaching strategies and instructional methods. In this project, innovation is defined as "using knowledge to create ways and services that are new (or perceived as new) in order to transform systems" (Pardue, Tagliareni, Valiga, Davison-Price, & Orchowsky, 2005). Studies on nursing student perceptions of innovation are limited, and it is unclear how undergraduate and graduate students conceptualize innovative learning experiences. This project explored students' perceptions of their experiences with instructor-defined, innovative teaching/learning strategies in four types of nursing education programs. Issues nurse educators should consider as they apply new techniques to their teaching are discussed.

Neuman LH; Pardue KT; Grady JL; Gray MT; Hobbins B; Edelstein J; Herrman JW

2009-05-01

143

Writing electronic nursing care plans. An approach to facilitate navigating the standardized Nursing vocabularies NANDA and NIC  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The introduction of the standardized nursing languages NANDA and NIC to write electronic care plans is hard for nurses, as reported by several projects. Both the need to relate to a new software tool and to the totally unknown domains of the standardized languages contributes to this. With an existi...

Igesund, Harald

144

Teaching of the Nursing Process in Brazil: literature review from 1996 to 2006  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present is a literature review aimed at identifying knowledge production on teaching of the nursing process in graduation courses in Brazil in the past decade. From May 1996 to May 2006, a systematized literature review was conducted using LILACS and MEDLINE databases and by means of a direct search of papers. Fourteen papers were selected predominantly quantitative descriptive exploratory researches (57.14%) carried out with teachers of nursing undergraduate courses (35.72%) or with nursing students (28.57%); the papers approached the topics of physical exam (35.71%) and nursing diagnosis (35.71%). Students considered the nursing process as important for the quality of nursing care; this requires teachers to develop the necessary skills and competences for its use. Among the most effective teaching strategies in the nursing process, the theoretical-practical activities are to be highlighted. Research suggesting practices and actions in the teaching of the different steps of the nursing process should be developed.

Ana Luísa P. Cogo; Eva Neri Rubim Pedro; Miriam de Abreu Almeida

2006-01-01

145

Teaching cultural considerations at the end of life: end of life nursing education consortium program recommendations.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The End of Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) is an end of life care nursing education program that addresses the many dimensions of culture, including ethnic identity, gender, age, differing abilities, sexual orientation, and religion and spirituality. This article focuses on one of the program's modules entitled "Cultural Considerations in End of Life Care." METHOD: The ELNEC "Cultural Considerations in End of Life Care" module, which identifies important cultural considerations as well as strategies and responses to teach cultural competence and sensitivity in undergraduate nursing curriculum, is described. FINDINGS: A total of 564 nursing faculty members and 707 continuing education faculty members have undergone ELNEC training. Essential module components including teaching strategies and resources are presented. CONCLUSION: Comprehensive education for nurses regarding cultural considerations in end of life care results in improved care for dying patients who ultimately have a peaceful, respectful death with sensitivity to their cultural expectations and needs.

Matzo ML; Sherman DW; Mazanec P; Barber MA; Virani R; McLaughlin MM

2002-11-01

146

Teaching care as the essence of nursing administration.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Not all nurses in managerial positions care for their clients (nursing departments). It is imperative that nurses in managerial positions implement strategies that will enable all nurses to value care. By focusing a nursing management curriculum on care, nurse-managers will value care and incorporate care into their nursing departments. "Health care delivery systems of this nation are currently dominated by an industrial management model. . . . Such a model presents serious conflict with a care culture and nursing, having mastered the current management model, must now move to merge it with the essentials of a care culture. Only then will we create new nursing models which will be responsive to the health care needs of the 21st century".

Evans CL

1990-01-01

147

Toward standard classification schemes for nursing language: recommendations of the American Nurses Association Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The American Nurses Association (ANA) Cabinet on Nursing Practice mandated the formation of the Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice. The Committee has established the process and the criteria by which to review and recommend nursing classification schemes based on the ANA Nursing Process Standards and elements contained in the Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) for inclusion of nursing data elements in national databases. Four classification schemes have been recognized by the Committee for use in national databases. These classification schemes have been forwarded to the National Library of Medicine (NLM) for inclusion in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and to the International Council of Nurses for the development of a proposed International Classification of Nursing Practice.

McCormick KA; Lang N; Zielstorff R; Milholland DK; Saba V; Jacox A

1994-11-01

148

Nursing monitoring and management of free and pedicled flaps--outcomes of teaching sessions on flap care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Close monitoring is crucial following successful flap surgery because early detection of signs of deterioration can result in a successful intervention and salvage of the flap. An observational audit of practice highlighted short comings in flap monitoring in our Plastic Surgery unit. We created and delivered a teaching session to junior nursing staff with regard the basic principles of flaps and their postoperative care and generated a universal postoperative flap monitoring protocol to help improve and standardize care provision. METHODS: Following a group teaching session, all healthcare providers provided input to create a flap monitoring chart. A cartoon was drawn and placed around the ward to consolidate the ideas generated. RESULTS: The working relationship between doctors and nurses on the ward improved dramatically. Nursing staff felt more confident in their ability to deal with flaps postoperatively and felt more able to contact the surgeons about any concerns or clarifications needed. A re-audit of procedures following these interventions showed improvement in detection of flap ischemia. DISCUSSION: Good patient care within any healthcare system is entirely dependent on the effective function of the multidisciplinary team while maintaining the patient as the focus of care. With both subjective and objective evidences of improvement in the care of flaps in our Plastic Surgery Unit, we can confidently conclude that our teaching program and postoperative flap protocol has been a successful intervention.

Khan MA; Mohan A; Ahmed W; Rayatt S

2010-10-01

149

A Study of the Effect of Standard Nursing Care Plans on Nurses' Documentation on Individualized Care Plans and Patient Medical Records.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report details the results of an experimental study to determine the effect of standard nursing plans on nurses' documentation on individualized care plans and patient medical records on one 60 bed medical ward. Nursing care plans were audited before...

M. G. Dunn

1977-01-01

150

Moodle and nursing teaching – a brief experience report  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Distance-learning based on the web am Technology Information (TI) have  been important in recent health policy initiatives, but still a challenge for nursing. This article points out an experience with Moodle to support Nurse Education.

Isabel CF da Cruz

2009-01-01

151

The effect of a workshop on Egyptian nurse educators' motivation and attitude toward evidence based teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Motivations and attitude are known to influence goal directed activity such as adoption of new behaviors in teaching. Accordingly, understanding nurse educators’ motivation and attitudes toward evidence-based teaching is a critical step to successfully transforming the faculty’s culture to use best practices in nursing education. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of workshop, on Egyptian nurse educators' motivation and attitude toward evidence-based teaching over time. Methods: Quasi-experimental design with three periods of data collection: a pre-test and two post-test periods at the School of Nursing, Zagazig University, Egypt. A convenience sample of nurse faculties who were invited to attend a one-day workshop was used. There were no exclusion criteria. Four tools were used: the Demographic form, the Follow-up form, The Situational Motivation Scale (SIMS), and the Evidence-Based Nursing Attitude Questionnaire (EBNAQ). Results: A total of 48 nurse faculty agreed to participate in the study; they were female with a mean age of 30 years and an average of 5.5 years of experience in academic setting. Half of the participants had master’s degree or higher. There were significant differences between the pre-, post- and follow-up scores in three of the motivation subscales. Regarding “lack of motivation”, these scores and scores of attitude toward evidence based teaching did not change over time. There was a significant difference in the external regulation score comparing faculty subgroups (i.e., implementers versus non- implementers). Conclusions: A workshop about best practices in nursing education fostered increased intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, and external regulation immediately and changes were sustained over a three month period. A total of 23% of workshop participants implemented an evidence-based education strategy after the workshop, promoting best practices in nursing education.

Farida Mahmoud Hassona; Chris Winkelman; Sahar Hamdy El-Sayed

2013-01-01

152

Lessons learned from an accelerated post-master's nurse educator certificate program: teaching the practicum course.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing faces current and future shortages in the practice arena. The nurse educator shortage exacerbates the nursing shortage.This article describes an innovative and collaborative approach developed to increase the supply of nurse educators. An overview of the initial offering of this post-master's nurse educator certificate program, a grant-funded, cohort-based program, delivered online in an accelerated format, is provided. Particular attention is given to the nursing education practicum, a precepted teaching experience. This course is viewed as a culminating course, wherein the role transition from expert practitioner to novice educator occurs as students connect the experiential aspects of the practicum with knowledge gained in didactic courses and enter a new community of practice. Lessons learned and recommendations for future cohorts are discussed.

Flood LS; Powers ME

2012-01-01

153

Lessons learned from an accelerated post-master's nurse educator certificate program: teaching the practicum course.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing faces current and future shortages in the practice arena. The nurse educator shortage exacerbates the nursing shortage.This article describes an innovative and collaborative approach developed to increase the supply of nurse educators. An overview of the initial offering of this post-master's nurse educator certificate program, a grant-funded, cohort-based program, delivered online in an accelerated format, is provided. Particular attention is given to the nursing education practicum, a precepted teaching experience. This course is viewed as a culminating course, wherein the role transition from expert practitioner to novice educator occurs as students connect the experiential aspects of the practicum with knowledge gained in didactic courses and enter a new community of practice. Lessons learned and recommendations for future cohorts are discussed. PMID:22416540

Flood, Lisa Sue; Powers, Mary Ellen

154

[Experiencing an emancipatory proposal in the teaching of semiology to nursing].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim was to analyze the teaching of Semiology through the programs of subject matters at five universities in the State of Ceará and, specifically, that of a public university. Three (3) classes were observed and meetings were held with teachers and students for collecting data about the teaching-learning process. The teachers presented teaching and research experience, and acknowledge that the high number of students impairs teaching-learning. The students mentioned difficulties in the elaboration of the nursing diagnosis and in the initial contact with the hospitalized client, causing insecurity and rejection of the practical part of the subject matter.

Dias MS; Machado Mde F; da Silva RM; Pinheiro AK

2003-05-01

155

Journal clubs: a strategy to teach civility to nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Incivility affects nurses and nursing students and can negatively influence patient care and the quality of nursing education. The Institute of Medicine, The Joint Commission, and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommended implementation of strategies to manage incivility and build social capital. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the influence of a journal club as an educational intervention to build civility and academic integrity among nursing students. Seventy-nine nursing students completed the Nurses' Intervention for Civility Education Questionnaire and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire before and after the Civility Journal Club intervention. Students involved in the Civility Journal Club were more aware of civility and incivility, more likely to be helpful to their peers, and better equipped to cope with episodes of incivility.

Kerber C; Jenkins S; Woith W; Kim M

2012-05-01

156

[Teaching of scientific methods in eight nursing schools of the south east region of Brazil].  

Science.gov (United States)

Few are the courses of professional formation in nursing that consider teaching activities of the scientific method in the nursing curriculum. This qualitative study identified the real situation of eight undergraduate courses of the southeast region related to the teaching of scientific method. We conclude that, in schools, the discipline in study is compulsory, being denominated Methodology of Nursing Research. The analysed content includes the phases of the research project and the teaching strategy employed was the lecture classes. The evaluations employed were: critical analysis of scientific texts and individual texts. Teachers indicated the importance of a monography at the end of the course and an option for the division of the content in two disciplines with a schedule of 45 hours each. PMID:9668897

Cassiani, S H; Rodrigues, L P

1998-04-01

157

[Teaching of scientific methods in eight nursing schools of the south east region of Brazil  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Few are the courses of professional formation in nursing that consider teaching activities of the scientific method in the nursing curriculum. This qualitative study identified the real situation of eight undergraduate courses of the southeast region related to the teaching of scientific method. We conclude that, in schools, the discipline in study is compulsory, being denominated Methodology of Nursing Research. The analysed content includes the phases of the research project and the teaching strategy employed was the lecture classes. The evaluations employed were: critical analysis of scientific texts and individual texts. Teachers indicated the importance of a monography at the end of the course and an option for the division of the content in two disciplines with a schedule of 45 hours each.

Cassiani SH; Rodrigues LP

1998-04-01

158

Individualized teaching programming for a virtual learning environment: development of content concerning nursing records.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Describe the planning of contents on nursing records for use in a virtual learning environment, based on Individualized Teaching Programming, a didactic resource that uses basic principles of behavioral analysis. METHOD: Final objectives were specified, after defining the intermediary components to achieve each final objective, as well as the preliminary requirements for each intermediary component. At the end of this process, teaching activities were planned and organized in steps the students need to develop. RESULTS: By breaking up the contents into behaviors, seven action categories emerged: impartiality, organization, honesty, objectiveness, coherence, readability and discernment. CONCLUSION: the use of Individualized Teaching Programming as a didactic resource to plan contents on nursing records is feasible to identify the units and modules for the development of a course in a virtual learning environment for nursing professionals.

Nagliate Pde C; Rocha ES; de Godoy S; Mazzo A; Trevizan MA; Mendes IA

2013-01-01

159

[Teaching of obstetrical nursing in Brazil: successes and failures from 1972 to 1996].  

Science.gov (United States)

Investigation with descriptive and qualitative approach. Political-social context of Nurse teaching are analyzed, with emphasis in policies formation. Teaching programs of Obstetrical Nursing from 1972 to 1996 utilized by five graduate teaching schools were described and analyzed according to geographical region, for dialetic analysis of thematic and contents. It was evidenced that disciplines has given priority for governmental purposes centered on pregnant-puerperal cycle, although it should had some political-social movements influence, mainly feminist and progressive sanitation, on which the PAISM is based. The emerging content of these movements were not exposed (family health, subjectivity, violence, gender, among others). Most of institutions were on curricular reformulation to attend the 314/94 statement which determines generalist nurse curriculum in Brazil. PMID:16689500

Tyrrel, Maria Antonieta Rubio; dos Santos, Antonio Eduardo Vieira; Lucas, Eduardo Alexander Júlio César F

160

[Teaching of obstetrical nursing in Brazil: successes and failures from 1972 to 1996].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Investigation with descriptive and qualitative approach. Political-social context of Nurse teaching are analyzed, with emphasis in policies formation. Teaching programs of Obstetrical Nursing from 1972 to 1996 utilized by five graduate teaching schools were described and analyzed according to geographical region, for dialetic analysis of thematic and contents. It was evidenced that disciplines has given priority for governmental purposes centered on pregnant-puerperal cycle, although it should had some political-social movements influence, mainly feminist and progressive sanitation, on which the PAISM is based. The emerging content of these movements were not exposed (family health, subjectivity, violence, gender, among others). Most of institutions were on curricular reformulation to attend the 314/94 statement which determines generalist nurse curriculum in Brazil.

Tyrrel MA; dos Santos AE; Lucas EA

2005-11-01

 
 
 
 
161

Barriers and facilitators of research utilization among nurses working in teaching hospitals in Tabriz  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research is a descriptive study in order to assess barriers and facilitators of research utilization among nurses working in teaching hospitals in Tabriz, year 2001. The aim is to identify causes of low extent of utilization and also to assess barriers and facilitators of researches. This study was conducted upon 304 nurses working in 12 teaching hospitals of Tabriz, which were selected by random sampling. Instrument used for study was questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS (10). The results of this study showed that three major barriers for research utilization included: 1) inadequate facilities for implementation, 2) Physicians will not cooperate with implementation and 3) the nurses do not have sufficient time to read researches. Facilitators which nurses suggested, emphasized on the role of education in enhancing their knowledge and skills of research evaluation.

Vali Zadeh; L. (M.Sc); Zaman Zadeh; V. (M.Sc); Fathi Azar; A. (Ph.D); Safaeian; A. (M.Sc).

2002-01-01

162

Formation of healthcare professionals: a look at the previous experiences of nursing teaching diploma students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study focused on the analysis of past experience of nursing teaching diploma students in their formation. This article is part of a larger longitudinal survey which followed a group of students throughout the five years of their formation. The students had to write essays, the first being about previous schooling and the others on the contribution of each year at university toward their formation. This was a qualitative study, which adopted the theoretical framework of Vygotski, in order to grasp the different meanings and feelings which are evident in the narratives. Forty-six subjects participated in the survey. They wrote the essays and filled out a questionnaire to characterize their profile. For this study seven narratives were detached from the sample and analyzed. They were written by students at the beginning of the first academic year using the proposed title: "My school history to reach the Nursing Teaching Diploma". The analysis of the essays along with the student profiles pointed out misunderstandings, difficulties and reasons why students chose the Nursing Teaching Diploma Course. The meanings given by students to the course and the actual practice of the nurse teacher indicates the basis of how the course proposals contradict each other in the process of formation. Awareness of these contradictions, considering them in the training of new nurses, is fundamental. Nursing teaching means teaching care for others. That also implies taking care of undergraduate students of nursing. To have students who are critical, active, and aware of the reality of the clients they will look after, has implications in how these factors are considered in their own training process.

Marlene Fagundes Carvalho Gonçalve

2010-01-01

163

Use of Joint Commission International standards to evaluate and improve pediatric oncology nursing care in Guatemala.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Inadequate nursing care is a major impediment to development of effective programs for treatment of childhood cancer in low-income countries. When the International Outreach Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital established partner sites in low-income countries, few nurses had pediatric oncology skills or experience. A comprehensive nursing program was developed to promote the provision of quality nursing care, and in this manuscript we describe the program's impact on 20 selected Joint Commission International (JCI) quality standards at the National Pediatric Oncology Unit in Guatemala. We utilized JCI standards to focus the nursing evaluation and implementation of improvements. These standards were developed to assess public hospitals in low-income countries and are recognized as the gold standard of international quality evaluation. METHODS: We compared the number of JCI standards met before and after the nursing program was implemented using direct observation of nursing care; review of medical records, policies, procedures, and job descriptions; and interviews with staff. RESULTS: In 2006, only 1 of the 20 standards was met fully, 2 partially, and 17 not met. In 2009, 16 were met fully, 1 partially, and 3 not met. Several factors contributed to the improvement. The pre-program quality evaluation provided objective and credible findings and an organizational framework for implementing change. The medical, administrative, and nursing staff worked together to improve nursing standards. CONCLUSION: A systematic approach and involvement of all hospital disciplines led to significant improvement in nursing care that was reflected by fully meeting 16 of 20 standards.

Day SW; McKeon LM; Garcia J; Wilimas JA; Carty RM; de Alarcon P; Antillon F; Howard SC

2013-05-01

164

[Teaching and nursing practices reorientation: Pro-Health implantation in Mossoro, Brazil].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The Nursing School of Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte through the Programa Nacional de Reorientação da Formação Profissional em Saúde (Pro-Health) seeks to articulate teaching and service, contributing to the development of the concept of nursing education in Mossoró, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. This research aims to investigate the implementation of Pro Health in the Basic Units of Health in Mossoró understanding the position of nursing workers in the teaching-service articulation. Interviews were conducted with six nurses who work in health clinics that coolaborated to this project. The results demonstrated that these workers lacked knowledge about the Pro-Health. This lack of knowledge associated with difficulties in integrating teaching and service did not contribute to the reflection about and reorientation of nursing practice. It is necessary to rethink the knowledge and nursing practices for a gradual change, contributing to improve health care quality, based on the norms established by the Unified Health System in Brazil.

Morais FR; Leite ID; de Oliveira LL; Verás RM

2010-09-01

165

Developing an educational framework for the teaching of simulation within nurse education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of simulations as a teaching and learning tool within health care has increasing importance; simulations are seen as the major teaching method for practicing and assessing developing skills, knowledge, attitudes and meaningful decision-making within the field of nursing. Certainly the utilisations of simulations feature widely within many aspects of health care; a greater understanding of the key conceptual notions will serve to benefit all of those engaged within their application. This literature review has enabled the construction of a conceptual model for the teaching of simulation and can serve to promote the continued positive development of simulations within education. Through a consistent and insightful approach to teaching, dynamic learning will be assured within this very important aspect of engaging the nursing student within the learning process.

Melanie Humphreys

2013-01-01

166

Impact of an educational program on the use of standardized nursing languages for nursing documentation among public health nurses in Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To measure the effect of an educational package on documentation of care among public health nurses (PHNs). METHOD: A quasi-experimental design was adopted. Forty PHNs working in primary healthcare settings were selected. Education was given through a 5-day workshop. Documentation of care was assessed using a modified "Muller-Staub Q-DIO instrument." Data were analyzed using t test third and twelfth months postintervention. FINDINGS: There was a significant improvement on documentation of care at p = .0001. CONCLUSION: Educating PHNs and providing them with standardized nursing care plans enhance documentation of care. IMPLICATION TO PRACTICE: A combination of education on the use of standardized nursing languages and standardized nursing care plans can enhance documentation of care. There is a need for more research on the use of standardized nursing languages in developing nations.

Odutayo PO; Olaogun AA; Oluwatosin AO; Ogunfowokan AA

2013-06-01

167

O ensino da administração em enfermagem: percepção diante da vivência profissional Teaching nursing administration: the nurse's comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo desvelar a compreensão de um grupo de enfermeiras egressas da Escola de Enfermagem da USP, quanto disciplina Administração aplicada à Enfermagem ministrada no Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem da Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade de São Paulo. Para tanto buscou-se como trajetória metodológica a fenomenologia, tendo MARTINS;BICUDO como autores básicos e eixo principal da pesquisa. Guiadas por este referencial, realizou-se o estudo junto a oito enfermeiras, fazendo a descrição e a compreensão dos seus discursos e buscando trazer o significado que foi percebido do fenômeno estudado. Da análise fenomenológica dos relatos das enfermeiras emergiram possibilidades e limites do ensino da referida disciplina.The purpose of this study was to disclose the nurses comprehension about the Nursing Administration discipline taught in the Nursing graduation course of the Nursing School of São Paulo University. We have followed the phenomenology as the methodological way, and MARTINS; BICUDO were taken as the basic authors and main axis of the research. Being guided by this referencial, we have done this study together with eight nurses and we could do a description and comprehension speeches trying to bring out the meaning of what was understood about their phenomenon studied. From the phenomenological analysis of the nurses'reports appeared the possibilities an limits of the teaching of this discipline.

Raquel Rapone Gaidzinski; Maria Madalena Januário Leite; Regina Toshie Takahashi

1998-01-01

168

O ensino da administração em enfermagem: percepção diante da vivência profissional/ Teaching nursing administration: the nurse's comprehension  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Este estudo teve por objetivo desvelar a compreensão de um grupo de enfermeiras egressas da Escola de Enfermagem da USP, quanto disciplina Administração aplicada à Enfermagem ministrada no Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem da Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade de São Paulo. Para tanto buscou-se como trajetória metodológica a fenomenologia, tendo MARTINS;BICUDO como autores básicos e eixo principal da pesquisa. Guiadas por este referencial, realizou-se o estudo (more) junto a oito enfermeiras, fazendo a descrição e a compreensão dos seus discursos e buscando trazer o significado que foi percebido do fenômeno estudado. Da análise fenomenológica dos relatos das enfermeiras emergiram possibilidades e limites do ensino da referida disciplina. Abstract in english The purpose of this study was to disclose the nurses comprehension about the Nursing Administration discipline taught in the Nursing graduation course of the Nursing School of São Paulo University. We have followed the phenomenology as the methodological way, and MARTINS; BICUDO were taken as the basic authors and main axis of the research. Being guided by this referencial, we have done this study together with eight nurses and we could do a description and comprehension (more) speeches trying to bring out the meaning of what was understood about their phenomenon studied. From the phenomenological analysis of the nurses'reports appeared the possibilities an limits of the teaching of this discipline.

Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário; Takahashi, Regina Toshie

1998-04-01

169

Ready, set, teach! How to transform the clinical nurse expert into the part-time clinical nurse instructor.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many schools of nursing are hiring part-time clinical instructors with little or no teaching experience. Although they contribute greatly to student nurses' clinical experience, many do not realize the commitment they are making when they accept such a position. If key issues are addressed before new part-time clinical instructors begin teaching, the transition could be made more smoothly. An in-depth orientation, awareness of the need for preparation for clinical rotations, and strategies to assist students in achieving course objectives can guide new instructors as they begin this venture. Preparing new part-time clinical instructors from the beginning will give them a more accurate picture of clinical education, increasing their recruitment and retention and providing students with quality learning experiences.

Hewitt P; Lewallen LP

2010-09-01

170

[The nursing process in a burn unit: analysis and reformulation of teaching  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present study aims at elaborating and applying an education plan for nurses in an Unit for Burnt Patients, with the proposal of analysing and reformulating the practice of the nursing process in this service. The framework proposed by Charles MAGUEREZ, was employed as a guideline, which led to the selection and application of the teaching and learning strategies implemented in this plan. We concluded that the framework proposed by MANGUEREZ made possible a substantial improvement in the nursing process in this service, and that this new reality claims for further studies.

Rossi LA; Trevizan MA

1995-07-01

171

Communities of practice in nursing academia: a growing need to practice what we teach.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract Although the community of practice (CoP) concept has been heavily utilized in business literature since its inception in the 1990s, it has not been significantly featured in nursing research. With student-centered approaches increasingly infusing nursing classrooms, including opportunities for collaborative learning and the development of student learning communities, it may be time to ask: Do we practice what we teach? Nursing academia faces challenges related to recruitment and retention, scholarly productivity and engagement of new faculty, and increasing demands for collaborative research. Challenges, some would argue, that could be addressed through CoPs; a sentiment reflected in the recent expansion of nursing CoP literature. What is the current state of the application of this concept in nursing academia and what barriers present in the promotion and development of CoPs in the academy? This article addresses these questions and provides guidance for those in search of community.

Risling T; Ferguson L

2013-01-01

172

Communities of practice in nursing academia: a growing need to practice what we teach.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although the community of practice (CoP) concept has been heavily utilized in business literature since its inception in the 1990s, it has not been significantly featured in nursing research. With student-centered approaches increasingly infusing nursing classrooms, including opportunities for collaborative learning and the development of student learning communities, it may be time to ask: Do we practice what we teach? Nursing academia faces challenges related to recruitment and retention, scholarly productivity and engagement of new faculty, and increasing demands for collaborative research. Challenges, some would argue, that could be addressed through CoPs; a sentiment reflected in the recent expansion of nursing CoP literature. What is the current state of the application of this concept in nursing academia and what barriers present in the promotion and development of CoPs in the academy? This article addresses these questions and provides guidance for those in search of community. PMID:23969471

Risling, Tracie; Ferguson, Linda

2013-08-22

173

Patient experience of nursing quality in a teaching hospital in saudi arabia.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Examining the quality of nursing care from the patient's perspective is an important element in quality evaluation. The extent to which patients' expectations are met will influence their perceptions and their satisfaction with the quality of care received. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among admitted patients at King Khalid Teaching Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected (from January 2011 to March 2011) from a convenience sample of 448 patients using a 42-items questionnaire assessing six dimensions of the nursing care provided to, during hospitalization. RESULTS: On a four-point scale (4-higly agree,3-agree, 2-disagree, and 1-higly disagree). The individual items of nursing care showing the lowest means were the information received from the nurses about self-help (2.81), the information about the laboratory results (2.76) and the way the nurse shared the patient's feeling (2.72). A strong correlation existed between the overall perception level and the variables of gender (P=0.01), and the types of department (0.004). CONCLUSION: The findings of this study demonstrate negative experiences of patients with nursing care in dimensions of information, caring behavior, and nurse competency and technical care. Awareness of the importance of these dimensions of nursing care and ongoing support to investigate patients' perception periodically toward quality of nursing care are critical to success the philosophy of patient centered health care.

Al Momani M; Al Korashy H

2012-01-01

174

Nursing diagnosis with the ICNP in the teaching context.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The premise for the research study was the authors' conviction that the use of nursing diagnostic taxonomies allows the nurse to formulate a thorough and valid diagnosis. AIM: To verify the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) in the context of a Polish academic nursing programme. RESEARCH QUESTIONS: Do nursing diagnoses made traditionally and those made with the ICNP reflect the patient's/client's condition? Is the range and type of the two kinds of diagnoses similar or different? Is the level of detail in both types of diagnoses compatible? METHODS: Quasi-experiment in which the experimental group diagnosed patients by means of the ICNP and the control group formulated nursing diagnoses by means of an intellectual decision-making process. STUDY GROUPS: 44 students in a MNurs. Programme, Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Medical University in Lublin, Poland. CONCLUSIONS: The range and type of nursing diagnoses do not depend on the method used in their formulation. The ICNP diagnoses are compatible with the traditionally formulated ones. The unbalanced size of the experimental and the study groups negatively influenced the validity of conclusions.

Zarzycka D; Górajek-Jó?wik J

2004-12-01

175

NURSING PROCESS: A PROPOSAL OF TEACHING THROUGH THE PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING.  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The way that teaching has been organized at the schools can represent na obstacle for the acquisition of theabilities to think, to reflect and to make decisions, influencing the coping with practical problems during the NursingProcess. The goal of the present study is to analyze the implementation of a proposal of teaching Nursing Processthrough the Problematical method, particularly through the Arch Method. This is an action-research project,developed at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Goiás, during 1998 and 1999. The subjects weresecond year students of Nursing, attending the course ?Methodology of Nursing Assistence?. To collect the data weuse activity and self-evaluation reports from students, field data and instruments of cognitive, affective andpsychomotor evaluation. The evaluation of the reports was done following the established guidelines for teaching ineach phase, and most of the scores obtained were medium to high (3 to 5), with the exception of the nursingassistance phase evaluation, with scores between 1 and 2. In the affective evaluation the majority of the studentsmentioned that the implementation of the nursing process phases, does not happen as the literature suggests, andmanifested the importance of the Nursing Process to improve the quality of assistance and the desire of use itduring the professional practical. The psychomotor evaluation was performed through physical lunge exam and theimplementation of technical procedures. More than 50% of the students had scores between 4 and 5 in the items ofinspection and auscultation, presenting difficulties to perform the abilities of palpation and percussion. The scoreobtained in the evaluation of procedures implementation ranged from 4 to 5. The cognitive evaluation of theNursing Process phases was realized through a write test with mean grades between 33,4 and 51,4, with amaximum of 100 points. The differences between written evaluation and reports may be due to the type of domainmeasured and/or the strategy of the evaluation. The guidelines made for teaching, the strategies for teaching andfor evaluation, the facilities and difficulties and perceptions pointed out by the research participants in relation to thethematic may be useful to trigger discussions about teaching the Nursing Process. Although we cannot extend theresults of these experiences to others groups, we expect this investigation to be a contribution for professionalsand professors that want to adopt the Problem-based Learning, triggering discussions about the pedagogic project.

Adélia Yaeko Kiosen Nakatani

2002-01-01

176

Opportunity to Teach and Learn Standards: Colombian Teachers’ Perspectives  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the outcomes of an exploration of in-service teachers’ perspectives in relation to an opportunity to teach and learn standards in English. A workshop for English teachers from Cali (Colombia) and the neighboring rural sectors was designed and carried out in order to collect the information. Teachers’ perspectives about the topic were explored in terms of three aspects: general considerations that underlie opportunities to learn; standards and conditions in educational institutions (work aspects) and other institutional factors such as human and material resources.

Cárdenas Ramos Rosalba; Hernández Gaviria Fanny

2012-01-01

177

An Analysis and Review of Nurse Staffing Literature and Standards and Criteria for Nurse Staffing in Nursing Homes.  

