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Sample records for self-esteem rosenberg self-esteem

  1. Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale: Two Factors or Method Effects.

    Tomas, Jose M.; Oliver, Amparo

    1999-01-01

    Results of a study with 640 Spanish high school students suggest the existence of a global self-esteem factor underlying responses to Rosenberg's (M. Rosenberg, 1965) Self-Esteem Scale, although the inclusion of method effects is needed to achieve a good model fit. Method effects are associated with item wording. (SLD)

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    Erik Franck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in self-esteem has been fuelled by the suggestion that level of self-esteem is associated with psychological well-being. In the present study, we translated the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES into the Dutch language and evaluated its psychometric properties in a sample of 442 adults. The results of both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed that a single-factor solution provides the best fit. In addition, the Dutch RSES showed high internal consistency as well as high congruent validity. Overall, these findings support the usefulness of the Dutch RSES as a measure for global self-esteem.

  3. Utility of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    Davis, Clare; Kellett, Stephen; Beail, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) continues to be used to purportedly measure self-esteem of people with intellectual disabilities, despite the lack of sound evidence concerning its validity and reliability when employed with this population. The psychometric foundations of the RSES were analyzed here with a sample of 219 participants with…

  4. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    Erik Franck; Rudi De Raedt; Catherine Barbez; Yves Rosseel

    2008-01-01

    Interest in self-esteem has been fuelled by the suggestion that level of self-esteem is associated with psychological well-being. In the present study, we translated the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) into the Dutch language and evaluated its psychometric properties in a sample of 442 adults. The results of both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed that a single-factor solution provides the best fit. In addition, the Dutch RSES showed high internal consistency as well as...

  5. Correlates of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Method Effects

    Quilty, Lena C.; Oakman, Jonathan M.; Risko, Evan

    2006-01-01

    Investigators of personality assessment are becoming aware that using positively and negatively worded items in questionnaires to prevent acquiescence may negatively impact construct validity. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) has demonstrated a bifactorial structure typically proposed to result from these method effects. Recent work suggests…

  6. Factorial Structure of Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale among Crack-Cocaine Drug Users.

    Wang, Jichuan; Siegal, Harvey A.; Falck, Russell S.; Carlson, Robert G.

    2001-01-01

    Used nine different confirmatory factor analysis models to test the factorial structure of Rosenberg's (M. Rosenberg, 1965) self-esteem scale with a sample of 430 crack-cocaine users. Results partly support earlier research to show a single global self-esteem factor underlying responses to the Rosenberg scale, method effects associated with item…

  7. RSE-40: An Alternate Scoring System for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE).

    Wallace, Gaylen R.

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (RSE) is a 10-item scale purporting to measure self-esteem using self-acceptance and self-worth statements. This analysis covers concerns about the degree to which the RSE items represent a particular content universe, the RSE's applicability, factor analytic methods used, and the RSE's reliability and validity.…

  8. Contribution of Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem in Predicting Depression

    Shraddha Sharma; Surila Agarwala

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted with the purpose to examine the relationship among self-esteem, collective self-esteem and depression. Anotherobjective was to study the contribution of self-esteem and collective self-esteem in predicting depression. Beck Depression Inventory (1996),Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (1985) and Collective Self-Esteem Inventory by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992) were used to measuredepression, self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. Study was carried out on 2...

  9. Factorial Structure of the French Version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale among the Elderly

    Gana, Kamel; Alaphilippe, Daniel; Bailly, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Ten different confirmatory factor analysis models, including ones with correlated traits correlated methods, correlated traits correlated uniqueness, and correlated traits uncorrelated methods, were proposed to examine the factorial structure of the French version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965). In line with previous studies…

  10. Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem Among Adolescents: An Interventional Approach

    Shraddha Sharma; Surila Agarwala

    2015-01-01

    Present research was conducted with the purpose to study the effectiveness of behavioural intervention program in enhancing the self-esteem and collective self-esteem among adolescents. The research was conducted on 74 subjects in the age range of 17-23 years. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSE; Rosenberg, 1965) and Collective self-esteem scale developed by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992) were used to measure self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. A self-structured behavioural interve...

  11. Factorial Validity and Invariance of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale among Portuguese Youngsters

    Vasconcelos-Raposo, Jose; Fernandes, Helder Miguel; Teixeira, Carla M.; Bertelli, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability, factorial validity and measurement invariance (across gender, age and physical activity participation) of a Portuguese version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). The sample consisted of 1,763 Portuguese youngsters (731 male and 1,032 female) with ages between 15 and 20 years.…

  12. Psychometric evaluation of the general health questionnaire-12 and Rosenberg self-esteem scale in Hungarian and Slovak early adolescents

    Sarkova, M.; Nagyova, I.; Katreniakova, Z.; Geckova, A.M.; Orosova, O.; Middel, B.; Dijk, J.P. van; van den Heuvel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The reliability and factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSE) were evaluated in samples of Hungarian and Slovak early adolescents. The principal component analyses support the two-factor solution for GHQ-12 with subscales "depression/anxiety" and "social dysfunction". Similarly, the RSE appears to be an instrument with a two-factor structure with subscales "negative self-esteem" and "positive self-esteem" in both samples. Reliab...

  13. Evaluation of the Factor Structure of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in Older Adults

    Mullen, Sean P; Gothe, Neha P.; McAuley, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale is the most utilized measure of global self-esteem. Although psychometric studies have generally supported the uni-dimensionality of this 10-item scale, more recently, a stable, response-bias has been associated with the wording of the items (Marsh, Scalas, & Nagengast, 2010). The purpose of this report was to replicate Marsh et al.’s findings in a sample of older adults and to test for invariance across time, gender and levels of education. Our results indicat...

  14. An examination of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale using collegiate wheelchair basketball student athletes.

    Vermillion, Mark; Dodder, Richard A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose was to examine the construct validity of the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES). The construct validity of the scale was examined by applying it to collegiate wheelchair basketball student athletes at an NCAA sanctioned wheelchair basketball tournament at a mid-sized university in the south central United States (N=68). In accordance with previous research on the scale, Cronbach alpha was .86; confirmatory factor analysis supported a one-factor structure. The scale is useful for measuring global self-esteem in collegiate wheelchair basketball student athletes. PMID:17566431

  15. Longitudinal Tests of Competing Factor Structures for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: Traits, Ephemeral Artifacts, and Stable Response Styles

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Scalas, L. Francesca; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Self-esteem, typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), is one of the most widely studied constructs in psychology. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that a simple unidimensional factor model, consistent with the original design and typical application in applied research, does not provide an adequate explanation of RSE…

  16. Extending Structural Analyses of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale to Consider Criterion-Related Validity: Can Composite Self-Esteem Scores Be Good Enough?

    Donnellan, M Brent; Ackerman, Robert A; Brecheen, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Although the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) is the most widely used measure of global self-esteem in the literature, there are ongoing disagreements about its factor structure. This methodological debate informs how the measure should be used in substantive research. Using a sample of 1,127 college students, we test the overall fit of previously specified models for the RSES, including a newly proposed bifactor solution (McKay, Boduszek, & Harvey, 2014 ). We extend previous work by evaluating how various latent factors from these structural models are related to a set of criterion variables frequently studied in the self-esteem literature. A strict unidimensional model poorly fit the data, whereas models that accounted for correlations between negatively and positively keyed items tended to fit better. However, global factors from viable structural models had similar levels of association with criterion variables and with the pattern of results obtained with a composite global self-esteem variable calculated from observed scores. Thus, we did not find compelling evidence that different structural models had substantive implications, thereby reducing (but not eliminating) concerns about the integrity of the self-esteem literature based on overall composite scores for the RSES. PMID:26192536

  17. Construct validity, dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale: A bifactor modelling approach among children of prisoners

    Sharratt, Kathryn; Boduszek, Daniel; Jones, Adele; Gallagher, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1989) has traditionally been conceptualised as a unidimensional measure of self-esteem but empirical evidence is equivocal, with some studies supporting a one-factor solution and others favouring multidimensional models. The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure, factorial invariance and composite reliability of the RSES within a European sample of children affected by parental imprisonment (N = 724). The study specified and te...

  18. On the factor structure of the Rosenberg (1965) General Self-Esteem Scale.

    Alessandri, Guido; Vecchione, Michele; Eisenberg, Nancy; Łaguna, Mariola

    2015-06-01

    Since its introduction, the Rosenberg General Self-Esteem Scale (RGSE, Rosenberg, 1965) has been 1 of the most widely used measures of global self-esteem. We conducted 4 studies to investigate (a) the goodness-of-fit of a bifactor model positing a general self-esteem (GSE) factor and 2 specific factors grouping positive (MFP) and negative items (MFN) and (b) different kinds of validity of the GSE, MFN, and MFP factors of the RSGE. In the first study (n = 11,028), the fit of the bifactor model was compared with those of 9 alternative models proposed in literature for the RGSE. In Study 2 (n = 357), the external validities of GSE, MFP, and MFN were evaluated using objective grade point average data and multimethod measures of prosociality, aggression, and depression. In Study 3 (n = 565), the across-rater robustness of the bifactor model was evaluated. In Study 4, measurement invariance of the RGSE was further supported across samples in 3 European countries, Serbia (n = 1,010), Poland (n = 699), and Italy (n = 707), and in the United States (n = 1,192). All in all, psychometric findings corroborate the value and the robustness of the bifactor structure and its substantive interpretation. PMID:25580614

  19. Self-esteem and Individual Wealth

    Swarn CHATTERJEE; Finke, Michael; Harness, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Self-esteem measures confidence in one’s abilities. Prior literature has shown that higher self-esteem can also affect individual financial decision making through an increased willingness to invest in risky assets and motivation to enhance self image through wealth accumulation. However, self-esteem can also lead to wealth-destroying investment behaviors due to overconfidence and an unwillingness to accept inevitable losses. Using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale included in the National Long...

  20. Aesthetic self-esteem.

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2015-01-01

    The concept of aesthetic self-esteem was explored for utilization in the medical spa environment. The aims and purposes of the analysis were outlined. The literature review identified various uses of the self-esteem concept as well as published definitions of the word. Defining attributes were also explored and examined, including positive and negative connotations of self-esteem. Two tools were utilized to help aesthetic nurse specialists assess patients for self-esteem and assess for a possible mental illness that may present as low self-esteem. A culturally sensitive theoretical definition of self-esteem was constructed to fit the needs and environment of medical spas. A model case of this definition, as well as a borderline and contrary case, was presented. Antecedents and consequences, as well as empirical referents of the concept, were explored. PMID:25730537

  1. Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem Among Adolescents: An Interventional Approach

    Shraddha Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Present research was conducted with the purpose to study the effectiveness of behavioural intervention program in enhancing the self-esteem and collective self-esteem among adolescents. The research was conducted on 74 subjects in the age range of 17-23 years. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSE; Rosenberg, 1965 and Collective self-esteem scale developed by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992 were used to measure self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. A self-structured behavioural intervention program was administered for three months to enhance low level of self-esteem and low level of collective self-esteem among subjects. In the interventional program, teachers and parents were requested to cooperate. Pre- and post-test design was used. Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was applied to test the significance of difference between pre-intervention scores and post-intervention scores of self-esteem and collective self-esteem. The results showed that the mean self-esteem score in pre-measure was 11.31, which increased to 17.42 in post measure and Z value was -7.51 that was significant at .01 level. It suggests that there is significant difference between pre-intervention self-esteem score and post-intervention self-esteem score. Further, the results showed that the mean collective self-esteem score was 34.73 in pre-intervention measure which increased to 53.47 in post-intervention measure. The obtained Z value for collective self-esteem was -7.57 that was also significant at .01 level. It suggests that there is significant difference between pre-intervention collective self-esteem scores and post-intervention collective self-esteem scores. Thus, the results proved the effectiveness of interventional program in enhancing self-esteem and collective self-esteem.

  2. Self-Esteem.

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    The paper examines self-esteem, what contributes to it, why it is important, and ways to build it in children, especially those with disabilities. Definitions of four basic terms (self-esteem, body image, unconditional acceptance, and active-reflective listening) are offered. Guidelines for teachers and parents are then offered in the form of…

  3. Situated Self-Esteem

    Cigman, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Pervasive though it is in modern life, the concept of self-esteem is often viewed with distrust. This paper departs from an idea that was recently aired by Richard Smith: that we might be better off without this concept. The meaning of self-esteem is explored within four homes: the self-help industry, social science, therapy and education. It is…

  4. Mean and Covariance Structures Analyses: An Examination of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale among Adolescents and Adults.

    Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Corwyn, Robert Flynn

    2003-01-01

    Examined the cross-age comparability of the widely used Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) in 414 adolescents and 900 adults in families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children. Found similarities of means in the RSES across groups. (SLD)

  5. Psychometric evaluation of the general health questionnaire-12 and Rosenberg self-esteem scale in Hungarian and Slovak early adolescents

    Sarkova, M.; Nagyova, I.; Katreniakova, Z.; Geckova, A.M.; Orosova, O.; Middel, B.; van Dijk, J.P.; van den Heuvel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The reliability and factor structure of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSE) were evaluated in samples of Hungarian and Slovak early adolescents. The principal component analyses support the two-factor solution for GHQ-12 with subscales "depression/a

  6. Self-esteem in adolescent patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder during open-label atomoxetine treatment: psychometric evaluation of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and clinical findings

    Dittmann, Ralf W.; Wehmeier, Peter M; Schacht, Alexander; Lehmann, Martin; Lehmkuhl, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    To report on (1) psychometric properties of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES) studied in adolescents with ADHD, (2) correlations of SES with ADHD scale scores, and (3) change in patient-reported self-esteem with atomoxetine treatment. ADHD patients (12–17 years), treated in an open-label study for 24 weeks. Secondary analyses on ADHD symptoms (assessed with ADHD-RS, CGI, GIPD scales) and self-esteem (SES) were performed. One hundred and fifty-nine patients were treated. A dichotomous stru...

  7. Story on Self-Esteem

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes The Story on Self-Esteem KidsHealth > For Kids > The Story on Self-Esteem ... español La historia de la autoestima What Is Self-Esteem? Self-esteem is a way of thinking and ...

  8. Contribution of Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem in Predicting Depression

    Shraddha Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted with the purpose to examine the relationship among self-esteem, collective self-esteem and depression. Anotherobjective was to study the contribution of self-esteem and collective self-esteem in predicting depression. Beck Depression Inventory (1996,Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (1985 and Collective Self-Esteem Inventory by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992 were used to measuredepression, self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. Study was carried out on 200 subjects in the age range of 17-23 years,selected from Agra city. The results of the research showed that there was significant positive relationship between self-esteem and collectiveself-esteem (p < .01, significant negative relationship between self-esteem and depression (p < .01. It was also found that collective self-esteemwas a significant predictor of depression. This research implies that an optimum level of self-esteem and high collective self-esteem not onlyprevents depression but also enhances the positive aspects of personality.

  9. The Factor Structure and Composite Reliability of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale among Ex-Prisoners

    Boduszek, Daniel; Hyland, Philip; Dhingra, Katie; Mallett, John

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure and composite reliability of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) using a sample of 669 ex-prisoners identified in the National Survey of American Life. Six distinct factor models, with uncorrelated measurement error terms, were specified and tested using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results indicated that the two-factor model consisting of positive and negative latent variables provided a better fit to the data than the al...

  10. Norms and Construct Validity of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in Canadian High School Populations: Implications for Counselling.

    Bagley, Christopher; Bolitho, Floyd; Bertrand, Lorne

    1997-01-01

    Reports on instrument validity regarding self-esteem among high school students (N=2,108) in the Province of Alberta. Results indicate significant variation of mean scores across age-groups within female students even though females had significantly lower self-esteem than males. Findings support the reliability of the self-esteem instrument. (RJM)

  11. A Two-Level Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Modified Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    Zimprich, Daniel; Perren, Sonja; Hornung, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Classical factor analysis assumes independent and identically distributed observations. Educational data, however, are often hierarchically structured, with, for example, students being nested within classes. In this study, data on self-esteem gathered in a sample of 1,107 students within 72 school classes in Switzerland were analyzed using…

  12. What Is Self-Esteem?

    Branden, Nathaniel

    By "self-esteem" is meant more than an innate sense of self-worth that presumably is a human birthright. Self-esteem is individuals' experience that they are appropriate to life and to the requirements of life. More specifically, self-esteem is confidence in the ability to think; confidence in the ability to cope with the challenges of life; and…

  13. Method Effects on an Adaptation of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in Greek and the Role of Personality Traits.

    Michaelides, Michalis P; Koutsogiorgi, Chrystalla; Panayiotou, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale is a balanced, 10-item scale designed to be unidimensional; however, research has repeatedly shown that its factorial structure is contaminated by method effects due to item wording. Beyond the substantive self-esteem factor, 2 additional factors linked to the positive and negative wording of items have been theoretically specified and empirically supported. Initial evidence has revealed systematic relations of the 2 method factors with variables expressing approach and avoidance motivation. This study assessed the fit of competing confirmatory factor analytic models for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale using data from 2 samples of adult participants in Cyprus. Models that accounted for both positive and negative wording effects via 2 latent method factors had better fit compared to alternative models. Measures of experiential avoidance, social anxiety, and private self-consciousness were associated with the method factors in structural equation models. The findings highlight the need to specify models with wording effects for a more accurate representation of the scale's structure and support the hypothesis of method factors as response styles, which are associated with individual characteristics related to avoidance motivation, behavioral inhibition, and anxiety. PMID:26528728

  14. Original article Construct validity, dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: a bifactor modelling approach among children of prisoners

    Kathryn Sharratt; Daniel Boduszek; Adele Jones; Bernard Gallagher

    2014-01-01

    Background The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) has traditionally been conceptualised as a unidimensional measure of self-esteem, but empirical evidence is equivocal, with some studies supporting a one-factor solution and others favouring multidimensional models. Participants and procedure The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure, factorial invariance and composite reliability of the RSES within a European sample of children affected by parental imprison...

  15. Self-Esteem, Coping Efforts and Marital Adjustment

    Claude Bélanger; Marie-France Di Schiavi; Stéphane Sabourin; Caroline Dugal; Ghassan El Baalbaki; Yvan Lussier

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between self-esteem, specific coping strategies and marital adjustment. The sample consists of 216 subjects from 108 couples who completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Ways of Coping Checklist. The results confirm the presence of a relationship between self-esteem, specific coping strategies and marital adjustment in men and women. High self-esteem and marital adjustment are associated ...

  16. Investigating the psychometric properties of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale for South African residents of Greater Pretoria.

