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  1. Technical Teachers and Technical Teacher Education - Research Results

    D. Dobrovská

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Chartered engineers who are new teachers of technical subjects at various educational institutions receive technical teacher education in the accredited bachelor programme at the Czech Technical University in Prague. This paper presents the results of a recent survey in which engineers expressed their opinions on technical teacher education.

  2. Technical Teachers and Technical Teacher Education - Research Results

    D. Dobrovská; Andres, P.

    2002-01-01

    Chartered engineers who are new teachers of technical subjects at various educational institutions receive technical teacher education in the accredited bachelor programme at the Czech Technical University in Prague. This paper presents the results of a recent survey in which engineers expressed their opinions on technical teacher education.

  3. Early Childhood Teacher Research: From Questions to Results

    Castle, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    What is early childhood teacher research and why is it important? How does a teacher researcher formulate a research question and a plan for doing research? How do teachers apply research results to effect change? "Early Childhood Teacher Research" is an exciting new resource that will address the sorts of questions and concerns that pre- and


  4. Mathematics Teachers' Knowledge Base: Preliminary Results

    Harel, Guershon; Lim, Kien H.

    2004-01-01

    Student learning depends on the teacher's actions, which are, in turn, dependent on the teacher's knowledge base--defined here by three components: knowledge of mathematics content, knowledge of student epistemology, and knowledge of pedagogy. The purpose of this study is to construct models for teachers' knowledge base and for their development…

  5. Preservice and Inservice Teacher Journals: What Do They Reveal?

    Koskela, Ruth; Cramer, Susan

    This study explored student teacher, intern, and beginning teacher journals for themes that might inform inservice and preservice teacher education programs. The journals of 58 teacher candidates and beginning teachers were read to identify themes. Then common themes were organized into categories and frequencies for each category were determined.


  6. The Fabric of Teacher Candidate Dispositions: What Case Studies Reveal about Teacher Thinking

    Schussler, Deborah L.; Bercaw, Lynne A.; Stooksberry, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Although case-based methods are not new to teacher education, research that explores how cases develop teacher candidate dispositions is uncharted. This study used three disposition domains--intellectual, cultural, moral--as a heuristic to examine how 30 teacher candidates were inclined to think through a teaching situation presented in a case


  7. What Will Classroom Teachers Do With Shared Research Results?

    Passow, M. J.; Weissel, J. K.; Cormier, M.; Newman, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists are passionate about the research problems they investigate, and wish to share their discoveries as widely as possible. Similarly, classroom teachers who are passionate about their subject can better foster student learning. One way to enhance such passions involves bringing teachers and scientists together to discuss cutting-edge discoveries and develop curricular materials based on the respective strengths of educators and investigators. Our presentation describes one example of this approach based on research about gas blowout structures offshore Virginia and North Carolina. Methane venting processes along continental margins may have important climatic, geotechnical, hazard, and resource implications. In 2000, shipboard surveys documented that large structures offshore VA-NC resulted from massive gas expulsion. Gas appears to be trapped in shelf edge deltas and stresses resulting from downslope creep is favoring its release. Scientists undertook a new expedition in 2004 to determine if there is present-day discharge of methane-rich fluids through the floors or walls of the blowouts or whether these seepage sites are relict features, and to gain insight into the origin of the vented methane. In July 2005, 12 teachers from New York and New Jersey met with the co-PIs (Weissel and Cormier), graduate student (Newman), and educational specialist (Passow) over a 2-day workshop to learn about how scientific problems are identified, how a research cruise is organized, what was learned through the measurements and analysis, and what might be possible significant impacts from such understandings. Based on what they learned, participants began development of classroom activities, Internet-based investigations, and constructed-response assessment items utilizing data and concepts from the project and other sources. The resulting curriculum units are designed for use in middle and high school chemistry, physics, earth science, and technology courses. Curricular units include "Using Real-Life Problems to Learn Scientific Principles," "Mapping the Unseen Floors," "Landslide or Not," and a board game based on conducting a scientific research cruise. Materials are available through www.earth2class.org. Over the following academic year, participants will continue to develop instructional materials, field-test them, and provide peer training through in-district and regional professional development opportunities. The scientists and educational specialist will provide support to ensure scientific accuracy and pedagogical soundness. The project will utilize DLESE as an additional effective dissemination and evaluation mechanism. In these ways, the scientists and core of educators may be able to share these discoveries with hundreds of teachers and thousands of students.

  8. The Experience of New Teachers: Results from TALIS 2008

    Jensen, Ben; Sandoval-Hernandez, Andres; Knoll, Steffen; Gonzalez, Eugenio J.

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides a comprehensive analysis of the most important issues facing teachers during the early stages of their careers. The effectiveness of teachers fresh to the profession is an important policy issue, especially knowing the impact that teachers have on student learning. The OECD's Teaching and Learning International Survey


  9. Workshop Results: Teaching Geoscience to K-12 Teachers

    Nahm, A.; Villalobos, J. I.; White, J.; Smith-Konter, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    A workshop for high school and middle school Earth and Space Science (ESS) teachers was held this summer (2012) as part of an ongoing collaboration between the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and El Paso Community College (EPCC) Departments of Geological Sciences. This collaborative effort aims to build local Earth science literacy and educational support for the geosciences. Sixteen teachers from three school districts from El Paso and southern New Mexico area participated in the workshop, consisting of middle school, high school, early college high school, and dual credit faculty. The majority of the teachers had little to no experience teaching geoscience, thus this workshop provided an introduction to basic geologic concepts to teachers with broad backgrounds, which will result in the introduction of geoscience to many new students each year. The workshop's goal was to provide hands-on activities illustrating basic geologic and scientific concepts currently used in introductory geology labs/lectures at both EPCC and UTEP to help engage pre-college students. Activities chosen for the workshop were an introduction to Google Earth for use in the classroom, relative age dating and stratigraphy using volcanoes, plate tectonics utilizing the jigsaw pedagogy, and the scientific method as a think-pair-share activity. All activities where designed to be low cost and materials were provided for instructors to take back to their institutions. A list of online resources for teaching materials was also distributed. Before each activity, a short pre-test was given to the participants to gauge their level of knowledge on the subjects. At the end of the workshop, participants were given a post-test, which tested the knowledge gain made by participating in the workshop. In all cases, more correct answers were chosen in the post-test than the individual activity pre-tests, indicating that knowledge of the subjects was gained. The participants enjoyed participating in these activities and intend to use them in their classes in the future. Copies of the materials used in this workshop are available upon request.

  10. Results of Romanian Teachers Survey on Assessment in Early Education

    Dan Sporea; Adelina Sporea

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of the European Union funded project “Creative Little Scientists” our team conducted a national survey among preschool and primary school teachers in order to provide radiography on teachers perception and practice in relation to the development of creativity along with science and mathematics education, in the context of inquiry-based teaching and learning. The survey included more than 40 questions, each divided into additional sub-questions. Over 275 Romanian teachers took par...

  11. Incentive Pay Programs Do Not Affect Teacher Motivation or Reported Practices: Results from Three Randomized Studies

    Yuan, Kun; Le, Vi-Nhuan; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Springer, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    This study drew on teacher survey responses from randomized experiments exploring three different pay-for-performance programs to examine the extent to which these programs motivated teachers to improve student achievement and the impact of such programs on teachers' instruction, number of hours worked, job stress, and collegiality. Results showed…

  12. What Makes Professional Development Effective? Results from a National Sample of Teachers.

    Garet, Michael S.; Porter, Andrew C.; Desimone, Laura; Birman, Beatrice F.; Yoon, Kwang Suk

    2001-01-01

    Used a national probability sample of 1,027 mathematics and science teachers to provide a large-scale empirical comparison of effects of different characteristics of professional development on teachers' learning. Results identify three core features of professional development that have significant positive effects on teachers' self-reported


  13. Subject Knowledge and Perceptions of Bioenergy among School Teachers in India: Results from a Survey

    Pradipta Halder; Sari Havu-Nuutinen; Janne Pietarinen; Anas Zyadin; Paavo Pelkonen

    2014-01-01

    Teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of bioenergy, and their motivation to teach such a topic, can largely determine the success of implementing bioenergy related education in schools. The study aimed to explore science teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of bioenergy in India. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among 28 science teachers from four urban schools in India. Results indicated that the science teachers were fairly knowledgeable regarding bioenergy and they also demonstrated...

  14. Physical development of students of teacher training college as a result of exercises of cheerleading

    Maslyak I. P.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to define the extent of influence of exercises of cheerleading on physical development of students of teacher training college. Material: researches were conducted on the basis of training college of Kharkov humanitarian teacher training college. 385 students of the I-III courses of not a sports profile took part in them from whom 3 control and 3 experimental groups were created. Results: the level of physical development on indicators of a harmony of a constitution, functionality of the system of breath and resistance of an organism to the hypoxemic phenomena, regulation of the cardiovascular system is determined; the age distinctions on the studied indicators are considered; the positive influence of exercises of cheerleading on indicators of functionality of the system of breath and resistance of an organism to the hypoxemic phenomena, regulation of the cardiovascular system is revealed. Conclusions: 1. As a result of the primary research the "low" level of physical development of students of 15-17 years old is established. 2. The application of exercises of cheerleading in the course of physical training positively wagged on the level of physical development of students of teacher training college.

  15. Teacher's emotional stability: preliminary results of self-other agreement

    Hƙebíčková, Martina

    Brno : NakladatelstvĂ­ Kƙepela, 2003, s. 107-120. [UčitelĂ© a zdravĂ­ /5./. Brno (CZ), 26.09.2002-27.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA406/01/1507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : teachers * emotional stability * neuroticism Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  16. Results of a radioactive waste course for high school teachers

    A week-long three-credit graduate-level course was taught in the summer of 1991 for high school science and social science teachers. Instruction was at the layperson's level, and no prior knowledge was presumed. The objectives of the course were to present factual information about radioactive waste, measure recipient's changes in perception about this topic, and measure the effect of the course on others. The technical half of the course involved discussions of basic nuclear physics, radiation control, biological effects of radiation, nuclear fuel cycle, waste management principles, Hanford waste issues, and transport of radioactive waste. The social half of the course included a discussion of values and attitudes, risk perception and communication, and public participation in a decision-making role-playing session. Discussions about radioactive-waste issues with high school teachers, especially of an extended nature such as discussed in this paper, are an effective tool because high school teachers are a critical link to reaching the next generation. Armed with facts presented in an open, nonconfrontational format, these teachers tend to become more understanding and accepting of radioactive-waste issues

  17. Self-Talk of Student Teachers and Resulting Relationships.

    Payne, Beverly D.; Manning, Brenda H.

    1991-01-01

    Study determined whether student teachers' self-talk differentially related to personality characteristics of locus of control and self-esteem. Subjects (n=69) recorded self-talk and completed personality assessments. They mainly engaged in negative, child-oriented, external self-talk. Those with high self-esteem and internal locus of control used


  18. Burnout hazard in teachers results of a clinical-psychological intervention study

    Wegner Ralf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study investigates whether established in-patient therapy for teachers with burnout results in long-acting success and whether gender gaps and differences between teachers of different school levels exist. According to our knowledge, our study is the most extensive inpatient intervention study on the burnout of a defined occupational group, i.e., teachers. Methods 200 teachers participated, 150 took part in a later performed katamnestic survey. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was used and work-related data were recorded. The days of incapacity for work and the percentage of teachers endangered by burnout decreased, which supports the long-term success of the treatment. Results Significant differences between males and females and between teacher levels were found. However, the differences between teacher levels only showed up before treatment. Because males only underwent treatment at a more severe stage, further efforts in persuading males to start therapy earlier are needed. Conclusions The proven and long-term success of the performed intervention could have greater effects if people, especially males, undergo treatment more frequently. Our results are based on selectively high proposition of teachers of advanced age. Thus it is possible that the long term effect of the intervention, particularly on retirement age, is greater when the intervention is started earlier. Regular burnout tests could help to identify risk cases among teachers at an early stage and to offer a therapeutic intervention.

  19. The American Elementary Teacher Today: Results of Instructor's First National Teacher Poll.

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a brief summary of the responses to this magazine's August 1979 opinion poll, covering a wide range of topics, such as likes and dislikes about teaching, school violence, use of audiovisuals, teacher unionization, national educational and political issues, and respondents' personal characteristics, interests, and income. (SJL)

  20. Teaching Anxieties Revealed: Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Reflections on Their Mathematics Teaching Experiences

    Brown, Amy; Westenskow, Arla; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, there has been ample research dedicated to mathematics anxiety in contexts of teaching and learning. However, there has been less attention focused on pre-service teachers' anxieties about teaching mathematics in classroom settings. This study analyzed pre-service teachers' reflections at the conclusion of an elementary…

  1. STEM Images Revealing STEM Conceptions of Pre-Service Chemistry and Mathematics Teachers

    Akaygun, Sevil; ASLAN-TUTAK, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has been an integral part of many countries’ educational policies. In last decade, various practices have been implemented to make STEM areas valuable for 21st century generation. These actions require reconsideration of both pre- and in-service teacher education because those who touch students in and out of the class settings are the teachers. In this respect, this phenomenograhic study aimed to investigate how STEM concepti...