Science.gov (United States)

A review of the literature concerning methodologies to determine nurse staffing in nursing homes and related facilities found no single ratio of nurses to patients universally accepted by the scientific or medical community. A similar review to identify c...

S. A. Terrell W. J. Neugroschel A. B. Cohen

1979-01-01

178

The humanbecoming connection: nursing students find meaning in the teaching-learning processes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Students are building a foundation to help them move fluidly and naturally while making human to human connections. Parse's theory of humanbecoming and the associated teaching-learning processes were used as underpinnings to guide students as they come to know more about themselves and others. The teaching-learning processes help nursing students understand that being present and bearing witness are an important part of honoring quality of life and respecting value choices. The purpose of this column is to highlight the humanbecoming teaching-learning processes as students explore their experiences of learning to be with others in true presence.

De Natale ML; Klevay AM

2013-04-01

179

Perceptions of Postbasic Nursing Students in the Use of Seminars as a Teaching Method  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the transformation of education inthe country, and the outcomes-basededucation that is learner-centred fastgaining ground, nurse educators needto revisit the teaching methods and considerthose that will foster reflective thinkingthrough interactive constructingprocess. These methods, according toCropley and Dave (1978:196) preparelearners for lifelong learning and to challengeproblems in the working world.

M Chabeli

1999-01-01

180

Why clinical nurse educators adopt innovative teaching strategies: a pilot study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this pilot study was to describe intentions to adopt innovative teaching strategies in clinical educators who have participated in an online course focusing on the role of clinical teaching (N = 71). Innovative teaching strategies were defined as those that embrace the tenets of sociocultural theory, a student-centered approach whereby the role of the nurse educator is to motivate and support the student and, in mutual process, to push students to reach toward their learning potential by using guiding techniques that can be erected or gradually reduced based on the individual student's learning needs. Participants stated that three factors proposed in the Rogers theory of diffusion of innovation (compatibility, trialability, and relative advantage) would be most influential in the adoption of innovative teaching strategies. Encouraging students to explore and apply new knowledge was described as the teaching strategy most likely to be adopted. Intent to adopt innovative teaching strategies may provide insight into the development of organizational climates in schools of nursing that could foster needed changes in clinical teaching.

Phillips JM; Vinten SA

2010-07-01

 
 
 
 
181

Why clinical nurse educators adopt innovative teaching strategies: a pilot study.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this pilot study was to describe intentions to adopt innovative teaching strategies in clinical educators who have participated in an online course focusing on the role of clinical teaching (N = 71). Innovative teaching strategies were defined as those that embrace the tenets of sociocultural theory, a student-centered approach whereby the role of the nurse educator is to motivate and support the student and, in mutual process, to push students to reach toward their learning potential by using guiding techniques that can be erected or gradually reduced based on the individual student's learning needs. Participants stated that three factors proposed in the Rogers theory of diffusion of innovation (compatibility, trialability, and relative advantage) would be most influential in the adoption of innovative teaching strategies. Encouraging students to explore and apply new knowledge was described as the teaching strategy most likely to be adopted. Intent to adopt innovative teaching strategies may provide insight into the development of organizational climates in schools of nursing that could foster needed changes in clinical teaching. PMID:20882862

Phillips, Janet M; Vinten, Sharon A

182

Nursing student anxiety as a context for teaching/learning.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Experiential learning in nursing programs includes role-play, simulation, and live clinical experiences. Anxiety levels can heighten during experiential learning as students attempt to gain psychomotor skills and transfer knowledge into critical thinking. Nursing students may experience anxiety that can interfere with learning and critical thinking. However, the presence of student anxiety can be used to initiate a purposeful caring transaction between nursing faculty and student. The caring transaction is a way for faculty to model both caring and presence, create experiential learning of caring by students, and lead students to initiate self-care interventions to manage anxiety through the nursing program and beyond. Multiple learning outcomes can be achieved as the students integrate faculty-modeled concepts of caring and presence into simulated or real clinical situations, reduce or manage their anxiety, and improve their clinical judgment and critical thinking skills.

Hutchinson TL; Janiszewski Goodin H

2013-03-01

183

The benefits of standardized nursing languages in complex adaptive systems such as hospitals.  

Science.gov (United States)

Paperwork is a major source of frustration for hospital nurses and takes valuable time away from patient care. Studies indicate that nurses spend an estimated 13% to 28% of total shift time documenting. The growth in documentation requirements for nurses can, in part, be attributed to an exponential rise in health system complexity. Authors explore the documentation of nursing care plans from a complex adaptive system perspective and then analyze the utility of adopting a standardized nursing language. An actual case history of a nursing unit's attempt to reduce complexity, improve completion time, and increase staff satisfaction in care planning by adopting a standardized nursing language is provided to emphasize a practical application. PMID:16969254

Clancy, Thomas R; Delaney, Connie White; Morrison, Bernice; Gunn, Jody K

2006-09-01

184

ROTC training teaches nursing students critical thinking skills.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The rising cost of college has many students seeking financial assistance. One option for helping students pay for an education is the Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC). Most educators are aware that ROTC students attend military classes and maintain physical fitness in addition to attending regular classes. However, nurse educators may not know that ROTC students receive intensive training in teamwork, leadership, and critical thinking, all extremely important skills required in professional nursing. The author describes the ROTC National Advanced Leadership Camp.

Griggs R

2005-01-01

185

Auditing the nursing standard for weighing patients on an acute medical unit.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes an audit of a standard for observations and assessments introduced on an acute medical unit (AMU), one element of which was patient weight. It showed that only 50% of nurses routinely weighed patients as part of the admission process and/or as part of nutritional screening. Revisions were made to the existing nursing standard. PMID:19736827

Lees, Liz; Allen-Mills, Gaynor

186

An integrative review of student evaluations of teaching: implications for evaluation of nursing faculty.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Student evaluations of teaching often play an important role in the promotion and tenure of faculty. Many of the instruments in use within the university setting are self-developed and have not undergone psychometric testing. More specifically, nursing education has many unique challenges, yet the effectiveness of student evaluations of teaching in nursing is understudied. The purposes of this integrative review were to review the current research literature on the design and psychometric testing of teaching evaluation scales, to synthesize the results, and to propose implications specific to nursing programs that are evidence based and will provide guidance on faculty teaching evaluations. A systematic literature review was conducted using Cooper, H. (1998). Synthesizing research: A guide for literature review (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications methodology. Data analysis led to the identification of 6 themes: faculty characteristics and perceptions, student characteristics and perceptions, course characteristics, on-line versus paper student evaluations, reliability and validity, and development of new instruments. This literature review provides the context in which to interpret student evaluations of teaching and discusses implications for practice.

Annan SL; Tratnack S; Rubenstein C; Metzler-Sawin E; Hulton L

2013-09-01

187

[Clinical teaching program: standardized operating procedure for intra-aortic balloon pump support].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is one of the most important treatment strategies for patients with heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). To ensure quality of treatment, clinical preceptors must employ effective teaching strategies to acquaint nurses with the proper use of IABPs. Many nurses are hesitant to use IABPs due to lack of knowledge regarding their use. Classroom lectures and instruction manual-style materials are often ineffective strategies for teaching novice nurses to use IABPs properly and have resulted in unsatisfactory patient treatment quality. This study developed a creative, pithy rhyme to help nurses remember the key elements of IABP support as part of their IABP learning process. This innovative tool uses rhymes and mental images to instill critical information related to IABP use and help nurses become fluent IABP users.

Huang YH; Hsu LL

2012-08-01

188

Effects of constructivist teaching methods on bioethics education for nursing students: A quasi-experimental study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: In order to help nurses advocate for the patient's human rights and ensure respect for life in clinical situations, it is of utmost importance to improve nursing students' capacity to make ethical decisions. OBJECTIVES: This study compares the effects of two constructivist teaching strategies (action learning and cross-examination debate) on nursing students' recognition of bioethical issues, experience of bioethical issues, and attainment of ethical competence. DESIGN: This study used a quasi-experimental (two-group pretest-posttest) design. SETTING: A nursing college in South Korea. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 93 Korean nursing students participated in the study (46 in the action learning group and 47 in the cross-examination debate group). METHODS: Participants took a bioethics class employing one or the other of the strategies mentioned, 2h a week for 15weeks. All participants responded twice to a set of questionnaires, at the beginning of the first session and at the end of the last session. RESULTS: After their bioethics education, the students' recognition of bioethical issues improved for both classes; however, the knowledge of students who had participated in action learning improved more than that of the students in the debate-based class. Students in both groups reported more experience of bioethics and exposure to better-quality instruction in bioethics after their classes than previously. Students in both groups also reported improved ethical competency after this education. CONCLUSION: Positive effects of action learning and cross-examination debate implemented as teaching strategies on nursing students' understanding of bioethical issues and their ethical competency were identified; these findings will be important in the essential task of teaching bioethics to nursing students in order to foster more ethical decision-making and other ethical behavior.

Choe K; Park S; Yoo SY

2013-09-01

189

O ensino de reabilitação: expectativas de estudantes de enfermagem The teaching of rehabilitation: expetance of student's nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este trabalho mostra as expectativas de estudantes de enfermagem quanto ao ensino de reabilitação durante o curso de graduação em enfermagem. Alunos do oitavo semestre e do segundo semestre do curso de Graduação em Enfermagem responderam um questionário específico para cada grupo e apontaram suas expectativas caracterizando uma proposta para o ensino de reabilitação em enfermagem.This article shows the nursing student's expetance about rehabilitation teaching during nursing graduation course, 8th semester students and 2nd semester of nursing graduation course answer a specific questionnaire for each grup and they show spectatives characterizing a proposal for the nursing rehabilitation teaching.

Ana Cristina Mancussi e Faro

1996-01-01

190

Networks of identity: the potential of biographical studies for teaching nursing identity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article reviews the historiographical elements of the professional identity of nursing, focusing on what historians have denoted as the "history of the present." Professional identity interacts with elements of power, gender, politics, philosophy, and history, and its value is tied to the importance it assumes at any given time in any given society. The collective identity of the profession is elucidated by the construction of nursing history, linked to the history of women and gender relationships in professional care and educational, organizational, and class practice, and also by the biographies of individuals who have shaped this identity through their reputations and life stories. In this light, it is argued that biographies could help illuminate the elements of identity formation of interest to nursing scholars and further the development of the profession; they could also bring discussions of the past and present into the teaching-learning process for nursing students. The authority and significance of these identities will also be discussed.

Padilha MI; Nelson S

2011-01-01

191

Teaching of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy in undergraduate nursing programs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To describe and analyze the teaching of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy on Brazilian undergraduate nursing programs. METHOD: Integrating an international multicentric study, a cross-sectional online survey was conducted between May and October 2010 with 571 undergraduate nursing programs in Brazil RESULTS: Responses were received from 142 programs, 75% private and 25% public. 64% of them included the IMCI strategy in the theoretical content, and 50% of the programs included IMCI as part of the students' practical experience. The locations most used for practical teaching were primary health care units. The 'treatment' module was taught by the fewest number of programs, and few programs had access to the IMCI instructional manuals. All programs used exams for evaluation, and private institutions were more likely to include class participation as part of the evaluation. Teaching staff in public institutions were more likely to have received training in teaching IMCI. CONCLUSION: In spite of the relevance of the IMCI strategy in care of the child, its content is not addressed in all undergraduate programs in Brazil, and many programs do not have access to the IMCI teaching manuals and have not provide training in IMCI to their teaching staff.

Fujimori E; Higuchi CH; Cursino EG; Veríssimo Mde L; Borges AL; Mello DF; Nascimento LC; Behn V; Wilson LL

2013-06-01

192

Development and evaluation of a teaching and learning approach in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination in university nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination are vital to ethical effective health systems. Nurses require quality educational preparation in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination. Limited evidence-based research is available to guide teachers. OBJECTIVES: To develop, implement and evaluate an evidence-based teaching and learning approach in cross-cultural care and antidiscrimination for undergraduate nursing students. DESIGN: A quantitative design using pre- and post-survey measures was used to evaluate the teaching and learning approach. SETTINGS: The Bachelor of Nursing program in an Australian university. PARTICIPANTS: Academics and second year undergraduate nursing students. METHODS: A literature review and consultation with academics informed the development of the teaching and learning approach. Thirty-three students completed a survey at pre-measures and following participation in the teaching and learning approach at post-measures about their confidence to practice cross-cultural nursing (Transcultural Self-efficacy Tool) and about their discriminatory attitudes (Quick Discrimination Index). RESULTS: The literature review found that educational approaches that solely focus on culture might not be sufficient in addressing discrimination and racism. During consultation, academics emphasised the importance of situating cross-cultural nursing and antidiscrimination as social determinants of health. Therefore, cross-cultural nursing was contextualised within primary health care and emphasised care for culturally diverse communities. Survey findings supported the effectiveness of this strategy in promoting students' confidence regarding knowledge about cross-cultural nursing. There was no reported change in discriminatory attitudes. The teaching and learning approach was modified to include stronger experiential learning and role playing. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing education should emphasise cross-cultural nursing and antidiscrimination. The study describes an evaluated teaching and learning approach and demonstrates how evaluation research can be used to develop cross-cultural nursing education interventions.

Allen J; Brown L; Duff C; Nesbitt P; Hepner A

2013-01-01

193

Developing information literacy skills in pre-registration nurses: an experimental study of teaching methods.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To compare the effectiveness of an online information literacy tutorial with a face-to-face session for teaching information literacy skills to nurses. DESIGN: Randomised control trial. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-seven first year undergraduate pre-registration diploma nursing students. INTERVENTION: Online in-house information literacy tutorial COMPARISON: One hour face-to-face session, covering the same material as the intervention, delivered by the nursing subject librarian. METHODS: Search histories were scored using a validated checklist covering keyword selection, boolean operators, truncation and synonyms. Skills retention was measured at 1 month using the same checklist. Inferential statistics were used to compare search skills within and between groups pre and post-session. RESULTS: The searching skills of first year pre-registration nursing students improve following information literacy sessions (p<0.001), and remain unchanged 1 month later, regardless of teaching method. The two methods produce a comparable improvement (p=0.263). There is no improvement or degradation of skills 1 month post-session for either method (p=0.216). CONCLUSION: Nurses Information literacy skills improve after both face-to-face and online instruction. There is no skills degradation at 1 month post-intervention for either method.

Brettle A; Raynor M

2013-02-01

194

Peer-supported review of teaching: Making the grade in midwifery and nursing education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper outlines the value of peer-supported review of teaching for nurse and midwifery educators in an academic environment. Reflection and continuing professional development are important tenets of an educators' practice and can be addressed via peer observation. Definitions and models of peer observation are presented. The strengths and challenges associated with peer-supported review of teaching are discussed. The reasons why peer observation is underutilised are explored with some suggestions on how to overcome these challenges. Recent developments in relation to peer observation and peer-supported review are outlined. The need for tangible evidence of development and enhancement of existing teaching expertise is very pronounced in the current economic climate, it is concluded that peer-supported review of teaching can provide such evidence.

Murphy Tighe S; Bradshaw C

2013-11-01

195

Peer-supported review of teaching: Making the grade in midwifery and nursing education.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper outlines the value of peer-supported review of teaching for nurse and midwifery educators in an academic environment. Reflection and continuing professional development are important tenets of an educators' practice and can be addressed via peer observation. Definitions and models of peer observation are presented. The strengths and challenges associated with peer-supported review of teaching are discussed. The reasons why peer observation is underutilised are explored with some suggestions on how to overcome these challenges. Recent developments in relation to peer observation and peer-supported review are outlined. The need for tangible evidence of development and enhancement of existing teaching expertise is very pronounced in the current economic climate, it is concluded that peer-supported review of teaching can provide such evidence. PMID:22921378

Murphy Tighe, Sylvia; Bradshaw, Carmel

2012-08-23

196

Diabetes teaching is not for the faint of heart: are cardiac nurses up to the challenge?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Patient education of self-care is an integral component of nursing care. Promoting self-care is important for patients with diabetes because day-to-day decision making has a tremendous impact on health. PURPOSE: To examine diabetes knowledge of nurses working on medical cardiology and cardiovascular surgical intermediate care units. METHODS: In this prospective, cross-sectional, correlational study, 90 registered nurses working on medical cardiology and cardiovascular surgical units completed a 20-item survey on diabetes survival skill education. Correlational and comparative statistics were used to analyze data. RESULTS: Subjects (N = 90) were more often female (n = 73; 83.0%) and worked full time (n = 76; 84%); mean (SD) RN experience was 5.6 years (SD, 7.6 years). Total mean score on the Diabetes Survival Skills Knowledge Test (DKSST) was 10.4 (SD, 2.6), reflecting 50% mastery of diabetes survival skill content. Test scores were higher in nurses with greater general comfort in teaching patients about diabetes (P =.04), more years of experience as a nurse (P =.004), more years of work at the current workplace (P <.001), and more years in their current work unit (P <.001). By age, nurses in the oldest quartile (> or =37 years) had higher DKSST content area scores in oral glucose-lowering agents (P =.02) and symptom management (P =.01) and had a trend toward higher overall DKSST score (P =.06) and score on blood glucose self-monitoring (P =.06). Sex, formal education level, work commitment, and previous diabetes education were not associated with higher DKSST scores. CONCLUSION: Nurse's knowledge and comfort related to diabetes survival skill teaching were low. The strongest correlate of higher DKSST score was length of time as a nurse. Because previous education and other nurse characteristics were not associated with higher test scores, nurse educators and advanced practice nurses must modify education delivery modalities to improve retention of information used in the delivery of patient education about diabetes survival skills.

Modic MB; Albert NM; Nutter B; Coughlin R; Murray T; Spence J; Brosovich D

2009-11-01

197

Evaluation of clinical teaching and professional development in a problem and community-based nursing module  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In South Africa the main focus is on primary health care. This affects the education and training of nurses, and training schools must respond by developing appropriate teaching modules. A school of nursing developed, implemented and revised a problem- and community- based learning module over a period of three years (1996-1998). This student-centered module focuses on students’ needs, active participation, collaboration, accountability, self-assessment, self-study, life-long learning and appropriate skills. In the formal clinical teaching environment PBL was the main approach. However, this approach was also supported by a variety of strategies, for example group discussions and scenarios. The knowledge, attitudes and professional development skills acquired in the PBL approach were then applied informally in the community setting (CBE). The purpose of the study was to evaluate a first year clinical teaching module as part of an extensive programme. A quantitative research method, a descriptive design, and a variety of data collection techniques were used. Conclusions were that clinical teaching was effective within the problem- (PBL) and community-based (CBE) approaches; 78% of respondents were positive about the clinical learning environment; 61 % stated that expectations were met; 81% preferred group activities, and 67% indicated that they had developed professional skills. Facilitators agreed that clinical teaching met the requirements of PBL & CBE. The pass rate also improved.

J.C de Villiers; A. Joubert; C.J. Bester

2004-01-01

198

Traditional nurse instruction versus 2 session nurse instruction plus DVD for teaching ostomy care: a multisite randomized controlled trial.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This randomized controlled trial compared 2 methods of ostomy care instruction to determine their effect on patients' knowledge, skills, and confidence related to postoperative ostomy care. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Eighty-eight adults with newly created ostomies were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Of the 88 enrolled patients, 68 completed the study: 10 patients were discharged from the hospital prior to completion of the study interventions; 10 others were withdrawn because they no longer met study inclusion criteria. The remaining subjects, who were equally split between men and women, ranged in age from 23 to 84 years. There were 23 colostomy and 45 ileostomy patients in our sample. The study setting was 2 acute care hospitals within a large tertiary health care system in the midwestern United States. METHODS: We used a posttest-only experimental design to compare 2 methods of postoperative ostomy education. Traditional education comprised 3 WOC nurse-led instruction sessions and the experimental intervention comprised 2 nurse-led instruction sessions plus DVD instruction that could be accessed in between nurse-led sessions. All patients received one-on-one instruction from certified WOC nurse at their bedside. Patients completed a written test of ostomy knowledge, a self-care skills demonstration, and a Visual Analog Scale rating their confidence with ostomy self-care. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the 2 teaching methods or type of ostomy with regard to knowledge of ostomy care (F3,64 5 1.308, P 5 0.28), ostomy care skills (F3,64 5 0.163, P 5 0.92), or confidence in performing ostomy self-care (F3,64 5 0.629, P 5 0.59). Differences between the study groups' self-reported learning style, education level, age, room type, and gender also did not significantly impact their knowledge, skills, or confidence. CONCLUSION: When teaching first-time ostomy patients postoperative self-care, a Nurse Instruction plus DVD method is as effective as Nurse Instruction alone.

Crawford D; Texter T; Hurt K; VanAelst R; Glaza L; Vander Laan KJ

2012-09-01

199

Attitudes of Jordanian Nursing Students towards Mental Illness: The Effect of Teaching and Contact on Attitudes Change  

Science.gov (United States)

|Purposes: Attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness influence the treatment they receive and decisions of policy makers. The purposes of this study were to assess Jordanian nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, and to assess the effectiveness of teaching and contact on changing nursing students' attitudes…

Hamaideh, Shaher H.; Mudallal, Rola

2009-01-01

200

Using Interactive Videodisc To Teach Psychomotor Skills to Nursing Students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

An interactive videodisc program on the process of administering medications to clients will be demonstrated. Discussion will center on the strengths and limitations of interactive video for teaching psychomotor skills to healthcare professionals as well as design modifications that will facilitate ...

Renshaw, Sharon M.; Beadenkopf, F. Scott; Murray, Rodney

 
 
 
 
201

Teaching nursing research. Integrating quantitative and qualitative methods.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In the belief that graduate nursing students should be able to analyze, evaluate, and critique both qualitative and quantitative research methods and should be able to design their own research projects, two faculty members developed a two-course sequence integrating the two methods. The authors, each an expert in one of the methods, describe how they designed and co-taught these innovative courses.

Lehna C; Pfoutz S

1999-11-01

202

Teaching nursing research. Integrating quantitative and qualitative methods.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the belief that graduate nursing students should be able to analyze, evaluate, and critique both qualitative and quantitative research methods and should be able to design their own research projects, two faculty members developed a two-course sequence integrating the two methods. The authors, each an expert in one of the methods, describe how they designed and co-taught these innovative courses. PMID:10876529

Lehna, C; Pfoutz, S

203

Journal writing: a teaching strategy for gerontology nursing courses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Journal writing, recognized as a valuable method to augment and enrich learning, has been used in adult education, higher education, and in the health care professions. Journal writing promotes reflective thought and increases awareness. This article describes how journal writing was used in the gerontology rotation of an associate degree nursing program to engage students in the content, encourage examination of personal beliefs, recognize biases, and reflect on perceptions about older adults.

Miller SM

2011-07-01

204

Analysis of the continuing education of a teaching hospital in the perception of the nursing team  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The objectives of this study was to analyze the Service of Continuated Education (SCE) of a teaching hospital, from the perspective of the nursing team in the evaluative dimensions of structure, process and outcome and to identify factors involved in the activities undertaken by that service, based on the Donabedian model. This is an exploratory-descriptive study, carried through in a private teaching hospital. The data collection was conducted through a questionnaire, using a Likert scale. The treatment of the data was carried through a descriptive statistics using the Cronbach Alpha test. Analyzing the data, we observed that in the tree evaluated dimensions (structure, process and result) the nurse team had favorable perception relative to this service. However, the structure dimension received the highest favorability score, average of 4,56 (dp±4,97), with process dimension receiving the lower score of, average 40,44 (dp±5,11).

Aline Togni Braga; Marta Maria Melleiro

2009-01-01

205

Teaching patient safety and human factors in undergraduate nursing curricula in England: a pilot survey.  

Science.gov (United States)

Patient safety is a key priority for all healthcare systems, and there is growing recognition for the need to educate tomorrow's nurses about the role of human factors in reducing avoidable harm to patients. A pilot survey was sent to 20 schools of nursing in England to explore the teaching of patient safety and human factors. All 13 schools that responded (65% response rate) stated that patient safety was covered in their curricula and was allocated more than 4 hours; all the classes included human factors. Only two respondents indicated their teaching to be multi-professional. Awareness of the World Health Organization's multiprofessional patient safety curriculum guide was poor. Faculties also seemed unaware that the Institute for Healthcare Improvement provides free online patient safety modules for students and that there is a global network of student patient safety chapters. PMID:24067309

Robson, Wayne; Clark, Debbie; Pinnock, David; White, Nick; Baxendale, Bryn

2013-09-26

206

Teaching patient safety and human factors in undergraduate nursing curricula in England: a pilot survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Patient safety is a key priority for all healthcare systems, and there is growing recognition for the need to educate tomorrow's nurses about the role of human factors in reducing avoidable harm to patients. A pilot survey was sent to 20 schools of nursing in England to explore the teaching of patient safety and human factors. All 13 schools that responded (65% response rate) stated that patient safety was covered in their curricula and was allocated more than 4 hours; all the classes included human factors. Only two respondents indicated their teaching to be multi-professional. Awareness of the World Health Organization's multiprofessional patient safety curriculum guide was poor. Faculties also seemed unaware that the Institute for Healthcare Improvement provides free online patient safety modules for students and that there is a global network of student patient safety chapters.

Robson W; Clark D; Pinnock D; White N; Baxendale B

2013-09-01

207

[Health didactics: undergraduates' nursing representations and the use of an innovative teaching strategy].  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aimed at analyzing the representations regarding the relationships between Nursing and Education practices, to reveal expectations regarding the course Fundamentals, Methods and Techniques of Teaching and evaluate the use of the Projects Method. Method this is a qualitative evaluation research performed between April and June 2007 with first-year nursing students of a Baccalaureate Degree Program. The data were analyzed based on the Social Representations framework and the constructivist postulates. The students revealed that their learning expectations were related with the contents of didactics, human communication, and the teaching-learning process. The Projects Method was considered capable of providing dynamism, interest towards the content, and the ability to associate theory and practice, in addition to having favored the amplitude and appreciation of the educate/care binomial. In conclusion, health didactics contents are capable of generating students' interest, especially when an innovative methodology is used. PMID:20187421

de Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli

2009-09-01

208

Impact of peer teaching on nursing students: Perceptions of learning environment, self-efficacy, and knowledge.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Peer teaching has been shown to enhance student learning and levels of self efficacy. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the current study was to examine the impact of peer-teaching learning experiences on nursing students in roles of tutee and tutor in a clinical lab environment. SETTINGS: This study was conducted over a three-semester period at a South Central University that provides baccalaureate nursing education. PARTICIPANTS: Over three semesters, 179 first year nursing students and 51 third year nursing students participated in the study. METHODS: This mixed methods study, through concurrent use of a quantitative intervention design and qualitative survey data, examined differences during three semesters in perceptions of a clinical lab experience, self-efficacy beliefs, and clinical knowledge for two groups: those who received peer teaching-learning in addition to faculty instruction (intervention group) and those who received faculty instruction only (control group). Additionally, peer teachers' perceptions of the peer teaching learning experience were examined. RESULTS: Results indicated positive response from the peer tutors with no statistically significant differences for knowledge acquisition and self-efficacy beliefs between the tutee intervention and control groups. In contrast to previous research, students receiving peer tutoring in conjunction with faculty instruction were statistically more anxious about performing lab skills with their peer tutor than with their instructors. Additionally, some students found instructors' feedback moderately more helpful than their peers and increased gains in knowledge and responsibility for preparation and practice with instructors than with peer tutors. CONCLUSIONS: The findings in this study differ from previous research in that the use of peer tutors did not decrease anxiety in first year students, and no differences were found between the intervention and control groups related to self efficacy or cognitive improvement. These findings may indicate the need to better prepare peer tutors, and research should be conducted using more complex skills.

Brannagan KB; Dellinger A; Thomas J; Mitchell D; Lewis-Trabeaux S; Dupre S

2013-11-01

209

[Clinical nursing research. New standards for quality assurance for nursing and patient].  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing as a health-service has a long tradition, nursing research however, a relatively short history. Florence Nightingale was the first to publish about nursing research in the year 1858. Since Nightingale, the need to study and improve the efficacy and efficiency of nursing has steadily increased. More than ever before, society needs nursing based on scientific knowledge and not just on unchallenged rituals and traditions. This scientific knowledge base can be acquired by clinical research. Within multidisciplinary clinical research it is necessary to focus on nursing's unique function. Virginia Henderson (1955) and Dorothea Orem (1959) have clearly explicated this function. Designs for clinical nursing research can be (quasi-) experimental, correlational or descriptive. Descriptive research can be qualitative or quantitative. Effects of nursing interventions on decrease of self-care problems and improvement of self-care capability and behaviors, should be investigated by experimental or quasi-experimental studies. Some examples of clinical nursing research are given. The first example demonstrates the effect of quantity and quality of nursing staff on patient's capabilities for hygiene self-care. The second example explicates the relation between self-care and quality of life with breast-cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment. The last example shows the effect of diabetes education on self-care behaviour and metabolic control. The examples given demonstrate the importance of clinical research focused on nursing's unique function. In order to accomplish this, programs of research are needed as well as close co-operation with nursing services, physicians and hospitals. Only when research findings are discussed and implemented in multidisciplinary teams, nursing will become more evidence-based. PMID:10969578

Evers, G C

2000-06-01

210

[Clinical nursing research. New standards for quality assurance for nursing and patient  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing as a health-service has a long tradition, nursing research however, a relatively short history. Florence Nightingale was the first to publish about nursing research in the year 1858. Since Nightingale, the need to study and improve the efficacy and efficiency of nursing has steadily increased. More than ever before, society needs nursing based on scientific knowledge and not just on unchallenged rituals and traditions. This scientific knowledge base can be acquired by clinical research. Within multidisciplinary clinical research it is necessary to focus on nursing's unique function. Virginia Henderson (1955) and Dorothea Orem (1959) have clearly explicated this function. Designs for clinical nursing research can be (quasi-) experimental, correlational or descriptive. Descriptive research can be qualitative or quantitative. Effects of nursing interventions on decrease of self-care problems and improvement of self-care capability and behaviors, should be investigated by experimental or quasi-experimental studies. Some examples of clinical nursing research are given. The first example demonstrates the effect of quantity and quality of nursing staff on patient's capabilities for hygiene self-care. The second example explicates the relation between self-care and quality of life with breast-cancer patients under chemotherapy treatment. The last example shows the effect of diabetes education on self-care behaviour and metabolic control. The examples given demonstrate the importance of clinical research focused on nursing's unique function. In order to accomplish this, programs of research are needed as well as close co-operation with nursing services, physicians and hospitals. Only when research findings are discussed and implemented in multidisciplinary teams, nursing will become more evidence-based.