    Westaway, Margaret S; Jordaan, Esmè R; Tsai, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    Interviewers administered the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSES) to five groups of Black (formal township and informal settlement), White, Indian, and mixed race adult residents of Greater Pretoria. The results demonstrated that the RSES was psychometrically sound for the five groups. The minimal effects of sociodemographic characteristics on global self-esteem showed that the RSES and its two dimensions, self-competence (SC) and self-liking (SL), were suitable in this setting. All five groups scored above the theoretical midpoint of the RSES, indicating that generally positive self-evaluations appear to be universal. The relationships between positively and negatively worded items, SC, and SL attested to the following: internal structure reliability, congruence between positive and negative items, no negative biases in response, and concordance between SC and SL dimensions. The significant differences between informal settlement residents and the other four groups on global self-esteem, positively and negatively worded items, and SC and SL were possibly due to physiological needs taking precedence over higher order needs. PMID:24064430

  17. A Comparison of Reliability and Construct Validity between the Original and Revised Versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale

    Tinakon, Wongpakaran; Nahathai, Wongpakaran

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) is a widely used instrument that has been tested for reliability and validity in many settings; however, some negative-worded items appear to have caused it to reveal low reliability in a number of studies. In this study, we revised one negative item that had previously (from the previous studies) produced the worst outcome in terms of the structure of the scale, then re-analyzed the new version for its reliability and construct validity, compa...

  18. Damaged Self-Esteem is Associated with Internalizing Problems

    Daan eCreemers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Implicit and explicit self-esteem are assumed to be important factors in understanding the onset and maintenance of psychological problems. The current study aims to examine the association between implicit and explicit self-esteem and their interaction with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and loneliness. Specifically, the relationship between the size and the direction of the discrepancy between implicit and explicit self-esteem with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and loneliness were examined. Participants were 95 young female adults (M= 21.2 years, SD = 1.88 enrolled in higher education. We administered the IAT to assess implicit self-esteem, and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale to measure explicit self-esteem while psychological problems were assessed through self-reports. Results showed that discrepancies between implicit and explicit self-esteem were positively associated with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness. In addition, the direction of the discrepancy was specifically relevant: damaged self-esteem (i.e., high implicit self-esteem and low explicit self-esteem was consistently associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness. In contrast, defensive or fragile self-esteem (i.e., low implicit and high explicit self-esteem was solely associated with loneliness. These findings provide further support that specifically damaged self-esteem is an important vulnerability marker for depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness.

  19. Importance and usefulness of evaluating self-esteem in children.

    Hosogi, Mizuho; Okada, Ayumi; Fujii, Chikako; Noguchi, Keizou; Watanabe, Kumi

    2012-01-01

    Self-esteem is the "feeling of self-appreciation" and is an indispensable emotion for people to adapt to society and live their lives. For children, in particular, the environment in which they are raised contributes profoundly to the development of their self-esteem, which in turn helps them to adapt better to society. Various psychologists have provided definitions of self-esteem, and examined methods of objectively evaluating self-esteem. Questionnaire-style assessment methods for adult include Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Janis-Field Feeling of Inadequacy Scale, and these for children include Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Pope's 5-Scale Test of Self-Esteem for children, and Kid- KINDL®. Other methods include Ziller Social Self-Esteem Scale and Implicit Association Test. The development of children's self-esteem is heavily influenced by their environment, that is, their homes, neighborhoods, and schools. Children with damaged self-esteem are at risk of developing psychological and social problems, which hinders recovery from low self-esteem. Thus, to recover low self-esteem, it is important for children to accumulate a series of successful experiences to create a positive concept of self. Evaluating children's self-esteem can be an effective method for understanding their past and present circumstances, and useful to treat for children with psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22433387

  20. Importance and usefulness of evaluating self-esteem in children

    Hosogi Mizuho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-esteem is the "feeling of self-appreciation" and is an indispensable emotion for people to adapt to society and live their lives. For children, in particular, the environment in which they are raised contributes profoundly to the development of their self-esteem, which in turn helps them to adapt better to society. Various psychologists have provided definitions of self-esteem, and examined methods of objectively evaluating self-esteem. Questionnaire-style assessment methods for adult include Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Janis-Field Feeling of Inadequacy Scale, and these for children include Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Pope's 5-Scale Test of Self-Esteem for children, and Kid- KINDL®. Other methods include Ziller Social Self-Esteem Scale and Implicit Association Test. The development of children's self-esteem is heavily influenced by their environment, that is, their homes, neighborhoods, and schools. Children with damaged self-esteem are at risk of developing psychological and social problems, which hinders recovery from low self-esteem. Thus, to recover low self-esteem, it is important for children to accumulate a series of successful experiences to create a positive concept of self. Evaluating children's self-esteem can be an effective method for understanding their past and present circumstances, and useful to treat for children with psychosomatic disorders.

  1. Body Image and Self-Esteem

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Body Image and Self-Esteem KidsHealth > For Teens > Body Image and Self-Esteem ... really bring down your self-esteem . Why Are Self-Esteem and Body Image Important? Self-esteem is all ...

  2. Self-Esteem and Earnings

    Drago, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Recent research in economics suggests a positive association between self-esteem and earnings. A major problem in this literature is that from simple cross-sectional wage regressions it is not possible to conclude that self-esteem has a causal impact on earnings. While classical measurement error leads to an attenuation bias, reverse causality and omitted variable are likely to drive the OLS coefficient on self-esteem upward. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) that adminis...

  3. Validation of two conceptualizations of fragile self-esteem: Contingent high self-esteem and incongruent high self-esteem

    Bodroža Bojana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to validate two aspects of fragile high self-esteem: a combination of contingent and high (explicit) self-esteem and a combination of high explicit and low implicit self-esteem (i.e. incongruent high self-esteem), as well as to examine the relationship between these aspects of fragile self-esteem and narcissism. No convergence was found between contingent high and incongruent high self-esteem. The result was consistent regardles...

  4. EXAMINING BADMINTON ATHLETES’ SELF-ESTEEM

    EYLEM GENCER

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine badminton athletes’ self-esteem according to some variables. The research was carried out in Badminton Turkey Clubs Championship where 12 clubs and 87 athletes participated in 2009. 42 national and 14 non-national totaly 56 badminton athletes whose mean age 18.78±3.46 that participated in Badminton Turkey Clubs Championship in 2009 constitute our research sample. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, that was developed by Rosenberg (1963 and adapted to Turkish by Çuhadaroglu was used to gather tha data. The data were analyzed by using the techniques such as desriptive statistics, bivariate correlation and Mann Whitney U test. Results showed that national athletes’ self-esteem points are higher than non-national athletes, there is positive and significant relationship between athletes’ self-esteem points and age, there is significant difference in athletes’ self-esteem points according to gender in favour of female badminton athletes, there is no significant relationship between athletes’ self-esteem points and competitor year, education, number of training day and interest to sport.

  5. A social work study on the effects of self-esteem games on elementary female self-esteem

    Samaneh Moein

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and clinicians from many disciplines are interested in learning more about the effects of self-esteem. Self-esteem affects motivation, functional behavior, and life satisfaction, and it is associated with well-being throughout life, significantly. What individuals choose to do and the way they do it in part may depend on their self-esteem and it can also fulfill the aims of mental health. This paper presents an investigation to determine the effect of play on children’s self-esteem and surveys appropriate interventions in this area. This study was semi experimental and the sample was 3rd grade elementary students who were randomly assigned into control (n=15 and experimental (n=15 groups. The instrument was Rosenberg self-esteem scale [Rosenberg, M. (1965. Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSE. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Measures Package, 61.]. Independent variable was 12 group sessions of self-esteem games executed among experimental group. Data was analyzed with univariate analysis of covariance. Results showed that self-esteem games in α ≤ 0.05 were affected on self-esteem of children. Self-esteem game can be effective intervention for children self-esteem that with them control of factors such as time and children interactions with parent and teachers in future investigations could lead to greater confidence in its effectiveness discussed.

  6. Cyberbullying and Self-Esteem

    Patchin, Justin W.; Hinduja, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    Background: This article examines the relationship between middle school students' experience with cyberbullying and their level of self-esteem. Previous research on traditional bullying among adolescents has found a relatively consistent link between victimization and lower self-esteem, while finding an inconsistent relationship between offending…

  7. Self-Esteem and Delinquency.

    Rosenberg, Florence R.; Rosenberg, Morris

    1978-01-01

    The relation between self-esteem and delinquency among high school youth was studied by cross-lagged panel correlations, which indicated that low self-esteem tended to cause delinquency, particularly among lower socioeconomic status youth. A reviewer's comment by McCord and the authors' reply are appended. (CTM)

  8. EXAMINING BADMINTON ATHLETES’ SELF-ESTEEM

    EYLEM GENCER; Ekrem Levent İLHAN

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine badminton athletes’ self-esteem according to some variables. The research was carried out in Badminton Turkey Clubs Championship where 12 clubs and 87 athletes participated in 2009. 42 national and 14 non-national totaly 56 badminton athletes whose mean age 18.78±3.46 that participated in Badminton Turkey Clubs Championship in 2009 constitute our research sample. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, that was developed by Rosenberg (1963) and adapted to Turkish ...

  9. Global Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy Correlates: Relation of Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem among Emirati Students

    Afari, Ernest; Ward, Graeme; Khine, Myint Swe

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between global self-esteem, academic self-efficacy and academic performance among a sample of 255 college students in the United Arab Emirates. The widely used Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965) and an academic self-efficacy scale, modified from (Jinks and Morgan, 1999) were used to assess…

  10. Computerized and Paper-and-Pencil Versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: A Comparison of Psychometric Features and Respondent Preferences.

    Vispoel, Walter P.; Boo, Jaeyool; Bleiler, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the characteristics of computerized and paper-and-pencil versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES) using scores for 224 college students. Results show that mode of administration has little effect on the psychometric properties of the SES although the computerized version took longer and was preferred by examinees. (SLD)

  11. Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem KidsHealth > For Parents > Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem ... response might be "I can't." What Is Self-Esteem? Self-esteem is similar to self-worth (how ...

  12. How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz) KidsHealth > For Teens > How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz) Print A A A Text Size We hear a lot about the importance of self-esteem. Self-esteem can influence our happiness and success. ...

  13. Improving Self-Esteem in General Music

    Culp, Mara E.

    2016-01-01

    Positive self-esteem helps students succeed in and outside of music classrooms. High self-esteem is associated with a positive self-image and fine musicianship. Conversely, low self-esteem is associated with a negative self-image and poorer musicianship. Because students' self-esteem may affect their participation in music classes, the music…

  14. Escala de Autoestima de Rosenberg (EAR: validade fatorial e consistência interna Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSS: factorial validity and internal consistency

    Juliana Burges Sbicigo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar as propriedades psicométricas da Escala de Autoestima de Rosenberg (EAR para adolescentes. Participaram 4.757 adolescentes, com idades entre 14 e 18 anos (M=15,77; DP=1,22, de nove cidades brasileiras. Os participantes responderam a uma versão da EAR adaptada para o Brasil. A análise fatorial exploratória apontou uma estrutura bidimensional, com 51.4% da variância explicada, que foi sustentada pela análise fatorial confirmatória. As análises de consistência interna realizadas por meio do coeficiente alfa de Cronbach, confiabilidade composta e variância extraída indicaram bons valores de fidedignidade. Diferenças nos escores de autoestima em função do sexo e da idade não foram encontradas. Conclui-se que a EAR apresenta qualidades psicométricas satisfatórias, mostrando-se um instrumento confiável para medir autoestima em adolescentes brasileiros.The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometrics properties of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSS for adolescents. The sample was composed of 4.757 adolescents, with ages between 14 and 18 years old (M=15.77; SD=1.22 in nine Brazilian cities. Participants responded to an adapted version of the RSS for Brazil. Exploratory factorial analysis showed a bidimensional structure, with 51.4% of explained variance. This result was supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency analysis by Cronbach alpha coefficient, composite reliability and extracted variance indicated good reliability. Differences in self-esteem for gender and age were not found. These findings show that RSS has satisfactory psychometric qualities and it's a reliable instrument to assess self-esteem in Brazilian adolescents.

  15. Two objective measures of self-esteem.

    Lorr, M; Wunderlich, R A

    1986-01-01

    Two scales were constructed to assess self-esteem, conceptualized as reflecting (a) feelings of competence and efficacy, and (b) perceived positive appraisal from significant others. To control for response bias a paired choice format was chosen for the items constructed. A buffer scale designed to measure social assertiveness was also included. Data were collected on three samples of high school boys. The item intercorrelations were subjected to principal component analyses followed by Varimax rotations. In each of the three analyses factors of Confidence, Popularity (Social Approval), and Social Assertiveness emerged. The revised self-esteem scales, each defined by 11 items, have been shown to have acceptable reliability and some concurrent validity based on correlations with the well-known Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. PMID:16367444

  16. Original article Construct validity, dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: a bifactor modelling approach among children of prisoners

    Kathryn Sharratt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES has traditionally been conceptualised as a unidimensional measure of self-esteem, but empirical evidence is equivocal, with some studies supporting a one-factor solution and others favouring multidimensional models. Participants and procedure The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure, factorial invariance and composite reliability of the RSES within a European sample of children affected by parental imprisonment (N = 724. The study specified and tested six alternative factor models using conventional confirmatory factor analytic (CFA techniques and a confirmatory bifactor modelling approach. Results The RSES was most effectively represented by a bifactor model including a general self-esteem factor comprising all ten scale items and separate method effects for the positively and negatively phrased items. This model was found to be factorially invariant among boys and girls. Composite reliability indicated good internal consistency for the general self-esteem dimension but slightly less so for the positive and negative method effects. Conclusions It follows that the calculation of a total RSES score is appropriate for children of prisoners, providing that the presence of method effects is taken into consideration to avoid giving rise to false interpretations. This study demonstrated the application of a bifactorial modeling approach as a potential solution.

  17. Investigating self-esteem in individuals with schizophrenia: relevance of the Self-Esteem Rating Scale-Short Form.

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc; Laisné, François

    2006-06-30

    Studies investigating self-esteem in individuals with severe mental illness, either as a treatment goal, outcome or correlate to other variables, have increased over the past few years. One of the main difficulties in assessing self-esteem is the assessment itself, often measuring global and stable self-esteem as in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, or requiring extensive training and long interviews. The present article aims at demonstrating the relevance of the French and English versions of the Self-Esteem Rating Scale-Short Form with individuals with severe mental illness. The instrument's reliability and validity were investigated in a sample of 250 French Canadian college students, 247 British college students and three samples of English- or French-speaking individuals with severe mental illness (N=254, N=150 and N=171). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that a shorter version of the instrument (20 items), with a positive and a negative self-esteem factor, had a great validity for all the samples studied. The Self-Esteem Rating Scale-Short Form, with its positive and negative self-esteem subscales, appears to be a valid and reliable self-esteem measure for individuals with mental health problems. Limitations of this study and future directions are discussed. PMID:16725210

  18. Explicit self-esteem mediates the relationship between implicit self-esteem and memory biases in major depression.

    Romero, Nuria; Sanchez, Alvaro; Vázquez, Carmelo; Valiente, Carmen

    2016-08-30

    This study examines the relationships between explicit and implicit self-esteem and self-referent memory biases in depression. We specifically tested the hypothesis that implicit self-esteem would influence depression-related memory biases via its association with explicit self-esteem. Self-esteem was assessed in patients with a current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD; n=38) and in a control group of participants who had never experienced depression (ND; n=40) by using explicit (Rosenberg Self-esteem Questionnaire) and implicit (Go/No-go Association Task) measures. A self-referent processing task of negative and positive adjectives was used to assess memory bias. Our analyses revealed that participants diagnosed with MDD showed lower levels of both explicit and implicit self-esteem in comparison to ND participants. MDD compared to ND participants also recalled a greater number of depressed self-referent adjectives and lower recall of positive self-referent information. Mediation analyses showed an indirect effect of explicit self-esteem on the relationship between implicit self-esteem and depression-related memory biases in the MDD group. These findings suggest an association between implicit and explicit self-esteem in depression that may result in negative cognitive processing, as reflected by self-referent memory biases. PMID:27341330

  19. Self-Esteem: Justifying Its Existence.

    Street, Sue; Isaacs, Madelyn

    1998-01-01

    The role of self-esteem as a professional and personality construct has been obscured by its panacea role. Definitions of self-esteem and related terms are distinguished. Self-esteem is discussed as a developmental construct, a personality construct, and as a therapeutic goal. Therapeutic, educational, and counseling implications are discussed.…

  20. A Brief Primer on Self-Esteem

    Robins, Richard W.; Trzesniewski, Kali H.; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2012-01-01

    Since the construct of "self-esteem" was first introduced over 100 years ago, a wealth of knowledge has been accumulated. Several conclusions about the nature of self-esteem can be reached that provide a foundation for future practice and research. In general, research shows that high self-esteem is associated with the behaviors, goals, and coping…

  1. Self-Esteem among Adult Literacy Learners

    Lipnevich, Anastasiya; Beder, Hal

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate adult literacy education learners' self-esteem and to examine the relationship between self-esteem and measures of achievement in reading and math. The rationale for the present study stemmed from the lack of research into adult literacy students' self-esteem levels. More than 200 learners enrolled in…

  2. The Educational Importance of Self-Esteem

    Ferkany, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Some philosophers of education have recently argued that educators can more or less ignore children's global self-esteem without failing them educationally in any important way. This paper draws on an attachment theoretic account of self-esteem to argue that this view is mistaken. I argue that understanding self-esteem's origins in attachment…

  3. Androgyny, Masculinity, and Self-Esteem.

    Lundy, Allan; Rosenberg, Judy A.

    1987-01-01

    Administered Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and Bem Sex Role Inventory to 194 adults. Found androgyny scale emphasizing masculinity was most predictive of self-esteem, due to strong correlation found between masculinity and self-esteem. Found no effects due to femininity, interaction of femininity and masculinity, or sex. (Author/NB)

  4. Self-Esteem and Classroom Participation

    Morrison, Thomas L.; Thomas, M. Duane

    1975-01-01

    According to the subscale of the Coopersmith Inventory specifically related to school self-esteem, college students with low self-esteem (1) say less in class, (2) contribute a smaller portion of their thoughts to class discussion, and (3) sit farther back in the classroom than the students with high self-esteem. (RC)

  5. Improving Students' Self-Esteem.

    Canfield, Jack

    1990-01-01

    To help strengthen their students' self-esteem and increase their chances for success, teachers must assume an attitude of 100 percent responsibility, focus on the positive, monitor their own self-talk, use classroom support groups, identify personal strengths and resources, set goals and objectives, use guided visualization, take action, and…

  6. A Review of the Current Literature Regarding Global Self-Esteem and Specific Self-Esteem in Adolescent Development.

    Kidder, Sherri L.

    The general development of the concept of self-esteem is reviewed, and concerns about the research strategies and issues are discussed. This paper focuses on adolescent self-esteem. Research is presented on global self-esteem, domain specific self-esteem as it relates to global self-esteem, and the identification of self-esteem trajectories.…

  7. Lesbian and Gay Male Group Identity Attitudes and Self-Esteem: Implications for Counseling.

    Walters, Karina L.; Simoni, Jane M.