  2. Investigating inquiry beliefs and nature of science (NOS) conceptions of science teachers as revealed through online learning

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    Creating a scientifically literate society appears to be the major goal of recent science education reform efforts (Abd-El-Khalick, Boujaoude, Dushl, Lederman, Hofstein, Niaz, Tregust, & Tuan, 2004). Recent national reports in the U.S, such as Shaping the Future, New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (NSF,1996), Inquiry in Science and In Classroom, Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 2001), Pursuing excellence: Comparison of international eight-grade mathematics and science achievement from a U.S. perspective (NCES, 2001), and Standards for Science Teacher Preparation (NSTA 2003) appear to agree on one thing: the vision of creating a scientifically literate society. It appears from science education literature that the two important components of being a scientifically literate individual are developing an understanding of nature of science and ability to conduct scientific inquiries. Unfortunately, even though teaching science through inquiry has been recommended in national reports since the 1950's, it has yet to find its way into many science classrooms (Blanchard, 2006; Yerrick, 2000). Science education literature identfies several factors for this including: (1) lack of content knowledge (Anderson, 2002; Lee, Hart Cuevas, & Enders, 2004; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Moscovici, 1999; Smith & Naele, 1989; Smith, 1989); (2) high stake tests (Aydeniz, 2006); (3) teachers' conflicting beliefs with inquiry-based science education reform (Blanchard, 2006; Wallace & Kang, 2004); and, (4) lack of collaboration and forums for communication (Anderson, 2002; Davis, 2003; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Wallace & Kang, 2004). In addition to the factors stated above this study suggest that some of the issues and problems that have impeded inquiry instruction to become the primary approach to teaching science in many science classrooms might be related to teachers NOS conceptions. Developing desired understanding of nature of science conceptions and having an adequate experience with inquiry learning is especially important for science teachers because science education literature suggests that the development of teachers' nature of science conceptions is influenced by their experiences with inquiry science (Akerson et. al. 2000) and implementation of science lessons reflect teachers' NOS conceptions (Abd-EL-Khalick & Boujaoude, 1997; Matson & Parsons, 1998; Rosenthal, 1993; Trowbridge, Bybee & Powell, 2000; Turner & Sullenger, 1999). Furthermore, the impediments to successful integration of inquiry based science instruction from teachers' perspective are particularly important, as they are the implementers of inquiry based science education reform. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between the teachers' NOS conceptions and their inquiry beliefs and practices in their classrooms and how this relationship impedes or contributes to the implementation of inquiry based science education reform efforts. The participants of this study were in-service teachers who were accepted into the online Masters Program in science education program at a southern university. Three online courses offered in the summer semester of 2005 constituted the research setting of this study: (1) Special Problems in the Teaching of Secondary School Science: Nature of Science & Science Teaching, (2) Curriculum in Science Education, and (3) Colloquium. Multiple data sources were used for data triangulation (Miles & Huberman, 1984; Yin, 1994) in order to understand the relationship between participants' NOS views and their conceptions and beliefs about inquiry-based science teaching. The study revealed that the relationship between the teachers' NOS conceptions and their inquiry beliefs and practices is far from being simple and linear. Data suggests that the teachers' sophistication of NOS conceptions influence their perception of inquiry science instruction in variety of ways. In a nutshell, these include: (1) The teachers become more confident in their ability to implement inquiry-based science classes; (2) Better understanding of NOS conceptions assists the teachers develop a higher appreciation of inquiry science instruction; (3) The teachers' misconceptions about nature of science appear to be connected to their misconceptions about inquiry science instruction; (4) A better understanding of NOS concepts seems to have stimulate the teachers to put more emphasis on some aspects of inquiry more than others; and (5) Sophistication of teachers' NOS conceptions influences their decisions about the type of inquiry they plan to incorporate in their instruction. This study also suggests that enhancing teachers' NOS conceptions should be among the main objectives of inquiry-based professional development programs and courses that are taught in science education programs. This study reveals that enhancing NOS conceptions helps teachers in their efforts to integrate inquiry into their instruction by boosting their confidence in their abilities to teach science through inquiry. This study reveals that especially teachers who lack strong science backgrounds and prior experience with inquiry science are at risk. Not having a strong background in science and lacking extensive experience with inquiry science negatively influences the teachers' confidence and thus delays their efforts to implement inquiry-based science lessons. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. [Stress and Burnout Risk in Nursery School Teachers: Results from a Survey].

    Jungbauer, J; Ehlen, S

    2015-06-01

    This article presents results from a study of 834 nursery school teachers in Germany, investigating working conditions, stress, and stress-related health problems. In order to evaluate the extent of mental and psychosomatic troubles, as well as the risk of burnout, we used the standardised questionnaire "Burnout Screening Scales" (BOSS I). Data analysis yielded a high percentage of nursery school teachers who reported a remarkably high stress level; nearly 20% can be considered as a high-risk group for burnout. Poor staff conditions in many nurseries turned out to be the crucial stress source, along with large groups, insufficient teacher-child ratio, time pressure and multitasking. In the concluding discussion of the study results, we consider possible measures to reduce stress and to improve working conditions for nursery school teachers. PMID:25025291

  4. Measuring classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers: A video-based assessment approach and statistical results

    Johannes König

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged (involving the challenges to manage transitions, instructional time, student behavior, and instructional feedback) and by applying three cognitive demands po...

  5. Teachers and performance pay in 2014: first results of a survey

    Marsden, David

    2015-01-01

    From the autumn of 2014, a new performance pay scheme was introduced for school teachers in England and Wales. It makes pay progression for all teachers dependent upon their performance as evaluated by their line managers by means of performance appraisals. This paper reports the results of a the first wave of a survey of teachers’ views about performance pay and their beliefs about its effects on their performance and that of their schools before the first decisions about pay awards under th...

  6. STEM Images Revealing STEM Conceptions of Pre-Service Chemistry and Mathematics Teachers

    Akaygun, Sevil; Aslan-Tutak, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has been an integral part of many countries' educational policies. In last decade, various practices have been implemented to make STEM areas valuable for 21st century generation. These actions require reconsideration of both pre- and in-service teacher education because those who


  7. Symbolic Drawings Reveal Changes in Preservice Teacher Mathematics Attitudes after a Mathematics Methods Course

    Rule, Audrey C.; Harrell, Mary H.

    2006-01-01

    A new method of analyzing mathematics attitudes through symbolic drawings, situated within the field of Jungian-oriented analytical psychology, was applied to 52 preservice elementary teachers before and after a mathematics methods course. In this triangulation mixed methods design study, pretest images related to past mathematics experiences…

  8. Revealing the Invisible Hand: The Role of Teachers in Children's Peer Experiences

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Lines, Meghan McAuliffe; Hamm, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    To introduce this special issue, the concept of the teacher as an ''invisible hand'' is presented as a metaphor to describe the potentially influential but relatively understudied contribution that educators are likely to have on children's peer relationships and their broader interpersonal growth. Building from conceptual work distinguishing


  9. Metaphors Reveal Preservice Elementary Teachers' Views of Mathematics and Science Teaching

    Cassel, Darlinda; Vincent, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Typically, experiences shape one's attitudes toward the "thing" that is being experienced, whether it is a person, pet, movie, etc. Classroom experiences also shape one's attitudes toward a subject, teacher, learning, and so forth. Studies have shown that attitudes become more negative as students move from elementary to secondary schools.


  10. Using Self-Efficacy to Measure Primary School Teachers' Perception of ICT: Results from Two Studies

    Fanni, F.; Rega, I.; Cantoni, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, the final results of two research projects, which investigated the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on primary schools teachers in disadvantaged areas in Brazil (BET k-12) and South Africa (MELISSA), are presented and discussed. Second, the Self-Efficacy construct is proposed as a…

  11. Can Teachers' Summative Assessments Produce Dependable Results and Also Enhance Classroom Learning?

    Black, Paul; Harrison, Christine; Hodgen, Jeremy; Marshall, Bethan; Serret, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    Summative assessments that are integrated within the daily pedagogy of teachers are problematic. Some argue that they cannot both be helpful to pedagogy and yield results that are comparable across and between schools. Others claim that there is enough evidence to show that these targets can be achieved. The project described in this paper…

  12. Changes in the social aspects of hypertensive patients through physical activity: revealing the importance of physical education teachers

    Italla Maira Pinheiro Bezerra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and treatment of hypertension, underscoring the importance of physical education teachers in guidance and direction of this treatment. The methodological approach was based on a qualitative approach consisting of 15 hypertensive patients enrolled in a project offered by the Fire Department as a group defined the Golden Age, in the municipality of Crato-Ce-Brazil. To this end, we used the technique to collect data, the interview was focused on groups of hypertensive patients who were physically active on a regular basis. With the purpose of organizing the material obtained in interviews, conducted an analysis of their content, which allowed the identification of themes and construction of the following categories: 1 heredity, and lifestyle concerns: the perception of the causes of hypertension Hypertension, 2 Practical exercise training: a tool for prevention and promotion hypertensive patients, 3 Benefits of Physical Activity: the importance of awareness of hypertension, 4 Revealing the importance of continuing the practice of exercise. Thus, considering that for an effective control, prevention and promotion of hypertensive patients is necessary if there is an interaction between teacher / patient in order to provide, in addition to the benefits of activities, the motivation for continuing care. To do so, it is the physical education teachers see their importance and their role in guiding, monitoring and promoting health in the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, so you can carry and to reveal the practices of physical exercise as an essential tool in controlling this pathology.

  13. Creation and Results of a Research Project with a Focus on School Management for Teachers

    Piso?ová Mária

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the process of preparation, solution and the results of the research project titled “Content innovation of the course School Management”, followed by preparation of a modern university course book for an e-course situated in LMS Moodle environment for the field of study Education and for the purposes of the continuing education of teachers. The content of the paper includes a detailed characterization of the backgrounds of the solved research tasks, which have been validated by the undertaken researches and surveys not only in Slovakia, but also abroad. Based on the results, the main output of the project has been specified as well as its importance for the quality of undergraduate training of future teachers, for training of managing teaching staff, but also for contemporary headmasters.

  14. Are High School Economics Teachers the Same as Other Social Studies Teachers? The Results of a National Survey

    Schug, Mark C.; Dieterle, David; Clark, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on how well students are learning economics, how teachers are trained, and other outcomes associated with improved understanding of economics. However, almost nothing is reported in the research literature on economics teachers' views of the curriculum, how they teach their subject, their views on public issues, and


  15. Are High School Economics Teachers the Same as Other Social Studies Teachers? The Results of a National Survey

    Schug, Mark C.; Dieterle, David; Clark, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on how well students are learning economics, how teachers are trained, and other outcomes associated with improved understanding of economics. However, almost nothing is reported in the research literature on economics teachers' views of the curriculum, how they teach their subject, their views on public issues, and…

  16. High School Physics Teacher Preparation: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    This report examines teachers' self-assessed preparedness to teach physics, their membership in professional organizations, and where they turn for help when they have questions. Almost every teacher reports feeling at least adequately prepared to teach basic physics knowledge and the application of physics to everyday experience. The smallest


  17. Teacher Responses to Pay-for-Performance Policies: Survey Results from Four High-Poverty, Urban School Districts

    Wells, John

    2011-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly adopting "pay-for-performance" policies in which teachers are compensated based on their performance as measured by classroom evaluations and/or student achievement test results. Prior research has produced largely inconclusive findings concerning support among teachers for these policies and their effects on


  18. Measuring classroom management expertise (CME of teachers: A video-based assessment approach and statistical results

    Johannes König

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged (involving the challenges to manage transitions, instructional time, student behavior, and instructional feedback and by applying three cognitive demands posed on respondents when responding to test items related to the video clips (accuracy of perception, holistic perception, and justification of action. Research questions are raised regarding reliability, testlet effects (related to the four video clips applied for measurement, intercorrelations of cognitive demands, and criterion-related validity of the instrument. Evidence is provided that (1 using a video-based assessment CME can be measured in a reliable way, (2 the CME total score represents a general ability that is only slightly influenced by testlet effects related to the four video clips, (3 the three cognitive demands conceptualized for the measurement of CME are highly intercorrelated, and (4 the CME measure is positively correlated with declarative-conceptual general pedagogical knowledge (medium effect size, whereas it shows only small size correlations with non-cognitive teacher variables.

  19. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Pinto JoĂŁo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might not fully correspond to the two A. gambiae incipient species in their entire geographical range. These limits are discussed and operational suggestions on the choice of the most convenient method for large-scale M- and S-form identification are provided, also taking into consideration technical aspects related to the epidemiological characteristics of different study areas.

  20. Effects of Professional Development on Teachers' Instruction: Results from a Three-year Longitudinal Study.

    Desimone, Laura M.; Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.; Yoon, Kwang Suk; Birman, Beatrice F.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of professional development on teachers' instruction using a purposeful sample of about 207 teachers across 5 states for 1996-1999. Professional development focused on specific instructional practices increased teachers' use of those practices in the classroom, and specific features, such as active learning opportunities,


  1. Evaluating the Accuracy of Results for Teacher Implemented Trial-Based Functional Analyses.

    Rispoli, Mandy; Ninci, Jennifer; Burke, Mack D; Zaini, Samar; Hatton, Heather; Sanchez, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the systematic and experimental assessment of challenging behavior in applied settings. The purposes of this study were to evaluate a professional development package focused on training three Head Start teachers to conduct TBFAs with fidelity during ongoing classroom routines. To assess the accuracy of the TBFA results, the effects of a function-based intervention derived from the TBFA were compared with the effects of a non-function-based intervention. Data were collected on child challenging behavior and appropriate communication. An A-B-A-C-D design was utilized in which A represented baseline, and B and C consisted of either function-based or non-function-based interventions counterbalanced across participants, and D represented teacher implementation of the most effective intervention. Results showed that the function-based intervention produced greater decreases in challenging behavior and greater increases in appropriate communication than the non-function-based intervention for all three children. PMID:26069219

  2. Results from pre- and post- tests of professional development astronomy workshops for teachers in Peru

    Deustua, Susana; Ros, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Since 2009, the Network for Astronomy School Education (NASE) has held 55+ workshops in countries in Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America, training more than 1200 teachers and potentially reaching one million or more students. Like modern professional development programs, NASE’s emphasis is on interactive, hands-on learning. However, our emphasis is on “low-tech” tools that are readily available, and, inexpensive. Teachers are led through a series of activities that cover a wide range of topics in astronomy, more or less equivalent to that covered in the typical 1st year astronomy course in US colleges.In 2014 we adopted the Astronomy Diagnostic Test as pre- and post- workshop tests to guage the change in teachers’ knowledge as a result of participation in this intervention. In this paper we discuss the first results using the Astronomy Diagnostic Test in astronomy workshops in Peru during March 2014 and February 2015. NASE workskhops were held at the facilities of the Observatorio de Radio de Sicaya of the Instituto Geofisico del Peru, in Chupaca, a farming community approximately 20 km from the Andean city, Huancayo. Sponsors of the Chupaca workshop were the IGP, NASE and the UGEL (regional school district). The second workshop was held at the University of Ica, in the coastal city of Ica, 250 km south of Lima, sponsored by the Instituto Geofisico del Peru and the University, and the 3rd workshop in Lima.We will discuss our results, which for the most part do indeed show a positive change in knowledge, but in a couple of areas the change is either null or negative.