Evers GC

2000-06-01

211

[Living in constant conflict: the meaning of teaching in intermediate nursing courses].  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was a result of the author's inquiries and reflections, aiming at understanding the meaning that nurses teaching in secondary Nursing courses give to their job. Considering the nature of the problem, this qualitative study used the Grounded Theory as its methodological framework. Data were collected by means of both observation and semi-structured interviews with nine teachers from three schools located in areas of the states of Minas Gerais and São Paulo that offer courses to technicians and/or auxiliary nurses. Data analysis enabled the identification of the "LIVING IN CONSTANT CONFLICT" process as the central theme, especially if we consider that the teachers showed ambiguous feelings and actions regarding their professional practice. PMID:12040627

dos Santos, L H; Cassiani, S H

2000-10-01

212

[Living in constant conflict: the meaning of teaching in intermediate nursing courses  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was a result of the author's inquiries and reflections, aiming at understanding the meaning that nurses teaching in secondary Nursing courses give to their job. Considering the nature of the problem, this qualitative study used the Grounded Theory as its methodological framework. Data were collected by means of both observation and semi-structured interviews with nine teachers from three schools located in areas of the states of Minas Gerais and São Paulo that offer courses to technicians and/or auxiliary nurses. Data analysis enabled the identification of the "LIVING IN CONSTANT CONFLICT" process as the central theme, especially if we consider that the teachers showed ambiguous feelings and actions regarding their professional practice.

dos Santos LH; Cassiani SH

2000-10-01

213

Active methodologies as strategies in nursing teaching: Raising awareness towards healthy habits  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: To identify how the use of active methodology may influence healthy habits in nursing students. Method: A qualitative Assistential Convergent Research, undertaken with 43 students of the Nursing Graduation Course, at a Federal University in Southern Brazil. Data were collected with a semi-structured tool, from May to July 2008. Data were organized into categories and analysed according to scientific publications in the area. Results: Three study categories raised from the study: Characterization of Nursing Students from the study, Contributions of teaching-learning active methodologies in raising awareness towards healthy habits, and Healthy habits: feeding and physical exercising. They recognize healthy habits and practice it in their routine, it was detected that 16% are overweight, do not exercise regularly, consider their food, leisure, sleeping patterns and self-image to be adequate. Conclusion: The use of active methodologies may unfold new possibilities towards healthy habits practices.

Luciara Fabiane Sebold; Silvana Silveira Kempfer

2012-01-01

214

Teaching spiritual care--a grounded theory study among undergraduate nursing educators.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore teachers' understanding of spirituality and how they prepare undergraduate nursing students to recognise spiritual cues and learn to assess and provide spiritual care. BACKGROUND: Nursing education addresses patient care in all domains of the person. Systematic teaching and supervision of students to prepare them to assist patients spiritually is an important part of holistic care. However, few role models for spiritual care are seen in clinical practice, and limited research addresses necessary student competencies or how teachers can best facilitate this process. DESIGN: Grounded theory was used to identify teachers' main concern and develop a substantive grounded theory. METHODS: Data collected during semi-structured interviews at three Norwegian University Colleges in five focus groups with 19 undergraduate nursing teachers were conducted from 2008 to 2009. Data were analysed through constant comparison of transcribed interviews until categories emerged and were saturated. RESULTS: The participants' main concern was 'How to help students recognize cues and ways of providing spiritual care'. Participants resolved this by 'Journeying with Students through their Maturation'. This basic social process has three iterative phases that develop throughout the nursing programme: 'Raising Student awareness to Recognize the Essence of Spirituality', 'Assisting Students to Overcome Personal Barriers', and 'Mentoring Students' Competency in Spiritual Care'. CONCLUSION: Nursing education should prepare students to recognise and act on spiritual cues. Making spiritual assessment and interventions more visible and explicit throughout nursing programmes, in both classroom and clinical settings, will facilitate student maturation as they learn to integrate theoretical thinking into clinical practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing students need role models who demonstrate spiritual care in the fast-paced hospital environment as well as in other clinical practice settings. To model spirituality as part of nursing care can assist students to overcome their vulnerability and to safeguard ethical issues and promote patient integrity.

Cone PH; Giske T

2013-07-01

215

New approach for teaching health promotion in the community: integration of three nursing courses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The complexity of the health care system and its interdisciplinary nature require that each component of the system redefine its professional framework, relative advantage, and unique contribution as an independent discipline. In choosing the most efficient and cost-effective work-force, each profession in the health care system must clarify its importance and contribution, otherwise functions will overlap and financial resources will be wasted. As rapid and wide-ranging changes occur in the health care system, the nursing profession must display a new and comprehensive vision that projects its values, beliefs, and relationships with and commitment to both patients and coworkers. The plans to fulfill this vision must be described clearly. This article presents part of a new professional paradigm developed by the nursing department of the University of Haifa, Israel. Three main topics are addressed: The building blocks of the new vision (i.e., community and health promotion, managerial skills, academic research). Integration of the building blocks into the 4-year baccalaureate degree program (i.e., how to practice health promotion with students in the community setting; managerial nursing skills at the baccalaureate level, including which to choose and to what depth and how to teach them; and academic nursing research, including the best way to teach basic research skills and implement them via a community project). Two senior student projects, demonstrating practical linking of the building blocks.

Moshe-Eilon Y; Shemy G

2003-07-01

216

Standards of care: integrating nursing care plans and quality assurance activities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Traditionally, standards are used to define the level of care that a patient can expect to receive in a given institution or on a given nursing unit. These standards are the foundation of quality assurance programs. Unfortunately, with the increased emphasis on monitoring care, many standards are being written after the quality assurance activities have been developed and are in place. Often, standards are placed neatly in a book that is dusted off and brought out when the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations representative (JCAHO) visits. The nursing staff at the unit level has no real knowledge or understanding of the standards. This may result in a nonfunctioning quality assurance program.

Mize CP; Bentley G; Hubbard S

1991-02-01

217

Standardized mapping of nursing assessments across 59 U.S. military treatment facilities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Create an interoperable set of nursing flowsheet assessment measures within military treatment facility electronic health records using the 3M Healthcare Data Dictionary (HDD). DESIGN: The project comprised three phases: 1) discovery included an in-depth analysis of the Essentris data to be mapped in the HDD; 2) mapping encompassed the creation of standard operating procedures, mapping heuristics, and the development of mapping tools; and 3) quality assurance incorporated validation of mappings using inter-rater agreement. RESULTS: Of 569,073 flowsheet concepts, 92% were mapped to the HDD. Of these, 31.5% represented LOINC concepts, 15% represented SNOMED CT and 1% represented both. 52.5% were mapped to HDD concepts with no standardized terminology representations. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing flowsheet data can be mapped to standard terminologies but there is not the breadth of coverage necessary to represent nursing assessments. Future work is necessary to develop a standard information model for the nursing process.

Harman TL; Seeley RA; Oliveira IM; Sheide A; Kartchner T; Woolstenhulme RD; Wilson PS; Lau LM; Matney SA

2012-01-01

218

The Stirling model of nursing audit. Its relationship to standard setting and quality assurance.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Setting up nursing audit can be a daunting prospect. Once done, however, it can provide information about the effectiveness and quality of care. This article describes how audit can be integrated into quality assurance and standard setting initiatives already underway.

Morison MJ

1991-04-01

219

HMO development for primary care team teaching of medical and nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article describes a three-year effort to facilitate the development of a university health maintenance organization (HMO) into an effective clinical teaching site for the team practice of primary care. Project staff initiated several activities to promote team development in the HMO. These included review and development of algorithms to guide physician/nurse teams in the care of patients with common problems, workshops on communication and role negotiating skills, and preceptor training. A variety of objective and subjective methods were employed to assess HMO team development and the effectiveness of the HMO as a primary care teaching site. Initial resistance to both team practice and teaching have been overcome. Students who were trained in the project not only acquired good clinical skills but also, perhaps more importantly, developed skills in professional role negotiation and communication as well.

Osterweis M; Chickadonz G; Huntley RR; Spencer CD

1980-09-01

220

The relationship between job satisfaction and intention to leave current employment among registered nurses in a teaching hospital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess Malaysian nurses' perceived job satisfaction and to determine whether any association exists between job satisfaction and intention to leave current employment. BACKGROUND: There is currently a shortage of qualified nurses, and healthcare organisations often face challenges in retaining trained nurses. Job satisfaction has been identified as a factor that influences nurse turnover. However, this has not been widely explored in Malaysia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. METHODS: Registered nurses in a teaching hospital in Malaysia completed a self-administered questionnaire. Of the 150 questionnaires distributed, 141 were returned (response rate = 94%). RESULTS: Overall, nurses had a moderate level of job satisfaction, with higher satisfaction for motivational factors. Significant effects were observed between job satisfaction and demographic variables. About 40% of the nurses intended to leave their current employment. Furthermore, age, work experience and nursing education had significant associations with intention to leave. Logistic regression analysis revealed that job satisfaction was a significant and independent predictor of nurses' intention to leave after controlling for demographic variables. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there is a significant association between job satisfaction and nurses' intention to leave their current employment. It adds to the existing literature on the relationship between nurses' job satisfaction and intention to leave. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Methods for enhancing nurses' job satisfaction are vital to promote the long-term retention of nurses within organisations. Attention must be paid to the needs of younger nurses, as they represent the majority of the nursing workforce and often have lower satisfaction and greater intention to leave than older nurses do. Strategies to nurture younger nurses, such as providing opportunities for further education, greater management decision-making capabilities and flexible working environment, are essential.

Ramoo V; Abdullah KL; Piaw CY

2013-11-01

 
 
 
 
221

A Standardized Measure: NDNQI Nursing Care Hours Indicator.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although nursing care hours (NCH) is commonly used to examine factors related to adverse events among inpatients, the reliability of the NCH measure has rarely been examined. This study assessed the reliability of NCH data from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators® by estimating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with data from the California Office for Statewide Health Planning and Development. Hospital-level aggregated NCH data for critical care units were linked from each of the databases for 48 California hospitals matched in the two databases. Estimated ICCs were .96 for registered nurse (RN) hours and .72 for non-RN hours. Findings provide evidence that NCH data of the national database were substantially reliable for use in national comparable benchmarking reports for hospitals' quality improvement activities and research.

Choi J; Boyle DK; Dunton N

2013-09-01

222

Achieving the standard of the school health nursing process in elementary schools of Kerman, Iran.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Considering the school nursing standards, which is the most important and vital element of the school health team, can be a fundamental step toward solving the current and future problems of the school and society health. The present research was done with the goal of determining the current situation of the standard of the school health nursing process in elementary schools of Kerman, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present research is a quantitative, descriptive study and was done between the years 2009 and 2010 through conducting an opinion poll. In this study, first the international standards of school nursing were searched and extracted from informational sources. Then, a questionnaire was designed based on the standards of the school nursing process and its related indicators in 6 areas. This questionnaire had two parts. The first part had the respondents' demographic information, answering was optional, and the second part of the poll was about each of the indicators. After preparing the questionnaire and determining its validity and reliability, it was distributed among the 120 samples (60 health trainers and 60 of Kerman's elementary school staff), and their opinions were gathered and analyzed through statistical-descriptive analysis. FINDINGS: The results of this research demonstrate that approximately all the above mentioned standard areas in the country were applied (98%). The rate of acquiring the standard of nursing process was high (90%) in some areas (Investigative area) and low (30%) in some other areas (diagnosis area). CONCLUSIONS: In total, the rate of acquiring the majority of indicators of nursing process standards has an average percentage. It is suggested to use schools health professionals to raise the indicators of the standard of the school nursing process (the indicators which had low or average acquiring rate), and to raise the performance quality.

Salehi S; Abedi H; Ghasemi T

2012-03-01

223

Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Intensive Care Unit Nurses and their General Health: A Randomized Clinical Trial.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Emotion and how people manage it is an important part of personality that would immensely affect their health. Investigations showed that emotional intelligence is significantly related to and can predict psychological health. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of teaching emotional intelligence to intensive care unit nurses on their general health. METHODS: This randomized clinical trial (registered as IRCT201208022812N9) was conducted on 52 of 200 in intensive care unit nurses affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. They were recruited through purposeful convenience sampling and then randomly categorized into two groups. The intervention group members were trained in emotional intelligence. Bar-on emotional intelligence and Goldberg's general health questionnaires were administered to each participant before, immediately after, and one month after the intervention. RESULTS: While the mean score of general health for the intervention group decreased from 25.4 before the intervention, to 18.1 immediately after the intervention and to 14.6 one month later, for the control group, it increased from 22.0, to 24.2 and to 26.5, respectively (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Teaching emotional intelligence improved the general health of intensive care unit nurses.

Sharif F; Rezaie S; Keshavarzi S; Mansoori P; Ghadakpoor S

2013-07-01

224

Curriculum learning designs: Teaching health assessment skills for advanced nursing practitioners through sustainable flexible learning.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Innovative curriculum designs are vital for effective learning in contemporary nursing education where traditional modes of delivery are not adequate to meet the learning needs of postgraduate students. This instance of postgraduate teaching in a distributed learning environment offered the opportunity to design a flexible learning model for teaching advanced clinical skills. AIM: To present a sustainable model for flexible learning that enables specialist nurses to gain postgraduate qualifications without on-campus class attendance by teaching and assessing clinical health care skills in an authentic workplace setting. METHODS: An action research methodology was used to gather evidence and report on the process of curriculum development of a core unit, Comprehensive Health Assessment (CHA), within 13 different postgraduate speciality courses. Qualitative data was collected from 27 teaching academics, 21 clinical specialist staff, and 7 hospital managers via interviews, focus groups and journal reflections. Evaluations from the initial iteration of CHA from 36 students were obtained. Data was analyzed to develop and evaluate the curriculum design of CHA. RESULTS: The key factors indicated by participants in the curriculum design process were coordination and structuring of teaching and assessment; integration of content development; working with technologies, balancing specialities and core knowledge; and managing induction and expectations. CONCLUSIONS: A set of recommendations emerged as a result of the action research process. These included: a constructive alignment approach to curriculum design; the production of a facilitator's guide that specifies expectations and unit information for academic and clinical education staff; an agreed template for content authors; and the inclusion of synchronous communication for real-time online tutoring. The highlight of the project was that it built curriculum design capabilities of clinicians and students which can sustain this alternative model of online learning.

Fitzgerald L; Wong P; Hannon J; Solberg Tokerud M; Lyons J

2013-10-01

225

Developing and Evaluating Clinical Written Assignment in Clinical Teaching for the Senior B.S. Nursing Students: An action research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: In a four-year undergraduate level , the nursing students have to get prepared in the patients education, designing care plans, applying nursing processes and exercise the clinical decisions, in addition to learning practical skills. Therefore, multiple clinical teaching strategies in nursing must be applied. In this study the sheets for the mentioned fields were designed and used. Methods: In this action research in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 64 nursing senior students and related instructors participated. Clinical written assignment included the patient’s health condition sheet, tables showing the used medicines and the precautions, the clinical and paraclinical tests and the results, identifying the patient problems, designing and implementing care plan and writing nursing reports with SOAPIE method. The instructors’ viewpoints were achieved through the group discussions and their notes taken. The perceived competency of the students was obtained through a questionnaire. The qualitative data was analyzed by the content analysis and quantitative using SPSS. Results: Both the students and the instructors agreed with the clinical written assignment. The desired care competency of the students before and after assignment was statistically significant (p<0.05). According to the instructors, intervention was useful for the senior students who have passed the courses needed for completing and using the different parts of these forms. Conclusion: Since a need is always felt in the trends of the nursing clinical teaching, the researchers recommend the clinical written assignment and their application along with other strategies for senior nursing students in clinical teaching.

Leila Valizadeh; Vahid Zamanzadeh; Faza Virani

2012-01-01

226

Application of an innovative, autonomous, creative teaching modality through service-learning in a community-health nursing course  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nursing faculty continue to find themselves challenged to meet student needs by the increasing student enrollment numbers and increasing faculty workloads without simultaneously increasing resources. The responsibility to meet student needs rests on the nursing faculty. It is therefore increasingly important that nursing faculty implement teaching modalities to meet student and patient needs. This article demonstrates faculty’s use of service-learning as an effective, innovative teaching modality to meet increasing student, patient, and community needs without additional resources. The authors seek to differentiate between service learning and contracted clinical experiences in order to enable nurse educators to use service learning as a teaching modality. The authors describe the process of using service learning with nursing process in this course. Nursing assessment is built into the project as a “windshield survey”. A literature review was conducted seeking to understand other uses of service learning in education and validate the authors’ experiences. This three-credit hour lecture and one credit hour clinical course has yielded unique and interesting service learning projects that positively impact their communities. The students work with cohorts of all races, ethnicities and cultures throughout the lifespan.  Service-learning opportunities assist in the availability and accessibility of health care to safety net facilities and vulnerable populations who may not otherwise receive health care screening or treatment.  Faculty in nursing and other health disciplines will likely appreciate the innovation, creativity, and autonomy afforded this modality of outreach.

Susan G. Williams; Suzanne Bihan

2012-01-01

227

Virtual reality simulation: using three-dimensional technology to teach nursing students.  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of computerized technology is rapidly growing in the classroom and in healthcare. An emerging computer technology strategy for nursing education is the use of virtual reality simulation. This computer-based three-dimensional educational tool simulates real-life patient experiences in a risk-free environment, allows for repeated practice sessions, requires clinical decision making, exposes students to diverse patient conditions, provides immediate feedback, and is portable. The purpose of this article was to review the importance of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy. In addition, a project to explore readiness of nursing faculty at one major Midwestern university for the use of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy is described where faculty thought virtual reality simulation would increase students' knowledge of an intravenous line insertion procedure. Faculty who practiced intravenous catheter insertion via virtual reality simulation expressed a wide range of learning experiences from using virtual reality simulation that is congruent with the literature regarding the barriers to student learning. Innovative teaching strategies, such as virtual reality simulation, address barriers of increasing patient acuity, high student-to-faculty ratio, patient safety concerns from faculty, and student anxiety and can offer rapid feedback to students. PMID:22411409

Jenson, Carole E; Forsyth, Diane McNally

2012-06-01

228

Virtual reality simulation: using three-dimensional technology to teach nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The use of computerized technology is rapidly growing in the classroom and in healthcare. An emerging computer technology strategy for nursing education is the use of virtual reality simulation. This computer-based three-dimensional educational tool simulates real-life patient experiences in a risk-free environment, allows for repeated practice sessions, requires clinical decision making, exposes students to diverse patient conditions, provides immediate feedback, and is portable. The purpose of this article was to review the importance of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy. In addition, a project to explore readiness of nursing faculty at one major Midwestern university for the use of virtual reality simulation as a computerized teaching strategy is described where faculty thought virtual reality simulation would increase students' knowledge of an intravenous line insertion procedure. Faculty who practiced intravenous catheter insertion via virtual reality simulation expressed a wide range of learning experiences from using virtual reality simulation that is congruent with the literature regarding the barriers to student learning. Innovative teaching strategies, such as virtual reality simulation, address barriers of increasing patient acuity, high student-to-faculty ratio, patient safety concerns from faculty, and student anxiety and can offer rapid feedback to students.

Jenson CE; Forsyth DM

2012-06-01

229

Communication in palliative care: philosophy, teaching approaches, and evaluation of an educational program for nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this article is presented a post-graduate program in palliative care nursing focusing communication. The teaching plan was inspired by action learning, and the students' discovery processes necessitated a variety of teaching methods. The program was based on a holistic view of the human being and of inter-human communication. Neuro-motoric stimulation exercises were used to improve the students' focus of attention, sensory reception, and awareness of their corporeal and intellectual selves. Stimulation of relational skills, the discussion of ethical and difficult questions, and narratives helped students discover relationships between theoretical knowledge and palliative practice, and were used to explain and illustrate topics, and as backgrounds for discussions. During the program the students examined, challenged, and continuously reflected upon their explicit and unconscious praxis theories and their communicative habits. Although very different from educational programs they previously had experienced, this teaching/learning plan and the outcome thereof was positively evaluated. At the end of the year the students found themselves to be more knowledgeable, discerning and self-confident nurses. Even so, some found that they needed more time to digest what they had learned and for new knowledge and philosophies to become internalised.

Rønsen A; Hanssen I

2009-10-01

230

Using standardized patient instructors to teach health promotion interviewing skills.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Medical students report knowledge, but inadequate skills, in health promotion and disease prevention (HPDP) technology. An established methodology using standardized patient instructors (SPIs) was adapted and tested for effectiveness in teaching HPDP. METHODS: Thirteen lay persons were trained and given profiles showing high cardiovascular risks. During their family medicine clerkship, 104 students engaged in one-to-one exercises with the SPIs. Half of these sessions were spent in the doctor-patient interview; in the other half, the SPI gave specific feedback using a validated scale. Encounters were videotaped. RESULTS: The students rated the SPI feedback as the program's most valuable aspect and the videotaping as the least valuable. The SPI feedback was rated valuable by 90%-96% of the students. The students also reported that the skills acquired were likely to be used, and they had learned "much" or "very much." As a group, students' self-assessments did not differ from the SPIs' assessments of the students. CONCLUSION: Lay SPIs are a powerful educational tool.

Sharp PC; Pearce KA; Konen JC; Knudson MP

1996-02-01

231

Teaching nurses sight unseen: comparing the cultural competency of online and on-campus BSN faculty.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This study supports best practices in nursing education and the need for cultural competency among faculty members. The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of cultural competency among on-campus Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) faculty compared with those of online BSN faculty. DESIGN: The research used a quantitative, nonexperimental, descriptive, correlational design. The Cultural Diversity Questionnaire for Nurse Educators (CDQ-NE) was e-mailed to 500 BSN faculty at five research sites (N = 222). The instrument included Likert-type scale items organized into the components of cultural competence according to Campinha-Bacote. RESULTS: The lowest levels of cultural competency were among the on-campus group (3.95). Faculty teaching both online and on-campus had the highest levels (4.0). DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: A significant finding indicated that training within the past 5 years in cultural competency reflected higher scores. IMPLICATIONS: These findings suggest that some cultural competency training should be mandatory for all BSN faculty, whether it occurs during their orientations or as part of nurse-educator curricula at the graduate levels.

Reneau M

2013-01-01

232

Curriculum evaluation. Using National League for Nursing accrediting commission standards and criteria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Systematic curricular evaluation is essential to assure integrity of nursing programs.A holistic approach to evaluation using the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) Standards and Criteria provides a comprehensive perspective for nursing faculty and administrators.A conceptual framework illustrating the dynamic relationship of curricular context, content, and conduct is presented. This framework suggests that curricular content cannot be isolated and must be examined in light of the milieu or context of curricular delivery as well as the implementation or conduct of curricula. Results of this approach are shared along with recommendations for future use.

Schug V

2012-09-01

233

Curriculum evaluation. Using National League for Nursing accrediting commission standards and criteria.  

Science.gov (United States)

Systematic curricular evaluation is essential to assure integrity of nursing programs.A holistic approach to evaluation using the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) Standards and Criteria provides a comprehensive perspective for nursing faculty and administrators.A conceptual framework illustrating the dynamic relationship of curricular context, content, and conduct is presented. This framework suggests that curricular content cannot be isolated and must be examined in light of the milieu or context of curricular delivery as well as the implementation or conduct of curricula. Results of this approach are shared along with recommendations for future use. PMID:23061187

Schug, Vicki

234

[Knowledge, attitude and practice about phototherapy among nursing professionals of teaching hospitals].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article consists of a KAP (Knowledge, Attitude and Practice) survey to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice of phototherapy among nursing professionals from two teaching hospitals at the city of Recife, Brazil, through semi-structured questionnaire applied to 111 professionals. It was used the T Student test to compare means of correct answers. Thus, there were higher means for practice, followed by those related to attitude and a lower percentage of correct answers for knowledge. When comparing the means between knowledge and practice the differences were statistically significant for all variables (p<0.05). The results of the study highlight the need to implement activities that will allow a balance among knowledge, attitude and practice of nursing professionals about phototherapy.

Machado SP; Samico IC; Braga TD

2012-01-01

235

Improving Care Transitions From Hospital to Home: Standardized Orders for Home Health Nursing With Remote Telemonitoring.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template.

Heeke S; Wood F; Schuck J

2013-08-01

236

The longitudinal effect of concept map teaching on critical thinking of nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Concept map is a useful cognitive tool for enhancing a student's critical thinking by encouraging students to process information deeply for understanding. However, there is limited understanding of longitudinal effects of concept map teaching on students' critical thinking. The purpose of the study was to investigate the growth and the other factors influencing the development of critical thinking in response to concept map as an interventional strategy for nursing students in a two-year registered nurse baccalaureate program. The study was a quasi-experimental and longitudinal follow-up design. A convenience sample was drawn from a university in central Taiwan. Data were collected at different time points at the beginning of each semester using structured questionnaires including Critical Thinking Scale and Approaches to Learning and Studying. The intervention of concept map teaching was given at the second semester in the Medical-Surgical Nursing course. The results of the findings revealed student started with a mean critical thinking score of 41.32 and decreased at a rate of 0.42 over time, although not significant. After controlling for individual characteristics, the final model revealed that the experimental group gained a higher critical thinking score across time than the control group. The best predictive variables of initial status in critical thinking were without clinical experience and a higher pre-test score. The growth in critical thinking was predicted best by a lower pre-test score, and lower scores on surface approach and organized study. Our study suggested that concept map is a useful teaching strategy to enhance student critical thinking.

Lee W; Chiang CH; Liao IC; Lee ML; Chen SL; Liang T

2013-10-01

237

Teaching spirituality to nurse practitioner students: the importance of the interconnection of mind, body, and spirit.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To describe the author's experience in locating and implementing a spiritual assessment tool in teaching a first semester clinical nurse practitioner (NP) course. DATA SOURCES: Selected articles and responses of NP students to the use of the tool. CONCLUSIONS: A spiritual assessment is an important component of a comprehensive health assessment. The use of a formal structured protocol provides a framework for beginning students to become comfortable with sprirituality and spiritual assessments and to begin to recognize spiritual distress in clients. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The protocol used in the course is very extensive and might not be practical in a busy practice setting. An alternative, 4-point assessment is provided.

Maddox M

2001-03-01

238

Nuevo modelo pedagógico de enfermería: un gran reto New Nursing teaching model: A big challenge  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available La enfermería en Cuba no puede expresarse fuera del análisis del contexto político, económico y social de nuestro país en las últimas décadas. La formación del nivel técnico y profesional se ha desarrollado en niveles educativos distintos: en el nivel secundario y en el nivel terciario o universitario con una trayectoria histórica mantenida. En respuesta al notorio déficit de personal de enfermería en la capital en el año 2001, se introdujeron los planes emergentes en la provincia Ciudad Habana. El Nuevo Modelo Pedagógico (NMP) surgió para dar respuesta a la formación de los enfermeros emergentes, así como para desarrollar un modelo educativo que permita captar, formar, retener y desarrollar a los educandos en forma progresiva hasta egresar un profesional universitario, el que integra en tres ciclos la formación básica, técnica y profesional y se propone alcanzar un grado superior de integración de ambas enseñanzas, en aras de asegurar la formación progresiva de los recursos humanos que necesita el sistema de salud. Este trabajo muestra cómo el estudiante es capaz de alcanzar su nivel de formación con flexibilidad, pertinencia y accesibilidad, de acuerdo con la batalla de ideas en que se encuentra enfrascada nuestra Revolución. Es notorio que ya existen sedes universitarias para el estudio de la Licenciatura en 118 municipios de los 169 de todo el país con una matrícula de 20214 estudiantes, dos hechos sin precedentes en la formación de enfermeros universitarios.Cuban nursing can't be expressed outside of the political, economic, and social context of our country in the last decades. Technical and professional training has been developed in different teaching levels: at secondary and tertiary or university, with a sustained historical route. In response to the marked deficit of nursing staff in the capital of the country in 2001, in Havana Province , emergence plans were introduced. The New Teaching Model appeared to give an answer to the training of emergent nurses, as well as to develop a teaching model allowing the recruitment, training, retention, and development of students in a progressive way to achieve a graduate with three cycles of basic, technical and professional training aimed at obtaining a higher degree of integration of both types of teaching, and to assure a progressive training of the human resources needed for the health system. This paper shows how the student is able to obtain his training level in a flexible, pertinent, and accessible way, according to the ”Battle of Ideas” waged by our Revolution. It should be stressed that nowadays there are 128 university headquarters in the 169 municipalities existing in the whole country, with 20214 s tudents enrolled: two unprecedented facts in the training of graduate nurses.

Nilda Bello Fernández; María C Fenton Tait

2006-01-01

239

Nuevo modelo pedagógico de enfermería: un gran reto/ New Nursing teaching model: A big challenge  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish La enfermería en Cuba no puede expresarse fuera del análisis del contexto político, económico y social de nuestro país en las últimas décadas. La formación del nivel técnico y profesional se ha desarrollado en niveles educativos distintos: en el nivel secundario y en el nivel terciario o universitario con una trayectoria histórica mantenida. En respuesta al notorio déficit de personal de enfermería en la capital en el año 2001, se introdujeron los planes emer (more) gentes en la provincia Ciudad Habana. El Nuevo Modelo Pedagógico (NMP) surgió para dar respuesta a la formación de los enfermeros emergentes, así como para desarrollar un modelo educativo que permita captar, formar, retener y desarrollar a los educandos en forma progresiva hasta egresar un profesional universitario, el que integra en tres ciclos la formación básica, técnica y profesional y se propone alcanzar un grado superior de integración de ambas enseñanzas, en aras de asegurar la formación progresiva de los recursos humanos que necesita el sistema de salud. Este trabajo muestra cómo el estudiante es capaz de alcanzar su nivel de formación con flexibilidad, pertinencia y accesibilidad, de acuerdo con la batalla de ideas en que se encuentra enfrascada nuestra Revolución. Es notorio que ya existen sedes universitarias para el estudio de la Licenciatura en 118 municipios de los 169 de todo el país con una matrícula de 20214 estudiantes, dos hechos sin precedentes en la formación de enfermeros universitarios. Abstract in english Cuban nursing can't be expressed outside of the political, economic, and social context of our country in the last decades. Technical and professional training has been developed in different teaching levels: at secondary and tertiary or university, with a sustained historical route. In response to the marked deficit of nursing staff in the capital of the country in 2001, in Havana Province , emergence plans were introduced. The New Teaching Model appeared to give an answ (more) er to the training of emergent nurses, as well as to develop a teaching model allowing the recruitment, training, retention, and development of students in a progressive way to achieve a graduate with three cycles of basic, technical and professional training aimed at obtaining a higher degree of integration of both types of teaching, and to assure a progressive training of the human resources needed for the health system. This paper shows how the student is able to obtain his training level in a flexible, pertinent, and accessible way, according to the ”Battle of Ideas” waged by our Revolution. It should be stressed that nowadays there are 128 university headquarters in the 169 municipalities existing in the whole country, with 20214 s tudents enrolled: two unprecedented facts in the training of graduate nurses.

Bello Fernández, Nilda; Fenton Tait, María C

2006-12-01

240

[Influence of learning styles of nursing students on teaching strategies choice].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objective of this research focuses on the framework of teaching strategies, by acknowledging learning styles as first determination and, in relation to the changes that these are going through, identifying the teaching strategies best rated and preferred by the students. This is a prospective open cohort study with the students of Nursing Diploma 2007/2010 of the Universidad de Córdoba. Once the population was identified in the first year (first analysis), annual measurings were undertaken every year during their training. In order to study the learning styles, the questionnaire CHAEA was administered and a scale from 1 to 10 (1 = highest, 10 = lowest) was used to determine the preferences for learning strategies. The results show the variability of the learner (up to 11 styles). However, the dominant style is the reflective, followed by the theoretical and the pragmatic. The least developed was the active style. As the years of training go by, a tendency towards a dual style (reflective-theoretical) can be observed. In relation to teaching strategies, the preferred ones were those set in professional areas, workshops and debates. Relevant changes were also seen as they advanced in their training. The results establish a specific significant relationship between learning styles and teaching strategies.

