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1

Multidimensional characterization of sexual minority adolescents' sexual safety strategies.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Young adults have high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sexual minority youths' risk for STIs, including HIV, is as high as or higher than sexual majority peers'. Sexual safety, while often treated as a single behavior such as condom use, can be best conceptualized as the result of multiple factors. We used latent class analysis to identify profiles based on ever-used sexual safety strategies and lifetime number of partners among 425 self-identified LGBTQ youth aged 14-19. Data collection took place anonymously online. We identified four specific subgroup profiles for males and three for females, with each subgroup representing a different level and type of sexual safety. Profiles differed from each other in terms of age and outness for males, and in outness, personal homonegativity, and amount of education received about sexual/romantic relationships for females. Youths' sexual safety profiles have practice implications for sexuality educators, health care professionals, and parents.

Masters NT; Beadnell B; Morrison DM; Hoppe MJ; Wells EA

2013-10-01

2

Conceptualization of sexual partner relationship steadiness among ethnic minority adolescent women: implications for evidence-based behavioral sexual risk reduction interventions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Cognitive behavioral interventions for sexual risk reduction have been less successful among ethnic minority adolescent women with histories of abuse and sexually transmitted infections (STI) than among other adolescent populations. African American and Mexican American adolescent women (ages 14-18 years, n = 548) self-reported sexual partner relationship steadiness and sexual risk behaviors via semi-structured interviews at study entry. Descriptive and bivariate analyses compared sexual risk behaviors by sexual partner relationship steadiness. Steady and unsteady relationships were conceptualized differently. Steady relationships included emotional or financial support, sexual communication, greater relationship importance, unintended pregnancy, and perceived monogamy during break-ups. Unsteady relationships were unpredictable, including sex with ex-steady partners and friends with benefits, lack of mutual respect, and poor sexual communication. Modification of sexual risk reduction interventions including conceptualizations of risk by context of sexual partner relationship status is recommended to enhance efficacy among minority adolescent women with STI or history of abuse.

Champion JD; Collins JL

2013-05-01

3

Portuguese adolescents' attitudes toward sexual minorities: transphobia, homophobia, and gender role beliefs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research has shown that negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men are common and widespread in Western societies. However, few studies have addressed attitudes toward transgender individuals. In addition, although research has shown that homophobic harassment and bullying is highly common among adolescents, little is known about adolescent's attitudes toward sexual minorities. This study aimed to fill these gaps in knowledge, by investigating adolescents' attitudes toward transgender individuals and possible attitudinal correlates of those attitudes. Participants (N?=?188; 62 males and 126 females) were recruited in high schools in Lisbon, Portugal. Age ranged from 15 to 19 years (M?=?17; SD = .96). Participants completed a questionnaire booklet measuring attitudes toward transgender individuals, lesbians, and gay men, and gender role beliefs. Results revealed that attitudes toward transgender individuals were significantly correlated with all attitude measures. Specifically, it was revealed that those participants who endorsed negative attitudes toward transgender individuals were also endorsing of negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men and tended to adhere to traditional gender roles. A significant gender effect was found with males being more negative toward sexual minorities than females, but these negative attitudes were more extreme toward gay men than toward lesbian women. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Costa PA; Davies M

2012-01-01

4

High burden of homelessness among sexual-minority adolescents: findings from a representative Massachusetts high school sample.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: We compared the prevalence of current homelessness among adolescents reporting a minority sexual orientation (lesbian/gay, bisexual, unsure, or heterosexual with same-sex sexual partners) with that among exclusively heterosexual adolescents. METHODS: We combined data from the 2005 and 2007 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a representative sample of public school students in grades 9 though 12 (n = 6317). RESULTS: Approximately 25% of lesbian/gay, 15% of bisexual, and 3% of exclusively heterosexual Massachusetts public high school students were homeless. Sexual-minority males and females had an odds of reporting current homelessness that was between 4 and 13 times that of their exclusively heterosexual peers. Sexual-minority youths' greater likelihood of being homeless was driven by their increased risk of living separately from their parents or guardians. CONCLUSIONS: Youth homelessness is linked with numerous threats such as violence, substance use, and mental health problems. Although discrimination and victimization related to minority sexual orientation status are believed to be important causal factors, research is needed to improve our understanding of the risks and protective factors for homelessness and to determine effective strategies to prevent homelessness in this population.

Corliss HL; Goodenow CS; Nichols L; Austin SB

2011-09-01

5

Sexual minority-related victimization as a mediator of mental health disparities in sexual minority youth: a longitudinal analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sexual minority youth (youth who are attracted to the same sex or endorse a gay/lesbian/bisexual identity) report significantly higher rates of depression and suicidality than heterosexual youth. The minority stress hypothesis contends that the stigma and discrimination experienced by sexual minority youth create a hostile social environment that can lead to chronic stress and mental health problems. The present study used longitudinal mediation models to directly test sexual minority-specific victimization as a potential explanatory mechanism of the mental health disparities of sexual minority youth. One hundred ninety-seven adolescents (14-19 years old; 70 % female; 29 % sexual minority) completed measures of sexual minority-specific victimization, depressive symptoms, and suicidality at two time points 6 months apart. Compared to heterosexual youth, sexual minority youth reported higher levels of sexual minority-specific victimization, depressive symptoms, and suicidality. Sexual minority-specific victimization significantly mediated the effect of sexual minority status on depressive symptoms and suicidality. The results support the minority stress hypothesis that targeted harassment and victimization are partly responsible for the higher levels of depressive symptoms and suicidality found in sexual minority youth. This research lends support to public policy initiatives that reduce bullying and hate crimes because reducing victimization can have a significant impact on the health and well-being of sexual minority youth.

Burton CM; Marshal MP; Chisolm DJ; Sucato GS; Friedman MS

2013-03-01

6

Puberty and adolescent sexuality.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Sexuality emerges as a major developmental element of puberty and the adolescent years that follow. However, connecting the sexuality that emerges with puberty and elements of adult sexuality is difficult because much adolescent sexuality research addresses the transition to partnered sexual behaviors (primarily coitus) and consequences such as unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This review proposes a framework of an expanded understanding of puberty and adolescent sexuality from the perspective of four hallmarks of adult sexuality: sexual desire; sexual arousal; sexual behaviors; and, sexual function. This approach thus addresses important gaps in understanding of the ontogeny of sex and the continuum of sexuality development from adolescence through the adult lifespan. PMID:23998672

Fortenberry, J Dennis

2013-07-01

7

Puberty and adolescent sexuality.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Sexuality emerges as a major developmental element of puberty and the adolescent years that follow. However, connecting the sexuality that emerges with puberty and elements of adult sexuality is difficult because much adolescent sexuality research addresses the transition to partnered sexual behaviors (primarily coitus) and consequences such as unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This review proposes a framework of an expanded understanding of puberty and adolescent sexuality from the perspective of four hallmarks of adult sexuality: sexual desire; sexual arousal; sexual behaviors; and, sexual function. This approach thus addresses important gaps in understanding of the ontogeny of sex and the continuum of sexuality development from adolescence through the adult lifespan.

Fortenberry JD

2013-07-01

8

Sexual behavior of adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction Numerous studies have shown that sexual behavior increases among adolescents. Disharmony between biological and psychosocial maturity among young people may cause risky behavior, and endanger psychophysical and reproductive health of young persons. Material and methods A questionnaire on sexual behavior was completed by 169 adolescents, 1st and 4th year high school students. Results Every 6th first grade and every 2nd forth grade adolescent is sexually active. Male adolescents begin sexual activities significantly earlier (at the age of 15.6) than female adolescents (16.5). Also, young men have significantly more partners (3.6) than girls (1.3), and more parallel sexual relations than girls. Only 1/3 of sexually active adolescents always use some kind of contraception, more frequently boys (41.9%) than girls (26.7%). Discussion Early commencement of sexual activity results with longer active period before realization of the reproductive function, which increases risk for reproductive health disorders. Unprotected sexual intercourse and large number of partners also present significant risk factors. Conclusion Sexual life of adolescents begins at the age of 16, on average, and only every third always uses contraceptive protection, which points to a need for better education on reproductive health by using contemporary methods. It is also necessary to increase availability of contraceptives (condoms) at all places where adolescents spend time (in schools, bars, cinemas, disco clubs etc.) in order to achieve responsible sexual behavior and protection of reproductive health among youth.

Mijatovi?-Jovanovi? Vesna; Ukropina Snežana; Kvrgi? Svetlana T.; Šurkovi?-Ni?iforovi? Olja

2004-01-01

9

Coping behaviors among sexual minority female youth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article summarizes data from a qualitative study investigating the ways in which female youth perceive and respond to challenges related to the interplay of late adolescence and a minority sexual orientation. Fifteen sexual minority females in late adolescence were interviewed individually and in focus groups. The interviews focused on participants' perceptions of challenges, the impact those stressors have in their lives, and methods they utilize to cope with them. The most common negative experiences reported were isolation, lack of acceptance, harassment, and violence. Sub-themes include: hearing negative messages about gender and sexual orientation, pressures to conform to a variety of cultural norms including gender norms, fears of future violence, and pressure to identify sexual orientation. Collectively, the participants described these negative consequences of experiences of heterosexism, sexism, and racism as their most difficult experiences. The most common responses to these stressors reported by participants were finding support in relationships, engaging in coping responses, pursuing education and activism, rebellion and resistance, and avoidance and deferment.

Pendragon DK

2010-01-01

10

Adolescent sexual behavior.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

What is known about adolescent sexual behavior is reviewed. First, the onset of sexual behavior in the teenage years is considered as a function of cohort, gender, and ethnic differences. Omissions in the research on sexual behavior other than intercourse are highlighted. Possible biological, social, and social cognitive processes underlying teenage sexual behavior are then considered. Next, demographic trends in the use of contraceptives and antecedents of regular birth control use are reviewed. Finally, some of the successful program initiatives directed toward altering sexual and contraceptive practices are discussed, keeping in mind the importance and relative lack of well-designed and carefully evaluated programs.

Brooks-Gunn J; Furstenberg FF Jr

1989-02-01

11

Sexual Behavior of Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Confined to discussion of heterosexual activities, this article examines adolescent sexual behavior in terms of promiscuity; the search for a sexual behavior code; the impact of the media; and the influence of peer groups, religious identification, and the adult double standard. (JC)

Wagner, Hilmar

1978-01-01

12

Health disparities among sexual minority women veterans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Lesbian and bisexual (i.e., sexual minority) identity is more common among women veterans than among male veterans. Unique health issues have been identified among women veterans and among sexual minority women, but little is known about women who are both sexual minorities and veterans. This study aimed to compare demographic and health information from sexual minority women veterans with sexual minority women non-veterans and heterosexual women veterans. METHODS: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data were pooled from ten U.S. states that elected to ask sexual identity during 2010. The analytic sample was comprised of women who identified both their sexual identity and veteran status (n=1,908). Mental health indicators were frequent mental distress, sleep problems, low social/emotional support, and low satisfaction with life. Health risk indicators included current smoking, overweight, and obesity. Physical health status was defined by three components: disability requiring assistive equipment, >14 days of poor physical health in the past 30 days, and activity limitations. RESULTS: Compared with heterosexual women veterans, sexual minority women veterans had higher odds of mental distress (odds ratio [OR]=3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.61-5.70) and smoking (OR=2.31, 95%CI: 1.19-4.48). After adjusting for demographic correlates, sexual minority women veterans had three times the odds of poor physical health (OR=3.01, 95%CI: 1.51-5.99) than their sexual minority non-veteran peers. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest sexual minority women veterans may experience unique health disparities relevant to provision of care in both Veterans Affairs (VA) and non-VA healthcare systems. Future research requires availability of data that include sexual minority status.

Blosnich J; Foynes MM; Shipherd JC

2013-07-01

13

Social networks and risk for depressive symptoms in a national sample of sexual minority youth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of the study was to examine the social networks of sexual minority youths and to determine the associations between social networks and depressive symptoms. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative cohort study of American adolescents (N = 14,212). Wave 1 (1994-1995) collected extensive information about the social networks of participants through peer nomination inventories, as well as measures of sexual minority status and depressive symptoms. Using social network data, we examined three characteristics of adolescents' social relationships: (1) social isolation; (2) degree of connectedness; and (3) social status. Sexual minority youths, particularly females, were more isolated, less connected, and had lower social status in peer networks than opposite-sex attracted youths. Among sexual minority male (but not female) youths, greater isolation as well as lower connectedness and status within a network were associated with greater depressive symptoms. Moreover, greater isolation in social networks partially explained the association between sexual minority status and depressive symptoms among males. Finally, a significant 3-way interaction indicated that the association between social isolation and depression was stronger for sexual minority male youths than non-minority youths and sexual minority females. These results suggest that the social networks in which sexual minority male youths are embedded may confer risk for depressive symptoms, underscoring the importance of considering peer networks in both research and interventions targeting sexual minority male adolescents.

Hatzenbuehler ML; McLaughlin KA; Xuan Z

2012-10-01

14

Social Networks and Risk for Depressive Symptoms in a National Sample of Sexual Minority Youth  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the study was to examine the social networks of sexual minority youths and to determine the associations between social networks and depressive symptoms. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative cohort study of American adolescents (N=14,212). Wave 1 (1994–1995) collected extensive information about the social networks of participants through peer nomination inventories, as well as measures of sexual minority status and depressive symptoms. Using social network data, we examined three characteristics of adolescents’ social relationships: (1) social isolation; (2) degree of connectedness; and (3) social status. Sexual minority youths, particularly females, were more isolated, less connected, and had lower social status in peer networks than opposite-sex attracted youths. Among sexual minority male (but not female) youths, greater isolation as well as lower connectedness and status within a network were associated with greater depressive symptoms. Moreover, greater isolation in social networks partially explained the association between sexual minority status and depressive symptoms among males. Finally, a significant 3-way interaction indicated that the association between social isolation and depression was stronger for sexual minority male youths than non-minority youths and sexual minority females. These results suggest that the social networks in which sexual minority male youths are embedded may confer risk for depressive symptoms, underscoring the importance of considering peer networks in both research and interventions targeting sexual minority male adolescents.

Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Xuan, Ziming

2012-01-01

15

After Breast Cancer: Sexual Functioning of Sexual Minority Survivors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research on sexual difficulties after cancer has neglected sexual minority women (SMW); for example, lesbian and bisexual women. Clinicians treating these women are therefore at a disadvantage as they lack information about sexual problems in this population. This study tested the hypothesis that SMW with breast cancer have poorer sexual function than SMW without breast cancer, distinguishing partnered from unpartnered women. Using convenience sample recruitment, we conducted a case-control study to compare survivors of breast cancers who are SMW, in other words, cases to controls, that is, SMW without cancer. Anonymous survey data were collected from 85 cases after they had completed active cancer treatment and 85 age- and partner-status matched controls with no history of any cancer. Participants' self-reported sexual frequency and sexual function measured by the Female Sexual Function Index were evaluated. Cases and controls did not differ in risk of sexual dysfunction or the level of overall sexual functioning; however, cases had lower sexual frequency and scored lower on desire and ability to reach orgasm, and higher on pain compared to controls. Results inform clinicians about sexual minority survivors' sexual domains affected by cancer. When discussing sexual problems and therapeutic options, sexual orientation should be ascertained.

Boehmer U; Ozonoff A; Timm A; Winter M; Potter J

2013-06-01

16

After Breast Cancer: Sexual Functioning of Sexual Minority Survivors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Research on sexual difficulties after cancer has neglected sexual minority women (SMW); for example, lesbian and bisexual women. Clinicians treating these women are therefore at a disadvantage as they lack information about sexual problems in this population. This study tested the hypothesis that SMW with breast cancer have poorer sexual function than SMW without breast cancer, distinguishing partnered from unpartnered women. Using convenience sample recruitment, we conducted a case-control study to compare survivors of breast cancers who are SMW, in other words, cases to controls, that is, SMW without cancer. Anonymous survey data were collected from 85 cases after they had completed active cancer treatment and 85 age- and partner-status matched controls with no history of any cancer. Participants' self-reported sexual frequency and sexual function measured by the Female Sexual Function Index were evaluated. Cases and controls did not differ in risk of sexual dysfunction or the level of overall sexual functioning; however, cases had lower sexual frequency and scored lower on desire and ability to reach orgasm, and higher on pain compared to controls. Results inform clinicians about sexual minority survivors' sexual domains affected by cancer. When discussing sexual problems and therapeutic options, sexual orientation should be ascertained. PMID:23730713

Boehmer, Ulrike; Ozonoff, Al; Timm, Alison; Winter, Michael; Potter, Jennifer

2013-06-01

17

Depressive symptoms among immigrant latino sexual minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of depressive symptoms among immigrant Latino sexual minorities. METHODS: Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms, and univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify correlates of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Unweighted and RDS-weighted prevalence estimates of depressive symptoms were 69.2% and 74.8%, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, low social support, sexual compulsivity, and high self-esteem were significantly associated with increased depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: A need exists for culturally congruent mental health services for immigrant Latino sexual minorities in the southern United States.

Rhodes SD; Martinez O; Song EY; Daniel J; Alonzo J; Eng E; Duck S; Downs M; Bloom FR; Allen AB; Miller C; Reboussin B

2013-05-01

18

PARENTING AND ADOLESCENTS' SEXUAL INITIATION  

Science.gov (United States)

This study draws on social control and social learning theories to examine the role of dating-specific attitudes and practices as predictors of adolescentssexual initiation. We include attention to the adolescent’s reaction to control attempts as a further means of assessing family dynamics (i.e., frequency of dating disagreements). The study uses longitudinal data from 697 adolescents who were not sexually active at the first interview as well as separate interviews with parents. In models that include all parenting variables, parental caring, parents’ preferences that the child should delay sex, and the frequency of dating disagreements are significant predictors of initiation of teen sexual activity.

Longmore, Monica A.; Eng, Abbey L.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Manning, Wendy D.

2009-01-01

19

Relationship Trajectories and Psychological Well-Being among Sexual Minority Youth  

Science.gov (United States)

|Dating in adolescence plays an integral part in the development of sexual and social identities. This process is particularly salient for sexual minority youth who face additional obstacles to their identity formation due to their marginalized status. We investigated the influence of participating in a same-sex relationship (SSR) or an…

Bauermeister, Jose A.; Johns, Michelle Marie; Sandfort, Theo G. M.; Eisenberg, Anna; Grossman, Arnold H.; D'Augelli, Anthony R.

2010-01-01

20

Adolescent sexuality: a gynecologist's viewpoint.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescent sexuality is affecting a younger age group each year. Diseases and conditions traditionally seen by the gynecologist are now found in both sexes in an age group seen in most cases only by the pediatrician. An awareness of these problems, a willingness to search out sexual involvement, and a close working relationship between the pediatrician and the gynecologist can do much to stem the rising tide of teen-age pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases.

Wortman WJ Jr

1983-06-01

 
 
 
 
21

Mental health characteristics of sexual minority veterans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examines the mental health characteristics of sexual minority (lesbian, gay, and bisexual, or LGB) veterans, compared these characteristics to those of an existing Veterans Affairs (VA) sample, and examined the relationship between mental health and anxiety around concealment of LGB identity while in the military. Data regarding LGB veterans' (n = 409) military experiences and current mental health were collected via an online survey; comparison data (n = 15,000) were retrieved from a VA data warehouse. LGB veterans were more likely to screen positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and alcohol problems than the comparison sample. Anxiety around concealment of one's sexual orientation while in the service was related to current depression and PTSD symptoms.

Cochran BN; Balsam K; Flentje A; Malte CA; Simpson T

2013-01-01

22

Sexual minority status and long-term breast cancer survivorship.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sexual minority women, such as lesbians, bisexuals, and women who have a woman partner face unique challenges, such as deciding on disclosing their sexual minority status to health providers. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of sexual minority women who were long-term breast cancer survivors. Twenty-two sexual minority women, diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer between 2000 and 2005, participated in semi-structured, open-ended interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed to identify emergent themes to summarize sexual minority women's perceptions of breast cancer survivorship. Participants' perceptions about the impact of their sexual minority identity on breast cancer survivorship consisted of: (1) breast cancer is a women's issue, not a lesbian issue; (2) I can manage my identity in the context of breast cancer; and (3) I am better off than heterosexual women. The authors' findings suggest a possible disconnect between sexual minority women with breast cancer who de-emphasized the importance of sexual minority status and the research community that emphasizes the importance of this status. Prior to counting on sexual minority women's interest in studies, researchers may need to educate sexual minority women about the need of breast cancer studies. PMID:22324359

Boehmer, Ulrike; White, Jessica Lee

2012-01-01

23

Sexual minority status and long-term breast cancer survivorship.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sexual minority women, such as lesbians, bisexuals, and women who have a woman partner face unique challenges, such as deciding on disclosing their sexual minority status to health providers. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of sexual minority women who were long-term breast cancer survivors. Twenty-two sexual minority women, diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer between 2000 and 2005, participated in semi-structured, open-ended interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed to identify emergent themes to summarize sexual minority women's perceptions of breast cancer survivorship. Participants' perceptions about the impact of their sexual minority identity on breast cancer survivorship consisted of: (1) breast cancer is a women's issue, not a lesbian issue; (2) I can manage my identity in the context of breast cancer; and (3) I am better off than heterosexual women. The authors' findings suggest a possible disconnect between sexual minority women with breast cancer who de-emphasized the importance of sexual minority status and the research community that emphasizes the importance of this status. Prior to counting on sexual minority women's interest in studies, researchers may need to educate sexual minority women about the need of breast cancer studies.

Boehmer U; White JL

2012-01-01

24

Sexual Minority-Related Victimization as a Mediator of Mental Health Disparities in Sexual Minority Youth: A Longitudinal Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

|Sexual minority youth (youth who are attracted to the same sex or endorse a gay/lesbian/bisexual identity) report significantly higher rates of depression and suicidality than heterosexual youth. The minority stress hypothesis contends that the stigma and discrimination experienced by sexual minority youth create a hostile social environment that…

Burton, Chad M.; Marshal, Michael P.; Chisolm, Deena J.; Sucato, Gina S.; Friedman, Mark S.

2013-01-01

25

Positive Health Practices of Urban Minority Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined factors related to health practices of urban minority adolescents. Participant surveys highlighted positive correlations between social support and positive health practices and hope and positive health practices. There was no significant relationship between self-esteem and positive health practices. Implications for school nursing…

Mahat, Ganga; Scoloveno, MaryAnn; Whalen, Colleen

2002-01-01

26

Identity, refugeeness, belonging: experiences of sexual minority refugees in Canada.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article explores the results of a qualitative community-based research project on the intersectional experiences of sexual minority refugees living in Canada. Undertaken between 2008 and 2010, this study examines sexual minority refugees' multifaceted experiences of migration, the refugee determination process, and settlement. Through an analysis of the interrelated themes of identity, refugeeness, and belonging, we hope to further investigate the ways in which Canadian refugee policies, social institutions, and dominant discourses contribute to the sociopolitical construction of sexual minority refugees. We conclude with an exploration of strategies for increasing protection of sexual minority refugees in Canada.

Lee EO; Brotman S

2011-08-01

27

[Life styles in adolescence: sexual behavior of Portuguese adolescents].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Recent studies have shown that adolescents have initiated their sex lives earlier and earlier, without, however, receiving consistent sex education. The objectives of this study were to analyze the sexual behavior of adolescent high school students and identify the habits of sexual health in sexually active adolescent high school students. An exploratory study was conducted with 680 adolescents, whose age ranged between 15 and 19 years. Results showed that most participants had not initiated their sex life; boys are those who most report having had sexual relations; not all the interviewed adolescents used condoms during sex; most adolescents do not practice sexual health surveillance. It is important for sexually active adolescents to receive health care and counseling. Health institutions and their workers must be proactive in trying to approach adolescents.

Ferreira MM; Torgal MC

2011-06-01

28

Mental Health Needs of Sexual Minorities in Jamaica.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the prevalence of Axis I disorders and associated risk factors in a sample of sexual minority men and women in Jamaica, a country that is widely known for its high societal rejection of homosexuality. Poor relationships with family, negative or abusive experiences related to one's sexual orientation, and greater openness about one's sexual orientation were independent risk factors for Axis I disorders. Prevention of mental disorders in sexual minorities in Jamaica should focus on rebuilding family support and promoting social acceptance of sexual minorities. PMID:21052478

White, Yohann R G; Barnaby, Loraine; Swaby, Antoneal; Sandfort, Theo

2010-04-01

29

Explanatory factors of sexual function in sexual minority women breast cancer survivors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The sexual function of sexual minority women (women with female partners) who are breast cancer survivors is mostly unknown. Our objective is to identify explanatory factors of sexual function among sexual minority women with breast cancer and compare them with a control sample of sexual minority women without cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using a conceptual framework that has previously been applied to heterosexual breast cancer survivors, we assessed the relationship of each explanatory factor to sexual function in sexual minority women. Using generalized estimating equations, we identified explanatory factors of sexual function and identified differences by case and control status. RESULTS: Self-perception of greater sexual attractiveness and worse urogenital menopausal symptoms explain 44% of sexual function, after controlling for case and control status. Focusing only on partnered women, 45% of sexual function was explained by greater sexual attractiveness, postmenopausal status, and greater dyadic cohesion. CONCLUSIONS: All of the relevant explanatory factors for sexual function among sexual minority survivors are modifiable as has been suggested for heterosexual survivors. Sexual minority survivors differ from heterosexual survivors in that health-related quality of life is less important as an explanatory factor. These findings can guide adaptation of interventions for sexual minority survivors.

Boehmer U; Timm A; Ozonoff A; Potter J

2012-11-01

30

[Sexually active adolescents  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

For today's teenagers, sex education has to go beyond simply handling out information. Young people are becoming sexually active at an earlier age than ever before. Nurses must therefore gear their teaching efforts to individual needs. The author looks at the factors that influence teenage sexual behavior and suggests support in the areas of health, contraception, interpersonal relations and values. The challenge is to arouse teenagers' sense of responsibility.

Doucet-Amyotte P

1990-02-01

31

Family culture and adolescent sexuality.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Adolescence is characterized by an increase in autonomy and the transformation of family relationships. Their experience has different meanings in future quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the relationship between the sociodemographic variables, of Sexual context and attitudes adopted by teenagers facing sexuality with the organizational culture of the family. METHODS: Observational descriptive and correlational, transversal study. The non-probabilistic convenience sample consists of 1216 adolescents attending the 9th year of study in Portuguese Public Schools and is part of the project PTDC/CPE-CED/103313/2008, the questionnaire applied was family organizational culture of Nave (2007) and attitudes towards sexuality of Nelas et al (2010). RESULTS: The majority lives in a village (47.5% of boys and 50.0% girls) .12.9%of boys do not use condoms in all relationships, and the same applies to 17.8% of girls. They belong mostly (55.8% boys and 49.5% girls) to a family with poor interpersonal relationships culture. The majority (51.8%) males and (58.9%) females have a family with moderate heuristic culture. Boys and girls (33.6% and 36.9%) both demonstrate a predominantly moderate hierarchy family culture and a moderate social goals family culture as well. Adolescents who have a bad attitude towards sexuality, mostly (43.2%) present a weak interpersonal relationships family culture with statistical significance (?(2)=32,092, p=0.000) and have moderate hierarchy family culture and also moderate social goals family culture, without statistical significance. CONCLUSION: The family that loves, welcomes and cares is the same that educates and informs about sexuality, promoting youth empowerment making them safer, healthier and happier.

Ferreira M; Nelas P; Duarte J; Albuquerque C; Grilo C; Nave F

2013-05-01

32

Sexual Development and behaviors of adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescents are faced with many developmental tasks related to sexuality, such as forming romantic relationships and developing their sexual identities. Many adolescents will engage in a variety of sexual behaviors, including perhaps oral and anal sex, during this time period. Almost half will engage in vaginal sexual intercourse by the end of high school. A number of biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural factors can influence adolescents' romantic relationships and sexual behaviors. Some of these factors (eg, exposure to violence in the home, early pubertal development) may increase an adolescent's risk of being in an unhealthy relationship or engaging in sex at an early age. Parents, healthcare providers, and communities can support adolescents through these developmental tasks by forming close, connected relationships with teens and devising age-appropriate messages about the development of healthy sexuality. PMID:16285632

Auslander, Beth A; Rosenthal, Susan L; Blythe, Margaret J

2005-10-01

33

Unique Aspects of Adolescent Sexual Victimization Experiences  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored females' adolescent experiences with sexual aggression using event-level data. A community sample of women, ages 18 to 30 years (N = 319), were interviewed regarding their most recent unwanted sexual experience. Incidents were categorized as occurring during adolescence (ages 14 to 17) or adulthood (after age 18). Preliminary…

Livingston, Jennifer A.; Hequembourg, Amy; Testa, Maria; VanZile-Tamsen, Carol

2007-01-01

34

Minority stress and physical health among sexual minority individuals.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the effects of minority stress on the physical health of lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs). Participants (N = 396) completed baseline and one year follow-up interviews. Exposure to stress and health outcomes were assessed with two methods: a subjective self-appraisal method and a method whereby two independent judges externally rated event narratives using standardized criteria. The odds of experiencing a physical health problem at follow-up were significantly higher among LGBs who experienced an externally rated prejudice event during the follow-up period compared to those who did not. This association persisted after adjusting for experiences of general stressful life events that were not related to prejudice. Self-appraised minority stress exposures were not associated with poorer physical health at 1-year follow-up. Prejudice-related stressful life events have a unique deleterious impact on health that persists above and beyond the effect of stressful life events unrelated to prejudice.

Frost DM; Lehavot K; Meyer IH

2013-07-01

35

Development of muscularity and weight concerns in heterosexual and sexual minority males.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the development of muscularity and weight concerns among heterosexual and sexual minority males in adolescence. METHOD: Participants were 5,868 males from the Growing Up Today Study, a U.S. prospective cohort spanning ages 9-25 years. Generalized estimating equations were used to test sexual orientation differences in the development of muscularity concerns, weight gain attempts, and weight and shape concern. RESULTS: Desire for bigger muscles increased slightly each year across adolescence (? = .10, 95% C.I. = .09, .11) regardless of sexual orientation, but gay and bisexual participants reported greater desire for toned muscles than completely and mostly heterosexual males (? = .39, 95% C.I. = .21, .57). Desire for toned muscles did not change with age. Attempts to gain weight increased threefold across adolescence, with up to 30% reporting weight gain attempts by age 16. Although underweight males (the smallest weight status class) were most likely to attempt to gain weight, most of the observed weight gain attempts were by healthy (69%) and overweight/obese (27%) males, suggesting that most attempts were medically unnecessary and could lead to overweight. Sexual minority participants were 20% less likely to report weight gain attempts than completely heterosexual participants. Weight and shape concern increased with age, with gay and bisexual participants experiencing a significantly greater increase than heterosexual males. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual orientation modifies the development and expression of male weight and muscularity concerns. The findings have implications for early interventions for the prevention of obesity and eating disorder risk in heterosexual and sexual minority males.

Calzo JP; Corliss HL; Blood EA; Field AE; Austin SB

2013-01-01

36

NASN position statement: Sexual orientation and gender identity/expression (sexual minority students): school nurse practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Sexual minority persons are those who identify themselves as gay, lesbian, or bisexual (LGB) or are unsure of their sexual orientation, or those who have had sexual contact with persons of the same sex or both sexes (Kann et al., 2011). Sexual minority is thought to be a more inclusive and neutral term. For the purposes of this statement, the term sexual minority will be used in lieu of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning).

Bradley B; Kelts S; Robarge D; Davis C; Delger S; Compton L

2013-03-01

37

Disentangling Adolescent Pathways of Sexual Risk Taking  

Science.gov (United States)

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors aimed to describe the pathways of risk within sexual risk taking, alcohol use, and delinquency, and then identify how the trajectory of sexual risk is linked to alcohol use and delinquency. Risk trajectories were measured with adolescents aged 15-24 years (N = 1,778). Using…

Brookmeyer, Kathryn A.; Henrich, Christopher C.

2009-01-01

38

Interventions to reduce sexual minority stigma in sororities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effects that two different types of interventions have on reducing sexual minority stigma in sororities. Affect, behaviors, and cognitions toward gay men and lesbians were measured using the Affective Reactions to Homosexuality Scale, Homophobic Behavior of Students Scale, and Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gays Scale. A total of 82 participants from two sororities participated in two different types of interventions, that is, panel discussion and video and discussion. Repeated measures analyses revealed significant reductions in the measures of sexual minority stigma and that neither intervention was more effective than the other. Implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:20391011

Hussey, Heather D; Bisconti, Toni L

2010-01-01

39

Interventions to reduce sexual minority stigma in sororities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the effects that two different types of interventions have on reducing sexual minority stigma in sororities. Affect, behaviors, and cognitions toward gay men and lesbians were measured using the Affective Reactions to Homosexuality Scale, Homophobic Behavior of Students Scale, and Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gays Scale. A total of 82 participants from two sororities participated in two different types of interventions, that is, panel discussion and video and discussion. Repeated measures analyses revealed significant reductions in the measures of sexual minority stigma and that neither intervention was more effective than the other. Implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

Hussey HD; Bisconti TL

2010-01-01

40

Sexual orientation microaggressions and the experience of sexual minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This qualitative study sought to confirm and expand on previous research on sexual orientation microaggressions--subtle discrimination in the form of verbal, behavioral, and environmental slights and indignities as defined by Sue (2010). The study had two primary research questions: Does the data from the sample validate Sue's (2010) typology of sexual orientation microaggressions? Beyond Sue's (2010) typology, are other themes/types of sexual orientation microaggressions present in the data? Using a focus group methodology, data was collected from a sample of self-identified non-heterosexual college students (N=12). Data analysis confirmed five previously identified themes from Sue's (2010) typology (Endorsement of Heteronormative Culture, Sinfulness, Homophobia, Heterosexist Language/Terminology, and Oversexualization) and demonstrated two new themes (Undersexualization and Microaggressions as Humor). The implications of sexual orientation microaggressions, along with limitations and future research directions, are discussed.

Platt LF; Lenzen AL

2013-07-01

 
 
 
 
41

Perceptions of campus climate by sexual minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Previous research has indicated that students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) often have negative experiences on university campuses due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Direct and indirect experiences contribute to an overall perception of the campus climate. This study used an online survey to assess students' perceptions of campus climate, their experiences confronting bias, support of family members and friends, and whether they had considered leaving campus. Multiple regression analysis indicated that perceptions of poorer campus climate were predicted by greater unfair treatment by instructors, more impact from anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) bias on friends' and families' emotional support, and having hidden one's LGBT identity from other students. Cluster analyses revealed four groups of participants distinguished by openness about their sexual orientation and negative experiences, with one group appearing to be at risk for poor retention. Results are discussed in terms of the needs of LGBTQ students on campus.

Tetreault PA; Fette R; Meidlinger PC; Hope D

2013-07-01

42

Perceptions of campus climate by sexual minorities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous research has indicated that students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) often have negative experiences on university campuses due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Direct and indirect experiences contribute to an overall perception of the campus climate. This study used an online survey to assess students' perceptions of campus climate, their experiences confronting bias, support of family members and friends, and whether they had considered leaving campus. Multiple regression analysis indicated that perceptions of poorer campus climate were predicted by greater unfair treatment by instructors, more impact from anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) bias on friends' and families' emotional support, and having hidden one's LGBT identity from other students. Cluster analyses revealed four groups of participants distinguished by openness about their sexual orientation and negative experiences, with one group appearing to be at risk for poor retention. Results are discussed in terms of the needs of LGBTQ students on campus. PMID:23808345

Tetreault, Patricia A; Fette, Ryan; Meidlinger, Peter C; Hope, Debra

2013-07-01

43

Identification and characterization of adolescents' sexual boundaries.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Adolescents' decisions to have sex may be based on a priori boundaries placed on sex. This study addresses: (1) to what extent adolescents set vaginal sexual boundaries; (2) the types of sexual boundaries most and least likely to be endorsed; and (3) to what extent sexual boundaries vary by sex, race/ethnicity, and sexual experience. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 518 students attending 10th grade. Survey measures queried about demographics, ever having sex, and existence of sexual boundaries (e.g., being in love, having an attractive partner) that must be in place before having vaginal sex. RESULTS: The most frequently endorsed boundaries were maturity, commitment, trust, love, and marriage. These boundaries were more frequently endorsed than having a safer-sex method. Compared with females, males were more likely to choose boundaries based on partner attractiveness (p < .001) and avoiding trouble (p < .04). Compared with Asians and Pacific Islanders, whites were more likely to endorse wanting to be a certain age to have sex (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively); Asians and Pacific Islanders were more likely to choose sexual boundaries based on marriage (p's < .05). Adolescents who were sexually experienced were more likely than inexperienced adolescents to endorse boundaries related to relationship characteristics and partner attractiveness (OR = 2.5), and less likely to endorse boundaries related to feeling mature (OR = .34) and waiting until marriage (OR = .34). CONCLUSIONS: Identifying adolescents' sexual boundaries should help healthcare professionals better understand under what circumstances adolescents are more or less likely to have sex; and this information should ultimately inform the development of new interventions.

Wolf HT; Morrell HE; Halpern-Felsher BL

2013-07-01

44

[Adolescence and sexuality: sexual scripts from the social representations].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study aimed to identify the social representations of adolescents about sexuality, from their personal experiences. The research, of a qualitative and representational nature, was carried out with thirteen teenagers in a unit of education for young and adults. It has, as instrument for data collection, a semi-structured interview and focus group meetings. It was observed the coexistence of questions regarding sexuality and its relation to the sexual act itself; absence of dialogue between parents and children about this theme; and incipient school approach, with limitations of the contents about condom use. In this study, the social representations are anchored in sexuality as sexual act, objectified through social and sexual scripts, which gives teens a practical knowledge about themselves.

Macedo Sda R; Miranda FA; Pessoa Júnior JM; Nóbrega VK

2013-01-01

45

Exploring Attitudes of Future Educators about Sexual Minority Youth  

Science.gov (United States)

Fifty-two secondary teacher candidates from a Canadian university completed questionnaires assessing levels of homoprejudice, knowledge of homosexuality, and perceptions of professional issues related to sexual minority youth. The level of homoprejudice in this sample was lower than in earlier studies with teachers, and lower homoprejudice was…

Dowling, Kristen B.; Rodger, Susan; Cummings, Anne L.

2007-01-01

46

Exposure to sexual lyrics and sexual experience among urban adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Two thirds of all sexual references in music are degrading in nature, yet it remains uncertain whether these references promote earlier sexual activity. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to lyrics describing degrading sex in popular music is independently associated with sexual behavior in a cohort of urban adolescents. METHODS: All ninth-grade health students at three large urban high schools completed in-school surveys in 2006 and 2007. Participants' exposure to lyrics describing degrading sex was computed with overall music exposure and content analyses of their favorite artists' songs. Outcomes included sexual intercourse and progression along a noncoital sexual continuum. Multivariable regression was used to assess independent associations between exposure to lyrics describing degrading sex and outcomes. RESULTS: The 711 participants were exposed to 14.7 hours each week of songs with lyrics describing degrading sex (SD=17.0). Almost one third of participants (n=216) had previously been sexually active. Compared to those with the least exposure to lyrics describing degrading sex, those with the most exposure were more than twice as likely to have had sexual intercourse (OR=2.07; 95% CI=1.26, 3.41), even after adjusting for all covariates. Similarly, among those who had not had sexual intercourse, those in the highest tertile of exposure to lyrics describing degrading sex were nearly twice as likely to have progressed along a noncoital sexual continuum (OR=1.88; 95% CI=1.23, 2.88) compared to those in the lowest tertile. Finally, the relationships between exposure to lyrics describing nondegrading sex and sexual outcomes were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports an association between exposure to lyrics describing degrading sex in popular music and early sexual experience among adolescents.

Primack BA; Douglas EL; Fine MJ; Dalton MA

2009-04-01

47

Sexual minority women's coping and psychological adjustment after a diagnosis of breast cancer.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To determine factors that influence sexual minority women's coping responses and adjustment to breast cancer. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 64 sexual minority women with breast cancer who were recruited through targeted community-based sampling. In this study, sexual minority women consisted of three sexual orientation groups: those who self-reported partnering with women and those with a lesbian or bisexual identity. We determined the number of years of sexual minority status and disclosure of sexual orientation and used standardized measures to assess these women's coping and adjustment to breast cancer. Data were analyzed using statistical methods as appropriate for the level of data. RESULTS: We determined that sexual minority factors, such as sexual orientation group, influenced coping and adjustment even after illness and social support factors were controlled. In multivariate analyses, women who identified as lesbians or bisexuals used less maladaptive coping compared with women who reported partnering with women. The association between reporting a lesbian identity and lower distress approached significance in multivariate regression equations. CONCLUSIONS: Of the sexual minority factors that were considered, sexual orientation group, number of years of sexual minority status, and disclosure of sexual minority status, only sexual orientation group was related to coping and lower distress. Contrary to expectations, disclosure of sexual orientation did not relate to coping and lower distress. The findings support the need for future studies to include different aspects of sexual minority status, in particular, clearly defined sexual orientation groups.

Boehmer U; Linde R; Freund KM

2005-04-01

48

Sexual-orientation disparities in cigarette smoking in a longitudinal cohort study of adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Youths with a minority sexual orientation (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual, and mostly heterosexual) are at high risk for cigarette smoking. We examined sexual-orientation disparities in smoking during adolescence and emerging adulthood and investigated the role of age at first smoking in contributing to smoking disparities. METHODS: We used data from the Growing Up Today Study, a large longitudinal cohort of adolescents followed from ages 12 to 24 years (N = 13,913). Self-administered questionnaires filled out annually or biennially assessed age at first smoking, current smoking, frequency of smoking, number of cigarettes smoked daily, and nicotine dependence. Proportional hazards survival analysis and repeated measures regression estimated sexual-orientation differences in smoking. RESULTS: Compared with completely heterosexuals, lesbian/gay, bisexual, and mostly heterosexual youths smoked their first cigarette at younger ages, were more likely to be current smokers, and had higher frequency of smoking. Among past-year smokers, sexual-minority females smoked more cigarettes daily and scored higher on nicotine dependence than completely heterosexual females. In some instances, gender and age modified relationships between sexual orientation and smoking, with relative risk accentuated in female sexual minorities and in sexual minorities during younger ages. Younger age of smoking onset contributed to elevated smoking in mostly heterosexuals and bisexuals, and to a lesser extent in lesbians, but not in gay males. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual-orientation minorities are at greater risk for smoking during adolescence and emerging adulthood than heterosexuals. Disparities are larger in females and evident in early adolescence. Prevention and cessation efforts should target this population, preferably beginning in early adolescence.

Corliss HL; Wadler BM; Jun HJ; Rosario M; Wypij D; Frazier AL; Austin SB

2013-01-01

49

Parents of minors who have sexually abused: legal liability and clinical interventions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

While children and adolescents generally do not have the right to vote, marry, or sign contracts independently, they are often held responsible for their crimes. In spite of this, some parents of minor victims file civil suits against parents of the youth responsible for the harm. The courts must then decide to what extent, if any, parents are legally liable when their minor children commit offenses. Since parents are essential to the successful rehabilitation of minors who have sexually offended, the impact of legal liability on parental engagement in therapy must be examined. This article will explore the conflicting issues of age, legal responsibility, parental responsibility, and therapeutic effectiveness in the Israeli context and propose a means for resolution.

Oz S

2013-01-01

50

An exploration of sexual minority stress across the lines of gender and sexual identity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Despite growing evidence to suggest that gays, lesbians, and bisexuals experience a range of stressors and consequences related to their sexual minority status, no known studies to date have employed focus group discussion to explore and document their perceptions of sexual minority stress. In this exploratory study, we present focus group data on a range of sexual minority stressors as described by 43 gay men, lesbians, and bisexual men and women. We explore gender and sexual identity differences in the respondents' perceptions of heteronormativity, disclosure issues in different social settings, sources of support, and strategies for coping with stress. Respondents reported that women's same-sex relationships were eroticized and distorted to accommodate heterosexual male desire, while men were negatively depicted as sexually promiscuous and deviant. These differing stereotypes held important consequences for disclosure decisions and affected men's and women's social interactions with heterosexual men. Bisexual respondents reported unique strategies to cope with exclusion and isolation associated with misunderstandings about their sexual identities. Directions for future research on sexual minority stress are discussed.

Hequembourg AL; Brallier SA

2009-01-01

51

An exploration of sexual minority stress across the lines of gender and sexual identity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite growing evidence to suggest that gays, lesbians, and bisexuals experience a range of stressors and consequences related to their sexual minority status, no known studies to date have employed focus group discussion to explore and document their perceptions of sexual minority stress. In this exploratory study, we present focus group data on a range of sexual minority stressors as described by 43 gay men, lesbians, and bisexual men and women. We explore gender and sexual identity differences in the respondents' perceptions of heteronormativity, disclosure issues in different social settings, sources of support, and strategies for coping with stress. Respondents reported that women's same-sex relationships were eroticized and distorted to accommodate heterosexual male desire, while men were negatively depicted as sexually promiscuous and deviant. These differing stereotypes held important consequences for disclosure decisions and affected men's and women's social interactions with heterosexual men. Bisexual respondents reported unique strategies to cope with exclusion and isolation associated with misunderstandings about their sexual identities. Directions for future research on sexual minority stress are discussed. PMID:19319738

Hequembourg, Amy L; Brallier, Sara A

2009-01-01

52

Adolescent sexual orientation and suicide risk: evidence from a national study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Sexual orientation has been a debated risk factor for adolescent suicidality over the past 20 years. This study examined the link between sexual orientation and suicidality, using data that are nationally representative and that include other critical youth suicide risk factors. METHODS: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were examined. Survey logistic regression was used to control for sample design effects. RESULTS: There is a strong link between adolescent sexual orientation and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The strong effect of sexual orientation on suicidal thoughts is mediated by critical youth suicide risk factors, including depression, hopelessness, alcohol abuse, recent suicide attempts by a peer or a family member, and experiences of victimization. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide strong evidence that sexual minority youths are more likely than their peers to think about and attempt suicide.

Russell ST; Joyner K

2001-08-01

53

Culturally competent care for members of sexual minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Culture has historically been interpreted as the beliefs, mores, and lifeways of groups of people primarily related to race and ethnicity. However, individuals who self identify as being lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgendered experience ethnocentrism when seeking care from medical and health professionals. Using the principles and concepts of Lenninger's theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality, members of sexual minorities can assist their health care providers to provide culturally sensitive and ethical care.

Gonser PA

2000-01-01

54

Culturally competent care for members of sexual minorities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Culture has historically been interpreted as the beliefs, mores, and lifeways of groups of people primarily related to race and ethnicity. However, individuals who self identify as being lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgendered experience ethnocentrism when seeking care from medical and health professionals. Using the principles and concepts of Lenninger's theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality, members of sexual minorities can assist their health care providers to provide culturally sensitive and ethical care. PMID:11854957

Gonser, P A

2000-01-01

55

The relationship between sexual abuse and risky sexual behavior among adolescent boys: a meta-analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Childhood and adolescent sexual abuse has been shown to lead to increased odds of sexual behaviors that lead to sexually transmitted infections and early pregnancy involvement. Research, meta-analyses, and interventions, however, have focused primarily on girls and young women who have experienced abuse, yet some adolescent boys are also sexually abused. We performed a meta-analysis of the existing studies to assess the magnitudes of the link between a history of sexual abuse and each of the three risky sexual behaviors among adolescent boys in North America. METHODS: The three outcomes were (a) unprotected sexual intercourse, (b) multiple sexual partners, and (c) pregnancy involvement. Weighted mean effect sizes were computed from ten independent samples, from nine studies published between 1990 and 2011. RESULTS: Sexually abused boys were significantly more likely than nonabused boys to report all three risky sexual behaviors. Weighted mean odds ratios were 1.91 for unprotected intercourse, 2.91 for multiple sexual partners, and 4.81 for pregnancy involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that childhood and adolescent sexual abuse can substantially influence sexual behavior in adolescence among male survivors. To improve sexual health for all adolescents, even young men, we should strengthen sexual abuse prevention initiatives, raise awareness about male sexual abuse survivors' existence and sexual health issues, improve sexual health promotion for abused young men, and screen all people, regardless of gender, for a history of sexual abuse.