  3. Information Security of Children and Adolescents According to Parents and Teachers (Part 2: The Results of an Empirical Study

    Budykin S.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a second part of the study on information security of children and adolescents according to parents and teachers. This part of the study focuses at empirical research results aimed in studying the so-called "naive theories" about information security. 136 people (aged 21 to 62 years attended the study. We based on the following hypotheses : 1 the group of parents and teachers understand similarly the issue of information threat for children and adolescents, yet they have different understandings of the dangerous effects of information on children and adolescents: parents underestimate the seriousness of the effects compared with teachers; 2 according to parents and teachers, the formers are primarily responsible for information security of children; while teachers expect parents to monitor, prohibit, restrict the access to information for children and adolescents. Parents, in turn, expect teachers to train children and teenagers to observe the safety procedures, as well as use Internet safely. Our assumptions are confirmed partly, and study results are discussed in terms of the theory of social representations.

  4. Is Teacher Professional Development an Effective Way to Mitigate Teachers' Gender Differences in Technology? Result from a Statewide Teacher Professional Development Program

    Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed data from a statewide professional development (PD) program to investigate whether gender difference towards technology usage was mitigated after participation in the program. Teachers responded to pre- and post-questionnaires regarding their perceptions and use of technology before and after participating in PD courses.


  5. Teacher Autonomy Perceptions of Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining Iranian (N= 218 and Turkish (N=142 high school EFL teachers’ opinions about teacher autonomy over (a the choice of appropriate teaching methods, strategies and techniques and implementation of the established curriculum (b teacher involvement in decision making processes and (c teachers’ use of personal initiative in solving their work problems. An 11-item questionnaire (α= .758 was used to measure autonomy perceptions of the participants. The results revealed that Turkish teachers’ autonomy perceptions were greater than that of Iranian teachers in the three teacher autonomy dimensions. Moreover, it was observed that male and master- holder teachers perceive less autonomy than female and bachelor-holder ones; whereas, no significant relationship were observed for the age and marital status variables with any teacher autonomy dimensions. Lastly, decision making dimension was the strongest predictor of teacher autonomy among both Iranian and Turkish teachers.

  6. Results of integrated geological-geophysical investigations in Makhtesh Ramon (Israel) aimed to revealing diamondiferous associations

    Eppelbaum, L.; Kouznetsov, S.; Sazonova, L.; Korotaeva, N.; Surkov, A.; Smirnov, S.; Vaksman, V.; Klepatch, C.; Itkis, S.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of several geological, mineralogical, petrological and geophysical factors makes possible to select the Makhtesh Ramon erosional-tectonic structure (southern Israel) for searching of diamondiferous associations. About 200 kg of geological associations (concentrate) have been withdrawn in this area (during 2001-2002 field works) from the depth of 0.2-1 m for mineralogical-geochemical analyses. The following minerals of the anticipating diamondiferous association were revealed in the selected probes: (first group) - chrome-diopside, orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope, picroilmenite, moissanite, corundum, perovskite, black spinel, olivine, anatase, titanomagnetite and tourmaline (including black samples). Chrome-diopside as an indicator mineral may be found only in the neighboring zone of basic pipe occurrence. Orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope and tourmaline also are essential indicators of the presence of diamondiferous association in the studied district. Moissanite and corundum are the rarely occurring minerals indicating certain presence of buried kimberlite pipes. These minerals do not rolled and oxidized that is additional evidence of the neighboring occurrence of the indigenous rocks. Data of electronic microscopy show that the grains of (1) picroilmenite and (2) pyrope contain, respectively: (1) cobalt, chrome, magnesium and nickel and (2) chrome, magnesium and aluminum. These data indicate that both picroilmenite and pyrope have the hyper-abyssal origin. Besides above mentioned minerals, list of indicator minerals (second group) in the probes includes: hexagonal quartz, feldspars, pyroxenes (black, green, dark-green, gray-green, brown-green), magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, galenite, pyrite, limonite, small magnetic spheres (quant. matter), mica, hydro-mica, chromite, leucoxene, zircon, rutile, secondary minerals of cuprum (green and blue), calcite, etc. The last minerals (by their combined considering with the first group) are also indicators of diamond-bearing of the studied area. It should be noted that the amount of these minerals (first and second groups) is extremely high: in 200 kg of the investigated geological concentrate (selected from the loose deposits and conglomerate) till the present time (January 2003) altogether were detected more than 14,000 grains of the proposed diamondiferous association. Identification of small plates of Au and Ag as well as tracing of La, Ce, Th, Nb and Ta also maybe linked with the nearest kimberlite rock occurrence. Analysis of the studied polymineral fractions has been performed using electronic scanning raster microscope CAMSCAN-4DV with energy-dispersion Roentgen micro-analyzer Link AN10000 (binocular microscopes were applied only by initial analyzing). Examination of the performed geophysical investigations: (1a) magnetic field (applied ground observations were integrated with the previous airborn measurements), (1b) magnetic susceptibility measurements; (2) self-potential field and (3) set of physical-chemical examinations of significant features (S2+, CO2-_3, Eh{-}Pt, N0^-_3, Br^-, F^-, I^-, Cl^-, Ca2+, B^+, ClO^-_4, pH, Hg2+, Na^+, K^+, Cd2+, Cu2+ &Pb2+) using ion-selective electrodes (gradient mode was applied) testifies to high probability of discovering diamondiferous pipes (dykes) at the depths from several meters up to 30 meters. The latest important petrological identifications include discovering of blue clay (usually occurring at the top of kimberlite pipe) and yttrium phosphate (it is a known signature of kimberlite associations). Finally, the total number of recognized diamonds exceeds 400 units (size of the largest crystal is about of 1.5 mm). On basis of the mentioned positive features we can unambiguously estimating that the Makhtesh Ramon Canyon is highly perspective area for discovering indigenous diamond-containing targets.

  7. Pluto Revealed: First Results from the Historic 1st Fly-By Space Mission

    Smith, Kimberly Ennico

    2015-01-01

    On July 14, 2015, after a 9.5 year trek across the solar system, NASAs New Horizons spacecraft successfully flew by the dwarf planet Pluto and its system of moons, taking imagery, spectra and in-situ particle data. Data obtained by New Horizons will address numerous outstanding questions on the geology and composition of Pluto and Charon, plus measurements of Plutos atmosphere, and provide revised understanding of the formation and evolution of Pluto and Charon and its smaller moons. This data set is an invaluable glimpse into the outer Third Zone of the Solar System. Data from the intense July 14th fly-by sequence will be downlinked to Earth over a period of 16 months, the duration set by the large data set (over 60 GBits), tempered by limited transmission bandwidth rates (1-2 kbps) and sharing the three 70m DSN assets. This presentation summarizes the New Horizons mission and early science results.

  8. Revealing the Experience of Children and Teachers Even in Their Absence: Documenting in the Early Childhood Studio

    Parnell, Will

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the educational approach in the municipal pre-primary schools and infant-toddler centers of Reggio Emilia, Italy, two studio teachers and a researcher participant in Portland, Oregon capture classroom work, make investigations and interpretations in the studio as a laboratory space of learning, help children represent thinking, and…

  9. Lithospheric geometries revealed through electromagnetic imaging: SAMTEX (Southern Africa MagnetoTelluric Experiment) observations and results

    Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Evans, R. L.; Miensopust, M. P.; Khoza, D. T.; Samtex Team

    2011-12-01

    The Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) is imaging the properties and geometries of the lithosphere below southern Africa to depths of 200+ km. Electrical conductivity is highly sensitive to ambient temperature, and to the presence of an interconnected conducting phase, such as a solid phase like graphite or sulphides, a fluid phase like partial melt, or bound water through hydrogen diffusion. Thus, primary geometrical information can be readily obtained from lithospheric-scale MT experiments about the three-dimensional variation in conductivity that can be related to formation and deformation processes. One important piece of information easily obtained from MT data is the depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), due to the sensitivity of conductivity to small fractions (water. SAMTEX measurements have been made at a total of more than 750 MT sites over an area in excess of a million square kilometres, making it by far the largest-ever regional MT project undertaken. One of the most significant results from SAMTEX is the mapping of the LAB beneath the Archean cratons and bounding mobile belts of Southern Africa, particularly of the previously unknown regions of Namibia and Botswana. The LAB is shallow (150 km) beneath the mobile belts, deep (250 km) in the centres of the cratons, and transitional at the edges. Diamondiferous kimberlites are located primarily where lithosphere is transitional in thickness, or where there is a change in its anisotropy properties, both of which are craton edge effects. The electrical properties of the continental mantle derived from SAMTEX data can be compared with seismic ones derived from data from the South African Seismic Experiment (SASE) of the Kaapvaal Project. Generally there is very good predictive linear agreement between seismic velocity and log(conductivity), indicative of both being influenced by the same bulk property factors, such as temperature, Mg# and composition.

  10. High School Physics Textbooks, Resources and Teacher Resourcefulness: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Tesfaye, Casey Langer; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    What textbooks are physics teachers using? How highly do they rate those textbooks? What other types of materials do teachers use? The textbooks and other resources used by high school physics teachers in the US have evolved along with the changing demands of physics classes and the evolving set of options available to teachers. In this report,


  11. What Do the California Standards Test Results Reveal about the Movement toward Eighth-Grade Algebra for All?

    Liang, Jian-Hua; Heckman, Paul E.; Abedi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    In California, an increasing number of 8th graders have taken algebra courses since 2003. This study examines students' California Standards Test (CST) results in grades 7 through 11, aiming to reveal who took the CST for Algebra I in 8th grade and whether the increase has led to a rise in students' taking higher-level mathematics CSTs and an


  12. What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom? Results from a Survey of AMI and AMS Teacher Trainers

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2011-01-01

    There are two major types of Montessori teacher education in the United States: (1) AMI-USA (the American branch of the Association Montessori Internationale, founded by Dr. Montessori to carry on her work); and (2) AMS (American Montessori Society, founded by Nancy Rambusch to represent Montessori in America). This article presents the results…

  13. Teachers' Sense of Efficacy: Examining the Relationship of Teacher Efficacy and Student Achievement

    Alrefaei, Nouf

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which teachers' characteristics have an impact on teachers' sense of efficacy. In addition, the relationship between mathematics and science fifth grade teachers' sense of efficacy and student achievement was examined. Two characteristics related to teachers were examined: teachers' years of teaching experience and teachers' highest degree. Participants included 62 mathematics and science teachers from three school districts in Northwest Arkansas. When comparing fifth grade mathematics and science teachers' efficacy beliefs based on their highest degree, a significant difference in teachers' efficacy beliefs was found based on their degrees. Teachers with a Bachelor degree have higher total efficacy than teachers who hold Master's degrees. Moreover, an investigation to determine if there is a difference in mathematics and science teachers' efficacy beliefs in the three subscale of teachers' efficacy (for classroom management, for student engagement, and for instructional strategies) revealed a significant difference in teachers' efficacy for two of the three constructs. However, when examining teachers' sense of efficacy based on their teaching experience, no differences in teachers' efficacy were found. A correlation was conducted and the results indicated that there was no significant relationship between fifth grade teachers' sense of efficacy and students' achievement in the benchmark test in mathematics and science. The recommendations from this study should be used to inform other scholars and administrators of the importance of teachers' sense of efficacy in order to improve students' achievement gains.

  14. Changes in the social aspects of hypertensive patients through physical activity: revealing the importance of physical education teachers

    Italla Maira Pinheiro Bezerra; Juliana Correia Silva; Samara Calixto Gomes

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and treatment of hypertension, underscoring the importance of physical education teachers in guidance and direction of this treatment. The methodological approach was based on a qualitative approach consisting of 15 hypertensive patients enrolled in a project offered by the Fire Department as a group defined the Golden Age, in the municipality of Crato-Ce-Brazil. To this end, we used the technique to collect data, the int...

  15. Facilitating Teachers in Developing Online PBL Courses

    Miao, Yongwu; Samaka, Mohammed; Impagliazzo, John

    2013-01-01

    Developing a sound online problem-based learning (PBL) course plan is difficult because teachers need comprehensive PBL and technical knowledge. This paper proposes a model-driven approach to develop a PBL authoring tool that helps teachers create and customize online PBL course plans in a cost-effective and flexible manner. A pilot study was conducted to assess teacher acceptance of the tool. The results reveal that after a short training session, teachers understood the authoring tool and t...