    1993-01-01

    Ninety-six lesbians and gay men completed Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and modified version of Racial Identity Attitude Scale. Results indicated moderate inverse relationship between preencounter attitudes and self-esteem and positive relationship between internalization attitudes and self-esteem. Encounter and immersion-emersion attitudes were…

  8. Self-esteem stability in relation to narcissism and psychological well-being

    Saša Zorjan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of self-esteem stability has an important role in the understanding of interpersonal and psychological functioning of individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-esteem stability, narcissism and psychological well-being. A total of 178 participants (77% female participated in this study. The average age of the participants was 20, with the ages ranging from 18 to 26 years. The participants completed the following scales and questionnaires: Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI, Psychological Well-being Scales (PWBS, Instability of Selfesteem scale (ISES and Rosenberg Self-esteem scale (RSES. The Rosenberg Self-esteem scale was used to measure both self-esteem level and self-esteem stability, which was defined as dispersion of self-esteem level in time. For the purpose of obtaining data on self-esteem stability, the participants were required complete the Rosenberg self-esteem scale for a sequence of 14 days, other measures were completed during the first day of participation in the study. The main effects for self-esteem level emerged for narcissism and psychological well-being, in both cases higher levels of self-esteem was associated to higher levels of narcissism and psychological well-being. Self-esteem stability additionally explained a significant proportion of variability in narcissism and psychological well-being. Self-esteem stability was negatively associated with higher levels of narcissism and positively associated with higher levels of psychological well-being, above and beyond the effect of self-esteem level. When comparing two different measures of self-esteem stability, the results revealed that people with higher level of narcissism tend to overestimate their self-esteem stability. The results were consistent with our hypotheses. The importance of considering both level and stability of self-esteem, limitations of the present study and possibilities for further research are

  9. The Role of General and Performance Self Esteem In Relation Academic Procrastination and Academic Achievement

    Balkıs, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2010-01-01

    In this study, mediator role of general and performance self esteem were investigated in relation to the academic procrastination and reported academic achievement. The participants were 323 students who study different major fields at the Faculty of Education in Pamukkale University. Age range varied from 17 to 31. In this study, Aitken Procrastination Inventory, Rosenberg Self Esteem Inventory, Performance Self Esteem Subscale of State Self Esteem Scale and Personal Information Sheet w...

  10. Validation of two conceptualizations of fragile self-esteem: Contingent high self-esteem and incongruent high self-esteem

    Bodroža Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to validate two aspects of fragile high self-esteem: a combination of contingent and high (explicit self-esteem and a combination of high explicit and low implicit self-esteem (i.e. incongruent high self-esteem, as well as to examine the relationship between these aspects of fragile self-esteem and narcissism. No convergence was found between contingent high and incongruent high self-esteem. The result was consistent regardless of the technique of measurement of implicit self-esteem. There was a limited evidence that individuals with narcissistic personality characteristics were characterized by high self-esteem contingent upon competences, but not by a combination of high explicit and low implicit self-esteem, as an aspect of fragile self-esteem. Also, individuals with low selfesteem more contingent upon competences showed higher levels of narcissistic characteristics than those who were not contingent in this domain. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br.179034: From encouraging initiative, cooperation and creativity in education to new roles and identities in society i br. 47008: Improving he quality and accessibility of education in modernization processes in Serbia

  11. Self-Esteem and Academic Stress among Nursing Students.

    Acharya Pandey, R; Chalise, H N

    2015-01-01

    Stress and self-esteem are common issues that everyone has to cope with at some time in their lives and they could also affect other things going on in a persons' life. Academic stress is psychological condition often experienced by college students as, to some extent, being multidimensional variables. Among others are self-esteem and psychological well-being which are considered to have influences in explaining why college students experience stress. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the self-esteem level and academic stress among the nursing students. Method This is a cross-sectional study carried out in 2012. Total respondents were 190 nursing students selected randomly from Kathmandu University. Academic stress was assed using 30-item Scale for Assessing Academic Stress (SAAS) and Self esteem was assessed using 10 item Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale. Information was collected through the self-administered questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. Simple statistics measurement, percentage, means, correlation was used for the data analysis. Result This study shows mean age of the respondent's was 20.44±2.67 years. Majority (88%) of students getting financial support of less than NRs 6000 per month and 64% have low perceived family support. This study found mean score of self esteem and academic stress was 11.9 and 18.4 respectively. Further nearly 78% students have low self esteem and 74% have high academic stress. Significant variable for high academic stress and low self esteem were lower the age, lower the education and low perceived family support. Lower financial support has also high academic stress. Conclusion Nursing students have low self esteem and high academic stress. Intervention to lower the academic stress and increase the self esteem should be carried out so that the learning of students will be efficient. PMID:27423278

  12. An Analysis of Futsal Players' Self-Esteem Levels

    Kocak, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the self-esteem levels of futsal players according to certain variables. The samples of the study constituted 119 females and 96 males; a total of 215 players with an average age of 21.57 ± 2.20 years. The research was carried out with the end of "Rosenberg self-esteem Scale" developed by…

  13. The Relationship Between Parenting Style and Self-esteem

    TUNÇ, Aygül; TEZER, Esin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships of different types of perceived parenting styles and self-esteem. Gender differences were also examined. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSS) and Parenting Style Inventory (PSI) were administered to 755 (354 females, 401 males) high school students. Based on the two scores (acceptance/involvement and strictness/supervision) obtained from PSI, students were assigned to five parenting styles categories, namely, authoritative, permissiv...

  14. Global Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy Correlates: Relation of Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem among Emirati Students

    Ernest Afari; Graeme Ward; Myint Swe Khine

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between global self-esteem, academic self-efficacy and academic performance among a sample of 255 college students in the United Arab Emirates. The widely used Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965) and an academic self-efficacy scale, modified from (Jinks and Morgan, 1999) were used to assess student’s self-esteem and their academic self-efficacy. Each student’s average grade for the mid-semester and final semester was used as the performance ...

  15. Self-Esteem And Self-Estimates Of Academic Performance

    Morrison, Thomas L.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Three measures of self-esteem were used to test the hypothesis that college students with low self-esteem would predict getting lower grades on an examination than high-self esteem subjects. The hypothesis was confirmed for the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory but not for the Ziller Social Self-Esteem scale or for the subscale of the Coopersmith…

  16. INNER VOICE DAN SELF-ESTEEM

    Mellia Christia

    2007-01-01

    This study had been done to comprehend inner voice phenomena in psychopathology, especially suicide ideation in normal people. Using quantitative method, inner voice and self-esteem instruments have been developed and given to 196 students Faculty of Psychology Universitas Indonesia. The results showed that there is significant correlation between inner voice and self esteem and no sex differences in inner voice and self esteem between participants. In general, subjects inner voice state is i...

  17. Self-esteem development across the lifespan

    Robins, Richard W.; Trzesniewski, K H

    2005-01-01

    After decades of debate, a consensus is emerging about the way self-esteem develops across the lifespan. On average, self-esteem is relatively high in childhood, drops during adolescence (particularly for girls), rises-gradually throughout adulthood, and then declines sharply in old age. Despite these general age differences, individuals tend to maintain their ordering relative to one another: Individuals who have relatively high self-esteem at one point in time tend to have relatively high s...

  18. Self-Esteem, Coping Efforts and Marital Adjustment

    Claude Bélanger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between self-esteem, specific coping strategies and marital adjustment. The sample consists of 216 subjects from 108 couples who completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Ways of Coping Checklist. The results confirm the presence of a relationship between self-esteem, specific coping strategies and marital adjustment in men and women. High self-esteem and marital adjustment are associated with the use of problem solving strategies and less avoidance as a way of coping. Moreover, cross analyses reveal that one’s feelings of self-worth are associated with his/her spouse's marital adjustment. The theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  19. The impact of parental self-esteem and parental rearing behavior on adolescent attachment to parents

    Anbo Yang

    2011-01-01

    In this study the relationship of parental self-esteem, parental rearing and adolescent adult attachment was investigated. A total 448 senior high school students completed EMBU(Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran, or ―Own memories of parental rearing‖, Perris et al., 1980), the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR; Brennan, Clark, &Shaver, 1998), and their parents completed The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES; Rosenberg, 1965). The results suggested that parental global self-esteem ...

  20. IMPACT OF AGE AND SPORTS PARTICIPATION ON SELF ESTEEM OF ADOLESCENT BOYS

    Alfred Basumatary; Tarak Nath Pramanik

    2014-01-01

    -The purpose of the study was to see the impact of age and sports participation on self-esteem of adolescent boys. Total 200 adolescent boys were selected from various public schools of New Delhi where 100 boys have participated in sports and 100 boys have not participated in sports. Rosenberg Self Esteem Inventory (Rosenberg, 1965) was used as a criterion measure for self-esteem. Mean, Standard Deviation, and Two-Way ANOVA were employed as statistical techniques for computati...

  1. The Politics of Self-Esteem.

    Kahne, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Before analysts can assess self-esteem as a goal for policy and practice, they must consider the ideological orientations of those who use the term and the cultural norms that shape the debate. Explicit attention to the politics surrounding self-esteem is needed to evaluate the use of the term in policy contexts. (Author/SLD)

  2. Adolescent Self-Esteem, Attachment and Loneliness

    Dhal, Anubha; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sharma, Vidhi; Gupta, Priyanka

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess self-esteem, loneliness and attachment styles among adolescents and examine their association with each other and with age and gender. Method: Adolescents (55 males and 55 females) from a public school in Delhi, aged 10-13 years were administered Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (School Form), Attachment Scale and UCLA…

  3. Self-Esteem and Reading Achievement.

    Sweet, Anne E.; Burbach, Harold J.

    This study investigated the directionality of the relationship between self-esteem and reading achievement in 286 students in Lynchburg, Virginia. During the first year of the three-year study, subjects were fourth, fifth, and sixth graders. The Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and the SRA Achievement Series subscales were administered; sex and…

  4. Parenting and Adolescent Self-Esteem.

    Buri, John R.; And Others

    Research has shown variables of parental nurturance (acceptance, encouragement, support) of their children to be positively correlated with their children's self-esteem. This study investigated the effects of parental nurturance and the use of permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative parental discipline upon the self-esteem of college…

  5. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Orthodontics print full article print this chapter email ...

  6. Student self-esteem and academic achievement

    Milošević Nikoleta M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing belief that academic achievement is the product of a complex network of teacher-student relations, where the identity of successful and unsuccessful student is developing with high, moderate or low self-esteem level. Self-esteem is most often defined as a conscious cognitive-affective expression of self-evaluation which is one of the most immediate indicators of self-concept integration degree. A number of authors view high self-esteem level as an important prerequisite for high academic achievement. In contrast, academic achievement and other experiences related to teaching and learning are considered to exert significant influence on self-esteem and a student should be successful at school first so as to develop a positive self-image and his academic abilities. The debate on what comes first - self-esteem or academic achievement - is in its character more academic than practical. This claim is supported by an increasing number of studies indicating the dynamism and reciprocity of correlation between academic achievement and self-esteem. The paper gives recommendations for educational practice to promote self-esteem and development of personal and social responsibility, which contributes to better student academic achievement. It is pointed out that teacher education in the field is necessary and that self-esteem and responsibility must become essential segments of curricula. Teacher is expected to become sensitive to the needs of students who are at risk to be unsuccessful and to largely apply cooperative learning methods. Findings demonstrate that cooperative learning either sustain or increase student self-esteem, whereas traditional teaching methods, in general, lead to its decline. Cooperative relations improve student self-image in respect of academic abilities and social interactions. Positive feedback, peer support, more frequent experience of learning achievement leads mainly to general increase in self-esteem and

  7. Self-esteem in patients treated for anorexia nervosa.

    Karpowicz, Ewa; Skärsäter, Ingela; Nevonen, Lauri

    2009-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) mainly affects girls or women between 13 and 45 years of age. According to previous studies, one of the reasons for the desire to be thin is low self-esteem. The purpose of the study was to examine the self-esteem of 38 female patients with AN between 16 and 25 years of age, before and after 3 months of treatment at a specialist ward for eating disorders in Göteborg, Sweden. A quantitative pre- and post-assessment based on two self-rating questionnaires, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE-S) and three subscales (weight phobia, body dissatisfaction, and ineffectiveness) of Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), together with body mass index (BMI), were used in the study, which was conducted between June 2005 and March 2008. The results reveal that self-esteem, BMI, weight phobia, and body dissatisfaction improved significantly between pre- and post-treatment. The RSE-S and EDI-2 ineffectiveness correlate highly with one another, which lends support to convergent validity, and the internal consistency was high for both the RSE-S and EDI-2 ineffectiveness. The results indicate that the treatment was effective, as both patients' self-esteem and BMI increased after completed treatment, which was the primary goal of the treatment at this ward. Future studies should focus on follow up and the way self-esteem manifests itself at different points in time within an individual. PMID:19740141

  8. Avaliação da autoestima de gestantes com uso da Escala de Autoestima de Rosenberg Evaluación de la autoestima de gestantes con uso de la escala de autoestima de Rosemberg Assessment of self-esteem in pregnant women using Rosenberg's self-esteem scale

    Ligia Maçola

    2010-09-01

    gestantes que refirieron embarazo no planificado presentaron mayor prevalencia de autoestima insatisfactoria respecto de aquellas que refirieron haber planeado su gravidez. La ausencia de apoyo del compañero para cuidar del hijo con posterioridad al nacimiento también estuvo asociada a menor autoestima en las embarazadas. No se encontraron relaciones estadísticamente significativas para las demás variables estudiadas.The objective of this descriptive, cross-sectional study was to evaluate the self-esteem of 127 pregnant women seen in a prenatal care program conducted in a public school hospital. Data collection was performed using the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale; unsatisfactory self-esteem was related to socio-demographic and health variables of the pregnant woman, and to the presence or absence of support systems. Descriptive and univariate statistical analysis were used to assess possible associations. Pregnant women who had low scores for self-esteem were 60% of all subjects. As for the socio-demographic data, women with fewer years of education presented higher frequency of lower self-esteem scores, which disagrees with other studies. Pregnant women who report having an unplanned pregnancy presented higher prevalence of low self-esteem than those who reported having planned their pregnancy. The lack of support from the partner to look after the baby was also associated to the pregnant women's low self-esteem. Other associations between variables were not statistically significant.

  9. Obesity, Self-esteem and Wages

    Naci Mocan; Erdal Tekin

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with serious health problems, and it can generate adverse economic outcomes. We analyze a nationally-representative sample of young American adults to investigate the interplay between obesity, wages and self-esteem. Wages can be impacted directly by obesity, and they can be influenced by obesity indirectly through the channel of obesity to self-esteem to wages. We find that female wages are directly influenced by body weight, and self-esteem has an impact on wages in ca...

  10. Self-Esteem, Adolescence, and Pedagogy

    Itzel Silva-Escorcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-esteem in teenagers is a very important matter first for teenagers, second for their educational process, and finally for education itself, as educated individuals are productive for society.  Self-esteem is the element that can significantly increase students’ academic motivation as well as a favorable emotional state to achieve adequate school performance and educational development, as an individual and as a collective subject aiming towards fulfillment.  It is very important that teachers know the self-reference elements that shape and nurture self-esteem in order to work with them as educational processes and thus fortify their holistic pedagogical task.  

  11. Student self-esteem and academic achievement

    Milošević Nikoleta M.; Ševkušić Slavica

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing belief that academic achievement is the product of a complex network of teacher-student relations, where the identity of successful and unsuccessful student is developing with high, moderate or low self-esteem level. Self-esteem is most often defined as a conscious cognitive-affective expression of self-evaluation which is one of the most immediate indicators of self-concept integration degree. A number of authors view high self-esteem level as an important prerequisite for...

  12. How Low Self-Esteem Affects Adult Learners.

    James, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Defines global self-esteem (sense of efficacy, purpose, responsibility, self-acceptance) and trait self-esteem (confidence in specific abilities or talents). Gives examples of how low self-esteem impedes participation in learning and how learning can raise self-esteem. (SK)

  13. Self-Esteem and Adolescent Problems: Modeling Reciprocal Effects.

    Rosenberg, Morris; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Explores the reciprocal relationships between self-esteem and the following three problems of youth: (1) juvenile delinquency; (2) poor school performance; and (3) psychological depression. Findings include the following: (1) low self-esteem fosters delinquency, which may enhance self-esteem; (2) school performance affects self-esteem; and (3)…

  14. Self-Esteem and Emotional Maturity in College Students.

    Leung, Jupian J.; Sand, Margaret C.

    1981-01-01

    Determined if self-esteem is related to emotional maturity. Scores from 200 male and female college students on Coopersmith's Self-Esteem Inventory and on the Washburne Social-Adjustment Inventory were correlated. Students high in self-esteem were found to be more emotionally mature than students low in self-esteem. (Author)

  15. THE ASSESSMENT OF DIFFICULTY OF YACHT SAILING CLASSES AND STUDENTS' GLOBAL SELF-ESTEEM

    Romanowska-Tolloczko Anna.; Piwowarczyk Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: determination of relationship between the level of students’ global self-esteem and their perception of the degree of difficulty sailing yacht classes. Material and methods: Study consisted of 178 students of University School of Physical Education in Wrocław. The study used two tools: Polish adaptation of SES M. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire designed by the authors of the study. Results: men were characterized by a higher self-esteem than women. Distribution of the...

  16. Does self-esteem affect body dissatisfaction levels in female adolescents?☆

    Leonardo de Sousa FORTES; Cipriani, Flávia Marcele; Coelho, Fernanda Dias; Paes, Santiago Tavares; Maria Elisa Caputo FERREIRA

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of self-esteem on levels of body dissatisfaction among adolescent females. Methods: A group of 397 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were enrolled in the study. The Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) was applied to assess body dissatisfaction. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was used to assess self-esteem. Weight, height, and skinfold thickness were also measured. These anthropometric data were controlled in the statistical analyses. Results: The multiple regres...

  17. Effects of Swimming on Self-Esteem among Female College Students

    Tajul Arifin Muhamad; Hasti Sattari; Fariba Hossein Abadi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine changes in the self-esteem levels of female college students in relation to their swimming skills. The results of the study were obtained from of 141 female college students enrolled at the University of Kebangsaan Malaysia. Breaststroke was used in order to evaluate their swimming skills, whereas the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) questionnaire was used to evaluate their self-esteem levels for experimental and control groups. The analysis and observations con...

  18. Self Esteem, Locus of Control and Multidimensional Perfectionism as the Predictors of Subjective Well Being

    Zeynep Karatas; Ozlem Tagay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism, and the extent to which the variables of self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism contribute to the prediction of subjective well-being. The study was carried out with 318 final year (fourth grade) university students. Subjective Well-Being Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Rotter Internal External Locus of Control Scale ...