Vacas Pérez JC; Mérida Serrano R; Molina Recio G; Mesa Blanco Mdel P

2012-12-01

 
 
 
 
241

[Influence of learning styles of nursing students on teaching strategies choice].  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this research focuses on the framework of teaching strategies, by acknowledging learning styles as first determination and, in relation to the changes that these are going through, identifying the teaching strategies best rated and preferred by the students. This is a prospective open cohort study with the students of Nursing Diploma 2007/2010 of the Universidad de Córdoba. Once the population was identified in the first year (first analysis), annual measurings were undertaken every year during their training. In order to study the learning styles, the questionnaire CHAEA was administered and a scale from 1 to 10 (1 = highest, 10 = lowest) was used to determine the preferences for learning strategies. The results show the variability of the learner (up to 11 styles). However, the dominant style is the reflective, followed by the theoretical and the pragmatic. The least developed was the active style. As the years of training go by, a tendency towards a dual style (reflective-theoretical) can be observed. In relation to teaching strategies, the preferred ones were those set in professional areas, workshops and debates. Relevant changes were also seen as they advanced in their training. The results establish a specific significant relationship between learning styles and teaching strategies. PMID:23390877

Vacas Pérez, Juan Crisostomo; Mérida Serrano, Rosario; Molina Recio, Guillermo; Mesa Blanco, María del Pilar

2012-12-01

242

[Teaching the aging process and old age in nursing graduation courses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study aimed at unfolding how the teaching on the aging process and old age takes place in nursing undergraduate programs. Data were obtained by means of a questionnaire, which was completed by coordinators of the five existing nursing programs in the state of Ceará. Its theme is the content of a specific course in the program. Different techniques and strategies were used in order to learn what students' interests were and so to reach a better outcome in the teaching-learning situation. Students found such discussions relevant because these made them better prepared for entering a promising labor field; they stressed the high importance the discussions on that theme would have in other courses as well, aiming at providing a sound knowledge basis and at reaching excellence in patient care. We found that the courses surveyed try to raise interest in this knowledge field, promoting several opportunities for study and practice, and providing a new way to make opinions meet about growing old and old age.

de Freitas MC; Mendes MM

2003-09-01

243

An inquiry into the attitudes of qualified nursing staff towards the use of individualized nursing care plans as a teaching tool.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper summarizes a research study inquiring into the attitudes of qualified nursing staff towards the use of individualized nursing care plans as a teaching tool. The survey was conducted in medical and surgical wards used for nurse training, in two hospitals. In common with many hospitals, the introduction of the nursing process into the surgical wards is of more recent origin than the medical areas, so would this be reflected in the attitudes of staff? Results indicated an overall positive attitude of all staff, although significant differences were identified between the grades of staff participating in the study and between the two hospitals. There was no significant difference shown in the comparison of all surgical staff with all medical staff, but the ward sister demonstrated a more positive attitude than staff nurses or enrolled nurses. The length of time care plans had been in use and whether the Open University Programme P553 had been completed, were taken into consideration. Analysis of the individual statements which clustered around the same theme is discussed. Possible factors affecting the attitudes identified are suggested and recommendations which include ongoing educational support, in particular for the enrolled nurse, and exploration of the 'role model' function of the ward sister made. Finally, the method of study is critically examined. PMID:3372880

Daws, J

1988-01-01

244

An inquiry into the attitudes of qualified nursing staff towards the use of individualized nursing care plans as a teaching tool.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper summarizes a research study inquiring into the attitudes of qualified nursing staff towards the use of individualized nursing care plans as a teaching tool. The survey was conducted in medical and surgical wards used for nurse training, in two hospitals. In common with many hospitals, the introduction of the nursing process into the surgical wards is of more recent origin than the medical areas, so would this be reflected in the attitudes of staff? Results indicated an overall positive attitude of all staff, although significant differences were identified between the grades of staff participating in the study and between the two hospitals. There was no significant difference shown in the comparison of all surgical staff with all medical staff, but the ward sister demonstrated a more positive attitude than staff nurses or enrolled nurses. The length of time care plans had been in use and whether the Open University Programme P553 had been completed, were taken into consideration. Analysis of the individual statements which clustered around the same theme is discussed. Possible factors affecting the attitudes identified are suggested and recommendations which include ongoing educational support, in particular for the enrolled nurse, and exploration of the 'role model' function of the ward sister made. Finally, the method of study is critically examined.

Daws J

1988-01-01

245

Standards of care: integrating nursing care plans and quality assurance activities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Traditionally, standards are used to define the level of care that a patient can expect to receive in a given institution or on a given nursing unit. These standards are the foundation of quality assurance programs. Unfortunately, with the increased emphasis on monitoring care, many standards are being written after the quality assurance activities have been developed and are in place. Often, standards are placed neatly in a book that is dusted off and brought out when the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations representative (JCAHO) visits. The nursing staff at the unit level has no real knowledge or understanding of the standards. This may result in a nonfunctioning quality assurance program. PMID:1995020

Mize, C P; Bentley, G; Hubbard, S

1991-02-01

246

Using FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy to Teach the Internal Standard Method  

Science.gov (United States)

The internal standard method is widely applied in quantitative analyses. However, most analytical chemistry textbooks either omit this topic or only provide examples of a single-point internal standardization. An experiment designed to teach students how to prepare an internal standard calibration curve is described. The experiment is a modified…

Bellamy, Michael K.

2010-01-01

247

[Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology as a theoretical-philosophical framework in teaching research in nursing].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper aims at describing the theoretical-philosophical appraoch used in the development of the qualitative research that constituted the thesis "Meanings of sensibility for being a nursing teacher-nurse in teaching and learning to be and do nursing in light of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology. This approach made it possible to seek subsidies for the questions that result from life experience, since the philosopher recognizes the body inserted in the world as a constitution of the subjectivity and expression of speech. According to the Merleau-Pontyan thought, it is possible to comprehend the language as gesture and body expression in the perceptive experiences of the other when interviews are done with the participants. The results indicate the importance of phenomenology as it helped the researchers to figure out their own ways, know the feelings, behaviors, and the relations with the other in a dynamic world, which is in constant transformation and that develops a dialogue and makes connections with life.

Terra MG; Gonçalves LH; dos Santos EK; Erdmann AL

2009-09-01

248

Cancer Patients' Satisfaction With Communication And Information Given By Nurses At Teaching Hospitals Of Tehran, Iran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Effective patient–professional communication can be of crucial importance to long-term psycho-social outcomes in patients with cancer. A cross sectional study was conducted to examine cancer patients' satisfaction with regard to various aspects of communication and information given by nurses. Methods: A proportional stratified sampling method was done and data collected via face-to-face interview based on a validated Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) during a 3 month period. A total of 384 patients aged 14 years old and above were selected. Results: The majority of respondents were males (52.3%) and married (66.4%), working (52.6%) and age group 45-54 year (26.6%) with secondary education level (44.8%),and 53.1% of them admitted at teaching hospitals of government A University of Medical Science. The findings revealed that a vast majority of respondents (81.5%) were satisfied with communication and information given by nurses, while the others (18.5%) not. There was significant relationship between patients’ satisfaction and age group (p ? 0.05). Also, the age groups of 15-44 years old and married patients were the best predictors for level of cancer patients’ satisfaction with communication, and information given by nurses. Conclusion: Key findings are a number of issues with regard to information and communication which can be clearly improved within teaching hospitals of in Tehran city. The study concluded that patient– professional communication should be tailored to meet individual need.

Mehrnoosh Akhtari-Zavare; Mohd Yunus Abdullah; Syed Tajuddin Syed Hassan; Salmiah Binti Said; Mohammad Kamali

2011-01-01

249

Public health nursing job descriptions: are they aligned with professional standards?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The American Nurses' Association (ANA) 2007 Public Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice along with the Quad Council's PHN competencies frame the practice of public health nurses (PHNs). The preface for ANA's PHN Scope and Standards encourages using the standards as the basis of PHN job descriptions. This study sought to assess the extent to which PHN job descriptions are aligned with the ANA's PHN Scope and Standards and the Quad Council competencies. DESIGN: We obtained PHN job descriptions from 3 local health departments in Illinois and 3 in Washington. Statements from the job descriptions were content analyzed, categorizing statements into the 16 ANA PHN Scope and Standards and using Quad Council competencies as additional definitions of each category. To code all job statements related to PHN practice, 2 categories were added which were MPH competencies from the Associations of Schools of Public Health. Interrater reliability was established. RESULTS: All 18 PHN job descriptions had statements related to Standard 5 Implementation, followed by 94% of the job descriptions having statements related to assessment, planning, coordination of services, health education/health promotion, and collaboration. The least frequently (22%) included standard was outcome identification. CONCLUSIONS: Attention to human resource management is necessary to align job descriptions with current professional scope and standards for basic and advanced PHN practice. The lack of statements regarding Outcome Identification has serious implications for PHN involvement in quality improvement and health planning.

Issel LM; Ashley M; Kirk H; Bekemeier B

2012-05-01

250

[Undergraduate teaching in ophthalmology : Do standardized practical examinations make sense?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: University teaching in ophthalmology has tended to focus on imparting knowledge rather than practical skills. The new skills laboratory at the University Medical Center in Göttingen enables practical skills to be taught. The focus is on basic skills that could help all physicians. The learning goals set are techniques considered basic in ophthalmology that can be mastered without requiring any physician to operate major equipment. METHODS: The design and results from four semesters of an ophthalmological objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) following students engaged in peer-teaching, as well as feedback from a student questionnaire are described. RESULTS: Practical skills can successfully be taught and mastered within 1 week and 68-100?% of all students achieved the maximum scores in the individual tests. The OSCE and peer- eaching were well received by the students. CONCLUSIONS: Practical skills and peer teaching fulfill student educational goals in ophthalmology and are well accepted by undergraduates.

Simmenroth-Nayda A; Görlich Y; Wagner M; Müther M; Lohse C; Utte L; Leiterholt S; Hoerauf H; Feltgen N

2013-05-01

251

[Undergraduate teaching in ophthalmology : Do standardized practical examinations make sense?  

Science.gov (United States)

BACKGROUND: University teaching in ophthalmology has tended to focus on imparting knowledge rather than practical skills. The new skills laboratory at the University Medical Center in Göttingen enables practical skills to be taught. The focus is on basic skills that could help all physicians. The learning goals set are techniques considered basic in ophthalmology that can be mastered without requiring any physician to operate major equipment. METHODS: The design and results from four semesters of an ophthalmological objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) following students engaged in peer-teaching, as well as feedback from a student questionnaire are described. RESULTS: Practical skills can successfully be taught and mastered within 1 week and 68-100?% of all students achieved the maximum scores in the individual tests. The OSCE and peer- eaching were well received by the students. CONCLUSIONS: Practical skills and peer teaching fulfill student educational goals in ophthalmology and are well accepted by undergraduates. PMID:23712519

Simmenroth-Nayda, A; Görlich, Y; Wagner, M; Müther, M; Lohse, C; Utte, L; Leiterholt, S; Hoerauf, H; Feltgen, N

2013-05-29

252

La Bioética en la Enseñanza y la Investigación en Enfermería Bioethics in Nursing Teaching and Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Se hace imprescindible dada la naturaleza de la Bioética profundizar en su contexto histórico y sus conceptos básicos, principalmente destacar cómo afecta en la actitud de los estudiantes de Enfermería, tanto en sus inicios hasta cuando ya son profesionales. Con el propósito de evaluar cómo está la Bioética en la enseñanza e investigación, se realizó un estudio exploratorio de los planes de estudio de Enfermería de las universidades chilenas, intentando determinar su desarrollo, cómo y dónde está insertada, y así determinar su impacto en los estudiantes de Enfermería. Se detectó que la Enseñanza de la Bioética se encuentra en los últimos años de estudio, tercer y cuarto años, algo similar a lo que ocurre con la investigación. Se pudo comprobar que ambas están insertadas muy tardíamente, teniendo en cuenta que son elementos fundamentales que los estudiantes deben conocer desde el inicio de sus estudios de Enfermería.To deepen in its historical context becomes essential, given the nature of Bioethics and its basic concepts, and mainly emphasizing how affects the attitude of the nursing students, as much in their beginnings as well as when they are already professionals. In order to evaluate how is the Bioethics in the Education and the Investigation, an exploratory study of the study plans of nursing in Chilean Universities was made, trying to determinate how and were it is inserted and in that way determinates its impact in the nursing students and how it is their development. It was detected that the Teaching of Bioethics was found at the final years of study, third and forth grade, a similar issue that happens with Research. Concluding that both are inserted very late being fundamental issues that students must know at the beginnings of their Nursing studies.

Ivonne Brevis-Urrutia; Olivia Sanhueza-Alvarado

2007-01-01

253

Characteristics and outcomes of patients subject to intensive care nurse consultant review in a teaching hospital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution of our Intensive Care Nurse Consultant (ICNC) service, the characteristics and outcomes of the patients reviewed, and interventions performed. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective observational study in a tertiary referral university-affiliated teaching hospital among all patients reviewed by the ICNC service between September 2007 and December 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number and characteristics of patients reviewed, source of referral, interventions performed, inhospital mortality and hospital length of stay. RESULTS: Since August 2006, operating hours have increased and provision has been made for senior ICU nurses to undertake 6-month developmental allocations to the role. The name of the service was changed and a weekly report was commenced to capture patient referral source, and subsequent ICU medical referral. Additional changes included provision of an administration day, and use of an ICU discharge scoring tool. A total of 3118 (2278 post-ICU and 840 non-ICU) care episodes were provided by the ICNC service between September 2007 and December 2009. Median patient age was 64 years, inhospital mortality was about 9% and most reviews occurred in surgical patients and after ICU discharge. Most new ward referrals came from an ICU doctor or ward nurse, with few referrals from ward doctors. Communication with ward nurses was more common than with ward doctors. A common recommendation involved fluid and electrolyte management. In-hospital mortality was higher among patients entering the service after review by a medical emergency team or de-novo referral than in patients after ICU discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Most interventions are relatively simple, and the ICNC role may be augmented by limited rights to prescribe electrolyte replacement. The effect of the intervention on patient outcomes and the reproducibility of our findings in other hospitals remain to be determined.

McIntyre T; Taylor C; Reade M; Jones DA; Baldwin I

2013-06-01

254

Development of quality standards in inflammatory bowel disease management and design of an evaluation tool of nursing care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Background and aims: nursing management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is highly relevant for patient care and outcomes. However, there is evidence of substantial variability in clinical practices. The objectives of this study were to develop standards of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD and elaborate the evaluation tool "Nursing Care Quality in IBD Assessment" (NCQ-IBD) based on these standards.Methods: a 178-item healthcare quality questionnaire was developed based on a systematic review of IBD nursing management literature. The questionnaire was used to perform two 2-round Delphi studies: Delphi A included 27 IBD healthcare professionals and Delphi B involved 12 patients. The NCQ-IBD was developed from the list of items resulting from both Delphi studies combined with the Scientific Committee´s expert opinion.Results: the final NCQ-IBD consists of 90 items, organized in13 sections measuring the following aspects of nursing management of IBD: infrastructure, services, human resources, type of organization, nursing responsibilities, nurse-provided information to the patient, nurses training, annual audits of nursing activities, and nursing research in IBD. Using the NCQ-IBD to evaluate these components allows the rating of healthcare quality for nursing management of IBD into 4 categories: A (highest quality) through D (lowest quality).Conclusion: the use of the NCQ-IBD tool to evaluate nursing management quality of IBD identifies areas in need of improvement and thus contribute to an enhancement of care quality and reduction in clinical practice variations.

Torrejón A; Oltra L; Hernández-Sampelayo P; Marín L; García-Sánchez V; Casellas F; Alfaro N; Lázaro P; Vera MI

2013-05-01

255

Breast cancer risk factor knowledge among nurses in teaching hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in both the developed and the developing world. The incidence of breast cancer in Karachi, Pakistan is 69.1 per 100,000 with breast cancer presentation in stages III and IV being common (? 50%). The most pragmatic solution to early detection lies in breast cancer education of women. Nurses constitute a special group having characteristics most suited for disseminating breast cancer information to the women. We assessed the level of knowledge of breast cancer risk factors among registered female nurses in teaching hospitals of Karachi. We also identified whether selected factors among nurses were associated with their knowledge of breast cancer risk factors, so that relevant measures to improve knowledge of nurses could be implemented. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in seven teaching hospitals of Karachi using stratified random sampling with proportional allocation. A total of 609 registered female nurses were interviewed using a structured questionnaire adapted from the Stager's Comprehensive Breast Cancer Knowledge Test. Knowledge of breast cancer risk factors was categorized into good, fair and poor categories. Ordinal regression was used to identify factors associated with risk knowledge among nurses. Results Thirty five percent of nurses had good knowledge of risk factors. Graduates from private nursing schools (aOR = 4.23, 95% CI: 2.93, 6.10), nurses who had cared for breast cancer patients (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.99), those having received a breast examination themselves (aOR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.26) or those who ever examined a patient's breast (aOR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.34, 2.61) were more likely to have good knowledge. Conclusion A relatively small proportion of the nursing population had good level of knowledge of the breast cancer risk factors. This knowledge is associated with nursing school status, professional breast cancer exposure and self history of clinical breast examination. Since only about one-third of the nurses had good knowledge about risk factors, there is a need to introduce breast cancer education in nursing schools particularly in the public sector. Continuing nursing education at the workplace can be of additional benefit.

Ahmed Faiza; Mahmud Sadia; Hatcher Juanita; Khan Shaista M

2006-01-01

256

Factors and Conditions that Influence the Implementation of Standardized Nursing Care Plans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

RATIONALE AND AIM: There is a lack of evidence about how to successfully implement standardized nursing care plans (SNCP) in various settings. The aim of this study was to use the "Promotion Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework" (PARIHS) to explore important factors and conditions at hospital wards that had implemented SNCPs. METHOD: We employed a retrospective, cross-sectional design and recruited nurses from four units at a rural hospital and seven units at a university hospital in the western and southern region of Sweden where SNCPs had been implemented. Outcome was measured by means of a questionnaire based on the PARIHS-model. RESULT: In total, 137 nurses participated in the study. The main factors that had motivated the nurses to implement SNCPs were that they were easy to understand and follow as well as corresponding to organisational norms. The SNCPs were normally based on clinical experience, although research more frequently formed the basis of the SNCPs at the university hospital. Internal facilitators acted as important educators, who provided reminders to use the SNCP and feedback to the SNCP users. The patient experience was not considered valuable. Those who claimed that the implementation was successful were generally more positive in all measurable aspects. The use of SNCPs was rarely evaluated. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical experience was considered important by the nurses, while they attributed little value to the patient experiences. Successful implementation of research based SNCPs requires internal facilitators with knowledge of evidence-based nursing.

Jansson I; Bahtsevani C; Pilhammar-Andersson E; Forsberg A

2010-01-01

257

The Stirling model of nursing audit. Its relationship to standard setting and quality assurance.  

Science.gov (United States)

Setting up nursing audit can be a daunting prospect. Once done, however, it can provide information about the effectiveness and quality of care. This article describes how audit can be integrated into quality assurance and standard setting initiatives already underway. PMID:2020677

Morison, M J

1991-04-01

258

The Technology Teaching Lab: Meeting the ISTE Standards.  

Science.gov (United States)

The technology teaching lab program at Ohio State University at Mansfield is a series of 2-hour labs that runs concurrently with preservice methods blocks. The purpose of the lab is to give the students the experience necessary to integrate technology into their classroom. The lab provides the students with instruction, opportunities, and…

Bucci, Terri Teal

259

Teaching about Sexuality: Balancing Contradictory Social Messages with Professional Standards  

Science.gov (United States)

Human sexuality is taught in a number of public middle and high schools within the United States. Teachers report less professional preparation and training in this area and difficulties associated with teaching what is considered to be a sensitive subject. In the current paper, we review the nature by which sexuality education is positioned…

Walters, Andrew S.; Hayes, David M.

2007-01-01

260

Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of recent developments in medical and nursing education have highlighted the importance of communication and consultation skills (CCS). Although such skills are taught in all medical and nursing undergraduate curriculums, there is no comprehensive screening or assessment programme of CCS using professionally trained Standardized Patients Educators (SPE's) in Ireland. This study was designed to test the content, process and acceptability of a screening programme in CCS with Irish medical and nursing students using trained SPE's and a previously validated global rating scale for CCS. Methods Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5) and sixty four nursing students (Year 2/3 of 4) were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE's for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning. Results Almost three quarters of medical students (33/46; 72%) and 81% of nursing students (56/64) passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language. Conclusions A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.

Ryan C Anthony; Walshe Nuala; Gaffney Robert; Shanks Andrew; Burgoyne Louise; Wiskin Connie M

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Standards and network for quality control in nursing for pressure sore management  

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Full Text Available The decubitus expertise standard by the Network for Quality Control in Nursing was published in 2000. In practice, however, the implementation status differs greatly from field to field. The present paper, in addition to addressing this situation, also processes and explains decubitus prevention in practical application based on the new expertise standard. Focus is placed on the individually manageable elements, such as pressure, mobility, skin care, nourishment, perception promotion, communication/interaction, and individuality.

Loczenski, Barbara

2006-01-01

262

The critical role of nurses to the successful implementation of the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards requires health service compliance by 2013 and covers several areas including governance arrangements, partnerships with consumers and eight key clinical processes. Nurses in Australia comprise 62% of the hospital workforce, are the largest component and hence play a critical role in meeting these standards and improving the quality of patient care. Several of the standards are influenced by nursing interventions, which incorporate any direct-care treatment that the nurse performs for a patient that may be nurse or physician initiated. The ability for nurses to undertake these interventions is influenced by the hours of care available, the skill mix of the nursing workforce and the environment in which they practice. Taking into consideration the predicted nursing shortages, the challenge to successfully implement the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards will be great. This paper examines the role of nursing in the delivery of the National Standards, analyses the evidence with regard to nursing-sensitive outcomes and discusses the implications for health service decision makers and policy.

Twigg DE; Duffield C; Evans G

2013-09-01

263

[Nurses, teachers and pioneers: the students and permanent teaching staff at the opening of International School of Nursing in Lyon in 1965].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

On the initiative of the World health organization, the international School of nursing university education opens in Lyon on September the 6th, 1965 and closes 30 years later. After having approached the national and international context of this creation, the study, based on archives and contemporary printed sources and various interviews of living witnesses, boarding and teaching, only-female staff present at the opening of the School, shows that it's all about pioneers and activists to the nursing cause, each of them doing it her own way. The background, the training, the personality, the educational choices and the publications of most of them give evidence of their will to contribute actively to the development and valuation of nursing as a discipline without naming it, by being inspired by foreign experiences well ahead of the french situation at the time. Good intentions to confront with the complex reality of the stakes and games of the numerous actors involved in those years realization.

Poisson M

2012-06-01

264

[Application of clinical nursing path in standard management of advanced schistosomiasis patients with splenomegaly].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To study the feasibility and effect of clinical nursing path in the standard management of advanced schistosomiasis patients with splenomegaly. METHODS: A total of 64 advanced schistosomiasis patients with splenomegaly were randomly divided into a routine nursing group (control group) and a clinical nursing pathway group (CNP group), and the postoperative situation, average hospitalization days, cost of hospitalization and the satisfaction of the patients of the 2 groups were compared. RESULTS: The complications, average hospitalization days, costs of hospitalization in the CNP group were significantly decreased compared with those in the control group, and satisfaction rate of the patients in the CNP group increased from 81.25% to 100%. CONCLUSION: The implementation of CNP effectively reduces the length of hospitalization, costs and complications, and improves the satisfaction of the patients.

Yang L; Liu JJ

2013-04-01

265

Nurse endoscopists perform colonoscopies according to the international standard and with high patient satisfaction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Colonoscopy is increasingly performed by nurse endoscopists. We aimed to assess the endoscopic quality and patient experience of these procedures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective multicenter study analyzed 100 consecutive colonoscopies each for 10 trained nurse endoscopists with respect to endoscopic quality and patient experience. Colonoscopies were performed under the supervision of a gastroenterologist, using the techniques and protocols of the participating hospitals. Patient experience was assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS: Most nurse endoscopists were female (90?%; median age 43 [range 35?-?49]). Before the start of the study, they had performed a median of 528 colonoscopies (range 208?-?2103). For the 1000 patients, mean age was 56 ± 15 years; 55?% were women; and 96?% were in class I or II according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status classification system. Colonoscopies were performed for screening or surveillance in 42?%; for symptomatic indications in 58?% of patients. The unassisted cecal intubation rate was 94?%; the mean withdrawal time was 10?±?5 minutes. The adenoma detection rate was 26.7?%. In 229 of the colonoscopies (23?%), the nurse endoscopists required assistance from the supervising gastroenterologist. The complication rate was 0.2?%: one perforation and one cardiopulmonary complication. The questionnaire was completed by 734?/1000 patients (73?%) and of these 694?/734 (95?%) were satisfied with the endoscopic procedure. Among the respondents 530?/734 (72?%) had no specific preference for a physician or nurse endoscopist, whereas 113?/734 (15?%) preferred a physician endoscopist, and 91?/734 (12?%) preferred a nurse endoscopist. CONCLUSION: The nurse endoscopists performed colonoscopies according to the internationally recognized quality standards and with high patient satisfaction.

van Putten PG; Ter Borg F; Adang RP; Koornstra JJ; Romberg-Camps MJ; Timmer R; Poen AC; Kuipers EJ; Van Leerdam ME

2012-12-01

266

Online teaching and learning in a graduate course In nursing education  

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Full Text Available Information technology has a potential to be the answer to one of Africa’s most pressing problems- providing education to a number of geographically dispersed learners, who currently have to leave their countries for a number of years in order to pursue their studies elsewhere. The School of Nursing at the University of Natal launched an online graduate course in nursing education at the beginning of the year 2000 for the first time as part of a masters degree programme. A number of lessons have been learned from this experience. Firstly, it took too long to arrive at ‘closure’ on discussion of any one particular theme. There seemed to be a perpetual feeling of never “completing” teaching/learning tasks. Ordinarily, in a face-to-face (f2f) classroom, a particular theme or topic is scheduled for a particular lecture period. More often than not, whether clarity and/or resolution has been attained, the discussion moves on to the next theme, or topic. This has not been easy to do in computer mediated communication (CMC). The students’ contributions, however, seemed more thought out and more focused than had been the case in the f2f classes. Secondly, the essentiality/importance of structure became apparent very early. After an initial tentative and slow start, once the students felt comfortable with the computer “classroom” , the bulletin board was flooded with messages, necessitating re-thinking the original structure.

NS Gwele

2000-01-01

267

Do you want to play? Factors influencing nurse academics' adoption of simulation in their teaching practices.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Simulation based education (SBE) in healthcare is gaining popularity. It provides an opportunity for students to acquire and practice clinical skills in a safe and controlled environment and is also a potential solution to alleviating the increasing pressure on clinical placement availability. While there is growing evidence of the value of simulation to learners there is little understanding of the factors that influence academics attitudes towards and choices about the use simulation. Through an exploratory research design using semi-structured interviews, nurse academics' opinions, experiences and attitudes regarding simulation were captured. Thematic analysis was conducted utilising a cross comparative approach. Three themes Simulation as a Separate Entity; Getting Political, and Academic Adaptation were identified. These themes were then explored through the five essential characteristics of innovation identified in the persuasion phase of Roger's Diffusion of Innovation Model (1995). The findings indicated that in order to successfully integrate simulation into a university curriculum, the factors influencing nurse academics' attitudes and choices around simulation must be understood and addressed to avoid fragmentation of teaching and learning and to support strong learning outcomes.

Miller A; Bull RM

2013-03-01

268

'I thought I was just going to teach'- stories of new nurse academics on transitioning from essional teaching to continuing academic positions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Abstract Currently many nursing faculties and schools employ high numbers of sessional teachers to meet the demands of teaching. Sessional teachers are a source for future continuing academic staff; however, there is little exploration on the experiences of sessional teachers as they transition into the full-time nurse academic role. A qualitative study of 14 Registered nurse participants used a storytelling approach to explore the experiences of sessional teachers as they transitioned into full-time and continuing academic roles. Findings revealed that participants had only a very limited understanding of the requirements of the academic role when appointed to it. Thematic analysis revealed two major themes. These were: 'Uncertainty: Dealing with role expectation', and 'Mitigating lack of confidence'. The implications of this paper contributes to and enhances knowledge of the transition experiences of sessional teachers and provides new evidence to suggest that adequate support processes are essential for sessional staff transitioning into permanent, full-time academic positions.

McDermid F; Peters K; Daly J; Jackson D

2013-03-01

269

Nursing satisfaction after standardizing the chronic wounds care  

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Full Text Available The Management of Primary Attention of Ciudad Real and the Management of Area of Puertollano elaborated, jointly during year 2005, Manual in Prevention and a Treatment of Chronic Wounds with the objective to standardize and to protocol the welfare practice in this matter. During the month of February of 2006 an anonymous survey with 6 questions is elaborated to know the satisfaction the professionals after the implantation of this tool, presented/displayed a cross-sectional descriptive study that throws the following global results: The necessity to implant a manual is valued with 8,97 on 10. The format of pocket chosen for the manual is valued with 8,94 on 10. The presentation of the manual is valued with 8.88 on 10. Speakers are valued with 8,63 on 10. The contents of the manual obtain a score of 8.90 on 10. The utility of the manual is valued with 8.87 on 10.The results indicate that the professionals demanded a tool that standardized the clinical practice in the prevention and treatment of chronic wounds. It seems to be that it has been guessed right in the format of the same one (pocket) and emphasizes the utility that they give the same one, although statistically significantly appear differences between both managements.