  16. Teachers Making Sense of Result-Oriented Teams: A Cognitive Anthropological Approach to Educational Change

    Wierenga, Sijko J.; Kamsteeg, Frans H.; Simons, P. Robert Jan; Veenswijk, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Studies on educational change efforts abound but generally limit themselves to post hoc explanations of failure and success. Such explanations are rarely turned into attempts at providing models for predicting change outcomes. The present study tries to develop such a model based on the teachers' impact analysis of a management-driven…

  17. Learner Orientation through Professional Development of Teachers? Empirical Results from Cascade Training in Anglophone Cameroon

    Lange, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of a professional development programme on the attitudes towards the teaching and learning of teachers in the Anglophone part of Cameroon. The development programme combines a multiplier system with school-based in-service training. The research compares the effects that the training had on the attitudes of three…

  18. Learner Orientation through Professional Development of Teachers? Empirical Results from Cascade Training in Anglophone Cameroon

    Lange, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of a professional development programme on the attitudes towards the teaching and learning of teachers in the Anglophone part of Cameroon. The development programme combines a multiplier system with school-based in-service training. The research compares the effects that the training had on the attitudes of three


  19. The Teacher Internship Experiences of Prospective High School Mathematics Teachers

    Rhoads, Kathryn; Radu, Iuliana; Weber, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Nine prospective secondary mathematics teachers were interviewed about their teaching internship experience. The results of these interviews revealed that 7 of the 9 participants professed to value reform-oriented teaching and conceptual understanding in mathematics, yet all were paired with cooperating teachers who seemed to value traditional


  20. TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS IN RELATION TO EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Jyoti Bhagat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to analyse the impact of Emotional Intelligence on teacher effectiveness of secondary school teachers. The sample of the present investigation was drawn randomly from Govt. and Private schools of Jammu province and comprised of 600 teachers (300 Male and 300 Female. Emotional Intelligence inventory developed and validated by Dr. (Mrs. Shubra Mangal and Teacher Effectiveness Scale (TES developed and validated by Promodh Kumar and D.N. Mutha was used in the study. Three way analysis of variance (2x2x2 was used to test proposed hypotheses. The results revealed that, emotional intelligence and teacher effectiveness are dependent on each other and there is impact of emotional intelligence on teacher effectiveness of secondary school teachers. Significant sex differences were found in teacher effectiveness of teachers. First order interaction between emotional intelligence and experience and second order interaction among emotional intelligence, sex and experience was found to impact teacher effectiveness significantly.

  1. Teachers making sense of result-oriented teams : A cognitive anthropological approach to educational change

    Wierenga, Sijko J.; Kamsteeg, Frans H.; Simons, P. Robert Jan; Veenswijk, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Studies on educational change efforts abound but generally limit themselves to post hoc explanations of failure and success. Such explanations are rarely turned into attempts at providing models for predicting change outcomes. The present study tries to develop such a model based on the teachers’ impact analysis of a management-driven intervention, introducing new public management principles at a Dutch school for vocational education and training. The study uses a mixed method approach, the ...

  2. Obesity prevalence and unfavorable health risk behaviors among German kindergarten teachers: cross-sectional results of the kindergarten teacher health study

    Hoffmann, Sascha W; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate obesity status and associated health risk behaviors in a sample of German kindergarten teachers. At present, such data are not available, despite the fact that kindergarten teachers educate children at a formative time in their lives. Methods Kindergarten teachers aged 18–62 years (n = 313) were invited to participate in the Kindergarten Teacher Health Study (KTHS) by completing a self-reported questionnaire. We analyzed their obesity status,...

  3. Case, Teacher and School Characteristics Influencing Teachers' Detection and Reporting of Child Physical Abuse and Neglect: Results from an Australian Survey

    Walsh, Kerryann; Bridgstock, Ruth; Farrell, Ann; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Schweitzer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify the influence of multiple case, teacher and school characteristics on Australian primary school teachers' propensity to detect and report child physical abuse and neglect using vignettes as short hypothetical cases. Methods: A sample of 254 teachers completed a self-report questionnaire. They responded to a series of 32


  4. Common Pressures, Same Results? Recent Reforms in Professional Standards and Competences in Teacher Education for Secondary Teachers in England, France and Germany

    Page, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the introduction of professional standards and competences in initial teacher education for secondary teachers in England, France and Germany has provided the cornerstone of education reform in all three countries. The precise number and specific content of a measurable set of skills for teachers have offered challenges for


  5. A Survey Study of Chinese In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy about Inclusive Education

    Wang, Mian; Zan, Fei; Liu, Jiaqiu; Liu, Chunling; Sharma, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    A survey study was conducted to a total of 323 in-service teachers (110 special education teachers and 213 general education teachers) in Shanghai regarding their self-efficacy and concerns about inclusive education. Multivariate analysis results reveal that special teachers have significantly higher self-efficacy about inclusive education than


  6. The Effects of a Master's Program on Teachers' Science Instruction: Results from Classroom Observations, Teacher Reports, and Student Surveys

    Copur-Gencturk, Yasemin; Hug, Barbara; Lubienski, Sarah Theule

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a new master's degree program on the instructional practices of K-8 in-service teachers. This 2.5-year master's program was designed to deepen in-service teachers' knowledge in science and mathematics and promote greater use of reform-oriented instruction. Teachers' instructional practices were


  7. An examination of an aspect of the worldview of female college science teachers as revealed by their concepts of nature

    Tryon, Lisa A.

    American citizens are confronted every day with scientific issues such as global warming, alternative energy technologies, stem cell research, and the use of genetically modified foods. A scientifically literate adult should be able to understand these issues, see how they relate to their own lives, and make choices that reflect their knowledge of the problems at hand. Research has indicated that the majority of U.S. students are not prepared to take a proactive role in current scientific issues and so undergraduate educators are being charged with the task of improving the relevancy of science to the nonscience student. One method for exploring this problem has been the application of worldview theory, which seeks to analyze the thoughts and attitudes of teachers and students with regard to science in their lives. This qualitative case study sought to uncover the worldviews of female science college professors particularly as they related to nature and to examine how these educators felt their worldviews might influence their students. A series of established card sort activities used in previous worldview studies, in combination with an in-depth interview facilitated the data collection from female science professors teaching at universities in New England.

  8. Colonic perforation resulting from ingested chicken bone revealing previously undiagnosed colonic adenocarcinoma: report of a case and review of literature

    Ulusarac Ozlem

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 86 year old male with a four-day history of nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms was found on colonoscopy to have evidence of sigmoid colon obstruction and possible perforation. Emergent operative exploration revealed diffuse peritonitis, sigmoid perforation, adjacent dense adhesions, and a foreign body protruding through the perforated area. Pathologic examination showed the foreign body to be a sliver of bone consistent with chicken bone and the sigmoid subacute perforation to be associated distally with a circumferential ulcerated obstructing mass, microscopically seen to be transmurally infiltrating adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell type. There was extensive acute and organizing peritonitis, 100% Escherichia coli was cultured from peritoneal fluid, and the patient died two days postoperatively with sepsis and hypotension. This appears to be the fifth reported case of colonic perforation resulting from foreign body perforation due to previously undiagnosed adenocarcinoma. The four previously reported cases were all deeply invasive adenocarcinoma of sigmoid colon, and the foreign bodies included three chicken/poultry bones and a metallic staple. These five cases are highly unusual examples of a potentially lethal malignant neoplasm being clinically revealed by a usually (but not always innocuous event, the ingestion of a small foreign body.

  9. Colonic perforation resulting from ingested chicken bone revealing previously undiagnosed colonic adenocarcinoma: report of a case and review of literature.

    McGregor, Douglas H; Liu, Xiaoying; Ulusarac, Ozlem; Ponnuru, Kimberly D; Schnepp, Stephanie L

    2011-01-01

    An 86 year old male with a four-day history of nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms was found on colonoscopy to have evidence of sigmoid colon obstruction and possible perforation. Emergent operative exploration revealed diffuse peritonitis, sigmoid perforation, adjacent dense adhesions, and a foreign body protruding through the perforated area. Pathologic examination showed the foreign body to be a sliver of bone consistent with chicken bone and the sigmoid subacute perforation to be associated distally with a circumferential ulcerated obstructing mass, microscopically seen to be transmurally infiltrating adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell type. There was extensive acute and organizing peritonitis, 100% Escherichia coli was cultured from peritoneal fluid, and the patient died two days postoperatively with sepsis and hypotension. This appears to be the fifth reported case of colonic perforation resulting from foreign body perforation due to previously undiagnosed adenocarcinoma. The four previously reported cases were all deeply invasive adenocarcinoma of sigmoid colon, and the foreign bodies included three chicken/poultry bones and a metallic staple. These five cases are highly unusual examples of a potentially lethal malignant neoplasm being clinically revealed by a usually (but not always) innocuous event, the ingestion of a small foreign body. PMID:21333012

  10. Emotional Competence and Stressors of Female School Teachers

    Holeyannavar, P. G.; Itagi, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    A study on emotional competence and stressors of 105 primary school teachers was conducted in Dharwad in 2009. Emotional competence was assessed using EC- scale and stressors by stress inventory for teachers (SIT). Results revealed that majority of the teachers (89.5%) showed average to competent levels of emotional competence, followed by 6.7 and


  11. Helping Italian science teachers to make earth and climate active lessons. Results of 3 years support with the ICLEEN project

    Cattadori, M.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that in Italy Earth and Climate System Sciences Education (ESS) is one of the scientific disciplines where science teachers show a greatest need in terms of professional support. Among the causes that have been reported we should mention: the predominance of science teachers with a degree in biological disciplines rather then geo-logical or physical topics, and the high interdisciplinarity of certain topics, in particular those related to the climate system. Furthermore, it was found that ESS topics are predominant in the science curricula of those grades in which have been reported the major students dropout rates during the whole italian school cycle . In this context, in 2010, the MUSE, the Museum of Science of Trento (Italy), created a web-based service named I-Cleen (Inquring on Climate and Energy www.icleen.muse.it). This is a tool aimed at promoting the collaboration among science teachers in order to share resources and enhance the professional collaboration by means of participatory methods and models belonging to the world of open source and open content. The main instrument of the I-CLEEN project is an online repository (with metadata compliant with the DCMI and LOM international standards) of teaching resources focused on Earth and Climate Sciences all published under the Creative Commons license Attribution 3.0 and therefore, belonging to the model of OER (Open Educational Resources). The service has been designed, developed and managed by a team consisting of very experiencing science teachers and scientists from the Museum and other partners research institutions. The editorial work is carried out online utilizing a specific platform made with LifeRay, a CMS (Content Management System) software that is open source and manageable in a single Java-frameworked environment using the dbase, the website, the editorial process and several web 2.0 services. The project has been subjected to two distinct testing activities in collaboration with the University of Trento dealing with the effectiveness of the service as well as the usability of the graphic user interface (GUI). The present work aims to illustrate the essential features of the service I-cleen and the results achieved during the last three years of operation. It will be display and interpret for the first time data with web traffic, and other data from downloading and publishing documents of the teaching resources and the main outcomes of the above mentioned tests. The purpose of this contribution is to highlight strengths and weaknesses of this experience and potentially able to provide valuable information on the role of today's web based services and online communities to help support teachers in earth and climate sciences subjects.

  12. Inspiring Minds through a Professional Alliance of Community Teachers (IMPACT): Evaluation Results of the Cohort 1 Math and Science Apprentice Teachers. CRESST Report 826

    Wang, Jia; Schweig, Jon; Griffin, Noelle; Baldanza, Michelle; Rivera, Nichole M.; Hsu, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation reports findings from a study of a UCLA teacher education program called IMPACT, Inspiring Minds through a Professional Alliance of Community Teachers. To measure program quality and goal attainment, the evaluation team used a comprehensive, multiple measures approach which included instructional artifacts, classroom logs, measures


  13. Teacher Supply and Demand: Surprises from Primary Research

    Wayne, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of primary research studies on public school teacher supply and demand revealed four surprises. Projections show that enrollments are leveling off. Relatedly, annual hiring increases should be only about two or three percent over the next few years. Results from studies of teacher attrition also yield unexpected results. Excluding retirements, only about one in 20 teachers leaves each year, and the novice teachers who quit mainly cite personal and family reasons, not job diss...

  14. Clustering of the SOM easily reveals distinct gene expression patterns: results of a reanalysis of lymphoma study

    Smeland Erlend

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A method to evaluate and analyze the massive data generated by series of microarray experiments is of utmost importance to reveal the hidden patterns of gene expression. Because of the complexity and the high dimensionality of microarray gene expression profiles, the dimensional reduction of raw expression data and the feature selections necessary for, for example, classification of disease samples remains a challenge. To solve the problem we propose a two-level analysis. First self-organizing map (SOM is used. SOM is a vector quantization method that simplifies and reduces the dimensionality of original measurements and visualizes individual tumor sample in a SOM component plane. Next, hierarchical clustering and K-means clustering is used to identify patterns of gene expression useful for classification of samples. Results We tested the two-level analysis on public data from diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. The analysis easily distinguished major gene expression patterns without the need for supervision: a germinal center-related, a proliferation, an inflammatory and a plasma cell differentiation-related gene expression pattern. The first three patterns matched the patterns described in the original publication using supervised clustering analysis, whereas the fourth one was novel. Conclusions Our study shows that by using SOM as an intermediate step to analyze genome-wide gene expression data, the gene expression patterns can more easily be revealed. The "expression display" by the SOM component plane summarises the complicated data in a way that allows the clinician to evaluate the classification options rather than giving a fixed diagnosis.

  15. Primary School Student Teachers' Understanding of Climate Change: Comparing the Results Given by Concept Maps and Communication Analysis

    Ratinen, Ilkka; Viiri, Jouni; Lehesvuori, Sami

    2012-11-01

    Climate change is a complex environmental problem that can be used to examine students' understanding, gained through classroom communication, of climate change and its interactions. The present study examines a series of four science sessions given to a group of primary school student teachers (n = 20). This includes analysis of the communication styles used and the students' pre- and post-conceptualisation of climate change based on results obtained via essay writing and drawings. The essays and drawings concerned the students' unprompted pre- and post-conceptions about climate change, collected before and after each of the four inquiry-based science sessions (in physics, chemistry, biology and geography). Concept mapping was used in the analysis of the students' responses. The communication used in the four sessions was analysed with a communicative approach in order to find out the discussion about climate change between teacher and students. The analyses indicated that the students did not have the knowledge or the courage to participate in discussion, but post-conceptualisation map showed that students' thinking had become more coherent after the four sessions. Given the results of the present study, proposals for using concepts maps and/or communication analysis in studying students' conceptions are presented.