Homma Y; Wang N; Saewyc E; Kishor N

2012-07-01

56

Beyond Lesbian Bed Death: Enhancing Our Understanding of the Sexuality of Sexual-Minority Women in Relationships.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The goal of this study was to characterize the sexuality of sexual-minority (i.e., lesbian, bisexual, queer, unlabeled, questioning) women. Participants were 586 women (87% White) in a same-sex relationship of 1 to 36 years in duration. They completed measures assessing their sexual behavior (frequency of nongenital and genital sexual activities), motivation (sexual desire), and cognitive-affective responses (sexual satisfaction, sexual esteem, sexual anxiety, negative automatic thoughts). On average, the women reported experiencing their sexuality positively across all domains. Regardless of relationship duration, most of the women reported engaging in both genital and nongenital sexual behaviors with their partner once a week or more; few reported that they had not engaged in sexual activity in the previous month. A multiple regression analysis indicated that frequency of genital sexual activity, sexual desire, sexual anxiety, and automatic thoughts contributed uniquely to the prediction of sexual satisfaction over and above the other sexuality variables. The findings are discussed in terms of the idea that lesbians have sex less frequently than other couple types and that sexual frequency declines rapidly in lesbian relationships (i.e., "lesbian bed death") and descriptions of sexual-minority women's sexuality that suggest that genital sexual activity is not important to sexual satisfaction.

Cohen JN; Byers ES

2013-08-01

57

Older adolescents' positive attitudes toward younger adolescents as sexual partners.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The prevalence of older adolescents' positive attitudes toward younger sexual partners was investigated through three measures of self-reported hypothetical likelihood of having sex with preadolescents and younger adolescents (LSA), using a school-based cluster sample of 710 Norwegian 18- to 19-year-olds attending nonvocational high schools in Oslo. Some likelihood of having sex with a preadolescent (less than 12 years of age) was reported by 5.9% of the males. The 19.1% of the males who indicated some likelihood of having sex with a 13- to 14-year old, compared to those who did not, reported more high-frequency drinking, more alcohol-related problems, earlier sexual initiation, more conduct problems, and poorer psychosocial adjustment. This subgroup also reported more high-frequency use of pornography, having more friends with an interest in child pornography and violent pornography, and greater use of coercion to obtain sexual favors.

Hegna K; Mossige S; Wichstrøm L

2004-01-01

58

Older adolescents' positive attitudes toward younger adolescents as sexual partners.  

Science.gov (United States)

The prevalence of older adolescents' positive attitudes toward younger sexual partners was investigated through three measures of self-reported hypothetical likelihood of having sex with preadolescents and younger adolescents (LSA), using a school-based cluster sample of 710 Norwegian 18- to 19-year-olds attending nonvocational high schools in Oslo. Some likelihood of having sex with a preadolescent (less than 12 years of age) was reported by 5.9% of the males. The 19.1% of the males who indicated some likelihood of having sex with a 13- to 14-year old, compared to those who did not, reported more high-frequency drinking, more alcohol-related problems, earlier sexual initiation, more conduct problems, and poorer psychosocial adjustment. This subgroup also reported more high-frequency use of pornography, having more friends with an interest in child pornography and violent pornography, and greater use of coercion to obtain sexual favors. PMID:15727404

Hegna, Kristinn; Mossige, Svein; Wichstrøm, Lars

2004-01-01

59

Improving Sexual Risk Communication with Adolescents Using Event History Calendars  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit.…

Martyn, Kristy K.; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia; Pardee, Michelle; Ronis, David L.; Felicetti, Irene L.; Saftner, Melissa A.

2012-01-01

60

Measuring community connectedness among diverse sexual minority populations.  

Science.gov (United States)

Theory and research agree that connectedness to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community is an important construct to account for in understanding issues related to health and well-being among gay and bisexual men. However, the measurement of this construct among lesbian and bisexual women or racial and ethnic minority individuals has not yet been adequately investigated. This study examined the reliability and validity of an existing measure of connectedness to the LGBT Community among a diverse group of sexual minority individuals in New York City, and whether differences in connectedness existed across gender and race or ethnicity. Scores on the measure demonstrated both internal consistency and construct stability across subgroups defined by gender and race or ethnicity. The subgroups did not differ in their mean levels of connectedness, and scores on the measure demonstrated factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity, both generally and within each of the subgroups. Inconsistencies were observed with regard to which scores on the measure demonstrated predictive validity in their associations with indicators of mental health and well-being. The scale is a useful tool for researchers and practitioners interested in understanding the role of community connectedness in the lives of diverse populations of sexual minority individuals. PMID:21512945

Frost, David M; Meyer, Ilan H

2011-05-24

 
 
 
 
61

Measuring community connectedness among diverse sexual minority populations.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Theory and research agree that connectedness to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community is an important construct to account for in understanding issues related to health and well-being among gay and bisexual men. However, the measurement of this construct among lesbian and bisexual women or racial and ethnic minority individuals has not yet been adequately investigated. This study examined the reliability and validity of an existing measure of connectedness to the LGBT Community among a diverse group of sexual minority individuals in New York City, and whether differences in connectedness existed across gender and race or ethnicity. Scores on the measure demonstrated both internal consistency and construct stability across subgroups defined by gender and race or ethnicity. The subgroups did not differ in their mean levels of connectedness, and scores on the measure demonstrated factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity, both generally and within each of the subgroups. Inconsistencies were observed with regard to which scores on the measure demonstrated predictive validity in their associations with indicators of mental health and well-being. The scale is a useful tool for researchers and practitioners interested in understanding the role of community connectedness in the lives of diverse populations of sexual minority individuals.

Frost DM; Meyer IH

2012-01-01

62

"Honk against homophobia": rethinking relations between media and sexual minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The theory of "symbolic annihilation" or "symbolic violence" has been used in academic literature to describe the way in which sexual minorities have been ignored, trivialized, or condemned by the media. This article aims to de-center research from issues of media representation to consider the capacity for minority groups to proactively use new media and its various avenues for interactivity, social networking, and feedback to fight social exclusion. This work suggests that new media has become a space in which the nominally marginal in society may acquire "social artillery"-a term used to describe how sexual minorities utilize their expanding and more readily accessible social connections in digital space to combat instances of homophobia. The research draws on the results of an inquiry into the relation between media and a regional youth social justice group in Australia tackling homophobia. The research demonstrates that the group is becoming increasingly adept and comfortable with using a cross-section of media platforms to fulfill their own objectives, rather than seeing themselves as passive subjects of media representation. This article argues that this sets an example for other socially excluded groups looking to renegotiate their relation with the media in regional areas.

Venzo P; Hess K

2013-11-01

63

Risk of substance abuse and dependence among young adult sexual minority groups using a multidimensional measure of sexual orientation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between two definitions of sexual minority status (SMS) and substance abuse and/or dependence among young adults in a national population. METHODS: A total of 14,152 respondents (7,529 women and 6,623 men) interviewed during wave four of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were included in the study (age range: 24-32 years). We used two definitions of SMS based on self-reported attraction, behavior, and identity: 1-indicator SMS (endorsing any dimension) and 3-indicator SMS (endorsing all dimensions). Outcomes included nicotine dependence as well as ?3 signs of substance dependence, any sign of substance abuse, and lifetime diagnosis of abuse or dependence for alcohol, marijuana, and a composite measure of other drugs. Weighted logistic regression models were fit to estimate the odds of each outcome for each of the sexual minority groups (compared with the heterosexual majority), controlling for sociodemographic covariates. RESULTS: SMS women were more likely than exclusively heterosexual women to experience substance abuse and dependence, regardless of substance or SMS definition. In adjusted models for women, 3-indicator SMS was most strongly associated with abuse/dependence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] range: 2.74-5.17) except for ?3 signs of cannabis dependence, where 1-indicator SMS had the strongest association (AOR=3.35). For men, the 1-indicator SMS group had higher odds of nicotine dependence (AOR=1.35) and the 3-indicator SMS group had higher odds of ?3 signs of alcohol dependence (AOR=1.64). CONCLUSIONS: Young adult female sexual minority groups, regardless of how defined, are at a higher risk than their heterosexual peers of developing alcohol, drug, or tobacco abuse and dependence.

Goldberg S; Strutz KL; Herring AA; Halpern CT

2013-05-01

64

The right of sexual minorities under the African human rights system  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

"The protection of the rights of sexual minorities in many countries in Africa is a controversial issue. It is not unusual to find newspaper reports on gross violations suffered by this minority group. Gays and lesbians are victims of violence, sometimes resulting in death. Sexual minorities in Afri...

Huamusse, Luis Edgar Francisco

65

Minor depression during adolescence and mental health outcomes during adulthood  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Data from a community-based prospective longitudinal study were used to investigate the association of minor depressive disorder during adolescence with adverse mental health outcomes during adulthood. Structured diagnostic interviews were administered to a community-based sample of 755 individua...

Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie

66

Understanding sexual behaviors of adolescents within a biopsychosocial framework.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, adolescent sexual behavior is discussed within a biopsychosocial framework. Prevalence rates for both coital and noncoital behaviors are presented, and trends in coital behaviors are noted over time. Special attention is paid to the role culture plays in the development of sexual behaviors. The discussion includes prevalence rates and trends of pregnancies/births and sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents and the impact of these outcomes for both adolescents and their offspring. PMID:18453225

Auslander, Beth A; Rosenthal, Susan L; Blythe, Margaret J

2007-12-01

67

Ethnic composition of school classes, majority-minority friendships, and adolescents' intergroup attitudes in the Netherlands.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The relationships between the proportion of ethnic minority adolescents in school classes, the proportion and quality of majority-minority friendships and intergroup attitudes were examined using multi-level analysis (N = 2386 adolescents in 117 school classes in the Netherlands). In school classes with high proportions of ethnic minority adolescents, both ethnic majority and ethnic minority adolescents reported more negative out-group attitudes. Moreover, in these school classes, ethnic majority adolescents showed more positive in-group attitudes, whereas ethnic minority adolescents showed less positive in-group attitudes. The proportion of majority-minority friendships was related to less negative out-group attitudes for ethnic majority adolescents only. The quality of majority-minority friendships was related to less negative out-group and in-group attitudes for both the ethnic majority and ethnic minority adolescents. The results are discussed in the light of contact theory and ethnic competition theory.

Vervoort MH; Scholte RH; Scheepers PL

2011-04-01

68

Sexual health challenges of adolescents in Iran: A review article  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background and Aim: Becoming to an adult who is sexually healthy is one of the key developmental activities for adolescents. sexual health is included of sexual development and reproductive health and also the ability to create and maintain good interpersonal relationships, are valued for their body, Respectful engagement with both sexes in correct method and expressed a desire, love and intimacy based on personal and stable social values. Materials and Methods: In this study, using key words adolescence, sexual behavior, sexual risk behavior and sexual health and peers, related studies from 1370 to 1390 in IranMedex, Irandoc, Medlib, SID and Google scholar were investigated. Results: Factors and challenges are associated with adolescent sexual health can be categorized into the following 4 themes (12 sub themes): Religious beliefs and spirituality (abstinence); lack of sexual education (false beliefs and knowledge about sexual function; adolescents' attitudes toward risky behavior and sexual relations; information sources of adolescents; skills for "say no"); community and youth issues(gender differences; relationships with peers; monitoring and control by the family; communication challenges between teen and parents; socioeconomical factors; Centers for reproductive health services to adolescents); adolescents sexual relationship outcomes (catching sexually transmitted diseases probability). Conclusion: In some areas, including relationships between parents with children, gender differences, attitudes and sexual behavior and the influence of peers, Studies conducted in our country is well. But in areas such as spirituality and religious beliefs, self-control, prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS, life skills in adolescents and intervention strategies to promote sexual health of adolescents there are a great gap.

N Bahrami; M Simbar; M.A Soleimani

2013-01-01

69

Religiosity and sexual involvement within adolescent romantic couples.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The impact of religiosity in adolescent romantic partnerships on sexual behavior was assessed. Data were obtained from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health reciprocated couples database using religious- and relationship-oriented variables to predict sexual involvement in 374 couples (748 participants). We found that individual- and couple-based religiosity impacted sexual behavior. These findings provide evidence for dyad religiosity as a component involved in the expression of sexual behavior in romantic relationships. The current results highlight the importance of incorporating a broad social perspective in order to understand the expression of adolescent sexual behavior.

LeJeune BC; Zimet GD; Azzouz F; Fortenberry JD; Aalsma MC

2013-09-01

70

Neighborhood and parental supports for physical activity in minority adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined environmental, home, and parental supports for physical activity in underserved adolescents (low income, ethnic minority). Given the increasing incidence of obesity in minority adolescents, it is important to better understand ecologic determinants of physical activity in these youth. This study used an ecologic model to evaluate the significance of neighborhood, home, and parental supports for physical activity on moderate-to-vigorous (MV) physical activity in underserved adolescents. DESIGN: The study was a secondary data analysis of a randomized controlled school-based trial "Active by Choice Today" (ACT) for increasing physical activity in underserved sixth-graders. Schools were matched on school size, percentage minorities, percentage entitled to free or reduced-price lunch, and urban or rural setting prior to randomization. This study used a randomly selected sample of parents (n=280) from the intervention and control schools whose adolescent was enrolled in the larger trial. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: A total of 679 6th-grade students (mean age=11.4 years, 70% African-American, 76% free or reduced-price lunch, 52% female) participated in the larger trial. Parents of 280 youth were contacted to participate in a telephone survey and 198 (71%) took part in the study. INTERVENTIONS: The ACT trial was designed to test the efficacy of a 17-week (1 academic year) motivational plus behavioral skills intervention versus comparison after-school programs on increasing physical activity. A telephone survey was developed and was administered within 6 months after the trial began on parents of 198 adolescents from the ACT randomized school-based trial during 2005-2007. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was adolescent MVPA based on 7-day accelerometry estimates from baseline to mid-intervention. The data were analyzed in 2010-2011 and included both parent and adolescent self-reports of environmental, home, and family supports for physical activity. RESULTS: Regression analyses indicated a significant effect of parental and neighborhood supports for physical activity on adolescent MVPA. Adolescents who perceived higher (vs lower) levels of parental support for physical activity engaged in more minutes of MVPA (B=3.01, SE=1.38, p<0.05) at mid-intervention. Adolescents who lived in neighborhoods with more (vs fewer) supports for physical activity (parks, lighting), also engaged in more minutes MVPA (B=4.27, SE=2.15, p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Support from parents and neighborhood quality are both associated with increased physical activity in underserved adolescents.

Wilson DK; Lawman HG; Segal M; Chappell S

2011-10-01

71

[Relationships among cybersex addiction, gender egalitarianism, sexual attitude and the allowance of sexual violence in adolescents].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This study was done to investigate cybersex addiction, gender egalitarianism, sexual attitude and the allowance of sexual violence in adolescents, and to identify the relationships among these variables. METHOD: The participants were 690 students from two middle schools and three high schools in Seoul. Data was collected through self-report questionnaires which included a cybersex addiction index, a Korean gender egalitarianism scale for adolescents, a sexual attitude scale and a scale for the allowance of sexual violence. The data was analyzed using the SPSS program. RESULTS: Of the adolescents, 93.3% reported not being addicted to cybersex, 5.7% reported being mildly addicted, 0.4% moderately addicted, and 0.6% severely addicted. Cybersex addiction, gender egalitarianism, sexual attitude and the allowance of sexual violence in adolescents were different according to general characteristics. Cybersex addiction of adolescents correlated with gender egalitarianism, sexual attitude and the allowance of sexual violence. CONCLUSION: Gender egalitarianism, sexual attitude and the allowance of sexual violence in adolescents were influenced by cybersex addiction. Therefore, nursing interventions for prevention and management of cybersex addiction need to be developed and provided to adolescents. In addition, varied programs for teaching sexuality to adolescents should be developed and provided.

Koo HY; Kim SS

2007-12-01

72

A longitudinal, mixed methods study of sexual position identity, behavior, and fantasies among young sexual minority men.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Recent evidence suggests that young sexual minority men's sexual position identities (e.g., "top," "bottom," "versatile") may be governed by dynamic influences. Yet, no study has prospectively examined whether, how, and why this aspect of sexual minority men's sexuality changes over time. Consequently, the present study investigated the extent to which young sexual minority men use sexual position identities consistently over time, typical patterns of position identity change, explanations given for this change, and the correspondence of changing sexual position identities with changing sexual behavior and fantasies. A total of 93 young sexual minority men indicated their sexual position identity, behavior, and fantasies at two assessment points separated by 2 years. Following the second assessment, a subset (n = 28) of participants who represented the various sexual position identity change patterns provided explanations for their change. More than half (n = 48) of participants changed their sexual position identity. Participants showed a significant move away from not using sexual position identities toward using them and a significant move toward using "mostly top." Changes in position identity were reflected, although imperfectly, in changes in sexual behavior and largely not reflected in fantasy changes. Participants offered 11 classes of explanations for their identity changes referencing personal development, practical reasons, changing relationships, and sociocultural influences. Previous investigations of sexual minority men's sexual position identities have not adequately attended to the possibility of the changing use of the sexual position categories "top," "bottom," and "versatile" across young adulthood. Results of the present study suggest the possibility of a more fluid, context-dependent use of these terms than previously documented.

Pachankis JE; Buttenwieser IG; Bernstein LB; Bayles DO

2013-10-01

73

A Longitudinal, Mixed Methods Study of Sexual Position Identity, Behavior, and Fantasies Among Young Sexual Minority Men.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Recent evidence suggests that young sexual minority men's sexual position identities (e.g., "top," "bottom," "versatile") may be governed by dynamic influences. Yet, no study has prospectively examined whether, how, and why this aspect of sexual minority men's sexuality changes over time. Consequently, the present study investigated the extent to which young sexual minority men use sexual position identities consistently over time, typical patterns of position identity change, explanations given for this change, and the correspondence of changing sexual position identities with changing sexual behavior and fantasies. A total of 93 young sexual minority men indicated their sexual position identity, behavior, and fantasies at two assessment points separated by 2 years. Following the second assessment, a subset (n = 28) of participants who represented the various sexual position identity change patterns provided explanations for their change. More than half (n = 48) of participants changed their sexual position identity. Participants showed a significant move away from not using sexual position identities toward using them and a significant move toward using "mostly top." Changes in position identity were reflected, although imperfectly, in changes in sexual behavior and largely not reflected in fantasy changes. Participants offered 11 classes of explanations for their identity changes referencing personal development, practical reasons, changing relationships, and sociocultural influences. Previous investigations of sexual minority men's sexual position identities have not adequately attended to the possibility of the changing use of the sexual position categories "top," "bottom," and "versatile" across young adulthood. Results of the present study suggest the possibility of a more fluid, context-dependent use of these terms than previously documented.

Pachankis JE; Buttenwieser IG; Bernstein LB; Bayles DO

2013-04-01

74

[The experience of sexuality by visually impaired adolescents].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The combination between transformations in adolescence, the indefiniteness they are accompanied by and the visual impairment justifies a study about the sexual experience of female, visually impaired adolescents included in society and in the school community. Five adolescents were interviewed at a Pedagogical Support Center. Questions attempted to find out their knowledge and understanding about the cause of their visual impairment, family composition and orientations, affective-sexual experience, level of knowledge about sexuality-related issues, including contraceptive methods and sexually transmitted diseases. Results revealed that these adolescents display the same sexuality development characteristics of their age group, though they have particular characteristics. It was observed there is a lack of knowledge regarding contraceptive methods and sexually transmitted diseases, of which the adolescents have superficial information. Making knowledge on the referred issues accessible to this population is indispensible.

Bezerra CP; Pagliuca LM

2010-09-01

75

Predictors of sexual involvement among adolescents in rural Jamaica.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Early sexual activity of adolescents is associated with increased risk of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections including HIV, and higher maternal/perinatal morbidity and mortality. HIV and adolescent pregnancy are among the most serious public health problems in Jamaica. The objective of this study was to identify the potential predictors of adolescent sexual activity in Jamaica. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 788 students 13-19 years of age in Jamaica. A questionnaire containing items on socio-demographic characteristics such as age and gender, and scales on adolescent values about sexual activity, self-efficacy for abstinence, parental love, and depression were administered to adolescents at secondary schools in the parish of Hanover. Reliability analysis of the scales, descriptive statistics, and logistic regression to determine predictors of sexual activity were conducted. Approximately 62% of adolescents who responded reported previous sexual intercourse and 38% reported never having had sex. The mean age for sexual debut was 13.6 years. Logistic regression revealed delay values (values towards delaying sexual activity) as protective (OR=0.16, CI=0.09-0.26) against involvement in sexual activity. Risk factors for sexual activity included being older (OR=1.9, CI=1.50-2.50), being male (OR=2.26, CI=1.39-3.68) and having grown-up values (OR=1.49, CI=1.05-2.12). Contrary to expectations, having higher self-efficacy skills was predictive (OR=1.47, CI=1.05-2.05) of adolescent sexual involvement. Analyses by gender revealed that delay and grownup values predicted male sexual activity, while self-efficacy, paternal love and delay values predicted female behavior. These findings show the importance of age, gender, self-efficacy, delay and grown-up values in predicting sexual activity in adolescents and indicate the need for gender-specific interventions for Jamaican adolescents.

Stallworth J; Roofe M; Clark LF; Ehiri JE; Mukherjee S; Person S; Jolly PE

2004-04-01

76

Psychological vulnerability among overweight/obese minority adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Depression is associated with obesity among adolescents, with racial/ethnic variability noted. Psychological correlates that may influence this relationship have not been adequately explored. The primary objective of this secondary analysis was to compare levels of stress, self-esteem, coping, social support, and depressive mood between normal weight and overweight/obese minority adolescents (as defined using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention standards). Adolescents (n = 101) aged 14-18 years who were largely minority (87%) were recruited from two Midwestern-area high schools. Using a descriptive comparative design, individuals were grouped into normal weight (>5th to <85th percentile) and overweight/obese (? 85 th percentile) for comparison on measures. Self-reported levels of stress, coping, self-esteem, social support, depressive mood, and body mass index were obtained. Obese/overweight adolescents reported significantly lower self-esteem than did those with normal weight (p < .05). Although stress was a significant predictor of depressive mood in both groups (p < .001), low self-esteem was also a significant predictor of depressive mood in the overweight/obese group (p = .001). Strategies to manage stress and improve self-esteem may help alleviate depressive mood in high school adolescents.

Martyn-Nemeth PA; Penckofer S

2012-08-01

77

A Longitudinal Investigation of Peer Sexual Harassment Victimization in Adolescence  

Science.gov (United States)

|The current study describes longitudinal trends in sexual harassment by adolescent peers and highlights gender, pubertal status, attractiveness, and power as predictors of harassment victimization. At the end of 5th, 7th, and 9th grades, 242 adolescents completed questionnaires about sexual harassment victimization, pubertal status, and perceived…

Petersen, Jennifer L.; Hyde, Janet Shibley

2009-01-01

78

Does Sex Education Affect Adolescent Sexual Behaviors and Health?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines whether offering sex education to young teenagers affects several measures of adolescent sexual behavior and health: virginity status, contraceptive use, frequency of intercourse, likelihood of pregnancy, and probability of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent

Sabia, Joseph J.

2006-01-01

79

Families, resources, and adult health: where do sexual minorities fit?  

Science.gov (United States)

Extensive research documents the relevance of families and socioeconomic resources to health. This article extends that research to sexual minorities, using 12 years of the National Health Interview Survey (N = 460,459) to examine self-evaluations of health among male and female adults living in same-sex and different-sex relationships. Adjusting for socioeconomic status eliminates differences between same- and different-sex cohabitors so that they have similarly higher odds of poor health relative to married persons. Results by gender reveal that the cohabitation disadvantage for health is more pronounced for different-sex cohabiting women than for men, but little difference exists between same-sex cohabiting men and women. Finally, the presence of children in the home is more protective for women's than men's health, but those protections are specific to married women. In all, the results elucidate the importance of relationship type, gender, and the presence of children when evaluating health. PMID:23315360

Denney, Justin T; Gorman, Bridget K; Barrera, Cristina B

2013-01-11

80

Families, resources, and adult health: where do sexual minorities fit?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Extensive research documents the relevance of families and socioeconomic resources to health. This article extends that research to sexual minorities, using 12 years of the National Health Interview Survey (N = 460,459) to examine self-evaluations of health among male and female adults living in same-sex and different-sex relationships. Adjusting for socioeconomic status eliminates differences between same- and different-sex cohabitors so that they have similarly higher odds of poor health relative to married persons. Results by gender reveal that the cohabitation disadvantage for health is more pronounced for different-sex cohabiting women than for men, but little difference exists between same-sex cohabiting men and women. Finally, the presence of children in the home is more protective for women's than men's health, but those protections are specific to married women. In all, the results elucidate the importance of relationship type, gender, and the presence of children when evaluating health.

Denney JT; Gorman BK; Barrera CB

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
81

Factors related to sexual knowledge among Malaysian adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This influence of gender, race, age and personal belief on adolescent’s sexual knowledge was examined. The respondents for the study were 860 school–going adolescents aged 13 to 18 from urbanization city in Peninsular Malaysia. Data were collected by using self-administered questionnaire. A cultural sensitive sexual knowledge scale was developed and employed to measure respondent’s sexual knowledge. Descriptive, bivariate and multiple statistical tests were conducted to examine the relationships between gender, race, age and personal belief with adolescentssexual knowledge. Findings of the present study showed that: 1) No significant mean difference in sexual knowledge between boys and girls. 2) There was a statistically significant difference in the mean of sexual knowledge among the three races (F (2,766) =14.84, p?.001). 3) Respondents with higher score in sexual knowledge tend to be older (r=.21, p?.05), have lower score on extent of living a life according to the religious belief (r=-.07, p?.05), have lower self-perceived importance of religion in life (r=-.11, p?.01), have higher self-perceived sexual openness (r=-.31, p?.01) and have more positive attitude toward sex related sources (r=.35, p?.01). Findings of this study will help to further improve the understanding of adolescentssexual knowledge and to give inputs to programs on adolescent development specifically in sexuality and reproduction health.

Siti Nor Y; Wong Fui-Ping; Rozumah B; Mariani M; Rumaya J; Mansor, A.T

2010-01-01

82

Operationalization of three dimensions of sexual orientation in a national survey of late adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study investigated three dimensions of sexual orientation-identity, attraction, and behavior-in a national survey of late adolescents. Prevalence rates and the diversity of dimensions of sexual orientation when combined were studied. A representative sample of 3,432 Swedish high school seniors completed an anonymous school-based self-report survey about sexuality, Internet use, and health. Four measures of sexual orientation were included-one for sexual identity, two for attraction (emotional or sexual attraction, romantic attraction), and one for sexual behavior. Prevalence rates of sexual minority orientation varied between 4.3% for sexual behavior (males 2.9%, females 5.6%) and 29.4% for emotional or sexual attraction (males 17.7%, females 39.5%). Different measures of sexual orientation were significantly associated with one another. Bisexual or homosexual orientation was reported by 1.5% of the participants in all four measures and by 17.6% in at least one measure. Researchers need to carefully choose, depending on the research questions under investigation, which dimensions of sexual orientation and which measures they wish to include in their survey. Recommendations based on findings from the study are given.

Priebe G; Svedin CG

2013-11-01

83

Assessment and treatment of adolescent sexual offenders: implications of recent research on generalist versus specialist explanations.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Adolescent sex offenders (ASOs) are commonly considered a special kind of juvenile offender, with distinct risk and etiological factors from other adolescent offenders. However, a growing body of research suggests that ASOs are more similar to other adolescent non-sex offenders than they are different (e.g., Awad, Saunders, & Levine, 1984; Elliott, 1994; France & Hudson, 1993). The purpose of the present article is to review recent literature pertaining to the distinction between generalist and specialist adolescent sex offenders (ASOs). METHOD: This article summarizes the findings from Seto and Lalumière's (2010) meta-analysis on theoretically derived risk and etiological factors for adolescent sexual offending. Based on these findings, recommendations for the assessment and treatment of this population are made. RESULTS: The results of Seto and Lalumière's (2010) meta-analysis suggests the majority of ASOs are generalist offenders who are similar to other adolescent non-sex offenders, while a minority of ASOs are specialist offenders, who have unique risk and etiological factors including childhood sexual abuse/maltreatment and atypical sexual interests. CONCLUSIONS: A clear distinction has been shown between generalist ASOs and specialist ASOs. Assessment measures and treatment targets geared toward one of these groups may be less effective with the other group, which means that this distinction is clinically important. It is expected that if treatment is matched to ASO type, sexual and nonsexual recidivism will be reduced and positive changes in other clinically important areas will be evident.

Pullman L; Seto MC

2012-03-01

84

A systematic review of the aetiology of tobacco disparities for sexual minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the literature examining risk factors/correlates of cigarette smoking among lesbian, gay and bisexual (ie, sexual minority) populations. METHODS: Sets of terms relevant to sexual minority populations and cigarette smoking were used in a simultaneous search of 10 databases through EBSCOhost. The search was limited to the peer-reviewed literature up to January 2011, using no geographic or language limits. For inclusion, the paper was required to: (1) have been written in English, (2) have sexual minorities (defined by either attraction, behaviour, or identity) included in the study population and (3) have examined some form of magnitude of association for risk factors/correlates of any definition of cigarette smoking. A total of 386 abstracts were reviewed independently, with 26 papers meeting all inclusion criteria. Abstracts were reviewed and coded independently by authors JB and JGLL using nine codes derived from the inclusion/exclusion criteria. RESULTS: Studies used various measures of sexual orientation and of smoking. Risk factors that could be considered unique to sexual minorities included internalised homophobia and reactions to disclosure of sexual orientation. Some studies also indicated common smoking risk factors experienced at higher rates among sexual minorities, including stress, depression, alcohol use and victimisation. CONCLUSIONS: This review identified risks that were associated with sexual minority status and common to the general population but experienced at potentially higher rates by sexual minorities. Government and foundation funds should be directed towards research on the origins of this disparity.

Blosnich J; Lee JG; Horn K

2013-03-01

85

Neural mechanisms of impulse control in sexually risky adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The consequences of risky sexual behavior are of public concern. Adolescents contribute disproportionately to negative consequences of risky sexual behavior. However, no research has examined the neural correlates of impulse control and real-world engagement in risky sexual behavior in this population. The aim of the present study was to examine this question. Twenty sexually active adolescents performed an impulse control task during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan and risky sexual behaviors were assessed through self-report. Sexual riskiness ratings were negatively associated with activation in the prefrontal cortex during response inhibition. These results suggest that diminished engagement of impulse control circuitry may contribute to sexual riskiness in adolescents.

Goldenberg D; Telzer EH; Lieberman MD; Fuligni A; Galván A

2013-06-01

86

Sexuality-Related Outcomes of Adolescent Children of Teen Mothers  

Science.gov (United States)

The relationship between being an adolescent child of a teen mother and sexuality-related outcomes was investigated using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Adolescents whose mothers were teenagers at first birth were more likely to have had sex by age 16 than other adolescents. Gender moderated this effect, as this relationship…

Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

2008-01-01

87

The Developmental Association of Sexual Self-Concept with Sexual Behavior among Adolescent Women  

Science.gov (United States)

Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development…

Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Orr, Donald P.

2011-01-01

88

Risk factors for sexually transmitted infections among young adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Significant numbers of adolescents are initiating sexual activity at age 17 and younger. Little is known about this younger population of adolescents. This includes risk or protective factors for sexual activity and sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition. To safeguard all adolescents from the consequences of risky sexual behaviors, and to insure age appropriate and effective interventions, further study is critical to address risky behaviors specific to early adolescents. This study was a retrospective chart review of 155 sexually active adolescent girls. Students were divided into those who never had a documented STI and those who had 1 or more STIs. Data were collected from a sexual history questionnaire. These data were grouped into risk or protective domains. Domains were made up of 5 items of protective factors, 3 items of peer risks, 2 items of family risks, and 7 items of individual risks. STI outcomes were compared to these characteristics. One hundred fifty-five sexually active adolescents were studied. A univariate and multivariate analysis of risk and protective factors for testing positive for an STI demonstrated that high levels of protective factors reduced the risk of STIs. This suggests that STI prevention programs should focus on increasing protective factors among young adolescents in addition to reducing risk factors.

Lepusi? D; Radovi?-Radovci? S

2013-06-01

89

On intimacy, sexual activities and exposure to sexual abuse among children and adolescents with mobility impairment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: The aim was to describe experiences of intimacy and sexual activity and exposure to sexual abuse among children and adolescents with mobility impairment, and to relate these experiences to socio-demographic data, disability characteristics and well-being. METHODS: This study included semi-structured interviews with 141 children and adolescents aged 7-18 years with mobility impairment. Interpersonal experiences of intimacy and sexuality, socio-demographic data, disability characteristics and well-being were registered. RESULTS: About half of the children and adolescents in the study had been in a boy- or a girlfriend relationship, and about a fifth had an ongoing relationship. Of the adolescents, 15% had at least one experience of a sexual relationship. Whereas no particular sexual dysfunction was reported, 15% had concerns about their future sexual activities, presumably related to mobility impairment. A history of sexual abuse was reported by 7% in the age cohort of 13-18 years. The socio-demographic and disability-related features had a marginal influence on the experiences of intimacy and sexual activities. CONCLUSION: Several aspects of sexual health are not fully realized for children and adolescents with impaired mobility, and there is a need for specialized sexual health care services to protect the sexual rights of this group.

Jemtå L; Fugl-Meyer KS; Oberg K

2008-05-01

90

Ethnic Composition of School Classes, Majority-Minority Friendships, and Adolescents' Intergroup Attitudes in the Netherlands  

Science.gov (United States)

The relationships between the proportion of ethnic minority adolescents in school classes, the proportion and quality of majority-minority friendships and intergroup attitudes were examined using multi-level analysis (N = 2386 adolescents in 117 school classes in the Netherlands). In school classes with high proportions of ethnic minority

Vervoort, Miranda H. M.; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Scheepers, Peer L. H.

2011-01-01

91

New media use and sexual behavior among latino adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between SMS/social media use and sexual behavior among Latino adolescents. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-eight 9(th)- and 10(th)-grade Latino adolescents were recruited to participate in a survey. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine associations between new media use and sexual behaviors. RESULTS: There is a significant association between frequency of SMS/social media use and sexual behavior after controlling for age, gender, survey language, and nativity. CONCLUSIONS: Latino adolescents using SMS and social media at higher frequencies are more likely to have ever had sex. Future research must continue to explore this relationship.

Landry M; Gonzales FA; Wood S; Vyas A

2013-05-01

92

Cross-sectional evidence for a stress-negative affect pathway to substance use among sexual minority girls.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sexual minority girls (SMGs) are four times more likely to engage in substance use than are heterosexual girls. A better understanding of the explanatory mechanisms of this disparity is needed to inform prevention and intervention programs. The goal of this study was to conduct a preliminary test of a "stress-negative affect" pathway by examining gay-related victimization and depression as mediators of substance use among SMGs. Adolescent girls (N = 156, 41% SMGs) were recruited from two urban adolescent medicine clinics to participate in an NIH-funded study of adolescent substance use. The average age was 17.0 years old and 57% were nonwhite. Mediation analyses were conducted in a multiple regression framework using SPSS and a mediation macro utilizing bias-corrected bootstrapping. Four models were estimated to test mediated pathways from sexual orientation to gay-related victimization (Mediator 1), to depression symptoms (Mediator 2), and then to each of four substance use variables: cigarettes, marijuana, alcohol, and heavy alcohol use. Significant mediated pathways (mediation tests with 95% CIs) were found for cigarette, alcohol and heavy alcohol use outcome variables. Results provide preliminary support for the minority stress hypothesis and the stress-negative affect pathway, and may inform the development of future prevention and intervention programs. PMID:23919370

Marshal, Michael P; Burton, Chad M; Chisolm, Deena J; Sucato, Gina S; Friedman, Mark S

2013-04-19

93

HIV Prevention Intervention Outcome among Minority Adolescents in Court Mandated Drug Treatment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem statement: Delinquent adolescents with substance abuse disorders frequently engage in behaviors that elevate their risk of contracting HIV. Although effective risk reduction interventions are urgently needed, there is uncertainty about the nature of interventions required to produce change. Approach:This study evaluated whether Modified version of Becoming A Responsible Teen (M-BART) produced greater reductions in drug use and sexual risk behaviors than an Anger Management (AM) condition among a mixed gender, culturally diverse sample of adolescents in court-ordered substance dependence treatment. Results: No significant differences were found between M-BART (n = 70) and AM (n = 59) groups in degree of change between intake and outcome in HIV sex risk or drug use behaviors. However, across groups, meaningful reductions were found in total number of sex partners and in proportions of total unprotected sex acts, unprotected vaginal sex, unprotected oral giving sex acts and unprotected oral receiving sex acts from baseline to follow-up (all p?s Conclusion: Factors that accounted for meaningful changes across groups and no change between intervention outcomes were discussed. While the M-BART intervention impacted the adolescents directly by teaching skills about how to reduce risky sex, the AM intervention and also impacted higher order factor, impulsivity, linked to risky sex and drug use. Implications for HIV prevention among minority adolescents were discussed.

Jessy Devieux; Robert C. McMahon; Rhonda Rosenberg; Robert M. Malow

2007-01-01

94

Self-esteem: a comparative study of adolescents from mainstream and minority religious groups in Pakistan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present study aimed to investigate the level of self-esteem among religious minority adolescents (Christians and Hindus) by making a comparison with their dominant counterparts (Muslims) in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that adolescents of religious minorities would have lower level of self-esteem than their dominant counterparts. In the present study 320 adolescents participated, in which 160 adolescents belonged to minority religious groups (i.e. 76 Christians and 84 Hindus) and 160 adolescents belonged to dominant religious group i.e. Muslims. To assess self-esteem of the participants, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg in Society and the adolescent self image, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1965) was used. One Way Analysis of Variance reveals that religious minority adolescents (Christians and Hindus) inclined to have lower self-esteem as compared to their dominant counterpart (Muslim adolescents).

Iqbal S; Ahmad R; Ayub N

2013-02-01

95

Sexual health information seeking: a survey of adolescent practices.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify sources of information and support preferred by young people to understand adolescent practices as adolescents develop a sexual health knowledge base. BACKGROUND: Statistics suggest that adolescents are not always making safe sexual health decisions. It is essential to develop an understanding of preferred sources of information and support to structure health and education services so that adolescents develop skills and knowledge to make safer choices. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey design. METHODS: A wide-ranging questionnaire was developed using validated questions, drawn from similar adolescent lifestyle surveys and adapted with guidance from an advisory group; 2036 13-16-year-olds responded. Two questions, reporting information sources adolescents find useful and sources of approachable support, are considered here. RESULTS: Adolescents find informal sources more useful and experience higher levels of comfort accessing informal support especially from their best friends and mothers. Of formal provision, school-based sources are preferred; however, sexual health information seeking is gendered and changes across year groups. The range of sexual health information sources adolescents access increases with age, and how they access these information sources changes as sexual activity increases and the information becomes more relevant. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the targeting of sexual health provision in relation to age and gender and suggest a youth-focused approach to formal provision, including outreach working and a collaborative relationship with adolescents and parents. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings contribute to an understanding of sources of information and support preferred by adolescents. In particular, they need to reconsider how services external to the school may be developed so they are youth-focused and approachable. Nurses need to consider how best to work in partnership with adolescents and their families to disseminate accurate information and develop relevant services.

Whitfield C; Jomeen J; Hayter M; Gardiner E

2013-03-01

96

[Interventions involving parents in order to impact adolescent sexual behavior].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of educational interventions that incorporate parent participation to modify adolescent sexual behavior. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of 5 electronic databases for articles published between 2002 and 2009 that evaluated educational interventions involving parents. RESULTS: Nineteen articles evaluated 15 interventions that met all the criteria for inclusion. They found a significant increase in adolescents' intentions to postpone sexual intercourse and use contraceptives, a reduction in self-reported sexual relations and an increase in condom use. Positive results were also found for individual protective factors such as knowledge and attitude, and family factors such as parent-child communication, perception of rules, monitoring/supervision by parents and family support. CONCLUSION: Educational interventions that include parents support healthy sexual behavior among adolescents. Parental participation can be included in any intervention aimed at adolescents.

Atienzo EE; Campero L; Estrada F; Rouse C; Walker D

2011-03-01

97

Long-Term Effects of Self-Control on Alcohol Use and Sexual Behavior among Urban Minority Young Women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available High risk alcohol use and sexual behaviors peak in young adulthood and often occur in the same individuals. Alcohol use has been found to impair decision-making and contribute to high risk sexual activity. However, the association between alcohol use and risky sexual behavior may also reflect enduring individual differences in risk taking, sociability, self-control, and related variables. Both behaviors can serve similar functions related to recreation, interpersonal connection, and the pursuit of excitement or pleasure. The present study examined the extent to which high risk drinking and sexual behavior clustered together in a sample of urban minority young adult women, a demographic group at elevated risk for negative outcomes related to sexual health. We tested whether psychosocial functioning measured at the beginning of high school predicted classes of risk behaviors when girls were tracked longitudinally into young adulthood. Latent class analysis indicated three distinct profiles based on high risk drinking and sexual behavior (i.e., multiple sex partners) in young adulthood. The largest class (73% of the sample) reported low levels of risky drinking and sexual behavior. The next largest class (19%) reported high risk drinking and low risk sexual behavior, and the smallest class (8%) reported high levels of both behaviors. Compared to women from other racial/ethnic groups, black women were more likely to be categorized in the high risk drinking/low risk sex class. Multinomial logistic regression indicated that self-control in adolescence had a broad and enduring protective effect on risk behaviors eight years later and was associated with a greater probability of being in the low risk drinking/low risk sex class. Findings are discussed in terms of understanding the phenotypic expressions of risk behavior as they relate to early psychosocial development and the long-term protective function of self-control in reducing high risk drinking and sexual behaviors.

Kenneth W. Griffin; Lawrence M. Scheier; Bianca Acevedo; Jerry L. Grenard; Gilbert J. Botvin

2011-01-01

98

SEXUAL HEALTH BEHAVIORS OF ADOLESCENTS IN POKHARA, NEPAL  

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Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adolescent (10–19 years) is a transition of age during which hazardous sexual health behaviors may be adopted; increasing vulnerability to several kinds of behavioral disorders like drug use, unsafe sexual act leading to reproductive ill health. Objective of the study was to assess sexual health behaviors of adolescents in Pokhara, Nepal. METHODS: An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 15–19 years adolescents studying in grades 11 and 12. Probability sampling techniques were applied. A structured, pretested, envelope sealed self administered questionnaire was distributed among all (1584) adolescents of the 11 and 12 grades of selected institutions. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (16 versions). Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied. RESULTS: About 19.37% adolescents had sexual contact and male participation was higher than females (P<0.05). Nearly one fifth of unmarried were found to be involved in sexual activities and most of them had first sex between 15-19 years age (median age 15.26 years). Of those who had sex, 6.91% had adopted all the three: vaginal, oral and anal sexes and majority had single followed by 2-5 sex partners in their sexual intercourse in the last one year and last month. About 13.93% adolescents were found to be indulged in group sex. Most of them had sex with regular partners and commercial sex workers. More than eight out of every ten who had sex had used contraceptive methods and condom was method of choice (94.77%). CONCLUSIONS: Premarital sexual involvement was prevalent among adolescents; sex with commercial sex workers and non commercial sex partners was perceived to be risk. Behavior change intervention strategies need to be formulated and implemented to promote adolescent reproductive and sexual health.

Shrestha Niranjan; Prasad Paneru Damaru; Jnawali Kalpana

2012-01-01

99

Health workers' attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health services for unmarried adolescents in Ethiopia  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents in developing countries face a range of sexual and reproductive health problems. Lack of health care service for reproductive health or difficulty in accessing them are among them. In this study we aimed to examine health care workers' attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health services to unmarried adolescents in Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey among 423 health care service providers working in eastern Ethiopia in 2010. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed to drive proportions and associations. Results The majority of health workers had positive attitudes. However, nearly one third (30%) of health care workers had negative attitudes toward providing RH services to unmarried adolescents. Close to half (46.5%) of the respondents had unfavorable responses toward providing family planning to unmarried adolescents. About 13% of health workers agreed to setting up penal rules and regulations against adolescents that practice pre-marital sexual intercourse. The multivariate analysis indicated that being married (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.44 - 3.06), lower education level (OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.04 - 1.99), being a health extension worker (OR 2.49; 95% CI 1.43 - 4.35), lack of training on reproductive health services (OR 5.27; 95% CI 1.51 - 5.89) to be significantly associated with negative attitudes toward provision of sexual and reproductive services to adolescents. Conclusions The majority of the health workers had generally positive attitudes toward sexual and reproductive health to adolescents. However, a minority has displayed negatives attitudes. Such negative attitudes will be barriers to service utilization by adolescents and hampers the efforts to reduce sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies among unmarried adolescents. We therefore call for a targeted effort toward alleviating negative attitudes toward adolescent-friendly reproductive health service and re-enforcing the positive ones.

Tilahun Mesfin; Mengistie Bezatu; Egata Gudina; Reda Ayalu A

2012-01-01

100

Comparing sexual minority cancer survivors recruited through a cancer registry to convenience methods of recruitment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Sexual minority women, defined as having a lesbian or bisexual identity or reporting a preference for a female partner, are not considered by cancer surveillance. This study assesses the representativeness of sexual minority breast cancer survivors, defined as having a lesbian or bisexual identity or reporting a preference for a female partner, who were recruited into a convenience sample compared with a population-based registry sample of sexual minority breast cancer survivors. METHODS: Long-term survivors of non-metastatic breast cancer who self-reported as sexual minority were recruited from a cancer registry and subsequently from the community using convenience recruitment methods. Sexual minority breast cancer survivors who screened eligible participated in a telephone survey about their quality of life and factors associated therewith. RESULTS: Participants in the convenience sample were similar to the registry-based sample with respect to adjustment to cancer, physical health, trust in physician, coping, social support, and sexual minority experiences. Compared with the convenience sample, breast cancer survivors in the registry sample were more likely married, more educated, diagnosed more recently, at an earlier stage of cancer, and more likely treated with breast-conserving surgery; they differed on adjuvant therapies. DISCUSSION: Because sexual minority breast cancer survivors who volunteered for the community-based sample shared most characteristics of the sample recruited from the cancer registry, we concluded that the community sample had comparable representational quality. In the absence of cancer surveillance of sexual minorities, thoughtful convenience recruitment methods provide good representational quality convenience samples.

Boehmer U; Clark MA; Timm A; Glickman M; Sullivan M

2011-09-01

 
 
 
 
101

Individual and Family Correlates of Adolescents' Sexual Behavior: Multiethnic Findings  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine correlates of adolescent sexual activity, including age of first date, family composition, clarity of long term goals, and maternal and paternal views about premarital sex. There were 672 males and females, three races/ethnicities, both urban and suburban settings, and socioeconomic diversity. Sexual

Anagurthi, Claudia; Johnson, Ashley Cahill; Somers, Cheryl L.

2011-01-01

102

Sexual Harassment and Abuse of Adolescent Schoolgirls in South India  

Science.gov (United States)

|This article reports on a small exploratory study of adolescent girls' experiences of sexual harassment and abuse while attending secondary school in Karnataka State, South India. In South Asia, public discussion of sexual matters, especially relating to children, is largely taboo, and the study uncovers a hidden aspect of schooling, which…

Leach, Fiona; Sitaram, Shashikala

2007-01-01

103

Adolescent relationship abuse and reproductive and sexual coercion among teens.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) involves a range of coercive and violent behaviours in romantic or consensual relationships. ARA is prevalent and is associated with multiple poor reproductive and sexual health outcomes, especially for adolescent girls. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies and reviews of ARA research point to the prevalence of ARA, health consequences of ARA and the contribution of social and cultural norms to ARA perpetration, all of which can inform how to address ARA more effectively with adolescents. Emerging research on reproductive and sexual coercion among adolescents and technology-based abuse is directly relevant to the reproductive and sexual healthcare of adolescents. SUMMARY: Current findings underscore the extent to which young, reproductive-aged women may particularly benefit from more effective methods to address ARA. In line with recent American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommendations, clinicians should assess for and counsel their adolescent female patients about how ARA and reproductive and sexual coercion may influence adolescent girls' reproductive health. Recent evidence also highlights that ARA manifests in ways that may be less recognizable to clinicians, such as cyber dating abuse. Finally, ARA prevention and intervention efforts should continue to promote gender equity and address the social and cultural norms that shape adolescent girls' experiences of abuse.

Miller E; McCauley HL

2013-10-01

104

Adolescent Sexuality in a Therapeutic Community: Staff Countertransference Issues.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Issues connected with sexuality create conflict and countertransference dilemmas for staff who work with psychiatric adolescents in a therapeutic community. A system is proposed for articulating and working through these feelings, whereby the residential treatment center allows adolescents to develop a sense of self. (Author/NRB)|

Schneider, Stanley; Deutsch, Chaim

1985-01-01

105

Differences between sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers: developmental antecedents and behavioral comparisons.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study compares sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers on a number of variables. Self-report measures were administered to 325 male sexually abusive youth (average age 16) in six residential facilities in the Midwest, 55% of whom reported sexual victimization. The results indicate that the sexually victimized sexual abusers have more severe developmental antecedents (trauma, family characteristics, early exposure to pornography and personality) and recent behavioral difficulties (characteristics of sexual aggression, sexual arousal, use of pornography, and nonsexual criminal behavior) than the nonsexually victimized group. Results are contrasted with recent typological research, which found no relationship between sexual victimization and subtype membership. Treatment, research, and theoretical implications are discussed.