  19. Effect of Self-Esteem on the Relationship between Depression and Bullying among Teenagers in Malaysia

    Ikechukwu Uba; Siti Nor Yaacob; Rumaya Juhari; Mansor Abu Talib

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the moderating role of self-esteem in the relationship between depression and bullying among teenagers. The participants of the study were 242 teenagers aged 13 to 16 years, from selected secondary schools in Selangor, Malaysia. Self-esteem was measured with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, while teenage depression was measured with the Children Depression Inventory and bullying was measured using the Bully sub scale of the Peer Relationship Questionnaire. Findings of the s...

  20. Self-esteem in adolescents with chronic physical illness vs. controls in Northern Russia

    Zashikhina, Anna; Hägglöf, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This work aims to study self-esteem in adolescents with diabetes, asthma and epilepsy; compare the results with those of the representative sample of healthy adolescents; and evaluate the predictive value of certain demographic, family-related, and disease-related factors on self-esteem. Methods: A total of 148 chronically ill adolescents and 301 matched healthy counterparts completed the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and the "I think I am" questionnaire. Adolescents' parents answere...

  1. Exploring relationships between facets of self-esteem and drinking behavior among diverse groups of young adults

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Hsu, Sharon Hsin; Neighbors, Clayton; Paves, Andrew P.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and empirical evidence suggest that North American-based measures of self-esteem, which measure individualistic positive self-regard, may be less applicable to Eastern cultures. In the present exploratory study, we examined how different conceptualizations of self-esteem, as measured by the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and the Collective Self-esteem (CSE) Scale, predicted drinking behavior among three groups of American college students (N = 326) with varying ethnicities: White, Korean,...

  2. The Relationship of Self Esteem and Humor Styles in First Class Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Soner Cakmak; Gonca Karakus; Lut Tamam; Ali Tasdemir; Mahmut Onur Karaytug

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Self-esteem and humor styles are significant factors for being a healthy person. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation ship between self-esteem and humor styles in medical students. Material and Methods: Two hundred three medical students (107 males, 96 females) were included this study. Self-esteem was measured with the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and humor style was measured with Humor Styles Questionnaire. Results: The rate of students who have mild or high ...

  3. The Effect of a Camp Experience on Self Esteem.

    Dorian, Alexia Eve

    Two groups of American adolescents of Greek descent (12-15 year olds N=90 and 16-18 year olds N=166) at an Orthodox Christian Camp in Greece responded to the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (1965). Campers took the test on the first day of camp (pretest) and then two weeks later at the camp's conclusion (posttest). All subjects showed a significant…

  4. Self-esteem in Children with Psychosomatic Symptoms: Examination of Low Self-esteem and Prognosis

    Hosogi,Mizuho; Okada, Ayumi; Yamanaka,Eriko; Ootyou,Keiko; Tsukamoto,Chiaki; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2007-01-01

    Self-esteem is the evaluative feelings one holds for oneself and the sense that one has essential worth. It is evaluated as the difference between the actual self and the ideal self. Healthy self-esteem supports psychological stability and positive social activity and is an essential element in the psychological development of children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate self-esteem in children with psychosomatic symptoms and elucidate a strategy for using such evaluations in therapy. ...

  5. Self-Esteem Maintenance in Family Dynamics.

    Tesser, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In this study, a self-esteem maintenance model is introduced and is used to test predictions about sibling identification, sibling friction, and the closeness of father-son relationships as they relate to sibling performance. (Author/SS)

  6. Chemical dependency and adolescent self-esteem.

    Wasson, D; Anderson, M A

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study is to determine whether self-esteem differs between chemically dependent adolescents and adolescents from the general high school population. The Self-Esteem Inventory (Coopersmith, 1987) was completed by 119 adolescents (31 inpatient, 31 aftercare, and 57 general high school students) aged 13 to 18. Findings suggest that inpatient, chemically dependent adolescents have lower self-esteem than the other two groups. For the chemically dependent adolescent, nursing case management with communication among and between health care providers, school professionals, and family may facilitate successful, long-term recovery. For adolescents at risk for development of chemical dependence, nursing health promotion behaviors, such as early assessment and implementation of self-esteem-building activities, may assist in prevention of chemical dependency. PMID:7633338

  7. SELF-ESTEEM OF DISABLED AND ABLED : A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Anjana Bhattacharjee; Khousbo Chhetri

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to compare the self-esteem of disabled and non-disabled persons of Tripura. Fifty disabled and fifty non-disabled persons were participated in the study. Self esteem Inventory was used to collect data from the participants. The results showed that disabled person possessed low self esteem (both personally perceived self esteem and socially perceived self esteem) than their normal counterparts. The findings revealed no significant difference among male and female disable...

  8. Contracting with Self-Esteem Concerns

    Junichiro Ishida

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted in social psychology that the need to maintain and enhance self-esteem is a fundamental human motive. We incorporate this factor into an otherwise ordinary principal-agent framework and examine its impact on the optimal incentive scheme and the agent's behavior, especially focusing on a form of intrapersonal strategy known as self-handicapping. Incorporating self-esteem concerns into a contracting situation yields an implication that goes against the conventional wisdom:...

  9. Self-Esteem, Adolescence, and Pedagogy

    Itzel Silva-Escorcia; Omar Mejía-Pérez

    2015-01-01

    Self-esteem in teenagers is a very important matter first for teenagers, second for their educational process, and finally for education itself, as educated individuals are productive for society.  Self-esteem is the element that can significantly increase students’ academic motivation as well as a favorable emotional state to achieve adequate school performance and educational development, as an individual and as a collective subject aiming towards fulfillment.  It is very important that tea...

  10. The foundation of self-esteem.

    Bailey, Joseph A

    2003-05-01

    Self-esteem is a simplistic term for varied and complex mental states pertaining to how one views oneself. It takes but little research in the voluminous literature to see the vagueness and inconsistencies in its various definitions. Even more problematic is the uncertainty concerning its foundational components. The importance of having a solid definition and specific ideas about the foundational components of self-esteem is that both pave the way to recognizing its causes; to predicting effects from those causes; and to organizing the trouble-shooting process for locating those philosophical flaws or psychological scars which lead to low self-esteem. The purpose of this paper is to offer a common ground for thinking about self-esteem at its most basic level. In order to distinguish the "basic level" from the rest of the components of self-esteem, let us liken it to a skyscraper building. Here, the focus is on the building's "underground foundation" and the base upon which that foundation rests. The base is a definition that allows for the assessment of the foundation. The underground foundation itself consists of the mental building blocks called self-meaning, self-identity, self-image, and self-concepts. To help illustrate their interactions, a few of the "masks" and "faces" of self-esteem will be mentioned. What is not being addressed is the "above ground structure"--those theories and manifestations dealt with by most mental health specialists. PMID:12793795

  11. Body Image Perception and Self-esteem During Pregnancy

    Sema Inanir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the change in body image perception (BIP and evaluate self-esteem levels during pregnancy. Material and Methods: This study includes totally 180 females having similar demographic features, i.e. 30 non-pregnant (control group and 50 pregnant women from each trimester (first, second and third trimester groups at an Obstetrics Outpatient Department of a university hospital. BIP and self-esteem scores have been compared among the groups. Data relating to all participants have been obtained by using socio-demographic data form, body image scale and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES. Results: All demographic features have been found to be similar among the groups. The body mass index (BMI was higher in the third trimester of pregnancy compared to other groups; whereas BIP was significantly worse in the third trimester group compared to the first trimester and control groups (P < .05. There was a negative correlation between trimesters of pregnancy and BIP (Rho = -0.221; P = .003. Self-esteem was detected at a relatively higher level in first trimester group compared to the second and third trimester groups (P < .05. Conclusion: BIP levels have declined during the pregnancy period and self-esteem has been observed at a higher level in the first trimester compared to the advanced trimesters of pregnancy.

  12. Associations between assertiveness, psychological well-being, and self-esteem in adolescents

    Sarkova, Maria; Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria; Orosova, Olga; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Katreniakova, Zuzana; Klein, Daniel; van den Heuvel, Wim; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the associations between adolescents assertive behavior, psychological well-being, and self-esteem. The sample consisted of 1,023 students (14.9 +/-.51; 47.6% boys). Two dimensions of the Scale for Interpersonal Behavior (distress and performance), 2 factors of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (depression/anxiety and social dysfunction), and 2 factors of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (positive self-esteem and negative self-esteem) were used; data were analyzed using h...

  13. Leaving school in an economic downturn and self-esteem across early and middle adulthood

    Johanna Catherine Maclean; Hill, Terrence D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we test whether leaving school in an economic downturn impacts self-esteem. Self-esteem is an important dimension of non-cognitive skill that economists have recently begun to examine. Previous work documents that leaving school in a downturn persistently depresses career outcomes, and career success is an important determinant of self-esteem. We model responses to the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale as a function of the state unemployment rate at school-leaving. We address the pote...

  14. Self-esteem is associated with premorbid adjustment and positive psychotic symptoms in early psychosis

    Haug Elisabeth

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of self-esteem have been implicated as both a cause and a consequence of severe mental disorders. The main aims of the study were to examine whether premorbid adjustment has an impact on the subject's self-esteem, and whether lowered self-esteem contributes to the development of delusions and hallucinations. Method A total of 113 patients from the Thematically Organized Psychosis research study (TOP were included at first treatment. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS was used to assess present symptoms. Premorbid adjustment was measured with the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS and self-esteem by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES. Results Premorbid social adjustment was significantly related to lower self-esteem and explained a significant proportion of the variance in self-esteem. Self-esteem was significantly associated with the levels of persecutory delusions and hallucinations experienced by the patient and explained a significant proportion of the variance even after adjusting for premorbid functioning and depression. Conclusion There are reasons to suspect that premorbid functioning is an important aspect in the development of self- esteem, and, furthermore, that self-esteem is associated with the development of delusions and hallucinations.

  15. Implicit self-esteem decreases in adolescence: a cross-sectional study.

    Cai, Huajian; Wu, Mingzheng; Luo, Yu L L; Yang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Implicit self-esteem has remained an active research topic in both the areas of implicit social cognition and self-esteem in recent decades. The purpose of this study is to explore the development of implicit self-esteem in adolescents. A total of 599 adolescents from junior and senior high schools in East China participated in the study. They ranged in age from 11 to 18 years with a mean age of 14.10 (SD = 2.16). The degree of implicit self-esteem was assessed using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) with the improved D score as the index. Participants also completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (α = 0.77). For all surveyed ages, implicit self-esteem was positively biased, all ts>8.59, all psself-esteem and age was significant, r =  -.25, p = 1. 10(-10). A regression with implicit self-esteem as the criterion variable, and age, gender, and age × gender interaction as predictors further revealed the significant negative linear relationship between age and implicit self-esteem, β = -0.19, t = -3.20, p = 0.001. However, explicit self-esteem manifested a reverse "U" shape throughout adolescence. Implicit self-esteem in adolescence manifests a declining trend with increasing age, suggesting that it is sensitive to developmental or age-related changes. This finding enriches our understanding of the development of implicit social cognition. PMID:24587169

  16. Racial Identity, Self-Esteem, and Academic Achievement: Too Much Interpretation, Too Little Supporting Data.

    Lockett, Charles T.; Harrell, Jules P.

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationship between racial identity, self-esteem, and academic achievement, this study administered the Racial Identity Attitude Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and a background questionnaire to African American students from a historically black college. Results showed that the unique effect of racial identity on academic…

  17. The Relationship between Conflict Communication, Self-Esteem and Life Satisfaction in University Students

    Arslan, Coskun; Hamarta, Erdal; Uslu, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The current study used a survey model to analyze 306 university students to investigate relationship between life satisfaction, self-esteem and conflict communication. Data were collected from the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale and Conflict Communication Scale. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were…

  18. The Prevalence of Low Self-Esteem in an Intellectually Disabled Forensic Population

    Johnson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This was a quantitative study to measure the prevalence low self-esteem in an intellectually disabled forensic population. The dependent variables used were the adapted six-item Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the adapted Evaluative Beliefs Scale. It had a repeated measures design with independent variables including consideration of…

  19. The Relation between Self-Esteem, Parenting Style and Social Anxiety in Girls

    Yousaf, Saira

    2015-01-01

    This study is an attempt to explore the relationship between self-esteem, parenting style and social anxiety in girls. A sample of 100 female students selected from different schools. For data collection Social Interaction Anxiety Scale, Parental Authority Questionnaire and Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scales were used together with demographic sheet.…

  20. Racial Identity, Phenotype, and Self-Esteem among Biracial Polynesian/White Individuals

    Allen, G. E. Kawika; Garriott, Patton O.; Reyes, Carla J.; Hsieh, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This study examined racial identity, self-esteem, and phenotype among biracial Polynesian/White adults. Eighty-four Polynesian/White persons completed the Biracial Identity Attitude Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory, and a Polynesian phenotype scale. Profile analyses showed participants identified more with their Polynesian parent. A…

  1. Relationships between Academic Stress, Social Support, Optimism-Pessimism and Self-Esteem in College Students

    Fernández-González, L.; González-Hernández, A.; Trianes-Torres, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This research aims to analyse how optimism, self-esteem and social support help to predict academic stress. Method: The sample consisted of 123 students aged 20 to 31 years old, from the 3rd Year in the Psychology Degree. Students completed the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Life Orientation Optimism Questionnaire (LOT-R), the…

  2. Self-Esteem and Method Effects Associated with Negatively Worded Items: Investigating Factorial Invariance by Sex

    DiStefano, Christine; Motl, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    The Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSE) has been widely used in examinations of sex differences in global self-esteem. However, previous examinations of sex differences have not accounted for method effects associated with item wording, which have consistently been reported by researchers using the RSE. Accordingly, this study examined the…

  3. Self-Esteem during University Studies Predicts Career Characteristics 10 Years Later

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2007-01-01

    To examine how self-esteem measured during university studies would impact on the characteristics of the work career 10 years later, 297 university students completed the Rosenberg's self-esteem inventory four times while at university and various career-related questionnaires 10 years later. Latent Growth Curve Modeling showed that a high overall…

  4. Self-esteem and resilience : The connection with risky behavior among adolescents

    Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Orosova, Olga; Gajdosova, Beata; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to explore the association of self-esteem and resilience with smoking and cannabis use among adolescents, separately for gender. A sample of 3694 adolescents (mean age 14.3 years) from elementary schools in Slovakia filled out the Rosenberg Self-esteem scale, the Resiliency scale and ans

  5. Parental conflict and self-esteem: the rest of the story.

    Pawlak, J L; Klein, H A

    1997-09-01

    Previous research has supported the hypothesis that high levels of marital conflict are related to lower self-esteem in children. In this study, 122 young adults completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Questionnaire and the Student Interparental Conflict Scale, as well as the Parental Nurturance Scale and the Parental Authority Questionnaire. One parent of each young adult completed the Parent Interparental Conflict Scale, the O'Leary-Porter Overt Hostility Scale, and a modified Parental Authority Questionnaire. Perceived interparental conflict and parental style discrepancies in nurturance and in authoritarianism were significantly and negatively related to self-esteem, but the best predictors of self-esteem were the parental styles themselves. Warm, nurturant parents were more likely to have high self-esteem children and demonstrated less conflict in marital partnerships. Correlations between marital conflict and self-esteem may reflect parental characteristics. PMID:9255958

  6. Impact of self esteem on risky sexual behaviors among Nigerian adolescents.

    Enejoh, Victor; Pharr, Jennifer; Mavegam, Bertille Octavie; Olutola, Ayodotun; Karick, Haruna; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2016-05-01

    Although improved knowledge is often the first approach in HIV prevention for adolescents, studies have shown that despite being well informed, adolescents still engage in risky sexual behavior (RSB). Low self-esteem has been considered to be a psychological explanation for behavioral problems, but little is known about the impact of self-esteem on RSB among adolescents in Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adolescents with high self-esteem demonstrate lower RSB compared to those with low self-esteem. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 361 adolescents in 9 secondary schools in Jos Plateau, Nigeria. The Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale was used to measure self-esteem and the Brief HIV Screener (BHS) was used to measure RSB. All data were analyzed using SPSS 21. Chi square and odds ratios were calculated to determine differences in BHS questions based on predetermined low or high self-esteem categories. Independent t-test were utilized to determine difference in mean BHS scores based on self-esteem categories. Participants were 169 male (46.8%) and 192 female (53.2%) with a mean age of 16.9. Mean self-esteem score was 27.6 with no significant difference in self-esteem scores by gender. Adolescents with low self-esteem were 1.7 times more likely to be sexually active and had a higher mean BHS scores compared to adolescents with high self-esteem. Programs aimed at reducing RSB and in-turn HIV/AIDS should consider interventions to raise adolescents' self-esteem. PMID:26674246

  7. Self-esteem in mastectomized women – application of Rosenberg’s scale

    Marcela Marques Jucá Fernandes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify the variables that influence the self-esteem of mastectomized women and assess their self-esteem level through the implementation of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional research carried out in July 2009 with 14 women of a support group in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and application of this scale. The results showed an average age of 59 years, average time of 84.9 months after mastectomy and average time of support group of 59 months. Six (42.9% women were married, 13 (92.9% were religious and employed. The individual scores obtained with the Rosenberg scale showed high self-esteem among women. The assessment of self-esteem of mastectomized women can assist the adoption of nursing interventions capable of changing the type of care provided to these clients.

  8. IMPACT OF AGE AND SPORTS PARTICIPATION ON SELF ESTEEM OF ADOLESCENT BOYS

    Alfred Basumatary

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -The purpose of the study was to see the impact of age and sports participation on self-esteem of adolescent boys. Total 200 adolescent boys were selected from various public schools of New Delhi where 100 boys have participated in sports and 100 boys have not participated in sports. Rosenberg Self Esteem Inventory (Rosenberg, 1965 was used as a criterion measure for self-esteem. Mean, Standard Deviation, and Two-Way ANOVA were employed as statistical techniques for computation of Selfesteem of school boy students. Results revealed that boys who have participated in sports have higher self-esteem than the boys who have not participated in sports. Participation in sports had effected on selfesteem of different age group but age group alone did not effect on self-esteem of adolescent boys.

  9. Contingent self-esteem and vulnerability to depression: academic contingent self-esteem predicts depressive symptoms in students

    Schöne, Claudia; Tandler, Sarah S.; Stiensmeier-Pelster, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Low self-esteem has been established as a vulnerability factor for depression. In line with recent research, we suggest that a full understanding of the role of self-esteem in depression requires consideration of contingent self-esteem as well. For most people, competence is an important source of self-esteem. Students in particular link their self-esteem to academic competence. To test the hypothesis that academic contingent self-esteem (aCSE) predicts depressive symptoms (DS), two studies w...