  16. Environmental Awareness Among Upper Primary School Teachers

    Vipinder Nagra; Kulwant Kaur

    2013-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to identify the environmental education awareness of upper primary school teachers (Grade VI to VIII) in relation to type of school, gender and subject streams. Environmental Awareness Test was used for collecting data from a random sample of 200 upper primary school teachers. Statistical techniques such as mean, standard deviation and t test were applied for analysis of data. The results revealed that upper primary school teachers have average level of environ...

  17. Teaching in the Foundation Stage--How Current Systems Support Teachers' Knowledge and Understanding of Children's Speech and Language

    Mroz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the knowledge, skills and understandings of Foundation Stage teachers in relation to children's speech and language development. Results from a questionnaire to 294 teachers reveal limited initial and post qualification training. Teachers' knowledge of specific aspects of children's language revealed that key areas for…

  18. Mindfulness Training and Reductions in Teacher Stress and Burnout: Results from Two Randomized, Waitlist-Control Field Trials

    Roeser, Robert W.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Jha, Amishi; Cullen, Margaret; Wallace, Linda; Wilensky, Rona; Oberle, Eva; Thomson, Kimberly; Taylor, Cynthia; Harrison, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The effects of randomization to mindfulness training (MT) or to a waitlist-control condition on psychological and physiological indicators of teachers' occupational stress and burnout were examined in 2 field trials. The sample included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female) from Canada and the United States. Measures were…

  19. Assessing Teacher Change in Facilitating Mathematizing in Urban Middle Schools: Results of an Effective Professional Development Program

    Tarlow, Lynn D.

    2014-01-01

    This study documents the change in teaching practices of a group of mathematics teachers in urban middle schools as they participated in a program of professional development to promote standards-based learning environments. The teachers made a shift in their classroom practice from a traditional, didactic lecture approach towards a role of


  20. Colonic perforation resulting from ingested chicken bone revealing previously undiagnosed colonic adenocarcinoma: report of a case and review of literature

    Ulusarac Ozlem; Liu Xiaoying; McGregor Douglas H; Ponnuru Kimberly D; Schnepp Stephanie L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An 86 year old male with a four-day history of nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms was found on colonoscopy to have evidence of sigmoid colon obstruction and possible perforation. Emergent operative exploration revealed diffuse peritonitis, sigmoid perforation, adjacent dense adhesions, and a foreign body protruding through the perforated area. Pathologic examination showed the foreign body to be a sliver of bone consistent with chicken bone and the sigmoid subacute perforation to ...

  1. Clustering of the SOM easily reveals distinct gene expression patterns: results of a reanalysis of lymphoma study

    Smeland Erlend; Aasheim Hans; Delabie Jan; Wang Junbai; Myklebost Ola

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background A method to evaluate and analyze the massive data generated by series of microarray experiments is of utmost importance to reveal the hidden patterns of gene expression. Because of the complexity and the high dimensionality of microarray gene expression profiles, the dimensional reduction of raw expression data and the feature selections necessary for, for example, classification of disease samples remains a challenge. To solve the problem we propose a two-level analysis. ...

  2. Teacher Perceptions of NeuroEducation: A Mixed Methods Survey of Teachers in the United States

    Serpati, Lauren; Loughan, Ashlee R.

    2012-01-01

    Pickering and Howard-Jones (2007) reported educators' enthusiasm for NeuroEducation from a sample of teachers attending neuroscience professional development courses. Their results revealed teachers: (1) are enthusiastic about the role of neuroscience in education; (2) believe an understanding of the brain for educational program development is…

  3. Media Frames regarding Teacher Dress: Implications for Career and Technical Education Teacher Preparation

    Freeburg, Beth Winfrey; Workman, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teacher dress in United States schools as presented in the newspaper. Twenty-nine articles were examined to answer three questions. Results revealed: (a) the newspaper provided four contexts for processing information about teacher dress--roles, control, impression management, and educational learning


  4. Teacher Power Mediates the Effects of Technology Policies on Teacher Credibility

    Finn, Amber N.; Ledbetter, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between perceived technology policies and perceived teacher credibility, as well as the extent to which teachers' use of power bases mediates this association. Participants included 294 undergraduate students from a private university in the Southwest. Results revealed that policies encouraging


  5. The Impact of NBPTS Participation on Teacher Practice: Learning from Teacher Perspectives

    Tracz, Susan M.; Daughtry, Jody; Henderson-Sparks, Joan; Newman, Carole; Sienty, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    This study presents the results of qualitative interviews of teachers who completed the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification process. Teachers (N=25) were asked a series of questions about how the NBPTS process impacted their teaching. The findings revealed that the themes of reflection, assessment, and


  6. Teacher Supply and Demand: Surprises from Primary Research

    Andrew J. Wayne

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of primary research studies on public school teacher supply and demand revealed four surprises. Projections show that enrollments are leveling off. Relatedly, annual hiring increases should be only about two or three percent over the next few years. Results from studies of teacher attrition also yield unexpected results. Excluding retirements, only about one in 20 teachers leaves each year, and the novice teachers who quit mainly cite personal and family reasons, not job dissatisfaction. Each of these findings broadens policy makers' options for teacher supply.

  7. Student Teacher Challenges: Using the Cognitive Load Theory as an Explanatory Lens

    Moos, Daniel C.; Pitton, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive load theory (CLT) can explain the challenges faced by student teachers. This study, guided by the CLT, included 26 pre-service teachers. Participants completed a cognitive load self-report questionnaire and were interviewed at two points during their student teaching. Results revealed that student teachers decreased mental effort related


  8. Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematical Beliefs: What Is the Relationship in Elementary Pre-Service Teachers?

    Haciomeroglu, Guney

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred-one pre-service teachers enrolled in elementary teacher education program were administered two surveys to measure mathematics anxiety and mathematical beliefs. Results of the study revealed that there were significant differences between third year and fourth year pre-service teachers regarding their mathematics anxiety and


  9. Comparison of vocal tract discomfort scale results with objective and instrumental phoniatric parameters among teacher rehabilitees from voice disorders

    Ewelina Wo?nicka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of occupational dysphonia play a major role in voice self-assessment, which is one of the elements of a comprehensive evaluation of voice disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the applicability of the Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTD scale to monitor the effectiveness of voice rehabilitation and compare the VTD results with objective and instrumental methods of phoniatric diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The study included 55 teachers (mean age, 47.2 with occupational dysphonia. A comprehensive diagnosis took into account self-assessment by VTD scale, phoniatric examination, including laryngovideostroboscopy (LVSS and objective measurements of the aerodynamic parameter - the maximum phonation time (MPT. After 4 months of intense rehabilitation, post-therapy examination was performed using the methods specified above. Results: After the treatment, a significant improvement was obtained in the subjective symptoms measured on a VTD scale - assessed both for the frequency (p = 0.000 and the severity (p = 0.000 subscales. Positive effects of the therapy were also observed for the parameters evaluated in the phoniatric study (p < 0.01 and laryngovideostroboscopy (p < 0.01. After voice therapy, there was also an improvement in the objective parameter MCF, which was about 5 seconds longer. Studies have shown that the VTD scale is characterized by high reliability - Cronbach's alpha coefficient in the preliminary test was as follows: for the frequency subscale symptoms - 0.826, and severity - 0.845; similarly high reliability was achieved in the control test, 0.908 and 0.923, respectively. Conclusions: Vocal Tract Discomfort scale can be a valuable tool for assessing voice, and can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of therapy of the occupational dysphonia. Med Pr 2013;64(2:199–206

  10. Characteristics and Contributions of School Subjects at the Elementary Level: Results of a Survey of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers from Four Quebec Universities

    Lebrun, Johanne; Lenoir, Yves; Oliveira, Anderson Araujo; Morin, Marie-Pier; McConnell, Anne Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of a survey questionnaire involving 841 third and fourth year students enrolled in a French language Bachelors degree program in Elementary Education at four Quebec universities. The questionnaire dealt with pre-service elementary teachers' representations of the teaching and learning of four school subjects:…

  11. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A.

    Kumar, Chundi Vinay; Swetha, Rayapadi G; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between the wild type protein structure and the mutant protein structure. The mutation T118M resulted in the overall increase in the stability of the mutant protein. The superimposed structure shows marked structural variation between the wild type and the mutant protein structures. PMID:25400662

  12. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A

    Kumar, Chundi Vinay; Swetha, Rayapadi G.; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between th...

  13. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Romanov, Alexey; Romanov, Alexander; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increa...

  14. DNA Hydroxymethylation Profiling Reveals that WT1 Mutations Result in Loss of TET2 Function in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Raajit Rampal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in IDH1/IDH2 and TET2 result in impaired TET2-mediated conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The observation that WT1 inactivating mutations anticorrelate with TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML led us to hypothesize that WT1 mutations may impact TET2 function. WT1 mutant AML patients have reduced 5hmC levels similar to TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutant AML. These mutations are characterized by convergent, site-specific alterations in DNA hydroxymethylation, which drive differential gene expression more than alterations in DNA promoter methylation. WT1 overexpression increases global levels of 5hmC, and WT1 silencing reduced 5hmC levels. WT1 physically interacts with TET2 and TET3, and WT1 loss of function results in a similar hematopoietic differentiation phenotype as observed with TET2 deficiency. These data provide a role for WT1 in regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and suggest that TET2 IDH1/IDH2 and WT1 mutations define an AML subtype defined by dysregulated DNA hydroxymethylation.

  15. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Romanov, Alexey; Romanov, Alexander; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positiv...

  16. Science Research 4: Results of Implementation of Student-Facilitated Teacher Training and Student Mentorship Programs Promoting Original Scientific Research

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2014-12-01

    A high school curriculum allowing students previously involved in a 3-year Science Research Program to continue into a 4th year was developed in 2013 and implemented in 2014. The goals of this curriculum were to allow 3-year students to utilize their expertise in research methods and data acquisition technology to mentor both incoming research students and their teachers in the development and implementation of original scientific research. Student responsibilities involved the mentorship of both 8th Grade Honors Geoscience students and 9th grade Science Research students during the development and implementation of original research. Science Research 4 students also conducted teacher training sessions facilitating the use of electronic sensors and data acquisition devices in the classroom for general education and scientific research applications. The development, testing and presentation via teacher workshops, of the utilization of the Daily Inquiry method of promoting original scientific research in the middle school and high school classroom were also undertaken. Mentored students successfully completed and presented original research projects and teachers involved in training sessions reported increased and effective utilization of data acquisition technology and Daily Inquiry methods in the classroom.

  17. What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom? Results from a Survey of AMI and AMS Teacher Trainers

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2011-01-01

    There are two major types of Montessori teacher education in the United States: (1) AMI-USA (the American branch of the Association Montessori Internationale, founded by Dr. Montessori to carry on her work); and (2) AMS (American Montessori Society, founded by Nancy Rambusch to represent Montessori in America). This article presents the results


  18. Results of the 2004 DesignShare POE Program: Students and Teachers Tell Us what They Really Think

    Lackney, Jeffery A.

    2004-01-01

    DesignShare/School Construction News (DS/SCN) Jurists have often critically reflected on their desire to know more about how teachers and students really experience so-called innovative award-winning schools. Through the DesignShare Post-Occupancy Evaluation Program, the intention is to give voice to the individuals whose lives are directly


  19. Metabolic profiling reveals altered pattern of central metabolism in navel orange plants as a result of boron deficiency.

    Liu, Guidong; Dong, Xiaochang; Liu, Leichao; Wu, Lishu; Peng, Shu'ang; Jiang, Cuncang

    2015-04-01

    We focused on the changes of metabolite profiles in navel orange plants under long-term boron (B) deficiency using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) approach. Curling of the leaves and leaf chlorosis were observed only in the upper leaves (present before start of the treatment) of B-deficient plants, while the lower leaves (grown during treatment) did not show any visible symptoms. The metabolites with up-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly proline, l-ornithine, lysine, glucoheptonic acid, fucose, fumarate, oxalate, quinate, myo-inositol and allo-inositol, while the metabolites with down-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly serine, asparagine, saccharic acid, citrate, succinate, shikimate and phytol. The levels of glucose and fructose were increased only in the upper leaves by B deficiency, while starch content was increased in all the leaves and in roots. The increased levels of malate, ribitol, gluconic acid and glyceric acid occurred only in the lower leaves of B-deficient plants. The increased levels of phenols only in the upper leaves indicated that the effects of B on phenol metabolism in citrus plants may be a consequence of disruptions in leaf structure. Metabolites with opposite reactions in upper and lower leaves were mainly glutamine, glycine and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. To our knowledge, the phenomena of allo-inositol even higher than myo-inositol occurred characterized for the first time in this species. These results suggested that the altered pattern of central metabolism may be either specific or adaptive responses of navel orange plants to B deficiency. PMID:25212059

  20. Teacher collaboration praxis: conflicts, borders, and ideologies from a micropolitical perspective

    Nancy Keranen; Fátima Encinas Prudencio

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at a feature of teacher collaboration within Achinstein’s (2002) micropolitics of collaboration but from an intrapersonal perspective. Results discussed feature issues of conflict, borders, and ideologies within each participating teacher rather than between teachers. Unresolved or unacknowledged intrapersonal conflict might lead to interpersonal conflict of the type that does not enrich collaborative efforts. Findings from this study reveal that participating teachers did ex...

  1. THE ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS AND PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS RELATED TO THE GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    Cemalettin Ä°PEK

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in Turkish work life as well as in other countries. There are some social and personal barriers preventing women from managerial positions. One of the area in which women are underrepresented is school leadership. The main purpose of this study is to describe the attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions in schools. In accordance with the main purpose of the study it was investigated whether there were any differences between the attitudes and the views of the primary teacher and the primary pre-service teachers. The attitudes and the views about the barriers facing female teachers in school leadership were also compared according to gender and the grades of the primary pre-service teachers. Data were collected from 114 primary teachers working in primary schools in Çayeli district and 192 primary pre-service teachers attending primary school teacher training program in the Faculty of Education in Rize University.The attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions were described in two dimensions, personal attitudes and views, and social attitudes and views. Study results revealed that the attitudes and views differentiated significantly due to gender and position (teacher or pre-service teacher in both dimensions. Moreover, it was indicated that gender and the position of the primary teachers and the primary pre-service teachers have significant joint effects on the personal attitudes and views whereas joint effects of the gender and positions on the social attitudes and views were not observed at statistically significant level. As a conclusion, study results indicated that female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers have not negative attitudes and views for female promoting to school leadership as much as their male counterparts. However, female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers seemed to accept voluntarily the social female roles more than male primary teachers and male primary pre-service teachers.In accordance with the study results some suggestions were developed. First of all, it was proposed that traditional gender roles should be redefined in Turkish Educational System. Secondly, gender discrimination subject might take place in teacher training programs. Moreover, further gender studies were recommended in terms of motivation, stress, work satisfaction, work performance, work commitment and organizational culture.