Francisco José García Sánchez; Elena González Urraca; Francisco López Salazar; Mª Carmen Martínez García; Mª Pilar Romero Valverde; José María Flores López-Ibarra

2009-01-01

270

Shifting the Emphasis from Teaching to Learning: Process-Based Assessment in Nurse Education  

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Full Text Available Shifting from an emphasis on teaching to learning is a complex task for both teachers and students. This paper reports on a qualitative study of teachers in a nurse specialist education programme meeting this shift in a distance education course. The study aimed to gain a better understanding of the teacher-student relationship by addressing research questions in relation to the students’ role, the learning process, and the assessment process. A didactical design comprising three phases focusing on distinct learning outcomes for the course was adopted. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with teachers and were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The results indicate a shift towards a problematising and holistic approach to teaching, learning, and assessment. This shift highlighted a teacher-student relationship with a shared responsibility in the orchestration of the learning experience. The overall picture outlines a distance education experience of process-based assessment characterised by the imposition of teachers’ rules and a lack of creativity due to the limited role of ICT merely as a container of content.Distance education; higher education; e-learning

Peter Bergstrom

2011-01-01

271

An initiative to teach family systems nursing using online health-promoting conversations: A multi-methods evaluation  

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Full Text Available Background: Family systems nursing embraces the view that one family member’s illness affects other family members and vice versa. Family nursing developed as a way for nurses to work with families to promote health. Previously, teachers performed most of the education on health-promoting conversations with families on campus. Because online education is increasingly requested in nursing, this article evaluates teaching family systems nursing by using synchronous online health-promoting conversations. Methods: Fifteen registered nurses attended the course “Health-Promoting Family Focused Nursing”, an advanced-level nursing elective 10-week course. The course used technology enhanced learning and was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Students and teachers participated in semi-structured focus group interviews analyzed qualitatively. The students filled in a traditional course evaluation. Students responded before and after the course to the multidimensional research instrument “Families’ Importance in Nursing Care—Nurse’s Attitudes” (FINC-NA). Results: The students were satisfied with the course and the synchronous health-promoting conversations. They learned to “think family” and acknowledged the importance of inviting families to take part in the care of a family member. They stated that the online practice had helped them gain a useful tool for their future family nursing practice. The teachers appreciated working in a team to develop the course. At the start of the project they viewed the online technology as a challenge. However, during the course they saw many pedagogical possibilities with the synchronous meetings and that the online family conversation training worked well. The ability to record the meetings offered educational advantages and the opportunity for students to reflect on the conversations. Even if the students rated families importance in nursing care positively prior to the course on FINC-NA, the students still gave the following domains even stronger support post-course: Family as a resource in nursing care, Family as a burden, and Family as own resource. Conclusions: Family systems nursing and health-promoting conversations with families, comprising interaction between several participants, can be learned using online pedagogical methods. Furthermore, the belief that health-promoting family conversations need to be held with all participants in the same room has been challenged.

Lindh R. Viveca; Persson V. Chatrin; Saveman Britt Inger; Englund Claire J; Idberger Karl; Östlund E.A. Ulrika

2012-01-01

272

[Regulatory standard 32 and its implications for nursing workers].  

Science.gov (United States)

Workers in health care institutions often face inappropriate work situations without considering them as dangerous, however, even if scientific evidence demonstrates the presence of various occupational risk agents in work environments. This text aimed to present Regulatory Standard (RS) 32, about Safety and Health at Work in Health Care Institutions. This RS is important in the Brazilian scenario, due to the absence of federal legislation about work safety and health issues in the health sector and due to the fact that existing regulations are dispersed and joined with other RS and resolutions, which were not developed specifically for this purpose. It is concluded that the implantation of this RS may result in beneficial changes, since protection procedures and measures will have to be taken, promoting safety at work and occupational accident prevention among health workers. PMID:15717085

Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci

2005-01-13

273

Primary health care nurses' knowledge practice and client teaching of early detection measures of breast cancer in Ibadan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Early detection of breast cancer is vital to effective management and outcome of breast cancer. It has been suggested that women given information and instruction about breast self- examination and breast awareness by health care professionals demonstrated higher knowledge and confidence and tend to practice breast self-examination more than those who received information from other sources. Breast Self-Examination (BSE) and Clinical Breast Examination (CBE) have been recommended as Early Detection Measures (EDM) for developing countries. This study evaluated Primary Health Care (PHC) nurses' knowledge, practice and client teaching of EDM of breast cancer. METHODS: A descriptive study that utilized stratified random method to select PHC settings for the study. Data was collected from 120 trained nurses in selected settings. This represented 66.3% of total population of PHC nurses (181) in Ibadan. The instrument for data collection was a structured questionnaire that explored the bio data of participants, knowledge, practice and client teaching of EDMs of breast cancer. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethical Review Committee of Oyo State Ministry of Health, Nigeria. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 44.4±7.5 years. About half (52.2%) were double qualified (Registered Nurse and Midwife). Only 23 (20.0%) of the participants considered painless lump as an early sign of breast cancer while 47 (40.9%) considered pain as an early sign. BSE was listed as EDM of breast cancer by 80.9% of the participants while 40% and 30% listed CBE and mammogram respectively. Only eight (7.9%) have had a mammogram. The logistic regression of client teaching on four variables showed that for every increase in knowledge of breast cancer the odds of client teaching significantly increased by 7.5% (95% CI = 1.27 - 1.125). There were also significant relationships between knowledge of EDM, practice of BSE and client teaching. CONCLUSIONS: It is vital that attention should be given to enhance breast cancer EDMs among the PHC nurses to be able to enhance health deviation self-care of the clients. Nurses' knowledge, practice as well as client teaching especially at PHC level, will contribute to early detection of breast cancer.

Oluwatosin O

2012-01-01

274

Factors influencing nurses' compliance with Standard Precautions in order to avoid occupational exposure to microorganisms: A focus group study  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Nurses may acquire an infection during the provision of nursing care because of occupational exposure to microorganisms. Relevant literature reports that, compliance with Standard Precautions (a set of guidelines that can protect health care professionals from being exposed to microorganisms) is low among nurses. Additionally, high rates of exposure to microorganisms among nurses via several modes (needlesticks, hand contamination with blood, exposure to air-transmitted microorganisms) occur. The aim of the study was to study the factors that influence nurses' compliance with Standard Precaution in order to avoid occupational exposure to pathogens, by employing a qualitative research design. Method A focus group approach was used to explore the issue under study. Four focus groups (N = 30) were organised to elicit nurses' perception of the factors that influence their compliance with Standard Precautions. The Health Belief Model (HBM) was used as the theoretical framework and the data were analysed according to predetermined criteria. Results Following content analysis, factors that influence nurses' compliance emerged. Most factors could be applied to one of the main domains of the HBM: benefits, barriers, severity, susceptibility, cues to action, and self-efficacy. Conclusions Changing current behavior requires knowledge of the factors that may influence nurses' compliance with Standard Precautions. This knowledge will facilitate in the implementation of programs and preventive actions that contribute in avoiding of occupational exposure.

Efstathiou Georgios; Papastavrou Evridiki; Raftopoulos Vasilios; Merkouris Anastasios

2011-01-01

275

Concept maps to solve clinical cases as a teaching and learning strategy to be explored in nursing education: an essay  

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Full Text Available The essay sustains the strategy of creating Concept Maps (CM) to solve clinical cases due to its strength to evidence the undergraduates’ cognitive processes regarding their capacity to generate effective responses when solving problems, a condition that is essential to clinical competence of nurses. Concept Maps are tools that can lead to changes in the way of teaching, evaluating, and learning. In addition, they promote significant learning and using CM to their complete potentiality implies to attribute new meanings to the concepts of teaching, learning, and evaluating.  

Edvane Birelo Lopes De Domenico; Stela Conceição Bertholo Piconez; Maria Gaby Rivero de Gutierréz

2009-01-01

276

Refocusing acute psychiatry, performance management, standards and accountability, a new context for mental health nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The term 'performance management' has an aversive 'managerial' aspect, is unappealing to many public sector staff and has an 'image problem'. Perhaps as a consequence, it has failed to make a significant impact on Irish public sector workers, notably mental health nurses. In this paper, performance management is introduced and examined within an Irish healthcare context and with reference to its use in other countries. Some of the challenges faced by Irish mental health nurses and the potential benefits of working within a performance managed workplace are discussed. The paper concludes that performance management is likely to increasingly affect nurses, either as active agents or as passive recipients of a change that is thrust on them. The authors anticipate that the performance management 'image problem' will give way to recognition that this is a fundamental change which has the potential to enable health services to change. This change will bring high standards of transparency, worker involvement in decision making, an explicit value base for health services and individual teams. It provides the potential for clear practice standards and high standards of transparency as well as worker welfare in all aspects, including supporting employment and career progression.

Harnett PJ; Bowles N; Coughlan A

2009-06-01

277

[Therapeutic relationship and teaching of mental health and psychiatric nursing: trends in the state of Sao Paulo].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study presents a panorama of the insertion of the thematic of therapeutic relationship and therapeutic communication in undergraduate courses in Nursing in the public universities of the State of São Paulo. This is a qualitative and descriptive-analytical research. Data was collected through a questionnaire applied on professors of the area of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health from 8 schools and grouped according to the institution, the disciplines, the program and the objectives of the practical activities and practical fields. It was verified that most schools include the therapeutic relationship in their teaching approach, which makes possible the rescue of Nursing as a profession that is concerned with the human being in his/her complexity, in which the know-how is directed to the respect of the patients' limitations, potentialities, needs and interpersonal relations.

Kantorski LP; de Pinho LB; Saeki T; de Mello e Souza MC

2005-09-01

278

Nursing  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The history of nursing in Sydney is central to understanding a range of issues including healthcare and gendered employment. This article is an introduction to nursing’s complex, fascinating and much neglected history in Sydney, Australia. Its focus is on hospitals as these have been, and remain, a ...

Judith Godden

279

Recovery of funds in transaction affecting ownership of federally assisted health professions and nurse teaching facilities--HRSA. Statement of general policy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

HRSA announces its recovery policy regarding purported leases and sales of (1) health professions teaching facilities or affiliated hospitals constructed with grant funds under Part B of Title VII of the Public Health Service Act, and (2) nurse teaching facilities constructed with grant funds under Title VIII of the Act.

1985-08-01

280

Toward standard classification schemes for nursing language: recommendations of the American Nurses Association Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The American Nurses Association (ANA) Cabinet on Nursing Practice mandated the formation of the Steering Committee on Databases to Support Clinical Nursing Practice. The Committee has established the process and the criteria by which to review and recommend nursing classification schemes based on th...

McCormick, K A; Lang, N; Zielstorff, R; Milholland, D K; Saba, V; Jacox, A

 
 
 
 
281

[Role-playing in the teaching-learning process of the nursing degree. Assessment of graduate (profesionals)].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To assess role-playing as a methodology in the teaching-learning process for the Nursing Degree. To identify the attitude of alumni (professionals) towards role-playing after entering the job market. INTRODUCTION: One of the worst fears of students is facing real situations that they will have to face soon, when they become professionals. Role-playing is a tool that allows the students act out real situations and reduce their concerns. PARTICIPANTS AND CONTEXT: Five alumni (nurses) from the Nursing School of the University of Alicante. Academic years 2006-2007 and 2007-2008. METHODOLOGY: The reflexive nature of qualitative research is based on symbolic interactionism. COLLECTION OF DATA-SUMMARIES: The subject category chosen is role-playing and it is sorted into subcategories and codes. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the analysis of the summaries have allowed us to see what actually happens when using role-playing as a teaching-learning tool in nursing, and what the consequences are for professionals, once they finish their studies.

Martínez Riera JR; Luis Cibanal J; Pérez Mora MJ

2011-07-01

282

Counselling and adverse event management for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes undergoing azacitidine therapy: a practice standard for Canadian nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Azacitidine (5-azacytidine, VIDAZA) is a disease-modifying agent that improves survival, reduces transfusion dependence, and reduces progression to acute myeloid leukemia in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Azacitidine injection is associated with characteristic adverse events (AEs) that must be managed in order for patients to stay on therapy and achieve optimal therapeutic outcomes. These AEs include injection-site reactions, cytopenias, and gastrointestinal effects. Oncology nurses are uniquely positioned to provide patient support and counselling, thereby helping patients and their families set clear expectations for azacitidine therapy. This article presents a nursing standard designed to support Canadian oncology nurses in the key areas of counselling for patients initiating and continuing azacitidine, as well as nursing strategies for prevention and management of azacitidine-associated AEs. Many of the general principles discussed in this nursing standard can be applied broadly to many diseases and treatments.

Murray C; Wereley A; Nixon S; Hua-Yung C; von Riedemann S; Kurtin S

2012-01-01

283

Counselling and adverse event management for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes undergoing azacitidine therapy: a practice standard for Canadian nurses.  

Science.gov (United States)

Azacitidine (5-azacytidine, VIDAZA) is a disease-modifying agent that improves survival, reduces transfusion dependence, and reduces progression to acute myeloid leukemia in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Azacitidine injection is associated with characteristic adverse events (AEs) that must be managed in order for patients to stay on therapy and achieve optimal therapeutic outcomes. These AEs include injection-site reactions, cytopenias, and gastrointestinal effects. Oncology nurses are uniquely positioned to provide patient support and counselling, thereby helping patients and their families set clear expectations for azacitidine therapy. This article presents a nursing standard designed to support Canadian oncology nurses in the key areas of counselling for patients initiating and continuing azacitidine, as well as nursing strategies for prevention and management of azacitidine-associated AEs. Many of the general principles discussed in this nursing standard can be applied broadly to many diseases and treatments. PMID:23362656

Murray, Cindy; Wereley, Annie; Nixon, Shannon; Hua-Yung, Carol; von Riedemann, Sarah; Kurtin, Sandra

2012-01-01

284

Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8  

Science.gov (United States)

The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

2012-01-01

285

Pitfalls, perils and payments: service user, carers and teaching staff perceptions of the barriers to involvement in nursing education.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: There is an impetus to involve service users and carers in the education of nurses and a general consensus in the literature about the benefits that this brings to all involved. Whilst these benefits are well rehearsed in the literature there is little written about the potential barriers to service user and carer involvement in nurse education. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate service users, carers and staff views on the potential barriers to becoming engaged in nurse education. DESIGN: A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGD) was used to canvas the views of service users, carers and teaching staff. SETTING: A large school of nursing in the North West of England. PARTICIPANTS: 38 service users and carers recruited from the North West of England and 23 nursing and midwifery teachers and lecturers. METHODS: Focus group discussions were employed as the main data collection method. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Six themes occurred in the data as being negatively associated with potential and actual involvement: not knowing the context of the group, lack of preparation of the group, not being supported, not being allowed to be real, not receiving feedback, not being paid appropriately. CONCLUSIONS: The process of involvement is not without difficulties. These data show that some consideration needs to be given to the potential barriers to involvement if the engagement of service users and carers is to be effective.

Speed S; Griffiths J; Horne M; Keeley P

2012-10-01

286

Using VARK to assess changes in learning preferences of nursing students at a public university in Jordan: Implications for teaching.  

Science.gov (United States)

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe learning styles of nursing students at a public University in Jordan. SAMPLE: A descriptive research design was used, a purposive sample of 197 nursing students who were enrolled in nursing summer courses. These students were at different academic levels. RESULTS: Almost 55% of students have a multimodal preference, about 60% of multimodal students have the kinesthetic learning preference (K) associated with visual or read write preference. The rest have one dominant learning preference. Of the 45% students who have one dominant preference: 60% had the kinesthetic preference as the dominant preference, and 40% had the auditory preference accompanied with another preference. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) revealed significant difference between students based on their academic level. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students have varied learning styles; teachers should accommodate their classes to meet the learning needs and styles of students. Multimodal learners can be more flexible about how they exchange information than those with a single preference. However, multimodal learners need to have at least two, three or four modes involved in learning before they are satisfied. Teachers at nursing program should use more than one teaching modality to be able to make their students satisfied with their learning experience. PMID:23454890

Alkhasawneh, Esraa

2013-02-27

287

Using VARK to assess changes in learning preferences of nursing students at a public university in Jordan: Implications for teaching.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe learning styles of nursing students at a public University in Jordan. SAMPLE: A descriptive research design was used, a purposive sample of 197 nursing students who were enrolled in nursing summer courses. These students were at different academic levels. RESULTS: Almost 55% of students have a multimodal preference, about 60% of multimodal students have the kinesthetic learning preference (K) associated with visual or read write preference. The rest have one dominant learning preference. Of the 45% students who have one dominant preference: 60% had the kinesthetic preference as the dominant preference, and 40% had the auditory preference accompanied with another preference. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) revealed significant difference between students based on their academic level. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students have varied learning styles; teachers should accommodate their classes to meet the learning needs and styles of students. Multimodal learners can be more flexible about how they exchange information than those with a single preference. However, multimodal learners need to have at least two, three or four modes involved in learning before they are satisfied. Teachers at nursing program should use more than one teaching modality to be able to make their students satisfied with their learning experience.

Alkhasawneh E

2013-02-01

288

The Slightly different (bio)physics – A new concept biophysics teaching for nursing / Biofyzika trochu inak - návrh novej koncepcie výu?by pre študiný program ošetrovate?stvo  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The biophysics is the teaching subject that is in health care study programs (e.g. nursing) considered by students as demanding, difficult to understand and useless. A new concept of teaching is based on an analysis of necessity of physical knowledge in nursing. The starting point for analysis were textbooks used for nursing university study – Nursing standards (Kontrová et al., 2005) and Nursing techniques. Methodology of nursing activities. (Krišková et al., 2006) In the teaching of biophysics is necessary to start from practical nursing activities that could be explain by physical phenomena, knowledge and laws. Therefore we recommend teaching of biophysics according to the following thematic areas: measurement of vital signs; medication; biological material sampling; patient handling and prevention of bedsores; enteral nutrition, catheters, probes and purification procedures; functional tests; life-saving procedures. We recommend problem solving teaching, when teacher leads students from nursing problems solving to their physical principle. Seminars could be used for strengthen of obtained knowledge. There students would solve the problem tasks. We assume that biophysics teaching as described in this study could help students to understand the applied physical knowledge and their necessity for nursing practice, improve their flexibility and comprehensive approach in solving practical nursing problems and improve their ability to use gained knowledge in further studies and nursing practice. Biofyzika je v štúdiu zdravotníckych študijných programov predmet, ktorý je študentmi ?asto považovaný za náro?ný, málo zrozumite?ný a zbyto?ný. Návrh novej koncepcie výu?by vychádza z analýzy potrieb fyzikálnych vedomostí v ošetrovate?skej praxi. Východiskom pre analýzu boli u?ebnice používané v štúdiu ošetrovate?stva – Ošetrovate?ské štandardy (Kontrová et al. 2005) a Ošetrovate?ské techniky. Metodika sesterských ?inností. (Krišková et al. 2006). Vo výu?be biofyziky je nutné vychádza? z praktických ?inností sestry, na ktorých je možné vysvetli? potrebné fyzikálne deje, poznatky a zákony. Preto biofyziku odporú?ame vyu?ova? v nasledovných siedmych tematických okruhoch: meranie vitálnych funkcií; podávanie liekov; odber biologického materiálu; manipulácia s pacientom a prevencia proti dekubitom; enterálna výživa, katétre, sondy a o?istné procedúry; funk?né vyšetrenia; život zachra?ujúce výkony. Odporú?ame uprednostni? problémové vyu?ovanie, ktoré by malo by? orientované v smere od ošetrovate?ského problému k vysvetleniu fyzikálneho poznatku. Na preh?benie a upevnenie u?iva je vhodné využi? semináre, na ktorých by študenti riešili problémové úlohy. Predpokladáme, že biofyzika vyu?ovaná spôsobom opísaným v štúdii by mohla študentom pomôc? pochopi? fyzikálne poznatky a ich potrebu pre ošetrovate?skú prax, zlepši? ich flexibilnos? a komplexný prístup pri riešení problémov a zdokonali? schopnos? používa? získané poznatky v ?alšom štúdiu a v zdravotníckej praxi.

Zuzana Balázsiová

2011-01-01

289

A survey of ward nurses attitudes to the Intensive Care Nurse Consultant service in a teaching hospital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of an Intensive Care Nurse Consultant (ICNC) service is to optimise care of complex ward patients and reduce adverse events. Despite their widespread implementation, specific assessment of ward nurses' attitudes towards such is lacking. Accordingly, we surveyed ward nurses' attitudes towards our ICNC service in five domains: (a) accessibility and approachability; (b) perceived ICNC skill and knowledge; (c) perceived influence on patient management; (d) usefulness as a resource of clinical information; (e) impact upon adverse outcomes. To achieve this, an anonymous Liker-type questionnaire was distributed to 208 ward nurses in our hospital. We also included space for free text. Completed questionnaires were entered manually into a SURVEYMONKEY™ pro-forma to permit automatic report generation and results summary. The major findings were that ICNC staff were perceived as being approachable and good communicators, were skilled at early detection of deteriorating patients, and that they reduce serious adverse events. In addition, nurses believe the ICNC service provides continuity of care post discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU), as well as assisting staff to prioritise clinical issues following medical emergency team (MET) review or ICU discharge. The ward nurses did not believe that the ICNC service reduced their skills in managing ward patients. In contrast, respondents stated that the ICNC service needed to improve the processes of referral to allied health and education of ward staff regarding deteriorating patients. Finally, ward nurses suggest they would call the MET service rather than the ICNC service for patients who had already deteriorated. This survey suggests that the ICNC service is valued, and is perceived to prevent the development of adverse events, rather than playing a major role in the management of the deteriorating patient. There is a need to improve referrals to allied health and further educate ward nurses.

McIntyre T; Taylor C; Eastwood GM; Jones D; Baldwin I; Bellomo R

2012-05-01

290

Standardized Patients to Teaching Medical Students about Intimate Partner Violence  

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Full Text Available Objective: To use 360-degree evaluations within an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to assess medical student comfort level and communication skills with intimate partner violence (IPV) patients.Methods: We assessed a cohort of fourth year medical students’ performance using an IPV standardized patient (SP) encounter in an OSCE. Blinded pre- and post-tests determined the students’ knowledge and comfort level with core IPV assessment. Students, SPs and investigators completed a 360-degree evaluation that focused on each student’s communication and competency skills. We computed frequencies, means and correlations.Results: Forty-one students participated in the SP exercise during three separate evaluation periods. Results noted insignificant increase in students’ comfort level pre-test (2.7) and post-test (2.9). Although 88% of students screened for IPV and 98% asked about the injury, only 39% asked about verbal abuse, 17% asked if the patient had a safety plan, and 13% communicated to the patient that IPV is illegal. Using Likert scoring on the competency and overall evaluation (1, very poor and 5, very good), the mean score for each evaluator was 4.1 (competency) and 3.7 (overall). The correlations between trainee comfort level and the specific competencies of patient care, communication skill and professionalism were positive and significant (p<0.05).Conclusion: Students felt somewhat comfortable caring for patients with IPV. OSCEs with SPs can be used to assess student competencies in caring for patients with IPV. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5):500-505.

Heron, Sheryl L; Ander, Douglas S; Houry, Debra; Hassani, Dahlia M; Quest, Tammie

2010-01-01

291

Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined

1984-01-01

292

Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation  

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The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined.

Nickson, K.

1984-03-01

293

US Cancer Center Implementation of ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Because cancer chemotherapy is a high-risk intervention, ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) established in 2009 consensus- and evidence-based national standards for the safe administration of chemotherapy. We sought to assess the implementation status of the ASCO/ONS chemotherapy administration safety standards. METHODS: A written survey of chemotherapy practices was sent to National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers. Implementation status of each of 31 chemotherapy administration safety standards was self-reported. RESULTS: Forty-four (80%) of 55 eligible centers responded. Although the majority of centers have fully implemented at least half of the standards, only four centers reported full implementation of all 31. Implementation varied by standard, with the poorest implementation of standards that addressed documentation of chemotherapy planning, agreed-on intervals for laboratory testing, and patient education and consent before initiation of oral or infusional chemotherapy. CONCLUSION: Given wide variation in the implementation of ASCO/ONS chemotherapy administration safety standards at US cancer centers, there are significant opportunities for improvement.

Weingart SN; Li JW; Zhu J; Morway L; Stuver SO; Shulman LN; Hassett MJ

2012-01-01

294

Nurse taking care and teaching to the family of the client with gastrostomy in home scene . Preview note  

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Full Text Available The client that suffered a gastrostomy needs the full attention of a stomaterapist nurse. This support starts with the feeding tube installation and should be followed in homecare attention by motivating the family to take part of this process, giving them the necessary support, teaching how to manage the feeding tube, how to handle it in the process of feeding the client and also the physical and emotional care required in order to prevent difficulties and contributing effectively to the health promotion, maintenance and rehabilitation of the client in the family scenario. The aim of this work is to know the new possibilities of innovation in the nurse’s practice and teaching when attending the gastrostomy client’s family, identifying the needs of the family in this kind of care in the family scenario and elaborating a homecare program to the family of a gastrostomy client. It is a qualitative research which will count with: a selection of clients submitted to gastrostomy in the Video-Endo Clinic; home visits evaluations by participative observation of the family scenario conditions to attend the clients´s needs; orientations with practical demonstrations of care actions with the client in nutritional support by gastrostomy, thorough the identification of the family’s needs concerned the client care, by analyzing the interviews and observation, and the elaboration of a homecare program for these

Vera Lúcia de Castro Périssé; Fátima Helena Espírito Santo

2007-01-01

295

Nursing Dynamics  

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Full Text Available Prof. Marie Muller is the Chairperson of the Department of Nursing at the Rand Afrikaans University where she has been teaching the subject Nursing Administration and Nursing Dynamics for more than fourteen years. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Rosemarie Troskie

1997-01-01

296

Mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in the north-west of Iran.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Stigma is one of the obstacles in the treatment and regaining the mental health of people with mental illness. The aim was determination of mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards. This study was conducted in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in Tabriz, Urmia, and Ardabil in the north-west of Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This research is a descriptive analysis study in which 80 nurses participated. A researcher-made questionnaire was used, which measured demographic characteristics and mental illness stigma in the three components of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral. All data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and descriptive and analytical statistics. RESULTS: Majority of nurses (72.5%) had medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness. About half of them (48.8%) had great inclination toward the social isolation of patients. The majority of them (62.5%) had positive emotional responses and 27.5% had stereotypical views. There was a significant correlation between experience of living with and kinship of nurses to person with mental illness, with prejudice toward and discrimination of patients. There was also a significant correlation between interest in the continuation of work in the psychiatric ward and prejudice, and also between educational degree and stereotypical views. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest there is a close correlation between the personal experience of nurses and existence of mental illness stigma among them. Therefore, the implementation of constant educational programs on mental illness for nurses and opportunities for them to have direct contact with treated patients is suggested.

Ebrahimi H; Namdar H; Vahidi M

2012-11-01

297

Teaching Core Competencies of Reconstructive Microsurgery With the Use of Standardized Patients.  

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The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education has defined 6 core competencies that residents must master before completing their training. Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) using standardized patients are effective educational tools to assess and teach core competencies. We developed an OSCE specific for microsurgical head and neck reconstruction. Fifteen plastic surgery residents participated in the OSCE simulating a typical new patient consultation, which involved a patient with oral cancer. Residents were scored in all 6 core competencies by the standardized patients and faculty experts. Analysis of participant performance showed that although residents performed well overall, many lacked proficiency in systems-based practice. Junior residents were also more likely to omit critical elements of the physical examination compared to senior residents. We have modified our educational curriculum to specifically address these deficiencies. Our study demonstrates that the OSCE is an effective assessment tool for teaching and assessing all core competencies in microsurgery. PMID:23486137

Son, Ji; Zeidler, Kamakshi R; Echo, Anthony; Otake, Leo; Ahdoot, Michael; Lee, Gordon K

2013-03-11

298

The use of computers to teach human anatomy and physiology to allied health and nursing students  

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Educational institutions are under tremendous pressure to adopt the newest technologies in order to prepare their students to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century. For the last twenty years huge amounts of money have been spent on computers, printers, software, multimedia projection equipment, and so forth. A reasonable question is, "Has it worked?" Has this infusion of resources, financial as well as human, resulted in improved learning? Are the students meeting the intended learning goals? Any attempt to develop answers to these questions should include examining the intended goals and exploring the effects of the changes on students and faculty. This project investigated the impact of a specific application of a computer program in a community college setting on students' attitudes and understanding of human anatomy and physiology. In this investigation two sites of the same community college with seemingly similar students populations, seven miles apart, used different laboratory activities to teach human anatomy and physiology. At one site nursing students were taught using traditional dissections and laboratory activities; at the other site two of the dissections, specifically cat and sheep pluck, were replaced with the A.D.A.M.RTM (Animated Dissection of Anatomy for Medicine) computer program. Analysis of the attitude data indicated that students at both sites were extremely positive about their laboratory experiences. Analysis of the content data indicated a statistically significant difference in performance between the two sites in two of the eight content areas that were studied. For both topics the students using the computer program scored higher. A detailed analysis of the surveys, interviews with faculty and students, examination of laboratory materials, and observations of laboratory facilities in both sites, and cost-benefit analysis led to the development of seven recommendations. The recommendations call for action at the level of the institution requiring investment in additional resources, and at the level of the faculty requiring a commitment to exploration and reflective practice.

Bergeron, Valerie J.

299

[Historical perspectives of the Genome Project and the evolution of nursing].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article aims to draw a historical view of the main transformations that are happening in nursing after the completion of the Genome Project. We present current information about genetics, the Human Genome Project, genomic research and their interface within nursing practice, as well as vanguard proposals in various important research areas for nurses. Furthermore, we describe the emergence of a new specialization area in nursing, nursing in genetics, and the International Society for Nurses in Genetics, which standardizes its professional exercise. Finally, we present some recent research data, aimed at integrating genetics and, consequently, genomics in nursing teaching, research and care.

Flória-Santos M; Nascimento LC

2006-05-01

300

Standardization is superior to traditional methods of teaching open vascular simulation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Standardizing surgical skills teaching has been proposed as a method to rapidly attain technical competence. This study compared acquisition of vascular skills by standardized vs traditional teaching methods. METHODS: The study randomized 18 first-year surgical residents to a standardized or traditional group. Participants were taught technical aspects of vascular anastomosis using femoral anastomosis simulation (Limbs & Things, Savannah, Ga), supplemented with factual information. One expert instructor taught a standardized anastomosis technique using the same method each time to one group over four sessions, while, similar to current vascular training, four different expert instructors each taught one session to the other (traditional) group. Knowledge and technical skill were assessed at study completion by an independent vascular expert using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) performance metrics. Participants also provided a written evaluation of the study experience. RESULTS: The standardized group had significantly higher mean overall technical (95.7% vs 75.8%; P = .038) and global skill scores (83.4% vs 67%; P = .006). Tissue handling, efficiency of motion, overall technical skill, and flow of operation were rated significantly higher in the standardized group (mean range, 88%-96% vs 67.6%-77.6%; P < .05). The standardized group trended to better cognitive knowledge (mean, 68.8% vs 60.7%; P = .182), creation of a secure knot at the toe of the anastomosis, fashioning an appropriate arteriotomy, better double-ended suture placement at the heel of the anastomosis (100% vs 62.7%; P = .07), and accurate suture placement (70% vs 25%; P = .153). Seventy-two percent of participant evaluations suggested a preference for a standardized approach. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the feasibility of open vascular simulation to assess the effect of differing teaching methods on performance outcome. Findings from this report suggest that for simulation training, standardized may be more effective than traditional methods of teaching. Transferability of simulator-acquired skills to the clinical setting will be required before open simulation can be unequivocally recommended as a major component of resident technical skill training.

Bath J; Lawrence P; Chandra A; O'Connell J; Uijtdehaage S; Jimenez JC; Davis G; Hiatt J

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Teaching culturally appropriate therapeutic touch to nursing students in the Sultanate of Oman: reflections on observations and experiences with Muslim patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Therapeutic touch (TT) is a valid nursing intervention but some patients feel uncomfortable with it because of personal beliefs. This commentary presents observations and experiences of the use of TT during care of Muslim patients in the Sultanate of Oman. There is need to teach nursing students deliberate steps when considering its use in Muslim patients because they increase acceptability and implementation in a culturally sensitive manner.