Burton DL; Duty KJ; Leibowitz GS

2011-01-01

106

Comprehensive sexuality education in adolescents by their community nurse  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Adolescence is a key step in the process of building personal and sexual identity. The objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a sex education program in the acquisition of knowledge about contraception and sexually transmitted diseases in a population of adolescents. We believe that the educational intervention is effective for increasing knowledge about contraceptive methods and an improvement in most of the attitudes for the promotion of condoms and an appropriate tool to reduce unwanted pregnancy rates in young and sexually transmitted diseases.

Prado Sánchez-Molero Martín; Pedro Nieva Exposito; J. Antonio Gonzalez Mateos; Eloy Galiano Fernandez; M. Elvira Vilaplana Alcaraz; Ana Maria del Cerro Gutierrez

2010-01-01

107

Mothers, Fathers, Peers, and Mexican-Origin Adolescents' Sexual Intentions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Drawing on a symbolic-interaction perspective and a compensation model, the processes linking mother-and father-adolescent relationship qualities, deviant peer affiliations, and adolescents' sexual intentions were investigated for 246 Mexican-origin youths born in the United States and in Mexico using multiple-group structural equation models. Deviant peer affiliations significantly mediated the relations between paternal acceptance and sexual intentions and between disclosure to mothers and sexual intentions for U.S.-born youths but not for Mexico-born youths. Findings highlight the importance of examining variability as a function of youth nativity. PMID:21278903

Killoren, Sarah E; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Christopher, F Scott; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

2011-02-01

108

A multidimensional model of sexual health and sexual and prevention behavior among adolescent women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Sexual health refers a state of lifespan well-being related to sexuality. Among young people, sexual health has multiple dimensions, including the positive developmental contributions of sexuality, as well as the acquisition of skills pertinent to avoiding adverse sexual outcomes such as unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Existing efforts to understand sexual health, however, have yet to empirically operationalize a multi-dimensional model of sexual health and to evaluate its association to different sexual/prevention behaviors. METHODS: Sexual health dimensions and sexual/prevention behaviors were drawn from a larger longitudinal cohort study of sexual relationships among adolescent women (N = 387, 14-17 years). Second order latent variable modeling (AMOS/19.0) evaluated the relationship between sexual health and dimensions and analyzed the effect of sexual health to sexual/prevention outcomes. RESULTS: All first order latent variables were significant indicators of sexual health (?: 0.192 - 0.874, all p < .001). Greater sexual health was significantly associated with sexual abstinence, as well as with more frequent non-coital and vaginal sex, condom use at last sex, a higher proportion of condom-protected events, use of hormonal or other methods of pregnancy control and absence of STI. All models showed good fit. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual health is an empirically coherent structure, in which the totality of its dimensions is significantly linked to a wide range of outcomes, including sexual abstinence, condom use and absence of STI. This means that, regardless of a young person's experiences, sexual health is an important construct for promoting positive sexual development and for primary prevention.

Hensel DJ; Fortenberry JD

2013-02-01

109

Sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among young adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To present new data on sexual initiation, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among US adolescents aged 10 to 19, and to compare the youngest adolescents' behaviors with those of older adolescents. METHODS: Using nationally representative data from several rounds of the National Survey of Family Growth, we performed event history (ie, survival) analyses to examine timing of sexual initiation and contraceptive use. We calculated adolescent pregnancy rates by single year of age using data from the National Center for Health Statistics, the Guttmacher Institute, and the US Census Bureau. RESULTS: Sexual activity is and has long been rare among those 12 and younger; most is nonconsensual. By contrast, most older teens (aged 17-19) are sexually active. Approximately 30% of those aged 15 to 16 have had sex. Pregnancy rates among the youngest teens are exceedingly low, for example, ?1 per 10?000 girls aged 12. Contraceptive uptake among girls as young as 15 is similar to that of their older counterparts, whereas girls who start having sex at 14 or younger are less likely to have used a method at first sex and take longer to begin using contraception. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual activity and pregnancy are rare among the youngest adolescents, whose behavior represents a different public health concern than the broader issue of pregnancies to older teens. Health professionals can improve outcomes for teenagers by recognizing the higher likelihood of nonconsensual sex among younger teens and by teaching and making contraceptive methods available to teen patients before they become sexually active.

Finer LB; Philbin JM

2013-05-01

110

Improving sexual risk communication with adolescents using event history calendars.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was conducted to explore the effects of an event history calendar (EHC) approach on adolescent sexual risk communication and sexual activity. Adolescent school-linked health clinic patients (n = 30) who reported sexual activity self-administered the EHC that was used by nurse practitioners (NPs; n = 2) during a clinic visit. Immediately pre- and post-visit, and at 1 and 3 months, adolescents reported sexual risk behaviors and perceptions about EHC communication on questionnaires and by interview. NPs reported their perceptions of EHCs by questionnaire after the visit and poststudy interview. The EHC approach facilitated communication and adolescent awareness of their risk behaviors. Scores increased on Amount of Communication, t(29) = 8.174, p < .001; Satisfaction with Communication, t(29) = 3.112, p = .004; Client Involvement in Decision Making, t(29) = 3.901, p = .001, and Client Satisfaction with Interpersonal Style, t(29) = 3.763, p = .001. Adolescents reported decreased sexual intercourse at 1 month, p = .031. School nurses could use the EHC approach to facilitate adolescent communication and tailoring of interventions.

Martyn KK; Darling-Fisher C; Pardee M; Ronis DL; Felicetti IL; Saftner MA

2012-04-01

111

Patterns of alcohol use and consequences among empirically derived sexual minority subgroups.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The current study develops an empirically determined classification of sexual orientation developmental patterns based on participants' annual reports of self-identifications, sexual attractions, and sexual behaviors during the first 4 years of college. A secondary aim of the current work was to examine trajectories of alcohol involvement among identified subgroups. METHOD: Data were drawn from a subsample of a longitudinal study of incoming first-time college students at a large, public university (n = 2,068). Longitudinal latent class analysis was used to classify sexual minority participants into empirically derived subgroups based on three self-reported facets of sexual orientation. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses were conducted to examine how trajectories of alcohol involvement varied by sexual orientation class membership. RESULTS: Four unique subclasses of sexual orientation developmental patterns were identified for males and females: one consistently exclusively heterosexual group and three sexual minority groups. Despite generally similar alcohol use patterns among subclasses, certain sexual minority subgroups reported elevated levels of alcohol-related negative consequences and maladaptive motivations for use throughout college compared with their exclusively heterosexual counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Elevations in coping and conformity motivations for alcohol use were seen among those subgroups that also evidenced heightened negative alcohol-related consequences. Implications and limitations of the current work are discussed.

Talley AE; Sher KJ; Steinley D; Wood PK; Littlefield AK

2012-03-01

112

Testing a multiple mediator model of the effect of childhood sexual abuse on adolescent sexual victimization.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study modeled the direct relationship between child sexual abuse (CSA) and adolescent peer-to-peer sexual victimization (APSV) and the mediated effect via variables representing the number of sexual partners, sexual risk behavior, and signaling sexual boundaries. A cross-sectional study on the effect of CSA on APSV was conducted, utilizing a multiple mediator model. Mediated and direct effects in the model were estimated employing Mplus using bootstrapped percentile based confidence intervals to test for significance of mediated effects. The study employed 327 Danish female adolescents with a mean age of 14.9 years (SD = 0.5). The estimates from the mediational model indicated full mediation of the effect of CSA on APSV via number of sexual partners and sexual risk behavior. The current study suggests that the link between CSA and APSV was mediated by sexual behaviors specifically pertaining to situations of social peer interaction, rather than directly on prior experiences of sexual victimization. The present study identifies a modifiable target area for intervention to reduce adolescent sexual revictimization. PMID:23330622

Bramsen, Rikke H; Lasgaard, Mathias; Koss, Mary P; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask; Banner, Jytte

2013-01-01

113

Sexual behaviour in adolescents and young people attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic, Ile Ife, Nigeria  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

WHO estimates that 20% of persons living with HIV/AIDS are in their 20s and one out of twenty adolescents contract a sexually transmitted disease (STD) each year. A total of 303 adolescents and youths (10-24 years of age) attending an STD clinic were subjected to a questionnaire to assess sex...

Olasode Olayinka

114

Contextualising sexual harassment of adolescent girls in Bangladesh.  

Science.gov (United States)

Violence against women is a social mechanism confirming women's subordination in many societies. Sexual violence and harassment have various negative psychological impacts on girls, including a persistent feeling of insecurity and loss of self-esteem. This article aims to contextualize a particular form of sexual harassment, namely "eve teasing", experienced by Bangladeshi adolescent girls (12-18 years) which emerged from a study of adolescent sexual behaviour carried out by young people. The study used qualitative methods and a participatory approach, including focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observation. Despite taboos, unmarried adolescents actively seek information about sex, erotic pleasure and romance. Information was easily available from videos, mobile phone clips and pornographic magazines, but reinforced gender inequality. "Eve teasing" was one outlet for boys' sexual feelings; they gained pleasure from it and could show their masculinity. The girls disliked it and were afraid of being blamed for provoking it. Thus, "eve teasing" is a result of socio-cultural norms relating to sexuality, as well as a lack of access to sexual and reproductive health information and services in Bangladesh. These findings underscore the importance of comprehensive sexuality education that goes beyond a mere health focus and addresses gender norms and helps youth to gain social-sexual interaction skills. PMID:23684190

Nahar, Papreen; van Reeuwijk, Miranda; Reis, Ria

2013-05-01

115

Contextualising sexual harassment of adolescent girls in Bangladesh.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Violence against women is a social mechanism confirming women's subordination in many societies. Sexual violence and harassment have various negative psychological impacts on girls, including a persistent feeling of insecurity and loss of self-esteem. This article aims to contextualize a particular form of sexual harassment, namely "eve teasing", experienced by Bangladeshi adolescent girls (12-18 years) which emerged from a study of adolescent sexual behaviour carried out by young people. The study used qualitative methods and a participatory approach, including focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observation. Despite taboos, unmarried adolescents actively seek information about sex, erotic pleasure and romance. Information was easily available from videos, mobile phone clips and pornographic magazines, but reinforced gender inequality. "Eve teasing" was one outlet for boys' sexual feelings; they gained pleasure from it and could show their masculinity. The girls disliked it and were afraid of being blamed for provoking it. Thus, "eve teasing" is a result of socio-cultural norms relating to sexuality, as well as a lack of access to sexual and reproductive health information and services in Bangladesh. These findings underscore the importance of comprehensive sexuality education that goes beyond a mere health focus and addresses gender norms and helps youth to gain social-sexual interaction skills.

Nahar P; van Reeuwijk M; Reis R

2013-05-01

116

Translational research applications for the study of adolescent sexual decision making.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although the initiation of sexual behaviors in adolescence is normative, adverse sexual health outcomes disproportionately affect adolescents relative to adults. Efforts to improve sexual health and increase health promotion behaviors in adolescent populations have not been fully successful. In this paper, we propose that translational research that integrates insights from neuroscience, ecological systems theory, and decision science with adolescent sexual behavior research can lead to advances in our understanding of the etiology and prevention of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents. Moreover, these insights can be further translated to the design and implementation of clinical interventions that improve sexual health.

Farris C; Akers AY; Downs JS; Forbes EE

2013-02-01

117

Adolescent sexual victimization : a prospective study on risk factors for first time sexual assault  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The present study set out to investigate predictors of first time adolescent peer-on-peer sexual victimization (APSV) among 238 female Grade 9 students from 30 schools in Denmark. A prospective research design was utilized to examine the relationship among five potential predictors as measured at baseline and first time APSV during a 6-month period. Data analysis was a binary logistic regression analysis. Number of sexual partners and displaying sexual risk behaviors significantly predicted subsequent first time peer-on-peer sexual victimization, whereas a history of child sexual abuse, early sexual onset and failing to signal sexual boundaries did not. The present study identifies specific risk factors for first time sexual victimization that are potentially changeable. Thus, the results may inform prevention initiatives targeting initial experiences of APSV.

Bramsen, Rikke Holm; Lasgaard, Mathias

2012-01-01

118

Sexual behaviour in adolescents and young people attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic, Ile Ife, Nigeria  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available WHO estimates that 20% of persons living with HIV/AIDS are in their 20s and one out of twenty adolescents contract a sexually transmitted disease (STD) each year. A total of 303 adolescents and youths (10-24 years of age) attending an STD clinic were subjected to a questionnaire to assess sexual behavioural patterns that predisposed them to STD. Scope of the questions included age at initiation of sexual intercourse, partner at first exposure, number of sexual partners, use of condoms, exposure to commercial sex workers (CSWs), previous infection with STDs and role of alcohol. Their diagnosis was based on history, clinical findings and laboratory confirmation. Adolescents and youths accounted for 30% of the total number of patients attending the STD clinic during this period. The male to female ratio was 1:0.95. Ninety-six percent (290) were single while 4% (13) were married. Seventy-two percent (217) were students. Age at onset of sexual activity was 10-20 years in 80%, 85% practiced risky sexual behaviour, patronising casual partners was frequent especially after alcohol use, 10% had been exposed to CSWs, condom use was poor, number of sexual partners varied between 1 and 5 and previous infections were not professionally treated. Adolescents and young people are sexually active and practice risky sexual behavioural patterns. Adolescents and youths account for a high percentage of patients patronising the STD clinic. Sexual education and youth friendly reproductive health services are urgently needed to curb the spread of HIV/AIDS/STDs.

Olasode Olayinka

2007-01-01

119

Normative Sexuality Development in Adolescence: A Decade in Review, 2000-2009  

Science.gov (United States)

This review details a key innovation across the field of adolescent sexuality research over the last decade--conceptualizing sexuality as a normative aspect of adolescent development. Anchored in a growing articulation of adolescent sexuality as having positive qualities and consequences, we provide an organizing framework for understanding…

Tolman, Deborah L.; McClelland, Sara I.

2011-01-01

120

A population-based study of cardiovascular disease risk in sexual-minority women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Objectives. We sought to determine if sexual-minority women were at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) than their heterosexual counterparts. Methods. We aggregated data from the 2001-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys to examine differences in CVD risk between heterosexual and sexual-minority women by using the Framingham General CVD Risk Score to calculate a ratio of vascular and chronological age. We also examined differences in the prevalence of various CVD risk factors. Results. Sexual-minority women were more likely to be current or former smokers, to report a history of drug use, to report risky drinking, and to report a family history of CVD. On average, sexual-minority women were 13.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]?=?8.5%, 19.3%) older in vascular terms than their chronological age, which was 5.7% (95% CI?=?1.5%, 9.8%) greater than that of their heterosexual counterparts. Family history of CVD and history of drug use were unrelated to increased CVD risk, and this risk was not fully explained by either risky drinking or smoking. Conclusions. Sexual-minority women are at increased risk for CVD compared with heterosexual women.

Farmer GW; Jabson JM; Bucholz KK; Bowen DJ

2013-10-01

 
 
 
 
121

Does "It Get Better" for Depressed Sexual Minority Youth in Young Adulthood?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To examine depressive symptoms and suicidality in adolescence and adulthood in a sample of depressed adolescents in five sexual identity groups (heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, bisexual, mostly gay, and gay). METHODS: Depressed adolescents (N = 1,591) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were examined again in young adulthood. RESULTS: Paired t-tests revealed that depressive symptoms declined significantly in all five sexual identity groups. McNemar chi-square tests revealed that the percentage of participants reporting suicidal ideation decreased significantly in all groups except for the mostly gay group. The percentage of participants reporting suicide attempts declined in all groups except the bisexual group. CONCLUSIONS: Within-group differences are important to consider in delivering effective mental health services. Although depressive symptoms diminished in young adulthood in all groups, suicidality did not. Mostly gay and bisexual young adults did not report the same significant declines as their peers.

Cardom R; Rostosky S; Danner F

2013-09-01

122

Does positive youth development predict adolescent attitudes about sexuality?  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among individual factors, parental factors, involvement in activities, and adolescent attitudes regarding sex (the outcome variable). We suggest that Positive Youth Development (PYD) research and programming should include promoting healthy sexuality as an important developmental outcome for youth. PYD philosophy and theory, bioecological theory (Bronfenbrenner & Morris, 1998), and identity development theory (Erikson, 1983, 1968; Marcia, 1980, 1993) provided the foundation for this study and were used to make the connections between PYD, adolescent sexuality (including attitudes and behavior), and aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship. Both self-esteem and sexual experience were significant predictors of attitudes regarding sex, but overall, parents contributed the most influence on the outcome variable. (It should be noted, however, that parental influence was the only factor that was a significant predictor.) Only one of the two involvements in activities variables was a significant predictor of attitudes regarding sex. PMID:19086667

Chapman, Erin N; Werner-Wilson, Ronald Jay

2008-01-01

123

Comparison of Adolescents' Reports of Sexual Behavior on a Survey and Sexual Health History Calendar.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Assessing sexual risk is critical for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention with adolescents. This article compares sexual risk reports from two self-administered instruments, a standard survey and a sexual health history calendar (SHHC), among racially diverse youth (n = 232) ages 14 to 21 seeking services at a public health clinic. Agreement between methods was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and Bland-Altman plots. Lin's CCC showed poor to moderate agreement between instruments on reports of sexual partners in the past 3 (0.47), 6 (0.55), and 12 (0.49) months. While individual sexual partner questions were refused a total of 179 times on the survey, youth reported having sexual partners during the same time period on the SHHC in most (77.1%) of these instances. Poor agreement was also found for condom use frequency (CCC = 0.17), with youth's frequency of condom use on the SHHC differing from that reported on the survey for more than half (55.6%) of the months they were sexually active. While lack of objective sexual behavior measures limits conclusions about the accuracy of reports, the ways in which youth's responses varied across instruments may offer insight into the complexity of adolescent sexual risk taking as well as have important implications for development of HIV/STI preventive interventions.

Fisher CM; Lee MG

2013-07-01

124

LGBT community, social network characteristics, and smoking behaviors in young sexual minority women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Smoking rates among young sexual minority women (YSMW) are disproportionately high as compared to heterosexual populations. While this disparity has commonly been attributed to the sexual minority stress process, little empirical work has explored what may protect YSMW from high rates of smoking. Using data (N = 471) from a cross-sectional study designed to investigate YSMW's (age 18-24) smoking behaviors and correlates; we explore the relationship of LGBT community connections, YSMW's social network characteristics, and stress to smoking behaviors (i.e., status, frequency, amount). Through this analysis, we find support for LGBT community connection as well as friendships with other sexual minorities as protective in relation to YSMW's smoking behaviors. We discuss the implications of our results, highlighting the need for future longitudinal research and interventions designed to bolster YSMW's connections to the LGBT community and their social networks.

Johns MM; Pingel ES; Youatt EJ; Soler JH; McClelland SI; Bauermeister JA

2013-09-01

125

LGBT community, social network characteristics, and smoking behaviors in young sexual minority women.  

Science.gov (United States)

Smoking rates among young sexual minority women (YSMW) are disproportionately high as compared to heterosexual populations. While this disparity has commonly been attributed to the sexual minority stress process, little empirical work has explored what may protect YSMW from high rates of smoking. Using data (N = 471) from a cross-sectional study designed to investigate YSMW's (age 18-24) smoking behaviors and correlates; we explore the relationship of LGBT community connections, YSMW's social network characteristics, and stress to smoking behaviors (i.e., status, frequency, amount). Through this analysis, we find support for LGBT community connection as well as friendships with other sexual minorities as protective in relation to YSMW's smoking behaviors. We discuss the implications of our results, highlighting the need for future longitudinal research and interventions designed to bolster YSMW's connections to the LGBT community and their social networks. PMID:23783884

Johns, Michelle Marie; Pingel, Emily S; Youatt, Emily J; Soler, Jorge H; McClelland, Sara I; Bauermeister, Jose A

2013-09-01

126

Parental Monitoring during Early Adolescence Deters Adolescent Sexual Initiation: Discrete-Time Survival Mixture Analysis  

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We used discrete-time survival mixture modeling to examine 5,305 adolescents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth regarding the impact of parental monitoring during early adolescence (ages 14-16) on initiation of sexual intercourse and problem behavior engagement (ages 14-23). Four distinctive parental-monitoring groups were…

Huang, David Y. C.; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

2011-01-01

127

Partner age differences, educational contexts and adolescent female sexual activity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONTEXT: Research suggesting that female teenagers who date substantially older males are at increased risk for negative health outcomes supports the need for statutory rape laws. However, prior research has generally ignored the social context of adolescence when examining the risks associated with dating an older partner. METHODS: Data from Waves 1 (1995) and 2 (1996) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were used to model the occurrence of sexual intercourse within adolescent heterosexual romantic relationships. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the predictors of sexual intercourse among 4,266 romantically involved female students aged 12-18. RESULTS: Female students with male partners three or more years their senior had higher odds of engaging in sexual intercourse than female students with partners closer to their age (odds ratio, 1.5). However, the association between having an older partner and the risk of sexual intercourse was nonsignificant for females older than 16. Moreover, when male partners' school status was taken into account, the relationship was no longer significant. Female students with partners who had exited school had elevated odds of having had intercourse compared with females who dated partners in the same school (1.8). CONCLUSIONS: These findings challenge statutory rape laws' focus on age, given that the association between educational context and sexual risk overrides the association between partner age and sexual risk.

Koon-Magnin S; Kreager DA; Ruback RB

2010-09-01

128

"That's nasty" to curiosity: early adolescent cognitions about sexual abstinence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Effective sex education for early adolescents should make use of age-appropriate cultural models about sexual abstinence. However, little is known about how early adolescents view this topic. We describe developmental differences in cognitions about sexual abstinence among high-risk early adolescents. METHODS: After institutional review board approval and informed consent, we interviewed 22 11-14-year-olds, using a qualitative, two-stage interview. Participants were first asked a series of open-ended questions about sexual abstinence, and then asked to explain their answers. Interviews were transcribed, organized by age, and read in their entirety. Codes were developed from the literature, field notes, and transcripts. Key concepts were identified and models were developed with a focus on developmental change. RESULTS: We observed three distinct views of sexual abstinence, "That's Nasty," "Curious," and Normative. All viewed abstinence as a starting point and sex as a transition to adulthood. "That's Nasty" participants identified sex as distasteful, displayed limited understanding of sex, and viewed abstinence as appropriate for kids like themselves. Curious participants expressed a desire for information about sex, and a sense of missing something important. Normative participants viewed the transition from abstinence to sexual experience as part of a normal, albeit challenging, transition to adulthood. CONCLUSIONS: Participants demonstrated differences in cognitions about sexual abstinence, related to age and development. The transition from viewing sex as distasteful to curiosity appears to be a time of both vulnerability and openness, and may provide an opportunity for intervention.

Ott MA; Pfeiffer EJ

2009-06-01

129

Adolescent Sexually Transmitted Infections and Risk for Subsequent HIV.  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives. We estimated the risk of HIV associated with sexually transmitted infection (STI) history during adolescence. Methods. We retrospectively studied a cohort of adolescents (n?=?75?273, born in 1985-1993) who participated in the Philadelphia High School STD Screening Program between 2003 and 2010. We matched the cohort to STI and HIV surveillance data sets and death certificates and performed Poisson regression to estimate the association between adolescent STI exposures and subsequent HIV diagnosis. Results. Compared with individuals reporting no STIs during adolescence, adolescents with STIs had an increased risk for subsequent HIV infection (incidence rate ratio [IRR] for adolescent girls?=?2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.5, 4.7; IRR for adolescent boys?=?2.3; 95% CI?=?1.7, 3.1). Risk increased with number of STIs. The risk of subsequent HIV infection was more than 3 times as high among those with multiple gonococcal infections during adolescence as among those with none. Conclusions. Effective interventions that reduce adolescent STIs are needed to avert future STI and HIV acquisition. Focusing on adolescents with gonococcal infections or multiple STIs might have the greatest impact on future HIV risk. PMID:23947325

Newbern, E Claire; Anschuetz, Greta L; Eberhart, Michael G; Salmon, Melinda E; Brady, Kathleen A; De Los Reyes, Andrew; Baker, Jane M; Asbel, Lenore E; Johnson, Caroline C; Schwarz, Donald F

2013-08-15

130

Adolescent Sexually Transmitted Infections and Risk for Subsequent HIV.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Objectives. We estimated the risk of HIV associated with sexually transmitted infection (STI) history during adolescence. Methods. We retrospectively studied a cohort of adolescents (n?=?75?273, born in 1985-1993) who participated in the Philadelphia High School STD Screening Program between 2003 and 2010. We matched the cohort to STI and HIV surveillance data sets and death certificates and performed Poisson regression to estimate the association between adolescent STI exposures and subsequent HIV diagnosis. Results. Compared with individuals reporting no STIs during adolescence, adolescents with STIs had an increased risk for subsequent HIV infection (incidence rate ratio [IRR] for adolescent girls?=?2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.5, 4.7; IRR for adolescent boys?=?2.3; 95% CI?=?1.7, 3.1). Risk increased with number of STIs. The risk of subsequent HIV infection was more than 3 times as high among those with multiple gonococcal infections during adolescence as among those with none. Conclusions. Effective interventions that reduce adolescent STIs are needed to avert future STI and HIV acquisition. Focusing on adolescents with gonococcal infections or multiple STIs might have the greatest impact on future HIV risk. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print August 15, 2013: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301463).

Newbern EC; Anschuetz GL; Eberhart MG; Salmon ME; Brady KA; De Los Reyes A; Baker JM; Asbel LE; Johnson CC; Schwarz DF

2013-08-01

131

Exploring shame, guilt, and risky substance use among sexual minority men and women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the interrelations among shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, internalized heterosexism (IH), and problematic substance use among 389 gay, lesbian, and bisexual men and women. Problematic alcohol and drug use were positively related to shame-proneness and negatively related to guilt-proneness. Bisexuals reported riskier substance use behaviors, lower levels of guilt-proneness, and higher levels of IH than gay men and lesbians. Furthermore, study findings indicated that shame and IH are related. Additional investigations of these associations would supplement current understandings of sexual minority stress and advance the development of substance-related intervention and prevention efforts targeting sexual minorities.

Hequembourg AL; Dearing RL

2013-01-01

132

Exploring shame, guilt, and risky substance use among sexual minority men and women.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the interrelations among shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, internalized heterosexism (IH), and problematic substance use among 389 gay, lesbian, and bisexual men and women. Problematic alcohol and drug use were positively related to shame-proneness and negatively related to guilt-proneness. Bisexuals reported riskier substance use behaviors, lower levels of guilt-proneness, and higher levels of IH than gay men and lesbians. Furthermore, study findings indicated that shame and IH are related. Additional investigations of these associations would supplement current understandings of sexual minority stress and advance the development of substance-related intervention and prevention efforts targeting sexual minorities. PMID:23469820

Hequembourg, Amy L; Dearing, Ronda L

2013-01-01

133

Relationships between childhood sexual abuse and substance use and sexual risk behaviors during adolescence: An integrative review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is thought to be a precursor to substance use and sexual risk behaviors during adolescence. To inform adolescent prevention efforts, information is needed to explicate the nature of the relationships between CSA and these health risks. The aim of this study was to summarize the current literature on the associations between a history of CSA and substance use and sexual risk behaviors during adolescence. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search and an integrative review. RESULTS: Current evidence implicates CSA as a robust precursor to the use of a wide variety of substances and multiple sexual risk behaviors during adolescence. CONCLUSION: Screening for CSA in adolescents at risk and incorporating strategies that enhance CSA recovery in adolescent prevention programs are warranted. Future research that includes longitudinal designs, uses multiple methods of assessment, and identifies pathways between CSA and adolescent health risks is recommended.

Draucker CB; Mazurczyk J

2013-09-01

134

Female perpetrators of sexual abuse of minors: what are the consequences for the victims?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The definition of sexual abuse changes according to the moral values and culture of each era. In the past the perpetrators of sexual abuse were perceived to be exclusively male. However, contemporary literature is placing increasing emphasis on the role of female sexual abusers. The aim of the current literature review is to focus on the consequences of sexual abuse in minors when the perpetrator is female. METHODS: A literature search of the main databases for studies was conducted. Restriction was placed on European and North American literature due to perceived culture differences. RESULTS: Victims of sexual abuse by female perpetrators are usually friends or relatives of the abuser and find themselves sometimes under persuasion and psychological coercion to participate in sexual acts. The percentage of male victims is growing. There are severe and longstanding psychological consequences for the victims which are further analyzed. CONCLUSION: Contemporary studies offer limited information about this issue and the consequences it has on the victims. The majority of such cases are not reported. Sometimes sexual abuse by female perpetrators is considered more acceptable than sexual abuse by males. Psychological interventions could be a powerful tool in reduction of female sexual abuse and its consequences on the victims.

Tsopelas C; Tsetsou S; Ntounas P; Douzenis A

2012-07-01

135

Dating, Sexual Activity, and Well-Being in Italian Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

|Associations among dating, sexual activity, gender, and adjustment were investigated in 2,273 Italian adolescents (54% female, ages 14 to 19 years) attending public high schools. After controlling for age and type of school attended, both being in a dating relationship and being male were associated with less alienation, more positive views of…

Ciairano, Silvia; Bonino, Silvia; Kliewer, Wendy; Miceli, Renato; Jackson, Sandy

2006-01-01

136

Adolescent Sexuality and the Risk of Marital Dissolution  

Science.gov (United States)

This research investigates whether first sexual intercourse during adolescence is associated with increased risk of first marriage dissolution and tests whether the results are consistent with causal or selection explanations. Drawing on a sample of 3,793 ever-married women from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, this study estimated…

Paik, Anthony

2011-01-01

137

Self-disclosure to the best friend: friendship quality and internalized sexual stigma in Italian lesbian and gay adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study is the first contribution to the understanding of gender differences in best friendship patterns of adolescents sexual minorities. We explored friendship patterns, self-disclosure, and internalized sexual stigma in an Italian sample of lesbian (N = 202) and gay (N = 201) adolescents (aged 14-22 years). We found gender differences in cross-sex and cross-orientation patterns of best friendship. Gay men (52%) reported more cross-sex friendships than lesbians (20%). The 52% of participants had cross-orientation friendships, and no differences were found between lesbians and gay men. Lesbian and gay men with a cross-orientation best friend showed a lower level of internalized sexual stigma. Gay men with cross-orientation friendship showed a low level of internalized sexual stigma and less conflict with a best friend. For gay men and lesbian participants, self-disclosure to the best friend was better predicted by internalized sexual stigma and self-disclosure. Future studies may provide direct comparisons between heterosexual and sexual minority individuals.

Baiocco R; Laghi F; Di Pomponio I; Nigito CS

2012-04-01

138

Risk behaviors for sexual transmitted disease in male adolescents  

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Full Text Available Objective: to describe the risk behaviors and vulnerability adopted by adolescents regarding STD/AIDS. Methodology: this is an ethnographic study, carried out at a public school of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. The population was composed of twenty male adolescents, from 12 to 18 years and that study in the fundamental and secondary education. The data collection happened through a semi-structured interview and simple observation. The content analysis followed Bardin's orientation. The survey was adopted by the Ethics in Research of the UFC, under protocol number 119/07 and after the informed consent of parents. Results: the data showed that among the risk conducts mentioned by the adolescents, the main one is sexual intercourse without preservative, and that there is fear and regret after the unprotected intercourse, and that the partner's age do influence in a negative way for protection. Conclusion: we considered necessary an approach on safe sex among teenagers, demanding the production of creative strategies that make sense in several socio-cultural contexts in which the adolescents are inserted. Descriptors: adolescent; sexual behavior; sexually transmitted diseases.

Agnes Caroline Souza Pinto, Patrícia Neyva da Costa Pinheiro; Agnes Caroline Souza Pinto, Patrícia Neyva da Costa Pinheiro

2010-01-01

139

Psychological Disidentification with the Academic Domain Among Ethnic Minority Adolescents in The Netherlands  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Among ethnic minority group adolescents, experiences with discrimination and prejudice in school settings are thought to lead to a defensive detachment of the self from the school domain. That is, these adolescents may disengage their self-feelings from their academic performances causing the academic self to become a less important…

Verkuyten, M.; Thijs, J.

2004-01-01

140

Body Image and Eating Disorder Symptoms in Sexual Minority Men: A Test and Extension of Objectification Theory  

Science.gov (United States)

On the basis of integrating objectification theory research with research on body image and eating problems among sexual minority men, the present study examined relations among sociocultural and psychological correlates of eating disorder symptoms with a sample of 231 sexual minority men. Results of a path analysis supported tenets of…

Wiseman, Marcie C.; Moradi, Bonnie

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Future Directions in Studies of Trauma among Ethnoracial and Sexual Minority Samples: Commentary  

Science.gov (United States)

|Objective: Studies examining psychological trauma or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in ethnoracial or sexual minority groups are relatively few. The "Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology" recently published 4 articles (Balsam, Lehavot, Beadnall, & Circo, 2010; Harrington, Crowther, & Shipherd, 2010; Lester, Resick, Young-Xu, &…

Triffleman, Elisa G.; Pole, Nnamdi

2010-01-01

142

Transgender Individuals' Workplace Experiences: The Applicability of Sexual Minority Measures and Models  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study explored whether 3 existing measures of workplace constructs germane to the experiences of sexual minority people could be modified to improve their applicability with transgender individuals. To this end, the Workplace Heterosexist Experiences Questionnaire (WHEQ; C. R. Waldo, 1999); the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered…

Brewster, Melanie E.; Velez, Brandon; DeBlaere, Cirleen; Moradi, Bonnie

2012-01-01

143

Correlates of Cutting Behavior among Sexual Minority Youths and Young Adults  

Science.gov (United States)

Using secondary analyses of data from a sample of 265 sexual minority youths, the authors examined correlates of cutting behavior to determine whether patterns are similar to those found in studies of self-injury with community samples of predominately heterosexual youths. The sample consisted of youths who received services at an urban social…

Walls, N. Eugene; Laser, Julie; Nickels, Sarah J.; Wisneski, Hope

2010-01-01

144

Sexual-Minority College Women's Experiences with Discrimination: Relations with Identity and Collective Action  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined sexual-minority women's reports of sexism, heterosexism, and gendered heterosexism (discrimination that is both sexist and heterosexist) as predictors of social identity and collective action during college. A measure of gendered heterosexism was developed that assesses women's experiences with discrimination that is…

Friedman, Carly; Leaper, Campbell

2010-01-01

145

Planning for future care needs: experiences of unmarried heterosexual and sexual minority women.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the experiences of legally unmarried, middle-aged and older sexual minority (e.g., lesbian, bisexual) and heterosexual women in planning for future care needs and long-term assistance. A total of 215 women (90 sexual minority women and 125 heterosexual women) 41-78 years of age completed a survey about long-term care planning strategies, including: (1) executing a will; (2) naming a health care proxy; (3) purchasing long-term care insurance; and (4) discussing potential living arrangements with at least one family member. Overall, 18.5% of women reported completing zero of the strategies, and 3.4% reported completing all four. Over half (59%) had completed at least two strategies. Women were most likely to have executed a will (68%) and named a health care proxy (61%). Both sexual minority women and heterosexual women were most likely to have talked to a family member of choice, rather than a biological family member about living with them if they were unable to care for themselves. Currently, serving as a health care proxy was an important correlate for having made long-term care plans and was particularly important for sexual minority women. Women who are not in traditional marriage relationships tend to adopt long-term care planning strategies that legally clarify and establish the nature of their important relationships. PMID:21104565

Clark, Melissa A; Boehmer, Ulrike; Rogers, Michelle L; Sullivan, Mairead

2010-10-01

146

Human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities in Kathmandu, Nepal: a qualitative investigation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Nepal has experienced sporadic reports of human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities. Our objective was to identify a range of human rights that are enshrined in international law and/or are commonly reported by sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu, to be nonprotected or violated. Methods In September 2009 three focus group discussions were conducted by trained interviewers among a convenience sample of sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu Nepal. The modified Delphi technique was utilized to elicit and rank participant-generated definitions of human rights and their subsequent violations. Data was analyzed independently and cross checked by another investigator. Results Participants (n?=?29) reported experiencing a range of human rights violations at home, work, educational, health care settings and in public places. Lack of adequate legal protection, physical and mental abuse and torture were commonly reported. Access to adequate legal protection and improvements in the family and healthcare environment were ranked as the most important priority areas. Conclusions Sexual and gender minorities in Nepal experienced a range of human rights violations. Future efforts should enroll a larger and more systematic sample of participants to determine frequency, timing, and/or intensity of exposure to rights violations, and estimate the population-based impact of these rights violations on specific health outcomes

Singh Sonal; Pant Sunil; Dhakal Suben; Pokhrel Subash; Mullany Luke C

2012-01-01

147

The role of the judiciary in the protection of sexual minorities in Kenya  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The debate stirred by the recent appointment of a chief justice and deputy chief justice under the judicial reform process envisaged in Kenya?s new Constitution has, once again, brought to the fore the attitude surrounding sexual minorities. A section of religious organisations and citizens rejected...

Nyarang'o, Ivy I.K.

148

Sexualidad y reproducción en adolescentes Sexuality and reproduction in adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: caracterizar y explorar aspectos relacionados con sexualidad y reproducción en un grupo de adolescentes de 15 a 19 años de politécnicos del municipio Cotorro (diciembre 2007). MÉTODOS: investigación observacional, descriptiva, prospectiva y transversal. Universo: 2153 efebos de los cuales se tomó al azar una muestra de 1292. Se estudiaron: edad, sexo, edad de iniciación en vida sexual, conocimientos sobre sexualidad y reproducción, infecciones de transmisión sexual y fuentes de información. RESULTADOS: edades entre 15 y 18 años, 61,9 %, varones 56,7 % y 70,9 % se habían iniciado en la vida sexual. "Responsabilidad de evitar embarazo" obtuvo el porcentaje más elevado de respuestas correctas (81,4 %), 79,3 % señaló el condón como anticonceptivo ideal. En "riesgos de infecciones de transmisión sexual", 61,9 % acertó. Los pares, fueron la primera fuente de información en 55,7 % y principal en 68,1 %. CONCLUSIONES: predominaron los menores de 18 años y el sexo masculino de los iniciados en la vida sexual. La primera y principal fuente de información fue el grupo de pares.OBJECTIVES: to characterize and explore aspects related to sexuality and reproduction in a group of adolescents aged 15-19 from the polytechnics of Cotorro municipality (December 2007). METHODS: an observational, descriptive, prospective and cross-sectional research was undertaken. The universe was composed of 2153 adolescents, of whom a sample of 1292 was taken at random. Age, sex, age at the beginning of sexual relations, knowledge about sexuality and reproduction, sexually tranasmited infections, and iniformation sources were studied. RESULTS: 61.9 % were between 15 and 18 years old, 56.7 % of them were males and 70.9 % had already initiated sexual relations. "The responsability for preventing pregnancy" obtained the highest percent of correct answers (81.4 %). 79.3 % referred to condom as the ideal contraceptive. As regards "risks for sexually transmitted infections" 61.9 % were right. The peer groups were the first source of information in 55.7 % and the main in 68.1 %. CONCLUSIONS: It was observed a predominance of adolescents under 18, of males and of those who had started their sexual life. The main source of information was the peer group.

Aliucha Díaz Curbelo; Miriam Aliño Santiago; Alejandro Velasco Boza; Antonio Rodríguez Cárdenas; Vivian Rodríguez Tahuile

2008-01-01

149

Sexual Coercion of Adolescent Girls in Yoruba Land of Nigeria  

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Full Text Available This study investigates the magnitude and patterns of sexual coercion experienced by female adolescents in Southwest zone in Nigeria. The study population consists of all female adolescents aged 12-16 years. These adolescents are those who are either enrolled in the secondary school or those with limited education that was not in school at the period of this study. Samples of 475 girls were drawn from both the school and those not in schools. The sample was drawn from three different Yoruba speaking states in the south west Nigeria. The sampling techniques that were used were stratified and simple random sampling. The research instrument was a self constructed questionnaire title (SCAQ)- Sexual Coercion of female Adolescents Questionnaire. The instrument has a reliability coefficient of 0.76 and was validated using, face content, validity procedure of testing validity. The data generated were analyzed using frequency counts and percentages for describing the data. The appropriate statistics such as t-test, Pearson product moment correlation and chi-square were used to make inferences about the data. The analysis of the data shows that girls have experienced sexual coercion such as verbal threats, unwanted touch, deceived into sex or forced sex. Other forms of sexual coercion such as verbal pressure, threats or unwanted holding of hands unwanted hugging or kissing as well as forced sexual activities have been experienced by girls. Based on the findings, it was recommended that skill training needs to be provided in and outside the school system. Teachers and counsellors should convey prevention messages so as to sensitize or discourage sexual coercion of female students in school.

Akanle Florence Foluso

2011-01-01

150

Veterans administration health care utilization among sexual minority veterans.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

According to recent census reports, nearly a million veterans have a same-sex partner, yet little is known about them or their use of Veterans Health Care Administration (VHA) services. Gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) veterans recruited from the community (N = 356) completed an on-line survey to assess their rates of VHA utilization and whether they experience specific barriers to accessing VHA services. Andersen's model of health care utilization was adapted to provide an analytic and conceptual framework. Overall, 45.5% reported lifetime VHA utilization and 28.7% reported past-year VHA utilization. Lifetime VHA health care utilization was predicted by positive service connection, positive screen for both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, and history of at least one interpersonal trauma during military service related to respondent's GLB status. Past-year VHA health care utilization was predicted by female gender, positive service connection, positive screen for both PTSD and depression, lower physical functioning, a history of military interpersonal trauma related to GLB status, and no history of stressful experiences initiated by the military to investigate or punish GLB status. Rates of VHA utilization by GLB veterans in this sample are comparable to those reported by VHA Central Office for all veterans. Of those who utilized VHA services, 33% reported open communication about their sexual orientation with VHA providers. Twenty-five percent of all participants reported avoiding at least one VHA service because of concerns about stigma. Stigma and lack of communication between GLB veterans and their providers about sexual orientation are areas of concern for VHA.

Simpson TL; Balsam KF; Cochran BN; Lehavot K; Gold SD

2013-05-01

151

Development of an attachment-informed measure of sexual behavior in late adolescence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There is considerable interest in relations between sexual behavior and romantic attachment styles in adolescence as attachment needs are increasingly met through intimate partners rather than parents. The objectives of this research were to organize a measure of sexual behavior within an attachment theory framework, and then show that this new measure uniquely predicted sexual approach styles and invasive sexual experiences. 190 18- and 19-year-old university students in late adolescence completed sexual behavior items that were provided ambivalent (anxious) and avoidant dimensions. These were systematically related to the romantic attachment dimensions of the Experiences in Close Relationships - Revised. However, even after romantic relationship style, gender, and social desirability were controlled, avoidance in sexual relationships predicted lifetime sexual partner number and negatively predicted positive sexual strategies, and ambivalence in sexual relationships predicted invasive and coercive sexual behaviors. A measure specific to sexual relationships informs the attachment and romantic context of sex in late adolescence.

Szielasko AL; Symons DK; Lisa Price E

2013-04-01

152

Sexualidad y reproducción en adolescentes/ Sexuality and reproduction in adolescents  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish OBJETIVOS: caracterizar y explorar aspectos relacionados con sexualidad y reproducción en un grupo de adolescentes de 15 a 19 años de politécnicos del municipio Cotorro (diciembre 2007). MÉTODOS: investigación observacional, descriptiva, prospectiva y transversal. Universo: 2153 efebos de los cuales se tomó al azar una muestra de 1292. Se estudiaron: edad, sexo, edad de iniciación en vida sexual, conocimientos sobre sexualidad y reproducción, infecciones de transm (more) isión sexual y fuentes de información. RESULTADOS: edades entre 15 y 18 años, 61,9 %, varones 56,7 % y 70,9 % se habían iniciado en la vida sexual. "Responsabilidad de evitar embarazo" obtuvo el porcentaje más elevado de respuestas correctas (81,4 %), 79,3 % señaló el condón como anticonceptivo ideal. En "riesgos de infecciones de transmisión sexual", 61,9 % acertó. Los pares, fueron la primera fuente de información en 55,7 % y principal en 68,1 %. CONCLUSIONES: predominaron los menores de 18 años y el sexo masculino de los iniciados en la vida sexual. La primera y principal fuente de información fue el grupo de pares. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: to characterize and explore aspects related to sexuality and reproduction in a group of adolescents aged 15-19 from the polytechnics of Cotorro municipality (December 2007). METHODS: an observational, descriptive, prospective and cross-sectional research was undertaken. The universe was composed of 2153 adolescents, of whom a sample of 1292 was taken at random. Age, sex, age at the beginning of sexual relations, knowledge about sexuality and reproduction, sexu (more) ally tranasmited infections, and iniformation sources were studied. RESULTS: 61.9 % were between 15 and 18 years old, 56.7 % of them were males and 70.9 % had already initiated sexual relations. "The responsability for preventing pregnancy" obtained the highest percent of correct answers (81.4 %). 79.3 % referred to condom as the ideal contraceptive. As regards "risks for sexually transmitted infections" 61.9 % were right. The peer groups were the first source of information in 55.7 % and the main in 68.1 %. CONCLUSIONS: It was observed a predominance of adolescents under 18, of males and of those who had started their sexual life. The main source of information was the peer group.

Díaz Curbelo, Aliucha; Aliño Santiago, Miriam; Velasco Boza, Alejandro; Rodríguez Cárdenas, Antonio; Rodríguez Tahuile, Vivian

2008-12-01

153

Iniciação sexual de homens adolescentes/ The onset of sexual activity in male adolescents  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Trata-se de pesquisa quantitativa que teve como objetivo investigar a iniciação sexual de adolescentes do sexo masculino em Concórdia, Santa Catarina. Participaram da mesma 340 adolescentes do sexo masculino, com idades entre 14 e 19 anos, que freqüentavam o ensino médio em seis instituições de ensino do município de Concórdia, que aceitaram participar e que trouxeram o Termo de Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido assinado pelos pais ou responsáveis. Destes, 69,7% (more) afirmaram ter relações sexuais, sendo que a média de idade da primeira relação foi de 14,4 anos, menor que a média nacional de 15 anos. A primeira relação sexual ocorreu com uma ficante para 45,1% e 64,2% afirmaram que o principal motivo para a mesma foi vontade/tesão. A maioria (74,2%) qualificou a experiência como boa ou muito boa. O uso da camisinha foi apontado como método utilizado na primeira relação sexual por 73,8% dos adolescentes e como método usado em todas as relações por 72,5%. Alguns adolescentes relataram não conversar sobre sexualidade, mas a maioria aponta os amigos como principal fonte de informações sobre sexo. Frente ao exposto, fica claro que apesar de terem sua primeira relação sexual cada vez mais precocemente, o diálogo sobre prevenção tem surtido efeito, o que é reforçado pelo uso expressivo do preservativo entre os adolescentes. Abstract in english This quantitative study aimed to investigate the onset of sexual activity in male adolescents from Concordia, Santa Catarina, Brazil. The studied sample consisted of a total of 340 14-19-year-old male adolescents attending secondary school in six local educational institutions, who accepted to answer the questionnaire and whose parents signed the Free and Informed Consent. From these, 69,7% affirmed that they already had sexual relations; the mean age at the first relatio (more) n was 14,4, lower than national average of 15 years. The first sexual relation occurred with a date in the case of 45,1% and 64,2% affirmed that the main reason was sexual desire/excitation. Most of adolescents (74,2%) qualified the experience as good or very good. The condom was used in the first sexual relation by 73,8% and in all relations by 72,5%. Some adolescents do not talk about sexuality, but most of them indicate friends as the main source of information about sex. These data show the effectiveness of the dialogue about STD/AIDS prevention and contraception developed over the last decades, expressed by the considerable condom use among the adolescents.