  2. Measurements of occupational ultraviolet exposure and the implications of timetabled yard duty for school teachers in Queensland, Australia: preliminary results.

    Downs, N J; Parisi, A V; Igoe, D

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous personal measurements of the occupational ultraviolet exposure weighted to the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection hazard sensitivity spectrum (UVICNIRP) were made over a five week period (44 person-days) in the second half of the summer school term of 2012 in Queensland, Australia for individual high school teachers located at latitudes of 27.5°S and 23.5°S. These teachers were employed for the duration of the study in a predominately indoor classroom teaching role, excluding mandatory periods of lunch time yard duty and school sport supervisions. Data is presented from personal measurements made to the shirt collar using polyphenylene oxide (PPO) film UV dosimeters. UVICNIRP exposure data is presented for each week of the study period for the shirt collar measurement site and are further expressed relative to the measured ambient horizontal plane exposure. Personal exposures were correlated with time outdoors, showing a higher exposure trend on days when teachers were required to supervise outdoor areas for more than 2h per week (mean daily exposure: 168Jm(-2)UVICNIRP±5Jm(-2) (1?)) compared to the study average (mean daily exposure: 115Jm(-2)UVICNIRP±91Jm(-2) (1?)). Time spent in an open playground environment was found to be the most critical factor influencing the occupational UVICNIRP exposure. A linear model was developed showing a correlation (R(2)=0.77) between the time teachers spent on yard duty and UVICNIRP exposure, expressed relative to ambient. The research findings indicate a greater reduction in personal exposure can be achieved by timetabling for yard duty periods in playground areas which offer more shade from trees and surrounding buildings. All mean daily personal exposures measured at the shirt collar site were higher than the ICNIRP occupational daily exposure limit of 30Jm(-2) for outdoor workers. PMID:24509070

  3. Changes in teacher efficacy and beliefs during a one-year teacher preparation program

    Lockman, Alison Schirmer

    This study attempted to further understanding of factors affecting the teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary science preservice teachers, and to develop a model relating teacher efficacy to beliefs about teaching and students. A mixed quantitative and qualitative methodology was utilized in order to track participants' beliefs both broadly and in depth throughout a one-year teacher preparation program. Results from this analysis revealed that preservice teachers at the end of the program had significantly higher personal science teaching efficacy beliefs than at the beginning of the program. No significant difference in science teaching outcome expectancy beliefs was found, although individual preservice teachers did develop alternate beliefs. Teacher efficacy beliefs were directly affected by three of Bandura's four sources of self-efficacy beliefs---Mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, and verbal persuasion---with the influence of each source of self-efficacy information appearing to change during the course of the teacher preparation program. No evidence was found that affective states by themselves had resulted in belief changes, although many of the other experiences were more powerful because they were accompanied by an emotional incident. Connections between teacher efficacy beliefs, beliefs about students, and beliefs about teaching were uncovered, as was the importance of content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge on a teacher's sense of efficacy.

  4. Curriculum Development in Outdoor Education: Tasmanian Teachers' Perspectives on the New Pre-Tertiary Outdoor Leadership Course

    Dyment, Janet; Morse, Marcus; Shaw, Simon; Smith, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines how outdoor education teachers in Tasmania, Australia have implemented and perceive a new pre-tertiary Outdoor Leadership curriculum document. It draws on an analysis of in-depth semi-structured interviews with 11 outdoor education teachers. The results revealed that teachers were generally welcoming of the new higher-order


  5. The status of history teaching, learning and examination results in Lesotho, 2000 - 2004: implications for teacher education.

    Ntabeni, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of History teaching and learning in Lesotho which is at its lowest ebb. Very few schools teach the subject and their poor performance, particularly in the senior classes, exacerbates the situation. On the basis of the examiners' comments in the last five years, the study has identified lack of essay writing skills among the candidates as the main reason behind the high failure rate in History. It also suggests pursuit of quality pre-service & in-service teacher ...

  6. A COMPARISON OF ORAL EVALUATION RATINGS BY NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS AND NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS

    Brittany Baitman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explore the differences and similarities between native English speaker (NES teachers and non-native English speaker (NNES teachers in their oral evaluation ratings of the same university level English language learners. To this effect, the iBT/Next Generation TOEFL Test Independent Speaking Rubric and a questionnaire were employed. The results reveal that NES teachers are more lenient in their oral evaluation ratings than NNES teachers. In regards to the questionnaire employed, it was found that NES teachers take into consideration the aspects of fluency and pronunciation more so than NNES teachers when orally assessing students, while NNES teachers take more into consideration the aspects of grammatical accuracy and vocabulary. Further research is required in the area of oral assessment specifically pertaining to nationality, age, work experience, and knowledge of a second language.

  7. An analysis of zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development

    Kubarek-Sandor, Joy

    Informal science institutions are a significant provider of science teacher professional development. As pressure continues to critically analyze the work of teachers and their effectiveness in the classroom, it is important to understand how informal science institutions contribute to effective change in teacher science content knowledge and pedagogy. This research study analyzed zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development to respond to the research questions: How do zoos and aquaria determine and assess their goals for teacher professional development? How do these goals align with effective teacher change for science content knowledge and pedagogy? Theoretical frameworks for high quality teacher professional development, effective evaluation of teacher professional development, and learning in informal science settings guided the research. The sample for the study was AZA accredited zoos and aquariums providing teacher professional development (N=107). Data collection consisted of an online questionnaire, follow-up interviews, and content analysis of teacher professional development artifacts. Analysis revealed that by and large zoos and aquariums are lacking in their provision of science teacher professional development. Most professional development focuses on content or resources, neglecting pedagogy. Assessments mismatch the goals and rely heavily on self-report and satisfaction measures. The results demonstrate a marked difference between those zoos and aquariums that are larger in capacity versus those that are medium to small in size. This may be an area of research for the future, as well as analyzing the education resources produced by zoos and aquariums as these were emphasized heavily as a way they serve teachers.

  8. Secondary Science Teachers' Development of Pedagogical Content Knowledge as Result of Integrating Nanoscience Content in Their Curriculum

    Wischow, Emily D.; Bryan, Lynn; Bodner, George M.

    2013-06-01

    Nanoscale science is a rapidly-developing, multidisciplinary field of science and research that combines engineering, chemistry, physics, biology, and information technology pushes and the boundary between the science and the technology required to conduct it. Nanoscale science involves investigating and working with matter on the scale of 1-100 microns and has broad societal implications for new technologies. It is estimated that the worldwide workforce necessary to support the field of nanoscale science and nanotechnology will be close to 2 million by 2015 (National Nanotechnology Initiative, 2005). With such rapid developments in nanoscale science and technology, it is becoming more incumbent upon K-12 science teachers to provide the learning experiences necessary for students to understand the principles that govern behavior at the nanoscale and develop the skills needed to apply these concepts to improve everyday life. While onlya limited amount of nanoscale curricular materials are available for K-12 and undergraduate education many important unanswered questions exist, including: How do science teachers learn to teach nanoscale science?

  9. Burnout among Low and High Experienced Teachers

    Seyedehhava Mousavy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a serious psychological syndrome that can affect not only an individual’s well-being, but also the functioning of whole organisations, such as schools. It is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment.The level of burnout among teachers in the field of education has a negative impact on student success. The present investigation examines the level of burn out among high and low experienced teachers. It focused on a group of English teachers from different nationalities: Iranian, and Malaysian at UPM to examine if there is any relation between burnout and experience level. The sample consisted of 30 English teachers. Two instruments namely, The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Demographic Questionnaire were used to collect data. Data analysis revealed that there is no significant difference in depersonalization and personal accomplishment scores between low and high experienced teachers. But the result of this study also revealed that there is a significant difference in Emotional Exhaustion scores between low and high experienced teachers. Further research is required to explore the roots and the causes of burnout.Keywords: teacher burnout, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment

  10. Are Quebec’s Future Teachers Ready to Use ICT in Class? The Case of Prospective Teachers in Quebec, Canada

    Thierry Karsenti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Are Quebec’s future teachers ready to integrate information and communication technologies (ICT into the scholastic context? To answer this question, a study was conducted with some 2,065 future teachers, 410 associate professors and 90 supervisors of teaching practices from nine French-speaking Quebec universities offering a beginning teacher-training program. The results show that these prospective teachers have access to the equipment needed to become familiar with ICT, and that they use basic technology skills well. Furthermore, the data collected revealed that teachers in training use ICT regularly and reflectively to plan their classes, communicate, search for information, prepare didactic materials, solve problems, or improve themselves professionally. Although the profile shown is promising, the study results also indicate a very low proportion of future teachers who use ICT in the classroom.

  11. Japanese EFL Teachers' Perceptions of Communicative, Audiolingual and Yakudoku Activities

    Greta Gorsuch

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the learning of English as a Foreign Language in Japanese high schools has become the focus of new educational policies applied at the national level. One of these is The Course of Study issue by the Ministry of Education, in which teachers are, for the first time in a long series of curriculum guidelines, adjured to develop students' "positive attitudes towards communicating in English." Another is the JET program, which has put thousands of native English speaking assistant language teachers (ALTs into Japanese secondary classrooms for the purpose of team teaching with Japanese teachers. Data resulting from a survey project of 876 Japanese high school English teachers was used to provide empirical evidence of teachers' levels of approval of communicative, audiolingual and traditional (yakudoku activities. Teachers were also asked to rate the strengths of a variety of influences on their instruction, including university entrance exams, and pre- and in-service teacher education programs. Teachers' perceptions of both activities and instructional influences were examined in light of teachers' length of career, type of school (private versus public, academic versus vocational, and level of contact with an ALT. The data revealed the complexities of imposing broad, national educational policies on a diverse group of teachers, and in an educational culture which likely precludes teachers' use of communicative activities.

  12. Excellent Mentor Teachers’ Skills in Mentoring for Pre-Service Teachers

    Shih-Hsiung Liu

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identify the performances of 76 Taiwanese awarded mentor teachers inmentoring pre-service teachers by analyzing their written reports related to mentoringprocesses. An inductive content analysis method was used to construct headings and codes inrelation to mentoring skills. The analytical result reveals that 448 headings were formed andwere further categorized into six groups, reported as six mentoring skills. The mentoringskills rank-order from high to low frequencies are ...

  13. The Role of Teacher Leaders in School Improvement through the Perceptions of Principals and Teachers

    Nancy Akert; Barbara N Martin

    2012-01-01

    These researchers examined the perceptions of fifteen principals and 96 classroom teachers regarding the role of teacher leadership in school improvement. The data revealed significant differences in how principals and teachers perceive teachers’ involvement in teacher leadership roles, in ratings of involvement of teachers in leadership roles when compared to the ratings of how involved they would like to be in those same roles, and how principals and teachers perceived the impact of teacher...

  14. Functional Anatomy of the Cardiovascular System: Professional Development for PreK-3 Teachers Using a "Train and Equip" Method Results in Learning Opportunities for Students

    Burns, E. Robert

    2008-01-01

    Preadolescent students are interested in learning the structure and function of the human body. However, their teachers are not trained in this content. The purpose of this project was to expand a successful outreach effort in the health sciences for grade 7-12 teachers to include PreK-3 teachers. A "Healthy Hearts" workshop was offered to train


  15. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy reveals polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination despite relatively pristine site characteristics: Results of a field study in the Niger Delta.

    Obinaju, Blessing E; Martin, Francis L

    2016-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an emerging technique to detect biochemical alterations in biological tissues, particularly changes due to sub-lethal exposures to environmental contaminants. We have previously shown the potential of attenuated total reflection FTIR (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to detect real-time exposure to contaminants in sentinel organisms as well as the potential to relate spectral alterations to the presence of specific environmental agents. In this study based in the Niger Delta (Nigeria), changes occurring in fish tissues as a result of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure at contaminated sites are compared to the infrared (IR) spectra of the tissues obtained from a relatively pristine site. Multivariate analysis revealed that PAH contamination could be occurring at the pristine site, based on the IR spectra and significant (P<0.0001) differences between sites. The study provides evidence of the IR spectroscopy techniques' sensitivity and supports their potential application in environmental biomonitoring. PMID:26826366

  16. Who Needs to Fit in? Who Gets to Stand out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers Through an Ableism Lens

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic will impact students with disabilities in the domain of special education is explored. Data was drawn from six special education school teachers from one school in Calgary, Alberta. Five sub-themes (social acceptance, not adding to the impairment, fear of judgement by society, pursuing “normality” and meeting the demands of society were identified that fit under the main identified theme of “fitting in by not standing out”. Findings demonstrate a dichotomy in participant views of non- or socially acceptable communication devices. The perception of BMI technology was also explored among special education school teachers, revealing benefits and challenges with the uptake of this technology for students with disabilities. Perceptions of people with disabilities and ableism are presented as conceptual frameworks to interpret the influence and impact of the findings.