  10. Preterm Infants and Parents’ self-esteem

    Aagaard, Hanne; Madsen, Mette Kold

    Background: Little is known about parents to preterm infants and their self-esteem. The care of preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is in accordance with the principles of Family Centered Care. Previously, focus has mainly been on the mother-infant-dyad. Current research has...... shown that involving the father at an early stage improves the psychological dynamic of fatherhood and encourages bonding with the infant. The self-esteem of parents appears to be negatively affected after preterm birth. Objective: To get more knowledge and a deeper understanding of the preterm parents......’ experiences of their self-esteem during admission to the NICU and later eight months after discharge. Method and data collection: A qualitative semi-structured interview was conducted in two phases: 1) Three weeks after giving birth to a preterm infant and eight months after discharge. Parents were...

  11. The Self-Esteem Test for Adolescents

    Joaquín Caso Niebla

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study intended to explore construct validity of the Self-esteem Test for Adolescents and update psychometric properties found in previous studies. 1581 Mexican students (850 women and 731 men of a public high school in Mexico City responded to the scale. The sample was split randomly in half. EFA was applied using one sample´s data, and CFA to the other sample´s data. The model, assumed to underlie responses to the Self-esteem Test for Adolescents, satisfactorily fit the data, confirming a structure of 4 factors: self-cognitions, competence cognitions, family relations and rage. Results of the present study corroborate previous data concerning content, criterion-related and construct validity of the Self-esteem Test for Adolescents.

  12. The relationship between psychological comfort space and self-esteem in people with mental disorders.

    Kunikata, Hiroko; Shiraishi, Yuko; Nakajima, Kazuo; Tanioka, Tetsuya; Tomotake, Masahito

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a causal model of the sense of having psychological comfortable space that is call 'ibasho' in Japanese and self-esteem in people with mental disorders who had difficulty in social activities. The subjects were 248 schizophrenia patients who were living in the community and receiving day care treatment. Data were collected from December 2007 to April 2009 using the Scale for the Sense of ibasho for persons with mentally ill (SSI) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and analyzed for cross-validation of construct validity by conducting covariance structure analysis. A relationship between the sense of having comfortable space and self-esteem was investigated. Multiple indicator models of the sense of having psychological comfortable space and self-esteem were evaluated using structural equation modeling. Furthermore, the SSI scores were compared between the high- and low-self-esteem groups. The path coefficient from the sense of having comfortable space to self-esteem was significant (0.80). High-self-esteem group scored significantly higher in the SSI subscales, 'the sense of recognizing my true self' and 'the sense of recognizing deep person-to-person relationships' than the low-self-esteem group. It was suggested that in order to help people with mental disorders improve self-esteem, it might be useful to support them in a way they can enhance the sense of having comfortable space. PMID:21372487

  13. Structure of Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale: Three-factor solution

    Blatný, Marek; Urbánek, Tomáš; Osecká, Terezie

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2006), s. 371-378. ISSN 0039-3320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : Rosenberg Self - Esteem Scale * confirmatory factor analysis * adolescents Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  14. The relation between self-esteem, sexual activity, and pregnancy.

    Robinson, R B; Frank, D I

    1994-01-01

    This study examined self-esteem in relation to sexual behaviors which often result in teen pregnancy. A sample of 141 male and 172 female adolescents of racial diversity was surveyed to elicit levels of self-esteem, sexual activity, pregnancy and fatherhood status. The Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory was used as well to elicit qualitative data about self-esteem, demographics, and sexual activity. Analysis revealed no differences in the self-esteem of males vs. females. Further, sexual activity or virginity was not related to self-esteem in either males or females. Pregnant teens did not have different levels of self-esteem from the nonpregnant. However, males who had fathered a child had lower self-esteem than did nonfathers. The findings support a multifocused approach to sex education for pregnancy prevention and also emphasize a need to include males in both pregnancy prevention efforts as well as in further research on teen pregnancy. PMID:8036980

  15. Self-Esteem and Children's Human Figure Drawings

    Dalby, J. Thomas; Vale, Helen L.

    1977-01-01

    One hundred and fifteen students in Grade 5 made human figure drawings which were compared with their scores on the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory and on teachers' ratings of the students' self-esteem. (Author)

  16. Prediction of Five Factor Personality Dimensions Through Self- Esteem in Turkish Late Adolescents

    Aslan, Sevda

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between five factor personality dimensions and self-esteem in terms of how self-esteem predicts five factor personality dimensions. The study group consisted of a total of 122 students 98 of whom were females (80%) and 24 males (19.7 %). Personality Test Based on Adjectives (Bacanlı, İlhan ve Aslan, 2009) and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965; Çuhadaroğlu, 1986) were used as data collection instruments in this study. The data gathered f...

  17. Correlation of self-concept and self-esteem with aggressiveness

    Renata Marčič

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We were interested in the correlation of aggressiveness with independent self-concept, codependent self-concept and level of self-esteem. Some previous research gave contradictory results about correlations between aggressiveness, self-concept and self-esteem. Researchers report of negative correlation, but also of positive and no correlation. One hundred and fifty-eight participants, aged from 19 to 51, with average age of 21 participated in the research. Fifty participants were males and 108 were females. Self-concept was measured with the Adult Sources of Self-Esteem Inventory – ASSEI (Elovson & Fleming, 1989, level of self-esteem with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale – RSES (Rosenberg, 1965 and aggressiveness with The Aggression Questionnaire – AQ (Buss & Perry, 1992. The results showed that aggressiveness is negatively correlated with co-dependent self-concept, but is not correlated with independent self-concept, even if we control for the level of self-esteem. The level of self-esteem is negatively correlated with anger, hostility, and overall aggression, but not with physical and verbal aggression, even if we control for the self-concept. We can conclude that only certain areas of self-concept are relevant in the research of the relationship between self-concept and aggressiveness, and that the level of self-esteem is to be taken into account only in some forms of aggressiveness, like anger and hostility, but not in physical and verbal aggression.

  18. Self-esteem, shyness, and sociability in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI)

    Wadman, Ruth; Durkin, Kevin; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if lower global self-esteem, shyness, and low sociability are outcomes associated with SLI in adolescence. Possible concurrent predictive relationships and gender differences were also examined. Method: Fifty-four adolescents with SLI, aged between 16 and 17 years, were compared with a group of 54 adolescents with typical language abilities on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) and the Cheek and Buss Shyness and Sociability scales (Cheek & Buss, 1981)....

  19. Self-esteem, shyness, and sociability in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI).

    Wadman, R.; Durkin, K.; Conti-Ramsden, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if lower global self-esteem, shyness, and low sociability are outcomes associated with SLI in adolescence. Possible concurrent predictive relationships and gender differences were also examined. Method: Fifty-four adolescents with SLI, aged between 16 and 17 years, were compared with a group of 54 adolescents with typical language abilities on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) and the Cheek and Buss Shyness and Sociability scales (Cheek & Buss, 1981)....

  20. Gender differences in self-esteem and happiness among university students

    Malik, S; Saida

    2013-01-01

    The current research examines gender differences in the self esteem and happiness of university students. A sample of 120 students (60 males and 60 females) was drawn from the various departments of university of Sargodha within the age range of 18-26 years. Convenience sampling technique was used. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1985) and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (Hills and Argyle, 2001) were individually administered to the participants. The results suggested that the male st...

  1. Self-esteem: models and implications for management

    Becker, Manfred R.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. This thesis presents a literature review of self-esteem, primarily as it relates to organizations and management. Based on this literature review, self-esteem is defined as the emotional valuation individuals have of themselves and the degree of certainty of this valuation. Several models of self-esteem are presented. The relationship of coping and avoidance to self-esteem is considered. Coping is presented as being one of the primary so...

  2. Importance and usefulness of evaluating self-esteem in children

    Hosogi Mizuho; Okada Ayumi; Fujii Chikako; Noguchi Keizou; Watanabe Kumi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Self-esteem is the "feeling of self-appreciation" and is an indispensable emotion for people to adapt to society and live their lives. For children, in particular, the environment in which they are raised contributes profoundly to the development of their self-esteem, which in turn helps them to adapt better to society. Various psychologists have provided definitions of self-esteem, and examined methods of objectively evaluating self-esteem. Questionnaire-style assessment methods for...

  3. Self-esteem, political efficacy, and perceived parental attitudes

    Okçu, Tuba Nur; Okcu, Tuba Nur

    2007-01-01

    This thesis proposes to test the following three hypotheses: perceived political efficacy positively correlates with self-esteem; self-esteem positively correlates with perceived democratic parental attitude; and, lastly, self-esteem negatively correlates with perceived protective-demanding and perceived authoritarian parental attitudes. Two questionnaires (Q1 and Q2), each measure perceived political efficacy, selfesteem,and perceived parental attitudes. In Q2, the items of self-esteem and p...

  4. Behavioral Referents of Presented Self-Esteem in Young Children.

    Haltiwanger, Jane

    In two studies which were designed to identify behavioral manifestations of self-esteem, experienced teachers were asked to perform a criterion sort of an 84-item behavioral Q-set, with high and low self-esteem as the criteria. Aims included: (1) identification of classroom behaviors of preschool children associated with self-esteem; (2)…

  5. Self-Esteem and Suicide Ideation in Psychiatric Outpatients

    Bhar, Sunil; Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Brown, Gregory; Beck, Aaron T.

    2008-01-01

    Depression, hopelessness, and low self-esteem are implicated as vulnerability factors for suicide ideation. The association of self-esteem with suicide ideation after controlling for depressed mood and hopelessness was examined. Adult psychiatric outpatients (N = 338) completed measures of self-esteem, suicide ideation, hopelessness, and…

  6. Continuity and change in self-esteem during emerging adulthood

    Chung, J.M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the development of self-esteem in a sample of emerging adults (N = 295) followed longitudinally over 4 years of college. Six waves of self-esteem data were available. Participants also rated, at the end of their 4th year, the degree to which they thought their self-esteem

  7. Stress, Self-Esteem, and Suicidal Ideation in Late Adolescents

    Wilburn, Victor R.; Smith, Delores E.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships among stress, self-esteem, and suicidal ideation in late adolescents were examined in a group of college students. Multiple regression analysis indicated that both stress and self-esteem were significantly related to suicidal ideation; low self-esteem and stressful life events significantly predicted suicidal ideation. The…

  8. Visual Impairment and Self-Esteem: What Makes a Difference?

    Bowen, Jayne

    2010-01-01

    This account follows on from the research report "Visual impairment and its impact on self-esteem" (Bowen, 2010) published in this journal. The original article reported the results of an investigation of self-esteem levels amongst a sample group of 60 children with visual impairment. Four children, whose self-esteem was measured as "low" or "very…

  9. Exercise and Self-esteem: Recommendations for Expository Research.

    Sonstroem, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of selected research in the area of exercise and self-esteem illustrates recommendations made for improving research in this area. Studies concerning self-esteem theory and static and dynamic relationships between exercise and self-esteem are reported. (CJ)

  10. The Self-Esteem Complex and Youth Fitness.

    Fox, Kenneth R.

    1988-01-01

    The article outlines recent theoretical developments in self-esteem research that have not yet been applied to the youth fitness problem, including concepts of self-esteem multidimensionality and hierarchical structuring, and personalization processes. Programmatical implications related to self-esteem promotion and exercise motivation are…

  11. Relationships between Self-Esteem and Smoking Experimentation in Childhood

    Barlow, Alexandra; Woods, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    There have been mixed results concerning any association between self-esteem and smoking prevalence in young people. The aim of this paper was to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between self-esteem and the uptake of smoking in childhood, and how various sub-components of self-esteem are related to smoking. A sample of…

  12. Little League Baseball and Players' Self-Esteem.

    Hawkins, Donna B.; Gruber, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of a season of little league baseball on the self-esteem of 94 pre-adolescent players was investigated. The Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory and a newly devised Baseball-Self scale were administered. Significant improvements in players' total Self-esteem, Home-Parents and School-Academic scores were found. (Author/PN)

  13. Promoting Self-Esteem, Defining Culture.

    Witt, Norbert

    1998-01-01

    Treatment programs for the growing problem of solvent abuse, in the form of sniffing gasoline, among Canadian-Native youth have had no success. Increased self-esteem, which is central to successful treatment, can only be achieved through programs designed by Native people and based on the their culture. Contains 32 references. (TD)

  14. Restoring Self-Esteem in Adolescent Males

    Hendel, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    When presented with the words self-esteem, it is most common in our society to immediately think of girls. It is not often that people ponder the effects of body image, athleticism, success, or even friendships for boys. Unfortunately in overlooking these concepts, we are doing a disservice to our male youth. This article addresses the effects of…

  15. The Self-Esteem of Rural Children

    Yang, Raymond K.; Fetsch, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    The self-esteem of children in small towns was assessed. Comparing these children's self-rated competencies to extant norms suggests that rural children's self-perceptions are not distinctly different from suburban and urban children. Rural children's feelings of self-worth and self-assessments of scholastic competence are comparable to or higher…

  16. Parental styles and the stability of self-esteem in adolescence

    Todorović Jelisaveta A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between parents and children is significantly important for the forming of identity and its affective component of self-esteem. High and stable self-esteem is being developed in certain family conditions through parental influences to which a child is exposed within a family. In this research the results of a role of different parental styles have been presented in forming of stable self-esteem in adolescents. The research has been done in eight secondary school in Niš. The sample was done on N=280 pupils with Global Self-Esteem Rosenberg's scale, and EMBU parental styles scale of Perris-Arrindell's version. This research has shown that stable self-esteem in adolescents is being connected to mother’s emotional warmth and acceptance through the process of parenting. Unstable self-evaluations are connected to inconsistency and overprotection, while rejection leads to stable, but low self-evaluations.

  17. Self-esteem in Children with Psychosomatic Symptoms: Examination of Low Self-esteem and Prognosis

    Hosogi,Mizuho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Self-esteem is the evaluative feelings one holds for oneself and the sense that one has essential worth. It is evaluated as the difference between the actual self and the ideal self. Healthy self-esteem supports psychological stability and positive social activity and is an essential element in the psychological development of children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate self-esteem in children with psychosomatic symptoms and elucidate a strategy for using such evaluations in therapy. We evaluated self-esteem in 56 patients at the Department of Pediatrics of Okayama University Hospital who were undergoing outpatient therapy for psychosomatic symptoms, using Pope's 5-scale test of self-esteem for children. We examined patient attributes, course of therapy, and social adjustment. Patients with low self-esteem on multiple scales at the first visit were all female, and these patients had a significantly higher frequency of family function problems, such as a family member with a psychiatric disorder, economic hardship, or experience of child abuse. Moreover, the prognosis for these patients was poor regardless of their social adjustment at the first visit.

  18. Implicit self-esteem decreases in adolescence: a cross-sectional study.

    Huajian Cai

    Full Text Available Implicit self-esteem has remained an active research topic in both the areas of implicit social cognition and self-esteem in recent decades. The purpose of this study is to explore the development of implicit self-esteem in adolescents. A total of 599 adolescents from junior and senior high schools in East China participated in the study. They ranged in age from 11 to 18 years with a mean age of 14.10 (SD = 2.16. The degree of implicit self-esteem was assessed using the Implicit Association Test (IAT with the improved D score as the index. Participants also completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (α = 0.77. For all surveyed ages, implicit self-esteem was positively biased, all ts>8.59, all ps<0.001. The simple correlation between implicit self-esteem and age was significant, r =  -.25, p = 1. 10(-10. A regression with implicit self-esteem as the criterion variable, and age, gender, and age × gender interaction as predictors further revealed the significant negative linear relationship between age and implicit self-esteem, β = -0.19, t = -3.20, p = 0.001. However, explicit self-esteem manifested a reverse "U" shape throughout adolescence. Implicit self-esteem in adolescence manifests a declining trend with increasing age, suggesting that it is sensitive to developmental or age-related changes. This finding enriches our understanding of the development of implicit social cognition.

  19. 自尊与记忆偏向的关系%Self-esteem and Memory Bias

    杨慧; 吴明证; 刘永芳; Li Qian

    2012-01-01

    Recendy,many studies has revealed that people with different self-esteem level hold with the cognitive bias of memory asymmetry in their encoding and retention for valence-laden information.Previous studies mainly explored the influence of explicit selfesteem on memory bias but not the effect of implicit memory.Moreover,whether and how self-esteem impacts implicit memory awaits to be answered.Both implicit memory and implicit self-esteem can be characterized as unconscious,with implicit memory being defined as processing of retrieval of unconscious information,and implicit self-esteem being viewed as unconscious and automatic evaluation toward self.Whether implicit self-esteem has more influence on implicit memory or explicit self-esteem affect explicit memory heavily is worthy theoretical topic for both implicit memory and implicit self-esteem.Based on the conceptual framework of process dissociation model (PDM) proposed by Jacoby(1991),this study aims to explore the influence of level and type of self-esteem on recognition performance of individuals across level of encoding. A 2(types of explicit self-esteem)×2(types of implicit self-esteem)×2(levels of encoding)×3(valence of words) mixed design were mainly adopted to explore the effect of memory bias for valences of the words on two levels of encoding among 89 participants with different self-esteem level and type,with self-esteem type and level and encoding levels as between-subjects variable and valences of the word as within-subjects variable.Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale(SES) and Implicit Association Test(IAT) adopted to measure participants' explicit and implicit self-esteem were completed first.After completed the SES and IAT,subjects will take part in a supposedly unrelated learning task under deep or shallow encoding level,in which they were asked to remember three kinds of words:positive, passive and neutral words.In the subsequent test task,subjects should judge the word presented on the computer

  20. Relationship of self-esteem and happiness from the positive psychology among intercultural nursing students

    Marco Alberto Núñez Ramírez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are contradictions on the relationship between self-esteem and happiness: it exists for some researches, for others it does not, and even some argue that self-esteem affects happiness. These variables are elementary for the practice of Nursing; however, their study is small within intercultural environments. The objective of this research is to know the association between self-esteem and happiness among Intercultural Nursing students from the positive psychology.Method: A quantitative, descriptive, transversal and correlational, research with a non-experimental design was realized, with a sample of 55 students of Intercultural Nursing. Two questionnaires were applied: the scale of Rosenberg self-esteem and happiness of Lima scale.Results: High levels of self-esteem and happiness were obtained. Through correlation of Pearson and hierarchical regression we found that self-esteem is associated in negative and positive way with certain factors of happiness; the same thing happened in the level of influence.Conclusion: In positive psychology is possible to associate variables such as self-esteem and happiness as strengths. Much more in the case of Intercultural Nursing students which have the aim to contribute to the indigenous communities development, that require nurses with favorable levels of self-esteem and the perception of subjective well-being to counteract an historical legacy of backwardness. From positive psychology is possible that this educational model will contribute to the mutual enrichment and empowerment within the work of the Intercultural Nursing.