Muliira JK; Muliira RS

2013-01-01

302

An Evaluation of the Teaching Practice Curriculum in Light of the Standards-Based Evaluation Model  

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Full Text Available This study was conducted to identify standards related to the objectives, content, learning-teaching process, evaluation, practice teacher and university practice teacher dimensions of the teaching practice curriculum and their actualization level in light of the standards-based evaluation model. The study follows the singular descriptive model and its population comprises practicing teacher candidates and university practice teachers from education faculties located in the Eastern and Southeastern Turkish provinces of Elaz??, Erzincan, Erzurum, Diyarbak?r, Malatya and A?r?, and practice teachers working at Directorates of National Education in these provinces. The “simple random sampling method” was used in the study and 1,392 of the 2,075 individuals in the population were included in the sample. A 95-item scale was designed by the researchers to be used as the data collection tool. After completing the several stages of the scale development process, a pilot study was conducted on 312 candidate teachers using the draft scale consisting of 134 draft standards. The pilot study showed that the reliability coefficients of the study were Cronbach Alpha=.979, Bartlett= 59501.482 (p=0.000 and df= 17955) and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO)=.850 and the load factor values of the scale was over .45. In addition, the test retest, parallel test and split half test reliability analyses of the scale were also made. The data were analyzed by using frequency and percentage, arithmetic mean, and standard deviation techniques. As a result of the study, a total of 95 standards were identified, 16 of which were in the objectives dimension, 15 in the content dimension, 14 in the learning-teaching process dimension, 14 in the evaluation dimension, 18 in the practice dimension, and 18 in the practice teacher dimension. It was also found that the standards in the objectives, content, evaluation and university practice teacher dimensions were actualized “Partially”, while those in the learning-teaching process and practice teacher dimensions were actualized “Fairly”.© 2013 IOJES. All rights reserved

Etem Ye?ilyurt; Çetin Semerci

2013-01-01

303

[The effect of teaching critical thinking skills in an introductory nursing course  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This almost-experimental study utilized an education model to develop critical thought in a group of first year nursing students having as an objective to determine skills acquisition. Twelve weeks after its implementation the results showed the treatment statistical significance. Therefore, the instruction method utilized to promote critical thought skills produced the intended result in introductory nursing courses.

de Isaacs LG

1994-07-01

304

Evaluating the quality of interaction between medical students and nurses in a large teaching hospital  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective health care depends on multidisciplinary collaboration and teamwork, yet little is known about how well medical students and nurses interact in the hospital environment, where physicians-in-training acquire their first experiences as members of the health care team. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of interaction between third-year medical students and nurses during clinical rotations. Methods We surveyed 268 Indiana University medical students and 175 nurses who worked at Indiana University Hospital, the School's chief clinical training site. The students had just completed their third year of training. The survey instrument consisted of 7 items that measured "relational coordination" among members of the health care team, and 9 items that measured psychological distress. Results Sixty-eight medical students (25.4%) and 99 nurses (56.6%) completed the survey. The relational coordination score (ranked 1 to 5, low to high), which provides an overall measure of interaction quality, showed that medical students interacted with residents the best (4.16) and with nurses the worst (2.98; p Conclusion The quality of interaction between medical students and nurses during third-year clinical rotations is poor, which suggests that medical students are not receiving the sorts of educational experiences that promote optimal physician-nurse collaboration. Medical students and nurses experience different levels of psychological distress, which may adversely impact the quality of their interaction.

Nadolski Gregory J; Bell Mary A; Brewer Barbara B; Frankel Richard M; Cushing Herbert E; Brokaw James J

2006-01-01

305

A Faculty Development Program for Nurse Educators Learning to Teach Online  

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As the College of Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville prepared to move their graduate programs online, a nursing faculty grass-roots movement led to the implementation of a faculty development program. This instructional design portfolio describes the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of this program, with the goal…

Lee, Debra; Paulus, Trena M.; Loboda, Iryna; Phipps, Gina; Wyatt, Tami H.; Myers, Carole R.; Mixer, Sandra J.

2010-01-01

306

Congruence Between Position Descriptions for Public Health Nursing Directors and Supervisors With National Professional Standards and Competencies.  

Science.gov (United States)

OBJECTIVES:: This study described the extent to which position descriptions (PDs) for public health directors of nursing (DONs) and non-DON public health nursing (PHN) supervisors in Ohio local health departments incorporate national standards of PHN practice and competencies for public health managers. DESIGN:: Ninety-four PDs were obtained from 66 local health departments. Statements in each PD were analyzed for congruence with the 2007 American Nurses Association Public Health Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice (ANA Standards) and the Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (COL Competencies). Health department and PD characteristics were also obtained. COL Competencies within each COL skill domain were pooled for analysis. RESULTS:: Position descriptions addressed an average of 7.6 of the 20 ANA Standards/Substandards (range, 1-15). The most commonly addressed ANA Standards were Leadership, Regulatory Activities, Collegiality and Professional Relationships, and Planning; the least often addressed were Population Diagnosis and Priorities, Professional Practice Evaluation, Outcomes Identification, Advocacy, and Evaluation. Position descriptions addressed an average of 3.6 of the 8 COL skill domains (range, 0-6). Financial Planning and Management, Policy Development/Program Planning, Community Dimensions of Practice, and Analytic/Assessment were the most commonly addressed COL skill domains, whereas Cultural Competence and Basic Public Health Sciences were the least commonly addressed. About 75% of the PDs included task statements that did not correspond to any of the ANA Standards or COL Competencies. CONCLUSIONS:: Results indicate that PDs do not reflect compliance with professional mandates for the practice of PHN. This lack of fit between PDs and nationally recognized standards of practice and competencies suggest that PHN may be undifferentiated as a public health discipline and as a nursing specialty. PMID:23760309

Polivka, Barbara J; Chaudry, Rosemary Valedes; Jones, Alexandria

2013-06-11

307

Congruence Between Position Descriptions for Public Health Nursing Directors and Supervisors With National Professional Standards and Competencies.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES:: This study described the extent to which position descriptions (PDs) for public health directors of nursing (DONs) and non-DON public health nursing (PHN) supervisors in Ohio local health departments incorporate national standards of PHN practice and competencies for public health managers. DESIGN:: Ninety-four PDs were obtained from 66 local health departments. Statements in each PD were analyzed for congruence with the 2007 American Nurses Association Public Health Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice (ANA Standards) and the Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (COL Competencies). Health department and PD characteristics were also obtained. COL Competencies within each COL skill domain were pooled for analysis. RESULTS:: Position descriptions addressed an average of 7.6 of the 20 ANA Standards/Substandards (range, 1-15). The most commonly addressed ANA Standards were Leadership, Regulatory Activities, Collegiality and Professional Relationships, and Planning; the least often addressed were Population Diagnosis and Priorities, Professional Practice Evaluation, Outcomes Identification, Advocacy, and Evaluation. Position descriptions addressed an average of 3.6 of the 8 COL skill domains (range, 0-6). Financial Planning and Management, Policy Development/Program Planning, Community Dimensions of Practice, and Analytic/Assessment were the most commonly addressed COL skill domains, whereas Cultural Competence and Basic Public Health Sciences were the least commonly addressed. About 75% of the PDs included task statements that did not correspond to any of the ANA Standards or COL Competencies. CONCLUSIONS:: Results indicate that PDs do not reflect compliance with professional mandates for the practice of PHN. This lack of fit between PDs and nationally recognized standards of practice and competencies suggest that PHN may be undifferentiated as a public health discipline and as a nursing specialty.

Polivka BJ; Chaudry RV; Jones A

2013-06-01

308

[A Taiwan nursing perspective on current imbalances in educating, licensing and hiring new nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Level of development in the nursing profession affects healthcare quality and safety. The nursing profession in Taiwan today faces myriad external pressures such as the global financial crisis and rapidly changing national health insurance policies and social issues. For example, cutbacks in nursing manpower at medical institutions and increasingly difficult healthcare working conditions are increasing nurse workloads and turnover, conflict in the workplace, and difficulties in recruiting new nursing staff. Such negative developments directly and negatively impact professional development, healthcare quality, healthcare safety, and workplace morale. In terms of maintaining and enhancing the quality of new nurses entering the profession, rapid growth in numbers of technology schools and nursing students have severely strained insufficient resources and resulted in teaching quality and education outcomes below expectations. Poor passing rates on the national nursing license examination and increasingly high new nurse turnover are now significant negative factors influencing clinical manpower availability. Imbalances among education, licensing, and hiring clearly and negatively impact nursing professional development and social needs and cause the inefficient allocation of limited education resources. This article discusses and analyzes the causes underlying current imbalances in nurse hiring, licensing, and education. We provide the following suggestions: (1) Integrate education and licensing activities based on professional recruitment considerations to promote nursing competent and manpower stability; (2) revise the focus and content of the national license examination to resolve the current disconnect between license examination and hiring needs; (3) redesign curricula, update teaching material, and adjust teaching methods based on professional competencies in order to resolve key education and recruitment problems. All nursing schools should prepare their students well to pass the license examination in order to resolve the current state of inconsistent educational standards, and (4) train international nursing talent to address and reflect international medical care trends and policies in Taiwan. This paper is intended to serve as reference for both policymakers and professionals in the nursing and healthcare fields.

Lee S; Chang T

2012-10-01

309

[A Taiwan nursing perspective on current imbalances in educating, licensing and hiring new nurses].  

Science.gov (United States)

Level of development in the nursing profession affects healthcare quality and safety. The nursing profession in Taiwan today faces myriad external pressures such as the global financial crisis and rapidly changing national health insurance policies and social issues. For example, cutbacks in nursing manpower at medical institutions and increasingly difficult healthcare working conditions are increasing nurse workloads and turnover, conflict in the workplace, and difficulties in recruiting new nursing staff. Such negative developments directly and negatively impact professional development, healthcare quality, healthcare safety, and workplace morale. In terms of maintaining and enhancing the quality of new nurses entering the profession, rapid growth in numbers of technology schools and nursing students have severely strained insufficient resources and resulted in teaching quality and education outcomes below expectations. Poor passing rates on the national nursing license examination and increasingly high new nurse turnover are now significant negative factors influencing clinical manpower availability. Imbalances among education, licensing, and hiring clearly and negatively impact nursing professional development and social needs and cause the inefficient allocation of limited education resources. This article discusses and analyzes the causes underlying current imbalances in nurse hiring, licensing, and education. We provide the following suggestions: (1) Integrate education and licensing activities based on professional recruitment considerations to promote nursing competent and manpower stability; (2) revise the focus and content of the national license examination to resolve the current disconnect between license examination and hiring needs; (3) redesign curricula, update teaching material, and adjust teaching methods based on professional competencies in order to resolve key education and recruitment problems. All nursing schools should prepare their students well to pass the license examination in order to resolve the current state of inconsistent educational standards, and (4) train international nursing talent to address and reflect international medical care trends and policies in Taiwan. This paper is intended to serve as reference for both policymakers and professionals in the nursing and healthcare fields. PMID:23034543

Lee, Sheuan; Chang, Ting

2012-10-01

310

Teaching physiologic birth in maternal-newborn courses in undergraduate nursing programs: current challenges.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

For low-risk childbearing women, fewer technological interventions are associated with better physical and psychosocial outcomes; yet, the number of unmedicated physiologic births is decreasing. As a result, fewer undergraduate nursing students experience caring for women who choose physiologic birth, which presents a challenge for nurse educators and implications for preparing students to provide appropriate care for all childbearing women after the students graduate. This exploratory descriptive qualitative study was conducted among 150 randomly selected undergraduate nursing programs in the United States to explore the challenges of educating nursing students about low-intervention birth. Four themes described current challenges: lack of placement opportunities, education versus clinical practice, evidence-based support of physiologic birth, and the need for more research on pedagogical strategies that effectively educate future nurses to advocate for minimal intervention birth options for all women.

Birkhead AC; Callister LC; Fletcher N; Holt A; Curtis S

2012-01-01

311

Teaching physiologic birth in maternal-newborn courses in undergraduate nursing programs: current challenges.  

Science.gov (United States)

For low-risk childbearing women, fewer technological interventions are associated with better physical and psychosocial outcomes; yet, the number of unmedicated physiologic births is decreasing. As a result, fewer undergraduate nursing students experience caring for women who choose physiologic birth, which presents a challenge for nurse educators and implications for preparing students to provide appropriate care for all childbearing women after the students graduate. This exploratory descriptive qualitative study was conducted among 150 randomly selected undergraduate nursing programs in the United States to explore the challenges of educating nursing students about low-intervention birth. Four themes described current challenges: lack of placement opportunities, education versus clinical practice, evidence-based support of physiologic birth, and the need for more research on pedagogical strategies that effectively educate future nurses to advocate for minimal intervention birth options for all women. PMID:23730128

Birkhead, Ana C Sanchez; Callister, Lynn Clark; Fletcher, Nicole; Holt, Allison; Curtis, Samantha

2012-01-01

312

Teaching Physiologic Birth in Maternal-Newborn Courses in Undergraduate Nursing Programs: Current Challenges  

Science.gov (United States)

For low-risk childbearing women, fewer technological interventions are associated with better physical and psychosocial outcomes; yet, the number of unmedicated physiologic births is decreasing. As a result, fewer undergraduate nursing students experience caring for women who choose physiologic birth, which presents a challenge for nurse educators and implications for preparing students to provide appropriate care for all childbearing women after the students graduate. This exploratory descriptive qualitative study was conducted among 150 randomly selected undergraduate nursing programs in the United States to explore the challenges of educating nursing students about low-intervention birth. Four themes described current challenges: lack of placement opportunities, education versus clinical practice, evidence-based support of physiologic birth, and the need for more research on pedagogical strategies that effectively educate future nurses to advocate for minimal intervention birth options for all women.

Birkhead, Ana C. Sanchez; Callister, Lynn Clark; Fletcher, Nicole; Holt, Allison; Curtis, Samantha

2012-01-01

313

Horta’s benchmark as a tool of Nursing teaching-learning: assistential convergent research  

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Full Text Available This is a qualitative research supported by the assistencial convergent modality that aimed to use Wanda Horta’s referential with fifteen nursing students during Clinical Education in Semiology and Semiotchnical at a private college of Curitiba, and to verify the perception of these students concerning this trajectory. The students considered that this practice provided a vision of the patient as a whole, culminating in a theory-practice approach in the related disciplines and facilitating the care humanization. In addition, they emphasize that the systematization of nursing assistance based on Horta’s benchmark reveals the importance of the nurse’s work, since it outlines the knowledge of this category with greater precision, increasing the professional’s performance perception and improving the quality of the nursing assistance.

Juliana Helena Montezeli; Kriscie Kriscianne Venturi; Aida Maris Peres; Lilliana Maria Labronici; Mariluci Alves Maftum; Lillian Daisy Gonçalves Wolff

2009-01-01

314

Ensino de graduação em enfermagem da Unicamp: políticas e práticas Enseñanza de graduación en enfermería de Unicamp: políticas y prácticas Graduate nursing teaching at Unicamp: policies and practices  

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Full Text Available Os autores analisam o ensino de Graduação em Enfermagem da Unicamp a partir da implantação de um novo currículo em 1997, bem como sua adequação às Diretrizes Curriculares emanadas da LDB. No plano teórico, as mudanças realizadas subvertem a ordem instituída. Operar reforma curricular numa conjuntura de crise financeira e de gestão da universidade pública, reflexo da aplicação do ideário neoliberal nas políticas públicas de educação que tem provocado a valorização crescente da produção científica e das atividades de extensão no cotidiano docente em detrimento das iniciativas que visem à qualidade do ensino de graduação, tem sido uma tarefa árdua. As dificuldades encontradas exigiram algumas reflexões e a proposição de sete teses fundamentais para subsidiar a análise de problemas e orientar as medidas de intervenção necessárias. Neste texto enfoca-se uma delas, as Políticas e as Práticas no ensino de enfermagem.Los autores analizan la enseñanza de Graduación en Enfermería de Unicamp a partir de la implantación de un nuevo Currículo en 1997, así como su adecuación a las Directrices Curriculares derivadas de la LDB. En el plan teórico, los cambios realizados subvierten el orden instituido. Llevar a cabo una reforma curricular en una coyuntura de crisis financiera y de gestión de la universidad pública ha sido una tarea ardua. Las dificultades encontradas exigieron algunas reflexiones, cuyo resultado es la proposición de siete tesis fundamentales para subsidiar el análisis de los problemas y orientar las medidas de intervención necesarias. En este texto se enfoca una de ellas, las Políticas y Prácticas en la enseñanza de enfermería.The authors analyse teaching at the graduate nursing program from Unicamp (SP), starting from the introduction of a new curriculum in 1997, in accordance to the curricular standards taken from Federal Law concerning education. In theory, the changes implemented subvert the established order. It has been a hard task to operate curricular reform in a public university that is experiencing a financial and management crisis - reflections of a neoliberal ideology in public education policies, which increasingly values scientific production to the detriment of iniciatives toward quality teaching. The difficulties found demanded some considerations and the proposition of seven fundamental thesis in order to subsidize problem analysis and guide necessary interventions. Among them, the theme Policies and Practice in nursing teaching is focused in this text.

Márcia Regina Nozawa; Débora Isane Ratner Kirschbaum; Mauro Antônio Pires Dias da Silva; Eliete Maria Silva

2003-01-01

315

La enseñanza de la Historia de la Enfermería en España The teaching of Nursing`s History in Spain  

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Full Text Available La convergencia europea obliga a reflexionar sobre el tipo de estudios y profesionales de la Enfermería que queremos para el futuro. En este contexto la situación de asignaturas humanísticas, como la Historia, es muy frágil. Este trabajo pretende mostrar la necesidad incluir esta asignatura en los Planes de Estudio como herramienta indispensable para adquirir conocimientos básicos sobre la profesión, habilidades en el manejo de fuentes diversas y la competencia suficiente para valorar la incidencia de los factores culturales en el estado de salud de los pacientes. Para ello se proponen una serie de categorías historiográficas que permitan elaborar una Historia de la Enfermería significativa.The European process of convergence should lead us to think about the kind of studies and professionals we want for the future. In this context, the situation of humanistic disciplines, like History, is very fragile. This article explores the need to include the History of Nursing in the academic curriculum to obtain not only a basic knowledge about the profession, but also some necessary skills to deal with different information sources, and help to assessing the patient's cultural environment. In this sense we outline some historiografical categories that should allow us building a meaningful History of Nursing.

Paloma Moral de Calatrava

2004-01-01

316

Nurses' Assessment and Teaching Behaviors Regarding Breast Self-Examination with Reasons for Actions.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored registered nurses' knowledge about breast self-examination (BSE) and breast cancer risk factors, frequency of determining clients' risk factors and knowledge and followup instruction with reasons for actions. The convenience sample con...

P. E. Harris

1984-01-01

317

Effects of competitive computer-assisted learning versus conventional teaching methods on the acquisition and retention of knowledge in medical surgical nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This paper presents a novel approach of computer-assisted learning for nursing education in university undergraduate courses. BACKGROUND: The most innovative aspect of the proposal is the design of nursing assignments as on-line competitions. The effects of competitive e-learning versus conventional teaching methods on the acquisition and retention of knowledge were compared in a course on medical-surgical nursing. METHOD: A total of 116 students of mixed gender, age, computer experience and educational background in a second-year course on medical-surgical nursing participated in the study. Data were collected from nursing students at four time points. The on-line activities were carried out using a web-based automatic evaluation system. RESULTS: The study revealed that the competitive e-learning method produced significant cognitive gains for the experimental group students in the immediate follow-up test. Nevertheless, both teaching methods resulted in similar knowledge retention in the 10-week follow-up test. CONCLUSION: Significant benefits were found following our approach. The work of the students could be evaluated along the course, the workload of instructors was reduced and students received immediate feedback by the on-line judge, which promoted both independent learning and reflective thinking. The approach is applicable to any other nursing educational institution.

Fernández Alemán JL; Carrillo de Gea JM; Rodríguez Mondéjar JJ

2011-11-01

318

Demographic and academic-related differences between standard-entry and graduate-entry nursing students: a prospective correlational survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Students who enroll in graduate-entry nursing programs are described as more highly motivated, scoring higher in most learning strategies, and achieving greater academic success than standard-entry nursing students. DESIGN: A prospective correlational design was used to compare the demographic and academic-related characteristics of standard-entry and graduate-entry nursing students in their first year of study. METHODS: Between 2007 and 2011, students enrolled in the Bachelor of Nursing, Standard Entry and the Bachelor Nursing, Graduate Entry at a large Australian university were surveyed in the first year of their program. Data included English-language usage and time spent in paid work, as well as four dimensions of Pintrich's Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Survey data was linked to students' academic grades at the end of the semester. RESULTS: A total of 730 students completed the survey and consented to collection of their academic grades. Graduate-entry students were more likely to be older (28.6 vs. 24.3 years, P < 0.001), and there was a higher percentage of males (25.2% vs. 15.9%, P = 0.003). Although no difference was identified between groups for use of Extrinsic Goal Orientation as a learning strategy, the graduate-entry students were more likely to identify Peer Learning, Help Seeking and Critical Thinking as strategies for learning than the standard-entry students (P < 0.001). Further, while this group of students achieved a higher mean GPA (4.8 vs. 4.0, P < 0.001) compared to the standard-entry students, regression analyses revealed that in both groups, lower levels of English-language proficiency and increased time spent in paid work were predictors of poorer academic performance. CONCLUSIONS: Similar to US-based studies, demographic and academic-related differences were identified between standard-entry and graduate-entry nursing students. However, the study also highlights lower levels of English-language proficiency and increased time spent in paid work negatively impacted academic performance in both groups of nursing students.

Everett B; Salamonson Y; Trajkovski S; Fernandez R

2013-07-01

319

Nursing diagnosis of patients in treatment of hemodialysis in teaching hospital  

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Full Text Available Objective: to identify the profile of nursing diagnosis and socio-demographic conditions of patients in hemodialysis. Method: a cross-sectional exploratory study, with fifteen patients. Data collected by form, organized and analyzed by Excel program. Research accredited for Research Ethics Committee of Ceara Federal University protocol number 087.12.08. Results: most of the participants were male (60%), aged between 21 and 53 years and presented an average nine years of study. The most frequent comorbidity was hypertension. 34 nursing diagnosis were identified, eight of them were presented in 50% or more of the participants. infection risk, impaired skin integrity, willingness to increased religiosity, excess fluid volume, activity intolerance, ineffective scheme therapeutic control, knowledge deficit and sedentary lifestyle were the most expressive. Some diagnoses were a result of improper conduct, such as excessive intake of liquids, non-adherence to prescribed diet, sedentary lifestyle and disobedience. Conclusion: the patients in hemodialysis, the majority young men, presented as main nursing diagnosis infection risk and impaired skin integrity aggravated by immunosuppression condition. Descriptors: nursing; nursing diagnosis; nursing care; renal insufficiency chronic.

Alice Gabrielle de Sousa Costa, Renata Mônica Barbosa dos Santos, Allyne Fortes Vitor, Thelma Leite de Araujo

2010-01-01

320

Hospital Compliance with Clinical Documentation Standards: A Descriptive Study in Two Iranian Teaching Hospitals  

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Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Standard clinical documentation is an integral part of quality patient care. This study aimed to explore compliance of two Iranian teaching hospitals with the clinical documentation standards.Methods: A total of 400 records were surveyed. Data were collected using a checklist of standard measures. The checklist comprised 15 items selected from relevant guidelines from either the American Health Informa­tion Management Association or Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.Findings: On average, 50.2% of medical records were provided in high compliance with standard measures, 26.4% in moderate compliance, and 23.4% in non-compliance. The average highest frequency of compliance with documentation standard was received by “Only blue ink is used for writing” (92%), followed by “Consent forms are completed” (79%) and “Highlighter pen or correction pen is avoided” (71%). The average lowest frequency of compliance with standards was identified for “Admission form is typed and inserted as first page” (0.5%) followed by “Unusable elements for patient are mentioned” (0.75%), and both “Error corrections (if any) are signed and dated by the editor.” (2.52%), and “Cause of error reporting (if any) is mentioned.” (2.52%).Conclusions: Our results indicated an unsatisfactory level of compliance with clinical documentation standards in the studied hospitals. In addition, some of the lowest rated measures were related to documentation of errors in data re­cording and their subsequent correction, which can potentially lead to adverse patient outcome or legal consequences. Hence, our study provides further evidence for the urgency of developing strategies to improve commitment of Iranian hospitals to clinical documentation standards.

Mohammadjavad Hosseinpourfard; Sepehr Abbasi; Ali Ayoubian; Morteza Izadi; Mohammad Parsa Mahjoob

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Work Engagement & Effective Factors Among Nurses In General Teaching Hospital Of Shiraz University Of Medical Sciences  

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Full Text Available Background and Aim: Work engagement is defined as a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption. Since the quality of care delivery to patients depends on nurse's practices, the objective of this study was to determine work engagement & its effective factors among nurses of general hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed among 273 in-patient nurses of Namazi and Faghihi hospitals using 2 stages of sampling. Our questionnaire was validated by experts opinions and Cronbach's alpha index (86%). Descriptive statistics and correlation tests were used for the analysis of data by SPSS. Results: According to the results obtained, mean work engagement was 58.95 ± 10.51 and there was a significant correlation between work engagement and organizational - supervisor support, organizational justice, job characteristics, reward & recognition, organizational citizenship behavior, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, turnover( p<0.05). The relationship between work engagement and reward was the strongest(r=0.512). Conclusion: The results imply the importance of work engagement and its related factors. Nurses are one of the biggest health system groups, and their burnout disadvantages hospitals and community. Thus, work engagement should be noticed in all policy-making related to nurses.

Ali Keshtkaran; Zahra Kavosi; Ariyan Gholipour; Sanaz Sohrabi Zadeh; Zahra Sharafi

2012-01-01

322

A statewide program to teach nurses the use of fetal monitors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The regionalization concept in perinatal medicine has opened many new areas of information and practice for obstetrical nurses. One of these areas is in electronic fetal monitoring. Since the technique is relatively new to most nurses, the need for in-hospital training is tremendous. This article describes the first steps taken in establishing such an educational program, the expansion of that program to statewide coverage, and the incorporation and expansion of such a program to meet the needs of the area in the regionalization of perinatal health care.

Haire MF; Boehm FH

1978-05-01

323

Analysis of the costs and benefits of using standardized patients to help teach physical diagnosis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Although a majority of medical schools use standardized patients (SPs) for teaching or evaluating students, the costs and benefits of such programs have not been examined in depth. In 1992-93 the Tulane University School of Medicine reduced by 40% the faculty-precepted sessions in its physical diagnosis program in order to incorporate seven focused examinations using SPs to teach basic examination skills. METHOD: Costs for the revised program included costs for SPs, staff, supplies, and faculty. Faculty cost was estimated at a minimum to equal hourly salary and at a maximum to equal this salary plus potential collectible billings. An objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was used to assess the skill acquisitions of 150 second-year students in 1991-92, before SPs were used, and in 1992-93, when SPs were used. An unpaired t-test was then used to compare the OSCE performances of the two groups of students. Chi-square analysis was used to compare the evaluations of the physical diagnosis program by the 1992-93 and 1991-92 students. RESULTS: The cost of incorporating SPs into the program was $43,800. The amount of time spent teaching by faculty was reduced by 608 hours, costing between $33 (salary) and $108 (salary plus potential revenue) per hour. Thus, the total savings in the cost of faculty time was between $20,064 and $65,664. Despite the reduction in faculty involvement, the students' performance on the OSCE did not change, and the students' evaluations of the course became significantly more favorable. CONCLUSION: The incorporation of SPs as instructors in the physical diagnosis program was accomplished at a minimal cost and resulted in an increase in students' enthusiasm for the purpose, with no loss of skill acquisition as measured by the OSCE.

Hasle JL; Anderson DS; Szerlip HM

1994-07-01

324

The Effect of Simulation Teaching on Baccalaureate Nursing Students’ Self - confidence Related to Peripheral Venous Catheterization in Children : A Randomized Trial  

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Full Text Available Introduction:In recent decades, nursing instructors have tended to use simulation rather than traditional methods due to benefits such as increased self-confidence. However, little academic literature is available to verify this claim. The procedure of establishing peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients is of great importance. Therefore, the researchers attempted to review the effect of the simulation teaching method on nursing students' self-confidence related to peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients. Methods:In this trial, 45 students in the 5th and 6th semester of nursing school in the first half of school year 2012 from the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were randomly assigned to three groups (a control group, and two intervention groups). They were trained in establishing peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients through simulation teaching method and practical training. The students' self-confidence was assessed by C-Scale before and after the intervention. Results:The students’ self-confidence score showed a significant increase in the simulation group after the intervention in comparison to other groups (p = 0.03). Conclusion:Results revealed a significant increase in self-confidence of nursing students related to peripheral venous catheterization in pediatric patients by simulation. This substantiates the assertion that simulation can improve self-confidence. Due to the low sample size, further studies with larger population are suggested.

Leila Valizadeh; Abolghasem Amini; Eskandar Fathi-Azar; Shahrzad Ghiasvandian; Bahareh Akbarzadeh

2013-01-01

325

Predictors of quality in rural nursing homes using standard and novel methods.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We examined the effect of market and organizational characteristics on nursing home quality as measured by deficiencies (number and weighted) on states in a rural region of the United States. Rural nursing homes in five Mountain West states (N = 161) were sampled from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting system between January 1, 2004 and June 15, 2005. State comparisons indicated that rural nursing homes in Nevada had a higher number of deficiencies and weighted deficiency score as compared with Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and Idaho. Using regression analyses, we found that a higher percentage of licensed practical nurses in the staffing mix were predictive of a greater number of deficiencies. Nursing homes with more beds or higher Medicaid occupancy had higher weighted deficiency scores. Although rural Mountain West nursing homes average a similar number of deficiencies as nursing homes nationwide, these nursing homes had a greater number of serious deficiencies and higher weighted deficiency scores, suggesting greater actual harm to resident health and safety.

Towsley GL; Beck SL; Pepper GA

2013-04-01

326

Nurses' perception and barriers to use of information communication technology in a teaching hospital in Nigeria.  

Science.gov (United States)

The impact of information technology on nursing has been a subject of discourse for the latter half of the 20th century and the early part of the 21st. Despite its obvious benefits, adapting information technology to healthcare has been relatively difficult, and rates of use have been limited especiallyin many developing countries. This quantitative study has shown a generally low usage of information technology among nurses in the study setting. Many of the nurses adjudged themselves as novice in information technology, with 37.8% stating that they had never had formal training in information technology and many rating themselves as possessing little or no skill in the use of spreadsheet, databases, and so on. Many (55.6%) stated that they do not have access to information technology despite the fairly widespread satisfactory perception established among them. Results further showed that unreliable network connections, high work demand, inadequate number of computers, poor access to computers consequent on wrong locations, and poor system design with associated failure to fit work demands are some of the major barriers to the use of information technology in the study setting. These factors therefore need to be taken into consideration in any intervention that seeks to improve the nurses' use of information technology in clinical setting. PMID:23851710

Irinoye, Omolola O; Ayandiran, Emmanuel Olufemi; Fakunle, Imoleayo; Mtshali, Ntombifikile

2013-08-01

327

Nurses' perception and barriers to use of information communication technology in a teaching hospital in Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The impact of information technology on nursing has been a subject of discourse for the latter half of the 20th century and the early part of the 21st. Despite its obvious benefits, adapting information technology to healthcare has been relatively difficult, and rates of use have been limited especiallyin many developing countries. This quantitative study has shown a generally low usage of information technology among nurses in the study setting. Many of the nurses adjudged themselves as novice in information technology, with 37.8% stating that they had never had formal training in information technology and many rating themselves as possessing little or no skill in the use of spreadsheet, databases, and so on. Many (55.6%) stated that they do not have access to information technology despite the fairly widespread satisfactory perception established among them. Results further showed that unreliable network connections, high work demand, inadequate number of computers, poor access to computers consequent on wrong locations, and poor system design with associated failure to fit work demands are some of the major barriers to the use of information technology in the study setting. These factors therefore need to be taken into consideration in any intervention that seeks to improve the nurses' use of information technology in clinical setting.