  17. THE KING’S CARPET: DRAMA PLAY IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    Judit Kerekes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Trying to develop new perspectives of teaching is never easy, but trying to cultivate ownership and initiative among teacher education students is a still greater aspiration that is infrequently realized. This article addresses each of these highly valued goals for teacher educators as a case study reveals the impact of involving teacher candidates in interdisciplinary focused, constructivist and reflective models and planning for teaching, and then student teaching, which reaffirms this approach. Most significant is the phenomenon of several teacher candidates continuing their development and study of innovative drama play projects with their classes after the semester finishes. The resulting transformations in professional identity development, self-efficacy and student-teacher relationships confirm the value of the teacher education model which has developed over a decade of practice (Lyublinskaya & Kerekes, 2009.

  18. Teachers' Voice: A Needs Analysis of Teachers' Needs for Professional Development with the Emergence of the Current English Textbooks

    AL-Qahtani, Hind M.

    2015-01-01

    The study attempts to reveal the attitudes' of the English teachers toward teachers' professional development, to identify the needs of English teachers for Teachers' professional development, to clarify the challenges that faced by English teachers throughout their teachers' professional development. The study uses a descriptive methods to


  19. Teacher Incentives in the Third World.

    Chapman, David W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examines the extent that teacher incentives were related to teachers' instructional practices and career satisfaction within a group of junior secondary school teachers in Botswana. Results indicate that the level of incentives teachers received was meaningfully related to teachers' career satisfaction but not related to teachers' classroom


  20. Attitude of teachers towards the inclusion of special needs children in general education classroom: the case of teachers in some selected schools in Nigeria

    Samuel Olufemi ADENIYI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes about inclusion are extremely complex and vary from teacher to teacher and schoolto school. This article explores the attitudes of teachers about inclusion of special needschildren in their secondary schools in general education. This study adopted a descriptivesurvey research design, with 60 teachers as participants from selected secondary schools inOyo State, Nigeria. Four hypotheses were postulated at the significant level of .05. Theinstrument, a questionnaire with question items on demographic information like gender,marital status, professionalism and teaching experience has a general reliability coefficientalpha of .83. A t-test method of analysis was the main statistical method used to test the 4generated hypotheses. The findings revealed that the attitude of male teachers is 39.4, whilethat of female teacher is 43.3, thus, the t-test analysis shows that the calculated t-test is2.107, which is greater than the critical t (t=1.960. This implies that female teachers havemore positive attitude towards the inclusion of special needs students than their malecounterparts. Furthermore, the results reveal that significant difference exists betweenmarried and single teachers in their attitude towards special need students. And thatprofessionally qualified teacher tends to have a more favourable attitude towards theinclusion of special need students than their non-professional qualified teachers. It wasrecommended that teachers should attend seminars and conferences to improve theirknowledge about ways of practicing and accepting inclusion for a better tomorrow for ourspecial needs children in Nigeria.

  1. Elementary teachers committed to actively teaching science and engineering

    Opperman, Julianne Radkowski

    Committed elementary teachers of science and engineering, members of a professional learning community called Collaborative Conversations in STEM, were studied to elicit their perceptions of experiences that influenced their commitment to, and their pedagogical content knowledge of, STEM teaching and learning. The hermeneutic phenomenological interviews enabled the teachers to express their beliefs in their own words. Data analysis employed a theoretical framework that investigated teacher epistemology and knowledge in light of their experiences. Findings revealed a web of lifelong experiences unique to each individual, and evidential of the committed elementary scientist-teachers' present day values, teaching epistemology, lifelong learning, and emotional and intellectual engagement. Scientist-teachers are individuals whose teaching and learning characteristics reflect those of scientists and engineers. Evidence indicated that no single transformative learning experience resulted in those elementary teachers' commitment to STEM teaching and learning, but recent professional development activities were influential. Formal K-16 STEM learning was not uniformly or positively influential to the teachers' commitment to, or knowledge of, STEM. Findings suggest that ongoing professional development for STEM teaching and learning can influence elementary teachers to become committed to actively teaching STEM. The Collaborative Conversations in STEM provided intellectual and emotional engagement that empowered the teachers to provide STEM teaching and learning for their students and their colleagues overcoming impediments encountered in a literacy-focused curriculum. Elementary teachers actively committed to teaching science and engineering can undergo further transformation and emerge as leaders.

  2. Career Paths of Beginning Public School Teachers: Results from the First through Fifth Waves of the 2007-08 Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study. Stats in Brief. NCES 2015-196

    Raue, Kimberley; Gray, Lucinda

    2015-01-01

    This report examines the career paths of beginning public school teachers and how these career paths vary by characteristics during the teachers' first year of teaching and most recent year of teaching. The career paths in this report are based on those developed for the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) research and development


  3. Factors That Promote/Inhibit Teaching Gifted Students in a Regular Class: Results from a Professional Development Program for Chemistry Teachers

    Naama Benny; Ron Blonder

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims at better understanding the factors that promote and hinder chemistry teachers in teaching a gifted student in their regular chemistry class. In addition, it provides evidence of ways that teachers perceive a professional development course dealing with a gifted student in a mixed-abilities science classroom. Eighty-four photonarratives were collected from 14 chemistry teachers that participated in the course about teaching a gifted student in a regular classroom (41 pr...

  4. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that


  5. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that…

  6. Trait Emotional Intelligence of Greek Special Education Teachers in Relation to Burnout and Job Satisfaction

    Platsidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates perceived emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to burnout syndrome and job satisfaction in primary special education teachers from Greece. EI was measured by the EIS developed by Schutte et al. (1998). Factor analysis revealed that four factors can be identified in the EIS. Results showed that Greek teachers reported


  7. Attitudes toward Communication Skills among Students'-Teachers' in Jordanian Public Universities

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the positive and negative attitudes among 289 students of class teachers and childhood teachers' disciplines using the communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) in Jordanian public universities. GPA, year level of students were recorded. Overall results of study revealed that the mean of positive


  8. Trait Emotional Intelligence of Greek Special Education Teachers in Relation to Burnout and Job Satisfaction

    Platsidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates perceived emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to burnout syndrome and job satisfaction in primary special education teachers from Greece. EI was measured by the EIS developed by Schutte et al. (1998). Factor analysis revealed that four factors can be identified in the EIS. Results showed that Greek teachers reported…

  9. Mongolian Teachers

    Madsen, Ulla Ambrosius

    2002-01-01

    The article comprises the result of a research project conducted among Mongolian teachers in a period of transition. The study is based on quantitative as well as on qualitative data. The study is carried out as part of research activities in an educational development programme....

  10. Effective Teacher Professionalization in Networks?

    Hofman, Roelande H.; Dijkstra, Bernadette J.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher professionalization has been focused too strongly on external experts and a one-size-fits-all set of solutions that often fail to distinguish between the needs of different teachers. This article describes a research into teacher networks that might be more successful vehicles for professional development of teachers. The results show that


  11. Investigation of the impacts of physical environment on teacher-child communication

    Filiz Erbay*

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to reveal the effects of physical environment in pre-school education on teacher-child communication. The sample of the study is composed of 42 nursery classes and their teachers in primary schools affiliated with Konya Provincial Directorate of National Education. The study was conducted in survey model. In the study, “The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- the sub-dimensions of Classroom Space and Furnishings” was used to assess physical environment and “Teacher-Child Communication Questionnaire” which was developed by the researchers was used to assess teacher-child communication. The relation between physical environment and teacher-child communication was tested with Spearman Correlation. The results of the study revealed that teacher-child communication is a significantly related with ECER-S daily care, play and learning space sub-scale and furnishings for relaxation and comfort sub-scale.

  12. Administrational Factors as Predictors of Teacher Burnout across Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at measuring the perceived burnout levels of Iranian (N= 230 and Turkish (N=156 EFL teachers and determining the role of four administrational factors (i.e., Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, Fairness, and Fringe Benefits in predicting EE, DP and PA burnout processes across Iranian and Turkish EFL teachers. The MBI-ES was used to measure the perceived burnout levels of the participants, and a four-dimension scale (41 items was developed based on the literature study to measure the participants’ perceptions in these four areas. The average internal consistency reliability of the 41-item scale was r = 0.703. The results of t-tests analyses showed that there was a slight significant difference between Iranian and Turkish groups only in EE burnout processes. Moreover, the results of regression analyses showed that EE, DP, and PA subscales were better predicted by Fairness factor among Iranian teachers, while by Teacher Autonomy among Turkish teachers. Finally, the contrasted results also revealed that Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, and Fairness factors had cross-culturally discriminatory roles, while Fringe Benefits factor did not have.

  13. Administrational Factors as Predictors of Teacher Burnout across Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at measuring the perceived burnout levels of Iranian (N= 230 and Turkish (N=156 EFL teachers and determining the role of four administrational factors (i.e., Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, Fairness, and Fringe Benefits in predicting EE, DP and PA burnout processes across Iranian and Turkish EFL teachers. The MBI-ES was used to measure the perceived burnout levels of the participants, and a four-dimension scale (41 items was developed based on the literature study to measure the participants’ perceptions in these four areas. The average internal consistency reliability of the 41-item scale was r = 0.703. The results of t-tests analyses showed that there was a slight significant difference between Iranian and Turkish groups only in EE burnout processes. Moreover, the results of regression analyses showed that EE, DP, and PA subscales were better predicted by Fairness factor among Iranian teachers, while by Teacher Autonomy among Turkish teachers. Finally, the contrasted results also revealed that Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, and Fairness factors had cross-culturally discriminatory roles, while Fringe Benefits factor did not have.

  14. Lost at Sea: Summary Results of a Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Teacher Induction and Implications for Administrative Practice

    Shockley, Robert; Watlington, Eliah; Felsher, Rivka

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes a qualitative meta-analysis of the empirical research on the effectiveness of teacher induction programs over the last decade for the purpose of identifying the essential elements that make them effective in reducing teacher attrition. The study used Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as the theoretical framework for…

  15. Lost at Sea: Summary Results of a Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Teacher Induction and Implications for Administrative Practice

    Shockley, Robert; Watlington, Eliah; Felsher, Rivka

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes a qualitative meta-analysis of the empirical research on the effectiveness of teacher induction programs over the last decade for the purpose of identifying the essential elements that make them effective in reducing teacher attrition. The study used Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as the theoretical framework for


  16. Opportunities and Challenges in Training Elementary School Teachers in Classroom Management: Initial Results from Classroom Management in Action, an Online Professional Development Program

    Marquez, Brion; Vincent, Claudia; Marquez, Jessie; Pennefather, Jordan; Smolkowski, Keith; Sprague, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Classroom management remains a challenge for many teachers. The approach and delivery of professional development (PD) in classroom management may determine how well teachers are able to apply evidence-based approaches in their classrooms. We use existing literature to identify the key features that make in-service PD effective and present them as


  17. Extent of Burnout among Teachers of Vocational Agriculture in Ohio.

    Newcomb, L. H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 322 Ohio vocational agriculture teachers measured and analyzed teacher burnout, job satisfaction, and coping ability. The percentage of teachers in the high burnout category revealed a need for better support systems and education about coping. (CH)

  18. Mathematics teacher candidates’ evaluations of teaching and learning process in faculty of education

    Sava? Ba?türk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher has an important role in the formation of subjects that society needs. Therefore teacher training programs should be continuously reviewed and improved to have well-trained teachers. This study aimed to investigate master's non-thesis program in education faculty according to student teachers' opinions. A questionnaire included one open-ended question was administered to 36 student teachers in Secondary School Mathematics Education. Data were examined and qualitatively analyzed for the common themes by means of qualitative analysis software. The results revealed that while relations between student teachers and lecturers were considered as positive by student teachers, there were some problems in courses, courses' organizations and given homework.

  19. Regression analysis exploring teacher impact on student FCI post scores

    Mahadeo, Jonathan V.; Manthey, Seth R.; Brewe, Eric

    2013-01-01

    High School Modeling Workshops are designed to improve high school physics teachers' understanding of physics and how to teach using the Modeling method. The basic assumption is that the teacher plays a critical role in their students' physics education. This study investigated teacher impacts on students' Force Concept Inventory scores, (FCI), with the hopes of identifying quantitative differences between teachers. This study examined student FCI scores from 18 teachers with at least a year of teaching high school physics. This data was then evaluated using a General Linear Model (GLM), which allowed for a regression equation to be fitted to the data. This regression equation was used to predict student post FCI scores, based on: teacher ID, student pre FCI score, gender, and representation. The results show 12 out of 18 teachers significantly impact their student post FCI scores. The GLM further revealed that of the 12 teachers only five have a positive impact on student post FCI scores. Given these differences among teachers it is our intention to extend our analysis to investigate pedagogical differences between them.

  20. Model of the Research Master Program: Results of Testing the New Modules of Basic Educational Programs in the Moscow City Teacher Training University

    Vesmanov S.V.,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of testing new modules of basic educational master programs at the Moscow City Teacher Training University. The authors present quantitative and qualitative test characteristics of the modules of research master program, the formation of competencies as units of meaningful activities. The additions to working curricula of disciplines, practices and research were lit in the form of specified learning outcomes in four groups of competencies developed in the framework in the research master’s. The changes in the Federal State Educational Standard for Higher Education of the training direction # 44.04.01 «Pedagogical education» and «Order of organization and implementation of educational activity on bachelor, specialty, and master educational programs of higher education» are proposed. According to the testing results authors carried out correction of new modules of the research master's and a number of the measures directed on increase of efficiency educational programs implemented in the research master’s

  1. Internationally Educated Teachers and Student Teachers in Iceland: Two Qualitative Studies

    Ragnarsdottir, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    This article draws upon two qualitative studies with internationally educated teachers and teacher assistants in preschools in Iceland as well as ethnic minority student teachers at the Iceland University of Education. The common research question in both studies is whether the experiences of these teachers reveal barriers to integration within…

  2. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

  3. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious


  4. If you pay peanuts, do you get monkeys? Paying teachers 10 per cent more results in 5-10 per cent higher pupil performance

    Dolton, Peter; Marcenaro-Gutierrez, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    It is no secret that higher teacher quality translates into higher educational outcomes, but how can the UK attract the best and brightest to the profession? Peter Dolton and Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez examine the enormous variation in teachers’ pay across OECD countries and find evidence that if teachers are better paid and higher up the national income distribution, there is likely to be an improvement in pupil performance.