  1. THE ASSESSMENT OF DIFFICULTY OF YACHT SAILING CLASSES AND STUDENTS' GLOBAL SELF-ESTEEM

    Romanowska-Tolloczko Anna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determination of relationship between the level of students’ global self-esteem and their perception of the degree of difficulty sailing yacht classes. Material and methods: Study consisted of 178 students of University School of Physical Education in Wrocław. The study used two tools: Polish adaptation of SES M. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire designed by the authors of the study. Results: men were characterized by a higher self-esteem than women. Distribution of the results obtained by women was closer to a normal distribution, but it was not completely compatible with it. The relationship was noted between the level of global self-esteem of the students and their perception of the degree of difficulty of the course. People with higher self-esteem assessed the knowledge and skills of sailing as easier. For people with lower levels of self-esteem sailing it was a more difficult. Conclusions: self-acceptance and self-esteem have a substantial impact on goal setting and the perception and taking various tasks. It is therefore important to help young people to build adequate self-esteem and positive self-image, because faith in its own strength and capabilities is a key element in achieving success in every area of life.

  2. Children's self-esteem based on their sex

    Antonio Serrano Muñoz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The following study proposes describing the levels of self-esteem in children and analyzing whether there are differences based on their sex. The sample consists of 1,757 children aged from 3 to 7. For self-esteem assessment, the EDINA questionnaire was administrated, which shows an appropriate reliability rate (0.803. The self-esteem of girls and boys studied is high. Statistical analyzes showed: a significantly higher scores on self-esteem of girls; b a decrease on self-esteem associated to age of children; c significant differences depending on the socioeconomic status; and d higher level of self-esteem in children when they have a woman as advisor of class group. In future researches, we suggest the need to study in depth the evolution of sex differences in relation to self-esteem.

  3. Evaluation of self-esteem among homosexuals in the southern region of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Tiago José Canali; Sylvia Marina Soares de Oliveira; Deivid Montero Reduit; Daniele Botelho Vinholes; Viviane Pessi Feldens

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to evaluate self-esteem in homosexuals from southern Santa Catarina and relate it to several variables such as gender, age, bullying and psychiatric treatment. Participants were selected using the "Snowball" technique. The Rosenberg self-esteem scale was used for self-esteem assessment with subsequent comparison with other variables. A total of 403 individuals were interviewed, including 310 males with a mean age of 24.02. Most of the population studied (80.9%) had high self-...

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction in Romanian University Students: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem and Social Support

    Patricia Luciana RUNCAN; Mihai-Bogdan IOVU

    2013-01-01

    This study examines a mediation model for the relationship between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction for students. Self-esteem and social support were used as mediators. The participants were 131 Romanian undergraduate students. Data were collected by using the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, the Multi-Dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Bootstrap analysis showed that both self-esteem and socia...

  5. Self-esteem in mastectomized women – application of Rosenberg’s scale

    Marcela Marques Jucá Fernandes; Pricilla Cândido Alves; Míria Conceição Lavinas Santos; Elizabeth Moreira Mota; Ana Fátima Carvalho Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the variables that influence the self-esteem of mastectomized women and assess their self-esteem level through the implementation of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional research carried out in July 2009 with 14 women of a support group in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and application of this scale. The results showed an average age of 59 years, average time of 84.9 months after mast...

  6. Gender differences in self-esteem and happiness among university students

    Malik, S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The current research examines gender differences in the self esteem and happiness of university students. A sample of 120 students (60 males and 60 females was drawn from the various departments of university of Sargodha within the age range of 18-26 years. Convenience sampling technique was used. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1985 and Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (Hills and Argyle, 2001 were individually administered to the participants. The results suggested that the male students reported significantly higher level of self esteem as compared to the female university students (t = 3.78, df = 117, ***p .05. Furthermore, significant positive relationship was found between happiness and self esteem of students (r = .22*. These findings have implications for helping teachers and parents.

  7. Self-esteem and passion for activities

    Lafrenière, Marc-Andre K; Bélanger, Jocelyn J.; Sedikides, Constantine; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Dualistic Model of Passion (Vallerand, 2010) regards passion as a strong inclination toward a self-defining activity that one loves, values, and in which one invests a substantial amount of time and energy. The model proposes two distinct types of passion, harmonious and obsessive, that predict adaptive and less adaptive outcomes, respectively. We hypothesized that individuals relatively high on explicit self-esteem would experience higher levels of harmonious passion, given their impleme...

  8. Self-Esteem, Shame and Personal Motivation

    Dessi, Roberta; Zhao, Xiaojian

    2011-01-01

    The available evidence from numerous studies in psychology suggests that overconfidence is a much more important phenomenon in North America than in Japan. Relatedly, North Americans appear to view high self-esteem much more positively than Japanese. The pattern is reversed when it comes to shame, a social emotion which appears to play a much more important role among Japanese than North Americans. We develop an economic model that endogenizes these observed differences, and relates them to d...

  9. Adolescent self-esteem in cross-cultural perspective: Testing measurement equivalence and a mediation model

    Farruggia, SP; Chen, C.; Greenberger, E; Dmitrieva, J; Macek, P

    2004-01-01

    Theorists and researchers have raised the question of whether self-esteem has similar meanings and correlates in individualistic and collectivist cultures. This study examined the cross-cultural equivalence of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in four countries and compared its association with parental warmth and acceptance and depressed mood. Participants were 11th graders in the United States (n = 422), the Czech Republic (n = 490), China (n = 502), and Korea (n = 497). Cross-cultural simila...

  10. Money Attitude, Self-esteem, and Compulsive Buying in a Population of Medical Students

    Lejoyeux, Michel; Richoux-Benhaim, Charlotte; Betizeau, Annabelle; Lequen, Valérie; Lohnhardt, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    This study tried to determine the prevalence of compulsive buying (CB) and to identify among compulsive buyers a specific relation to money, a different buying style, and a lowered level of self-esteem. We included 203 medical students and diagnosed CB with the Mc Elroy criteria and a specific questionnaire. The money attitude was characterized by the Yamauchi and Templer's scale and self-esteem with the Rosenberg scale. 11% of the medical students presented compulsive buying (CB+). Sex ratio...

  11. Self-Esteem Among the Elderly Visiting the Healthcare Centers in Kermanshah-Iran (2012)

    Franak, Jafari; Alireza, Khatony; Malek, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Self-esteem is viewed the most decisive factor in the psychological development of the elderly. This study was performed to assess self-esteem among the elderly referring to the elderly consulting unit of the healthcare centers in Kermanshah, Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study was completed with 201 elderly respondents visiting the consulting unit of the healthcare services in Kermanshah, Iran. The samples were selected through convenience sampling. Rosenberg Sel...

  12. The impact of forced social comparison on adolescents’ self-esteem and appearance satisfaction

    Purić Danka; Simić Nataša; Savanović Ljubomir; Kalanj Marko; Jovanović-Dačić Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The impact of forced social comparison on adolescents’ self-esteem and appearance satisfaction research, conducted on a sample of 133 high school seniors, consisted of two phases. In phase one, participants were given the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory, Appearance Satisfaction Scale and Appearance Relevance Scale, and in phase two, one month later, they were exposed to photographs of attractive and unattractive individuals. Two groups of boys and girls each assessed attractive or unatt...

  13. The sources of self-esteem: Initating and maintaining romantic intimacy at emerging adulthood in Turkey

    Nilüfer Özabacı; Ali Eryılmaz

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship of emerging adults’ in initiating and maintaining romantic intimacy with sub-dimensions and explores the extent that self-esteem in emerging adults could explain the initiation and maintenance of a romantic relationship. The participants included 136 male and 106 female totaling 242 university students. In order to collect data, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Markers of Starting Romantic Intimacy Scale and Quality of Relationship Inventory were used. Accordi...

  14. Mother - Daughter Relationship’s links to Daughter’s Self-Esteem and Life Satisfaction

    ONAYLI, Selin; Erdur-Baker, Özgür

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relation of mother - daughter relationship to an adult daughter’s self- esteem and life satisfaction. 426 university students with a mean age of 21.62 (SD= 2.35) participated in the study. Adult Mother - Daughter Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Satisfaction with Life Scale were administered. The canonical correlation analysis revealed that three indicators of mother - daughter relationship (connectedness, interdependency, and trust in hierarchy) ...

  15. Polytraumatization in an adult national sample and its association with psychological distress and self-esteem

    Nilsson, Doris; Dahlström, Örjan; Pribe, Gisela; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2014-01-01

    AbstractObjective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of self-reported experiences of potential childhood traumas and polytraumatization, and to find cut-off values for different kinds of potential traumatic events in a national representative sample of adults in Sweden. In addition, to analyse the association between polytraumatization and both psychological distress and global self-esteem. Method A web-based survey - containing SCL-25 and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, a...

  16. Self-esteem, shyness, and sociability in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI)

    Wadman, Ruth; Durkin, Kevin; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if lower global self-esteem, shyness and low sociability are outcomes associated with SLI in adolescence. Possible concurrent predictive relationships and gender differences were also examined. Method: Fifty-four adolescents with SLI, aged between 16 and 17 years, were compared with a group of 54 adolescents with typical language abilities on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and the Cheek and Buss shyness and sociability scales. Results: The SLI group had significantly lo...

  17. Affect and Strategy Use: The Relationship between EFL Learners’ Self-esteem and Language Learning Strategies

    Amir Asadifard; Reza Biria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between Language Learning Strategies (LLSs) and Global Self-esteem (GSE) among college-level EFL learners. It was also meant to know which strategies are more frequent among learners. One hundred and twenty seven undergraduate students majoring in English at Lorestan University participated in the study. Two questionnaires, i.e. the Oxford’s (1990) Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL), and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem...

  18. Correlation of adolescents' self-concept and self-esteem with some unwholesome behavior

    Renata Marčič

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlations between self-image, self-esteem and some unwholesome behavior (alcohol consumption, cigarette and marihuana smoking, overeating at a meal, television watching and computer use in spare time) in Slovenian adolescents. We used Offer Self-image Questionnaire for adolescents, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and Unwholesome behaviour Questionnaire that was made for the purpose of this research. In the research 392 high school students partic...

  19. DIFFERENCES REGARDING SELF-ESTEEM AND THE COMMUNICATION STYLE DEPENDING ON THE LEVEL OF EDUCATION

    Georgeta PÂNIȘOARĂ; Sandu, Cristina; Nicoleta DUȚĂ

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to study the differences in self-esteem and the communication style, depending on the level of education (at high school and university subjects). It is analyzed also how the positive self-esteem can correlate with a style of communication and assertively-positive approach. The participants are 120 subjects, 60 high school students and 60 students. The data was collected using two instruments: the Rosenberg questionnaire and a questionnaire on communication style. The d...

  20. 外显自尊、相对内隐自尊和整体内隐自尊%Explicit Self-esteem, Relative Implicit Self-esteem and Global Implicit Self-esteem

    艾传国; 佐斌

    2011-01-01

    目的:通过自尊量表、内隐联想测验(IAT)和单类内隐联想测验(SC-IAT)三种方法测量自尊,并比较三者的关系.方法:外显自尊采用Rosenberg自尊量表的中文修订版,内隐自尊采用inquisit 3编制两个实验程序:我-他人IAT(实验1)和我SC-IAT(实验2).结果:①被试整体外显自尊水平比较高,我-他人IAT和我SC-IAT实验的内隐效应显著,并且都显示在内隐层面被试对自己有较高的评价.外显自尊和内隐自尊均不存在性别差异.②外显自尊与我-他人IAT不相关,但与我SC -IAT呈显著负相关.我-他人IAT与我SC-IAT之间相关不显著.结论:我-他人IAT测量的是相对内隐自尊,而我SC-IAT测量的是整体内隐自尊,是两个相对独立的结构.%Objective: To measure self-esteem through three methods, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Implicit Association Test and Single Category Implicit Association Test, and compare their relationships. Methods: Explicit self-esteem was tested by revised edition of Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Implicit experiment procedures were made by inquisit 3: Test 1 was self-others IAT, Test 2 was self SC-IAT. Results: (Dglobal explicit self-esteem was high, which indicated that subjects had high self-evaluation. Implicit effects were significant in self-others IAT and self SC-IAT, which meant they also had high self-evaluation in implicit level. Gender difference did not exit. ?There was no correlation between explicit self-esteem and self-others IAT, but negative correlation exits between explicit self-esteem and self SC-IAT. There was no significant correlation between the two implicit self-esteem. Conclusion: Self-others IAT measures relative implicit self-esteem, which self SC-IAT measures global implicit self-esteem. They were two independent structures.

  1. Autonomy, Educational Plans, and Self-Esteem in Institution-Reared and Home-Reared Teenagers in Estonia

    Tulviste, Tiia

    2011-01-01

    The study examines autonomy, self-esteem, and educational plans for the future of 109 institution-reared and 106 home-reared teenagers (15-19 years). Teenagers were asked to complete the Teen Timetable Scale (Feldman & Rosenthal), two Emotional Autonomy Scales (Steinberg & Silverberg), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and answer questions about…

  2. Relation between childhood abuse and self esteem in adolescence

    Özlem Karakuş

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the connection between childhood abuse and self esteem in adults and reveal the potential of childhood abuse determining self esteem. Sampling of this study comprised 915 secondary school students from Konya city’s central district who were randomly selected. 583 of the sample students (%58.3 were females while 382 were males (%41.7. As a result of this study, it has been determined that there is a significant negative correlation between childhood abuse and self esteem. As a result of the regression analyses conducted separately, childhood abuse predicted significantly self-esteem, and it has been revealed that just even emotional abuse is major determinant of self esteem. Result achieved on this issue indicates that students’ self esteem levels decrease as childhood abuse increase.

  3. Relation between childhood abuse and self esteem in adolescence

    Özlem Karakuş

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the connection between childhood abuse and self esteem in adults and reveal the potential of childhood abuse determining self esteem. Sampling of this study comprised 915 secondary school students from Konya city’s central district who were randomly selected. 583 of the sample students (%58.3 were females while 382 were males (%41.7. As a result of this study, it has been determined that there is a significant negative correlation between childhood abuse and self esteem. As a result of the regression analyses conducted separately, childhood abuse predicted significantly self-esteem, and it has been revealed that just even emotional abuse is major determinant of self-esteem. Result achieved on this issue indicates that students’ self esteem levels decrease as childhood abuse increase.

  4. Original article Validation of the Polish version of the Collective Self-Esteem Scale

    Róża Bazińska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this article is to present research on the validity and reliability of the Collective Self-Esteem Scale (CSES for the Polish population. The CSES is a measure of individual differences in collective self-esteem, understood as the global evaluation of one’s own social (collective identity. Participants and procedure Participants from two samples (n = 466 and n = 1,009 completed a paper-pencil set of questionnaires which contained the CSES and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES, and subsets of participants completed scales related to a sense of belonging, well-being and psychological distress (anxiety and depression. Results Like the original version, the Polish version of the CSES comprises 16 items which form the four dimensions of collective self-esteem: Public collective self-esteem, Private collective self-esteem, Membership esteem and Importance of Identity. The results confirm the four-factor structure of the Polish version of the CSES, support the whole Polish version of the CSES as well as its subscales, which represent satisfactory reliability and stability, and provide initial evidence of construct validity. Conclusions As the results of the study indicate, the Polish version of the CSES is a valid and reliable self-report measure for assessing the global self-esteem derived from membership of a group and has proved to be useful in the Polish context.

  5. Parenting and Adolescents’ Self-Esteem: The Portuguese Context

    Rodrigues, Yara; Veiga, Feliciano; María C. Fuentes; García, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationships between parenting styles and adolescent’s psychosocial adjustment (self-esteem) in the Portuguese culture. The sample was of 517 adolescents, 214 males (41.39 %), and aged 11 to 18 years. We used the Parental Socialization Scale (ESPA29) to assess the parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent and negligent), and the Multidimensional Self-esteem Scale Form-5 (AF5) that assesses five dimensions of self-esteem: academic, social, emotional, fa...

  6. Dental aesthetics and self-esteem in adolescents

    Ginna Mabel Muñoz; David Alexander Barrera; Nubia Rocío Sánchez; Edwin Gerardo Luna; Ana Cristina Mafla

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental aesthetics and self-esteem inadolescents.Methods: The sample was 387 randomly selected high school adolescents between 13 and 16 years of age. A clinicalexamination to evaluate dental aesthetics was conducted using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Self-esteem was assessedwith the Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale. The statistical analysis included a descriptive analysis and means comparison, whichwas made through...

  7. Physical education candidate teachers' beliefs about vocational self-esteem

    OZSAKER, Murat; CANPOLAT, A. Meliha

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine epistemological belief and vocational self-esteem physical education candidate teachers of Physical Education and Sports Department in 3 different universities, and also to examine effect of epistemological beliefs on vocational self-esteem. A total of 346 candidate teacher respondents (137 female and 209 male) participated in the study. Epistemological Beliefs and Vocational Self-Esteem Scale were used to determine candidate teachers’ epistemologica...

  8. Damaged self-esteem is associated with internalizing problems

    Daan eCreemers; Ron eScholte; Rutger eEngels; Mitchell ePrinstein; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2013-01-01

    Implicit and explicit self-esteem are assumed to be important factors in understanding the onset and maintenance of psychological problems. The current study aims to examine the association between implicit and explicit self-esteem and their interaction with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness. Specifically, the relationship between the size and the direction of the discrepancy between implicit and explicit self-esteem with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneli...

  9. EFFECT OF SELF ESTEEM ON PERSONALITY TRAITS AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Vishal Subhash Bindwal

    2015-01-01

    Objective of the Study: To investigate the self esteem and personality traits among college students. Hypothesis: There will be no significant difference between high self esteem college students and low self esteem college students on dimension personality traits (decisiveness, responsibility, emotional stability, masculinity, friendliness, heterosexuality, ego strength, curiosity, dominance, and self concept). Participant: A total of 80 students (40 Boys and 40 Girls) were se...

  10. Self esteem and outgroup derogation: A clarification of competing theories

    Davidowitz, Cara; Childs, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Research surrounding the Self Esteem Hypothesis has produced conflicting results and unresolved issues. Whilst the original hypothesis posited that it is individuals low in self-esteem that are motivated to show intergroup discrimination, subsequent research has found evidence to suggest a pattern of individuals high in self esteem showing greater amounts of intergroup discrimination. Furthermore, the Social Identity Theory suggests that this intergroup discrimination will occur between membe...

  11. Self-Esteem and Anxiety among Asian and European students

    Amorim, Filipe; Lam, Mei Ka Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Self-esteem and Anxiety have been widely studied back-to-back on the premises of academic settings, since research has shown that they interact with eachother. The current study compares the score of self-esteem and anxiety of international students currently studying at Umeå University. Thirty students from Europe and Asia have been accessed respectively through usage of a questionnaire designed for its purpose. Overall, Europeans has higher self-esteem than Asians, however, there is no sign...

  12. How self-esteem shapes our interactions with play technologies

    Birk, M.; Mandryk, R.; Gerling, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    The experience that results from video game play is shaped by the play environment, but also by various characteristics of the person playing. We investigated how player self-esteem predicts post-game motivation (enjoyment, effort, and tension), and conducted mediated regressions to show that players’ self-esteem alters post-play motivation by affecting how needs are satisfied during play. We also explored how self-esteem predicts post-play positive and negative affect and conducted mediated ...