Gubert, Daniela; Madureira, Valéria Silvana Faganello

2008-12-01

154

Iniciação sexual de homens adolescentes The onset of sexual activity in male adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Trata-se de pesquisa quantitativa que teve como objetivo investigar a iniciação sexual de adolescentes do sexo masculino em Concórdia, Santa Catarina. Participaram da mesma 340 adolescentes do sexo masculino, com idades entre 14 e 19 anos, que freqüentavam o ensino médio em seis instituições de ensino do município de Concórdia, que aceitaram participar e que trouxeram o Termo de Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido assinado pelos pais ou responsáveis. Destes, 69,7% afirmaram ter relações sexuais, sendo que a média de idade da primeira relação foi de 14,4 anos, menor que a média nacional de 15 anos. A primeira relação sexual ocorreu com uma ficante para 45,1% e 64,2% afirmaram que o principal motivo para a mesma foi vontade/tesão. A maioria (74,2%) qualificou a experiência como boa ou muito boa. O uso da camisinha foi apontado como método utilizado na primeira relação sexual por 73,8% dos adolescentes e como método usado em todas as relações por 72,5%. Alguns adolescentes relataram não conversar sobre sexualidade, mas a maioria aponta os amigos como principal fonte de informações sobre sexo. Frente ao exposto, fica claro que apesar de terem sua primeira relação sexual cada vez mais precocemente, o diálogo sobre prevenção tem surtido efeito, o que é reforçado pelo uso expressivo do preservativo entre os adolescentes.This quantitative study aimed to investigate the onset of sexual activity in male adolescents from Concordia, Santa Catarina, Brazil. The studied sample consisted of a total of 340 14-19-year-old male adolescents attending secondary school in six local educational institutions, who accepted to answer the questionnaire and whose parents signed the Free and Informed Consent. From these, 69,7% affirmed that they already had sexual relations; the mean age at the first relation was 14,4, lower than national average of 15 years. The first sexual relation occurred with a date in the case of 45,1% and 64,2% affirmed that the main reason was sexual desire/excitation. Most of adolescents (74,2%) qualified the experience as good or very good. The condom was used in the first sexual relation by 73,8% and in all relations by 72,5%. Some adolescents do not talk about sexuality, but most of them indicate friends as the main source of information about sex. These data show the effectiveness of the dialogue about STD/AIDS prevention and contraception developed over the last decades, expressed by the considerable condom use among the adolescents.

Daniela Gubert; Valéria Silvana Faganello Madureira

2008-01-01

155

Peer sexual harassment and disordered eating in early adolescence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Peer sexual harassment is a pervasive problem in schools and is associated with a variety of negative mental health outcomes. Objectification theory suggests that sexual attention in the form of peer harassment directs unwanted attention to the victim's body and may lead to a desire to alter the body via disordered eating. In the current study, we used latent growth modeling with a sample of 406 U.S. adolescents to examine the relationship between longitudinal trends in peer sexual harassment from 5th to 9th grade and disordered eating in 9th grade. Longitudinal trends in self-surveillance were proposed as a mediator of the relationships. Results indicated that the relationship between upsetting sexual harassment at 5th grade and disordered eating symptoms at 9th grade was mediated by self-surveillance at 5th grade. Girls reported more upsetting sexual harassment, more self-surveillance, and thus more disordered eating than boys did. These results are in accord with objectification theory, which proposes that sexual harassment is a form of sexual objectification and may lead to self-surveillance and disordered eating.

Petersen JL; Hyde JS

2013-01-01

156

Abuso sexual en niños y adolescentes de ambos sexos/ Sexual Abuse in Children and Adolescents of Both Sexes  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Para los propósitos de esta publicación, se define lo que entendemos por abuso sexual infantil (ASI). Los datos se obtienen de un protocolo utilizado en la revisión de las fichas clínicas. Se describen algunas de las características del abuso sexual en una población de 44 niños y adolescentes de ambos sexos, 24 mujeres (54,5%) y 20 varones (45,5%), que consultaron en el Servicio de Salud Mental Infantil del Hospital Roberto del Río durante 1998, ya sea directament (more) e por la situación de abuso sexual, por la patología psiquiátrica asociada a esta situación o porque en sus antecedentes figuraba el dato de ASI. Los abusos sexuales mayoritariamente correspondieron a las formas más graves y de mayor penalidad legal (penetración bucal, vaginal, anal o intento de penetración), afectando éstos al 62,5% de las mujeres y al 55% de los varones. Los abusadores se distinguieron, de acuerdo a la edad, en adultos (mayores de 18 años) y adolescentes (menores de 18 años) que correspondían al 79,5% y 20,5% respectivamente. El abusador era un familiar o conocido en el 90,9% de los casos. El 66,7% de los casos fueron abusos sexuales intrafamiliares. El abuso sexual constituye una patología emergente en los Servicios de Psiquiatría Infantil, debe ser buscado intencionadamente, pues de lo contrario puede pasar desapercibido. Se plantea la necesidad de constituir grupos multiprofesionales para proteger al menor de nuevos abusos y favorecer la recuperación de los miembros de la familia afectados Abstract in english A definition is given of child sexual abuse (CSA) for the purposes of this publication. The data was obtained from clinical records. Sexual abuse is described in a population of 44 children and adolescents of both sexes, 24 girls (54.5%) and 20 boys (45.5%) that were seen at the Pediatric Mental Health Service of Roberto del Rio Hospital during 1998 either directly for the sexual abuse, for psychiatric pathologies associated with the situation, or because of a past histor (more) y of CSA. The sexual abuse was generally the more serious type carrying more serious legal penalties (mouth, vaginal or anal penetration, or attempted penetration) and affected 62.5% of the girls and 55% of the boys. The abusers included both adults (over the age of 18) and adolescents (under 18), 79.5% and 20.5% respectively. Abusers were relatives or acquaintances in 90.9% of the cases, and 66.7% were cases of intrafamily sexual abuse. Sexual abuse is an emerging pathology in the pediatric psychiatric services, and it must be intentionally sought so that it does not go undetected. The need to establish multiprofessional groups is suggested in order to protect minors from subsequent abuse and to facilitate the recovery of the family members affected

Almonte, Carlos; Insunza, Carla; Ruiz, Cecilia

2002-01-01

157

Abuso sexual en niños y adolescentes de ambos sexos Sexual Abuse in Children and Adolescents of Both Sexes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Para los propósitos de esta publicación, se define lo que entendemos por abuso sexual infantil (ASI). Los datos se obtienen de un protocolo utilizado en la revisión de las fichas clínicas. Se describen algunas de las características del abuso sexual en una población de 44 niños y adolescentes de ambos sexos, 24 mujeres (54,5%) y 20 varones (45,5%), que consultaron en el Servicio de Salud Mental Infantil del Hospital Roberto del Río durante 1998, ya sea directamente por la situación de abuso sexual, por la patología psiquiátrica asociada a esta situación o porque en sus antecedentes figuraba el dato de ASI. Los abusos sexuales mayoritariamente correspondieron a las formas más graves y de mayor penalidad legal (penetración bucal, vaginal, anal o intento de penetración), afectando éstos al 62,5% de las mujeres y al 55% de los varones. Los abusadores se distinguieron, de acuerdo a la edad, en adultos (mayores de 18 años) y adolescentes (menores de 18 años) que correspondían al 79,5% y 20,5% respectivamente. El abusador era un familiar o conocido en el 90,9% de los casos. El 66,7% de los casos fueron abusos sexuales intrafamiliares. El abuso sexual constituye una patología emergente en los Servicios de Psiquiatría Infantil, debe ser buscado intencionadamente, pues de lo contrario puede pasar desapercibido. Se plantea la necesidad de constituir grupos multiprofesionales para proteger al menor de nuevos abusos y favorecer la recuperación de los miembros de la familia afectadosA definition is given of child sexual abuse (CSA) for the purposes of this publication. The data was obtained from clinical records. Sexual abuse is described in a population of 44 children and adolescents of both sexes, 24 girls (54.5%) and 20 boys (45.5%) that were seen at the Pediatric Mental Health Service of Roberto del Rio Hospital during 1998 either directly for the sexual abuse, for psychiatric pathologies associated with the situation, or because of a past history of CSA. The sexual abuse was generally the more serious type carrying more serious legal penalties (mouth, vaginal or anal penetration, or attempted penetration) and affected 62.5% of the girls and 55% of the boys. The abusers included both adults (over the age of 18) and adolescents (under 18), 79.5% and 20.5% respectively. Abusers were relatives or acquaintances in 90.9% of the cases, and 66.7% were cases of intrafamily sexual abuse. Sexual abuse is an emerging pathology in the pediatric psychiatric services, and it must be intentionally sought so that it does not go undetected. The need to establish multiprofessional groups is suggested in order to protect minors from subsequent abuse and to facilitate the recovery of the family members affected

Carlos Almonte; Carla Insunza; Cecilia Ruiz

2002-01-01

158

Pervasive trauma exposure among US sexual orientation minority adults and risk of posttraumatic stress disorder.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: We assessed sexual orientation disparities in exposure to violence and other potentially traumatic events and onset of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a representative US sample. METHODS: We used data from 34 653 noninstitutionalized adult US residents from the 2004 to 2005 wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. RESULTS: Lesbians and gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals who reported any same-sex sexual partners over their lifetime had greater risk of childhood maltreatment, interpersonal violence, trauma to a close friend or relative, and unexpected death of someone close than did heterosexuals with no same-sex attractions or partners. Risk of onset of PTSD was higher among lesbians and gays (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.34, 3.06), bisexuals (AOR = 2.13; 95% CI = 1.38, 3.29), and heterosexuals with any same-sex partners (AOR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.54, 2.74) than it was among the heterosexual reference group. This higher risk was largely accounted for by sexual orientation minorities' greater exposure to violence, exposure to more potentially traumatic events, and earlier age of trauma exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Profound sexual orientation disparities exist in risk of PTSD and in violence exposure, beginning in childhood. Our findings suggest there is an urgent need for public health interventions aimed at preventing violence against individuals with minority sexual orientations and providing follow-up care to cope with the sequelae of violent victimization.

Roberts AL; Austin SB; Corliss HL; Vandermorris AK; Koenen KC

2010-12-01

159

Psychiatric morbidity associated with same-sex sexual behaviour: influence of minority stress and familial factors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Increased psychiatric morbidity has been widely reported among non-heterosexual individuals (defined as reporting a homosexual/bisexual identity and/or same-sex sexual partners). However, the causes of this psychiatric ill-health are mostly unknown. METHOD: We attempted to estimate the influence of minority stress and familial factors on psychiatric disorder among adults with same-sex sexual partners. Self-report data from a 2005 survey of adults (age 20-47 years, n=17,379) in the population-based Swedish Twin Registry were analysed with regression modelling and co-twin control methodology. RESULTS: Rates of depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), eating disorders, alcohol dependence and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were increased among men and women with same-sex sexual experiences. Adjusting for perceived discrimination and hate crime victimization lowered this risk whereas controlling for familial (genetic or environmental) factors in within-twin pair comparisons further reduced or eliminated it. CONCLUSIONS: Components of minority stress influence the risk of psychiatric ill-health among individuals with any same-sex sexual partner. However, substantial confounding by familial factors suggests a common genetic and/or environmental liability for same-sex sexual behaviour and psychiatric morbidity.

Frisell T; Lichtenstein P; Rahman Q; Långström N

2010-02-01

160

Body Image and First Sexual Intercourse in Late Adolescence  

Science.gov (United States)

Sexual behavior is associated with body image, but the directionality of this association is unclear. This study used longitudinal data from a sample of previously abstinent college students (N = 100, 45% female, 49% European American, 26% Latino American, 25% African American) to test whether satisfaction with appearance changed after first intercourse. Male students were more satisfied with their appearance after first intercourse, whereas female students became slightly less satisfied with their appearance. These findings demonstrate that first intercourse can lead to changes in well-being, even if the transition takes places in late adolescence. In addition, they suggest that gendered cultural expectations regarding sexual behavior are associated with differing psychological outcomes for male and female adolescents.

Vasilenko, Sara A.; Ram, Nilam; Lefkowitz, Eva S.

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Sexual Aggression among Adolescents: Prevalence and Predictors in a German Sample.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined the prevalence of sexual aggression among 197 male and 194 female adolescents from the former East Germany and West Germany using the Sexual Experiences Survey (M. Koss and C. Oros, 1982). Data suggest that coercive sexuality must be acknowledged as a reality in the sexual experiences of young adults in Germany. (SLD)

Krahe, Barbara

1998-01-01

162

Risky adolescent sexual behaviors and reproductive health in young adulthood.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONTEXT: Little research links adolescent risk behaviors to reproductive health outcomes beyond adolescence, although young adults--men and women in their early 20s--bear a disproportionate burden of STDs and unintended childbearing. METHODS: To assess whether individuals who engaged in risk behaviors during adolescence had increased risk of negative reproductive health outcomes in young adulthood, data from Waves 1-4 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health on 5,798 sexually active respondents were analyzed. Logistic and multinomial logistic regressions examined associations between risk behaviors (cumulatively and individually) and each of three outcomes. RESULTS: Four in 10 youth reported at least three risk factors during adolescence. Women who were exposed to an increasing number of risks had an elevated likelihood of having had multiple sex partners in the last year, rather than none (relative risk ratio, 1.3); having had an STD (odds ratio, 1.1); and having had an intended or unintended birth, as opposed to no birth (relative risk ratio, 1.1 for each). Inconsistent contraceptive use and having had multiple partners, a non-monogamous partner or a non-romantic partner were associated with reporting multiple partners in the last year; inconsistent use, sexual debut after age 16 and not discussing contraception with a partner were associated with having any birth. CONCLUSIONS: Teenagers' sexual behaviors have both short-term and long-term consequences, and interventions that focus on multiple domains of risk may be the most effective in helping to promote broad reproductive health among young adults.

Scott ME; Wildsmith E; Welti K; Ryan S; Schelar E; Steward-Streng NR

2011-06-01

163

Safer sexual decision making in adolescent women: perspectives from the conflict theory of decision-making.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescent women are at risk for unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases, including human immune deficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency deficiency syndrome (AIDS), if they do not engage in safer sexual practices. Adolescent women are biologically, behaviorally, and socially more at risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and HIV than adolescent men. Although abstinence is the safest sexual health practice for adolescent women, once sexual activity begins, safer sexual practices involve condom and contraceptive use, and communicating with sexual partners to negotiate condom use. A number of implicit and explicit decisions are involved in these activities. A number of researchers have examined safer sexual decisions of adolescent women, some of whom have used theory models such as the Transtheoretical Model of Change. Although these findings have contributed to the knowledge base about safer sexual decision making, many questions remain unanswered about how adolescent women make safer sexual decisions. The Conflict Model of Decision Making is presented and discussed as a framework for enhanced understanding of safer sexual decision making by adolescent women.

Chambers KB; Rew L

2003-07-01

164

Minor Delinquency and Immigration: A Longitudinal Study Among Male Adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

On the basis of general theories of delinquency and the specific situation of immigrants, this longitudinal study investigated predictors of initial levels and rates of change in delinquency among 188 male ethnic German Diaspora immigrants from the former Soviet Union (FSU) in Germany, 237 male native German adolescents, and 182 male Jewish Diaspora adolescents from the FSU in Israel. The participants (15.2 years old) completed 3 annual assessments. Latent growth curve models showed that ethnic German adolescents reported higher initial levels of delinquency than native German adolescents and lower levels than the Russian Jewish adolescents. Groups did not differ in the rate of change, indicating a decrease in delinquency over time. Peer-oriented leisure related positively and parental knowledge negatively with levels and change rates in delinquency in all groups, but could not fully account for the ethnic differences in delinquency levels. School bonding was associated negatively with delinquency only among native German adolescents. Acculturation-related hassles were an additional predictor for higher levels and also associated with change rates in the immigrant groups. Thus, general theories of delinquency apply to immigrants, but may be complemented by adding acculturation-specific challenges. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Titzmann PF; Silbereisen RK; Mesch G

2013-04-01

165

Sexual health of adolescents in Quebec residential Youth Protection Centres.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To document risk behaviours and prevalence of chlamydia and gonorrhoea infections among adolescents aged 14 to 17 years entering care in Quebec Youth Protection Centres (YPC). METHODS: From July 2008 to May 2009, adolescents residing in six YPCs completed a questionnaire during a face-to-face interview. Questions covered sexual and substance use behaviours prior to admission, as well as other health issues affecting respondents' mental and physical health. Urine samples were tested for Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection (CTGI) and Neisseria gonorrhoea genital infection (NGGI). RESULTS: Among 578 participants aged 14 to 17 years, 89% had had consensual sexual relations. Sexual risk behaviours included early sexual initiation (66% at <14 years); multiple partners (median lifetime number: girls 5, boys 8); 50% or more of sexual relations under the influence of drugs or alcohol (girls 43%, boys 48%); group sex (girls 38%, boys 43%); and sex in exchange for money or other goods (girls 27%, boys 8%). Only a quarter of boys and girls used double protection (condom and a contraceptive method) during the most recent vaginal relation. A history of pregnancy was reported by 28% of girls. Prevalence of CTGI was 9.3% (CI: 5.5-14.5) among girls and 1.9% (CI: 0.6-4.4) among boys. Prevalence of NGGI gonorrhoea was 1.7% (CI: 0.3-4.8) among girls and 0% (CI: 0.0-1.4) among boys.In multivariate analyses, factors significantly associated with chlamydia infection among sexually active girls were: hospitalization for alcohol intoxication; and a history of suicidal ideation with plan. CONCLUSION: Sexual risk behaviours are common among adolescents entering YPCs, resulting in high levels of chlamydia infection. Mental health issues such as substance misuse and serious depressive symptoms are associated with these high rates. A youth's stay in these facilities is an opportune time to screen not only for sexual risk behaviours but also for mental health problems; appropriate risk reduction education and referrals can then be provided as needed.

Lambert G; Haley N; Jean S; Tremblay C; Frappier JY; Otis J; Roy É

2013-05-01

166

Sexual exploitation and labor during adolescence: A case study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present article focused on the perception of sexual exploitation as a job, using a single case study design. The aim of the study was to investigate the case of a 14 year-old girl, involved in commercial sexual exploitation, who considered this situation as her labor activity. A content analysis showed protective and risk factors as categories, especially related to her labor activities. The girl perceived the sexual exploitation activity as a job that provided autonomy, subsistence, and survival. The study revealed that the negative effects of working during adolescence may bring consequences to health and development. Youth work may be defined as a risk factor, especially when the labour conditions are not adequate and protected.

Luciana Dutra-Thomé; Elder Cerqueira-Santos; Silvia Helena Koller

2011-01-01

167

Communication about sexuality among parents and adolescents: literature review study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objectives: to analyze publications involving communication between parents and children about issues related to sexuality in the databases MEDLINE, BDENF E LILACS of the Virtual Health Library - VHL from 2004 to 2009. Methods: systematic literature review study, held in VHL, in May 2009, from descriptors: communication, adolescent and sexuality. For the analysis of information, there was the organization of content as thematic categories present in the publications. Results: the 20 references were analyzed, and 12 in the database MEDLINE, five in LILACS and three in BDENF. The results show the family as a reference in the communication and identify the mother, as the main mediator of the dialogue with the children. In studies, it emphasizes the need for educational strategies that strengthen parents, as young people who enjoy communication in the family, tend to experience sexual health in a more healthy and pleasant. Conclusion: place new strategies/experiences in the sexual and reproductive behavior from family relationships promote the understanding of health and quality of life. The nurse must strengthen the social support network of adolescents and actions for health promotion in this field.

Fabiane do Amaral Gubert, Neiva Francenely Cunha Vieira, Patrícia Neyva da Costa Pinheiro, Eliany Nazaré de Oliveira, Izabelle Mont’Alverne Napoleão Albuquerque

2009-01-01

168

Aspectos da sexualidade na adolescência Aspects of sexuality in adolescence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available O estudo envolveu 920 adolescentes entre 12 e 19 anos de idade em escolas de ensino fundamental e médio da região de Santo Eduardo do município de Embu, São Paulo. Teve por objetivo identificar aspectos da sexualidade de adolescentes de ambos os sexos. Os dados foram obtidos por meio de um questionário estruturado, cujos resultados demonstraram a equivalência entre garotas e rapazes com relação à busca de informações específicas sobre sexualidade; 39% dos rapazes e 17% das garotas tinham prática sexual, destes, 77% dos rapazes e 84% das garotas utilizavam preservativo.The study involved 920 adolescents between 12 and 19 years of age in junior and senior high schools of the region of Santo Eduardo of the city of Embu, São Paulo. The objective was to identify aspects of sexuality of adolescents of both sexes. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, the results of which established the difference between boys and girls with respect to their quest for specific information about sexuality; 39% of boys and 17% of girls practiced sexual intercourse, and among these, 77% of boys and 84% of girls used preservativos.

José Roberto da Silva Brêtas; Conceição Vieira da Silva Ohara; Dulcilene Pereira Jardim; Wagner de Aguiar Junior; José Rodrigo de Oliveira

2011-01-01

169

Improving adolescent sexual risk assessment with event history calendars: a feasibility study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Nurses assess adolescent sexual risk to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. However, barriers to sexual risk assessment include lack of time and adolescent-friendly services. The purpose of this feasibility study is to evaluate the clinical utility and feasibility of using an Event History Calendar (EHC) for sexual risk assessment. METHOD: Latina females aged 15 to 19 years (n = 30) completed an adolescent risk assessment EHC, reviewed it with a nurse, and reported their perceptions of the EHC. Two nurse practitioners used the EHCs to identify the adolescent's risk behavior and reported their perceptions of EHC risk assessment and communication. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis indicated the EHC is a time-efficient, adolescent-friendly risk assessment tool that facilitates identification and discussion of sexual risk and co-morbid risk behaviors. DISCUSSION: Although larger scale evaluation of the EHC is needed, it is useful for improving adolescent risk assessment and communication.

Martyn KK; Reifsnider E; Murray A

2006-01-01

170

Sexual mixing and HIV risk among ethnic minority MSM in Britain.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of men who have sex with men (MSM) living in Britain in 2007-2008 to examine sexual mixing among ethnic minority MSM. The sample comprised 115 black, 112 South Asian, 47 Chinese and 4,434 white MSM who reported unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the previous 3 months. In each ethnic minority group, MSM were three times more likely to report UAI with a partner of the same ethnicity than would be expected by chance alone (?(2) > 8.43, p < 0.05). Nonetheless, most (>80 %) ethnic minority MSM reported UAI with men from an ethnic group other than their own. In multivariable analysis there was statistical evidence that, compared with white British MSM, self-reported HIV seropositivity remained low for South Asian and Chinese MSM after adjusting for UAI with partners of the same ethnicity (e.g. South Asian MSM, adjusted odds ratio 0.35, 95 % CI 0.19-0.66). This analysis suggests that differences in self-reported HIV seropositivity between ethnic minority and white MSM in Britain cannot be explained by sexual mixing with partners from the same ethnic group.

Doerner R; McKeown E; Nelson S; Anderson J; Low N; Elford J

2012-10-01

171

Somatic Symptoms Among US Adolescent Females: Associations with Sexual and Physical Violence Exposure.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objective of this study is to examine the association between physical and sexual violence exposure and somatic symptoms among female adolescents. We studied a nationally representative sample of 8,531 females, aged 11-21 years, who participated in the 1994-1995 Wave I of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Female adolescents were asked how often they had experienced 16 specific somatic symptoms during the past 12 months. Two summary categorical measures were constructed based on tertiles of the distributions for the entire female sample: (a) total number of different types of symptoms experienced, and (b) number of frequent (once a week or more often) different symptoms experienced. Groups were mutually exclusive. We examined associations between adolescents' violence exposure and somatic symptoms using multinomial logistic regression analyses. About 5 % of adolescent females reported both sexual and non-sexual violence, 3 % reported sexual violence only, 36 % reported non-sexual violence only, and 57 % reported no violence. Adolescents who experienced both sexual and non-sexual violence were the most likely to report many different symptoms and to experience very frequent or chronic symptoms. Likelihood of high symptomatology was next highest among adolescents who experienced sexual violence only, followed by females who experienced non-sexual violence only. Findings support an exposure-response association between violence exposure and somatic symptoms, suggesting that symptoms can be markers of victimization. Treating symptoms alone, without addressing the potential violence experienced, may not adequately improve adolescents' somatic complaints and well-being.

Halpern CT; Tucker CM; Bengtson A; Kupper LL; McLean SA; Martin SL

2013-01-01

172

Children and adolescents' commercial sexual exploitation: comparing truck drivers clients and non-clients of sexual  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aims at comparing two groups of truck drivers, clients and non-clients of children and adolescents' commercial sexual exploitation (ESCA). Interviews were conducted with 239 truck drivers in different areas of Brazil. The data were analyzed statistically by inferential and descriptive analyses. The comparison between the groups showed that those who said they were clients of ESCA (n = 85) use to have a higher loading time than the ones in the other group (n = 154). Moreover, the clients use to utilize more prostitutes' services and have less knowledge of children's rights. However, the profiles of both groups were very similar, according to demographic and professional data. This study highlighted the circumstantial feature of the relationship between the truck drivers and the children and adolescents' commercial sexual exploitation.

Elder Cerqueira-Santos; Normanda A. Morais; Andreína S. Moura; Silvia Helena Koller

2008-01-01

173

Sexual problems among a specific population of minority women aged 40-80 years attending a primary care practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: Clinicians are embarrassed about discussing sex with patients and do not know how to ask about sexual problems in a way that will optimize honest and open responses. Learning about inquiry responses and the prevalence of sexual problems among specific groups of women, including minority women, can help identify appropriate inquiry and management pathways. AIM: To better understand useful inquiry techniques as well as to describe the prevalence of sexual problems among a specific group of minority women aged 40-80 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Responses to two styles of sexual problem inquiry, direct vs. ubiquity, were compared among sexually active subjects. Prevalence of sexual problems and interest in discussing problems with personal clinician were determined. METHODS: Minority women aged 40-80 years receiving care at one of two Family Health Centers in Brooklyn, New York who could speak English met inclusion criteria. A cross-sectional survey of 212 subjects, the majority being Afro-Caribbean, identified those who were sexually active and then randomly asked about sexual problems using one of two inquiry types: (i) a direct question, such as "Do you have a problem during sex," or (ii) a ubiquity-style question, such as "Many women with diabetes have sexual problems, how about you?" Sexual problems were characterized by recognized phases of female sexual activity. Interest in discussing sexual problems with a personal clinician was determined. RESULTS: Of the 212 women surveyed, 108 (50.9%) were sexually active with 37 (34.3%) of these women responding "yes" when asked about sexual problems using one of the two inquiry techniques. Stratified analysis by age group showed significantly higher reporting of sexual problems when a ubiquity-style inquiry was used among older women aged 61-80 years (P = 0.028) but not among younger ones. The prevalence of sexual problems was 14.8% reporting pain, 12.0% lack of interest, 9.2% lack of excitation, 5.5% lack of orgasm, and 6.5%"other." Forty-three percent of women with problems said they would like to discuss their problem(s) with their clinician. CONCLUSIONS: In a specific minority group of women aged 40 years and older, especially those over age 60 years, ubiquity-style inquiries may encourage more open and honest responses about sexual problems. The most common sexual problem among this group of women was pain. There is willingness and even interest in talking with clinicians about sexual issues. Recognition of sexual problem prevalences helps clarify the high number of women who could be potentially helped with current and future pharmacologic and psychosocial treatments.

Sadovsky R; Alam W; Enecilla M; Cosiquien R; Tipu O; Etheridge-Otey J

2006-09-01

174

[Ineffective sexuality pattern in an adolescent: Nursing approach in primary health care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescent is a phase of continual physiological, psychological and social adaptation. It is during this time that young people tend to have their first sexual experiences. Sexual dysfunctions are characterized by important clinical changes in sexual desire and/or by psycho-physiological changes in the sexual response cycle. Premature ejaculation is one of the most frequent sexual dysfunction amongst men, with a higher prevalence in the younger population compared to other populations. The clinical case is presented of a 17 year-old male who experienced difficulties during his sexual relations. It is discussed whether his condition was a sexual dysfunction or ineffective sexual pattern. The care plan which was developed in nursing consultation was described for ineffective sexual pattern; the pending nursing treatment incorporated activities recommended by scientific evidence. Finally, the role of primary health care nursing professionals is pointed out in the detection and approach of sexual problems in adolescents.

Martín-García A; Oter-Quintana C; Brito-Brito PR; Martín-Iglesias S; Alcolea-Cosín MT

2013-10-01

175

Arousability as a predictor of sexual risk behaviours in African-American adolescent women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the impact of sexual excitation (arousability) on sexual risk-taking behaviours in a community sample of African-American adolescent women. A sample of 701 African-American adolescent women completed measures examining their propensity for sexual arousal, impulsivity and sexual behaviour. Compared with women with a lower propensity for sexual arousability, women with a higher propensity reported a greater number of sexual partners, more inconsistent condom use, a greater likelihood of having engaged in sexual intercourse with 'risky' partners, and sex while high on alcohol or drugs. These results indicate that women who have a greater propensity to become sexually aroused in a variety of situations may be at a greater risk for contracting HIV or sexually transmissible infections relative to women with a lower propensity for arousal. This suggests that individual differences in the propensity to become sexually aroused should be considered when developing intervention approaches targeting young African-American women.

Wood JR; Milhausen RR; Sales JM; Graham CA; Sanders SA; Diclemente RJ; Wingood GM

2013-04-01

176

Characteristics related to sexual experience and condom use among Jamaican female adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Young women in Jamaica face significant risk for HIV and other STIs. A clearer understanding of the factors associated with sexual experience and unprotected intercourse is needed. Data were collected from 330 adolescent females aged 13 to 17 recruited through community based organizations in Kingston, Jamaica, from 2009-2011. Nearly one-third of sexually experienced participants reported not using a condom the last time they had sex. Characteristics associated with sexual experience included older age, marijuana use, and less comfort talking to mother about sexual topics. Characteristics associated with condom use included perceived importance of religion, positive attitudes toward condoms, and not-having multiple sexual partners. Sexually experienced Jamaican female adolescents were engaging in behaviors that made them vulnerable to HIV and other STIs. Interventions with young adolescent girls and their mothers are recommended to postpone sexual debut and promote safer sexual behaviors in those who do engage in sex.

Kang SY; Hutchinson MK; Waldron N

2013-02-01

177

Men's sexual orientation and suicide: evidence for U.S. adolescent-specific risk.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There is strong consensus in the research literature that adolescent and adult men who report same-sex sexual orientations, identities, and behaviors are at higher risk for suicide. Recent studies of general adolescent suicide risk have identified developmental trajectories that peak during the teenage years. Because the adolescent years are characterized by the development and heightened awareness of gender roles and sexual scripts closely tied to dominant cultural ideals of masculinity and heterosexuality, an adolescent-focused developmental trajectory for suicide risk might be particularly relevant for males with adolescent same-sex sexual orientations. We provide the first prospective examination of adolescent-specific risk for suicidality based on adolescent same-sex sexual orientation using data from the United States, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Tracing suicide ideation and attempts across four assessments from adolescence (Wave 1 average age 15.3 years) to young adulthood (Wave 4 average age 28.2), we documented that the risk for suicidal thoughts and attempts for adolescent same-sex attracted males is developmental in nature. Specifically, the risk for suicidal thoughts and attempts for males with same-sex attractions is largely limited to the adolescent years. These results offer new insights for suicide prevention and intervention for male adolescents and adults with same-sex sexual orientations.

Russell ST; Toomey RB

2012-02-01

178

[Ethic evaluation of sexual health programs on adolescence].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In public health services, the interest in sexuality seems to turning from traditional topics such as potential treatments for male erectile dysfunction, psychosomatic disorders, the control of premature ejaculation and contraception. Instead, an increasingly prominent role is being given to prevention strategies carried out by means of campaigns or through sexual health programme sin schools. The different teaching strategies that underlie these programmes, which in many cases lack social consensus but are often promoted by international organizations such as WHO or UNESCO, reveal not only divergent ethical conceptions and worldviews on the meaning of sexuality, but also conflicting starting points, means and goals, focusing either on barrier-contraceptive methods or on sexual abstinence and personal responsibility. There is therefore a pressing need to understand the scientific evidence underlying each educational approach and the ethical postulates of each pedagogical proposal. This paper presents an outline of a six-point adolescent sexuality education program, which is respectful of individuals' ethical convictions. Given that few works on preventive medicine issues include an ethical evaluation of the steps followed in their development, this article also proposes a systematic evaluation of strategies for sexual health in the community that is developed through four steps verifying the following aspects: 1) the accuracy of information, 2) the level of evidence, 3) efficiency and 4) non-maleficence about the target population of each health program. The methodology used in these sexual health programs is another aspect that will verify their ethical consistence or, conversely, their absence of ethical values. We emphasize the duty of designers of programme for children not to carry then out against the will of their parents or tutors, and not conceal sensitive and relevant information.

Jara Rascón J; Alonso Sandoica E

2011-01-01

179

Methamphetamine Use Is Independently Associated with Recent Risky Sexual Behaviors and Adolescent Pregnancy  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Lifetime methamphetamine use among adolescents is estimated to be between 5% and 10%. Youth substance use in general is known to be associated with risky sexual behaviors, but the effect of methamphetamine use on recent risky sexual behaviors and adolescent pregnancy has received little attention. The purpose of this analysis was to…

Zapata, Lauren B.; Hillis, Susan D.; Marchbanks; Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Lowry, Richard

2008-01-01

180

Gender, Pubertal Development, and Peer Sexual Harassment Predict Objectified Body Consciousness in Early Adolescence  

Science.gov (United States)

|Objectified body consciousness (OBC)--the tendency to view one's body as an object for others to look at and evaluate--is theorized to emerge during sexual maturation as adolescents, particularly adolescent girls, experience sexual objectification. Although OBC generally is discussed in developmental terms, research so far has examined primarily…

Lindberg, Sara M.; Grabe, Shelly; Hyde, Janet Shibley

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

Adolescent Sexual Orientation and Suicide Risk: Evidence from a National Study.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to investigate links between sexual orientation and suicidality. There was a strong link between adolescent sexual orientation and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. This relationship was mediated by critical youth suicide risk factors (depression, hopelessness, alcohol abuse,…

Russell, Stephen T.; Joyner, Kara

2001-01-01

182

Interpersonal Factors in the Risk for Sexual Victimization and Its Recurrence during Adolescence  

Science.gov (United States)

Being a victim of sexual aggression from a peer is a common experience among adolescents and poses a significant risk for various forms of psychopathology. Unfortunately, little is known concerning specific interpersonal factors that increase an adolescent's risk for experiencing sexual aggression. The current study assessed the contribution made…

Young, Brennan J.; Furman, Wyndol

2008-01-01

183

The use and abuse of prescription medication to facilitate or enhance sexual behavior among adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescents naturally experience an increased interest in sexual behavior, but they usually lack much experience. Thus, any prescription medication that holds the potential to ease or facilitate sexual matters holds a unique allure. Widespread cultural awareness of medications to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) has combined with a recent trend toward increased adolescent prescription drug abuse to create unique challenges for industry, clinicians, and researchers.

Apodaca TR; Moser NC

2011-01-01

184

Minor physical anomalies in childhood and adolescent onset schizophrenia.  

Science.gov (United States)

A modified version of the Waldrop scale (WS) was used to assess the prevalence of minor physical anomalies in schizophrenic patients (n = 71) and healthy controls (n = 65). The mean total WS score was 3.32 (SD 1.98) for the schizophrenic patients, significantly higher than that for the controls (2.19, SD 1.18). Minor physical anomalies were compared between two schizophrenic groups, divided on the basis of age at onset, early onset schizophrenia (EOS, onset under age 18 years) group and late onset schizophrenia (LOS, onset at or above age 20 years) group. The mean total WS score was 3.92 (SD 1.86) in the EOS group, significantly higher than the 2.59 (SD 1.79) in the LOS group. Minor physical anomalies are an indirect index for early prenatal central nervous system (CNS) maldevelopment; the present study indicated association between minor physical anomalies and EOS, thus a relationship between early prenatal CNS maldevelopment and EOS. These results support the hypothesis that EOS constitutes a subset of schizophrenia in which neurodevelopmental damage is largely involved. PMID:12519450

Hata, Kazuya; Iida, Junzo; Iwasaka, Hidemi; Negoro, Hidek I; Ueda, Fumiyo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

2003-02-01

185

Epilepsia y desarrollo sexual en adolescentes/ Epilepsy and sexual development in adolescents  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Los efectos de las epilepsias y de los fármacos antiepilépticos en el desarrollo sexual de los adolescentes han sido poco estudiados. Las epilepsias per se pueden alterar los ritmos de secreción de las hormonas del eje hipotálamo-hipofisiario y contribuir a que se altere la evolución puberal. Los fármacos antiepilépticos pueden afectar la talla en ambos sexos y producir cambios en el tamaño testicular y en la longitud del pene. En las mujeres adolescentes existen (more) los riesgos del síndrome de ovario poliquístico y de la epilepsia catamenial. En los hombres se pueden afectar la fertilidad y el desempeño sexual. Es necesario hacer más estudios sobre este asunto, que incluyan los efectos de los nuevos medicamentos anticonvulsivantes. Abstract in english The effects of epilepsies and of antiepileptic drugs on the sexual development of adolescents have been poorly studied. Epilepsy may by itself alter the rhythms of secretion of the hypothalamichypophyseal axis, thus contributing to alter pubertal evolution. Antiepileptic drugs may affect height in both women and men, and produce changes in testicular size and penile length. Adolescent epileptic women are at risk to develop polycystic ovary syndrome and catamenial epilepsy (more) . Fertility and sexual performance may be affected in men. Further studies on this subject are required including those focused on the new antiepileptic drugs.

Carrizosa Moog, Jaime

2011-03-01

186

Stress, Self-Esteem, Hope, Optimism, and Well-Being in Urban, Ethnic Minority Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined hope, optimism, self-esteem, social support, stress, and indices of subjective well-being (SWB) in 137 low-income, urban, ethnic minority adolescents. Hope, optimism, and self-esteem were significant predictors of SWB indices, but stress predicted only 1 SWB index: negative affect. No moderators of stress and negative affect…

Vacek, Kimberly R.; Coyle, Laura D.; Vera, Elizabeth M.

2010-01-01

187

On Early Starters and Late Bloomers: The Development of Sexual Behavior in Adolescence Across Personality Types.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Little is known about the relationship between personality and sexual development among mid-adolescents. In the current study, we used a person-centered approach to investigate the relation between personality types and the development of sexual behavior. We hypothesized that undercontrolling adolescents would engage in more advanced, casual, and risky sexual behavior compared to their resilient and overcontrolling peers. Data were used from 407 mid-adolescents (M age = 14.5) followed across four measurement waves spanning 18 months. Results from latent class analyses (LCA) identified the three classical personality types: resilients, undercontrollers, and overcontrollers. Controlling for perceived pubertal timing and biological sex, latent growth curve analyses in Mplus showed that, at baseline, undercontrollers were more sexually experienced and engaged in more casual and risky sexual behavior than resilients and overcontrollers. Although initial levels of sexual behavior differed by personality types, over time increases in sexual behavior occurred at a similar rate across the types. Overall, the current study showed that undercontrolling adolescents are early sexual developers who engage in more advanced, casual, and risky sexual behavior than other adolescents. The implications of these findings for longer-term differences in sexual behavior between personality types in later adolescence are discussed.

Baams L; Overbeek G; Semon Dubas J; van Aken MA

2013-09-01

188

Risky sexual behavior among orphan and non-orphan adolescents in Nyanza Province, Western Kenya.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A household survey of male and female adolescents was conducted to establish whether orphanhood or other factors contribute to risky sexual behavior. Results show that orphanhood was not associated with risky sexual behavior. Sleeping in a different house from the household head and attending social activities at night were positively associated with sexual activity and transactional sex among boys and girls. Older adolescents were more likely to be sexually active while urban residents, and those who perceived their caregivers as able to provide for their basic needs, were less likely to have ever engaged in sex. Condom use at last sex was associated with older age and having talked with parents/caregivers about sexual risks. Interventions should address these predictors, promote risk reduction among all adolescents irrespective of orphan status, and strengthen parents'/guardians' capacity to discuss sexuality with adolescents and to provide for their basic needs.

Juma M; Alaii J; Bartholomew LK; Askew I; Van den Borne B

2013-03-01

189

Exposure to media content and sexual health behaviour among adolescents in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The influence of adolescents' exposure to sexual health content of mass media in their sexual health behaviour in Nigeria is still not clear. Data were gathered through a survey conducted among adolescents aged 12-19 years in Lagos metropolis between November 2009 and February 2010. A multistage sampling strategy was adopted in selecting respondents. Logistic regression technique was utilised in the analysis. The results indicate that the respondents were most frequently exposed to TV (male = 92.2; female = 94.9) and radio (male = 88.2; female = 91.7) media. The odds ratios indicate that sexual health content of mass media significantly predicted condom use, multiple sexual relationship, sexual intercourse and self reported occurrence of abortion in the study sample. The findings imply that positive media sexual health content is likely to promote sexual health among adolescents but negative contents can put adolescents' sexual health in danger. In addition, safe sex can be advanced among adolescents if the media provide accurate information on sexuality, emphasising the dangers of risky sexual practices. Finally, this study posits that accurate portrayal of sexuality in the media would contribute immensely to improving public health in the metropolis.

Wusu O

2013-06-01

190

Dispositional hope and the propensity to cope: a daily diary assessment of minority adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors examined the predictive ability of dispositional hope components (pathways, agency) in explaining minority adolescents' consistent use of daily coping strategies. Using daily diary methodology, 126 low socioeconomic status minority participants completed a multidimensional measure of dispositional hope and reported on subsequent stressful events that they experienced and the coping strategies that they employed over the course of a 5-day period. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that hope-pathways was uniquely and positively related to direct problem solving, planning, positive thinking, religious coping, distracting action, and overall coping use. Hope-agency was uniquely and positively associated with instrumental support for actions. Discussion focuses on the role of hope as a protective factor for minority adolescents experiencing stress, and particularly the unique predictive ability of each hope component. PMID:20438157

Roesch, Scott C; Duangado, Kate M; Vaughn, Allison A; Aldridge, Arianna A; Villodas, Feion

2010-04-01

191

Dispositional hope and the propensity to cope: a daily diary assessment of minority adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The authors examined the predictive ability of dispositional hope components (pathways, agency) in explaining minority adolescents' consistent use of daily coping strategies. Using daily diary methodology, 126 low socioeconomic status minority participants completed a multidimensional measure of dispositional hope and reported on subsequent stressful events that they experienced and the coping strategies that they employed over the course of a 5-day period. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that hope-pathways was uniquely and positively related to direct problem solving, planning, positive thinking, religious coping, distracting action, and overall coping use. Hope-agency was uniquely and positively associated with instrumental support for actions. Discussion focuses on the role of hope as a protective factor for minority adolescents experiencing stress, and particularly the unique predictive ability of each hope component.

Roesch SC; Duangado KM; Vaughn AA; Aldridge AA; Villodas F

2010-04-01

192

Factors Related to Sexual Practices and Successful Sexually Transmitted Infection/HIV Intervention Programs for Latino Adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to explore factors that are related to sexual practices among Latino adolescents and identify which of those factors are common across successful sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention programs for Latino adolescents. DESIGN: An integrative literature review was conducted. Search terms included Latino, Hispanic, education, intervention/prevention programs, sex, sexuality, reproductive health, health risk behaviors, multiple sex partners, contraception, STI/HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, delay in initiation of sexual intercourse, consistent use of birth control, avoidance of STI/HIV infections, unintended pregnancy, cultural factors, and gender roles. RESULTS: Findings revealed from the review of 17 articles addressing factors related to sexual practices among Latino adolescents included familialism, religion, gender roles, level of knowledge/information, and privacy/confidentiality. Five successful STI/HIV intervention programs, that incorporated those factors to effectively reduce risky sexual behaviors were identified. STI/HIV knowledge and gender roles were recognized as common factors integrated into and across successful intervention programs for this population. CONCLUSION: Only STI/HIV knowledge and gender roles were found as common factors across the five successful STI/HIV intervention programs and should be incorporated into future intervention programs that are culturally and gender specific. Therefore, health care providers need to understand culturally related gender roles and their impact on sexual practices to provide culturally sensitive and appropriate sex education about STIs and HIV for Latino adolescents to increase the program potential for reducing STI/HIV.

Lee YM; Dancy B; Florez E; Holm K

2013-09-01

193

Compliance in Rhode Island Emergency Departments With American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for Adolescent Sexual Assaults  

Science.gov (United States)

OBJECTIVES We assessed the offering of American Academy of Pediatrics–recommended tests and prophylaxes after sexual assault to adolescents who presented to Rhode Island emergency departments for 3 categories of sexual exposures: sexual assault, consensual sex, and suspected sexual abuse. PATIENTS AND METHODS This study entailed a retrospective review of visits for adolescent sexual exposures across 11 Rhode Island emergency departments between January 1995 and June 2001. Cases were identified through billing codes. Offering of each test and prophylaxis was compared by gender, category of sexual exposure, and type of sexual assault. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with the offering of a greater number of tests and prophylaxes after sexual assault. RESULTS The vast majority of emergency department visits for adolescent sexual exposures were by sexually assaulted girls (82.5%). Across the 3 sexual exposure categories, girls were offered tests and prophylaxes more often than boys (eg, chlamydia or gonorrhea testing and prophylaxis). Among sexually assaulted adolescents, 32.8% of girls and no boys were offered all recommended tests and prophylaxes. The multivariable linear regression found that vaginally and/or anally assaulted girls were offered, on average, 2.5 more tests and prophylaxes than patients with other types of sexual assaults. Girls presenting for care at the state’s women’s health care specialty hospital emergency departments were offered 1.7 more tests and prophylaxes than those evaluated in general hospital emergency departments. CONCLUSIONS Many adolescents did not receive American Academy of Pediatrics–recommended tests and prophylaxes after sexual assault. Boys received fewer tests than girls. Testing and prophylaxis varied by type of emergency department. Efforts are needed to improve and standardize emergency department medical management of adolescent sexual exposures.

Merchant, Roland C.; Kelly, Erin T.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Becker, Bruce M.; Duffy, Susan J.; Pugatch, David L.

2011-01-01

194

HIV, Sexual Violence and Special Populations: Adolescence and Pregnancy  

Science.gov (United States)

The risk of male to female transmission of HIV is impacted by baseline inflammation in the female genital tract, semen viral load and seminal plasma’s ability to induce specific patterns of cervical cytokine signalling and influx of immune cell populations. Disruption of the epithelial barrier during non-consensual intercourse may trigger further inflammation and initiation of cell-signalling pathways, thus facilitating transmission of HIV and expansion of local infection. Adolescent and pregnant women are at high risk for sexual violence and may exhibit alterations of genital mucosal immunity that promote immune activation, making them uniquely vulnerable to HIV acquisition.

Madan, Rebecca Pellett; Herold, Betsy C.

2013-01-01

195

HIV, sexual violence and special populations: adolescence and pregnancy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The risk of male to female transmission of HIV is impacted by baseline inflammation in the female genital tract, semen viral load and seminal plasma's ability to induce specific patterns of cervical cytokine signalling and influx of immune cell populations. Disruption of the epithelial barrier during non-consensual intercourse may trigger further inflammation and initiation of cell-signalling pathways, thus facilitating transmission of HIV and expansion of local infection. Adolescent and pregnant women are at high risk for sexual violence and may exhibit alterations of genital mucosal immunity that promote immune activation, making them uniquely vulnerable to HIV acquisition.

Pellett Madan R; Herold BC

2013-02-01

196

Adolescent sexuality in the light of group processes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet is used to illustrate several connected theses regarding the relation of the couple to its surrounding social group: these include a couple's oedipal rebellion, the unconscious longing for and hatred of the idealized couple by the large group, the denial of aggression within the couple and its projection onto the group, the impotence of rationality and the conventionalization of sexuality in the large group, and the pervading dynamics of aggression in group formation. Pertinent psychoanalytic theories are briefly summarized, and this combined analysis is applied to the psychoanalyst's attitude regarding adolescent patients' love life.

Kernberg OF

1980-01-01

197

Online sexual activities and sexual risk-taking among adolescents and young adults in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria.  

Science.gov (United States)

As internet penetration surges in different parts of the world, access to a wide range of subject matters also increases. Matters of sexuality are no exceptions. While there is ample empirical evidence that youths seek knowledge about sexuality, and get involved in sexually stimulating and/or gratifying activities on the internet, the relationship between involvement in these online sexual activities (OSAs) and real life sexual behaviour remains a matter of polemic. Modelling theorists contend that exposure to sexuality related information propel acting out such information. Catharsis on the other hand holds the view that exposure to such information serves as safety valves for the peaceful release of imperfectly sublimated antisocial sexual drives. Using data gathered from adolescent internet users involved in OSAs as well as those not involved within the city of Lagos, this study concludes that OSA is associated with involvement in risk-bearing sexual behaviours. PMID:22916553

Michael, Kunnuji

2012-06-01

198

Online sexual activities and sexual risk-taking among adolescents and young adults in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As internet penetration surges in different parts of the world, access to a wide range of subject matters also increases. Matters of sexuality are no exceptions. While there is ample empirical evidence that youths seek knowledge about sexuality, and get involved in sexually stimulating and/or gratifying activities on the internet, the relationship between involvement in these online sexual activities (OSAs) and real life sexual behaviour remains a matter of polemic. Modelling theorists contend that exposure to sexuality related information propel acting out such information. Catharsis on the other hand holds the view that exposure to such information serves as safety valves for the peaceful release of imperfectly sublimated antisocial sexual drives. Using data gathered from adolescent internet users involved in OSAs as well as those not involved within the city of Lagos, this study concludes that OSA is associated with involvement in risk-bearing sexual behaviours.