Irinoye OO; Ayandiran EO; Fakunle I; Mtshali N

2013-08-01

328

Integrating information literacy into an online undergraduate nursing informatics course: the librarian's role in the design and teaching of the course.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Integration of information literacy as a core component into a new online undergraduate nursing course proved to be a learning experience in course design and teaching. This article describes the framework for the course design that combined cultural competency, informatics, and information literacy and was grounded in informatics competencies for nurses at the beginning level, an informatics textbook, and the Neurnan Systems Model. The librarian's role in this process and the information literacy unit's content and written assignment are detailed, and challenges in the collaboration are also addressed.

Schulte SJ

2008-01-01

329

Integrating information literacy into an online undergraduate nursing informatics course: the librarian's role in the design and teaching of the course.  

Science.gov (United States)

Integration of information literacy as a core component into a new online undergraduate nursing course proved to be a learning experience in course design and teaching. This article describes the framework for the course design that combined cultural competency, informatics, and information literacy and was grounded in informatics competencies for nurses at the beginning level, an informatics textbook, and the Neurnan Systems Model. The librarian's role in this process and the information literacy unit's content and written assignment are detailed, and challenges in the collaboration are also addressed. PMID:18844089

Schulte, Stephanie J

2008-01-01

330

2013 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards Including Standards for the Safe Administration and Management of Oral Chemotherapy  

Science.gov (United States)

In 2009, ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) published standards for the safe use of parenteral chemotherapy in the outpatient setting, including issues of practitioner orders, preparation, and administration of medication. In 2011, these were updated to include inpatient facilities. In December 2011, a multistakeholder workgroup met to address the issues associated with orally administered antineoplastics, under the leadership of ASCO and ONS. The workgroup participants developed recommended standards, which were presented for public comment. Public comments informed final edits, and the final standards were reviewed and approved by the ASCO and ONS Boards of Directors. Significant newly identified recommendations include those associated with drug prescription and the necessity of ascertaining that prescriptions are filled. In addition, the importance of patient and family education regarding administration schedules, exception procedures, disposal of unused oral medication, and aspects of continuity of care across settings were identified. This article presents the newly developed standards.

Neuss, Michael N.; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen; Esper, Peg; Gilmore, Terry R.; LeFebvre, Kristine B.; Schulmeister, Lisa; Jacobson, Joseph O.

2013-01-01

331

Academic Curricula Models of Teaching Foreign Languages and Economic Profession Standards  

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Full Text Available The development of academic training in Romania is a must for our country to adapt to the European Union professional standards. The article makes reference to the late evolution of English for Special Purposes (ESP) training in several universities in the country and to the case-study of ESP learning in the Academy of Economic Studies in Bucharest. English for Special Purposes is an academic subject based on the long-term professional and social needs of the specialised labor force in market economy. Its authentic content and learning/teaching tasks are selected and adapted to the curriculum subjects that the students attend to make their access autonomous to original professional sources.

Violeta Negrea

2006-01-01

332

A comparison between EASI system 12-lead ECGs and standard 12-lead ECGs for improved clinical nursing practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study was carried out to verify the accuracy of 12-Lead ECG, obtained through a continuous ECG monitoring system with five cables positioned in EASI mode, to identify basic ECG alterations. BACKGROUND: This study concerns continuous ECG monitoring systems in Coronary Care Units. Continuous ECG monitoring is an important device for nursing surveillance and is useful in decreasing adverse events. DESIGN AND METHOD: Thirteen patients admitted consecutively to the Coronary Care Unit for Acute Myocardial Infarction underwent daily and simultaneous recording of a12-lead ECG using both procedures: EASI ECG and STANDARD ECG. A sample of 1,164 ECG leads acquired in EASI mode was compared with a sample of as many ECG leads acquired using the standard procedure with a traditional cardiograph. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In the Coronary Care Unit, Continous ECG monitoring with five cables positioned in EASI mode is a valid alternative to the standard 12-lead ECG for cardiac rhythm abnormalities detection and for acute myocardial ischemia and old myocardial infarction assessment. Therefore, the EASI system might be advantageous for long-term patient monitoring. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The EASI system represents a valid device for the nursing surveillance of patients who need continuous ECG monitoring, improves clinical nursing practice in Coronary Care Units, supports the reduction of adverse events such as cardiac arrest and reduces the hospital costs.

Lancia L; Pisegna Cerone M; Vittorini P; Romano S; Penco M

2008-02-01

333

Computer and internet use by first year clinical and nursing students in a Nigerian teaching hospital  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is an important source of up-to-date medical information. Although several studies in different countries have explored the extent to which health science students use the computer and the internet, few researches are available on this subject in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to assess the uptake of computer and internet by health science students studying in the country. Methods One hundred and eighty three first year medical and nursing students of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, completed a-25 item questionnaire during routine Library Orientation Program in the medical library. The EPI-Info software was used for data analysis. Results The mean ages for medical students and the student nurses were 22 and 24.6 years respectively. Overall, 42.6% of the entire sample could use the computer, 57.4% could not. While more than half (58%) of the medical students are computer literate, majority (75.9%) of the student nurses are not. Slightly more than two thirds (60.7%) of the entire students had ever used the internet, 33. 9% had not. E-mail was the most popular of internet services used by the students (76.4%) and the cyber café was the common place where students had accessed these services. The students' mean scores on a 15-point perceived self-efficacy scale for internet-related tasks was 3.8 for medical and 0.7 for nursing students (p = 0.00). Students who are computer literate had superior mean scores (4.8) than those without (0.6) (p = 0.000). Conclusion First year clinical and nursing students in Ibadan Nigeria have not fully utilised the opportunity that the use of computer and internet offer for medical education. Improved efforts such as inclusion of computer education in medical and nursing curricular and establishment of computer laboratories are required to increase the student's access to computers and internet.

Ajuwon Grace

2003-01-01

334

Nurse  

Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (Canada)

Purposes were to describe nurse case management effect on a weight manager program, compare weight and body fat changes in clients receiving usual services vs. enhanced services, and describe goal attainment. Using a quasi-experimental design, experimental group received case management and military weight program; the control group, military weight program. Data analysis employed paired t-test, two sample t-test, and chi-square analysis. Paired t-tests indicated significant weight loss in experimental group (p .01), but not control group (p =.16). Two sample independent t-tests indicated no difference between group means (t = 57 df= 24, p =58). Paired t-tests indicated significant difference in loss in both groups (p = .01, p=00). Two sample independent t-tests indicated no difference between group means (t= .71 df= 24, p .49). There was no relationship between the two groups on goal attainment x2 (1, N =26) = .02, p=90).

1997-01-01

335

[Construction of an educational technology for teaching about nursing on peripheral venipuncture].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of the study was to describe the construction of a course on peripheral venipuncture using the Information and Communication Technologies. This is a methodological research, developed at the Federal University of Ceara from January to March 2012. The construction phases are: the analysis, design and development according to the theoretical framework of Galvis-Panqueva. In the analysis, objectives, content target audience, the study environment and technology infrastructure were delimited. During the design phase the environment interface and navigation structure of the course were evaluated. The development consisted in the materialization of all that was designed in the previous phase Once all three phases of construction of the course were conducted it was available in the Virtual Learning Environment SOLAR. The finalproduct of the course is presented as support of nursing students and consequently the training of future nurses in their care practice on peripheral venipuncture.

Frota NM; Barros LM; de Araújo TM; Caldini LN; do Nascimento JC; Caetano JA

2013-06-01

336

Seeing is believing - Reducing misconceptions about children's hospice care through effective teaching with undergraduate nursing students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Children's palliative care has evolved in recent years and is now recognised as a distinct area of health and social care practice. Whilst children's hospices are viewed as central to quality care for these children and families, lack of knowledge regarding the exact nature of care they provide exists. Education can go part way to changing attitudes and knowledge about the key contribution of hospices, thus improving future care. Alternative and innovative strategies to stimulate meaningful learning are pivotal to children's nurse education and this paper examines one such innovation adopted with 2nd year children's nursing students. Aiming to help students explore the ethos of children's hospice an educational visit was arranged, followed by an on line discussion. Although some practical challenges were encountered, the visit heightened student awareness moving them from the readily held perception that children's hospices were exclusively for dying children and was viewed by students as more effective than a traditional classroom session.

Price J; Dornan J; Quail L

2013-09-01

337

The use of high-fidelity simulation to teach home care nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of high-fidelity human patient simulation (HPS) is increasing in nursing education, yet little is known about its use in community health. This study examined an HPS home care experience to determine effects on three outcomes (student satisfaction, self-confidence, and learning). In addition, design characteristics of the simulation and demographic characteristics of students were examined for correlation with these outcomes. Senior baccalaureate students took part in the experience. Results indicated that students were very satisfied with the experience and felt it increased their confidence in providing care in the home, although learning outcomes were not high. Although no demographic characteristics were found to be correlated with outcomes, five design characteristics of a simulation were moderately correlated with the outcomes of satisfaction and self-confidence, especially support. It is recommended that nurse educators design HPS home care simulation experiences that provide student support prior to their first home care visit. PMID:21844126

Smith, Sherrill Jeanne; Barry, Detrice G

2011-08-15

338

The use of high-fidelity simulation to teach home care nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The use of high-fidelity human patient simulation (HPS) is increasing in nursing education, yet little is known about its use in community health. This study examined an HPS home care experience to determine effects on three outcomes (student satisfaction, self-confidence, and learning). In addition, design characteristics of the simulation and demographic characteristics of students were examined for correlation with these outcomes. Senior baccalaureate students took part in the experience. Results indicated that students were very satisfied with the experience and felt it increased their confidence in providing care in the home, although learning outcomes were not high. Although no demographic characteristics were found to be correlated with outcomes, five design characteristics of a simulation were moderately correlated with the outcomes of satisfaction and self-confidence, especially support. It is recommended that nurse educators design HPS home care simulation experiences that provide student support prior to their first home care visit.

Smith SJ; Barry DG

2013-03-01

339

Nueva estructura para la enseñanza-aprendizaje de la materia de enfermería clínica en los estudios de Grado de Enfermería A new structure for the teaching-learning of the subject of clinical nursing in Nursing Degree studies  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available En el Grado de Enfermería, los cambios requeridos para la adaptación al Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior se han orientado a la introducción de novedades metodológicas que han propiciado la génesis de nuevos enfoques para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje, con el objetivo último de disminuir los desajustes que en algunas ocasiones se han detectado entre la teoría y la práctica. En esta línea, partiendo de las necesidades actuales de la formación en relación a la materia de enfermería clínica del grado y de las competencias profesionales, se inició un proceso de reflexión y análisis que originó una nueva estructura organizativa de la materia. Este nuevo enfoque nace con el objetivo fundamental de mejorar la docencia de la enfermería clínica, actualizando la forma de enseñar la enfermería y los cuidados enfermeros. Lejos del modelo biomédico centrado en la enfermedad que ha imperado hasta ahora, el nuevo enfoque parte de una visión profundamente enfermera y, en consecuencia, hace explícitos los cuidados de la persona con un trastorno real o potencial de la salud. Los resultados de la implementación de esta nueva estructura en la asignatura 'Enfermería clínica I' de segundo curso de grado ponen de manifiesto que hay una mejora en la precisión diagnóstica y en la etapa de planificación del proceso enfermero, así como en la identificación de la responsabilidad profesional en los ejes autónomo e interdisciplinar.In Nursing Degree there have been many changes for adapting to the European Higher Education Area aimed to changing methodologies, but have also given rise to new approaches to teaching and learning. Their ultimate goal is to reduce the maladjustments have sometimes been found between theory and practice. Based on the education needs in the field of clinical nursing and also in professional competences, began a process of reflection and analysis resulted in a new organizational structure of matter. This new approach starts with the fundamental objective of improving the teaching of clinical nursing, updating the way we teach nursing and nursing care. Away from the biomedical model focused on the disease that has prevailed until now, the new approach comes from a nursing perspective, and therefore, makes explicit the care of the person with an actual or potential health disturbance. The results of implementing this new approach to the subject 'Clinical Nursing I' in second year of degree studies, show that the new structure represents an improvement in diagnostic accuracy and planning in the nursing process and the identification of responsibility in the independent and interdisciplinary professional axes.

Anna Falcó-Pegueroles; M. Teresa Luis-Rodrigo

2012-01-01

340

Views and perceptions of nursing students on their clinical learning environment: Teaching and learning.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The clinical learning environment constitutes an initial area of professional practice for nurses and student opinion contributes to its improvement. PURPOSE: The assessment of students' views and perceptions of a Greek nursing school on their clinical learning environment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was concurrent and included 196 students. We used the published questionnaire "Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI)" which is a tool for identifying and assessing Nursing students' perceptions of the psychosocial characteristics of their clinical learning environment. The questionnaire was anonymous and completed by the students themselves during their clinical training at the hospital. We conducted inductive and descriptive statistics. The level of statistical significance was set at p<0.05. The statistical program SPSS 16.0 was used. RESULTS: The highest mean score for the Actual Clinical Learning Environment was observed in the scales of "Personalization" (23.97) and "Task orientation" (23.31) while for the Preferred Clinical Learning Environment in the scales of "Personalization" (27.87), "Satisfaction" (26.82) and "Task orientation" (26.78). The lowest mean score for the Actual Clinical Learning Environment was found in the scales of "Innovation" (19.21) and "Individualization" (19.24) while for the Preferred Clinical Learning Environment in the scales of "Individualization" (22.72) and "Involvement" (24.31). Statistically significant positive correlation was found between "Satisfaction" and all other scales of the CLEI. CONCLUSIONS: There is a noticeable gap between the expectations and reality of the clinical learning environment for the students in nursing. Reorganization of the educational framework is needed with an emphasis on innovation and individualization.

Papathanasiou IV; Tsaras K; Sarafis P

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
341

[Teaching of nursing in mental and psychiatric health: the point-of-view of teachers and students in a social phenomenology perspective].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study aimed to understand the teaching-learning process from the point-of-view of teachers and students who experienced the nursing practice in mental and psychiatric health. Data were collected through interviews with students and teachers who had experienced the phenomenon and analyzed according to a social phenomenology perspective. The teachers' experiences gave rise to the following concrete meaning categories: valuing communication and the relation between persons, learning to appreciate others as human beings, appreciating integral care; demystifying fears and prejudices and attaching meaning to self-knowledge. The following categories emerging from students' interviews: acknowledging the relevance of knowledge in communication and interpersonal relations; learning to appreciate others as human beings; applying acquired knowledge to integral care; feeling motivated to change attitudes; acknowledging the meaning of self-knowledge. Finally, the social types were described. In this subject, the teaching-learning process arouses interest in the specialty, personal development and valuation of its application in general nursing.

Campoy MA; Merighi MA; Stefanelli MC

2005-03-01

342

Calidad de la docencia en enfermería: un concepto desde la percepción de sus actores/ Quality of teaching in Nursing: a concept from the perception of the actors  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Introducción. Los procesos de acreditación, necesarios en el actual escenario de la educación, requieren una descripción de los conceptos de calidad como un parámetro básico desde donde se deriven dimensiones e indicadores evaluables. Tomando en cuenta la polisemia del concepto de calidad, parece arriesgado que las descripciones de dicho concepto se generen de forma arbitraria. Respondiendo a este riesgo y carencia de conceptos, el objetivo del presente estudio cual (more) itativo es generar colectivamente una conceptualización de calidad de la docencia en enfermería. Sujetos y métodos. El surgimiento de conceptos que implica este estudio se logra a partir de la utilización de la teoría fundamentada. Las percepciones se obtuvieron mediante entrevistas en profundidad y grupos focales a docentes, estudiantes y licenciadas de enfermería, más el análisis recursivo de los datos obtenidos. Resultados. Los elementos constituyentes de la conceptualización de la calidad de la docencia en enfermería incluyen, entre otros: valores del docente, habilidades de comunicación interpersonal docente-estudiante, características particulares del modelamiento del quehacer enfermero y metodologías de enseñanza en enfermería. Conclusiones. Al obtener la conceptualización de la calidad de la docencia en enfermería desde las percepciones de los propios actores, su utilización en procesos de acreditación y evaluación (y en los cambios consecuentes que se puedan generar a partir de ello) podría ser aceptada de mejor forma por los mismos actores. Esto ayudaría, a su vez, a fortalecer los fundamentos de la disciplina. Abstract in english Introduction. Accreditation processes, necessary as they are for the actual stage of education, require a description of quality concept as the basic parameter from which dimension and valuable indicators are to be derived. Considering the polysemy of the concept of quality, it seems risky that descriptions of such a concept were generated arbitrarily. Responsive to this risk and conceptual deficiency, the purpose of this qualitative study is to collectively generate a qu (more) ality conceptualization of nursing teaching. Subjects and methods. The emergence of concepts that the study reveals is accomplished by the application of grounded theory method. The reported perceptions were obtained in substantive interviews and focus groups teachers, students and Nursing graduated students, and the recursive analysis of the data. Results. The constitutive elements of Nursing teaching quality conceptualization includes, among others: values of Nursing teachers; abilities of interpersonal communication between teacher and student; particulars characteristics of modelling the Nursing work; and methodologies of teaching in Nursing. Conclusions. As we obtain the quality conceptualization in Nursing teaching from the perspective of the actors involved, its application in accreditation and evaluation processes (and the consequent changes generated from these), could be accepted in a better way by the same actors. And this could reinforced the foundations of the discipline.

Moscoso, Paz

2013-06-01

343

Furthering the development of standardized nursing terminology through an ENP-ICNP cross-mapping.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To examine the completeness and validity of the terms used in ENP in describing nursing diagnoses using a cross-mapping to ICNP. METHODS: The mapping procedure was carried out using the parallel mapping method. RESULTS: The interrater reliability showed good to very good results. The percentage of agreement of the rating results for the ICNP phenomenon axes was between 73% and 99%, and the randomly adjusted Cohen's Kappa value was 0.88 on the ICNP focus axis. DISCUSSION: The results of the mapping show that both classifications, ENP and INCP, are not yet complete for illustrating all aspects of nursing. Both classifications use a large proportion of overlapping terms (75%), and a small proportion of terms (25%) which describe different dimensions of nursing in both ENP and ICNP. CONCLUSION: The results of the mapping are discussed in consideration of the nurse's perspective. The main focus is on the difference between pre-combined systems, like ENP, and post-combined, like ICNP, and their implications on the use of nursing classifications in practice for the illustration of the nursing process.

Wieteck P

2008-09-01

344

How to Conduct Research on the Inherent Moral Significance of Teaching: A Phenomenological Elaboration of the Standard Repertory Grid Application  

Science.gov (United States)

George Kelly's repertory grid application seems a promising method for researching the moral significance of teaching from a "life world" perspective. However, we encountered several challenges employing the repertory grid in its standard form for an inquiry into the inherent moral significance of teachers' everyday classroom interactions. In this…

van Kan, Carlos A.; Ponte, Petra; Verloop, Nico

2010-01-01

345

A standards-based, peer-reviewed teaching award to enhance a medical school's teaching environment and inform the promotions process.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The authors provide the rationale, design, and description of a unique teaching award that has enhanced Baylor College of Medicine's teaching environment and become highly valued by the promotions and tenure (P&T) committee in determining a faculty member's readiness for promotion. This award is self-nominating and standards based. The primary purpose for development of the award was to provide the Baylor community and the P&T committee a method to understand and value the scholarship of teaching to the same degree that they understand and value the scholarship of discovery.The authors also present results from an internal evaluation of the program that included a survey and interviews. Between the inception of the award in 2001 and the internal review conducted in 2010, the award could have had an influence on the promotion of 130 of the recipients. Of the 130, 88 (65.6%) received this award before gaining their current rank (? (1) = 16.3, P < .001). Stakeholders, including department chairs and members of the P&T committee, agreed that this award is valuable to those seeking promotion. Individual recipients stated that the award is good for the institution by encouraging reflection on teaching; increasing the recognition, importance, and value of teaching; encouraging the improvement of teaching skills; and providing a better understanding to others about what medical teachers really do. Of the 214 open-ended responses to survey questions of award recipients, more than half the comments were about the value of the award and its positive effect on promotion.

Searle NS; Teal CR; Richards BF; Friedland JA; Weigel NL; Hernandez RA; Lomax JW; Coburn M; Nelson EA

2012-07-01

346

Teaching the Standards Is Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Strategies for Incorporating the Sociopolitical Dimension of DAP in Early Childhood Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

Many early childhood practitioners in the U.S. are experiencing tension between their desire to offer students developmentally appropriate learning experiences and their obligation to teach the academic knowledge and skills mandated by their states. However, careful examination of the DAP guidelines' definition of culturally appropriate practice…

Goldstein, Lisa S.

2008-01-01

347

The windmill of learning processes : a learning and teaching tool for student nurses and mentors  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

 This article presents a new approach to student nurses' learning from their interaction with psychiatric patients. Using the approach can enable students and mentors to exploit students' learning opportunities, and help students to get the most out of their clinical placement in a time, where that part of the nursing education has been reduced in some countries as e.g. Denmark. The approach is presented through a model termed the ‘Windmill of Learning Processes’, which draws on empirical data from a qualitative investigation with an explorative and descriptive design, and on the theoretical concepts of ‘disjuncture’, and ‘everyday life activities’. ‘Disjuncture’ is defined as a situation in which there is disharmony between a person's experiences and the current situation. In such a situation there is potential for learning. My analysis of the empirical data led to the identification of a new concept, which I have labelled ‘collective not-conscious disjuncture’. This is when the student and the mentor are both unaware that the student is operating in a potential learning situation. ‘Everyday life activities’ are seen as activities that are known to succeed in specific situations, because they have done so in similar situations. I have expanded upon the concept to define another phenomenon, which I have coined ‘pseudo-everyday life activities’. These closely resemble everyday life activities, but take place in a psychiatric context. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Kragelund, Linda

2011-01-01

348

Behaviour modification and gentle teaching workshops: management of children with learning disabilities exhibiting challenging behaviour and implications for learning disability nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Challenging behaviours (behaviour difficulties) represent a problem of considerable clinical significance for learning disability nurses, and a source of much human distress. Gentle teaching is a relatively new approach to dealing with behavioural difficulties, and has been received with enthusiasm by clinicians, but has so far received little empirical support. The current study attempted to compare gentle teaching with a well-established alternative (behaviour modification) and a control group. OBJECTIVES: To examine the comparative effectiveness of gentle teaching, behaviour modification and control interventions for challenging behaviour amongst children with learning disabilities. DESIGN: Nonrandomized controlled trial. SETTING: Service users' homes in East Yorkshire. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-seven children who presented with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour (behaviour difficulties) and their parents. PROCEDURE: One-day workshops in were offered by recognized authorities in either behaviour modification or gentle teaching that were not otherwise involved with the research project. Forty-one participants were recruited to the gentle teaching condition; 36 to behaviour modification; 26 to the control group. Random allocation was not possible, because of the slow uptake by interested parents. Measures was preintervention, and at assessment points up until 12 months following intervention. ANALYSIS: Quantitative analysis of pre-post differences between the groups, using t-test. RESULTS: In general, no significant differences were found between the treatment groups and controls. Significant improvements were found for both gentle teachingand behaviour modification children over controls on the AAMR ABS XVII (social engagement) subscale. Controls had more contact with medical practitioner (GP) services than behaviour modification children and less than gentle teaching children. CONCLUSION: Although very few differences were found between the three groups, those that did exist generally favoured behaviour modification. Implications for service provision and learning disability nursing practice are described.

Gates B; Newell R; Wray J

2001-04-01

349

Web-based virtual microscopy in teaching and standardizing Gleason grading.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Gleason grading forms the basis of prognostic and therapeutic assessment in prostatic carcinoma despite its subjective nature and substantial interobserver variation. The accuracy of Gleason grading can be improved by the use of educational tools such as reference images. However, conventional microscopy images are of limited educational value because it is neither possible to view the sample at different magnifications nor to navigate into different areas of the specimen. This limitation can be overcome by the use of virtual microscopy, which allows viewing entire digitized microscope slides. We created an interactive Web site ( www.webmicroscope.net/gleason ) featuring a comprehensive set of prostatic needle biopsies as virtual slides, which can be viewed with a standard Web browser (Internet Explorer or Netscape). To evaluate the validity of Web-based virtual microscopy for Gleason grading, an experienced uropathologist (TK) scored a series of 62 biopsies from the original glass slides and 6 weeks later from virtual slides on the Web site using an ordinary desktop computer. The intraobserver agreement was excellent, with identical Gleason scores found in 48 of the 62 cases ( kappa = 0.73). The 14 remaining scores differed only by 1 point on the Gleason scale (2-10). The virtual slides were viewed by 2 other uropathologists (PM and HH), with interobserver kappa coefficients ranging from 0.55 to 0.62, which is within the range of previously reported studies using glass slides. The 3 uropathologists' Gleason scores were included as reference scores on the Web site, which now serves as a publicly open platform for self-testing and learning of Gleason grading. We conclude that Web-based virtual microscopy is a promising new tool for teaching and standardizing Gleason grading.

Helin H; Lundin M; Lundin J; Martikainen P; Tammela T; Helin H; van der Kwast T; Isola J

2005-04-01

350

[Survey on the cost of the admission process of nursing technicians in a teaching hospital].  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was aimed at contributing to the cost management of the admission process of nursing technicians by mapping and measuring the direct cost of the main activities in this process. The exploratory, retrospective, documental study on the modality of case study was carried out at the Educational Support Service of the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário. The admission process was divided into five sub-processes: planning, recruiting, selection, hiring and admission training. Results showed that the direct total cost of the admission process was R$ 6359.90, and that, within the sub-processes, selection was the one that consumed most resources--R$ 3416.40, amounting to 53.72% of the total. Each hired candidate cost R$ 635.99. PMID:17977388

Okano, Helena Isuku Horibe; Castilho, Valeria

2007-09-01

351

Teaching about vulnerable populations: nursing students' experience in a homeless center.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Cultural competence is not limited to ethnicity, religion, or race but is inclusive of vulnerable groups, such as the homeless. The complex health and social issues related to homelessness requires educational instruction that supports students' ability to address and care for the multidimensional elements that surround this group. Exposure to homeless populations provides nursing students with increased awareness of the issues related to health disparities, while promoting introspective reflection on one's values and beliefs. To increase student exposure to working with homeless clients, a service-learning project using a critical social theory (CST) lens was offered at a homeless center. The students' response that clients were "just like" them, coupled with ambiguity regarding the complex social-economic-political issues surrounding the homeless, may indicate a need for further education regarding cultural understanding, sensitivity, and vulnerability. This project demonstrates the need for learning experiences that support advocacy and social responsibility for vulnerable groups. [J Nurs Educ. 2013;52(10):585-588.].

Stanley MJ

2013-10-01

352

[Survey on the cost of the admission process of nursing technicians in a teaching hospital].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was aimed at contributing to the cost management of the admission process of nursing technicians by mapping and measuring the direct cost of the main activities in this process. The exploratory, retrospective, documental study on the modality of case study was carried out at the Educational Support Service of the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário. The admission process was divided into five sub-processes: planning, recruiting, selection, hiring and admission training. Results showed that the direct total cost of the admission process was R$ 6359.90, and that, within the sub-processes, selection was the one that consumed most resources--R$ 3416.40, amounting to 53.72% of the total. Each hired candidate cost R$ 635.99.

Okano HI; Castilho V

2007-09-01

353

Recommending a Nursing-Specific Passing Standard for the IELTS Examination  

Science.gov (United States)

Licensure testing programs in the United States (e.g., nursing) face an increasing challenge of measuring the competency of internationally trained candidates, both in relation to their clinical competence and their English language competence. To assist with the latter, professional licensing bodies often adopt well-established and widely…

O'Neill, Thomas R.; Buckendahl, Chad W.; Plake, Barbara S.; Taylor, Lynda

2007-01-01

354

The standardized live patient and mechanical patient models--their roles in trauma teaching.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated improved medical student performance using standardized live patient models in the Trauma Evaluation and Management (TEAM) program. The trauma manikin has also been offered as an option for teaching trauma skills in this program. In this study, we compare performance using both models. METHODS: Final year medical students were randomly assigned to three groups: group I (n = 22) with neither model, group II (n = 24) with patient model, and group III (n = 24) with mechanical model using the same clinical scenario. All students completed pre-TEAM and post-TEAM multiple choice question (MCQ) exams and an evaluation questionnaire scoring five items on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the highest. The items were objectives were met, knowledge improved, skills improved, overall satisfaction, and course should be mandatory. Students (groups II and III) then switched models, rating preferences in six categories: more challenging, more interesting, more dynamic, more enjoyable learning, more realistic, and overall better model. Scores were analyzed by ANOVA with p < 0.05 being considered statistically significant. RESULTS: All groups had similar scores (means % +/- SD)in the pretest (group I - 50.8 +/- 7.4, group II - 51.3 +/- 6.4, group III - 51.1 +/- 6.6). All groups improved their post-test scores but groups II and III scored higher than group I with no difference in scores between groups II and III (group I - 77.5 +/- 3.8, group II - 84.8 +/- 3.6, group III - 86.3 +/- 3.2). The percent of students scoring 5 in the questionnaire are as follows: objectives met - 100% for all groups; knowledge improved: group I - 91%, group II - 96%, group III - 92%; skills improved: group I - 9%, group II - 83%, group III - 96%; overall satisfaction: group I - 91%, group II - 92%, group III - 92%; should be mandatory: group I - 32%, group II - 96%, group III - 100%. Student preferences (48 students) are as follows: the mechanical model was more challenging (44 of 48); more interesting (40 of 48); more dynamic (46 of 48); more enjoyable (48 of 48); more realistic (32/48), and better overall model (42 of 48). CONCLUSIONS: Using the TEAM program, we have demonstrated that improvement in knowledge and skills are equally enhanced by using mechanical or patient models in trauma teaching. However, students overwhelmingly preferred the mechanical model.

Ali J; Al Ahmadi K; Williams JI; Cherry RA

2009-01-01

355

Does teaching audit improve standards, and affect MCQ results in undergraduate trauma and orthopaedic tuition?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Over the study period from 1981 to 1987 inclusive, student critiques were scored to indicate the undergraduates' perception of the quality of teaching they received on each 2-month attachment to the trauma and orthopaedic surgical departments of two teaching hospitals. The medical staff and the envi...

Spencer, J. D.; Morris, R. W.