  13. Continuity and Change in Self-Esteem During Emerging Adulthood

    Chung, Joanne M.; Robins, Richard W.; Trzesniewski, Kali H.; Noftle, Erik E.; Brent W. Roberts; Widaman, Keith F.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the development of self-esteem in a sample of emerging adults (N = 295) followed longitudinally over 4 years of college. Six waves of self-esteem data were available. Participants also rated, at the end of their 4th year, the degree to which they thought their self-esteem had changed during college. Rank-order stability was high across all waves of data (Mdn disattenuated correlation = .87). On average, self-esteem levels dropped substantially during the 1st semeste...

  14. Self-esteem and injury in competitive field hockey players.

    Kolt, G S; Roberts, P D

    1998-08-01

    A volunteer sample of 50 competitive field hockey players completed the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory at pre- and postseason and prospectively collected injury data over a 20-wk. season. Multiple regression analysis showed no relationship between scores on Self-esteem and the number of injuries, the participation time affected due to injury, and sex of players. Further multiple regression analysis showed that frequency of the more severe injuries significantly predicted scores on Self-esteem. This finding can be interpreted as evidence of the relationship between low self-esteem and injury in sport. PMID:9760670

  15. Self-esteem and communication skills as predictors of psychological resilience for Turkish vocational school students

    Özlem TAGAY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes whether or not communication skills and self-esteem of vocational school students can predict their psychological resilience. The data of the study were collected from a total of 295 vocational school students including 147 female and 148 male in Burdur and Isparta. The study benefited from the Ego Resiliency Scale developed by Block and Kremen (1996 and adapted by Karaırmak (2007, the Communication Skills Evaluation Scale developed by Korkut (1996, and the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale developed by Morris Rosenberg (1965. The study made use of the standard multiple regression analysis in order to prove the power of the assessment of communication skills and self-esteem to predict psychological levels of resilience of vocational school students. The data were tested on a 0.05 level of significance. This study shows that the assessment of communication skills and self-esteem positively co- relates with the personal strengths of pulling oneself together. The positive self-assessment predicts self- esteem positively and significantly as well. A positive sense of an individual’s about oneself positively co- relates with high self-esteem.

  16. Psychosocial support and parents' social life determine the self-esteem of orphan children.

    Erango, Markos Abiso; Ayka, Zikie Ataro

    2015-01-01

    Parental death affects the life of children in many ways, one of which is self-esteem problems. Providing psychosocial support and equipping orphans play a vital role in their lifes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 7-18-year-old orphans at 17 local districts of Gamo Gofa Zone, Southern Regional State of Ethiopia. From a total of 48,270 orphans in these areas, 4,368 were selected using stratified simple random sampling technique. Data were collected with a designed questionnaire based on the Rosenberg's rating scale to measure their self-esteem levels. Self-esteem with a score less than or equal to an average score was considered to be low self-esteem in the analysis. Binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the data using the SPSS software. The results of the study revealed that the probability of orphans suffering from low self-esteem was 0.59. Several risk factors were found to be significant at the level of 5%. Psychosocial support (good guidance, counseling and treatment, physical protection and amount of love shared, financial and material support, and fellowship with other children), parents living together before death, strong relationship between parents before death, high average monthly income, voluntary support, and consideration from the society are some of the factors that decrease the risk of being low in self-esteem. There are many orphans with low self-esteem in the study areas. The factors negatively affecting the self-esteem of orphans include the lack of psychosocial support, poor social life of parents, and death of parents due to AIDS. Society and parents should be aware of the consequences of these factors which can influence their children's future self-esteem. PMID:26508894

  17. Self-esteem mediates the effect of the parent-adolescent relationship on depression.

    Hu, Junmin; Ai, Hongshan

    2016-06-01

    There is a trend of rapid growth in both the level and occurrence of depression when people reach adolescence. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of the parent-adolescent relationship on depression in adolescents, and mainly focused on the confirmation of the mediator role of self-esteem. A total of 364 senior middle school students accomplished the Parent-Adolescent Relationship Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. The results suggested that both parent-adolescent relationship and self-esteem were significantly correlated with depression. Structural equation modeling indicated that self-esteem partially mediated the relationship between parent-adolescent relationship and depression. PMID:25030796

  18. Italian youth subculture: collection, self-esteem, and self-efficacy.

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Miglioretti, Massimo

    2004-10-01

    63 young people (M age=23.9 yr., SD=2.4, 50 men, 13 women) belonging to four subculture groups (New American Punk, Cyberpunk, Trash Style, and Rasta-Hippy) were studied to examine the relationship between self-esteem, self-efficacy, and the development of a body modification collection. A survey was created to evaluate quality of life, risk behaviour, and body modification. Self-esteem and self-efficacy were assessed using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and General Perceived Self-efficacy Scale. Belonging to a group which permits neglect of standard norms of communal life makes it possible to avoid facing up to low self-esteem. Adherence to a group appears, from the results of this study, to be correlated with self-efficacy; inability to cope with life situations suggests a state of malaise in these young people. PMID:15587221

  19. The sources of self-esteem: Initating and maintaining romantic intimacy at emerging adulthood in Turkey

    Nilüfer Özabacı

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship of emerging adults’ in initiating and maintaining romantic intimacy with sub-dimensions and explores the extent that self-esteem in emerging adults could explain the initiation and maintenance of a romantic relationship. The participants included 136 male and 106 female totaling 242 university students. In order to collect data, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Markers of Starting Romantic Intimacy Scale and Quality of Relationship Inventory were used. According to the results, emerging adults perceived both having markers of starting romantic intimacy and the positive quality of relationship as significant sources for their self-esteem. The results of the present study emphasize the significance of self-esteem for starting and maintaining romantic intimacy.

  20. The state of measurement of self-esteem of African American women.

    Hatcher, Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    This article critically reviews the state of measurement of self-esteem in African American women. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory are three commonly used measures. However, their validity for African American women has not been adequately tested. Given the unique nature of the self-esteem of this group, related to experiences of racism and sexism, the accurate measurement of this construct is important. This review provided support for the internal consistency of each measure with alpha coefficients ranging from .74 to .87. However, the validity of the measures was not fully supported. Suggestions for further research specific to the unique needs of this population are discussed. PMID:17607059

  1. Is self-esteem a "double edged sword"? Self-esteem and the onset of adolescent sexual activity

    Favara, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Self-esteem has been conceptualized as a "social vaccine". The belief is that high self-esteem can inoculate young people, against vulnerability to a wide range of social illnesses. This study gives a contribution in the understanding of the causal relation between self-esteem and sexual behaviour among American adolescents. I analyzes the impact of different levels of early self-esteem on a wide set of risky sexual behaviours. I use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Hea...

  2. Sweets, Sex, or Self-Esteem? Comparing the Value of Self-Esteem Boosts with Other Pleasant Rewards

    Bushman, Brad J.; Scott J. Moeller; Crocker, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Many people ascribe great value to self-esteem, but how much value? Do people value self-esteem more than other pleasant activities, such as eating sweets and having sex? Two studies of college students (Study 1: N=130; Study 2: N=152) showed that people valued boosts to their self-esteem more than they valued eating a favorite food and engaging in a favorite sexual activity. Study 2 also showed that people valued self-esteem more than they valued drinking alcohol, receiving a paycheck, and s...

  3. The impact of forced social comparison on adolescents’ self-esteem and appearance satisfaction

    Purić Danka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of forced social comparison on adolescents’ self-esteem and appearance satisfaction research, conducted on a sample of 133 high school seniors, consisted of two phases. In phase one, participants were given the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory, Appearance Satisfaction Scale and Appearance Relevance Scale, and in phase two, one month later, they were exposed to photographs of attractive and unattractive individuals. Two groups of boys and girls each assessed attractive or unattractive individuals of their own gender, while two control groups (of both genders were not exposed to any photographs. Immediately after assessing the photographs, the participants were again given the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory and Appearance Satisfaction Scale. We found that forced social comparison had an impact on self-esteem and a marginally significant effect on appearance satisfaction in the group of participants (of both genders assessing the photographs of unattractive individuals, while no effects were found in the either the control group or the group assessing the photographs of attractive individuals. We also examined the impact of self-esteem, appearance satisfaction and appearance relevance as moderating variables on the effect size of social comparison and showed that higher pretest self-esteem and appearance relevance and lower appearance satisfaction predict higher posttest self-esteem scores, regardless of the participants’ group membership. The group of participants exposed to photographs of unattractive people, however, showed the opposite pattern - those participants who had initially lower self-esteem have increased it more as a result of the experimental exposure.

  4. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Navidian, Ali; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35) and intervention (n=35) groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention. Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients. PMID:25276758

  5. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Hossein Ebrahimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35 and intervention (n=35 groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES. Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention.Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients.

  6. Is low self-esteem a risk factor for depression among adolescents? an analytical study with interventional component

    Jayanthi P, Rajamanickam Rajkumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self – esteem is an important factor for helping persons deal with life stressors. It is an important determinant of psychological well-being that is particularly problematic during an adolescent life stage. Low self-esteem might contribute to depression through both interpersonal and intrapersonal pathways. Many theories of depression postulate that low self esteem is a defining feature of depression. Aims: Self-esteem in adolescents has been associated with a number of risk and protective factors in previous studies. This study examined the relationship between low self esteem and depression among adolescents. Methods: This study used a case control (retrospective design. Samples of 1120 adolescents, aged 14-17 years were selected for the study. Screening was done by using MINI-KID and the level of depression was assessed by using Beck depression inventory. Self esteem was measured by Rosenberg self esteem scale. Odds Ratio and Multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the relation between self-esteem and socio-demographic variables. Results: The odds ratio analysis revealed that adolescents who had low self esteem found to have 3.7 times (95% CI=1.9-6.9 and p- value 0.001 more risk of developing depression than the adolescents who had high self esteem. Conclusions: The findings implied that low self-esteem is a risk factor for depression among adolescents. Adolescents with low self esteem have to be identified earlier and prompt interventions will prevent future psychiatric illnesses. As an intervention towards the educational component pamphlet was distributed to the adolescents, parents and teachers. A concept programme called “Self Esteem Education & Development – SEED” programme, is planned for, from High school level.

  7. Romanticism and Self-Esteem among Teen Mothers.

    Medora, Nilufer P.; von der Hellen, Cheryl

    1997-01-01

    Examined teen mothers' (N=94) romanticism and self-esteem so as to investigate these variables' relationships among ten independent variables, (e.g., age and sexual activity). Results indicate that five variables were significantly related to romanticism (previous abortion, etc.), whereas two variables were connected to self-esteem (age and birth…

  8. Sex Differences in Global Self-Esteem. A Research Review.

    Skaalvik, Einar M.

    1986-01-01

    Studies included in two major reviews of sex differences in global self-esteem have been reanalyzed on methodological grounds. A survey is also conducted of 29 studies reported between 1975 and 1985. Results show a strong indication that males had higher global self-esteem than females as measured by context-free instruments. (Author/LMO)

  9. Global Self-Esteem: Cognitive Interpretation in an Academic Setting.

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    Researchers have assumed that global self-esteem (often labeled as general self-concept), being a general aggregate of perceptions of the self, is content free. Recent research has, however, shown that responses to self-esteem survey items are influenced by the context in which the respondents are asked to make their responses--a chameleon effect.…

  10. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  11. Teachers' Definitions of Self-Esteem When Rating Preschool Children.

    Bell, Nancy J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Female teachers rated 107 preschool boys and girls on their self-esteem and on a sex role rating scale. Although the validity of such ratings remains an issue, it appears that children rated high in self-esteem by their teachers are those perceived as assertive, active, athletic--stereotypically masculine traits. (Author/SJL)

  12. Damaged self-esteem is associated with internalizing problems

    D.H.M. Creemers; R.H.J. Scholte; R.C.M.E. Engels; M.J. Prinstein; R.W. Wiers

    2013-01-01

    Implicit and explicit self-esteem are assumed to be important factors in understanding the onset and maintenance of psychological problems. The current study aims to examine the association between implicit and explicit self-esteem and their interaction with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, a

  13. Self-Esteem of Junior High and High School Students.

    Lee, Kimberly E.

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the self-esteem of junior high and high school students. The independent variables investigated were quality of family life, birth order, family size, maternal employment, grade level and family structure. The dependent variables were the self-esteem scores from the following sub-scales of the Texas…

  14. Employed Mothers: Job Satisfaction and Self-Esteem.

    Sinacore-Guinn, Ada L.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how certain demographic variables affect job satisfaction and self-esteem in a sample of 138 employed mothers from a major U.S. city. Results indicate that age, race, and employment status were significantly related to job satisfaction and self-esteem, whereas time, education level, number and age of children, and marital status were not.…

  15. Why hospice nurses need high self-esteem.

    Olthuis, G.J.; Leget, C.J.W.; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between personal and professional qualities in hospice nurses. We examine the notion of self-esteem in personal and professional identity. The focus is on two questions: (1) what is self-esteem, and how is it related to personal identity and its moral dimensio

  16. Special Delivery Systems. Self-Esteem Exercises. Learning Disabilities Curriculum.

    Molek, Carol

    This publication contains self-esteem exercises and a learning disabilities (LD) curriculum for students with LD in adult basic education programs. The 37 student exercises are designed to build the self-esteem of students with LD. They include self-evaluations, profiles, and checklists. Topics covered are success, decision making, problem…

  17. Trajectories of Global Self-Esteem Development during Adolescence

    Birkeland, Marianne Skogbrott; Melkevik, Ole; Holsen, Ingrid; Wold, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Based on data from a 17-year longitudinal study of 1083 adolescents, from the ages of 13 to 30 years, the average development of self-reported global self-esteem was found to be high and stable during adolescence. However, there is considerable inter-individual variance in baseline and development of global self-esteem. This study used latent…

  18. Area Specific Self-Esteem, Values, and Adolescent Substance Use

    Donnelly, Joseph; Young, Michael; Pearson, Rebecca; Penhollow, Tina M.; Hernandez, Aida

    2008-01-01

    The use of illicit and licit drugs continues to be a major public health concern. Many prevention and drug education programs address this issue by attempting to enhance self-esteem. The idea is that increased levels of self-esteem will serve as a protective factor in decreasing the motivation and increasing the resistance to use drugs. This study…

  19. Dental aesthetics and self-esteem in adolescents

    Ginna Mabel Muñoz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental aesthetics and self-esteem inadolescents.Methods: The sample was 387 randomly selected high school adolescents between 13 and 16 years of age. A clinicalexamination to evaluate dental aesthetics was conducted using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI. Self-esteem was assessedwith the Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale. The statistical analysis included a descriptive analysis and means comparison, whichwas made through t-Student and ANOVA tests. DAI was correlated to Rosenberg’s Self-esteem Scale with Spearman’s rankcorrelation coefficient. The data collected was analyzed by using the SPSS program version 17.Results: The mean DAI score was 34.2 (SD=14.2 and self-esteem was 22.6 (SD=4.6. The low socioeconomic status(SES group had the highest levels of DAI and the lowest levels of self-esteem. A weak, but statistically significant, negativecorrelation was found between DAI scores and Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale (r=-0.1, p0.05. Regarding gender, in female individualsa negative weak correlation (r=-0.14, p0.05.Conclusions: The outcomes generated by this investigation can improve our understanding of how the correlationbetween dental aesthetics and self-esteem may fluctuate because of the SES variability.

  20. Nurturing Self-Esteem in Your Child with Special Needs

    Mulholland, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author offers tips to boost the self-esteem of a child with special needs. Rick Lavoie, renowned author, speaker and advocate for children with special needs, says that one of the ways to increase a child's self-esteem is to find "islands of competence" and focus on the child's natural abilities. All parents need to be…

  1. Visual Impairment and Its Impact on Self-Esteem

    Bowen, Jayne

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate self-esteem levels amongst a sample group of 60 children with Visual Impairment (VI). The group was made up of equal numbers of boys and girls from primary and secondary schools. Each child's self-esteem was measured using the BG STEEM Questionnaire (Maines and Robinson, 1993). The results showed that…

  2. Promoting Self-Esteem in a Caring Positive Classroom.

    Hodges, Linda; Wolf, Carolyn J.

    Noting that low self-esteem negatively affects student achievement, this action research project implemented and evaluated a program for increasing student self-esteem through a caring and positive classroom environment incorporating cooperative learning and the use of praise and rewards. The targeted population consisted of fifth grade physical…

  3. Social Class and Self-Esteem among Children and Adults

    Rosenberg, Morris; Pearlin, Leonard I.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of two studies examining the relationship of social class to self-esteem. Two groups were involved, children ages eight to 18 and adults 18 to 65. Four principles of self-esteem development were advanced to account for the results. The principles were said to apply equally to adults and children. (BC)

  4. Self-esteem and hopefulness in adolescents with cancer.

    Ritchie, M A

    2001-02-01

    Increased survivorship in childhood cancer has raised questions about adolescents' psychosocial functioning during the treatment experience and long-term adaptation as cancer survivors. This descriptive correlation study examines the relationships among the stages of adolescence, gender, self-esteem, and hopefulness in a sample of 45 adolescents with cancer. The perceived level of self-esteem was measured by using the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory; the amount of hopefulness was measured by using the Hopefulness Scale for Adolescents. Mean scores for self-esteem and hopefulness were comparable to normative data reported for healthy adolescents on each scale. Perceived level of self-esteem and hopefulness did not significantly differ between boys and girls overall; early, middle, and late adolescents; or between boys and girls within each stage of adolescence. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed self-esteem and the early stage of adolescence accounted for 27.3% (R2 = .306) of the variance in hopefulness scores. Self-esteem was the most significant predictor (F = 12.456, p = .001), explaining 20.7% of the variance (R2 = .225, p = .001). This study contributes to nursing the knowledge of the psychosocial response and the treatment experience in adolescents with cancer. These results can be used in future research to develop and test nursing actions that can influence a perceived sense of self-esteem and hopefulness and potentially allow for continued psychosocial development and effective coping among these adolescents during treatment and into survivorship. PMID:11247523

  5. Comparison of self-esteem scores: American and Indian adolescents.

    Wood, P C; Hillman, S B; Sawilowsky, S S

    1995-04-01

    The Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory was administered to 112 African American adolescents who were academically at-risk for dropping out of high school. Results were similar to those of a previous study comparing a heterogeneous group of 100 American adolescents with 100 youths from India. Differences on scores of self-esteem for the two international groups were noted. PMID:7667445

  6. Using Trait-State Models to Evaluate the Longitudinal Consistency of Global Self-Esteem From Adolescence to Adulthood

    Donnellan, M. Brent; Kenny, David A.; Kali H Trzesniewski; Richard E. Lucas; Conger, Rand D.