Michael K

2012-06-01

199

Effects of abstinence-only education on adolescent attitudes and values concerning premarital sexual intercourse.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article compares the values and attitudes of two groups of 7th and 8th grade adolescents toward premarital sexual activity. One group received state-funded, abstinence-only education; the other group did not receive that education. Abstinence-only education did not significantly change adolescents' values and attitudes about premarital sexual activity, nor their intentions to engage in premarital sexual activity. The majority of both the treatment and control group subjects expressed disagreement with the statement: "It is okay for people my age to have sexual intercourse," and they did not intend to have sexual intercourse while an unmarried teenager.

Sather L; Zinn K

2002-07-01

200

Condom use at last sexual relationship among adolescents of Santiago Island, Cape Verde, - West Africa  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Objective To estimate factors associated with condom use at last sexual intercourse among adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional study of a representative sample of 368 sexually active adolescents aged 13–17 years from eight public high schools on Santiago Island, Cape Verde, 2007. The level of significance was 5.0% obtained from logistic regression, considering the association between condom use and socio-demographic, sexual and reproductive variables. Results The prevalence of condom use at last sexual intercourse was 94.9%. Factors associated with condom use at last sexual relationship were: non-Catholic religion (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.52; 0.88) and affective-sexual partnership before the interview (OR=5.15, 95%CI: 1.79; 14.80). Conclusions There was a high prevalence of condom use at last sexual intercourse of adolescents.

Tavares Carlos; Schor Néia; Valenti Vitor E; Kanikadan Paula Yuri; de Abreu Luiz

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Pervasive Vulnerabilities: Sexual Harassment in School. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 54  

Science.gov (United States)

|"Pervasive Vulnerabilities" explores the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of adolescent girls and boys and female teachers in order to expose the continuing persistence of sexual harassment in the United States. The book addresses the sexual double standard that continues to hold girls and women accountable for male sexual aggression, and…

Rahimi, Regina; Liston, Delores D.

2012-01-01

202

Pervasive Vulnerabilities: Sexual Harassment in School. Adolescent Cultures, School, and Society. Volume 54  

Science.gov (United States)

"Pervasive Vulnerabilities" explores the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of adolescent girls and boys and female teachers in order to expose the continuing persistence of sexual harassment in the United States. The book addresses the sexual double standard that continues to hold girls and women accountable for male sexual aggression, and…

Rahimi, Regina; Liston, Delores D.

2012-01-01

203

Perspectives of midwives and doctors on adolescent sexuality and abortion care in Vietnam.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Vietnam has one of the highest abortion rates in the world and adolescent abortions are thought to constitute at least one third of all cases. Lack of balanced reproductive health information and services to adolescents and negative social attitudes towards adolescent sexuality are contr...

Klingberg Allvin, Marie; Thu Nga, Nguyen; Rangsjö-Arvidson, Ann-Berit; Johansson, Annika

204

Concern Over the Misidentification of Sexual Orientation: Social Contagion and the Avoidance of Sexual Minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Membership in a valued group can provide an individual with a variety of benefits. As a result, people should be motivated to avoid being misidentified as a member of an outgroup, particularly a stigmatized outgroup. We argue that when group membership is not readily identifiable, concern over potentially being mistaken for a member of the outgroup (i.e., social contagion concerns) can be potent and can lead to avoidance of the outgroup. The current work shows that after controlling for negative attitudes toward homosexuality, social contagion concerns independently predict anxiety and avoidance in response to imagined, anticipated, and actual contact with a lesbian or gay individual. Results from these studies suggest that concern over misclassification of sexual orientation is an important and unique predictor of responses to contact with lesbian and gay people. Implications for intergroup contact and responses to other stigmatized groups are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Buck DM; Plant EA; Ratcliff J; Zielaskowski K; Boerner P

2013-08-01

205

Alcohol--a predictor of risky sexual behavior among female adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Alcohol use has been linked to risky sexual practices among adolescents. However, limited research on alcohol use and risky sexual behavior has been conducted among female adolescents. This study examined a high quantity of alcohol as a longitudinal predictor of risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among female adolescents. Three hundred ninety-three adolescent females aged 15-21 were assessed for alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors. Participants also provided 2 swab specimens that were assayed for STDs. Use of high alcohol quantity was defined as > or = 3 drinks in 1 sitting. Binary generalized estimating equation models were conducted assessing the impact of alcohol use at baseline on risky sexual behavior and STDs over a 12-month period. Age, intervention group and baseline outcome measures were entered as covariates. The results indicated that use of high alcohol quantity predicted inconsistent condom use, high sexual sensation seeking, multiple sexual partners, sex while high on alcohol or drugs, and having anal sex during 12-month follow-up period. These findings suggest that STD-related behavioral interventions for adolescents should discuss the link between alcohol and STD-risk behavior. Deeper understanding of alcohol as a predictor of risky sexual behavior among female adolescents is of paramount importance for development of efficient prevention programs at individual and community levels. The risk of acquiring an STD is higher among teenagers than among adults.

Lepusi? D; Radovi?-Radovci? S

2013-03-01

206

P300 and the stroop effect in overweight minority adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: The goal was to examine the relationship between a risk factor for poor cognitive control and a health outcome of growing public significance--an excess body mass--among adolescents. METHODS: To this end, 109 adolescents aged 14-20 years were recruited and assigned to 1 of 4 groups defined by the crossing of the absence versus presence of a parental history (PH) of externalizing disorders with a body mass index (BMI) percentile (BMIP) < 85 versus > or = 85. The principal measure estimating cognitive control was the P300 event-related electroencephalographic response recorded during the Stroop task. RESULTS: The analyses revealed a synergistic interaction between BMIP rank, PH and trial type: the increase in P300 latency and the decrease in response accuracy, elicited by the presence of interfering information, were markedly greater in high-BMIP subjects with a PH of externalizing disorders than in the other subject groups. Analyses of a later component, the N450, previously associated with the Stroop interference effect, revealed no effect of BMI or PH. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that subjects with both a PH of externalizing disorders and an excess BMI constitute a unique group that is less able to resolve cognitive conflict than others. The excessive delay in P300 evoked by conflicting response demands in these subjects may be a marker of a heritable factor that increases risk for both excess body mass and substance use disorders.

Bauer LO; Kaplan RF; Hesselbrock VM

2010-01-01

207

As relações familiares do adolescente ofensor sexual Adolescente ofensor sexual y família Family relations of the sexual offender adolescent  

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Full Text Available O texto trata de uma pesquisa qualitativa que enfoca o conhecimento das relações familiares do adolescente ofensor sexual, enfatizando as figuras da mãe e do pai, e se baseia nas entrevistas que antecedem o oferecimento de uma intervenção grupal, com os adolescentes e familiares. As entrevistas foram realizadas com sete adolescentes, entre 14 e 17 anos, e suas mães. Foram construídos três núcleos de resultados sobre: a interação familiar desse adolescente se organiza para garantir a sobrevivência da família; esse adolescente apresenta uma intensa e paradoxal relação com sua mãe; e há uma relação extremamente pobre de convivência e vinculação afetiva com a figura paterna. Concluímos que a violência sexual intrafamiliar, cometida pelos adolescentes, está ligada à dinâmica afetiva familiar de distanciamento e autoritarismo. Uma melhor compreensão da violência presente nas relações familiares desse adolescente é fundamental, porque uma característica desses sujeitos é a falta de habilidade social, e esse aspecto provém de um processo pobre de vinculação com seus pais.El texto trata de una investigación cualitativa que enfoca el conocimiento de las relaciones familiares del adolescente ofensor sexual, enfatizando las figuras de la madre y del padre, y se basa en las entrevistas que anteceden el ofrecimiento de una intervención grupal, con los adolescentes y familiares. Las entrevistas fueron realizadas con siete adolescentes, entre 14 y 17 años, y sus madres. Fueron construidos tres núcleos de resultados sobre: la interacción familiar de ese adolescente se organiza para garantizar la supervivencia de la familia; ese adolescente presenta una intensa y paradoxal relación con su madre; y hay una relación extremamente pobre de convivencia y vinculación afectiva con la figura paterna. Concluimos que la violencia sexual intrafamiliar, cometida por los adolescentes, está asociada a la dinámica afectiva familiar de distanciamiento y autoritarismo. Una mejor comprensión de la violencia presente en las relaciones familiares de ese adolescente es fundamental, porque una característica de eses sujetos es la falta de habilidad social, y ese aspecto proviene de un proceso pobre de vinculación con sus padres.This text deals with a qualitative research about family relations of the sexual offender adolescent, with emphasis on the paternal figures, and is based on the interviews that precede the offer of a group intervention with the adolescents and their families. The interviews were conducted with seven adolescents and their mothers. Three nuclei results were interpreted: the family interaction of this adolescent is organized to guarantee the survival of the family; this adolescent presents an intense and paradoxical relation with his mother; there is an extremely poor living relation and affective link with the father. We conclude that the intra-family sexual violence made by the adolescents is linked with the family affective dynamics of distance and authoritarianism. A better comprehension of the violence present in the family relations of this adolescent is of fundamental importance because one of their characteristics is the lack of social ability, which originates from a poor process of linking with their parents.

Liana Fortunato Costa; Eika Lôbo Junqueira; Fernanda Figueiredo Falcomer Meneses; Lucy Mary Cavalcanti Stroher

2013-01-01

208

Violência sexual e sua prevalência em adolescentes de Porto Alegre, Brasil Sexual violence and its prevalence among adolescents, Brazil  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência da exposição à violência sexual entre adolescentes estudantes de escolas estaduais. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionadas 52 escolas estaduais de Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, com ensino fundamental completo, por meio de um processo de amostragem aleatória, estratificada de acordo com o tamanho das escolas. Foi selecionada, em cada escola, uma turma de oitava série por sorteio aleatório e foram incluídos todos os adolescentes presentes nas salas de aula que consentiram em participar do estudo. Foi utilizado o instrumento Triagem da Exposição de Crianças à Violência na Comunidade para identificar jovens que foram vítimas, testemunhas ou que conheciam vítimas de atos de violência sexual. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 1.193 adolescentes, representando 10,3% dos alunos matriculados na oitava série da rede estadual da cidade. Vinte e sete (2,3%) adolescentes relataram ter sido vítimas de violência sexual, 54 (4,5%) ter sido testemunhas de algum tipo de violência sexual e 332 (27,9%) relataram conhecer alguém que tenha sido vítima de violência sexual. CONCLUSÕES: A exposição à violência sexual pelas três formas de contato relatadas mostrou-se freqüente entre os adolescentes estudados. São necessários estudos que abordem a violência sexual como um fenômeno social amplo, com múltiplos fatores associados, amparando estratégias comunitárias de prevenção e de tratamento.OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence o sexual violence among adolescents of public schools. METHODS: Fifty-two public elementary schools of Porto Alegre, Brazil, were selected through random sampling stratified by school size. An 8th grade class was selected in each school through simple random sampling and all adolescents attending the classes who agreed to participate were included in the study. The Screening Survey of Children's Exposure to Community Violence was used to identify adolescents who were victims, witnesses or knew someone who had been a victim of sexual violence. RESULTS: There were 1,193 adolescents included in the study, representing 10.3% of all students enrolled on 8th grade classes in the city's public schools. Twenty-seven adolescents (2.3%) reported being victims of sexual violence, 54 (4.5%) reported witnessing some episode of sexual violence and 332 (27.9%) reported knowing someone who was a victim of sexual violence. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to sexual violence in any of the three forms of contact was a common event among the studied adolescents. Studies focusing sexual violence as a broad social phenomenon with multiples associated factors are necessary to support preventive and treatment strategies at the community level.

Guilherme Vanoni Polanczyk; Maria Lucrécia Zavaschi; Silvia Benetti; Raquel Zenker; Patrícia Wainberg Gammerman

2003-01-01

209

Substance use and sexual behavior among recent Hispanic immigrant adolescents: effects of parent-adolescent differential acculturation and communication.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To ascertain the effects of parent-adolescent acculturation gaps, perceived discrimination, and perceived negative context of reception on adolescent cigarette smoking, alcohol use, sexual activity, and sexual risk taking. We used an expanded, multidimensional model of acculturation. METHOD: A sample of 302 recently immigrated parent-adolescent dyads (152 from Miami and 150 from Los Angeles) completed measures of acculturation (Hispanic and American practices and identifications, and individualist and collectivist values) and parent-adolescent communication. Adolescents completed measures of recent cigarette smoking, alcohol use, sexual behavior, and sexual risk taking. RESULTS: Parent-adolescent gaps in American practices and ethnic identity, and perceptions of a negative context of reception, predicted compromised parent-adolescent communication. In Miami only, adolescent-reported communication negatively predicted odds of cigarette smoking, occasions of drunkenness, and number of sexual partners. Also in Miami only, parent-reported communication positively predicted these outcomes, as well as occasions of adolescent binge drinking, drunkenness, number of sexual partners, and odds of unprotected sex. The only significant findings in Los Angeles were protective effects of parent-reported communication on frequency of alcohol use and of binge drinking. Mediational effects emerged only in the Miami sample. CONCLUSIONS: Effects of parent-adolescent acculturation gaps vary across Hispanic groups and receiving contexts. The especially strong parental control in many Mexican families may account for these differences. However, other important differences between Hispanic subgroups and communities of reception could also account for these differences. Prevention efforts might encourage Hispanic youth both to retain their culture of origin and to acquire American culture.

Schwartz SJ; Unger JB; Des Rosiers SE; Huang S; Baezconde-Garbanati L; Lorenzo-Blanco EI; Villamar JA; Soto DW; Pattarroyo M; Szapocznik J

2012-09-01

210

Development of Sexual Expectancies among Adolescents: Contributions by Parents, Peers and the Media.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To expand the scant research on sexual expectancies development among non-sexually active adolescents, we examined the relationship between adolescents' exposure to four socializing agents-mother/female guardian, father/male guardian, peers, and television programs with high sexual content-and their endorsement of four sexual expectancies: social benefit, pleasure, social risk, and health risk. Data are from Waves 2 and 3 of a three-wave annual longitudinal study conducted among California adolescents, the majority of whom were not sexually active (N = 914, 84%). Structural equation models were conducted to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between the socializing agents and the sexual expectancies. Cross-sectional results indicate associations between peer sexual communication and social benefit, pleasure, and social risk expectancies. A positive association was found between exposure to music videos and social benefit expectancies, and a negative association was found between exposure to music videos and health risk expectancies. Longitudinal results suggest that communication with peers positively predicted pleasure expectancies and negatively predicted social risk expectancies. No other socializing agents were associated with any sexual expectancies. An invariance test found that significant correlations were similar across the different age groups. Results suggest that efforts to support positive sexual decision making among non-sexually active adolescents should target peer sexual communication.

Ragsdale K; Bersamin MM; Schwartz SJ; Zamboanga BL; Kerrick MR; Grube JW

2013-04-01

211

Interrelationships between LGBT-based victimization, suicide, and substance use problems in a diverse sample of sexual and gender minorities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Research has documented significant relationships between sexual and gender minority stress and higher rates of suicidality (i.e. suicidal ideation and attempts) and substance use problems. We examined the potential mediating role of substance use problems on the relationship between sexual and gender minority stress (i.e. victimization based on lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender identity [LGBT]) and suicidality. A nonprobability sample of LGBT patients from a community health center (N?=?1457) ranged in age from 19-70?years. Participants reported history of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts, substance use problems, as well as experiences of LGBT-based verbal and physical attacks. Substance use problems were a significant partial mediator between LGBT-based victimization and suicidal ideation and between LGBT-based victimization and suicide attempts for sexual and gender minorities. Nuanced gender differences revealed that substance use problems did not significantly mediate the relationship between victimization and suicide attempts for sexual minority men. Substance use problems may be one insidious pathway that partially mediates the risk effects of sexual and gender minority stress on suicidality. Substances might be a temporary and deleterious coping resource in response to LGBT-based victimization, which have serious effects on suicidal ideation and behaviors. PMID:23535038

Mereish, Ethan H; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Bradford, Judith B

2013-03-27

212

Interrelationships between LGBT-based victimization, suicide, and substance use problems in a diverse sample of sexual and gender minorities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research has documented significant relationships between sexual and gender minority stress and higher rates of suicidality (i.e. suicidal ideation and attempts) and substance use problems. We examined the potential mediating role of substance use problems on the relationship between sexual and gender minority stress (i.e. victimization based on lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender identity [LGBT]) and suicidality. A nonprobability sample of LGBT patients from a community health center (N?=?1457) ranged in age from 19-70?years. Participants reported history of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts, substance use problems, as well as experiences of LGBT-based verbal and physical attacks. Substance use problems were a significant partial mediator between LGBT-based victimization and suicidal ideation and between LGBT-based victimization and suicide attempts for sexual and gender minorities. Nuanced gender differences revealed that substance use problems did not significantly mediate the relationship between victimization and suicide attempts for sexual minority men. Substance use problems may be one insidious pathway that partially mediates the risk effects of sexual and gender minority stress on suicidality. Substances might be a temporary and deleterious coping resource in response to LGBT-based victimization, which have serious effects on suicidal ideation and behaviors.

Mereish EH; O'Cleirigh C; Bradford JB

2013-03-01

213

Estilos de vida na adolescência: comportamento sexual dos adolescentes portugueses/ Life styles in adolescence: sexual behavior of Portuguese adolescents/ Estilos de vida en la adolescencia: comportamiento sexual de los adolescentes portugueses  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Estudos recentes têm demonstrado que actualmente os adolescentes iniciam a vida sexual cada vez mais cedo, sem contudo possuírem uma educação sexual consistente. Os objectivos deste estudo foram analisar o comportamento sexual de adolescentes do ensino secundário e identificar os hábitos de vigilância de saúde sexual em adolescentes, do ensino secundário, sexualmente activos. Realizou-se um estudo exploratório em que participaram 680 adolescentes, com idades ent (more) re 15 e 19 anos. Os resultados evidenciam que a maioria dos inquiridos ainda não iniciou a actividade sexual; são os rapazes os que mais reportam já ter tido relações sexuais; o preservativo não é um método utilizado por todos os adolescentes nas suas relações sexuais; a maioria dos adolescentes não faz vigilância de saúde sexual. É importante que os adolescentes sexualmente activos recebam cuidados de saúde e aconselhamento. As instituições de saúde e os seus profissionais necessitam de ser pró-activos tentando captar os adolescentes. Abstract in spanish Estudios recientes han demostrados que actualmente los adolescentes inician su vida sexual cada vez más temprano, sin tener una educación sexual consistente. Este estudio objetivó analizar el comportamiento sexual de adolescentes de enseñanza secundaria e identificar los hábitos de seguridad de salud sexual en estudiantes adolescentes sexualmente activos. Se realizó un estudio exploratorio con 680 adolescentes de edad entre 15 y 19 años. Los resultados demostraron (more) que la mayoría de los participantes no había iniciado aún actividad sexual. Los de sexo masculino son quienes más reportan haber tenido relaciones sexuales; el preservativo no es un método utilizado por todos los adolescentes en sus relaciones; la mayoría de los adolescentes no vigila su salud sexual. Es importante que los adolescentes sexualmente activos reciban atención de salud y consejos. Las instituciones de salud y sus profesionales necesitan ser proactivos intentando captar a los adolescentes. Abstract in english Recent studies have shown that adolescents have initiated their sex lives earlier and earlier, without, however, receiving consistent sex education. The objectives of this study were to analyze the sexual behavior of adolescent high school students and identify the habits of sexual health in sexually active adolescent high school students. An exploratory study was conducted with 680 adolescents, whose age ranged between 15 and 19 years. Results showed that most participan (more) ts had not initiated their sex life; boys are those who most report having had sexual relations; not all the interviewed adolescents used condoms during sex; most adolescents do not practice sexual health surveillance. It is important for sexually active adolescents to receive health care and counseling. Health institutions and their workers must be proactive in trying to approach adolescents.

Ferreira, Maria Margarida da Silva Reis dos Santos; Torgal, Maria Constança Leite de Freitas Paúl Reis

2011-06-01

214

Estilos de vida na adolescência: comportamento sexual dos adolescentes portugueses Estilos de vida en la adolescencia: comportamiento sexual de los adolescentes portugueses Life styles in adolescence: sexual behavior of Portuguese adolescents  

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Full Text Available Estudos recentes têm demonstrado que actualmente os adolescentes iniciam a vida sexual cada vez mais cedo, sem contudo possuírem uma educação sexual consistente. Os objectivos deste estudo foram analisar o comportamento sexual de adolescentes do ensino secundário e identificar os hábitos de vigilância de saúde sexual em adolescentes, do ensino secundário, sexualmente activos. Realizou-se um estudo exploratório em que participaram 680 adolescentes, com idades entre 15 e 19 anos. Os resultados evidenciam que a maioria dos inquiridos ainda não iniciou a actividade sexual; são os rapazes os que mais reportam já ter tido relações sexuais; o preservativo não é um método utilizado por todos os adolescentes nas suas relações sexuais; a maioria dos adolescentes não faz vigilância de saúde sexual. É importante que os adolescentes sexualmente activos recebam cuidados de saúde e aconselhamento. As instituições de saúde e os seus profissionais necessitam de ser pró-activos tentando captar os adolescentes.Estudios recientes han demostrados que actualmente los adolescentes inician su vida sexual cada vez más temprano, sin tener una educación sexual consistente. Este estudio objetivó analizar el comportamiento sexual de adolescentes de enseñanza secundaria e identificar los hábitos de seguridad de salud sexual en estudiantes adolescentes sexualmente activos. Se realizó un estudio exploratorio con 680 adolescentes de edad entre 15 y 19 años. Los resultados demostraron que la mayoría de los participantes no había iniciado aún actividad sexual. Los de sexo masculino son quienes más reportan haber tenido relaciones sexuales; el preservativo no es un método utilizado por todos los adolescentes en sus relaciones; la mayoría de los adolescentes no vigila su salud sexual. Es importante que los adolescentes sexualmente activos reciban atención de salud y consejos. Las instituciones de salud y sus profesionales necesitan ser proactivos intentando captar a los adolescentes.Recent studies have shown that adolescents have initiated their sex lives earlier and earlier, without, however, receiving consistent sex education. The objectives of this study were to analyze the sexual behavior of adolescent high school students and identify the habits of sexual health in sexually active adolescent high school students. An exploratory study was conducted with 680 adolescents, whose age ranged between 15 and 19 years. Results showed that most participants had not initiated their sex life; boys are those who most report having had sexual relations; not all the interviewed adolescents used condoms during sex; most adolescents do not practice sexual health surveillance. It is important for sexually active adolescents to receive health care and counseling. Health institutions and their workers must be proactive in trying to approach adolescents.

Maria Margarida da Silva Reis dos Santos Ferreira; Maria Constança Leite de Freitas Paúl Reis Torgal

2011-01-01

215

Coping strategies and health in a national sample of sexual minority women.  

Science.gov (United States)

Coping strategies have been shown to significantly influence mental and physical health among heterosexual and medically ill populations. These associations have not been thoroughly examined among sexual minority women, who are known to shoulder a high burden of disease. This study assesses the impact of adaptive and maladaptive coping on mental and physical health among 1,381 lesbian and bisexual women and examines the potential mediating role of maladaptive coping in explaining bisexual women's poorer health relative to lesbians. Participants completed a web-based survey that assessed demographic characteristics, social support, adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies, and mental and physical health. Maladaptive coping strategies, especially behavioral disengagement and self-blame, were significantly associated with mental and physical health. Coping was more strongly predictive of mental health than physical health, and maladaptive coping more strongly predictive of health outcomes than demographics, social support, and adaptive coping. Interactions between social support and coping were generally not significant. Additionally, bisexual women reported more adverse mental and physical health outcomes than lesbians, and maladaptive coping significantly mediated these relationships. Providers working with sexual minority women may wish to pay particular attention to maladaptive coping strategies, countering these with adaptive, empowerment-based interventions. PMID:23039347

Lehavot, Keren

2012-10-01

216

Coping strategies and health in a national sample of sexual minority women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Coping strategies have been shown to significantly influence mental and physical health among heterosexual and medically ill populations. These associations have not been thoroughly examined among sexual minority women, who are known to shoulder a high burden of disease. This study assesses the impact of adaptive and maladaptive coping on mental and physical health among 1,381 lesbian and bisexual women and examines the potential mediating role of maladaptive coping in explaining bisexual women's poorer health relative to lesbians. Participants completed a web-based survey that assessed demographic characteristics, social support, adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies, and mental and physical health. Maladaptive coping strategies, especially behavioral disengagement and self-blame, were significantly associated with mental and physical health. Coping was more strongly predictive of mental health than physical health, and maladaptive coping more strongly predictive of health outcomes than demographics, social support, and adaptive coping. Interactions between social support and coping were generally not significant. Additionally, bisexual women reported more adverse mental and physical health outcomes than lesbians, and maladaptive coping significantly mediated these relationships. Providers working with sexual minority women may wish to pay particular attention to maladaptive coping strategies, countering these with adaptive, empowerment-based interventions.

Lehavot K

2012-10-01

217

Association between socio-economic status and sexual behavior of adolescents  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of contextual factors as determinants of sexual behavior of adolescents. It has been found that lower socioeconomic status is associated with risky sexual behavior. Sexual behavior is individual but develops under strong influence of cultural and other influences. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of family’s socioeconomic status and risky sexual behavior of adolescents in Belgrade. Method. Self-administered questionnaire was used in secondary schools in Belgrade, and 1,782 adolescents attending first grade filled the questionnaire. For the analyses of predictors of risky sexual behavior, multiple logistic regression was used. Results. Parents’ occupations did not show significant association with any of analyzed behaviors. Adolescents who received weekly disposable money above average were 2.5 times more likely to ever have had sexual intercourse, and if sexually active were more likely to use contraception. Perceived family’s wealth was a significant predictor of ever having sex (OR=1.9; CI 1.2-2.8) and not using contraception (OR=4.3; CI 1.2-15.0). Conclusion. Socioeconomic status is associated with sexual behaviors of adolescents. Fifteen-year olds who perceive their families as wealthier are more likely to ever have had sex and not use any kind of contraception. Adolescents with higher weekly income are more likely to ever have had sex and use contraception than their counterpats with less weekly disposable money. .

Vukovi? Dejana S.; Bjegovi?-Mikanovi? Vesna M.

2007-01-01

218

Female sexual offenders in the educational system: a brief overview.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Female sexual offenders comprise the minority of sexual offenders in the criminal justice system. However, empirical research reveals that sexual offenses against adolescents by females are a bigger problem than previously thought, particularly in the educational system. The authors review some of the data in the criminal justice system as well as in empirical research studies about female sexual offenders, with a specific focus on females who commit sexual crimes against students who are minors.

Solis OL; Benedek EP

2012-01-01

219

Reciprocal relationships between friends' and parental mediation of adolescents' media use and their sexual attitudes and behavior.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research has argued that adolescents are at risk for harmful effects of sexual media, but little is known about the role of parents and friends on adolescents' media use in regard of these effects. The present two-wave study investigated whether prior parental and friends' influences on adolescents' use of sexual media shape their sexual attitudes and behaviors, and vice versa if prior sexual attitudes and behaviors predict parental and friends' media mediation. At two measurement points 18 months apart, 528 adolescents (12-17 years; 51.3 % girls) reported on permissive sexual attitudes, sexual experience, perceived parental and friends' mediation of sexual media use, and communication with parents and friends about sex. Structural Equation Modeling shows that parents' mediation activities on adolescents' media use were not followed by less sexual experience and less permissive attitudes. On the contrary, parental restrictive mediation of girls' media use unexpectedly was followed by somewhat more sexual experience. Friends' interventions with media use did not predict adolescents' sexual experience and attitudes neither. Inverse relationships showed that prior sexual experience was followed by less restrictive parental mediation among boys, and both among boys and girls that permissive sexual attitudes were followed by less restrictive and less active parental mediation. At the same time, sexually more experienced and more permissive boys and girls did report more media pressure from and sexual communication with their friends later on. Our study thus indicates that the opposite agent roles of parents and friends for adolescents also applies to their usage of sexual media.

Nikken P; de Graaf H

2013-11-01

220

As relações familiares do adolescente ofensor sexual/ Family relations of the sexual offender adolescent/ Adolescente ofensor sexual y família  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O texto trata de uma pesquisa qualitativa que enfoca o conhecimento das relações familiares do adolescente ofensor sexual, enfatizando as figuras da mãe e do pai, e se baseia nas entrevistas que antecedem o oferecimento de uma intervenção grupal, com os adolescentes e familiares. As entrevistas foram realizadas com sete adolescentes, entre 14 e 17 anos, e suas mães. Foram construídos três núcleos de resultados sobre: a interação familiar desse adolescente se or (more) ganiza para garantir a sobrevivência da família; esse adolescente apresenta uma intensa e paradoxal relação com sua mãe; e há uma relação extremamente pobre de convivência e vinculação afetiva com a figura paterna. Concluímos que a violência sexual intrafamiliar, cometida pelos adolescentes, está ligada à dinâmica afetiva familiar de distanciamento e autoritarismo. Uma melhor compreensão da violência presente nas relações familiares desse adolescente é fundamental, porque uma característica desses sujeitos é a falta de habilidade social, e esse aspecto provém de um processo pobre de vinculação com seus pais. Abstract in spanish El texto trata de una investigación cualitativa que enfoca el conocimiento de las relaciones familiares del adolescente ofensor sexual, enfatizando las figuras de la madre y del padre, y se basa en las entrevistas que anteceden el ofrecimiento de una intervención grupal, con los adolescentes y familiares. Las entrevistas fueron realizadas con siete adolescentes, entre 14 y 17 años, y sus madres. Fueron construidos tres núcleos de resultados sobre: la interacción fami (more) liar de ese adolescente se organiza para garantizar la supervivencia de la familia; ese adolescente presenta una intensa y paradoxal relación con su madre; y hay una relación extremamente pobre de convivencia y vinculación afectiva con la figura paterna. Concluimos que la violencia sexual intrafamiliar, cometida por los adolescentes, está asociada a la dinámica afectiva familiar de distanciamiento y autoritarismo. Una mejor comprensión de la violencia presente en las relaciones familiares de ese adolescente es fundamental, porque una característica de eses sujetos es la falta de habilidad social, y ese aspecto proviene de un proceso pobre de vinculación con sus padres. Abstract in english This text deals with a qualitative research about family relations of the sexual offender adolescent, with emphasis on the paternal figures, and is based on the interviews that precede the offer of a group intervention with the adolescents and their families. The interviews were conducted with seven adolescents and their mothers. Three nuclei results were interpreted: the family interaction of this adolescent is organized to guarantee the survival of the family; this adol (more) escent presents an intense and paradoxical relation with his mother; there is an extremely poor living relation and affective link with the father. We conclude that the intra-family sexual violence made by the adolescents is linked with the family affective dynamics of distance and authoritarianism. A better comprehension of the violence present in the family relations of this adolescent is of fundamental importance because one of their characteristics is the lack of social ability, which originates from a poor process of linking with their parents.

Costa, Liana Fortunato; Junqueira, Eika Lôbo; Meneses, Fernanda Figueiredo Falcomer; Stroher, Lucy Mary Cavalcanti

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
221

The Evaluation of Communication between Adolescent Girls and their Mothers Related to Sexual Issues  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AIM: This is done as a descriptive study with the purpose of evaluating the communication of female students with their mothers related to sexual issues, who are being educated in high schools in the municipal border of Sivas. METHODS: The universe includes 7202 female students who receive education in high schools in the municipal border of Sivas, sample covers 1045 students from this universe. Data was collected by using ?Personal Information Form? and ?The Evaluating Form of Communication of Adolescent Girls with Their Mothers Related to Sexual Issues? which is improved by researchers. Data is exhibited as frequency distribution and it is evaluated by using chi-square test. RESULTS: According to research findings, it was found that the communication between adolescent girls and their mothers about the subjects related to sexuality is not at the desired level. Mothers come third among the information resources from which the adolescent girls take information about subjects related to sexuality. The initial subjects that adolescent girls talk to their mothers are firstly menstruation (78.4 %), choosing a spouse (71.9 %), physical changes in puberty (68.0 %), flirtation (63.3 %) and engagement (60.2%). Additionally the initial subjects that adolescent girls do not talk to their mothers are; the structure and function of male organ (94.0 %), sexual relation (87.6 %), risky sexual behaviors (83.0 %), sexuality before marriage (78.6 %), ways of contraception (74.3 %), sexually transmitted infections (74.2 %). Mostly, adolescent girls indicate that the information about menstruation they take from their mothers is enough. CONCLUSION: According to findings obtained from researches, mothers have an important part among the sources that adolescent girls take information about the subjects related to sexuality, however, it is concluded that the communication between adolescent girls and their mothers about the subjects related to sexuality is not at the desired level. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(1.000): 27-36

Funda Bulut; Zehra Golbasi

2009-01-01

222

Factors associated with sexual debut during adolescence in the Republic of Korea.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with sexual debut among Korean adolescents. METHODS: Based on a 2008 cross-sectional nationwide online survey conducted in 75,238 Korean middle and high school students aged 12-18 years (39,278 boys and 35,960 girls), demographic profiles of the reproductive health and factors associated with sexual debut were analysed. RESULTS: The proportion of adolescents who had heterosexual intercourse was 5.1%. The cumulative proportion of sexual debut at age 18 was 20%, and the median age was 17 years. Overall, 0.2% of girls reported past pregnancies, while 8.8% of sexually active girls had ever been pregnant. A proportion of girls who underwent an induced abortion was 89.5%. Up to half (46.0% for boys and 48.3% for girls) never resorted to contraception during coitus. After adjusting for covariates, attendance at general and technical high school, low school record, drinking alcohol, smoking, drug use, high economic status and not living with both parents were associated with the increased proportion of sexual debut in both genders. By contrast, internet use was associated with a reduced risk of adolescent sexual debut. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the factors associated with sexual debut among Korean adolescents. This information may be helpful for the prevention of unprotected sexual debut and subsequent teenage pregnancy in adolescents who are susceptible to initiating sexual intercourse.

Lee DY; Moon JM; Lee IS; Suh CS; Choi D

2012-11-01

223

Socio-cultural challenges to sexual health education for female adolescents in Iran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Despite clear reasons for necessity of sexual health education for adolescents, it is a contested issue and has faced challenges in most cultures. Providing sexual education for non-married adolescents is culturally unacceptable in most Muslim societies. Objective: This qualitative study addressed socio-cultural challenges to sexual health education for female adolescents in Iran. Materials and Methods: Qualitative data from female adolescents (14-18 yr), mothers, teachers, authorities in health and education organizations, health care providers and clergies were collected in two large cities of Iran including Mashhad and Ahvaz through focus group discussions and individual in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis with MAXqda software. Results: Our results revealed that the main socio-cultural challenges to sexual health education for adolescents in Iran are affected by taboos surrounding sexuality. The emergent categories were: denial of premarital sex, social concern about negative impacts of sexual education, perceived stigma and embarrassment, reluctance to discuss sexual issues in public, sexual discussion as a socio-cultural taboo, lack of advocacy and legal support, intergenerational gap, religious uncertainties, and imitating non-Islamic patterns of education. Conclusion: It seems that cultural resistances are more important than religious prohibitions, and affect more the nature and content of sexual health education. However, despite existence of salient socio-cultural doubtful issues about sexual health education for adolescents, the emerging challenges are manageable to some extent. It is hoped that the acceptability of sexual health education for adolescents could be promoted through overcoming the cultural taboos and barriers as major obstacles.

Robab Latifnejad Roudsari; Mojgan Javadnoori; Marzieh Hasanpour; Seyyed Mohammad Mehdi Hazavehei; Ali Taghipour

2013-01-01

224

Estadísticas y trascendencia de la violencia sexual en menores Statistics and significance of sexual violence in minors  

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Full Text Available Hemos recopilado 58 casos de denuncias por violencia sexual en menores durante 8 años (1993-2001). Nos planteamos estudiar algunas variables, como la frecuencia a lo largo de los años o meses para poder objetivar incrementos del número de incidencias en algún período como los vacacionales o de otro tipo. También estudiamos, entre otras variables, las horas de la exploración, el estado civil de las madres o el origen de la denuncia, observando que es la propia menor la que relata lo sucedido en un 67% de los casos originando la denuncia. El tiempo transcurrido entre los hechos y la denuncia es muy variable, observándose que es más corto cuando el agresor es desconocido o no tiene relación de parentesco con la menor. Cuando es un familiar o el propio progenitor suele tardar años en revelar los hechos, probablemente hasta que la niña descubra que esas actividades son incorrectas e injustas o que pueda defenderse de su agresor. En nuestra investigación el perpetrador es conocido en un 88% de los casos, si bien se piensa que ocurre en todas las estratos sociales, pudiendo comprobar en este estudio una mayor frecuencia en el estatus social bajo, lo que podría interpretarse de muchas formas, bien porque ocurre menos en los niveles económicos altos, o porque en este estatus se denuncie menos. El estudio de nuestras observaciones son indicativos de que la marginalidad y la pobreza son frecuentes en este grupo de menores.We have compiled during eight years 58 cases on sexual violence allegations to minors. We have considered studying some variables like the incidence frequency throughout the years or months in order to assess if there was greater incidence in vacation periods, end-of-month, pay-check days, etc. We have also paid attention to other variables such as hours of the exploration; marital status of the mothers; origin of the allegation. For instance we have observed that it is the same minor who relates the allegation in 67% of the cases. The time elapsed between the event and the time a charge is presented varies widely, although it has been observed that it is shorter when the aggressor is not known or is not related to the minor. When it is a relative or the parent, it usually takes years for charges to be brought to justice, probably until the girl discovers that those activities are incorrect and unjust or she can defend herself against her aggressor. In our investigation the offender is known in 88% of the cases. Although sexual abuse can happen in all social classes, in this study we could verify that it is more frequent in deprived, poorer classes. This can be interpreted in many ways. Either it happens less in wealthier classes, or they prefer to keep it quiet in order to avoid public scrutiny. Nevertheless the study shows that social outcast and poverty are frequent in this group of minors.

M. L. Suárez Solá; F. J. González Delgado

2003-01-01

225

A content analysis of the prevalence and portrayal of sexual activity in adolescent literature.  

Science.gov (United States)

Most research on sexual content in the media has focused on visual images such as those in TV, film, advertisements, and magazines. However, researchers have largely overlooked sexual content in novels. The popularity of novels and the potential for such literature to educate teens on sexual behaviors merits a closer examination into the sexual messages contained in popular adolescent literature. This study content analyzes the top 40 novels targeting adolescents. Results show that adolescent novels are replete with sex-related information, especially in novels targeted to girls. These sexual behaviors range from passionate kissing and romantic ideation to sexual intercourse. Over one third of the instances focus on references to sex, suggestive innuendos, or sexual descriptions; and an additional one third of sexual behavior involved sexual affection in the form of passionate kissing, intimate touching, and playful sexual behavior. Across the 40 books, there were 56 instances of sexual intercourse, most of which involved unmarried couples (94%); and many were in non-committal relationships. Moreover, sexual material rarely dealt with issues of abstinence, safe sex practices, and the health risks associated with sex. PMID:21660836

Callister, Mark; Coyne, Sarah M; Stern, Lesa A; Stockdale, Laura; Miller, Malinda J; Wells, Brian M

2011-06-09

226

A content analysis of the prevalence and portrayal of sexual activity in adolescent literature.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Most research on sexual content in the media has focused on visual images such as those in TV, film, advertisements, and magazines. However, researchers have largely overlooked sexual content in novels. The popularity of novels and the potential for such literature to educate teens on sexual behaviors merits a closer examination into the sexual messages contained in popular adolescent literature. This study content analyzes the top 40 novels targeting adolescents. Results show that adolescent novels are replete with sex-related information, especially in novels targeted to girls. These sexual behaviors range from passionate kissing and romantic ideation to sexual intercourse. Over one third of the instances focus on references to sex, suggestive innuendos, or sexual descriptions; and an additional one third of sexual behavior involved sexual affection in the form of passionate kissing, intimate touching, and playful sexual behavior. Across the 40 books, there were 56 instances of sexual intercourse, most of which involved unmarried couples (94%); and many were in non-committal relationships. Moreover, sexual material rarely dealt with issues of abstinence, safe sex practices, and the health risks associated with sex.

Callister M; Coyne SM; Stern LA; Stockdale L; Miller MJ; Wells BM

2012-01-01

227

Genetic Influences on Adolescent Sexual Behavior: Why Genes Matter for Environmentally Oriented Researchers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There are dramatic individual differences among adolescents in how and when they become sexually active adults, and early sexual activity is frequently cited as a cause of concern for scientists, policymakers, and the general public. Understanding the causes and developmental impact of adolescent sexual activity can be furthered by considering genes as a source of individual differences. Quantitative behavioral genetics (i.e., twin and family studies) and candidate gene association studies now provide clear evidence for the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in adolescent sexual behavior and related phenotypes. Genetic influences on sexual behavior may operate through a variety of direct and indirect mechanisms, including pubertal development, testosterone levels, and dopaminergic systems. Genetic differences may be systematically associated with exposure to environments that are commonly treated as causes of sexual behavior (gene-environment correlation). Possible gene-environment correlations pose a serious challenge for interpreting the results of much behavioral research. Multivariate, genetically informed research on adolescent sexual behavior compares twins and family members as a form of quasi experiment: How do twins who differ in their sexual experiences differ in their later development? The small but growing body of genetically informed research has already challenged dominant assumptions regarding the etiology and sequelae of adolescent sexual behavior, with some studies indicating possible positive effects of teenage sexuality. Studies of Gene × Environment interaction may further elucidate the mechanisms by which genes and environments combine to shape the development of sexual behavior and its psychosocial consequences. Overall, the existence of heritable variation in adolescent sexual behavior has profound implications for environmentally oriented theory and research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Harden KP

2013-07-01

228

Negotiating the Confluence: Middle-Eastern, Immigrant, Sexual-Minority Men and Concerns for Learning and Identity  

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Full Text Available Sexual-minority male immigrants re-locating from the Middle East to the United States and Canada have particular experiences upon entry and integration into their new societies. The needs of learning and identity are highlighted through a multiple case approach involving three men. Interviews were conducted with the three participants, which were analyzed by the authors using qualitative case analysis. The data highlights the unmet expectations for life as a new immigrant, as well as the complexities of becoming involved in sexual-minority settings. Their learning experiences may be explained using a theoretical framework of transformative learning. These findings suggest that sexual-minority immigrants have complex needs, such as identifying with appropriate communities and deconstructing false representations of “gay rights” and citizenship in popular culture. Educational and social programs could address these needs when considering what might be important for immigrant adult learners.

Matthew A. Eichler; Robert C Mizzi

2013-01-01

229

The effects of sexual orientation on stress-reactive cortisol: are sexual minority women ruminative and men resilient?  

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Full Text Available Rationale/statement of the problem : Lesbian (L), gay (G), and bisexual (B) individuals frequently report heightened distress due to discrimination, yet investigations into their physiological stress responsivity are missing from the literature. Our group recently showed that disclosing one's sexual orientation corresponds with comparatively lower psychiatric symptoms and morning cortisol levels than those who remain “in the closet.” Extending from our earlier studies, the current study investigated whether sexual minorities might manifest differential cortisol levels than heterosexuals (Hs) in response to social-evaluative threat. Methods : Participants included 87 healthy adults (mean age 25, 54% men) identifying as L/G/B (n=46) or as Hs (n=41). Stress was induced using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), and 10 salivary cortisol samples were collected throughout a 2-hour afternoon visit. Results were analyzed through ANOVA split by sex with sexual orientation as the between-subject factor and cortisol as the with-subject factor while controlling for age, self-esteem, and disclosure status. Results : Results reveal that L/B women had higher cortisol levels than Hs women 40 min after stress exposure. As a group, G/B men had significantly lower cortisol levels in contrast to Hs men. The covarying effects of age, self-esteem, and disclosure status intermittingly contributed to time and group effects for both sexes. Conclusions : Our findings demonstrate that relative to Hs controls (1) L/B women displayed higher cortisol levels late after TSST exposure, whereas (2) G/B men displayed lower overall cortisol levels throughout testing. We previously reported that G/B men in our sample manifested lower depressive symptoms and allostatic load based on 20 biomarkers compared to Hs men. It is possible that G/B men who are able to successfully overcome stigma may be resistant to chronic stress and stress reactivity. Yet, the opposite might be true for L/B women who displayed heightened distress during recovery that may indicate ruminative processes. These results suggest that it is important to include intrasex variations such as sexual orientation as well as unique developmental challenges such as disclosure processes in future psychoneuroendocrine studies.

Robert-Paul Juster; Nathan G. Smith; Philip J. Johnson; Jean-Philippe Lefebvre-Louis; Marie-France Marin; Shireen Sindi; Jens C. Pruessner; Sonia J. Lupien

2012-01-01

230

A Pilot Evaluation of Older Adolescents' Sexual Reference Displays on Facebook  

Science.gov (United States)

Many older adolescents display sexual references on their social networking site profiles; this study investigated whether these references were associated with self-reported sexual intention, sexual experience or risky sexual behavior. We identified public Facebook profiles of undergraduate freshmen within one large US university Facebook network. Profile owners who displayed sexual references (Displayers) and did not display references (Non-Displayers) were invited to complete surveys. Surveys measured sexual intention using the Postponing Sexual Involvement (PSI) scale, and sexual experiences. A higher PSI score is inversely related to intention to initiate sexual intercourse. Of the 118 profiles that met inclusion criteria, 85 profile owners completed surveys. Profile owners were mostly female (56.5%) and Caucasian (67.1%). Mean PSI score for Displayers was 6.5+/?1.6, mean PSI score for Non-Displayers was 10.2+/?0.6 (p=0.02). There were no differences between Displayers and Non-Displayers regarding lifetime prevalence of sexual behavior, number of sexual partners or frequency of condom use. Display of sexual references on college freshmen’s Facebook profiles was positively associated with reporting intention to initiate sexual intercourse. Facebook profiles may present an innovative cultural venue to identify adolescents who are considering sexual activity and may benefit from targeted educational messages.

Moreno, Megan A.; Brockman, Libby; Wasserheit, Judith; Christakis, Dimitri A.

2012-01-01

231

Violência sexual contra crianças e adolescentes: características relativas à vitimização nas relações familiares/ Sexual abuse of children and adolescents: characteristics of sexual victimization in family relations  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O objetivo deste estudo é analisar as características relativas às vitimizações sexuais intrafamiliares cometidas contra grupos etários categorizados segundo o critério de idade estabelecido pelo Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente,atendidos no Centro de Referência da Criança e do Adolescente e nos Conselhos Tutelares de Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, no período de 1995 a 2000. Identificou-se 234 agressões cometidas por 217 agressores contra 210 famílias e 226 (more) vítimas. Foram vitimizadas 131 crianças (48,7%) e 95 adolescentes (41,2%) com predomínio do sexo feminino. Crianças com idade entre dez anos e um mês e 12 anos incompletos foram as mais atingidas (19,5%) e nos adolescentes, entre 12 e 14 anos completos (17,3%). A maioria das vítimas reside com famílias que possuem três (19,9%) ou quatro filhos (17,7%), sendo os primogênitos os mais agredidos (33,6%). Agressores únicos vitimizaram em sua maioria apenas uma vítima (86,7%). Pais (34,2%) e padrastos (30,3%) foram os que mais agrediram, com os primeiros vitimizando mais crianças (19,7%) e os segundos, adolescentes (17,1%). Abstract in english This study analyzes the characteristics of sexual abuse committed within the family against age groups classified according to the Brazilian Statute for Children and Adolescents (the prevailing legislation on matters pertaining to minors) and treated at the Reference Center for Children and Adolescents and the Guardianship Councils in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil, from 1995 to 2000. Some 234 abuses were identified, committed by 217 aggressors, against 210 fam (more) ilies and a total of 226 victims. A total of 131 children (48.7%) and 95 adolescents (41.2%), predominantly females, were victimized. Children ranging from 10 to 12 years were the most frequently abused (19.5%), as well as adolescents from 12 to 14 years old (17.3%). The majority of the victims live in families with 3 (19.9%) or 4 children (177%), and the firstborn are the most frequently abused (33.6%). The majority of aggressors who acted alone victimized only one individual (86.7%). Fathers (34.2%) and stepfathers (30.3%) were the most frequent aggressors, with the former victimizing more children (19.7%) and the latter adolescents (17.1%).