356

Estratégias de ensino das habilidades do pensamento crítico na enfermagem Estrategias de enseñanza de las habilidades del pensamiento crítico en enfermería Strategies for teaching the critical thinking abilities in nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objetivou-se caracterizar estratégias de ensino utilizadas na enfermagem para desenvolver habilidades do pensamento crítico. Elaborou-se uma revisão integrativa nas bases de dados Web of Science e Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), com os descritores critical thinking, nursing e teaching, no período de 1987 a 2008. A amostra constitui-se de 64 artigos e a análise permitiu a identificação de 27 estratégias de ensino do pensamento crítico aplicadas na enfermagem. Dentre estas, as cinco mais citadas foram: questionamento, estudo de caso, ensino online e aprendizagem interativa, mapa conceitual e aprendizagem baseada em problemas. Diferentes estratégias reveladas neste estudo evidenciam uma gama de possibilidades que poderão ser aplicadas no ensino e na prática clínica. Conclui-se que o desenvolvimento de habilidades do pensamento crítico por meio destas estratégias pode proporcionar a formação de profissionais mais críticos e reflexivos.El objetivo es caracterizar estrategias de enseñanza utilizadas en enfermería para desarrollar habilidades del pensamiento crítico. Fue elaborada una revisión integrativa en las bases de datos Web of Science y Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), con los descriptores critical thinking, nursing y teaching, en el período de 1987 a 2008. La muestra se constituye de 64 artículos cuyo análisis permitió la identificación de 27 estrategias de enseñanza del pensamiento crítico aplicadas a la enfermería. Entre estas, las cinco más citadas fueron: cuestionamiento, estudio de caso, enseñanza online y aprendizaje interactivo, mapa conceptual y aprendizaje con base a problemas. Diferentes estrategias reveladas en este estudio evidencian una gama de posibilidades que podrán ser aplicadas a la enseñanza y a la práctica clínica. Se concluye que el desarrollo de habilidades del pensamiento crítico a través de estas estrategias puede proporcionar la formación de profesionales más críticos y reflexivos.This study aimed characterize the teaching strategies applied to nursing in order to develop critical thinking skills. An integrative review was elaborated on the Web of Science and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) data base, with the descriptors critical thinking, nursing and teaching, from 1987 to 2008. The sample comprised 64 articles and the analysis provided the identification of 27 strategies for teaching critical thinking in nursing. Among those, the most referred to were questioning, case study, online teaching and interactive learning, concept map and teaching based on problem solving. Different strategies described in the study revealed a wide range of possibilities which can be applied to teaching and to clinical practice. It was concluded that the development of the critical thinking skills through these teaching strategies can help nursing students to be more critical and reflexive.

Maria da Graça Oliveira Crossetti; Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias Bittencourt; Diego Schaurich; Thaíla Tanccini; Michele Antunes

2009-01-01

357

Estratégias de ensino das habilidades do pensamento crítico na enfermagem/ Estrategias de enseñanza de las habilidades del pensamiento crítico en enfermería/ Strategies for teaching the critical thinking abilities in nursing  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Objetivou-se caracterizar estratégias de ensino utilizadas na enfermagem para desenvolver habilidades do pensamento crítico. Elaborou-se uma revisão integrativa nas bases de dados Web of Science e Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), com os descritores critical thinking, nursing e teaching, no período de 1987 a 2008. A amostra constitui-se de 64 artigos e a análise permitiu a identificação de 27 estratégias de ensino do pensamento cr? (more) ?tico aplicadas na enfermagem. Dentre estas, as cinco mais citadas foram: questionamento, estudo de caso, ensino online e aprendizagem interativa, mapa conceitual e aprendizagem baseada em problemas. Diferentes estratégias reveladas neste estudo evidenciam uma gama de possibilidades que poderão ser aplicadas no ensino e na prática clínica. Conclui-se que o desenvolvimento de habilidades do pensamento crítico por meio destas estratégias pode proporcionar a formação de profissionais mais críticos e reflexivos. Abstract in spanish El objetivo es caracterizar estrategias de enseñanza utilizadas en enfermería para desarrollar habilidades del pensamiento crítico. Fue elaborada una revisión integrativa en las bases de datos Web of Science y Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), con los descriptores critical thinking, nursing y teaching, en el período de 1987 a 2008. La muestra se constituye de 64 artículos cuyo análisis permitió la identificación de 27 estrategias (more) de enseñanza del pensamiento crítico aplicadas a la enfermería. Entre estas, las cinco más citadas fueron: cuestionamiento, estudio de caso, enseñanza online y aprendizaje interactivo, mapa conceptual y aprendizaje con base a problemas. Diferentes estrategias reveladas en este estudio evidencian una gama de posibilidades que podrán ser aplicadas a la enseñanza y a la práctica clínica. Se concluye que el desarrollo de habilidades del pensamiento crítico a través de estas estrategias puede proporcionar la formación de profesionales más críticos y reflexivos. Abstract in english This study aimed characterize the teaching strategies applied to nursing in order to develop critical thinking skills. An integrative review was elaborated on the Web of Science and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) data base, with the descriptors critical thinking, nursing and teaching, from 1987 to 2008. The sample comprised 64 articles and the analysis provided the identification of 27 strategies for teaching critical thinking in nursing (more) . Among those, the most referred to were questioning, case study, online teaching and interactive learning, concept map and teaching based on problem solving. Different strategies described in the study revealed a wide range of possibilities which can be applied to teaching and to clinical practice. It was concluded that the development of the critical thinking skills through these teaching strategies can help nursing students to be more critical and reflexive.

Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira; Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Schaurich, Diego; Tanccini, Thaíla; Antunes, Michele

2009-12-01

358

Reflexões sobre competência docente no ensino de enfermagem/ Thoughts on teaching competences in nursing/ Reflexiones sobre competencia docente en la enseñanza de enfermería  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Este estudo teórico-analítico tem como objetivo discutir os conceitos de competências docentes no ensino de enfermagem no Brasil, partindo do resgate, deste conceito, no mundo do trabalho. O ensino de enfermagem realizado em um ambiente específico, efetiva os fenômenos pedagógicos em meio a relações complexas, que ocorrem entre professor, aluno, paciente e família. Assim, o docente e o enfermeiro-educador vivenciam as atividades de ensino-aprendizagem em enfermag (more) em, nos processos de trabalho educacional, assistencial e gerencial. Para esta nova conformação do processo de ensino-aprendizagem, é necessário que não só os novos enfermeiros, mas também os atuais e futuros enfermeiros-professores, desenvolvam competências que os possibilitem a pensar e agir com ética e ousadia. Abstract in spanish Este estudio teórico-analítico tiene como objetivo discutir los conceptos de competencias docentes en la enseñanza de enfermería en Brasil, partiendo del rescate, desde el concepto, en el mundo del trabajo. La enseñanza de enfermería realizada en un ambiente específico, efectiva los fenómenos pedagógicos por medio de relaciones complejas, que ocurren entre profesor, alumno, paciente y familia. Así, el docente y el enfermero-educador vivencian las actividades de (more) enseñanza-aprendizaje en enfermería, en los procesos de trabajo educacional, asistencial y gerencial. Para esta nueva conformación del proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, es necesario que no solo los nuevos enfermeros, pero también los actuales y futuros enfer-meros-profesores, desarrollen competencias que los posibiliten a pensar y actuar con étnica y osadía. Abstract in english This theoretical-analytical study is aimed at discussing the concepts of teaching competences in Nursing courses in Brazil, with the starting point being the transfer of this concept from the professional practice. Nursing education takes place in a specific environment and puts into effect the pedagogical phenomena among the complex relations that occur between instructor, pupil, patient and family. Therefore, instructors and nurse-educators experience the activities of (more) teaching-learning in Nursing in the processes of educational, caring and management work. For such new conformation of the teaching-learning process it is necessary not only that the new nurses, but the current and future nurse-instructors as well, develop abilities that make possible for them to think and act with ethics and boldness.

Pinhel, Inahiá; Kurcgant, Paulina

2007-12-01

359

Reflexões sobre competência docente no ensino de enfermagem Reflexiones sobre competencia docente en la enseñanza de enfermería Thoughts on teaching competences in nursing  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este estudo teórico-analítico tem como objetivo discutir os conceitos de competências docentes no ensino de enfermagem no Brasil, partindo do resgate, deste conceito, no mundo do trabalho. O ensino de enfermagem realizado em um ambiente específico, efetiva os fenômenos pedagógicos em meio a relações complexas, que ocorrem entre professor, aluno, paciente e família. Assim, o docente e o enfermeiro-educador vivenciam as atividades de ensino-aprendizagem em enfermagem, nos processos de trabalho educacional, assistencial e gerencial. Para esta nova conformação do processo de ensino-aprendizagem, é necessário que não só os novos enfermeiros, mas também os atuais e futuros enfermeiros-professores, desenvolvam competências que os possibilitem a pensar e agir com ética e ousadia.Este estudio teórico-analítico tiene como objetivo discutir los conceptos de competencias docentes en la enseñanza de enfermería en Brasil, partiendo del rescate, desde el concepto, en el mundo del trabajo. La enseñanza de enfermería realizada en un ambiente específico, efectiva los fenómenos pedagógicos por medio de relaciones complejas, que ocurren entre profesor, alumno, paciente y familia. Así, el docente y el enfermero-educador vivencian las actividades de enseñanza-aprendizaje en enfermería, en los procesos de trabajo educacional, asistencial y gerencial. Para esta nueva conformación del proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, es necesario que no solo los nuevos enfermeros, pero también los actuales y futuros enfer-meros-profesores, desarrollen competencias que los posibiliten a pensar y actuar con étnica y osadía.This theoretical-analytical study is aimed at discussing the concepts of teaching competences in Nursing courses in Brazil, with the starting point being the transfer of this concept from the professional practice. Nursing education takes place in a specific environment and puts into effect the pedagogical phenomena among the complex relations that occur between instructor, pupil, patient and family. Therefore, instructors and nurse-educators experience the activities of teaching-learning in Nursing in the processes of educational, caring and management work. For such new conformation of the teaching-learning process it is necessary not only that the new nurses, but the current and future nurse-instructors as well, develop abilities that make possible for them to think and act with ethics and boldness.

Inahiá Pinhel; Paulina Kurcgant

2007-01-01

360

Successful implementation of a nurse-led teaching programme to independently administer subcutaneous methotrexate in the community setting to children with Crohn's disease.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Methotrexate is increasingly used as a third line immunosuppression agent in children with Crohn's disease (CD). Methotrexate is traditionally administered in the hospital setting. AIM: To set up a nurse-led education programme to teach children/their parents to administer subcutaneous methotrexate in the community. METHODS: All patients were given methotrexate over a 16-month period. Patient demographics including previous treatments were collected. A competency based teaching package was implemented by the inflammatory bowel disease nurse. Distances and travel times together with costings were calculated. RESULTS: Thirty two patients (19 male; 13 female) with a median treatment age of 11.96 years (IQR 10.67-13.92) were studied. Thirty of 32 (17 children, 13 parents) were independently administering methotrexate. The median return journey distance to hospital was 23 miles (IQR 14.4-42.4) taking a median time of 52 min (IQR 41.0-73.5) for each injection. The total patient travel saving was £10,537 (average £730 per patient) and nursing time saving was £12,808 with home administration (total saving £23,345). CONCLUSIONS: This paediatric study demonstrates that methotrexate injections can be given successfully in the majority (94%) of patients with CD independently in the community, resulting in significant time and money savings for patients and health professionals alike.

Garrick V; Atwal P; Barclay AR; McGrogan P; Russell RK

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

Escenarios docentes asistenciales para la formación de los enfermeros en Cuba Healthcare Teaching Scenarios for nurses training in Cuba  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar la proporción en que se proyecta la utilización de los diferentes escenarios de formación docente-asistencial en los territorios del país para la carrera de Licenciatura en Enfermería. MÉTODOS: Se analizó y aprobó en los colectivos de asignatura de la disciplina Enfermería de los diferentes centros de formación del país (CEMS) una propuesta de distribución en escenarios de atención primaria (APS) y secundaria (hospitales) del fondo de tiempo de educación en el trabajo que aparece en los programas propuestos por la Comisión Nacional de Carrera (CNC). RESULTADOS: Se aprecia heterogeneidad en la distribución de horas propuesta por los diversos CEMS para las asignaturas consultadas, aunque en todas, la mayoría de los CEMS -y en algunos casos, la totalidad- reconoce el hospital como escenario principal para la formación de enfermeros, tanto de nivel técnico como profesional. Varios centros no se pronunciaron sobre las actividades de educación en el trabajo en el período interencuentros, lo que debe ser objeto de análisis ulterior, por la importancia que se atribuye a esa parte de la formación en la estrategia del plan de estudio. CONCLUSIONES: Los profesores de estos colectivos de asignatura identifican al hospital como escenario preferencial para la formación. Se requieren otras investigaciones para buscar una caracterización de los factores asociados a la falta de proyección del tiempo de educación en el período interencuentros por algunas asignaturas y centros.OBJECTIVE: To characterize the ratio in which the use of different scenarios of teaching-assisting training in all the country for the Nursing Degree career is planned. METHODS: A proposal of distribution of primary care scenarios (PCS) and secondary (hospitals) of the education time reservoir in the tasks appearing in the programs proposed by the National Commission of Career (NCC) was analyzed and approved. RESULTS: There is heterogeneity in the hours distribution proposed the different NCCs for the looked up subjects, although in all of them, most of the NCCs _ and in some cases the total, recognize the hospital as the main scenario to nurses training at technical and professional level. Some institutions don't gave opinion on the work education activities during the inter-meetings period, which must to be subsequently analyzed due to significance of that part of the training in the study plan strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Professors of these subject staff identify the hospital like the training preferential scenario. Other researchers are needed to find a characterization of factors associated with the lack of projection of education time during the inter-meeting period by some subjects and centers.

Marta Pernas Gómez; Magdalena Zubizarreta Estévez; Maritza Leyva Hidalgo

2010-01-01

362

Escenarios docentes asistenciales para la formación de los enfermeros en Cuba/ Healthcare Teaching Scenarios for nurses training in Cuba  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish OBJETIVO: Caracterizar la proporción en que se proyecta la utilización de los diferentes escenarios de formación docente-asistencial en los territorios del país para la carrera de Licenciatura en Enfermería. MÉTODOS: Se analizó y aprobó en los colectivos de asignatura de la disciplina Enfermería de los diferentes centros de formación del país (CEMS) una propuesta de distribución en escenarios de atención primaria (APS) y secundaria (hospitales) del fondo de t (more) iempo de educación en el trabajo que aparece en los programas propuestos por la Comisión Nacional de Carrera (CNC). RESULTADOS: Se aprecia heterogeneidad en la distribución de horas propuesta por los diversos CEMS para las asignaturas consultadas, aunque en todas, la mayoría de los CEMS -y en algunos casos, la totalidad- reconoce el hospital como escenario principal para la formación de enfermeros, tanto de nivel técnico como profesional. Varios centros no se pronunciaron sobre las actividades de educación en el trabajo en el período interencuentros, lo que debe ser objeto de análisis ulterior, por la importancia que se atribuye a esa parte de la formación en la estrategia del plan de estudio. CONCLUSIONES: Los profesores de estos colectivos de asignatura identifican al hospital como escenario preferencial para la formación. Se requieren otras investigaciones para buscar una caracterización de los factores asociados a la falta de proyección del tiempo de educación en el período interencuentros por algunas asignaturas y centros. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To characterize the ratio in which the use of different scenarios of teaching-assisting training in all the country for the Nursing Degree career is planned. METHODS: A proposal of distribution of primary care scenarios (PCS) and secondary (hospitals) of the education time reservoir in the tasks appearing in the programs proposed by the National Commission of Career (NCC) was analyzed and approved. RESULTS: There is heterogeneity in the hours distribution propo (more) sed the different NCCs for the looked up subjects, although in all of them, most of the NCCs _ and in some cases the total, recognize the hospital as the main scenario to nurses training at technical and professional level. Some institutions don't gave opinion on the work education activities during the inter-meetings period, which must to be subsequently analyzed due to significance of that part of the training in the study plan strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Professors of these subject staff identify the hospital like the training preferential scenario. Other researchers are needed to find a characterization of factors associated with the lack of projection of education time during the inter-meeting period by some subjects and centers.

Pernas Gómez, Marta; Zubizarreta Estévez, Magdalena; Leyva Hidalgo, Maritza

2010-12-01

363

Achievement of standards for quality care of hypertension by physicians and nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The quality of care provided by physicians and nurses to a hypertension clinic population was studied using retrospective chart audit to compare control of blood pressure (physiologic outcome) and provider performance (process). Data was collected from 200 records, 36.4% of patients, in the program. Return visits were kept by 173 patients (86.5%) during the 6 month study period. Satisfactory point prevelance BP control (diastolic less than or equal to 90 mmHg) was achieved in 103 (59.5%). Adequate process was documented for 49 of 69 patients with unsatisfactory BP control. The records of 20 patients (11.5%) did not satisfy minumum quality of care criteria. Physicians and nurses saw similar patient groups and did not differ in process documentation or outcome results. The audit methodology was efficient, effective in evaluating management and useful in providing information about staff performance.

Hill MN; Reichgott MJ

1979-01-01

364

Standard medication information is not enough: poor concordance of patient and nurse perceptions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This paper is a report of a study to describe patient and nurse perceptions of patient satisfaction with information about the medicines at two heart failure clinics after medication up-titration and information-giving. BACKGROUND: Chronic heart failure is a major cause of hospitalization. Poor adherence to medications increases mortality and heart failure-related hospitalizations. To achieve mutual goal-setting (concordance) regarding medication-taking behaviours, health providers need to understand patient information needs regarding the prescribed medicines. METHODS: A convenience sample of 56 patients with chronic heart failure referred for an up-titration of medicines and information-giving about the condition and treatment completed the Satisfaction about Information about Medicines Scale at their first and last visits. Nurses completed the same questionnaire after each patient's final visit, assessing the patient's need for further information. The data were collected between 2002 and 2004. RESULTS: Patient scores indicated statistically significantly more satisfaction with their information at the final visit compared with the first visit (P = 0.005). However, at the programme conclusion, nurses (n = 7) rated patients to be appropriately informed while patients reported a persistent need for further information (P = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Further research should evaluate more advanced pedagogical strategies such as how to address patients' expectations about the effect of medicines when actual effects of the treatment are related to mortality and morbidity at the population level and may not result directly in symptom relief at an individual level.

Ekman I; Schaufelberger M; Kjellgren KI; Swedberg K; Granger BB

2007-10-01

365

Computers in nursing research.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nicola Eaton launches a four-part, monthly series by considering the range of uses of computer hardware and software for nurse researchers. The other articles in the series will look at expert systems in nursing, computers in nurse education and interactive video as a teaching medium.

Eaton N

1991-05-01

366

Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

Denehy, Janice

2010-01-01

367

Evaluation of pneumococcal vaccination rates after vaccine protocol changes and nurse education in a tertiary care teaching hospital.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Pneumococcal vaccination in eligible patients is recommended by the Infectious Disease Society of America and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Because hospitalization provides an opportunity to vaccinate patients at high risk for developing serious pneumonia complications, eligibility screening and administration of the pneumococcal vaccine prior to discharge in qualified patients are evaluated by the Joint Commission and the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services (CMS) as part of pneumococcal vaccination core quality measures. Among patients with an inpatient diagnosis of pneumonia in 2008, 56% in our 580-bed tertiary care teaching hospital, compared with 84% nationwide, received pneumococcal vaccination. To improve pneumococcal vaccination rates for all patients in the study facility and not just those with pneumonia, a multifaceted intervention including a revised nurse screening tool, rescheduling of the vaccine order, storage of the vaccine in automated dispensing cabinets on the nursing unit, and creation of a vaccine tracking system was developed and implemented between August 2009 and October 2009. OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of a multifaceted intervention on pneumococcal vaccine screening and administration rates in eligible patients according to the CDC recommendations who were admitted to an internal medicine unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. METHODS: All patients aged 18 years or older from 2 internal medicine units were identified during 4-month time intervals before (pre-intervention, April through July 2009) and after (post-intervention, November 2009 through February 2010) implementation of the multifaceted pneumococcal vaccine protocol. Of these, 150 patients from each 4-month period were randomly selected for electronic medical record review. Eligibility for pneumococcal vaccination was derived from the CDC recommendations and consensus of the vaccine steering committee at the study institution; the criteria included aged 65 years or older, admitting diagnosis of pneumonia, at least 1 of several chronic diseases, immunocompromising condition, cochlear implant, cerebrospinal fluid leak, current tobacco smoking, pregnancy or having a child in the home less than aged 6 months, or awaiting solid organ transplantation. Patients who had vaccine contraindications/precautions or had been vaccinated in the previous 5 years were ineligible. Data on demographics, presence of vaccine screening, indication, administration, rescheduling, and refusal were collected. The primary endpoint was the rate of pneumococcal vaccine administration in eligible medicine patients. Secondary endpoints included changes in screening rates, vaccine refusal, and order rescheduling. Descriptive statistics and Student's t-test were used to evaluate patient demographic data. Pearson chi-square was used to compare the pre- and post-implementation periods. RESULTS: The rate of pneumococcal vaccine administration in eligible patients significantly improved post-implementation compared with pre-implementation (74.2% vs. 19.1%, respectively, P < 0.001). Rates of vaccine screening were similar pre-implementation (96.0%) and post-implementation (99.3%, P = 0.056). The rates of vaccine refusal in the pre- and post-implementation periods did not significantly differ (10.6% vs. 22.6%, respectively, P = 0.203). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of vaccine protocol changes was associated with improved pneumococcal vaccination rates in eligible medicine patients. Protocol changes were relatively easy to implement in a large institution, and a similar approach may be implemented at other institutions as an effective way to improve pneumococcal vaccination rates.

Smith JG; Metzger NL

2011-11-01

368

NURSING KNOWLEDGE OF OXIGENOTHERAPY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge of the nurses? team about the sequels thatthe oxigentherapy may cause to the newborns and how to make the nurse?s care. The research was qualitativeaccording to MINAYO (1996) and applied to the nurse?s team of an intensive care for newborns. The analysis wasbased in two categories: the nurse?s care for the newborn in oxigentherapy and the nurse?s team perception aboutsome possible sequels to the newborn in oxigentherapy. It was possible to observe that the care was appliedwithout any standardization and the knowledge about this problem is not enough.

Liandra Grando; Cláudia Silveira Viera

2002-01-01

369

Using role playing in the integration of knowledge in the teaching-learning process in nursing: assessment of students Utilización del role playing en la integración de conocimientos en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de enfermería: valoración de los estudiantes Usando role playing na integração do conhecimento no processo ensino-aprendizagem em enfermagem: avaliação dos alunos  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

To assess role-playing as a methodology in the teaching-learning process for the Nursing Degree. To identify the attitude of nursing students towards role-playing. To analyze the response of students to their teaching-learning process after role-playing. Relationship is one of the main functions of ...

Martínez Riera, José Ramón; Cibanal Juan, Luis; Pérez Mora, María Jesús

370

Ensino de Graduação em Enfermagem: a contribuição da Associação Brasileira de Enfermagem Enseñanza de Graduación en Enfermería: la contribuición de la Asociación Brasilera de Enfermería Teaching in Undergraduate Nursing: the contribution of Brazilian Nursing Association  

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Full Text Available O presente estudo apresenta algumas das ações mais relevantes da Associação Brasileira de Enfermagem para com o processo de formação da(o) enfermeira(o), no país, contextualizando essas ações com o momento histórico em que elas aconteceram. Nesse sentido, o estudo se constitui, não só, numa produção de conhecimento na área, mas também num elemento de registro da história do ensino de graduação em enfermagem no Brasil, oferecendo instrumentos de análise para a situação atual desse ensino. O texto destaca as contribuições da ABEn no processo de formação da enfermeira, na construção e sustentabilidade das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais do Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem.El presente estudio presenta algunas de las acciones más relevantes de la Asociación Brasileña de Enfermería para con el proceso de formación del (de la) enfermero(a), en el país, contextualizando esas acciones con el momento historico en que ellas acontecieron. En ese sentido, el estudio se constituye, no sólo, en una producción de conocimiento en el área, pero también en un elemento de registro de la historia de la enseñanza de graduación en enfermería en el Brasil, ofreciendo instrumentos de análisis para la situación actual de esa enseñanza. El texto señala las contribuciones de la ABEn en el proceso de formación de la enfermería, en la construcción y sustentabilidad de las Directrices Curriculares Nacionales para la Graduación en Enfermería.The present study shows some of the most relevant actions of the Brazilian Association of Nursing in favor of the education process of the nursing professionals in Brazil, contextualizing those actions in the historical moment in which they occurred. In this manner, the study represents not only production of knowledge in the field, but also an element of record of the history of undergraduate nursing teaching in Brazil, offering instruments of analysis of the current situation of this teaching. The text highlights the contributions of the Brazilian Association of Nursing (ABEn) in the education process of the nursing professionals, and in the elaboration and sustainability of the National Curricular Guidelines of the Undergraduate Nursing Course.

Eucléa Gomes Vale; Josicelia Dumêt Fernandes

2006-01-01

371

Is a nurse-led telephone intervention a viable alternative to nurse-led home care and standard care for patients receiving oral capecitabine? Results from a large prospective audit in patients with colorectal cancer.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Home care nursing has been shown to be a valuable service for patients receiving oral chemotherapy; however, associated costs can be high and telephone-based services may be more cost-effective options. This prospective audit explored the usefulness of a nurse-led telephone intervention for supporting cancer patients treated with Capecitabine, comparing historical findings from a randomised trial evaluating a home-based intervention over standard care with a modified nurse-led telephone follow-up intervention. Self-reported toxicity and service use were assessed in 298 patients who received nurse-led telephone follow-up, compared with historical data from 164 patients (81 receiving standard care and 83 home care intervention). Findings suggested that nurse-led telephone follow-up can potentially lead to reduced toxicity (chest pain, vomiting, oral mucositis, nausea, insomnia) when compared with standard care, and that it has a similar impact on the management of some symptoms when compared with home care (i.e. vomiting, oral mucositis), although it was not as effective as the home care intervention for other toxicities (diarrhoea and insomnia). These encouraging findings need to be explored further using a randomised trial design before we reach any conclusions. Further research should also include a health economics study to assess the cost-effectiveness of the telephone-based services for patients receiving oral chemotherapy.

Craven O; Hughes CA; Burton A; Saunders MP; Molassiotis A

2013-05-01

372

Referências para o ensino de competências na enfermagem Referencias para la formación por competencia en enfermería References for competence teaching in nursing  

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Full Text Available O presente artigo de revisão de literatura traz referências pedagógicas para a implantação de um projeto de ensino por competências para a formação de enfermeiros, destacando as bases de sustentação deste projeto e o modelo formativo de avaliação.El artículo presenta referencias pedagógicas para la implantation de um proyecto de enseñanza por competência para la formación de enfermeras, destacando las bases de sustentar este proyecto y el modelo de formación cualitativa.The present literature review introduces pedagogical references for the implantation of a teaching by competences project to the nursing education, emphasizing the support of this project and the formative model of evaluation.

Edvane Birelo Lopes De Domenico; Cilene Aparecida Costardi Ide

2005-01-01

373

Pain in children: knowledge and perceptions of the nursing staff at a rural tertiary care teaching hospital in India.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To assess the knowledge and perception regarding pain amongst nursing staff and to determine whether varying clinical exposure to painful procedures in children had any association with their perception of pain. METHODS: A consensually validated questionnaire containing combination of questions from basic (must know) and advanced (nice to know) areas of knowledge about nursing pediatric patients and questions related to nurses' perception about pain in pediatric patients was administered to the eligible nursing staff at a Rural Tertiary Care Hospital in Western India. The responses to the questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the comparisons were made by applying chi-square test. RESULTS: Three Hundred and Fifty one usable questionnaires (83.37 %) out of 421 were returned. The knowledge of the nurses in general regarding pain was observed to be poor. Only 60 % of all the nurses had complete knowledge of all the basic questions asked. Only 3.1 % had answered all of the five advanced questions correctly, while 96.9 % of the nurses had answered one or more questions incorrectly. CONCLUSIONS: The deficit in knowledge and shortcomings in perception of nursing staff needs to be addressed and steps need to be taken to improve the nurse's knowledge and modify beliefs and attitude of the nursing staff towards the pain of the pediatric patients.

Nimbalkar AS; Dongara AR; Ganjiwale JD; Nimbalkar SM

2013-06-01

374

The use of standardized patients to teach and test interpersonal and communication skills with students in speech-language pathology.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of standardized patients (SPs) with aphasia to teach interpersonal and communication skills to new graduate student-clinicians in Speech-Language Pathology, and to test those skills via serial Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). This study had three phases: (1) clinical teaching using SPs, (2) mid-term evaluation via a single case OSCE, and (3) end-of-term evaluation via a multi-case OSCE. These phases were integrated with classroom teaching and testing components over a 16-week academic semester. Eighteen students participated while concurrently enrolled in a course on diagnosis and management of aphasia taught by the first author. One half of the class received initial instruction via a combination of didactic lecture and standardized patient interaction, while the other half of the class was taught initially via didactic lecture only. On OSCE I, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in their interpersonal and communication skills, with the class as a whole demonstrating less than acceptable competency. After targeting these skills in all students via additional class lectures, there was a statistically and clinically significant improvement in their competency in this area on OSCE II. Student feedback was positive.

Zraick RI; Allen RM; Johnson SB

2003-01-01

375

Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Nursing Education: Trends and Issues  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Nurse educators are considering the inclusion of complementary and alternative therapies in nursing curricula with increasing frequency, motivated at least in part by the ever-increasing public enthusiasm for these therapies. This article addresses the differing paradigms between orthodox Western medicine and complementary and alternative therapies, describing the research, language, educational, legal , financial, and ethical issues related to the use of complementary and alternative therapies. Additionally, it presents sources of current standards, along with examples of teaching these therapies at the undergraduate, graduate and continuing education levels and suggests strategies for teaching these therapies.

Gaydos, H.L

2001-01-01

376

Improving information technology competencies: implications for psychiatric mental health nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

While substantial evidence links information technology (IT) with improved patient safety, care quality, access, and efficiency, nurses must demonstrate competencies in computers, informatics, and information literacy in order to use IT for practice, education, and research. The nursing profession has established IT competencies for all nurses at beginning and experienced levels. Newly revised standards also articulate role-specific expectations for advanced practice nurses. Unfortunately, there is a concern that many nurses may not possess these capabilities and that nurse educators are not prepared to teach them. IT competency evaluations, which have focused predominately on nursing education, indicate novice skill levels for most faculty and students. In numerous studies, again conducted largely in nursing education, significant improvement in IT competencies has been achieved only with intensive interventions. Deficits in IT competencies are a significant concern, because the federal government has mandated full implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by 2014. EHR will require all nurses to use IT to deliver, document, and obtain reimbursement for patient care. In response to these concerns, two recent initiatives, the "Health Information Technology Scholars (HITS)" and "Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER)" projects, have been launched. By enhancing IT competencies, these projects will enable nurses to use evidence-based practice and other innovations to transform clinical care, education, and research. This report updates psychiatric-mental health nurses on the IT competencies literature, recent enhancement initiatives and innovations, and their implications for the specialty. PMID:19148816

Fetter, Marilyn S

2009-01-01