    2012-01-01

    The present research used a latent variable trait-state model to evaluate the longitudinal consistency of self-esteem during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Analyses were based on ten administrations of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) spanning the ages of approximately 13 to 32 for a sample of 451 participants. Results indicated that a completely stable trait factor and an autoregressive trait factor accounted for the majority of the variance in latent self-est...

  7. HIV/AIDS knowledge and self-esteem among adolescents.

    Oxley, G M

    2001-05-01

    The incidence of HIV/AIDS is rapidly increasing among adolescents and young adults with some studies linking sexual risk taking and self-esteem. A convenience sample of 39 ethnically diverse adolescents, ages 14-18, participated in a pilot study designed to assess HIV/AIDS knowledge and to build self-esteem. Adolescents selected from two centers in California completed the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and the Student Health Questionnaire (SHQ) before beginning and after completing a program of six 2-hour educational sessions. These sessions focused on HIV/AIDS knowledge and building self-esteem. Knowledge of HIV/AIDS prevention and transmission increased by 2096 from pretest to posttest. Practitioners addressing the needs of adolescents should focus on in-depth information regarding HIV/AIDS, especially in the area of prevention strategies and cultural factors influencing levels of self-esteem. PMID:11881719

  8. Self-Esteem Challenges of Nursing Students: An Integrative Review

    Leila Valizadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-esteem among nursing students is important in providing high-quality serviceto clients, yet each study in this field has described only a portion of existing relevant knowledge.Integrative review studies are the best practice for identification of existing nursing knowledge.The purpose of this study was to determine self-esteem challenges among nursing students. Methods: An integrative review was conducted in this study. The databases ProQuest, Medlineon PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar and Iran Medix were used for the review. The articleswere retrieved in three steps, including searching by search terms, reviewing the proceedingsbased on inclusion criteria and final retrieval and assessment of the available full texts. We used alist of keywords, including nursing, self-esteem and challenges and mixed them with "AND" and"OR" as a search strategy. Papers were included and eligible if they were associated with problemsrelated to nursing students’ self-esteem. Those studies that focused only on the self-esteem ofregistered nurses or patients were excluded. Search results were limited to the years 1960-2014. Results: Our findings showed three major challenges, including challenges associated withinconsistency in determining the level of students’ self-esteem, self-esteem associated challengesin professionalism of students, and the psychosocial challenges pertaining to the consequences oflow self-esteem. Conclusion: The findings suggest there is a need for more qualitative research to explore thefactors that contribute to self-esteem in nursing students with a particular focus on the factorsthat increase or decrease self-esteem. In addition, strategies to maintain and increase self-esteemneed to be designed, implemented and evaluated.

  9. Sweets, sex, or self-esteem? Comparing the value of self-esteem boosts with other pleasant rewards.

    Bushman, Brad J; Moeller, Scott J; Crocker, Jennifer

    2011-10-01

    Many people ascribe great value to self-esteem, but how much value? Do people value self-esteem more than other pleasant activities, such as eating sweets and having sex? Two studies of college students (Study 1: N=130; Study 2: N=152) showed that people valued boosts to their self-esteem more than they valued eating a favorite food and engaging in a favorite sexual activity. Study 2 also showed that people valued self-esteem more than they valued drinking alcohol, receiving a paycheck, and seeing a best friend. Both studies found that people who highly valued self-esteem engaged in laboratory tasks to boost their self-esteem. Finally, personality variables interacted with these value ratings. Entitled people thought they were more deserving of all pleasant rewards, even though they did not like them all that much (both studies), and people who highly value self-esteem pursued potentially maladaptive self-image goals, presumably to elevate their self-esteem (Study 2). PMID:21950264

  10. Self-Concept, Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement: Strategies for Maintaining Self-Esteem in Students Experiencing Academic Failure

    Peixoto, Francisco; Almeida, Leandro S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research into the relationship between self-esteem and academic achievement shows that despite differences in academic self-evaluation, students' global self-representations do not differ as a result of their grades at school. In this study, we will analyse the strategies that underachievers used to maintain their self-esteem at an…

  11. Self-esteem accessibility as attitude strength: on the durability and impactfulness of accessible self-esteem.

    DeMarree, Kenneth G; Petty, Richard E; Strunk, Daniel R

    2010-05-01

    The present research examines the accessibility of one's self-esteem as a predictor of the "strength" (durability and impactfulness) of that self-esteem. Based on attitude accessibility research, the authors predicted that accessibility of self-esteem (i.e., a self-attitude) would be positively related to self-esteem's ability to resist change and guide information processing. In Study 1, accessibility of self-esteem was positively related to resistance to change in a paradigm where participants listed either positive or negative self-attributes. Self-esteem was also associated with biases in judgments of ambiguous personality feedback (Study 2) and in explanatory style and future event predictions (Study 3), but did so to a greater extent as self-esteem accessibility increased. In addition, these patterns were obtained after controlling for other variables, including general reaction time, evaluative extremity, self-concept clarity, and self-esteem certainty. Results are discussed in relation to past literature, self-strength, and applied implications. PMID:20371798

  12. Trait self-esteem and neural activities related to self-evaluation and social feedback.

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Xiaofan; Chen, Yu; Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2016-01-01

    Self-esteem has been associated with neural responses to self-reflection and attitude toward social feedback but in different brain regions. The distinct associations might arise from different tasks or task-related attitudes in the previous studies. The current study aimed to clarify these by investigating the association between self-esteem and neural responses to evaluation of one's own personality traits and of others' opinion about one's own personality traits. We scanned 25 college students using functional MRI during evaluation of oneself or evaluation of social feedback. Trait self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale after scanning. Whole-brain regression analyses revealed that trait self-esteem was associated with the bilateral orbitofrontal activity during evaluation of one's own positive traits but with activities in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and occipital cortices during evaluation of positive social feedback. Our findings suggest that trait self-esteem modulates the degree of both affective processes in the orbitofrontal cortex during self-reflection and cognitive processes in the medial prefrontal cortex during evaluation of social feedback. PMID:26842975

  13. An application of the LC-LSTM framework to the self-esteem instability case.

    Alessandri, Guido; Vecchione, Michele; Donnellan, Brent M; Tisak, John

    2013-10-01

    The present research evaluates the stability of self-esteem as assessed by a daily version of the Rosenberg (Society and the adolescent self-image, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1965) general self-esteem scale (RGSE). The scale was administered to 391 undergraduates for five consecutive days. The longitudinal data were analyzed using the integrated LC-LSTM framework that allowed us to evaluate: (1) the measurement invariance of the RGSE, (2) its stability and change across the 5-day assessment period, (3) the amount of variance attributable to stable and transitory latent factors, and (4) the criterion-related validity of these factors. Results provided evidence for measurement invariance, mean-level stability, and rank-order stability of daily self-esteem. Latent state-trait analyses revealed that variances in scores of the RGSE can be decomposed into six components: stable self-esteem (40 %), ephemeral (or temporal-state) variance (36 %), stable negative method variance (9 %), stable positive method variance (4 %), specific variance (1 %) and random error variance (10 %). Moreover, latent factors associated with daily self-esteem were associated with measures of depression, implicit self-esteem, and grade point average. PMID:24092488

  14. Self-concept, self-esteem and psychopathological symptoms in persons with intellectual disability.

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Pérez, José Ignacio

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: (a) to analyze self-concept, self-esteem, and psychopathological symptoms in individuals with and without intellectual disability; and (b) to explore whether there were gender differences in these same variables in both groups. The sample is made up of 170 participants aged 19 to 40, 128 without disability and 42 with intellectual disability. The methodology is descriptive. To measure the variables, three assessment instruments were applied: the "Listado de adjetivos para la evaluaci6n del autoconcepto en adolescentes y adultos" (LAEA; Garaigordobil, in press), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE; Rosenberg, 1965), and the Revised Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90; Derogatis, 1983). The ANOVA showed that participants with intellectual disability scored significantly lower in self-concept and self-esteem, and higher in all the psychopathological symptoms except for somatization. The ANOVA did not reveal significant gender differences in any variables in either of the two groups. PMID:17549887

  15. The impact of parental self-esteem and parental rearing behavior on adolescent attachment to parents

    Anbo Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the relationship of parental self-esteem, parental rearing and adolescent adult attachment was investigated. A total 448 senior high school students completed EMBU(Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran, or ―Own memories of parental rearing‖, Perris et al., 1980, the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR; Brennan, Clark, &Shaver, 1998, and their parents completed The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES; Rosenberg, 1965. The results suggested that parental global self-esteem has no effect on the adolescent attachment to parents. Parental positive rearing behaviors have been significantly associated with avoidance to parents. Furthermore, the negative rearing behaviors, such as paternal denying and rejecting, maternal punitiveness, maternal overinvolved and overprotective behavior, can predict the adolescent avoidance and anxiety to parents.

  16. Impact of Value Structure on Brand Engagement Depending on Degree of Self-Esteem of Adolescents

    Blandína Šramová

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This research demonstrates the relationship between the brand engagement, depending on the structure of values and level of self-esteem in adolescents. The research methods was used: Rosenberg´s Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965, Portrait Values Questionnaire (Schwartz, 1992, 1994, 1999, Brand engagement (Sprott, Czellar, Spangenberg, 2009. The final outcomes showed differences, as well as a certain correlation between the values, which are attributed to adolescents, and engagement attributed to brand. Cultural values are identified as influential factors for the brand engagement perception of the importance of adolescents depending on their level of self-esteem. Research shows the importance of recognition of the values for understanding and foresight of relations between values and attitudes towards brands, which reflect both their behavior and their social experience. The result provides recommendations for marketing communication to easier identification of compatible and antagonistic values, which adolescents associate with a brand.

  17. Evaluation of self-esteem among homosexuals in the southern region of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Tiago José Canali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to evaluate self-esteem in homosexuals from southern Santa Catarina and relate it to several variables such as gender, age, bullying and psychiatric treatment. Participants were selected using the "Snowball" technique. The Rosenberg self-esteem scale was used for self-esteem assessment with subsequent comparison with other variables. A total of 403 individuals were interviewed, including 310 males with a mean age of 24.02. Most of the population studied (80.9% had high self-esteem, with a mean score of 5.55 on the Rosenberg scale. Individuals who had only studied up to primary school level, were unemployed, evangelicals, with a history of psychotherapeutic and psychiatric treatment, or who had been subjected to bullying in the last year and those who wished to change their sexual orientation, had significantly lower self-esteem than the others. 114 people had used psychotropic drugs, 47.58% of which were benzodiazepine-based, primarily Clonazepam (27.58%. Most of this population had high self-esteem. There was a difference between some categories of the variables studied, however, all averages corresponded to high self-esteem on the Rosenberg scale. Benzodiazepines were the psychotropic drugs most often used by the individuals in this study.

  18. Mothers’ Attitudes and Self-Esteem among Deaf Children in Iranian High Schools

    Effat Hamed Sardar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between mothers’ attitude and self-esteem among deaf children who are currently enrolled in deaf high schools in Iran. While family system theory is typically used in trying counseling and therapy, much can be learned from examining it by studying the relationship between deaf children and their mothers. Family systems theory has been used in trying to understand problems of communication between children and their families (Widerman, 1995. In general, attention with some significant findings has been focused on environmental factors such as parenting, communication at home, and type of schooling as potential contributors to self-esteem (Crocker, 2008. However, the role of other variables such as family’s attitude has not been systematically explored. This implies that the picture is far from complete. It is also not clear what kind of factors effect on deaf children’s self-esteem. Henceforth, the findings of this study may be helpful in the development of curriculum goals for increasing self-esteem in deaf children. Counselors and social workers can do much to promote positive family relationships as well as acceptance of disabilities in deaf children. The sample consisted of 200 deaf children (100 boys and 100 girls and 200 normal-hearing mothers. The study was conducted at deaf high schools in Iran. Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, Parental Attitudes towards Deafness and interviews Scale were used. The results showed that a relationship existed between mothers’ attitude and deaf children’s self-esteem. Additionally, according to the Pearson correlation test, there is a relationship between the mothers’ attitudes and self-esteem in deaf children. Children whose mothers ably communicated had higher self-esteem scores than their counterparts whose mothers could not ably communicate. The findings of this study may be helpful in the development of curriculum goals for increase of self-esteem in deaf

  19. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = - .60, p self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  20. Contingent self-esteem and vulnerability to depression: Academic contingent self-esteem predicts depressive symptoms in students

    Claudia eSchöne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Low self-esteem has been established as a vulnerability factor for depression. In line with recent research, we suggest that a full understanding of the role of self-esteem in depression requires consideration of contingent self-esteem as well. For most people, competence is an important source of self-esteem. Students in particular link their self-esteem to academic competence. To test the hypothesis that academic contingent self-esteem (aCSE predicts depressive symptoms, two studies were conducted. Preceding the investigation of our hypothesis, the first purpose of Study 1 was to describe the development of aCSE, self-esteem level, and depressive symptoms in adolescence in a sample of German students aged 10–16 (N = 1888 in order to provide a foundation for further analyses. Then, to address the main question, age and gender differences in aCSE, self-esteem level, and depressive symptoms as well as their relations were investigated. The results show that (1 gender differences emerged after the age of 10/11. Girls scored higher on aCSE and depressive symptoms and lower on self-esteem level than did boys, and aCSE and depressive symptoms decreased and self-esteem level increased over time in boys, while the rather disadvantageous pattern in girls remained stable. (2 After controlling for self-esteem level and aCSE, the effects of gender and age × gender interaction on depressive symptoms disappeared, suggesting an influence of aCSE on depressive symptoms. (3 aCSE predicted depressive symptoms over and above self-esteem level.Since the results of Study 1 did not allow for causal conclusions, a longitudinal study (N = 160 was conducted to further investigate the causal role of aCSE. According to the diathesis-stress model, aCSE was expected to serve as a diathesis for developing depressive symptoms in the face of academic stress (daily hassles during an academic semester at university. The results of Study 2 revealed that aCSE interacted with

  1. A Cooperative Study of Self-Esteem, Leadership and Resilience amongst Illegal Motorbike Racers and Normal Adolescents in Malaysia

    Wan Shahrazad, W. S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding self-esteem, leadership and resilience among at risk youth who are involved in illegal motorbike racing is a crucial issue prior to starting any intervention programs. It may provide an indication of their profile in order to change this negative behavior. This study aimed in examining the relationship between self-esteem, leadership and resilience among illegal motorbike racers and its comparison with normal adolescents. The study employed survey research involving the administration of three standardized psychological tests namely the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE, the adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ and the Resilience Questionnaire (RQ. A total of 140 respondents participated in this study. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and t-test analysis. Results showed that there were significant correlations between self-esteem, leadership and resilience dimensions among normal adolescents. However there were no significant correlations between self-esteem, leadership and resilience dimensions among illegal motorbike racers. In addition, there were significant differences of self-esteem, leadership and resilience between normal adolescents and illegal motorbike racers. In conclusion, normal adolescents had higher self-esteem and leadership and they showed higher resilience while illegal motorbike racers showed lower self-esteem and leadership and in turn they were less resilient. This implied the need for continuous intervention programs in order to empower at risk youth. It was recommended that future studies explore other variables such as family and school variables that can influence resilience.

  2. Self-perception, Self-esteem and Relationship Behaviour

    Bale, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    What do you see when you look in the mirror? How do you feel about yourself? Are you attractive, likeable, a person of worth? This talk outlines some current psychological research on self-perception and self-esteem, including studies which challenge the common notion that an epidemic of low self-esteem is at the root of a range of social and personal problems. It then goes on to discuss some of my own research on physical attractiveness, self-esteem and relationship behaviour. It co...

  3. Self-Esteem and Writing Achievements of Iranian EFL Learners

    Ali Akbar Khansir; Zahra Abdolahi

    2014-01-01

    Writing skill is one of the four language skills in learning English language in EFL setting. The role of self-esteem in learning second language as is one of the major important factors is very vital; because, success or failure of a learner depends mostly on the degree of ones’ self-esteem. This research aimed at investigating the correlation between self-esteem and English writing achievement of Iranian EFL learners. The Iranian learners who participated in this research were sixty male an...

  4. Cutural Predictors of Self-Esteem: A Study of Chinese American Female and Male Young Adults.

    Tsai, Jeanne L.; Ying, Yu-Wen; Lee, Peter Allen

    2001-01-01

    Domains of cultural orientation such as language, social affiliation, and cultural pride, were examined in Chinese American college students (N=353) to see how they related to self-esteem. Cultural orientation significantly predicted self-esteem differences. Cultural predictors of self-esteem varied by gender; self-esteem was mainly related to…

  5. The Influence of Discrimination and Fairness on Collective Self-Esteem

    Scheepers, Daan; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S. R.; Doosje, Bertjan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the influence of discrimination and fairness on collective self-esteem. Whereas social identity theory's self-esteem hypothesis emphasizes that discrimination can enhance self-esteem, the authors contend that this self-esteem advantage will actually reverse when groups are prim

  6. Adaptation and Validation of Aricak's Professional Self-Esteem Scale for Use in the Pakistani Context

    Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad; Bibi, Fariha; Gul, Asma

    2016-01-01

    One of the characteristics of teachers having great bearing upon students' learning is their professional self-esteem. Various instruments are available for measuring general self-esteem and professional self-esteem of teachers. For the present study it was deemed appropriate to use a Turkish professional self-esteem scale developed by Aricak…

  7. A New Measure to Assess Linguistic Self-Esteem in Adolescent Latino Bilinguals

    Neugebauer, Sabina Rak

    2011-01-01

    Present conceptualizations and measures of self-esteem do not account for linguistic self-esteem, an aspect of the self specifically relevant for bilingual students. This study examines the utility of a newly developed measure of linguistic self-esteem. This novel measure is compared with a commonly used self-esteem measure, two standardized…

  8. Birth Order, Family Size, and Self-Esteem: A Filipino Study.

    Watkins, David; Astilla, Estela

    1980-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between birth order and self-esteem among 209 11- to 13-year-old girls attending a private high school in the central Philippines. The Self-Esteem Inventory was used to measure self-esteem. No evidence of any influence of birth order, family size, or their interaction with self-esteem was found. (Author/RH)

  9. Instability in self-esteem and paranoia in a general population sample

    Thewissen, Viviane; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Bentall, Richard; De Graaf, Ron; Vollebergh, Wilma; Os, Jim van

    2007-01-01

    Research on the association between paranoia and self-esteem has yielded inconsistent findings. Some studies have indicated an association between paranoia and low self-esteem, while other studies have shown an association with high self-esteem. A plausible explanation for these inconsistencies is that self-esteem is unstable in paranoid individuals.

  10. The Effects of Similarity, Evaluation, and Self-Esteem on Interpersonal Attraction.

    Sachs, Donald H.

    It was predicted that high self-esteem subjects would have higher attraction scores than low self-esteem subjects to similar strangers or to strangers who gave positive personal evaluations. It was also predicted that high self-esteem subjects would have lower attraction scores than low self-esteem subjects to dissimilar strangers or to subjects…