Ribeiro, Márcia Aparecida; Ferriani, Maria das Graças Carvalho; Reis, Jair Naves dos

2004-04-01

232

Violência sexual contra crianças e adolescentes: características relativas à vitimização nas relações familiares Sexual abuse of children and adolescents: characteristics of sexual victimization in family relations  

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Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar as características relativas às vitimizações sexuais intrafamiliares cometidas contra grupos etários categorizados segundo o critério de idade estabelecido pelo Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente,atendidos no Centro de Referência da Criança e do Adolescente e nos Conselhos Tutelares de Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, no período de 1995 a 2000. Identificou-se 234 agressões cometidas por 217 agressores contra 210 famílias e 226 vítimas. Foram vitimizadas 131 crianças (48,7%) e 95 adolescentes (41,2%) com predomínio do sexo feminino. Crianças com idade entre dez anos e um mês e 12 anos incompletos foram as mais atingidas (19,5%) e nos adolescentes, entre 12 e 14 anos completos (17,3%). A maioria das vítimas reside com famílias que possuem três (19,9%) ou quatro filhos (17,7%), sendo os primogênitos os mais agredidos (33,6%). Agressores únicos vitimizaram em sua maioria apenas uma vítima (86,7%). Pais (34,2%) e padrastos (30,3%) foram os que mais agrediram, com os primeiros vitimizando mais crianças (19,7%) e os segundos, adolescentes (17,1%).This study analyzes the characteristics of sexual abuse committed within the family against age groups classified according to the Brazilian Statute for Children and Adolescents (the prevailing legislation on matters pertaining to minors) and treated at the Reference Center for Children and Adolescents and the Guardianship Councils in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil, from 1995 to 2000. Some 234 abuses were identified, committed by 217 aggressors, against 210 families and a total of 226 victims. A total of 131 children (48.7%) and 95 adolescents (41.2%), predominantly females, were victimized. Children ranging from 10 to 12 years were the most frequently abused (19.5%), as well as adolescents from 12 to 14 years old (17.3%). The majority of the victims live in families with 3 (19.9%) or 4 children (177%), and the firstborn are the most frequently abused (33.6%). The majority of aggressors who acted alone victimized only one individual (86.7%). Fathers (34.2%) and stepfathers (30.3%) were the most frequent aggressors, with the former victimizing more children (19.7%) and the latter adolescents (17.1%).

Márcia Aparecida Ribeiro; Maria das Graças Carvalho Ferriani; Jair Naves dos Reis

2004-01-01

233

Co-morbid disorders and sexual risk behavior in Nigerian adolescents with bipolar disorder  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent onset bipolar disorder often presents with co-morbid disorders of which psychoactive substance use disorders are notable. Mania symptoms and co-morbid psychoactive substance use disorders prone adolescents with bipolar disorder to impulsivity, impaired judgment, and risk taking behavior which often includes sexual risk behavior. There are dearth of information on pattern of co-morbid disorders and sexual risk behavior in adolescent onset bipolar disorder in Nigeria. This study assessed the prevalence and pattern of co-morbid disorders and determined associated factors of sexual risk behavior among adolescents with bipolar disorder. Methods Socio-demographic information was obtained from the adolescents using socio-demographic questionnaire. Clinical interview, physical examination and laboratory investigations were employed to establish co-morbid disorders in these adolescents during the outpatient follow up visits over a one year period. Results A total of forty six (46) adolescents with bipolar disorder were followed up over a one year period. Twenty two (47.8%) of the adolescents had co-morbid disorders with cannabis use disorders, alcohol use disorders, conduct disorder with or without other psychoactive substance use accounting for 23.9%, 8.7%, 13.0% respectively and HIV infection, though a chance finding accounting for 2.2%. Twenty one (45.7%) of the adolescents had positive history of sexual risk behavior, which was significantly associated with presence of co-morbid disorders (p = 0.003), level of religion activities in the adolescents (p = 0.000), and marital status of the parents (p = 0.021). Conclusion When planning interventions for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, special attention may need to be focused on group of adolescents with co-morbid disorders and propensity towards impulsivity and sexual risk behavior. This may help in improving long term outcome in this group of adolescents.

Bakare Muideen O; Agomoh Ahamefule O; Ebigbo Peter O; Onyeama Gabriel M; Eaton Julian; Onwukwe Jojo U; Okonkwo Kevin O

2009-01-01

234

Shared social and emotional activities within adolescent romantic and non-romantic sexual relationships.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Typically, "non-romantic" sexual relationships are assumed to be casual; however, the emotional and social distinctions between romantic and non-romantic contexts are not well understood, particularly in adolescence. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) was used to compare shared emotional (e.g., telling partner that they love her/him) and social (e.g., going out in a group) activities within romantic and non-romantic sexual relationships. Adolescents who reported exclusively romantic sexual relationships (n = 1,891) shared more emotional, but not social, activities with their partners than adolescents who were in non-romantic sexual relationships (n = 315; small effect size, r = .07-.13), akin to adolescents who experienced both relationship types (n = 519; small-to-medium effect size, r = .18-.38). Girls shared more emotional and social activities with their partners than boys when in romantic relationships (small effect size, r = .06-.10); there were no significant gender differences within non-romantic sexual relationships. Findings suggest that gendered scripts remain for sexual relationships that are romantic but not for those that are non-romantic. Notably, for the majority of adolescents, non-romantic relationships still held many emotional and social dimensions typical of romantic relationships and differences between relationship types were small. Although non-romantic relationships were less intimate than romantic sexual relationships, there was remarkable heterogeneity within this relationship type. Caution is advised when working with adolescents engaged in "casual" sexual relationships. Understanding the complexity of adolescent sexual relationships is critical for the advancement of effective sex education programming.

Williams LR; Russell ST

2013-05-01

235

Shared social and emotional activities within adolescent romantic and non-romantic sexual relationships.  

Science.gov (United States)

Typically, "non-romantic" sexual relationships are assumed to be casual; however, the emotional and social distinctions between romantic and non-romantic contexts are not well understood, particularly in adolescence. Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) was used to compare shared emotional (e.g., telling partner that they love her/him) and social (e.g., going out in a group) activities within romantic and non-romantic sexual relationships. Adolescents who reported exclusively romantic sexual relationships (n = 1,891) shared more emotional, but not social, activities with their partners than adolescents who were in non-romantic sexual relationships (n = 315; small effect size, r = .07-.13), akin to adolescents who experienced both relationship types (n = 519; small-to-medium effect size, r = .18-.38). Girls shared more emotional and social activities with their partners than boys when in romantic relationships (small effect size, r = .06-.10); there were no significant gender differences within non-romantic sexual relationships. Findings suggest that gendered scripts remain for sexual relationships that are romantic but not for those that are non-romantic. Notably, for the majority of adolescents, non-romantic relationships still held many emotional and social dimensions typical of romantic relationships and differences between relationship types were small. Although non-romantic relationships were less intimate than romantic sexual relationships, there was remarkable heterogeneity within this relationship type. Caution is advised when working with adolescents engaged in "casual" sexual relationships. Understanding the complexity of adolescent sexual relationships is critical for the advancement of effective sex education programming. PMID:23297147

Williams, Lela Rankin; Russell, Stephen T

2013-01-08

236

The role of family conflict on risky sexual behavior in adolescents aged 15 to 21.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Family conflict is related to numerous risky behavioral outcomes during adolescence; however, few studies have examined how family conflict is associated with risky sexual behavior during adolescence. METHODS: Data from 1104 adolescents aged 15 to 21 who completed the 2008 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were analyzed. Information on family conflict (family fighting and family criticizing) and sexual behavior (number of sexual partners in past year and use of contraception at last intercourse) was self-reported. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjustment, adolescents whose family members often fought had increased odds of not using contraception at last intercourse and having two or more sexual partners in the past year (OR, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.04-1.88] and OR, 1.62 [95% CI, 1.23-2.14], respectively). Adolescents whose family members often criticized each other also had increased odds of not using contraception at last intercourse and having two or more sexual partners in the past year (OR, 1.46 [95% CI, 1.12-1.90] and OR, 1.22 [95% CI, 0.96-1.55], respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Family conflict was associated with risky sexual behaviors in this racially/ethnically diverse sample of adolescents. If confirmed in other studies, adolescents who experience family conflict may be an important population to target with information regarding safer sex practices.

Lyerly JE; Brunner Huber LR

2013-04-01

237

A prospective study of perinatal depression and trauma history in pregnant minority adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Adolescent pregnancy is common and minority adolescents are at high risk. We sought the following: (1) to prospectively assess prevalence of antenatal depression (AND) and postpartum depression (PPD) in minority adolescents and (2) to examine the association of social support and adjustment, trauma, and stress on depression status. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 212 pregnant adolescents were recruited from public prenatal clinics and administered a prospective research survey during pregnancy and 6 weeks' postpartum. Depression was measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariable analyses were performed using logistic regression to assess predictors of AND and PPD. RESULTS: In our cohort, 20% screened positive for AND and 10% for PPD. The strongest predictor of PPD was AND (odds ratio [OR], 4.89; P < .001). Among adolescents with trauma history, there was a 5-fold increase (OR, 5.01) in the odds of AND and a 4-fold increase (OR, 3.76) in the odds of PPD. AND was associated with the adolescent's poor social adjustment (P < .001), perceived maternal stress (P < .001), less social support (P < .001), and a less positive view of pregnancy (P < .001). PPD was significantly associated with primiparity (P = .002), poor social adjustment (P < .001), less social support and involvement of the baby's father (P < .001), and less positive view of pregnancy (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Significant independent risk factors for PPD include AND, view of pregnancy, and social support. Trauma history was highly prevalent and strongly predicted AND and PPD. Point prevalence decreased postpartum, and this may be due to transient increased social support following the birth, warranting longer follow-up and development of appropriate interventions in future work.

Meltzer-Brody S; Bledsoe-Mansori SE; Johnson N; Killian C; Hamer RM; Jackson C; Wessel J; Thorp J

2013-03-01

238

Is increased sexual behavior a symptom of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents?  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract While there is consensus that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents, its diagnostic criteria are debated. Excessive sexual behavior has been reported in youth who may have juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD), and has been termed "hypersexuality." Although there is no universal definition of this term, this observation has led to a hypothesis that increased sexual behavior characterizes the bipolar syndrome in children and adolescents, and differentiates it from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although this hypothesis is plausible, evidence for it is incomplete, because testing it definitively would require both establishing a standard definition of hypersexuality in children and adolescents, and also reaching consensus about the other nonsexual criteria for pediatric bipolar disorder. In addition, studies to test it would need to control factors other than JBD that are known to increase sexual behavior in children and adolescents. These include sexual abuse and related posttraumatic stress disorder, excessive exposure to sexual stimuli, psychiatric illness in general, and social variables such as family chaos and social stress. Some of these factors might increase sexual behavior in youth with bipolar disorder through psychodynamic mechanisms rather than as a result of the illness itself. Therefore, further research is needed to determine whether increased sexual behavior can serve as a diagnostically valuable criterion for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, and whether it differentiates the disorder from other conditions known to be associated with increased sexual behavior in youth. PMID:24001164

Adelson, Stewart; Bell, Robinette; Graff, Adam; Goldenberg, David; Haase, Elizabeth; Downey, Jennifer I; Friedman, Richard C

2013-01-01

239

Is increased sexual behavior a symptom of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

While there is consensus that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents, its diagnostic criteria are debated. Excessive sexual behavior has been reported in youth who may have juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD), and has been termed "hypersexuality." Although there is no universal definition of this term, this observation has led to a hypothesis that increased sexual behavior characterizes the bipolar syndrome in children and adolescents, and differentiates it from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although this hypothesis is plausible, evidence for it is incomplete, because testing it definitively would require both establishing a standard definition of hypersexuality in children and adolescents, and also reaching consensus about the other nonsexual criteria for pediatric bipolar disorder. In addition, studies to test it would need to control factors other than JBD that are known to increase sexual behavior in children and adolescents. These include sexual abuse and related posttraumatic stress disorder, excessive exposure to sexual stimuli, psychiatric illness in general, and social variables such as family chaos and social stress. Some of these factors might increase sexual behavior in youth with bipolar disorder through psychodynamic mechanisms rather than as a result of the illness itself. Therefore, further research is needed to determine whether increased sexual behavior can serve as a diagnostically valuable criterion for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, and whether it differentiates the disorder from other conditions known to be associated with increased sexual behavior in youth.

Adelson S; Bell R; Graff A; Goldenberg D; Haase E; Downey JI; Friedman RC

2013-01-01

240

Sexual risk assessment using event history calendars with male and female adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to explore male and female adolescents' perceptions of and differences in Event History Calendar (EHC) sexual risk assessment in a clinical setting. METHOD: This study is a secondary analysis exploring male and female qualitative data from a mixed methods study of adolescent and provider communication. Participants included 30 sexually active 15- to 19-year-old male (n = 11) and female (n = 19) patients at a school-linked clinic. The adolescents completed a pre-clinic visit EHC and then discussed it with a nurse practitioner during their visit. The adolescents shared their perceptions of the EHCs in a post-clinic visit interview. RESULTS: Constant comparative analyses revealed gender differences in: (a) adolescents' perceptions of how EHCs helped report, reflect on, and discuss sexual risk histories; (b) how adolescents self-administered EHCs; and (c) the histories they reported. DISCUSSION: The EHC was well received by both male and female adolescents, resulting in a more complete sexual risk history disclosure. Self-administration of the EHC is recommended for all adolescents, but further sexual risk assessment by nurse practitioners who use EHCs is needed.

Martyn KK; Saftner MA; Darling-Fisher CS; Schell MC

2013-11-01

 
 
 
 
241

Forensic and medical evaluation of sexual abuse at adolescence, multidisciplinary approach  

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Full Text Available Adolescence is defined as the period of transition from childhood to adulthood in terms of physical, sexual, cognitive and psychosocial development. Adolescence period can be investigated in three phases which are early adolescence, middle adolescence and late adolescence. Physical and mental maturity is reached in late adolescence and the sexual behavior of the child changes from individual to socially shared relationships. There are some researches which show the increase of sexual abuse in adolescence. In these researches, importance of forensic and medical evaluation is emphasized in situations where sexual abuse of a psychosocially immature child by an adult exists. During forensic and medical evaluation, protecting every kind of material which can be used as medical evidence, and structuring the inspection as soon as possible is very important in order to not only preserve the rights of the attacked person, but also to identify the attacker. In forensic and medical evaluation, preparation of judicial report by doctors, who were assigned as medical referees, collaborating with doctors from different specialty areas in medicine is very important. During the evaluation of physical and mental symptoms in the sexually abused adolescent forensic and psychiatric examination is also needed. To be able to reintegrate child to the society, carrying out the medicalevaluation by an experienced team composed of forensic science experts, psychiatrists, psychologists, pedagogues, and social service experts is very important. (Turk Arch Ped 2011; 46 Suppl: 35-8)

?evki

2011-01-01

242

Symptomatology in Adolescents Following Initial Disclosure of Sexual Abuse: The Roles of Crisis Support, Appraisals and Coping  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: The present study examined possible explanations for symptom development and variability in sexually abused adolescents. A theoretical model of sexual abuse, in which appraisal, coping and crisis support play prominent roles, was tested in a clinical group of 100 sexually abused adolescents. Method: Participants, aged 12-18 years,…

Bal, Sarah; Crombez, Geert; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Van Oost, Paulette

2009-01-01

243

The Association of Sexual Behaviors with Socioeconomic Status, Family Structure, and Race/Ethnicity among U.S. Adolescents.  

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Assessed the relationship of socioeconomic status (SES), family structure, and race/ethnicity to adolescent sexual behaviors that are key determinants of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Data from the 1992 Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that differences in adolescent sexual behavior by race and SES were not large enough to…

Santelli, John S.; Lowry, Richard; Brener, Nancy D.; Robin, Leah

2000-01-01

244

Adolescent sexual offender recidivism: success of specialized treatment and implications for risk prediction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the success of specialized community-based treatment for reducing adolescent sexual reoffending and explore the predictive utility of variables assessed regarding sexual and nonsexual recidivism. METHOD: Recidivism data (criminal charges) were collected for 58 offenders participating in at least 12 months of specialized treatment at the SAFE-T Program. Data were also collected for a comparison group of 90 adolescents who received only an assessment (n = 46), refused treatment (n = 17), or dropped out before 12 months (n = 27). Follow-up interval ranged from 2 to 10 years (M = 6.23, SD = 2.02). Offenders completed a battery of psychological tests to provide standardized data regarding social, sexual, and family functioning. RESULTS: Recidivism rates for sexual, violent nonsexual, and nonviolent offenses for treated adolescents were 5.17%, 18.9%, and 20.7%, respectively. The Comparison group had significantly higher rates of sexual (17.8%), violent nonsexual (32.2%), and nonviolent (50%) recidivism. Sexual recidivism was predicted by sexual interest in children. Nonsexual recidivism was related to factors commonly predictive of general delinquency such as history of previous offenses, low self-esteem, and antisocial personality. CONCLUSIONS: Results support the efficacy of treatment for adolescent sexual offenders and are consistent with the notion that sexual recidivism is predicted by unique factors unrelated to general (nonsexual) reoffending.

Worling JR; Curwen T

2000-07-01

245

Identifying key topics for a description of sexual behavior among Danish adolescents: A qualitative study.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background: Surveying sexual behavior in the general population serves to identify critical points, monitor the effects, and interpret changes in the spread of sexually transmitted infection. Aim: The aim of this qualitative study was to identify points of particular importance to adolescentssexual behavior in order to initiate and design a behavior surveillance programme in Denmark. Methods: We conducted four semi-structured focus group interviews with a total of 19 sexually experienced adolescents aged 18 to 23. Boys and girls were interviewed separately. Each group contained pupils from one Danish Folk High School, but with different social and educational backgrounds. The interview guide was developed from literature reviews and hypotheses based on years of experience with sexually transmitted infections. Data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative description. Results: Four major categories of risk behavior were identified: Alcohol consumption is associated with “no condom use”, Nights on the town and meetings in foreign counties or at festivals are associated with one night stands and often lead to unsafe sex, Low self-esteem increases the risk of pushing one’s personal boundaries, thus resulting in promiscuous sexual behavior and Increased sexual experience is associated with lack of condom use. Conclusion: Danish adolescents identified four key elements that could lead to unsafe sex. These results differed slightly from our expectations and will be included in a sexual behavior questionnaire to describe important elements influencing the sexual behavior of Adolescents.

JØrgensen, Marianne Johansson; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

246

Diabetes in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities: barriers to education, treatment and good metabolic control  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

AIM: This paper reports an investigation to establish whether metabolic control is different in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities with type 1 diabetes compared with young Danish patients, and to learn about factors affecting their opportunities to achieve good metabolic control. BACKGROUND: The prevalence of diabetes in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities in Denmark is increasing. Having a different ethnic background has frequently been described as a risk factor for poor metabolic control, but whether the risk is represented by the ethnicity and immigration itself or in combination with other factors is unclear. METHODS: The study included data (gender, age, diabetes duration HbA(1c), number of incidents of severe hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis) from a national register including 919 Danish and 58 children and adolescents from ethnic minorities, questionnaires to all 20 Danish paediatric diabetes centres and questionnaires to 38 families of other ethnic backgrounds completed by professional interpreters. The study was conducted in 2001-2002. RESULTS: HbA(1c) was significantly higher in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities (mean 9.05 +/- 1.4%) compared with Danish patients (mean 8.62 +/- 1.3%; P = 0.018). There was no significant difference in HbA(1c) among the different ethnic groups, nor in the prevalence of severe hypoglycaemia or ketoacidosis. Patients from different ethnic minorities were unevenly distributed throughout the country, and generally the centres provided limited specialized knowledge and support. The questionnaires completed by the parents revealed limited schooling, lack of professional education and a major need for interpreters; these characteristics were especially prevalent among the mothers. CONCLUSIONS: Young patients from ethnic minorities have significantly poorer metabolic control compared with Danish patients, and patients with an immigrant background are seen as a vulnerable group with different needs and probably fewer chances of achieving good control. Special education for health care professionals as well as projects to improve methods, quality and knowledge should be encouraged in order to provide tailored support to members of individual ethnic groups. We recommend that the use of professional interpreters should become the gold standard in health care provision to all immigrant families.

Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe

2005-01-01

247

A review of parenting and adolescent sexual behavior: the moderating role of gender.  

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In spite of the established link between parenting and adolescent sexual risk behavior, less is known about the role of adolescent gender as a potential moderator of this association. This literature review integrates findings from 24 studies to examine gender as a moderator of the link between parenting and youth sexual risk behavior. Despite the wide variability in methodology across the reviewed studies, findings suggest that monitoring may be more protective against sexual risk behavior for boys than girls, whereas parental warmth and emotional connection may be an especially salient factor for girls. The results of this review support further research on gender as an important factor in better understanding the role of parenting in the development of adolescent sexual behavior. Furthermore, the findings highlight the potential role of gender-specific, tailored family-focused prevention programs targeting sexual behavior. PMID:22366393

Kincaid, Carlye; Jones, Deborah J; Sterrett, Emma; McKee, Laura

2012-02-09

248

A review of parenting and adolescent sexual behavior: the moderating role of gender.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In spite of the established link between parenting and adolescent sexual risk behavior, less is known about the role of adolescent gender as a potential moderator of this association. This literature review integrates findings from 24 studies to examine gender as a moderator of the link between parenting and youth sexual risk behavior. Despite the wide variability in methodology across the reviewed studies, findings suggest that monitoring may be more protective against sexual risk behavior for boys than girls, whereas parental warmth and emotional connection may be an especially salient factor for girls. The results of this review support further research on gender as an important factor in better understanding the role of parenting in the development of adolescent sexual behavior. Furthermore, the findings highlight the potential role of gender-specific, tailored family-focused prevention programs targeting sexual behavior.

Kincaid C; Jones DJ; Sterrett E; McKee L

2012-04-01

249

[The sexual behavior of adolescents in some schools in the city of Embu, Sao Paulo, Brazil].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

It is a descriptive, qualitative study aimed at identifying some aspects related to teenagers' sexual behavior. The subjects of the study were 920 adolescents aged 10 to 19, who were attending primary and secondary schools in the region of Santo Eduardo, municipality of Embu, São Paulo, Brazil. The data were collected through a questionnaire with 28 structured questions. The results show that 77% of adolescents liked their bodies, 71% looked for information about sexuality, and 35% thought their parents were the primary source of information; 26% of them said they had an active sexual life, 79% had had the first sexual intercourse at the age of 14 or younger, and 81% used condoms. The results of the study emphasize the importance of providing sexual guidance for adolescents in order to encourage prevention attitudes.

Brêtas JR; Ohara CV; Jardim DP

2008-12-01

250

Education and Sexuality: Towards Addressing Adolescents’ Reproductive Health Needs in Nigeria  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the crucial role of sexuality education in addressing adolescents’ reproductive health needs within the backdrops of immense challenges in Nigerian environment. Young people have been well documented as a special need group in the area of reproductive health. Adolescent sexuality and reproductive health are important contemporary concerns especially for reproductive health problems such as early marriage, unintended/unwanted pregnancy, maternal mortality and sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS. A large number of adolescents in Nigeria decide to be more sexually active without access to preventive measure, such as condoms or family planning devices and thus face undesired consequences, including unwanted pregnancies, Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs), including the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the social consequences of both. In fact, adolescents have a higher prevalence of most reproductive health problems because of lack of information and poor access to service. However, one of the 2004 Nigerian National Population Policy objectives is increasing the integration of adolescents and young people into development efforts and effectively addressing their reproductive health and related needs. The study, which relies mainly on secondary data, examines the crucial role and benefits of sexuality education against the backdrops of the challenges including reaching the youths with sexuality and reproductive information and service, or motivating them to change behavior in the light of new information and awareness, more institutional support and creating the social and economic climate, which will make the desired changes possible and sustainable. The author contends that it is a violation of ones fundamental human rights and freedom guaranteed by numerous international, regional and national policies as well as legal instruments when attempts are made to control rather than educate people to freely express their sexuality positively and in good health. Thus, there is need for all stakeholders to acknowledge the reality of adolescent sexuality and teach them how to be healthy sexual beings without endangering themselves and others.

James Godswill

2012-01-01

251

Psychological disidentification with the academic domain among ethnic minority adolescents in The Netherlands.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Among ethnic minority group adolescents, experiences with discrimination and prejudice in school settings are thought to lead to a defensive detachment of the self from the school domain. That is, these adolescents may disengage their self-feelings from their academic performances causing the academic self to become a less important part of global self-worth. However, there is limited empirical evidence for this assumption and the existing research is on African American students. AIMS: To examine among ethnic minority adolescents in the Netherlands the hypothesis that under conditions of perceived discrimination minority group members tend to psychologically disengage their self-feelings from educational performance. SAMPLES: Study 1 was conducted among 161 Turkish students between 13 and 16 years of age. The sample in Study 2 consisted of 112 Turkish participants of 11 and 12 years of age. METHODS: Two questionnaire studies were conducted and participants responded to questions on perceived academic performance, academic self-esteem, global self-worth and perceived discrimination in school. RESULTS: In both studies, academic self-esteem mediated the relationship between perceived educational performance and feelings of global self-worth. More importantly, perceived discrimination in school moderated the relationship between academic self-esteem and global self-worth. Discrimination did not moderate the relationship between academic performance and academic self-esteem. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that for ethnic minorities perceived discrimination in school can lead to psychological disidentification from the academic domain whereby global self-worth is less based on performances and competencies in the academic domain.

Verkuyten M; Thijs J

2004-03-01

252

Sexual activity of adolescent school girls in an urban secondary school in cameroon.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to describe the extent of sexual activity in adolescent school girls. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study with prolective collection of data carried out at Lycée General Leclerc, Yaounde (Cameroon), from October 1 to November 30, 2011. Heterosexual coitus was considered as sexual activity. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was proposed to all consenting girl students aged 10 to 19 years. The data were analyzed using Epi Info 3.2.1 and Microsoft Excel 2007 software. RESULTS: Of the 2660 students who responded to the questionnaire, 21.3% (566) admitted being sexually active. Out of these, 64.3% (364) were aged between 10 and 16 years at their first heterosexual contact. The mean age at the first sexual intercourse was 15.3 years. Although 56.4% (319) of the sexually active respondents had only one sexual partner, 43.6% (247) of them had at least two partners. Sexual activity was occasional in 71.4% of those being sexually active. Meanwhile, 52.1% (295) of the sexually active adolescent girls used condoms during sexual intercourse, 41.5% (235) did so occasionally, and 6.4% (36) had regular unprotected sex. CONCLUSION: More than one-fifth of adolescent girls were sexually active in this study. Sexual intercourse started mostly at the age of 16 or less, and it was mostly occasional. Half of the cases had multiple sexual partners, and half were not using condoms during sexual intercourse. We, thus, recommend the implementation of interventions aimed at delaying the age of the first sexual intercourse and accessibility of condoms to students in this setting.

Foumane P; Chiabi A; Kamdem C; Monebenimp F; Dohbit JS; Mbu RE

2013-04-01

253

The influence of general identity disturbance on reports of lifetime substance use disorders and related outcomes among sexual minority adults with a history of substance use.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Previous research has shown that sexual minority (i.e., nonheterosexual) individuals report increased problematic substance use involvement, compared with their sexual majority counterparts. We hypothesize that feelings of an unstable sense of self (i.e., identity disturbance) may potentially drive problematic substance use. The purpose of the current study is to examine identity disturbance among sexual minorities as a potential explanatory mechanism of increased sexual minority lifetime rates of substance dependence. Measures of identity disturbance and three indicators of sexual orientation from lifetime female (n = 16,629) and male (n = 13,553) alcohol/illicit drug users in Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) were examined. Findings generally showed that the increased prevalence of alcohol dependence, illicit drug dependence, and combined alcohol/illicit drug dependence as well as a younger age of alcohol use initiation among sexual minority women was associated with elevated levels of identity disturbance. The results were consistent with a mediational role for identity disturbance in explaining the association between sexual minority status and substance dependence and were generally replicated among male sexual minority respondents. The current research suggests that identity disturbance, a predictor of substance use, may contribute to heightened risk for substance dependence among certain subgroups of sexual minority individuals.

Talley AE; Tomko RL; Littlefield AK; Trull TJ; Sher KJ

2011-09-01

254

Sexually transmitted infections associated with vulvovaginal symptoms in adolescents denying sexual activity Infecciones de transmisión sexual asociadas a síntomas vulvovaginales en adolescentes que niegan vida sexual activa  

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Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify clinical, laboratory and ultrasonographic evidence of a probable sexually transmitted infection associated with vulvovaginal symptoms in adolescents denying sexual activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The medical records of female adolescents, aged 10-18 years were reviewed. These women received first-time medical care for vulvovaginitis, between 1995 and 1999 at Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, (Children's Hospital). Comparisons between groups were performed, as appropriate, by the unpaired Student's t-test, the Z test or the chi-square test; statistically significant differences were set at a two-tailed pOBJETIVO: Identificar datos clínicos, de laboratorio y ultrasonográficos que permitan el diagnóstico de una infección de transmisión sexual asociada a síntomas vulvovaginales en las pacientes adolescentes que niegan vida sexual activa. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se revisaron los expedientes de las adolescentes de 10 a 18 años de edad que requirieron atención médica de primera vez por vulvovaginitis entre 1995 y 1999 en el Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Las comparaciones entre grupos se llevaron a cabo con la prueba t de Student, la prueba de Z, o la de ji-cuadrada. Se utilizó un valor de p<0.05 para establecer diferencias estadísticamente significativas. Se calcularon razones de momios con intervalos de confianza de 95%. RESULTADOS: De 258 adolescentes, en 53 (20.5%) se identificó un microrganismo de transmisión sexual y 52 de ellas negaron tener vida sexual activa. No hubo diferencias estadísticas entre los dos grupos de adolescentes en cuanto a la edad, los años de estudio, el nivel socioeconómico, la maduración sexual y la presencia de menarquia. El dolor abdominal en los cuadrantes inferiores, la coloración anormal de la secreción vaginal, un cultivo urinario positivo y un estudio ultrasonográfico abdominal compatible con enfermedad pélvica inflamatoria estuvieron asociados con infección de transmisión sexual. Con el estudio ultrasonográfico se obtuvo una razón de momios de 144.8 (intervalo de confianza 95% 51.0 a 411.3). CONCLUSIONES: Se demostró una asociación entre infección de transmisión sexual en adolescentes con vulvovaginitis y dolor abdominal bajo, secreción vaginal anormal, urocultivo positivo y un estudio ultrasonográfico compatible con enfermedad pélvica inflamatoria.

Elizabeth Velarde-Jurado; Elizabeth Estrada-Reyes; Luis Eraña-Guerra; Atlántida Raya-Rivera; E Yadira Velázquez-Armenta; Alejandro A Nava-Ocampo

2003-01-01

255

Gender and the influence of peer alcohol consumption on adolescent sexual activity  

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I consider the alcohol consumption of opposite-gender peers as explanatory to adolescent sexual intercourse and demonstrate that female sexual activity is higher where there is higher alcohol consumption among male peers. This relationship is robust to school fixed effects, cannot be explained by br...

Waddell, Glen R.

256

Signs of Resilience in Sexually Abused Adolescent Girls in the Foster Care System  

Science.gov (United States)

In a sample of 99 sexually abused adolescent girls in the foster care system (64% in congregate living situations and 36% in family/foster care homes), nearly half were psychologically functioning well despite having experienced moderate-to-severe emotional, physical, and sexual abuse. It was hypothesized that these girls with resilient…

Edmond, Tonya; Auslander, Wendy; Elze, Diane; Bowland, Sharon

2006-01-01

257

[Use of condoms among Mexican adolescents for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the current sexual behavior and condom use during the first sexual intercourse among adolescents, as well as variations and factors influencing condom use at first sexual intercourse. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The data source for this study was Mexico's National Health Survey 2000. Study subjects were male and female adolescents aged 12 to 19 years (n = 16,258). Statistical analysis consisted of descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression, to assess the association of four types of factors (demographic, socioeconomic, cultural, and cognitive) with condom use during the first sexual intercourse. RESULTS: Males and residents of urban areas reported greater sexual activity and condom use. Typically, adolescents who used condoms during the first sexual intercourse were male, older, resided in urban areas, non-speakers of an indigenous language, and with higher schooling. CONCLUSIONS: New policies should be framed to prevent sexually transmitted infections to span the gap between knowledge and practice, targeting adolescents starting sexual activity earlier, those who speak an indigenous language, living in rural areas, with less schooling, and females. The English version of this paper is available too at:http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

Gayet C; Juárez F; Pedrosa LA; Magis C

2003-01-01

258

"Running a Train": Adolescent Boys' Accounts of Sexual Intercourse Involving Multiple Males and One Female  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors used qualitative research methods to explore the context and sexual risk behavior associated with sexual intercourse involving multiple males and one female, commonly called "running a train." Participants were 20 adolescent males aged 14 to 22 years who were either perpetrators of dating violence or perceived by teachers to be at risk…

Rothman, Emily F.; Decker, Michele R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Raj, Anita; Silverman, Jay G.; Miller, Elizabeth

2008-01-01

259

Prevalence of child sexual abuse among adolescents in Geneva: results of a cross sectional survey.  

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OBJECTIVE--To measure the cumulative prevalence of child sexual abuse in a representative sample of the adolescent population of Geneva. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey with an anonymous self administered questionnaire centred on a factual description of sexual activities. SETTING--68 classes (17 sch...

Halpérin, D. S.; Bouvier, P.; Jaffé, P. D.; Mounoud, R. L.; Pawlak, C. H.; Laederach, J.; Wicky, H. R.; Astié, F.

260

Developmental assets and age of first sexual intercourse among adolescent African American males in Mobile, Alabama  

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Full Text Available Background and Aims: Younger age at first sexual intercourse is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. We aimed to gain a clearer understanding of a wide range of individual, family and social factors that may influence sexual behavior of children and adolescents. Specifically, we examined the relationships of developmental assets with age of first sexual intercourse among a large sample (n = 1061) of adolescent African American males living in low-income neighborhoods in Mobile, Alabama. Methods: Using the Developmental Asset Model as a theoretical guide, we selected variables from adolescent survey data and conducted logistic regression analysis to determine predictors of early age of first sexual intercourse. Results: Nearly one half (49%) of the male survey participants reported that they first had sexual intercourse at the age of 12 or younger. The total number of assets was the strongest predictor of later age (13 years old or later) of first sexual intercourse (OR 1.49, 95% CI = 1.09, 2.04), followed by decision-making skills (OR 1.40, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.86), and positive view of the future (OR 1.36, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.74). Conclusion: There are several developmental assets related to the age of first sexual intercourse. This study found support for the Developmental Asset Model as a framework for promoting sexual and overall adolescent health. Recommendations for asset-building among this population are discussed.

Shannon Talbott; Jessica W. Henderson; Linda Stonecipher; John Bolland; Brad Lian

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Developmental Trajectory of Sexual Risk Behaviors from Adolescence to Young Adulthood  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the trajectories of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents from ages 15 to 23 and factors associated with those trajectories. The sample was 5,419 adolescents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Using group-based trajectory modeling, five distinctive trajectory groups were identified. The High group had a high…

Huang, David Y. C.; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

2012-01-01

262

KNOWLEDGE, AWARENESS, PRACTICE AMONG ADOLESCENTS REGARDING SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES IN URBAN SLUMS  

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Full Text Available Background: Sexually transmitted diseases are very important health challenges for adolescents. Many national and international governmental and nongovernmental health agencies are running programmes to reduce the incidence of these diseases. We can provide an insight to the reproductive and sexual health needs of adolescents by assessing their knowledge, attitude and practice about these diseases. Research Question: What is the level of knowledge awareness and practice among adolescents regarding sexually transmitted diseases?  Objectives: To assess the knowledge awareness and practice among adolescents regarding sexually transmitted diseases in an urban slum in Dehradun. Study Design: Cross-Sectional Settings and Participants: Adolescents belonging to registered families of Chandreshwar Nagar urban slum under the field practice area of Urban Health Training Centre (UHTC) of department of Community Medicine, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences. Sample Size: 166 Adolescents i.e. Males-88 and Females-78. Study Period: May 2009 to October 2009 Study Variable: A predesigned, pretested, self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting information on Age, Sex, Knowledge and awareness regarding STDs, etc. Statistical Analysis: Standard statistical package i.e. SPSS, Microsoft Excel.  Results: 51.2% of the adolescents were having knowledge about STD’s. Majority of (91.4%) the adolescents knew about AIDS as a type of STD. Their attitude cum practice towards prevention of STD was found to be 72.9% by use of condoms. Conclusions: Appropriate health care seeking behaviour and Information Education and Communication (IEC) activities should be promoted. 

Tushar Rai; Pradeep Aggarwal; S D Kandpal

2013-01-01

263

KNOWLEDGE, AWARENESS, PRACTICE AMONG ADOLESCENTS REGARDING SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES IN URBAN SLUMS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Sexually transmitted diseases are very important health challenges for adolescents. Many national and international governmental and nongovernmental health agencies are running programmes to reduce the incidence of these diseases. We can provide an insight to the reproductive and sexual health needs of adolescents by assessing their knowledge, attitude and practice about these diseases. Research Question: What is the level of knowledge awareness and practice among adolescents regarding sexually transmitted diseases?  Objectives: To assess the knowledge awareness and practice among adolescents regarding sexually transmitted diseases in an urban slum in Dehradun. Study Design: Cross-Sectional Settings and Participants: Adolescents belonging to registered families of Chandreshwar Nagar urban slum under the field practice area of Urban Health Training Centre (UHTC) of department of Community Medicine, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences. Sample Size: 166 Adolescents i.e. Males-88 and Females-78. Study Period: May 2009 to October 2009 Study Variable: A predesigned, pretested, self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting information on Age, Sex, Knowledge and awareness regarding STDs, etc. Statistical Analysis: Standard statistical package i.e. SPSS, Microsoft Excel.  Results: 51.2% of the adolescents were having knowledge about STD’s. Majority of (91.4%) the adolescents knew about AIDS as a type of STD. Their attitude cum practice towards prevention of STD was found to be 72.9% by use of condoms. Conclusions: Appropriate health care seeking behaviour and Information Education and Communication (IEC) activities should be promoted. 

Tushar Rai; Pradeep Aggarwal; S D Kandpal

2011-01-01

264

The Relationship Between Early Sexual Debut and Psychosocial Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of Dutch Adolescents  

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In a longitudinal dataset of 470 Dutch adolescents, the current study examined the ways in which early sexual initiation was related to subsequent attachment, self-perception, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems. For male adolescents, analyses revealed general attachment to mother and...

Udell, Wadiya; Sandfort, Theo; Reitz, Ellen; Bos, Henny; Dekovic, Maja

265

Are Adolescent Girls with a Physical Disability at Increased Risk for Sexual Violence?  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether US female adolescents who self-reported having a physical disability or long-term health problem were more likely to report having been physically forced to have sexual intercourse than US female adolescents without a physical disability or long-term health problem. Methods: Using…

Alriksson-Schmidt, Ann I.; Armour, Brian S.; Thibadeau, Judy K.

2010-01-01

266

Assessing Developmental Trajectories of Sexual Minority Youth: Discrepant Findings from a Life History Calendar and a Self-Administered Survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research suggests that the timing and sequence of sexual identity development milestones impacts myriad health and mental health outcomes for sexual minority youth. Because these milestone events are typically assessed retrospectively, traditional data collection approaches are limited by recall bias and lack of precision in the recording of milestone events, which may conceal the distinctions between events and distort the recording of youths' developmental trajectories. The purpose of this exploratory study was to compare responses to questions about psychosexual milestones elicited by a Life History Calendar and a self-administered survey. Results indicated discrepancies in the reported occurrence and timing of milestone events between the survey and Life History Calendar. Differences in the timing of specific milestone events ranged from two months to 15 years. Implications of these discordant findings for sexual minority youth are discussed.

Fisher CM

2012-01-01

267

Naturaleza de los abusos sexuales a menores y consecuencias en la salud mental de las víctimas Characteristics of sexual abuse of minors and its consequences on victims' mental health  

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Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia, la naturaleza y las consecuencias de los abusos sexuales sufridos durante la infancia o la adolescencia. Métodos: 2.159 estudiantes de la Universidad de Granada respondieron voluntariamente y de forma anónima a un cuestionario sobre abuso sexual. Establecido el grupo de víctimas, se formó otro de comparación con estudiantes sin antecedentes de abusos. En una segunda sesión se evaluó la salud mental de ambos grupos. Resultados: 269 (12,5%) estudiantes manifestaron haber sufrido abusos sexuales antes de los 18 años de edad. El 62,8% de los abusos consistió en tocamientos y la edad media de inicio fue a los 8,8 años. Los perpetradores, mayoritariamente varones y un 44% menores de edad, solían cometer los abusos en el hogar de la víctima o en el suyo, aprovechándose de las visitas o de su estrecha vinculación. Alrededor del 50% se sirvió del engaño o del juego. En cuanto a la salud mental de las víctimas, las universitarias con antecedentes de abusos sexuales tenían menor autoestima y asertividad, y puntuaciones más altas en actitud vital negativa, depresión y ansiedad, que las del grupo de comparación. Las víctimas varones, sin embargo, sólo diferían de los universitarios sin antecedentes de abusos en su mayor nivel de ansiedad. Conclusiones: Los resultados demuestran la gravedad del problema de los abusos sexuales a menores y sus consecuencias, así como las circunstancias en que se producen y el perfil de los agresores y de las víctimas; unos resultados relevantes para la planificación de programas de detección y prevención de los abusos.Objective: To analyze the prevalence, nature and consequences of sexual abuse during childhood or adolescence. Methods: A total of 2,159 college students from the University of Granada anonymously completed a questionnaire on sexual abuse. A group of sexual abuse survivors was established and a comparison group without a history of abuse was selected. In a second session, the socio-affective adjustment of both groups was assessed. Results Sexual abuse before the age of 18 was reported by 269 (12.5%) students. In 62.8%, the abuse consisted of the perpetrator touching the victim and/or the victim touching the perpetrator. The average age at which the sexual abuse started was 8.8 years old. The vast majority of perpetrators were males and 44% were under-age minors. The perpetrators usually committed the sexual abuse in the victim's home or in their own homes, taking advantage of visits and/or close relationships. Almost half the perpetrators made use of deception or games. Female college students with a history of sexual abuse had lower self-esteem, were less assertive, had a more negative attitude toward life, and higher depression and anxiety scores than women in the comparison group. Male survivors, however, differed from non-survivors only in having higher anxiety levels. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the severity of the problem of sexual abuse of minors and its consequences, the circumstances in which this abuse occurs, and the profiles of perpetrators and victims. These results are relevant for the planning of abuse detection and prevention programs.

Mª Rosario Cortés Arboleda; José Cantón Duarte; David Cantón-Cortés

2011-01-01

268

Minority women victims of recent sexual violence: disparities in incident history.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: The aims of this descriptive study were to (1) describe assault and care characteristics and (2) determine differences in assault and care characteristics between black women and white women who sought emergency care following sexual violence. METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional design was used to examine forensic examination data characterizing the incident history reported by women victims of sexual violence at the time of a forensic nurse examination. Examinations occurred at an urban university-affiliated hospital emergency department (ED) over a 2-year period. RESULTS: Of the women (n = 173) seeking care in the ED, 58.4% were black and 41.6% were white. When compared with white women, black women were more likely to have weapons used in their assaults (42.6% vs. 16.7%, p < 0.00) and to be assaulted in the city rather than the suburbs (82.8% vs. 56.5%, p < 0.00). In general, substance use prior to the assault was reported to have occurred in 49.1% of the victims and 41% of the assailants; however, differences existed in the type and pattern of substance use by race/ethnicity. Black victims were more likely to report use of illicit drugs (28.7% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.01). White women were more likely than black women to report personal alcohol use prior to their assault, with significant differences for drinking by victims (47.2% vs. 23.8%, p = 0.01) or assailant use of alcohol (47.2% vs. 23.8%, p = 0.00). White women were more likely than black women to report both they and the assailant had used some type of substance (38.9 vs. 21.8, p = 0.01). Black women were more likely to arrive to the ED via EMS services (45.5% vs. 29.2%, p = 0.03). There were no reported differences in care characteristics by race. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study suggest that differences exist in assault characteristics between black and white women. Use of substances, including alcohol, plays an important role in sexual violence in women and should be a focus of preventive intervention initiatives when conducting a forensic examination. Both coordinated responses and comprehensive, individualized care by specially trained providers are important in the emergency care of minority women who are victims of recent sexual violence.

Boykins AD; Alvanzo AA; Carson S; Forte J; Leisey M; Plichta SB

2010-03-01

269

Discursos de jovens adolescentes portugueses sobre sexualidade e amor: implicações para a educação sexual Discourses of portuguese adolescents about sexuality and love: implications for sexual education  

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Full Text Available Os esforços para diminuir os comportamentos sexuais de risco de adolescentes e jovens têm conduzido a resultados que ficam aquém das expectativas. Algumas causas para este fracasso parecem dever-se ao seu desconhecimento sobre os mitos e crenças associados à sexualidade. Tentando ultrapassar algumas das limitações de estudos anteriores, o objectivo deste trabalhar foi auscultar directamente jovens adolescentes,1 procurando entender, de uma forma mais espontânea e profunda, as percepções e crenças associadas às relações amorosas e sexuais. Para isso, recolheram-se os seus discursos ao longo de um programa de educação sexual e usou-se a Análise Foucaudiana do Discurso como método de análise dos resultados. Estes apontam para a presença do duplo padrão sexual, embora pareça desenhar-se uma tendência para um padrão sexual singular e para a pouca importância atribuída aos comportamentos de prevenção. Conclui-se com a referência a algumas pistas para a educação sexual.The efforts to lower adolescents sexual risk behaviors have led to results that did not come up to the expectations. Lack of knowledge on myths and beliefs on sexuality may be the main cause of this failure. Trying to overcome some of the limitations of previous studies, this work aimed to directly hear adolescents trying to understand, in a more spontaneous and deeply way, the perceptions and beliefs associated with love and sexual relations. To do so, the discourses of adolescents during a sexual education program were collected and analyzed through Foucauldian Discourse Analysis. Results point out the recognition of sexual double standard, although there seem to exist a tendency to consider a single sex standard and disregard the importance of prevention behaviors. We conclude with some clues about sexual education.

Luísa Saavedra; Conceição Nogueira; Sara Magalhães

2010-01-01

270

Discursos de jovens adolescentes portugueses sobre sexualidade e amor: implicações para a educação sexual/ Discourses of portuguese adolescents about sexuality and love: implications for sexual education  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Os esforços para diminuir os comportamentos sexuais de risco de adolescentes e jovens têm conduzido a resultados que ficam aquém das expectativas. Algumas causas para este fracasso parecem dever-se ao seu desconhecimento sobre os mitos e crenças associados à sexualidade. Tentando ultrapassar algumas das limitações de estudos anteriores, o objectivo deste trabalhar foi auscultar directamente jovens adolescentes,1 procurando entender, de uma forma mais espontânea e (more) profunda, as percepções e crenças associadas às relações amorosas e sexuais. Para isso, recolheram-se os seus discursos ao longo de um programa de educação sexual e usou-se a Análise Foucaudiana do Discurso como método de análise dos resultados. Estes apontam para a presença do duplo padrão sexual, embora pareça desenhar-se uma tendência para um padrão sexual singular e para a pouca importância atribuída aos comportamentos de prevenção. Conclui-se com a referência a algumas pistas para a educação sexual. Abstract in english The efforts to lower adolescents sexual risk behaviors have led to results that did not come up to the expectations. Lack of knowledge on myths and beliefs on sexuality may be the main cause of this failure. Trying to overcome some of the limitations of previous studies, this work aimed to directly hear adolescents trying to understand, in a more spontaneous and deeply way, the perceptions and beliefs associated with love and sexual relations. To do so, the discourses of (more) adolescents during a sexual education program were collected and analyzed through Foucauldian Discourse Analysis. Results point out the recognition of sexual double standard, although there seem to exist a tendency to consider a single sex standard and disregard the importance of prevention behaviors. We conclude with some clues about sexual education.

Saavedra, Luísa; Nogueira, Conceição; Magalhães, Sara

2010-03-01

271

Concepções de sexualidade entre adolescentes com e sem histórico de violência sexual Sexuality conceptions in adolescents with and without a sexual violence history  

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Full Text Available Os objetivos deste estudo consistiram em: verificar as concepções de sexualidade de adolescentes que passaram por violência sexual comparando as que não passaram e avaliar se os dois grupos de adolescentes (vítimas e não vítimas) diferiam quanto aos escores no Inventário de Depressão. A pesquisa foi realizada com 16 adolescentes do sexo feminino, sendo oito jovens vítimas de violência sexual, e outras oito jovens que jamais passaram por experiência deste abuso. Na maioria dos casos o agressor era próximo da vítima e houve a consumação do ato sexual vaginal. Verificou-se que as adolescentes que passaram por violência sexual, contrastando com as demais, demonstravam medo quanto a se envolverem com indivíduo do sexo oposto e também do ato sexual. Neste grupo foram encontradas idéias equivocadas acerca da sexualidade. Quanto a se sentir à vontade diante de um indivíduo do sexo oposto, todas as vítimas de abuso declararam que não se sentiam.The goals of this study consisted in verifying the sexuality conceptions of adolescents who have been victims of sexual violence compared to the ones who were not victims and to evaluate if both teenagers' groups (victims and not victims) differed regarding their scores in the Depression Inventory. The research was conducted with 16 female teenagers, eight youngsters victim of sexual violence, and eight nonvictims. In most victims' cases the aggressor was someone close to the victim and involved consummation of the vaginal sexual act. It was verified that the adolescents who experienced sexual violence, contrasting with the others, demonstrated striking fear regarding involvement with an individual of the opposite sex and also of the sexual act. In such group, mistaken ideas concerning sexuality were observed. Regarding feeling confortable in front of an individual of the opposite sex, all the abuse victims affirmed that they did not.

Julliana Luiz Rodrigues; Rachel de Faria Brino; Lúcia Cavalcanti Albuquerque Williams

2006-01-01

272

Sexual risk behavior and pregnancy in detained adolescent females: a study in Dutch detention centers  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the lifetime prevalence of teenage pregnancy in the histories of detained adolescent females and to examine the relationship between teenage pregnancy on the one hand and mental health and sexuality related characteristics on the other. Methods Of 256 admitted detained adolescent females aged 12–18 years, a representative sample (N = 212, 83%) was examined in the first month of detention. Instruments included a semi-structured interview, standardized questionnaires and file information on pregnancy, sexuality related characteristics (sexual risk behavior, multiple sex partners, sexual trauma, lack of assertiveness in sexual issues and early maturity) and mental health characteristics (conduct disorder, alcohol and drug use disorder and suicidality). Results Approximately 20% of the participants reported having been pregnant (before detention), although none had actually given birth. Sexuality related characteristics were more prevalent in the pregnancy group, while this was not so for the mental health characteristics. Age at assessment, early maturity, sexual risk behavior, and suicidality turned out to be the best predictors for pregnancy. Conclusion The lifetime prevalence of pregnancy in detained adolescent females is high and is associated with both sexuality related risk factors and mental health related risk factors. Therefore, prevention and intervention programs targeting sexual risk behavior and mental health are warranted during detention.

Hamerlynck Sannie MJJ; Cohen-Kettenis Peggy T; Vermeiren Robert; Jansen Lucres MC; Bezemer Pieter D; Doreleijers Theo AH

2007-01-01

273

The first sexual experience among adolescent girls with and without disabilities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

First sexual intercourse is an important experience in the young adult life course. While previous research has examined racial, gender, and socioeconomic differences in the characteristics of first sexual intercourse, less is known about differences by disability status. Using a racially diverse (27% Black, 20% Hispanic, and 53% non-Hispanic white) sample of 2,729 adolescent girls aged 12-24 at first sexual intercourse from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this article examines the association between disability and type of first sexual relationship, degree of discussion about birth control, and pregnancy wantedness. Regression analyses indicate that girls with mild or learning or emotional disabilities experience first sexual intercourse in different types of relationships than girls without disabilities. Adolescents with learning or emotional conditions have greater levels of discussion about birth control with their first sexual partners than those without disabilities. In addition, among those who do not use birth control at first sexual intercourse, girls with multiple or seriously limiting conditions are more likely to want a pregnancy-versus not want a pregnancy-at first sexual intercourse. Findings indicate that disability status is important to consider when examining adolescent sexuality; however, not all youth with disabilities have equal experiences.

Shandra CL; Chowdhury AR

2012-04-01

274

A profile of sexually active male adolescent high school students in Lima, Peru  

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Full Text Available To document knowledge and attitudes regarding sexuality and sexual practices of male adolescent high school students in Lima, Peru, a self-administered, anonymous survey was completed by 991 male adolescents aged 12-19 as part of a School-Based Sex Education Intervention model. Questions concerned sociodemographic information; family characteristics; personal activities; knowledge and attitudes regarding sexuality; sexual experience; and contraceptive use. Knowledge related to sexuality was limited. Males tended to mainly discuss sexuality with their male peers (49.8%). Attitudes towards sexual activity and condom use were largely positive, although some males expressed ambivalent feelings towards the latter. Of the sample, 43% had ever had sex; age at first sexual intercourse was 13 years. While 88% of the sample would use condoms, 74% also gave reasons for not using them. Sexual activity was related to age, ever having repeated a grade, living with only one parent or in a mixed family, activities such as going to parties, use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs, and viewing pornographic videos or magazines. Many male adolescents were at risk of causing an unintended pregnancy or acquiring an STD.

Chirinos Jesús L.; Salazar Victor C.; Brindis Claire D.

2000-01-01

275

Factors associated with self-reported first sexual intercourse in Scottish adolescents  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background There is continuing concern about high pregnancy rates and increasing numbers of sexually transmitted infections being detected in Scottish adolescents. Consistent evidence about factors associated with risky sexual behaviours, including early first sexual intercourse, may help to identify adolescents at risk and help improve interventions. This study aimed to provide detailed analysis of the evidence of the associations between individual factors and early sexual intercourse using cross-sectional questionnaire data from 4,379 Scottish adolescents who participated in a sexual health intervention evaluation. Findings Multivariate secondary analysis showed that aspects of family and school life such as decreasing parental monitoring (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.24–1.70) and decreasing enjoyment of school (OR 2.55, 95% CI 2.15–3.03) were associated with reporting previous sexual intercourse. Furthermore, females were more likely to report previous sexual intercourse than males (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.14–1.91). Several factors commonly used to inform sexual health intervention design, such as socioeconomic status, self-esteem and religion, were not independently associated. Conclusion These results contribute to the evidence base for the association of several factors with early initiation of sexual activity. The findings suggest that interventions aiming to delay first intercourse may need to consider targeting aspects of individuals' connection to their school and family. Furthermore, the results do not support the need to consider socio-economic background, religion or self-esteem of the individuals in intervention design.

Penfold Suzanne C; van Teijlingen Edwin R; Tucker Janet S

2009-01-01

276

Adolescent criminal justice involvement and adulthood sexually transmitted infection in a nationally representative US sample.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Criminal justice involvement (CJI) disrupts social and sexual networks, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) thrive on network disruption. Adolescent CJI may be a particularly important determinant of STI because experiences during adolescence influence risk trajectories into adulthood. We used Wave III (2001-2002: young adulthood) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N?=?14,322) to estimate associations between history of adolescent (younger than 18 years) CJI and adult STI risk. Respondents who reported a history of repeat arrest in adolescence, adolescent conviction, and arrest both as an adolescent and an adult (persistent arrest) had between two to seven times the odds of STI (biologically confirmed infection with chlamydia, gonorrhea, or trichomoniasis) in adulthood and between two to three times the odds of multiple partnerships and inconsistent condom use in the past year in adulthood. In analyses adjusting for sociodemographic and behavioral factors, history of having six or more adolescent arrests was associated with more than five times the odds of STI (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 5.44, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.74-17.1). Both adolescent conviction and persistent CJI appeared to remain independent correlates of STI (conviction: AOR 1.90, 95 % CI 1.02-3.55; persistent CJI: AOR 1.60, 95 % CI 0.99-2.57). Adolescents who have repeat arrests, juvenile convictions, and persist as offenders into adulthood constitute priority populations for STI treatment and prevention. The disruptive effect of adolescent CJI may contribute to a trajectory associated with STI in adulthood.

Khan MR; Rosen DL; Epperson MW; Goldweber A; Hemberg JL; Richardson J; Dyer TP

2013-08-01

277

Part II: differences between sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers and delinquent youth: further group comparisons of developmental antecedents and behavioral challenges.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In a recent paper published in the Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, we assessed the differences between sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers ( Burton, Duty, & Leibowitz, 2011 ). We found that the sexually victimized group had more severe developmental antecedents (e.g., trauma and early exposure to pornography) and behavioral difficulties (sexual aggression, arousal, pornography use, and nonsexual offenses). The present study compares sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized adolescent sexual abusers with a group of nonsexually victimized delinquent youth. Findings included that delinquent youth had fewer behavioral and developmental problems than the comparison groups. In addition, sexually victimized sexual abusers had the highest mean scores on trauma and personality measures. Implications for research and treatment are offered.

Leibowitz GS; Burton DL; Howard A

2012-01-01

278

Part II: differences between sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers and delinquent youth: further group comparisons of developmental antecedents and behavioral challenges.  

Science.gov (United States)

In a recent paper published in the Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, we assessed the differences between sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers ( Burton, Duty, & Leibowitz, 2011 ). We found that the sexually victimized group had more severe developmental antecedents (e.g., trauma and early exposure to pornography) and behavioral difficulties (sexual aggression, arousal, pornography use, and nonsexual offenses). The present study compares sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized adolescent sexual abusers with a group of nonsexually victimized delinquent youth. Findings included that delinquent youth had fewer behavioral and developmental problems than the comparison groups. In addition, sexually victimized sexual abusers had the highest mean scores on trauma and personality measures. Implications for research and treatment are offered. PMID:22574846

Leibowitz, George S; Burton, David L; Howard, Alan

2012-01-01

279

Use and perceptions of sexual and reproductive health services among northern Thai adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study sheds light on obstacles to safe sexual health for young Thais and their need for appropriate sexual and reproductive health services. The study population was 1,745 unmarried adolescents aged 17-20 who resided or worked in Chiang Mai, the major city in northern Thailand. The study used quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the vulnerability of sexually active adolescents as well as the lack of support and care for them from parents and health providers. We found that young Thais still prefer pharmacies for self-medication and use government health care facilities as a last resort. Current health services are not suitable for adolescents in northern Thailand because they lack privacy and impose judgemental attitudes, especially towards sexually active adolescent females. Current programs for adolescent sexual and reproductive health focus on education and counselling and do not provide appropriate privacy or clinical care. There is a pressing need for advocacy, and policy support for the development of youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health services in Thailand.

Tangmunkongvorakul A; Banwell C; Carmichael G; Utomo ID; Seubsman SA; Kelly M; Sleigh A

2012-03-01

280

Prevalence of cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection in sexually active adolescents from Salvador, Brazil  

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Full Text Available The incidence of sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents is increasing worldwide. Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases in young women, and undetected disease is highly associated with long-term complications in women. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a sexually active population of female adolescents from Salvador, Brazil, and to describe their socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics. 100 sexually active adolescents (10-19 years) were included in this study, between 2008 and 2010. Endocervical samples were obtained during gynecological examination. Inhouse polymerase chain reaction of cervical specimens was used for Chlamydia trachomatis detection. The overall prevalence of cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection was 31% (95% CI 22-40). There were no statistically significant differences in the age at first sexual intercourse, number of sexual partners, and frequency of condom use between Chlamydia infected and uninfected adolescents. The prevalence of cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection among adolescents from Salvador was the highest in Brazil up to the present date. These results demonstrate an urgent need for continued and comprehensive prevention strategies along with proper screening for Chlamydia in high-risk populations in order to decrease the rates of infection.

Márcia Sacramento Cunha Machado; Bruno Fernando Borges da Costa e Silva; Igor Logetto Caetité Gomes; Iuri Usêda Santana; Maria Fernanda Rios Grassi

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Social Factors Associated with Readiness for Sexual Activity in Adolescents: A Population-Based Cohort Study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Various factors are associated with sexual activity in adolescence and it is important to identify those that promote healthy and adaptive romantic and sexual development. The objectives of this study were to describe rates of early sexual intercourse (before 16 years) and sexual readiness in adolescence and to assess the extent to which these were social patterned. We prospectively studied nearly 5,000 15-year-olds from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a UK birth cohort. Between 2006 and 2008, female and male participants answered a computer assisted interview about romantic and sexual behaviors in the last year. Predictors of sexual intercourse and readiness for sexual intercourse were examined across a range of sociodemographic measures. Overall, 17.7 % (95 % CI 16.7 %, 18.9 %) of participants reported having had sexual intercourse in the last year, with more girls than boys reporting sexual experience (risk ratio 1.30, 95 % CI 1.15, 1.47). Of these, one-third of both male and female were classed as unready because they were unwilling, lacking in autonomy, felt regret or had not used contraception. There was strong evidence of social patterning for sexual activity with higher rates for young people from poorer homes, with lower social class, and with younger, less educated mothers. In contrast, among 860 young people who had had sexual intercourse, there was no clear evidence of associations between social factors and sexual readiness. The lack of social patterning in sexual readiness supports the provision of comprehensive education to develop life skills for adolescents across all social groups.

Heron J; Low N; Lewis G; Macleod J; Ness A; Waylen A

2013-08-01

282

Dominance-popularity status, behavior, and the emergence of sexual activity in young adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this paper, we investigated the sexual activity levels of several subtypes of middle adolescents (age 14-15 years). The subtype profiles were based on dominance-popularity status and a range of behaviors associated with dominance and popularity. In addition, gender differences in behavioral profiles were examined among dominant-popular, sexually active young adolescents. Results showed that socially dominant and popular young adolescent boys who exhibited a highly aggressive profile were more sexually active than their low-status and non-aggressive male peers; dominant-popular girls who were very attractive and gossips were more sexually active than their female peers. The results are discussed from an evolutionary psychological framework.

de Bruyn EH; Cillessen AH; Weisfeld GE

2012-01-01

283

Dominance-popularity status, behavior, and the emergence of sexual activity in young adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, we investigated the sexual activity levels of several subtypes of middle adolescents (age 14-15 years). The subtype profiles were based on dominance-popularity status and a range of behaviors associated with dominance and popularity. In addition, gender differences in behavioral profiles were examined among dominant-popular, sexually active young adolescents. Results showed that socially dominant and popular young adolescent boys who exhibited a highly aggressive profile were more sexually active than their low-status and non-aggressive male peers; dominant-popular girls who were very attractive and gossips were more sexually active than their female peers. The results are discussed from an evolutionary psychological framework. PMID:22947640

de Bruyn, Eddy H; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Weisfeld, Glenn E

2012-06-21

284

Maltreatment and depression in adolescent sexual offenders with an autism spectrum disorder.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the self-reported presence and severity of abuse, neglect, and depressive symptoms for 43 adolescents adjudicated delinquent due to a sexual offense. Twenty-seven of the adolescent sexual offenders were also diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, and 16 did not carry an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. Both groups reported moderate to high levels of abuse and neglect. Adolescent sexual offenders with an autism spectrum disorder reported significantly higher depressive symptoms than those without an autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, of the group with an autism spectrum disorder, those reporting severe levels of emotional abuse and/or emotional neglect were more likely to also have depressive symptoms. Results suggest a need to tailor treatment programs to match the unique needs of sexual offenders.

Bleil Walters J; Hughes TL; Sutton LR; Marshall SN; Crothers LM; Lehman C; Paserba D; Talkington V; Taormina R; Huang A

2013-01-01

285

Harmful lifestyles' clustering among sexually active in-school adolescents in Zambia  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Zambia. Like many other African nations with high HIV burden, heterosexual intercourse is the commonest mode of HIV spread. The estimation of prevalence and factors associated with sexual intercourse among in-school adolescents has potential to inform public health interventions aimed at reducing the burden of sex-related diseases in Zambia. Methods We carried out secondary analysis of the Zambia Global School-Based Health Survey (GSHS) 2004; a cross sectional survey that aims to study health-related behaviors among in-school adolescents. We estimated frequencies of relevant socio-demographic variables. The associations between selected explanatory variables and self-reported history of sexual intercourse within the last 12 months were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 2136 in-school adolescents who participated in the Zambia Global School-Based Health Survey of 2004 were available for analysis. Out of these respondents, 13.4% reported that they had sexual intercourse in the past 12 months prior to the survey; 16.4% and 9.7% among males and females respectively. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, with age less than 15 years as the referent the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of having engaged in sexual intercourse in adolescents of age 15 years, and those aged 16 years or more were 1.06 (95% CI 1.03–1.10) and 1.74 (95% 1.70–1.79) respectively. Compared to adolescents who had no close friends, adolescents who had one close friend were more likely to have had sexual intercourse, AOR = 1.28 (95% CI 1.24–1.32). Compared to adolescents who were not supervised by their parents, adolescents who were rarely or sometimes supervised by their parents were likely to have had sexual intercourse, and adolescents who were most of the time/always supervised by their parents were less likely to have had sexual intercourse; AORs 1.26 (95% CI 1.23–1.26) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.90–0.95) respectively. Compared to adolescents who did not smoke dagga, adolescents who smoked dagga 1 or 2 times, and those who smoked dagga 3 or more times in their lifetime were 70% and 25% more likely to have had sexual intercourse, respectively. Adolescents who drank alcohol in 1 or 2 days, and those who took alcohol in 3 or more days in a month preceding the survey were 12% and 9% more likely to have had sexual intercourse, respectively, compared to adolescents who did not drink alcohol in the 30 days prior to the survey. Furthermore, adolescents who had been drunk 1 or 2 times, and who had been drunk 3 or more times in a life time were 14% and 13% more likely to have had sexual intercourse compared to those who have never been drunk in their lifetime. Conclusion We identified a constellation of potentially harmful behaviours among adolescents in Zambia. Public health interventions aimed at reducing prevalence of sexual intercourse may be designed and implemented in a broader sense having recognized that sexually active adolescents may also be exposed to other problem behaviours.

Siziya Seter; Muula Adamson S; Kazembe Lawrence N; Rudatsikira Emmanuel

2008-01-01

286

Trends in sexual activity among adolescent American women: 1982-1995.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONTEXT: The formulation of policies and development of programs regarding adolescent sexual and reproductive health requires up-to-date information on levels of and trends in teenage sexual activity. METHODS: Analysis of three NSFG surveys, carried out in 1982, 1988 and 1995, allows examination of the sexual behavior of teenage women over a 13-year time period, using comparable data for the entire time period. RESULTS: The proportion of adolescent women who ever had sexual intercourse increased somewhat during the 1980s, but this upward trend stabilized between the late 1980s and the mid-1990s. Throughout the period, there has been little change in the proportion currently sexually active: In each of the surveys, about 40% of all 15-19-year-olds had had sexual intercourse in the last three months. The average number of months in the past year in which sexually experienced teenagers had had intercourse declined during the 1980s, with no change in the continuity of sexual intercourse taking place between 1988 and 1995, when the mean remained at 8.6 months. Differences in teenage sexual behavior across poverty and racial and ethnic subgroups were large in the early 1980s, but narrowed over the 13-year period. CONCLUSIONS: Only continued monitoring will tell whether the patterns observed during 1988-1995 signify a temporary leveling off in the trend toward increasing adolescent sexual activity, stability in behavior or the beginnings of a decline. Nevertheless, the sustained level of initiation of sexual activity during adolescence is by now a recognized pattern of behavior, and is an important characteristic of the transition to adulthood in the United States.

Singh S; Darroch JE

1999-09-01

287

Depressive symptoms and the sexual orientation among adolescent students: a cross-sectional study  

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Full Text Available Researches in otherpopulations report a strong association between sexual orientationand depressive symptoms, that is, bisexual, gay, lesbian and unsureabout sexual orientation adolescents refer more depressive symptomsthan heterosexual students. Objective: To determine the associationbetween the sexual orientation and depressive symptomsin adolescent students of a public school at the city of Cartagena, Colombia.Method: A cross-sectional study was designed. This surveyincluded students aged 13-17 year-olds. These students completedin the classroom a questionnaire about health behaviors and theZung´s self-rating depression. Logistic regression was computed forcontrolling confounding variables. Results: A total of 432 students,219 boys and 213 girls, completed successfully the survey. The meanage was 14,6 (SD=1,3), and the mean scholarship was 8,4 (1,5). Atotal of 21,1% of girls and 19,2% of boys considered themselvesbisexuals, gays, lesbians or insure about sexual orientation. Depressivesymptoms were related to sexual orientation exclusivally amonggirls (OR=1,10, 95%CI 1,01-1,18), after controlling confounding factors.Conclusions: Among these adolescent students, depressivesymptoms were associated with the sexual orientation only amonggirls. It is likely that this association could be explained better by the gender than the sexual orientation. Futher investigations are needed in Colombian adolescents students.

Carmen Elena Díaz Montes; Zuleima Cogollo Milanés; Jeidis Bánquez Mendoza; Lloyd Luna-Salcedo; Kelly Fontalvo Durango; Mailín Arrieta-Puello; Adalberto Campo-Arias

2005-01-01

288

Predictors of online and offline sexual activities and behaviors among adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract Despite the fact that many adolescents spend much time on the Internet, it is unknown who engages in sexually related online activities (SROA) and how these affect adolescent sexual development. The present longitudinal study on 323 adolescents (51.1% girls) aimed to explore how peer attachment processes predicted both SROA and offline sexual behaviors at the age of 17, while also considering puberty and prior offline sexual experiences in order to elucidate potential similarities or differences. Findings based on hierarchical, binary logistic regression analyses revealed that SROA were predicted by alienation attachment to peers (OR=3.36, p<0.05), puberty (OR=1.03, p<0.05), and prior SROA (OR=0.56, p<0.001), while only previous offline sexual experiences at the age of 15 increased the likelihood of offline sexual behaviors at the age of 17 (OR=6.04, p<0.001). Study findings indicate that the Internet provides an additional context for acquiring sexual experiences during adolescence. PMID:23721460

Sev?íková, Anna; Vazsonyi, Alexander T; Sir??ek, Jan; Kone?ný, St?pán

2013-05-30

289

Communication Skills assessed at OSCE are not affected by Participation in the Adolescent Healthy Sexuality Program  

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Full Text Available We proposed that first year medical students who voluntarily participated in the Healthy Sexuality adolescent program would perform better than their peers on an adolescent counseling station at the year-end OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). In addition we compared medical students? communication skills at the time of the program as assessed by self, peers and participating adolescents. Methods: Nineteen first year medical students voluntarily participated in the ongoing Healthy Sexuality program. Adolescent participants, medical student peer participants and medical students assessed communication components on a 7-point Likert scale at the end of the program. At the year-end OSCE, all first year medical students at the University of Western Ontario were assessed at an adolescent counseling station by a standardized patient (SP) and a physician examiner. Statistical analysis examined differences between the two groups. Results: Students who participated in the Healthy Sexuality program did not perform better than their colleagues on the year-end OSCE. A statistically significant correlation between physician examiner and SP evaluations was found (r = 0.62). Adolescent participants communication skills assessments in the Healthy Sexuality Program demonstrated no significant correlation with medical student assessments (self or peer). Conclusions:Voluntary intervention with adolescents did not result in improved communication skills at the structured year-end examination. Further investigation will be directed towards delineating differences between SP and physician examiner assessments.

Deborah Penava

2002-01-01

290

Examining Links between Sexual Risk Behaviors and Dating Violence Involvement as a Function of Sexual Orientation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between dating violence perpetration and victimization and sexually risky behaviors among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescent girls. DESIGN: Adolescent girls reported on sexual orientation, sexual behaviors, and risk-taking, and their use of, and experience with, dating violence in the past year. Data were analyzed using multinomial regression adjusted for race, poverty, living in a single parent household, and gender of current partner to examine (1) whether sexual minority status was associated with sexual risk behaviors after sociodemographic correlates of sexual risk were controlled; and (2) whether dating violence context accounted for elevated risk. SETTING: Urban, population-based sample of girls interviewed in the home. PARTICIPANTS: 1,647 adolescent girls (38% European American, 57% African American, and 5% other) aged 17 years. Over one-third of the sample lived in poverty. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Sexual risk-taking. RESULTS: Sexual minority status differentiated girls engaging in high sexual risk-taking from those reporting none, after controlling for sociodemographic and relationship characteristics. Dating violence perpetration and victimization made unique additional contributions to this model and did not account for the elevated risk conferred by sexual minority status. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual minority girls (SMGs) were more likely than heterosexual girls to report high sexual risk-taking and teen dating violence victimization. As with heterosexual girls, sexual risk-taking among SMGs was compounded by dating violence, which was not explained by partner gender. Adolescent girls' risky sexual behavior may be reduced by interventions for teen dating violence regardless of sexual minority status.

Hipwell AE; Stepp SD; Keenan K; Allen A; Hoffmann A; Rottingen L; McAloon R

2013-08-01

291

Conocimientos y factores de riesgo sobre infecciones de transmisión sexual en adolescentes/ Knowledge and risk factors of sexual transmiting infections in adolescents  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Se realizó un estudio de tipo descriptivo de corte transversal a un grupo de adolescentes de la Escuela Secundaria Básica Fructuoso Rodríguez de la localidad de Punta Brava, Municipio La Lisa, en un período de tiempo que abarcó desde enero a marzo del año 2008. Se utilizó un muestreo simple aleatorio con 95 % de confiabilidad. Los datos fueron procesados por el cálculo porcentual y se expresaron en tablas. Se consideraron algunas variables sociodemográficas para (more) caracterizar e identificar conocimientos y factores de riesgo sobre esta temática. Hubo un predominio del sexo femenino, el grupo de edades de 13 a 14 años y los que cursan el 9no grado. En cuanto a los conocimientos sobre infecciones de transmisión sexual y su prevención, las féminas evidenciaron mejor preparación. Observamos mayor dificultad en la identificación de las manifestaciones clínicas de las infecciones de transmisión sexual. Se apreció que la minoría de los estudiantes ha iniciado ya sus relaciones sexuales. Se demostró la existencia de prácticas sexuales de riesgo como: edad de inicio precoz entre 12.5 y 13.7, Motivación errada para iniciar la vida sexual (Curiosidad y búsqueda de apoyo, afecto), gran número de ellos ha tenido más de 3 parejas sexuales, aunque predominó el uso del condón como medio de protección, no es usado con la frecuencia adecuada. No se evidenció en la investigación estudiantes que hayan contraído infecciones de transmisión sexual. Se diseñó una estrategia para incrementar el conocimiento de las ITS en estos adolescentes. Abstract in english A survey was done with adolescents of the Fructuoso Rodriguez High School, located in Punta Brava town, La Lisa Municipality. During the months of January and March of 2008, a simple model 95% reliable by change was obtained and the data were processed by means of the porcentage calculus and put on boards. General points of view were considered according to the social way of life and quantity of people to identify the risk factors about this subject there was a predominan (more) ce of the feminine sex, in the students from 13 to 14 years old of the ninth grade. The females had the best preparation about how to prevent the sexual- transfer- infection. We observed difficulties identifying the clinic declare of the ITS. We appreciated that the minority of the students have already started the sexual relationship. In the survey was demonstrated the existence of the risk- sexual- practicing such as: Precocious start age between 12.5 and 13.7, erroneous motivation to start the sexual life (curiosity and search of a support affection), the great number of them have had more than 3 sexual couple, although the used condom as a means of protection, it was not used with an appropriate frequency. In our research we did not found students with ITS . A strategy to improve the adolescents knowledge about the ITS.

Castro Abreu, Idania

2010-12-01

292

Conocimientos y factores de riesgo sobre infecciones de transmisión sexual en adolescentes Knowledge and risk factors of sexual transmiting infections in adolescents  

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Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de tipo descriptivo de corte transversal a un grupo de adolescentes de la Escuela Secundaria Básica Fructuoso Rodríguez de la localidad de Punta Brava, Municipio La Lisa, en un período de tiempo que abarcó desde enero a marzo del año 2008. Se utilizó un muestreo simple aleatorio con 95 % de confiabilidad. Los datos fueron procesados por el cálculo porcentual y se expresaron en tablas. Se consideraron algunas variables sociodemográficas para caracterizar e identificar conocimientos y factores de riesgo sobre esta temática. Hubo un predominio del sexo femenino, el grupo de edades de 13 a 14 años y los que cursan el 9no grado. En cuanto a los conocimientos sobre infecciones de transmisión sexual y su prevención, las féminas evidenciaron mejor preparación. Observamos mayor dificultad en la identificación de las manifestaciones clínicas de las infecciones de transmisión sexual. Se apreció que la minoría de los estudiantes ha iniciado ya sus relaciones sexuales. Se demostró la existencia de prácticas sexuales de riesgo como: edad de inicio precoz entre 12.5 y 13.7, Motivación errada para iniciar la vida sexual (Curiosidad y búsqueda de apoyo, afecto), gran número de ellos ha tenido más de 3 parejas sexuales, aunque predominó el uso del condón como medio de protección, no es usado con la frecuencia adecuada. No se evidenció en la investigación estudiantes que hayan contraído infecciones de transmisión sexual. Se diseñó una estrategia para incrementar el conocimiento de las ITS en estos adolescentes.A survey was done with adolescents of the Fructuoso Rodriguez High School, located in Punta Brava town, La Lisa Municipality. During the months of January and March of 2008, a simple model 95% reliable by change was obtained and the data were processed by means of the porcentage calculus and put on boards. General points of view were considered according to the social way of life and quantity of people to identify the risk factors about this subject there was a predominance of the feminine sex, in the students from 13 to 14 years old of the ninth grade. The females had the best preparation about how to prevent the sexual- transfer- infection. We observed difficulties identifying the clinic declare of the ITS. We appreciated that the minority of the students have already started the sexual relationship. In the survey was demonstrated the existence of the risk- sexual- practicing such as: Precocious start age between 12.5 and 13.7, erroneous motivation to start the sexual life (curiosity and search of a support affection), the great number of them have had more than 3 sexual couple, although the used condom as a means of protection, it was not used with an appropriate frequency. In our research we did not found students with ITS . A strategy to improve the adolescents knowledge about the ITS.

Idania Castro Abreu

2010-01-01

293

Creencias, actitudes y conocimientos en educación sexual Beliefs and attitudes towards sexual education among adolescents aged 11 to 17 years old  

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Full Text Available Background: Previous reports show that Chilean teenagers have an inadequate knowledge about sexuality and reproduction. Aim: To compare the knowlege about sexuality among adolescents coming from private and public schools, with and without sexual education programs. Material and methods: A structured anonymous inquiry, containing multiple choice and open questions, was applied to a sample of 229 adolescents attending seventh and eigth grade of junior school, in private and public schools of Temuco, Chile. Results: Eleven percent of adolescents had already their first sexual intercourse at a mean age of 12.2 ± 2.4 years old. Of these, 96% came from public schools. An overall analysis of tests, disclosed a 53% of correct answers to the inquiry. Adolescents coming from private schools had a better performance than those coming from public schools. Sexual attitudes were not influenced by sexual education programs. Conclusions: Adolescents coming from private schools have a better sexual knowledge level and more conservative attitudes towards sexuality. Overall knowledge is inadequate albeit overvalued. These teenagers are high risk group for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases and require efficient sexual education programs. (Rev Méd Chile 2000; 128: 574-83).

Lilian Fernández F; Luis Bustos M; Leonardo González W; Damián Palma A; Johanna Villagrán A; Sergio Muñoz N

2000-01-01

294

Prevalence and predictors of sexual aggression in dating relationships of adolescents and young adults.  

Science.gov (United States)

Dyadic influences among the diverse forms of aggression in dating relationships of adolescents and young adults have been reported in various studies. The goal of this research was to extend a dyadic model of physical aggression against partners to sexual aggression against partners. An urban sample of 4,052 adolescents and young adults of both genders, between 16 and 26 years old, was used. The percentage of male aggressors was significantly higher than that of the females (35.7% vs. 14.9%) and the percentage of victimization was higher for the women (25.1% vs.21.7%). Sexual aggression and sexual victimization was almost solely psychological in nature, that is, verbal coercion. As predicted by the dyadic model of physical aggression in dating relationships, sexual victimization was best predicted by sexual aggression of the individuals in this study both for males and females. PMID:19403076

Muñoz-Rivas, Marina J; Graña, José Luis; O'Leary, K Daniel; González, M Pilar

2009-05-01

295

Prevalence and predictors of sexual aggression in dating relationships of adolescents and young adults.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Dyadic influences among the diverse forms of aggression in dating relationships of adolescents and young adults have been reported in various studies. The goal of this research was to extend a dyadic model of physical aggression against partners to sexual aggression against partners. An urban sample of 4,052 adolescents and young adults of both genders, between 16 and 26 years old, was used. The percentage of male aggressors was significantly higher than that of the females (35.7% vs. 14.9%) and the percentage of victimization was higher for the women (25.1% vs.21.7%). Sexual aggression and sexual victimization was almost solely psychological in nature, that is, verbal coercion. As predicted by the dyadic model of physical aggression in dating relationships, sexual victimization was best predicted by sexual aggression of the individuals in this study both for males and females.

Muñoz-Rivas MJ; Graña JL; O'Leary KD; González MP

2009-05-01

296

Same-Sex Sexual Attraction Does Not Spread in Adolescent Social Networks.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Peers have a powerful effect on adolescents' beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Here, we examine the role of social networks in the spread of attitudes towards sexuality using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Although we found evidence that both sexual activity (OR = 1.79) and desire to have a romantic relationship (OR = 2.69) may spread from person to person, attraction to same sex partners did not spread (OR = 0.96). Analyses of comparable power to those that suggest positive and significant peer-to-peer influence in sexual behavior fail to demonstrate a significant relationship on sexual attraction between friends or siblings. These results suggest that peer influence has little or no effect on the tendency toward heterosexual or homosexual attraction in teens, and that sexual orientation is not transmitted via social networks.

Brakefield TA; Mednick SC; Wilson HW; De Neve JE; Christakis NA; Fowler JH

2013-07-01

297

Reconceptualizing adolescent sexual behavior: beyond did they or didn't they?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONTEXT: Adolescent sexual behavior is typically studied as a dichotomy: Adolescents have had sex or they have not. Broadening this view would lead to a greater understanding of teenagers' sexual behavior. METHODS: Interview data from 907 high school students in Alabama, New York and Puerto Rico were used to examine the relationships between sexual experience and a variety of social, psychological and behavioral variables. Four groups of teenagers are compared: those who did not anticipate initiating sex in the next year (delayers), those who anticipated initiating sex in the next year (anticipators), those who had had one sexual partner (singles) and those who had had two or more partners (multiples). RESULTS: Compared with delayers, anticipators reported more alcohol use and marijuana use; poorer psychological health; riskier peer behaviors; and looser ties to family school and church. Similarly, multiples reported more alcohol and marijuana use, riskier peer behaviors and looser ties to family and school than singles. Risk behaviors, peer behaviors, family variables, and school and church involvement showed a linear trend across the four categories of sexual behavior. CONCLUSIONS: The traditional sex-no sex dichotomy obscures differences among sexually inexperienced teenagers and among adolescents who have had sex. Prevention efforts must be tailored to the specific needs of teenagers with differing sexual experiences and expectations, and must address the social and psychological context in which sexual experiences occur.

Whitaker DJ; Miller KS; Clark LF

2000-05-01

298

Sexual minority status and psychotic symptoms: findings from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Studies (NEMESIS).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Ethnic minority position is associated with increased risk for psychotic outcomes, which may be mediated by experiences of social exclusion, defeat and discrimination. Sexual minorities are subject to similar stressors. The aim of this study is to examine whether sexual minorities are at increased risk for psychotic symptoms and to explore mediating pathways. Method A cross-sectional survey was performed assessing cumulative incidence of psychotic symptoms with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview in two separate random general population samples (NEMESIS-1 and NEMESIS-2). Participants were sexually active and aged 18???64 years (n??=??5927, n??=??5308). Being lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) was defined as having sexual relations with at least one same-sex partner during the past year. Lifetime experience of any psychotic symptom was analysed using logistic regression, adjusted for gender, educational level, urbanicity, foreign-born parents, living without a partner, cannabis use and other drug use. RESULTS: The rate of any psychotic symptom was elevated in the LGB population as compared with the heterosexual population both in NEMESIS-1 [odds ratio (OR) 2.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.71???3.84] and NEMESIS-2 (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.42???3.71). Childhood trauma, bullying and experience of discrimination partly mediated the association. CONCLUSIONS: The finding that LGB orientation is associated with psychotic symptoms adds to the growing body of literature linking minority status with psychosis and other mental health problems, and suggests that exposure to minority stress represents an important mechanism.

Gevonden MJ; Selten JP; Myin-Germeys I; de Graaf R; Ten Have M; van Dorsselaer S; van Os J; Veling W

2013-05-01

299

Sexual assault in school, mental health and suicidal behaviors in adolescent women in Canada.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescent women (N = 1,025) in grades 7 through 12 in a stratified random sample of Alberta high schools completed measures of emotional problems and suicidal behavior in the past six months, and of frequency and type of sexual assault (including sexual harassment) experienced in school. It was found that 23% has experienced at least one event of assault (sexual touching, sexual threats or remarks, or an incident of indecent exposure); 4% had "often" experienced one or more of these assaults or harassments. Those experiencing a high number of sexual assaults or harassments were significantly more likely to have clinical profiles on the measures of emotional disorder; 15% of 38 women experiencing frequent, unwanted sexual touching had "often" made suicidal gestures or attempts in the previous six months, compared with 2% of 824 women with no experience of sexual assault.

Bagley C; Bolitho F; Bertrand L

1997-01-01

300

ATTACHMENT STYLE AS A PREDICTOR OF RISKY SEXUAL BEHAVIOR IN ADOLESCENTS  

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Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to examine attachment style as a predictor of risky sexual behavior in a younger, more vulnerable sample than previously investigated in the literature: High school aged adolescents. The hypothesized associations among the variables were partially supported. Contrary to our predictions, there was no significant association between avoidance and risky sexual behavior. However, higher anxiety was positively associated with risky sexual behavior. Finally, the prediction that the highest levels of risky sexual behavior would be found for those individuals with higher levels of anxiety and higher levels of avoidance (i.e., insecure attachment style) was supported.

Amber Paulk; Ryan Zayac

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Gender and the influence of peer alcohol consumption on adolescent sexual activity.  

Science.gov (United States)

I consider the alcohol consumption of opposite-gender peers as explanatory to adolescent sexual intercourse and demonstrate that female sexual activity is higher where there is higher alcohol consumption among male peers. This relationship is robust to school fixed effects, cannot be explained by broader cohort effects or general antisocial behaviors in male peer groups, and is distinctly different from any influence of the alcohol consumption of female peers which is shown to have no influence on female sexual activity. There is no evidence that male sexual activity responds to female peer alcohol consumption. PMID:22329054

Waddell, Glen R

2012-01-01

302

Gender and the influence of peer alcohol consumption on adolescent sexual activity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

I consider the alcohol consumption of opposite-gender peers as explanatory to adolescent sexual intercourse and demonstrate that female sexual activity is higher where there is higher alcohol consumption among male peers. This relationship is robust to school fixed effects, cannot be explained by broader cohort effects or general antisocial behaviors in male peer groups, and is distinctly different from any influence of the alcohol consumption of female peers which is shown to have no influence on female sexual activity. There is no evidence that male sexual activity responds to female peer alcohol consumption.

Waddell GR

2012-01-01

303

Disparities in adverse childhood experiences among sexual minority and heterosexual adults: results from a multi-state probability-based sample.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Adverse childhood experiences (e.g., physical, sexual and emotional abuse, neglect, exposure to domestic violence, parental discord, familial mental illness, incarceration and substance abuse) constitute a major public health problem in the United States. The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale is a standardized measure that captures multiple developmental risk factors beyond sexual, physical and emotional abuse. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (i.e., sexual minority) individuals may experience disproportionately higher prevalence of adverse childhood experiences. PURPOSE: To examine, using the ACE scale, prevalence of childhood physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and childhood household dysfunction among sexual minority and heterosexual adults. METHODS: Analyses were conducted using a probability-based sample of data pooled from three U.S. states' Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys (Maine, Washington, Wisconsin) that administered the ACE scale and collected information on sexual identity (n = 22,071). RESULTS: Compared with heterosexual respondents, gay/lesbian and bisexual individuals experienced increased odds of six of eight and seven of eight adverse childhood experiences, respectively. Sexual minority persons had higher rates of adverse childhood experiences (IRR = 1.66 gay/lesbian; 1.58 bisexual) compared to their heterosexual peers. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual minority individuals have increased exposure to multiple developmental risk factors beyond physical, sexual and emotional abuse. We recommend the use of the Adverse Childhood Experiences scale in future research examining health disparities among this minority population.

Andersen JP; Blosnich J

2013-01-01

304

Relationships between Adolescent Sexual Outcomes and Exposure to Sex in Media: Robustness to Propensity-Based Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

|Adolescent sexual health is a substantial problem in the United States, and two recent studies have linked adolescent sexual behavior and/or outcomes to youths' exposure to sex in the media. Both studies had longitudinal survey designs and used covariate-adjusted regression analysis. Steinberg and Monahan (2011) reanalyzed data from one of these…

Collins, Rebecca L.; Martino, Steven C.; Elliott, Marc N.; Miu, Angela

2011-01-01

305

Age-concordant and age-discordant sexual behavior among gay and bisexual male adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

There is evidence that risks for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among adolescent females are higher for those with older male sexual partners. Yet, little empirical research has been conducted with male adolescents who engage in sexual activity with older men. In this article, we summarize in a number of ways the range of sexual activity reported by an ethnically diverse sample of 200 gay and bisexual male youth (15-22 years old) in Chicago and Miami. A general pattern of progression from oral sex with men to both receptive and insertive anal sex with men appeared to characterize the sample during their adolescence. Further, there appeared to be a high degree of "versatile" positioning among the sexually active gay and bisexual young men, in both age-discrepant and age-concordant dyads. Risk analysis revealed having primarily age-concordant partners to be a significant predictor of sexual risk behavior. HIV risk among young gay and bisexual men engaging in sexual activity with older men may occur not only within a distinct biological context from their heterosexual counterparts, but also in a social context that may not as rigidly bound to traditional assumptions about age, gender, and power. The significant associations among participants with partners who were the same age and the risk behavior measures in this analysis have implications for HIV prevention efforts.

Bruce D; Harper GW; Fernández MI; Jamil OB

2012-04-01

306

A sexualidade nas adolescentes com epilepsia/ Sexuality in adolescents with epilepsy  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Mulheres com epilepsia apresentam com maior freqüência alterações relacionadas à sexualidade. O conhecimento adquirido com as adultas tem sido usado para as adolescentes, pressupondo-se que elas também sofram influência semelhante. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar aspectos relacionados à sexualidade nas adolescentes com epilepsia. MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas 35 pacientes do sexo feminino, com epilepsia, com idades entre 10 a 20 anos. Os critérios de (more) exclusão foram: pacientes que ainda não apresentaram a menarca, com doença crônica associada, ou deficiência mental moderada a grave. As informações sobre a função sexual das adolescentes foram avaliadas através de um questionário padrão. RESULTADOS: Não foi observada diferença entre a idade da primeira relação sexual, atividade sexual, libido e orgasmo entre as adolescentes com epilepsia e o grupo controle. Observaram-se índices de gravidez superiores entre as adolescentes com epilepsia. CONCLUSÃO: Adolescentes com epilepsia têm vida sexualmente ativa, não apresentando as mesmas disfunções que a mulher adulta. Nesta série, nós observamos freqüência elevada de gestação, sugerindo a falta de aconselhamento adequado. Os aspectos relacionados à sexualidade requerem atenção especial por parte dos profissionais de saúde que atendem adolescentes com epilepsia. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: Women with epilepsy have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. However, knowledge acquired with adult populations has been extrapolated to teenagers, by surmising that these patients are submitted to similar factors. This study aims to evaluate aspects related to sexuality in female adolescents with epilepsy. METHODS: We studied 35 female adolescents, with epilepsy, ages from 10 to 20 years. The criteria of exclusion were: patients that had not yet presented a f (more) irst period, patients with previous endocrine or clinical chronic disorders, and patients with moderate to severe mental deficiency. Information on sexual behavior of adolescents with epilepsy was evaluated by use of a standard questionnaire. RESULTS: No differences were observed between age at first sexual intercourse, sexual activity, libido and orgasm of adolescents with epilepsy when compared to controls. Higher rates of pregnancy occurred in adolescents with epilepsy when compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Adolescents with epilepsy have an active sexual life, without the dysfunctions presented by adults. In this series, we observed high rates of pregnancy suggesting lack of proper counseling. Therefore, aspects related to sexuality require special attention by health professionals when attending to adolescents with epilepsy.

Vincentiis, Sílvia de; Febrônio, Marília Vieira; Silva, Clóvis Artur Almeida da; Saito, Maria Ignez; Takiuti, Albertina Duarte; Valente, Kette Dualibi Ramos

2007-09-01

307

A sexualidade nas adolescentes com epilepsia Sexuality in adolescents with epilepsy  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Mulheres com epilepsia apresentam com maior freqüência alterações relacionadas à sexualidade. O conhecimento adquirido com as adultas tem sido usado para as adolescentes, pressupondo-se que elas também sofram influência semelhante. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar aspectos relacionados à sexualidade nas adolescentes com epilepsia. MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas 35 pacientes do sexo feminino, com epilepsia, com idades entre 10 a 20 anos. Os critérios de exclusão foram: pacientes que ainda não apresentaram a menarca, com doença crônica associada, ou deficiência mental moderada a grave. As informações sobre a função sexual das adolescentes foram avaliadas através de um questionário padrão. RESULTADOS: Não foi observada diferença entre a idade da primeira relação sexual, atividade sexual, libido e orgasmo entre as adolescentes com epilepsia e o grupo controle. Observaram-se índices de gravidez superiores entre as adolescentes com epilepsia. CONCLUSÃO: Adolescentes com epilepsia têm vida sexualmente ativa, não apresentando as mesmas disfunções que a mulher adulta. Nesta série, nós observamos freqüência elevada de gestação, sugerindo a falta de aconselhamento adequado. Os aspectos relacionados à sexualidade requerem atenção especial por parte dos profissionais de saúde que atendem adolescentes com epilepsia.OBJECTIVES: Women with epilepsy have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. However, knowledge acquired with adult populations has been extrapolated to teenagers, by surmising that these patients are submitted to similar factors. This study aims to evaluate aspects related to sexuality in female adolescents with epilepsy. METHODS: We studied 35 female adolescents, with epilepsy, ages from 10 to 20 years. The criteria of exclusion were: patients that had not yet presented a first period, patients with previous endocrine or clinical chronic disorders, and patients with moderate to severe mental deficiency. Information on sexual behavior of adolescents with epilepsy was evaluated by use of a standard questionnaire. RESULTS: No differences were observed between age at first sexual intercourse, sexual activity, libido and orgasm of adolescents with epilepsy when compared to controls. Higher rates of pregnancy occurred in adolescents with epilepsy when compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Adolescents with epilepsy have an active sexual life, without the dysfunctions presented by adults. In this series, we observed high rates of pregnancy suggesting lack of proper counseling. Therefore, aspects related to sexuality require special attention by health professionals when attending to adolescents with epilepsy.

Sílvia de Vincentiis; Marília Vieira Febrônio; Clóvis Artur Almeida da Silva; Maria Ignez Saito; Albertina Duarte Takiuti; Kette Dualibi Ramos Valente

2007-01-01

308

Acculturation and violence in minority adolescents: a review of the empirical literature.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although seminal reviews have been published on acculturation and mental health in adults and adolescents, far less is known about how acculturation influences adolescent interpersonal and self-directed violence. This article aims to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive review of research linking acculturation and violence behavior for adolescents of three minority populations: Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI), and American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN). The preponderance of evidence from studies on Latino and A/PI youth indicate that higher levels of adolescent assimilation (i.e., measured by time in the United States, English language use, U.S. cultural involvement, or individualism scales) were a risk factor for youth violence. Ethnic group identity or culture-of-origin involvement appear to be cultural assets against youth violence with supporting evidence from studies on A/PI youth; however, more studies are needed on Latino and AI/AN youth. Although some evidence shows low acculturation or cultural marginality to be a risk factor for higher levels of fear, victimization, and being bullied, low acculturation also serves as a protective factor against dating violence victimization for Latino youth. An important emerging trend in both the Latino and, to a lesser extent, A/PI youth literature shows that the impact of acculturation processes on youth aggression and violence can be mediated by family dynamics. The literature on acculturation and self-directed violence is extremely limited and has conflicting results across the examined groups, with high acculturation being a risk factor for Latinos, low acculturation being a risk factor of A/PI youth, and acculturation-related variables being unrelated to suicidal behavior among AI/AN youth. Bicultural skills training as a youth violence and suicide prevention practice is discussed.

Smokowski PR; David-Ferdon C; Stroupe N

2009-07-01

309

Alcohol and drug use among sexual minority college students and their heterosexual counterparts: the effects of experiencing and witnessing incivility and hostility on campus  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Michael R Woodford1, Amy R Krentzman2, Maurice N Gattis31School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USAPurpose: Research suggests that discrimination contributes to increased substance use among sexual minorities. Subtle discrimination and witnessing mistreatment, however, have received little attention. Using minority stress theory as a conceptual framework the authors examined the intersection of sexual orientation, experiencing and witnessing incivility and hostility, and students' alcohol and drug use. The authors hypothesized that experiencing/witnessing incivility/hostility would mediate the relationship between sexual minority status and drinking and drug use, as well as problematic use of these substances.Methods: Data were taken from a campus climate survey (n = 2497; age mean [M] = 23.19 years; 61% female; 17% sexual minorities). Controlling for demographics, logistic regressions depicted specifications for each path of the mediation analysis and bootstrapping was used to assess the significance of each sexual minority-mistreatment-drinking/drug use path.Results: Experiencing incivility mediated the relationship between sexual minority status and problematic drinking. Sexual minority college students were more likely to personally experience incivility (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.51–2.33), which was associated with greater odds of problematic drinking (AOR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.35–2.00). The mediation path was significant at P < 0.001. Further, witnessing hostility mediated the relationship between sexual minority status and problematic drinking. Sexual minority college students were more likely to witness hostility (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.48–2.36), which was associated with greater odds of problematic drinking (AOR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.24–1.90). The mediation path was significant at P < 0.01.Conclusion: The results provide further evidence for minority stress theory and suggest that clinical alcohol use interventions with sexual minorities need to assess personal incivilities and witnessing interpersonal mistreatment, especially hostility. Campus climate interventions that address subtle discrimination as well as harassment and violence may help reduce problematic drinking.Keywords: sexual orientation, discrimination, minority stress, campus climate, drinking, substance use

Woodford MR; Krentzman AR; Gattis MN

2012-01-01

310

Abuso sexual em crianças e adolescentes: revisão de 100 anos de literatura/ Sexual abuse in children and adolescents: review of 100 years of literature  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Maus tratos contra crianças e adolescentes, descritos por Ambroise Tardieu há cerca de um século, tornaram-se objeto de estudo nos últimos quarenta anos. O abuso sexual, uma das formas mais danosas, é conhecido desde a Antiguidade, porém, pouco se avançou no sentido de prevenir e amenizar suas conseqüências. Diferenças culturais, legais e de procedimentos dos profissionais envolvidos talvez expliquem a dificuldade em se estabelecer políticas públicas de preven (more) ção e enfrentamento do problema no mundo inteiro. O presente estudo realizou uma revisão de publicações sobre abuso sexual contra menores em medicina legal e psiquiatria nos últimos cinco anos. A pesquisa, além dos artigos obtidos nas bases Medline/PubMed e Scielo, utilizou capítulos de livros e textos disponíveis on-line e em bibliotecas. Houve unanimidade entre os autores sobre os malefícios à saúde mental das vítimas e sua adaptação e inserção sociais. É patente a importância do exame médico-legal e dos procedimentos policial e judiciário para o estabelecimento da verdade sobre a ocorrência do abuso sexual. Mais estudos são necessários para conhecer essa realidade: prevalência, incidência, desdobramentos legais e conseqüências futuras. Abstract in english Child and adolescent abuse, as described by Ambroise Tardieu about a century ago, became a subject matter in the last forty years. Sexual abuse, one of the most damaging forms of maltreatment, has been known since Antiquity, but very little has been attained as to the prevention and attenuation of its consequences. Cultural differences, as well as legal questions and those regarding procedures from the involved professionals would perhaps explain the difficult to establis (more) h public polices for the world wide prevention and resolution of problem. The present study has achieved a literature review of medico-legal and psychiatric publications on the sexual abuse of minors, comprehending the last five years. The search, in addition to scientific papers through the Medline/PubMed and Scielo databases, has employed textbook chapters as well as loose texts, located either in the Web or in libraries. All the sources unanimously agreed as to the noxious effects of maltreatments upon the victims? mental health, social adaptation and inclusion. The importance of the medico-legal examination and police and judicial procedures stands out in the truthful determination of sexual abuse. More studies are needed to reveal the prevalence, incidence, legal developments and future consequences of sexual abuse.

Aded, Naura Liane de Oliveira; Dalcin, Bruno Luís Galluzzi da Silva; Moraes, Talvane Marins de; Cavalcanti, Maria Tavares

2006-01-01

311

Abuso sexual em crianças e adolescentes: revisão de 100 anos de literatura Sexual abuse in children and adolescents: review of 100 years of literature  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Maus tratos contra crianças e adolescentes, descritos por Ambroise Tardieu há cerca de um século, tornaram-se objeto de estudo nos últimos quarenta anos. O abuso sexual, uma das formas mais danosas, é conhecido desde a Antiguidade, porém, pouco se avançou no sentido de prevenir e amenizar suas conseqüências. Diferenças culturais, legais e de procedimentos dos profissionais envolvidos talvez expliquem a dificuldade em se estabelecer políticas públicas de prevenção e enfrentamento do problema no mundo inteiro. O presente estudo realizou uma revisão de publicações sobre abuso sexual contra menores em medicina legal e psiquiatria nos últimos cinco anos. A pesquisa, além dos artigos obtidos nas bases Medline/PubMed e Scielo, utilizou capítulos de livros e textos disponíveis on-line e em bibliotecas. Houve unanimidade entre os autores sobre os malefícios à saúde mental das vítimas e sua adaptação e inserção sociais. É patente a importância do exame médico-legal e dos procedimentos policial e judiciário para o estabelecimento da verdade sobre a ocorrência do abuso sexual. Mais estudos são necessários para conhecer essa realidade: prevalência, incidência, desdobramentos legais e conseqüências futuras.Child and adolescent abuse, as described by Ambroise Tardieu about a century ago, became a subject matter in the last forty years. Sexual abuse, one of the most damaging forms of maltreatment, has been known since Antiquity, but very little has been attained as to the prevention and attenuation of its consequences. Cultural differences, as well as legal questions and those regarding procedures from the involved professionals would perhaps explain the difficult to establish public polices for the world wide prevention and resolution of problem. The present study has achieved a literature review of medico-legal and psychiatric publications on the sexual abuse of minors, comprehending the last five years. The search, in addition to scientific papers through the Medline/PubMed and Scielo databases, has employed textbook chapters as well as loose texts, located either in the Web or in libraries. All the sources unanimously agreed as to the noxious effects of maltreatments upon the victims’ mental health, social adaptation and inclusion. The importance of the medico-legal examination and police and judicial procedures stands out in the truthful determination of sexual abuse. More studies are needed to reveal the prevalence, incidence, legal developments and future consequences of sexual abuse.

Naura Liane de Oliveira Aded; Bruno Luís Galluzzi da Silva Dalcin; Talvane Marins de Moraes; Maria Tavares Cavalcanti

2006-01-01

312

Comportamientos sexuales y diferencias de género en adolescentes usuarios de un sistema público de salud universitario/ Sexual behavior and gender differencesamong adolescents consultingat a university public health system  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english Background: The predetermined gender roles and the emphasis on reproductive responsibility on women, excluding men, have negative consequences on their sexual reproductive health and satisfactory sexual practices. Aim: To describe and analyze changes in sexual practices and gender differences in adolescents of the lower-middle socioeconomic level, users of public health system who started their sexual activity. Material and methods: We studied 4,971 adolescents of both se (more) xes aged between 12 and 19 years, who consulted in a clinic for adolescents between the years 1990 and 2005. Several variables related to adolescent sexuality were considered. Uni and bivariate analysis were carried out and a model of stratified lineal regression per sex was fixed to explain the following variables: age at which sexual activity is initiated, number of sexual partners, time period between start of dating and the start of sexual activity along time. Results: The average age when men and women start their sexual activity was 15.7 and 15.5years, respectively. Along years and among women but not men, there was a reduction in the age of start of sexual activity and an increase in the number of sexual partners. The mean ¡apse between start of dating and the start of sexual activity in men and women was 6.2 and 7.5 months, respectively. This figure had an 11.696 and 13.9% reduction per year of study in females and males, respectively. Conclusions: There is an increasing expansion of sexual roles in adolescents, but certain patterns of contradictory conservative reasoning are maintained

González A, Electra; Molina G, Temístocles; Montero, Adela; Martínez N, Vania; Leyton M, Carolina

2007-10-01

313

Rethinking the Routine Provision of Psychotherapy to Children/Adolescents Labeled “Sexually Abused”  

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Full Text Available Whether symptomatic or asymptomatic, children labeled sexually abused are routinely offered treatment at considerable financial cost. One result of this is that mental health professionals are beingcharged with exploiting the problem of child sexual abuse (CSA). Is the routine provision of psychotherapy for children and adolescents labeled sexually abused warranted? In this paper, it is arguedthat the evidence indicates it is not warranted. Further, its provision is not in the best interests of either the children or mental health professionals. It is argued it is time to rethink the routine provision of psychotherapy to children and adolescents labeled sexually abuse. A number of recommendations are given which follow from the evidence.

Thomas Oellerich

2007-01-01

314

Compulsive buying and sexual attitudes, intentions, and activity among adolescents: an extension of Roberts and Tanner (2000).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Roberts and Tanner in 2000 reported that compulsive buying among 896 adolescents was associated with cigarette smoking, alcohol use, drug use, and the likelihood of engaging in premarital sex. The present study concerned the relations of compulsive buying to sexual attitudes, intentions, and activity among adolescents. Results are consistent with the earlier findings as compulsive buying was significantly but weakly correlated (-.14) with intentions to engage in premarital sex; however, compulsive buying was not correlated with adolescents' attitudes regarding sex or sexual behavior.

Roberts JA; Tanner JF Jr

2002-06-01

315

The development of conventional sexual partner trajectories among african american male adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

African American male youth disproportionately report involvement with multiple sexual partners, which increases their risk for sexually transmitted infections and initiation of unplanned pregnancies. Little is known about the developmental precursors of sexual partner trajectories among African American male youth. Moreover, few studies focus on the many African American youth who evince highly conventional sexual partner trajectories, i.e., youth who have only one partner or abstain from sexual activity across time. Using four waves of data from a longitudinal study, we hypothesized that an accumulation of social and economic disadvantages in early adolescence would negatively influence youths' conventional sexual partner trajectories in late adolescence. We expected these disadvantages to affect youths' receipt of protective family processes and their reports of a set of intrapersonal processes (self-regulation, hope, and low levels of anger) linked to generally conventional behavior. Hypotheses were tested with data from 315 African American male youth from 11 to 18.5 years of age and their primary caregivers. Our results supported the hypotheses. Socioeconomic disadvantages during preadolescence predicted less involvement in conventional sexual partner trajectories from ages 16 to 18.5 years. This association was mediated by protective family processes and a set of interrelated intrapersonal protective processes. Preventive interventions designed to promote protective parenting and intrapersonal processes can be expected to promote sexual behavior trajectories characterized by abstinence or relations with very few partners.

Kogan SM; Yu T; Brody GH; Allen KA

2013-07-01

316

Perspectives of adolescent boys on the risks of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections: Kenya.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sexual debut for boys in Kenya occurs mostly by mid-adolescence. This study looks at the perspectives of adolescent boys aged 15-19 attending schools in rural, eastern Kenya on the dual risks of unwanted pregnancy, STDs and HIV, based on qualitative data from eight focus group discussions with 90 boys. Despite a high knowledge of sexual risks, fear of HIV and awareness of the protective value of condoms, the young men exhibit high risk behaviour. They feel the need to conform to social prescriptions of male prowess, early sexual experience, and having more than one partner, yet their feelings about this behaviour are ambiguous and contradictory. They consider getting girls pregnant and having had a treatable STD as marks of masculinity, blame girls for not protecting themselves (and girls' parents), and want to boast about their sexual conquests to their peers. Yet they feel embarrassed and reticent about discussing sexual issues with adults, and are unwilling to get condoms from places where anonymity is not assured as they know their sexual activity is not sanctioned. There is a clear need for educational programmes that confront male sexual norms, address issues of gender power relations, promote communication skills, informed choice and sexual responsibility among boys as well as girls, and provide a consistent supply of good quality condoms free or at affordable prices.

Nzioka C

2001-05-01

317

Adolescents' religious discordance with mothers: is there a connection to sexual risk behavior during emerging adulthood?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study longitudinally investigates the relationship between adolescent/mother religious discordance and emerging adult sexual risk-taking 6-7 years later. We used Social Control Theory to examine the level and direction of concordance using data from Wave I and Wave III of the Add Health Study, focusing on constructs of religious importance, frequency of prayer, and attendance at religious services. We found that higher levels of adolescent/mother discordance in religious importance were related to increased emerging adult sexual risk-taking compared to those with similar levels adolescent/mother religiosity, but this occurred only when mothers reported higher levels of religious importance than their children. In contrast, adolescents reporting higher frequency of prayer than their mothers reported lower levels of sexual risk-taking than those with similar frequency of adolescent/mother prayer. These findings suggest that the protective effects of family religious socialization can be interrupted. However, this influence of religious difference on sexual risk-behavior operates differently depending on the direction and level of religious difference. Even in emerging adulthood, a period marked by distance from childhood values and institutions, religious difference with a parent remains a meaningful influence. PMID:23917789

Grossman, Jennifer M; Tracy, Allison J; Noonan, Anne E

2013-10-01

318

Adolescents' religious discordance with mothers: is there a connection to sexual risk behavior during emerging adulthood?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study longitudinally investigates the relationship between adolescent/mother religious discordance and emerging adult sexual risk-taking 6-7 years later. We used Social Control Theory to examine the level and direction of concordance using data from Wave I and Wave III of the Add Health Study, focusing on constructs of religious importance, frequency of prayer, and attendance at religious services. We found that higher levels of adolescent/mother discordance in religious importance were related to increased emerging adult sexual risk-taking compared to those with similar levels adolescent/mother religiosity, but this occurred only when mothers reported higher levels of religious importance than their children. In contrast, adolescents reporting higher frequency of prayer than their mothers reported lower levels of sexual risk-taking than those with similar frequency of adolescent/mother prayer. These findings suggest that the protective effects of family religious socialization can be interrupted. However, this influence of religious difference on sexual risk-behavior operates differently depending on the direction and level of religious difference. Even in emerging adulthood, a period marked by distance from childhood values and institutions, religious difference with a parent remains a meaningful influence.

Grossman JM; Tracy AJ; Noonan AE

2013-10-01

319

Association of perceived parental attitudes towards premarital sex with initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To assess the association between perceived parental disapproval of premarital sex, quality of the parent-daughter relationship, and initiation of sexual intercourse, a sample of 614 economically deprived female students in Chile were tested. The perception of disapproval of premarital sex by the mother along with a good mother-daughter relationship appears to constitute a buffer against early initiation of sexual activity in adolescence. Results are consistent with findings reported in studies conducted in the USA.

Silva M; Ross I

2002-12-01

320

Association of perceived parental attitudes towards premarital sex with initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescence.  

Science.gov (United States)

To assess the association between perceived parental disapproval of premarital sex, quality of the parent-daughter relationship, and initiation of sexual intercourse, a sample of 614 economically deprived female students in Chile were tested. The perception of disapproval of premarital sex by the mother along with a good mother-daughter relationship appears to constitute a buffer against early initiation of sexual activity in adolescence. Results are consistent with findings reported in studies conducted in the USA. PMID:12530724

Silva, Mónica; Ross, Inés

2002-12-01

 
 
 
 
321

Sexually transmitted infections in pregnant adolescents: prevalence and association with maternal and foetal morbidity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Pregnant adolescents have a high incidence of sexually transmitted infections and higher risk of adverse birth outcome. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in pregnant adolescents and the associations between these infections and adverse birth outcome. METHODS: A prospective study with a face-to-face interview to pregnant adolescents was followed by first-void urine and cervical swabs collection for polymerase chain reaction testing for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. After child delivery, clinical files were also reviewed for serological and microbiological results for other infections and data concerning maternal-foetal morbidity. A 5% level of significance was used. RESULTS: The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 204 pregnant adolescents, and the prevalence of C. trachomatis was 11.8% and of N. gonorrhoeae was 4.9%, with the majority being asymptomatic. No antibodies for syphilis or human immunodeficiency virus were found. Maternal morbidity occurred in 3.4%, prematurity was observed in 11.8% of the newborns and low birth weight in 9.8%. Statistically significant associations were observed between maternal morbidity and the presence of gonorrhoea, younger adolescents and severe prematurity and between infection with C. trachomatis and/or N. gonorrhoea and low birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: Sexually transmitted infections are frequently asymptomatic and cause maternal-foetal morbidity. The opportunity that pregnancy offers for screening and counselling should not therefore be missed, especially in adolescents.

Borges-Costa J; Matos C; Pereira F

2012-08-01

322

Entrevista clínica com crianças e adolescentes vítimas de abuso sexual Clinic interview with children and adolescents sexually abused  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available O abuso sexual contra crianças e adolescentes é atualmente um problema de saúde pública. A complexidade do fenômeno requer a capacitação dos profissionais que atuam na avaliação e intervenção clínica das vítimas. O presente artigo tem como objetivo fornecer subsídios teóricos e práticos sobre a entrevista clínica com crianças e adolescentes vítimas de abuso sexual, visando à obtenção do relato sobre a experiência abusiva. Aspectos como as possíveis conseqüências do abuso sexual, o setting da entrevista, a postura dos entrevistadores e as características da revelação pela criança estão apresentadas, bem como um roteiro de entrevista.The sexual abuse against children and adolescents is an actual public health concern. The complexity of phenomenon requires special training of professionals who work in the clinic evaluation of victims and intervention. This study aims to provide theoretical and practical information about the clinic interview with victims of child sexual abuse, aiming at the attainment of the abusive experience report. An interview protocol is presented and the aspects discussed include: sexual abuse potential outcomes, the interview setting, the professional attitude, and children's disclosure.

Luísa Fernanda Habigzang; Sílvia Helena Koller; Fernanda Helena Stroeher; Roberta Hatzenberger; Rafaela Cassol Cunha; Michele da Silva Ramos

2008-01-01

323

Entrevista clínica com crianças e adolescentes vítimas de abuso sexual/ Clinic interview with children and adolescents sexually abused  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O abuso sexual contra crianças e adolescentes é atualmente um problema de saúde pública. A complexidade do fenômeno requer a capacitação dos profissionais que atuam na avaliação e intervenção clínica das vítimas. O presente artigo tem como objetivo fornecer subsídios teóricos e práticos sobre a entrevista clínica com crianças e adolescentes vítimas de abuso sexual, visando à obtenção do relato sobre a experiência abusiva. Aspectos como as possíveis (more) conseqüências do abuso sexual, o setting da entrevista, a postura dos entrevistadores e as características da revelação pela criança estão apresentadas, bem como um roteiro de entrevista. Abstract in english The sexual abuse against children and adolescents is an actual public health concern. The complexity of phenomenon requires special training of professionals who work in the clinic evaluation of victims and intervention. This study aims to provide theoretical and practical information about the clinic interview with victims of child sexual abuse, aiming at the attainment of the abusive experience report. An interview protocol is presented and the aspects discussed include (more) : sexual abuse potential outcomes, the interview setting, the professional attitude, and children's disclosure.

Habigzang, Luísa Fernanda; Koller, Sílvia Helena; Stroeher, Fernanda Helena; Hatzenberger, Roberta; Cunha, Rafaela Cassol; Ramos, Michele da Silva

2008-12-01

324

Perícia psicológica no abuso sexual de crianças e adolescentes/ Forensic psychological examination in child and adolescent sexual abuse  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Ao mesmo tempo em que denúncias de abuso sexual contra crianças e adolescentes são frequentes, implicando em medidas protetivas urgentes para as vítimas e punições para os perpetradores, também são crescentes os casos de falsas denúncias. Este artigo tem como principal objetivo revisar, com base na literatura nacional e internacional recente, o papel da perícia psicológica no abuso sexual infantojuvenil. Na comum inexistência de vestígios físicos, uma avalia (more) ção psicológica abrangente demonstra-se imprescindível, devendo integrar diferentes fontes de informação e indicadores, já que alguns destes são contraditórios e inespecíficos. O perito deve possuir formação na área de atuação e conhecimentos sobre a legislação vigente, além de assegurar que a avaliação não se torne um elemento abusivo para o periciado. Abstract in english At the same time that allegations of sexual abuse against children and adolescents are frequent, enhancing urgent protective measures for victims and punishment for the perpetrators, there is also an increasing frequency of void allegations. This paper aims to review, from recent national and international literature, the role of psychological examination in child and adolescent sexual abuse. The literature review shows that since lack of physical evidence is common, a wi (more) de psychological evaluation is essential, and must integrate different information sources and indicators, some of which are inconsistent and nonspecific. An expert must have extensive training in the field and knowledge of the current legislation, making sure that the evaluation will not turn out to be traumatic for the client.

Schaefer, Luiziana Souto; Rossetto, Silvana; Kristensen, Christian Haag

2012-06-01

325

Perícia psicológica no abuso sexual de crianças e adolescentes Forensic psychological examination in child and adolescent sexual abuse  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Ao mesmo tempo em que denúncias de abuso sexual contra crianças e adolescentes são frequentes, implicando em medidas protetivas urgentes para as vítimas e punições para os perpetradores, também são crescentes os casos de falsas denúncias. Este artigo tem como principal objetivo revisar, com base na literatura nacional e internacional recente, o papel da perícia psicológica no abuso sexual infantojuvenil. Na comum inexistência de vestígios físicos, uma avaliação psicológica abrangente demonstra-se imprescindível, devendo integrar diferentes fontes de informação e indicadores, já que alguns destes são contraditórios e inespecíficos. O perito deve possuir formação na área de atuação e conhecimentos sobre a legislação vigente, além de assegurar que a avaliação não se torne um elemento abusivo para o periciado.At the same time that allegations of sexual abuse against children and adolescents are frequent, enhancing urgent protective measures for victims and punishment for the perpetrators, there is also an increasing frequency of void allegations. This paper aims to review, from recent national and international literature, the role of psychological examination in child and adolescent sexual abuse. The literature review shows that since lack of physical evidence is common, a wide psychological evaluation is essential, and must integrate different information sources and indicators, some of which are inconsistent and nonspecific. An expert must have extensive training in the field and knowledge of the current legislation, making sure that the evaluation will not turn out to be traumatic for the client.

Luiziana Souto Schaefer; Silvana Rossetto; Christian Haag Kristensen

2012-01-01

326

The relationship between asthma and obesity in urban minority children and adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between asthma and obesity in children and adolescents. DESIGN: Medical record review. SETTING: Urban community health center. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred seventy-one children aged 4 to 16 years, 85 with asthma and 86 nonasthmatic controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnosis of asthma, age, and sex-adjusted body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters). RESULTS: Seventy-eight percent of the sample was Hispanic, 17% was African American, 2% were white, and 3% were other minorities. There were significantly more children with asthma (30.6%) who were very obese (> or =95th body mass index percentile) compared with controls (11.6%) (P=.004). Children with asthma were also significantly more overweight than controls (mean+/-SD, 22.5%+/-28.3% vs 12.0%+/-19.6% overweight; P=.004). The difference in obesity between children with asthma and controls was significant for both sexes and across the 4.5 to 10.9 years and 11 to 16 years age groups. Asthma severity was not related to obesity. CONCLUSION: Asthma is a risk factor for obesity in children and adolescents.

Gennuso J; Epstein LH; Paluch RA; Cerny F

1998-12-01

327

Daily diaries and minority adolescents: random coefficient regression modeling of attributional style, coping, and affect.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many researchers underscore the importance of coping in the daily lives of adolescents, yet very few studies measure this and related constructs at this level. Using a daily diary approach to stress and coping, the current study evaluated a series of mediational coping models in a sample of low-income minority adolescents (N = 89). Specifically, coping was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between attributional style (and dimensions) and daily affect. Using random coefficient regression modeling, the relationship between (a) the locus of causality dimension and positive affect was completely mediated by the use of acceptance and humor as coping strategies; (b) the stability dimension and positive affect was completely mediated by the use of both problem-solving and positive thinking; and (c) the stability dimension and negative affect was partially mediated by the use of religious coping. In addition, the locus of causality and stability (but not globality) dimensions were also directly related to affect. However, the relationship between pessimistic explanatory style and affect was not mediated by coping. Consistent with previous research, these findings suggest that attributions are both directly and indirectly related to indices of affect or adjustment. Thus, attributions may not only influence the type of coping strategy employed, but may also serve as coping strategies themselves. PMID:22029618

Roesch, Scott C; Vaughn, Allison A; Aldridge, Arianna A; Villodas, Feion

2009-10-01

328

Daily diaries and minority adolescents: random coefficient regression modeling of attributional style, coping, and affect.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many researchers underscore the importance of coping in the daily lives of adolescents, yet very few studies measure this and related constructs at this level. Using a daily diary approach to stress and coping, the current study evaluated a series of mediational coping models in a sample of low-income minority adolescents (N = 89). Specifically, coping was hypothesized to mediate the relationship between attributional style (and dimensions) and daily affect. Using random coefficient regression modeling, the relationship between (a) the locus of causality dimension and positive affect was completely mediated by the use of acceptance and humor as coping strategies; (b) the stability dimension and positive affect was completely mediated by the use of both problem-solving and positive thinking; and (c) the stability dimension and negative affect was partially mediated by the use of religious coping. In addition, the locus of causality and stability (but not globality) dimensions were also directly related to affect. However, the relationship between pessimistic explanatory style and affect was not mediated by coping. Consistent with previous research, these findings suggest that attributions are both directly and indirectly related to indices of affect or adjustment. Thus, attributions may not only influence the type of coping strategy employed, but may also serve as coping strategies themselves.

Roesch SC; Vaughn AA; Aldridge AA; Villodas F

2009-10-01

329

HIV knowledge and its contribution to sexual health behaviors of low-income African American adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Although many factors contribute to racial disparities in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS among young African Americans, knowledge is a particularly modifiable factor. However, little information has been published about the current HIV knowledge of African American teens or to what extent knowledge independently contributes to their sexual behavior and health. This study aimed to describe the level of knowledge among this at-risk population and determine whether knowledge contributes to variance in sexual behavior and health beyond that of sociodemographic and psychological factors. METHODS: African American adolescents (n = 1658) were recruited in 2 northeastern and 2 southeastern US cities (74% eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch). Analyses utilized data gathered from adolescents using an audio computer-assisted self-interview program. RESULTS: On average, participants answered only 50% of HIV knowledge items correctly and were least accurate concerning effective condom use and HIV testing. Controlling tor associated sociodemographic and psychological factors, greater knowledge was associated with sexual experience and, among experienced adolescents, with sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing and--unexpectedly--less condom use. CONCLUSIONS: HIV knowledge, which is modifiable, is limited among at-risk African American adolescents and is an important contributor to sexual behavior and health. Findings indicate a need for more comprehensive HIV/AIDS education, particularly with regard to condom use and the benefits of routine sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing. Although knowledge might not be sufficiently protective in and of itself, having accurate information about HIV may benefit sexual health by impacting health-promoting attitudes necessary for successful engagement in health care-seeking behavior.

Swenson RR; Rizzo CJ; Brown LK; Vanable PA; Carey MP; Valois RF; DiClemente RJ; Romer D

2010-12-01

330

Gender nonconformity, perceived stigmatization, and psychological well-being in dutch sexual minority youth and young adults: a mediation analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Dutch sexual minority youth and young adults (106 females and 86 males, 16-24 years old) were assessed to establish whether there was a relation between gender nonconformity and psychological well-being and whether this relation was mediated by perceived experiences of stigmatization due to perceived or actual sexual orientation and moderated by biological sex. The participants were recruited via announcements on Dutch LGBTQ-oriented community websites and then linked to a protected online questionnaire. The questionnaire was used to measure gender nonconformity, perceived experiences of stigmatization, and psychological well-being. Gender nonconformity was found to predict lower levels of psychological well-being and the mediation analysis confirmed that lower levels of psychological well-being were related to the perceived experiences of stigmatization. This mediation was not moderated by biological sex. These findings show that both research and interventions should pay more attention to gender nonconformity among young people in order to create a more positive climate for young sexual minority members.

Baams L; Beek T; Hille H; Zevenbergen FC; Bos HM

2013-07-01

331

Gender nonconformity, perceived stigmatization, and psychological well-being in dutch sexual minority youth and young adults: a mediation analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Dutch sexual minority youth and young adults (106 females and 86 males, 16-24 years old) were assessed to establish whether there was a relation between gender nonconformity and psychological well-being and whether this relation was mediated by perceived experiences of stigmatization due to perceived or actual sexual orientation and moderated by biological sex. The participants were recruited via announcements on Dutch LGBTQ-oriented community websites and then linked to a protected online questionnaire. The questionnaire was used to measure gender nonconformity, perceived experiences of stigmatization, and psychological well-being. Gender nonconformity was found to predict lower levels of psychological well-being and the mediation analysis confirmed that lower levels of psychological well-being were related to the perceived experiences of stigmatization. This mediation was not moderated by biological sex. These findings show that both research and interventions should pay more attention to gender nonconformity among young people in order to create a more positive climate for young sexual minority members. PMID:23358856

Baams, Laura; Beek, Titia; Hille, Helene; Zevenbergen, Felice C; Bos, Henny M W

2013-01-29

332

The influence of older classmates on adolescent sexual behavior in Cape Town, South Africa.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examines the influence of exposure to older within-grade peers on sexual behavior among students in urban South Africa. Data are drawn from the Cape Area Panel Study, a longitudinal survey of young people conducted in metropolitan Cape Town from 2002 to 2006. The combination of early sexual debut, high rates of school enrollment into the late teens, and grade repetition create an environment in which young people who progress through school ahead of many in their cohort interact with classmates who may be several years older. We construct a measure of cumulative exposure to classmates who are at least two years older and show that such exposure is statistically significantly associated with early sexual initiation among adolescent girls. This exposure also increases the age difference between these girls and their first sexual partner, and helps explain a significant proportion of the earlier sexual debut of African girls, compared with colored and white girls in Cape Town.

Lam D; Marteleto LJ; Ranchhod V

2013-06-01

333

Sexual and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of adolescents in sierra leone, west Africa.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A survey of 307 Sierra Leonean adolescents between the ages of thirteen and nineteen was assessed to determine their sexual and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Results indicate high sexual activity rates among the sampled group; 89 percent of the males and 68 percent of the females had engaged in sexual intercourse. The mean age at first sexual intercourse was found to be 14.4 years for males and 15.1 years for females. Sixty-five percent of the males and 35 percent of the females reported having three or more sexual partners over their lifetime. Other findings included high rates of STDs and HIV/AIDS, low reported condom use, low reported use of other birth control methods, and low knowledge scores concerning pregnancy prevention, HIV/AIDS and STDs. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Richter DL; Barnes B; Strack RW; Rao R; Vincent ML

1996-01-01

334

Adolescent peer-on-peer sexual aggression: characteristics of aggressors of alcohol and non-alcohol-related assault.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of adolescents involved in alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related sexual assault of peers. METHOD: A Web-based survey was administered to 1,220 7th- to 12th-grade students from a middle school and high school in southeastern Michigan. RESULTS: Adolescents who reported alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related sexual aggression had higher levels of impulsivity and more extensive histories of dating, early sexual activity, and alcohol consumption than adolescents who did not assault. Moreover, aggressors of alcohol-related assault had higher levels of past-30-day alcohol use and reported more alcohol-/drug-related problems than aggressors of non-alcohol-related assault. CONCLUSIONS: Early identification of the characteristics associated with alcohol-related sexual aggression suggests that targeted interventions may be feasible for this group of adolescents at high risk for both sexual perpetration and alcoholism during adulthood.

Young AM; King L; Abbey A; Boyd CJ

2009-09-01

335

Homens adolescentes e vida sexual: heterogeneidades nas motivações que cercam a iniciação sexual Adolescent males and sex life: heterogeneous motivations related to sexual debut  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Buscou-se descrever a trajetória afetivo-amorosa e razões para o início ou adiamento da vida sexual de adolescentes do sexo masculino, por meio de entrevistas com 184 homens de 15 a 19 anos de idade, residentes no Município de São Paulo, Brasil, em 2002. O início da vida sexual ocorreu, entre outros, por conta da atração física, da curiosidade e do desejo de perder a virgindade, sugerindo um caráter mais próximo do papel social masculino. Por outro lado, a maior parte dos adolescentes virgens justificou sua opção por questões de ordem romântica, como não ter encontrado a pessoa certa ou porque gostaria de casar-se virgem. Os resultados revelaram um duplo padrão social em que há a valorização do sentimento de amor e entrega à pessoa amada simultaneamente à premência física e instintiva para o sexo. Padrões tradicionais de masculinidade, como a dissociação entre sexo e amor, parecem estar sendo transpostos no tocante à iniciação sexual, revelando diversidade nos modos de viver a sexualidade na adolescência que, por sua vez, estão relacionados à saúde sexual e reprodutiva dos homens e suas parcerias.This article describes male adolescents' affective history and reasons for initiating or postponing sexual activity, using interviews with 184 males ages 15 to 19 and residing in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in 2002. Factors for sexual debut included physical attraction, curiosity, and the desire to lose their virginity, suggesting a profile similar to the male social role. Most of the virgin adolescent males justified their choice based on issues of a romantic order, such as not having found the right person or because they preferred to remain virgin until marrying. The results showed a dual social pattern, valuing the feeling of love and deliverance to the loved one, simultaneously with the pressing physical and instinctive desire for sex. Traditional patterns of masculinity, like the dissociation between sex and love, appear to be transposed to sexual debut, revealing a diversity in the ways of experiencing sexuality during adolescence, related in turn to the sexual and reproductive health of men and their partners.

Ana Luiza Vilela Borges; Néia Schor

2007-01-01

336

Homens adolescentes e vida sexual: heterogeneidades nas motivações que cercam a iniciação sexual/ Adolescent males and sex life: heterogeneous motivations related to sexual debut  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese Buscou-se descrever a trajetória afetivo-amorosa e razões para o início ou adiamento da vida sexual de adolescentes do sexo masculino, por meio de entrevistas com 184 homens de 15 a 19 anos de idade, residentes no Município de São Paulo, Brasil, em 2002. O início da vida sexual ocorreu, entre outros, por conta da atração física, da curiosidade e do desejo de perder a virgindade, sugerindo um caráter mais próximo do papel social masculino. Por outro lado, a maio (more) r parte dos adolescentes virgens justificou sua opção por questões de ordem romântica, como não ter encontrado a pessoa certa ou porque gostaria de casar-se virgem. Os resultados revelaram um duplo padrão social em que há a valorização do sentimento de amor e entrega à pessoa amada simultaneamente à premência física e instintiva para o sexo. Padrões tradicionais de masculinidade, como a dissociação entre sexo e amor, parecem estar sendo transpostos no tocante à iniciação sexual, revelando diversidade nos modos de viver a sexualidade na adolescência que, por sua vez, estão relacionados à saúde sexual e reprodutiva dos homens e suas parcerias. Abstract in english This article describes male adolescents' affective history and reasons for initiating or postponing sexual activity, using interviews with 184 males ages 15 to 19 and residing in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in 2002. Factors for sexual debut included physical attraction, curiosity, and the desire to lose their virginity, suggesting a profile similar to the male social role. Most of the virgin adolescent males justified their choice based on issues of a romantic order, (more) such as not having found the right person or because they preferred to remain virgin until marrying. The results showed a dual social pattern, valuing the feeling of love and deliverance to the loved one, simultaneously with the pressing physical and instinctive desire for sex. Traditional patterns of masculinity, like the dissociation between sex and love, appear to be transposed to sexual debut, revealing a diversity in the ways of experiencing sexuality during adolescence, related in turn to the sexual and reproductive health of men and their partners.

Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Schor, Néia

2007-01-01

337

Sacred Choices: Adolescent Relationships and Sexual Ethics--The Reform Movement's Response to the Need for Faith-Based Sexuality Education  

Science.gov (United States)

"Sacred Choices: Adolescent Relationships and Sexual Ethics" is a sexual ethics curriculum for middle school and high school students developed by the Union for Reform Judaism. Sacred Choices strives to teach Reform Jewish teens that their bodies are gifts from God and that Judaism provides relevant guidance on how to use and care for that gift…

Winer, Rabbi Laura Novak

2011-01-01

338

Fuentes de información sobre educación sexual en adolescentes estudiantes de enfermería Information sources on sexual education in adolescents nursing students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVO: El propósito de este trabajo estuvo orientado a que la información obtenida incentivara la implementación de nuevos programas de educación en sexualidad para esta población, especialmente diseñados para la prevención del embarazo en la adolescencia. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y transversal para determinar las principales fuentes de información sobre educación sexual que tienen los adolescentes estudiantes de enfermería del nivel básico de la escuela hospital "Dr. Salvador Allende", en La Habana. RESULTADOS: Las principales vías por las cuales los adolescentes consideraron que recibían información sobre educación sexual para prevenir el embarazo fueron, en primer lugar, los medios de comunicación masiva, que correspondió al 92 % (604) de los encuestados. En segundo lugar los amigos, con el 70 % (456) y en tercer lugar los profesores (63,2 %). Los encuestados prefirieron recibir educación sexual preferentemente de la familia (93,75 %); en segundo lugar de los amigos (69,82 %) y en tercer lugar en la escuela (49,85). El 44 % escogió a la comunidad de los clubes y, por último, la literatura impresa, la cual alcanzó el 37,% en la preferencia. Solo el 12 % de los encuestados se comunicaba con los padres frecuentemente sobre los temas de sexualidad, el 57 % lo hacía con poca frecuencia y el 30% nunca lo hacía. DISCUSIÓN: Se profundiza en la información desagregada por sexo. Las fuentes de información que preferirían los adolescentes no se corresponden con las más accesibles para ellos. A pesar de considerar a la familia como fuente de preferencia, han recibido poca información de los padres. Los exponentes de atención primaria de salud no son percibidos como fuente de información. CONCLUSIONES: Debe reforzarse el rol educativo y afectivo entre padres y adolescentes, lo que posibilitará una mejor comunicación entre ellos.OBJECTIVE: The aim of present paper was aimed to motivate the implementation of new sexuality programs in this type of population especially those designed to prevent the pregnancy in adolescence according to information obtained. METHODS: A cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted to determine the main sources of information on the sexual education of adolescents studying nursing at basic level in the school of the «Salvador Allende» Hospital in La Habana. RESULTS: The main ways by which the adolescents received information on sexual education to prevent pregnancy were in the first place by the massive media, corresponding to the 92 % (604) of the person polled. In the second place through friends with the 70 % (456) and the third place by the professors (63.2 %). The person polled preferred to receive sexual education of the family (93.75%); in the second place of friends (69. 82 %) and in the third place in the school (49.85 %). The 44 % chose the club'community and lastly the printed literature, which achieved the 37 % in the preference. Only the 12 % of person polled had a frequent communication with the parents on the sexuality subjects, the 57 % had not much communication and the 30 % never done it. DISCUSSION: It is deepen in the information disintegrated by sex. The information sources of preferred by adolescent is not in correspondence with the more accessible for them. Despite the adolescents considered that family is the source of preference, they had not received much information of parents. The prime examples of primary health care are not considered as information source. CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to emphasize the educational and affective role among between parents and adolescents to facilitate a better communication between them.

Olga Gloria Barbón Pérez

2011-01-01

339

[Sexual behavior in adolescents aged 12 to 17 in Andalusia (Spain)].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To describe sexual behavior and activity among adolescents aged 12-17 years old in Andalusia (Spain) in 2007-2008. METHOD: The data for this study were collected through an anonymous questionnaire distributed to a stratified random sample of 2,225 secondary school students in Andalusia. Participation was voluntary. RESULTS: A total of 388 respondents (18.2%) reported having had complete sexual intercourse, with no statistically significant differences between boys (18.0%) and girls (18.5%). However, boys initiated the following practices earlier than girls: sexual activity (14 years versus 14.4 years), masturbation (11.3 years versus 12.7 years), oral sex (13.8 years versus 14.6 years) and mutual masturbation (13.7 years versus 14.4 years). Other gender differences included the number of sexual partners (two in boys versus 1.6 in girls), recent sexual activity (higher in girls), internet sex (higher in boys), contraceptive use during the first coitus (lower in boys) and knowledge about double-barrier methods of contraception and sexually transmitted diseases (higher in girls). CONCLUSIONS: One out of six Andalusian secondary education students had had sexual intercourse. Two-thirds of the students were sexually active, especially girls, with limited knowledge of double-barrier methods and sexually transmitted diseases. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of including sex education as a core subject in the secondary education curriculum.

Rodríguez Carrión J; Traverso Blanco CI

2012-11-01

340

Sexually Active Adolescent Women: Assessing Family and Peer Relationships Using Event History Calendars  

Science.gov (United States)

|The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore family and peer relationships (including support and influence on risk behavior) among sexually active European American and African American adolescent girls in the context of risk behaviors documented on retrospective event history calendars (EHCs) and in interviews. The EHCs were completed by…

Saftner, Melissa Ann; Martyn, Kristy Kiel; Lori, Jody Rae

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Differences in Trauma Symptoms and Family Functioning in Intra- and Extrafamilial Sexually Abused Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated to what extent abuse-related symptoms and family functioning are related to intra- or extrafamilial sexual abuse. One hundred adolescents (12 to 18 years old) were recruited shortly after disclosure of the abuse. Information from the participants was obtained through self-report questionnaires and a semistructured…

Bal, Sarah; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Crombez, Geert; Van Oost, Paulette

2004-01-01

342

Sexual Assault in School, Mental Health and Suicidal Behaviors in Adolescent Women in Canada.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reports on a study that explored adolescent women's (N=1,025) emotional problems, suicidal behavior, and the frequency and type of sexual assault they experienced in school. Results indicate that 23% of women suffered at least one assault. A correlation emerged between number of assaults and measures of emotional disorder. (RJM)

Bagley, Christopher; Bolitho, Floyd; Bertrand, Lorne

1997-01-01

343

The relationship between early sexual debut and psychosocial outcomes: a longitudinal study of Dutch adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

In a longitudinal dataset of 470 Dutch adolescents, the current study examined the ways in which early sexual initiation was related to subsequent attachment, self-perception, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems. For male adolescents, analyses revealed general attachment to mother and externalizing problems at Wave 1 to predict to early transition at Wave 2. However, there was no differential change in these psychosocial factors over time for early initiators of sexual intercourse and their non-initiating peers. For female adolescents, the model including psychosocial factors at Wave 1 did not predict to sexual initiation at Wave 2. However, univariate repeated measures analyses revealed early initiators to have significantly larger increases in self-concept and externalizing problems than their non-initiating female peers. While the difference between female early initiators and non-initiators were statistically significant, the mean levels of problem behaviors were very low. The findings suggest that, contrary to previous research, early sexual initiation does not seem to be clustered with problem behaviors for this sample of Dutch adolescents. PMID:20119696

Udell, Wadiya; Sandfort, Theo; Reitz, Ellen; Bos, Henny; Dekovic, Maja

2010-01-30

344

Peer and sexual relationships in the experience of drug-dependent adolescents in a therapeutic community.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Evidence for success of adolescent treatment programs, including therapeutic communities, has been found among those who complete treatment. However, there is a lack of research examining peer relationships as part of treatment experience. Given the central role of 'community', including peers, as agents of change in therapeutic communities, there is a need to better understand peer relationships in treatment. This ethnographic study provides a window into the dynamics of adolescent relationships in a residential treatment program. DESIGN AND METHODS: Four months of participant observation, including 21 residents (15 male and 6 female) aged between 14 and 18 years-comprising all residents admitted during the study. All the data in this paper are from those who were 16 years or over. RESULTS: The data reveal the complex peer relationships that form for some residents. Peer groups were found to provide a space for residents to feel included but more often were a mechanism to ostracise or bully others. In contrast to past studies, our study found sexual activity was widespread, in particular among girls. A lack of sex caused frustrations for some and sexual encounters were found to coincide with overt conflict between residents. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment programs for adolescents need to more explicitly grapple with the complexity of resident's peer relationships, which may impact on treatment experience. Our study suggests sexual relationships may be common in treatment programs for adolescents and a cause of conflict. Further research about the mediating impact of peer relationships, including sexual relationships, is needed.

Nathan S; Foster M; Ferry M

2011-07-01

345

“Shake It Baby, Shake It”: Media Preferences, Sexual Attitudes and Gender Stereotypes Among Adolescents  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this study exposure to and preferences for three important youth media (TV, music styles/music TV, internet) were examined in relation to adolescents’ permissive sexual attitudes and gender stereotypes (i.e., views of men as sex-driven and tough, and of women as sex objects). Multivariate structu...

ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Bogers, Sanne; Kloosterman, Monique

346

Adolescent sexual assault victims and the legal system: building community relationships to improve prosecution rates.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Adolescents are at high risk for sexual assault, but few of these crimes are reported to the police and prosecuted by the criminal justice system. To address this problem, communities throughout the United States have implemented multidisciplinary interventions to improve post-assault care for victims and increase prosecution rates. The two most commonly implemented interventions are Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Programs and Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether community-level context (i.e., stakeholder engagement and collaboration) was predictive of adolescent legal case outcomes, after accounting for "standard" factors that affect prosecution success (i.e., victim, assault, and evidence characteristics). Overall, 40% of the adolescent cases from these two SANE-SART programs (over a 10-year period) were successfully prosecuted. Cases were more likely to be prosecuted for younger victims, those with disabilities, those who knew their offenders, and instances in which the rape evidence collection kit was submitted by police for analysis. After accounting for these influences, multi-level modeling results revealed that in one site decreased allocation of community resources to adolescent sexual assault cases had a significant negative effect on prosecution case outcomes. Results are explained in terms of Wolff's (Am J Community Psychol 29:173-191, 2001) concept of "over-coalitioned" communities and Kelly's (1968) ecological principles.

Campbell R; Greeson MR; Bybee D; Fehler-Cabral G

2012-09-01

347

Thyroid Hormone Levels and Psychological Symptoms in Sexually Abused Adolescent Girls  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To explore the relationships between psychological symptoms and thyroid hormone levels in adolescent girls who had experienced the traumatic stress of sexual abuse. Method: The study design was cross-sectional/correlational. Subjects ("N"=22; age range=12-18 years) had their blood drawn, and they completed 2 psychological tests…

Haviland, Mark G.; Sonne, Janet L.; Anderson, Donald L.; Nelson, Jerald C.; Sheridan-Matney, Clare; Nichols, Joy G.; Carlton, Esther I.; Murdoch, William G. C.

2006-01-01

348

Effects of Youth Assets on Adolescent Alcohol, Tobacco, Marijuana Use, and Sexual Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Alcohol, tobacco, marijuana use, and sexual behaviors are consistently reported by high school students in the United States and can contribute to reduced quality of life. Empirical research finds that many assets may act as a protective factor for adolescent risk behaviors. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine the…

Dunn, Michael S.; Kitts, Cathy; Lewis, Sandy; Goodrow, Bruce; Scherzer, Gary D.

2011-01-01

349

Child physical and sexual abuse and cigarette smoking in adolescence and adulthood.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Analyses used data from an extended longitudinal study to examine the relationship between childhood physical and sexual abuse (CPA and CSA, respectively) and adolescent and adult smoking behavior. Two questions guided the study: (1) Is there an association between childhood abuse and adolescent and adult smoking behavior? (2) Does the relationship between childhood abuse and later cigarette smoking differ for males and females? METHODS: A censored-inflated path model was used to assess the impact of child abuse on adolescent and adult lifetime smoking prevalence and smoking frequency. Gender differences in significant model paths were assessed using a multiple-group approach. RESULTS: Results show no significant relation between CPA or CSA and risk of having ever smoked cigarettes in adolescence or adulthood. However, for males, both CPA and CSA had direct effects on adolescent smoking frequency. For females, only CSA predicted increased smoking frequency in adolescence. Adolescent smoking frequency predicted adult smoking frequency more strongly for females compared with males. CONCLUSIONS: CPA and CSA are risk factors for higher frequency of smoking in adolescence. Higher frequency of cigarette smoking in adolescence increases the risk of higher smoking frequency in adulthood. Results underscore the need for both primary and secondary prevention and intervention efforts to reduce the likelihood of childhood abuse and to lessen risk for cigarette smoking among those who have been abused.

Kristman-Valente AN; Brown EC; Herrenkohl TI

2013-10-01

350

Violência e atividade sexual desprotegida em adolescentes menores de 15 anos Violence and unsafe sexual activity of adolescents under 15 years of age  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores associados à atividade sexual desprotegida em adolescentes femininas menores de 15 anos. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional de corte transversal com adolescentes femininas menores de 15 anos e sexualmente ativas, atendidas em um ambulatório público de ginecologia. Os instrumentos de coleta de dados foram: entrevista semiestruturada para dados pessoais e de sexualidade, e exame clínico-laboratorial para diagnóstico de doenças sexualmente transmissíveis. Os dados foram analisados por meio de testes de frequência, de associação de variáveis com p OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with unprotected sexual activity in female adolescents younger than 15 years. METHODS: Observational cross-sectional trial with female teenagers less than 15 years-old and sexually active, attended at a public gynecology clinic. Instruments for data collection were: semi-structured interviews for personal data and about sexuality as well as clinical examination and laboratory tests for diagnosis of sexually transmitted diseases. Data were analyzed by testing of frequency, association of variables with p <0.05 and multiple correspondence analysis. RESULTS: One hundred adolescents between 11 an