  5. Science teachers’ conceptions of nature of science: The case of Bangladesh

    Md. Mahbub Alam SARKAR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored Bangladeshi science teachers’ conceptions of nature of science (NOS with a particular focus on the nature of (a scientific knowledge, (b scientific inquiry and (c scientific enterprise. The tentative, inferential, subjective and creative NOS, in addition to the myths of the scientific method and experimentation, the nature of scientific laws and theories, the social and cultural embeddedness, and cooperation and collaboration in science were considered in the conceptual framework. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected concurrently using the Myths of Science Questionnaire (MOSQ from 145 science teachers. Results showed that the majority of the teachers in this study held uninformed conceptions about most of the target NOS aspects. Also, an inconsistent response pattern was revealed in teachers’ response to the aspects directly related NOS. The results suggest that further research is required to better understand how Bangladeshi teachers model NOS in their classes and how the pedagogies of teacher education inform this modelling.

  6. The Effects of Transformational Leadership and the Sense of Calling on Job Burnout among Special Education Teachers

    Gong, Tao; Zimmerli, Laurie; Hoffer, Harry E.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transformational leadership of supervisors and the sense of calling on job burnout among special education teachers. A total of 256 special education teachers completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and rated their supervisors on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. The results reveal that transformational…

  7. The Effects of Transformational Leadership and the Sense of Calling on Job Burnout among Special Education Teachers

    Gong, Tao; Zimmerli, Laurie; Hoffer, Harry E.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transformational leadership of supervisors and the sense of calling on job burnout among special education teachers. A total of 256 special education teachers completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and rated their supervisors on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. The results reveal that transformational


  8. University Teachers' Job Dissatisfaction: Application of Two-Factor Theory--A Case of Pakistani Education System

    Mir, Imran Anwar

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study presents the reasons of teachers' job dissatisfaction in the government educational institutes in Pakistan. This case study is based on the two factor theory of Herzberg. The results of this case study reveal four core factors that cause job dissatisfaction among teachers in the public sector universities in developing…

  9. University Teachers' Job Dissatisfaction: Application of Two-Factor Theory--A Case of Pakistani Education System

    Mir, Imran Anwar

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study presents the reasons of teachers' job dissatisfaction in the government educational institutes in Pakistan. This case study is based on the two factor theory of Herzberg. The results of this case study reveal four core factors that cause job dissatisfaction among teachers in the public sector universities in developing


  10. Teachers who bully students: a hidden trauma

    Twemlow, S. W.; Fonagy, P.; Sacco, F. C.; Brethour, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The study examined teachers' perceptions of bullying by other teachers to see what causes and characteristics were attributed to such bullying teachers, and how often teachers were themselves bullied by students.Method: 116 teachers from seven elementary schools completed an anonymous questionnaire reflecting their feelings and perceptions about their own experiences of bullying, and how they perceive colleagues over the years.Results: Results confirmed that teachers who experience...

  11. New emerging results on molecular gas, stars, and dust at z~2, as revealed by low star formation rate and low stellar mass star-forming galaxies

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel; Combes, Francoise; Egami, Eiichi; Swinbank, Mark; Richard, Johan; Sklias, Panos; Rawle, Tim D.

    2015-08-01

    The large surveys of main sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z~2, made at near-IR and mm wavelengths, have revolutionized our picture of galaxies at this critical epoch, where the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density is at its peak and the stellar mass (Ms) assembly is rapid. They reveal that ~70% of SFGs are young, rotation dominated disk-like systems, yet dynamically hotter and geometrically thicker than local spirals, with larger molecular gas fractions (fgas).It is time to refine this modern picture of z~2 galaxies by extending the current studies toward the more numerous and typical SFGs, characterized by SFRcompilation of CO-detected SFGs at z>1 from the literature, and allow us to revisit and propose new correlations between IR and CO luminosities, molecular gas, stellar and dust masses, specific SFR, molecular gas depletion timescales (tdepl), fgas, dust-to-gas ratios, and redshift, to be directly compared with galaxy evolution models.We find an increase of tdepl with Ms, as now revealed by low-Ms SFGs at z>1 and also observed at z=0, which contrasts with the acknowledged constant tdepl in "bathtub" models and refutes the linearity of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. A steady increase of fgas with redshift is predicted by cosmological models and is observed from z~0 to z~1.5, but is followed by a mild increase toward higher redshifts, which we further confirm with our highest redshift CO measurement in an SFR* galaxy at z=3.6. We provide the first fgas measure in z>1 SFGs at the low-Ms end 109.4

  12. Revealing Interactions between Human Resources, Quality of Life and Environmental Changes within Socially-oriented Observations : Results from the IPY PPS Arctic Project in the Russian North

    Vlasova, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    Socially-oriented Observations (SOO) in the Russian North have been carried out within multidisciplinary IPY PPS Arctic project under the leadership of Norway and supported by the Research Council of Norway as well as Russian Academy of Sciences. The main objective of SOO is to increase knowledge and observation of changes in quality of life conditions (state of natural environment including climate and biota, safe drinking water and foods, well-being, employment, social relations, access to health care and high quality education, etc.) and - to reveal trends in human capital and capacities (health, demography, education, creativity, spiritual-cultural characteristics and diversity, participation in decision making, etc.). SOO have been carried out in industrial cities as well as sparsely populated rural and nature protection areas in observation sites situated in different bioms (from coastal tundra to southern taiga zone) of Murmansk, Arkhangelsk Oblast and Republic of Komi. SOO were conducted according to the international protocol included in PPS Arctic Manual. SOO approaches based both on local people's perceptions and statistics help to identify main issues and targets for life quality, human capital and environment improvement and thus to distinguish leading SOO indicators for further monitoring. SOO have revealed close interaction between human resources, quality of life and environmental changes. Negative changes in human capital (depopulation, increasing unemployment, aging, declining physical and mental health, quality of education, loss of traditional knowledge, marginalization etc.), despite peoples' high creativity and optimism are becoming the major driving force effecting both the quality of life and the state of environment and overall sustainability. Human induced disturbances such as uncontrolled forests cuttings and poaching are increasing. Observed rapid changes in climate and biota (ice and permafrost melting, tundra shrubs getting taller and more numerous, etc.) have become an add factor in accelerating or influencing land use and overall sustainability. In relation to the future sustainability in nature and society it is northern communities, their adaptive capacities and creativity that are decisive. SOO enables to identify and monitor the implementation of local strategies that will stimulate the human capital improvement and act not only as the agent of economic modernization but as an important solutions for better state of environment and society.

  13. Teaching How Language Reveals Character

    Metzger, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this Voices Inside Schools essay, a veteran teacher shares her reflections on a classroom unit entitled "How Language Reveals Character." The goal of the unit is to help adolescents read and write critically through an exploration of literary characters' language. Beginning by drawing on adolescents' fascination with one another, Metzger first…

  14. The Atlas-3D project - IX. The merger origin of a fast and a slow rotating Early-Type Galaxy revealed with deep optical imaging: first results

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Serra, Paolo; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Ferriere, Etienne; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    The mass assembly of galaxies leaves imprints in their outskirts, such as shells and tidal tails. The frequency and properties of such fine structures depend on the main acting mechanisms - secular evolution, minor or major mergers - and on the age of the last substantial accretion event. We use this to constrain the mass assembly history of two apparently relaxed nearby Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) selected from the Atlas-3D sample, NGC 680 and NGC 5557. Our ultra deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope reach 29 mag/arcsec^2 in the g-band. They reveal very low-surface brightness (LSB) filamentary structures around these ellipticals. Among them, a gigantic 160 kpc long tail East of NGC 5557 hosts gas-rich star-forming objects. NGC 680 exhibits two major diffuse plumes apparently connected to extended HI tails, as well as a series of arcs and shells. Comparing the outer stellar and gaseous morphology of the two ellipticals with that predicted from models of colliding galax...

  15. Revealing pre-earthquake signatures in atmosphere and ionosphere associated with 2015 M7.8 and M7.3 events in Nepal. Preliminary results

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Davidenko, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We analyze retrospectively/prospectively the transient variations of three different physical parameters of atmosphere during the time of M7.8 and M7.3 events in Nepal: outgoing earth radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC and the thermodynamic proprieties in the lower atmosphere. We found that in mid March 2015 a rapid augment of satellite observed earth radiation in atmosphere and the anomaly located in close vicinity to the future M7.8 epicenter reached the maximum on April 21-22. Our continuous satellite analysis revealed prospectively the new strong anomaly on May 3th, which was the reason to contemplate another large event in the area. On May 12, 2015 a large aftershock of M7.3 occurred. The analysis of air temperature from weather ground station near Katmandu shows analogous patterns with offset 1-2 days earlier to the satellite anomalies. The GPS/TEC data analysis indicates an augment and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value during April 22-24 period. A strong negative TEC anomaly in the crest of ...

  16. Preservice and inservice teachers' knowledge of language constructs in Finland.

    Aro, Mikko; Björn, Piia Maria

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the Finnish preservice and inservice teachers' knowledge of language constructs relevant for literacy acquisition. A total of 150 preservice teachers and 74 inservice teachers participated in the study by filling out a questionnaire that assessed self-perceived expertise in reading instruction, knowledge of phonology and phonics, and knowledge of morphology. The inservice teachers outperformed the preservice teachers in knowledge of phonology and phonics, as well as morphology. Both groups' knowledge of morphology was markedly lower than their knowledge of phonology and phonics. Because early reading instruction does not focus on the morphological level of language but is phonics-based, this result was expected. However, the findings also revealed a lack of explicit knowledge of basic phonological constructs and less-than-optimal phonemic awareness skills in both groups. Problems in phonemic skills manifested mostly as responding to the phonological tasks based on orthographic knowledge, which reflects an overreliance on the one-to-one correspondence between graphemes and phonemes. The preservice teachers' perceptions of expertise were weakly related to their knowledge and skills. Among the inservice teachers, perceived expertise and knowledge of language constructs were completely unrelated. Although the study was exploratory, these findings suggest that within the Finnish teacher education there is a need to focus more on explicit content studies for language structures and the concepts relevant for literacy instruction, as well as phonological and phonemic skills. PMID:26637487

  17. Views of elementary school teachers towards students with cochlear implants inclusion in the process of education.

    Dulcić, Adinda; Bakota, Koraljka

    2009-06-01

    The paper reveals views of teachers in some regular elementary schools in the Republic of Croatia where students with cochlear implants, who are also rehabilitants of SUVAG Polyclinic, are educated. Survey aimed to research the views of teachers towards education. Survey included 98 teachers. Likert type scale was applied in order to identify the views of teachers towards students with hearing impairment. The survey was carried out in May 2007. Data were processed by SPSS for Windows program, version 13. Methods of descriptive statistics were applied to process frequencies of responds on variables for total sample and 3 statistically significant factors emerged by factor analysis. Results of this survey reveal that teachers have positive views towards inclusive education as a process which offers students with cochlear implants the possibility to socialize and achieve intellectual and emotional development. The survey suggests that the way of inclusion enforcement mostly satisfies the criteria specified for successful inclusion. PMID:19662769

  18. Choice and control in a museal environment: a study with science teachers

    Charles Tiago dos Santos Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand teachers’ strategies of planning students’ visits to science museums and how they intend to relate this visit to formal science teaching. The study was conducted with 21 teachers of Science, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, randomly identified among visitors to a science museum, who were accompanying their students. Interviews and written records of teachers about teachers strategies were analyzed using the textual discursive analysis revealed five levels of control (or choice adopted by teachers for planning and tracking of students' visits to the museum. The results showed that most teachers surveyed use control elements, requesting notes for reports to be retrieved in school. The evaluation mechanisms planned by teachers after the visit showed an intention for preserving and contextualization of the museum experience in other contexts, like in school.

  19. "The Kids Keep Me Fresh!" Results of a Follow-Up Survey of Graduates from Two Special Education Teacher Education Programs Who Are Teaching.

    Nevin, Ann; Thousand, Jacqueline; Parsons, A. Sandy; Lilly, M. Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Assessed the extent to which special education teacher education program graduates applied instructional methods they had learned to the classroom. Survey, observation, and interview data highlighted seven themes: commitment to student success; strategies for successfully teaching all students; knowledge of legal supports; active searching for


  20. Impacting Teachers' Understanding of Geometric Similarity: Results from Field Testing of the Learning and Teaching Geometry Professional Development Materials

    Seago, Nanette M.; Jacobs, Jennifer K.; Heck, Daniel J.; Nelson, Courtney L.; Malzahn, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the Learning and Teaching Geometry project is to build professional development materials that provide opportunities for teachers to learn about mathematical similarity through the use of videocases, in which specific and increasingly complex mathematical ideas are presented within the dynamics of classroom practice. The central


  1. Deriving Instructional Objectives for Teacher Corps Training Programs.

    Higgins, Norman; Rabe, Bonnie

    The collaborative procedures used to derive the instructional objectives for Arizona State University's Teacher Corps training programs for inservice teachers, preservice teachers, and teacher aides were time consuming and costly, but have resulted in increased respect and better working relationships between teachers, parents, and teacher…

  2. Considering science and language arts connections: A study of teacher cognition

    Baker, Linda; Saul, Wendy

    The Elementary Science Integration Project (ESIP) brought together teachers knowledgeable about, and committed to, whole-language instruction with their science-oriented counterparts to explore connections between the disciplines and build from teachers' strengths. By recognizing commonalities, that both hands-on science and whole language center on inquiry and focus on children's learning processes, ESIP was designed to reveal the issues both groups of teachers see as important as they go about making classroom decisions. The ultimate goal of the project was to promote science as central to cross-curricular study, thus increasing the comfort level of teachers, the amount of time devoted to science in the classroom, and an interest in inquiry. This article described the project and identified the considerations teachers used to evaluate science-language-arts connections. Twenty expert and 7 novice teachers worked together over a 2-year period to construct and elaborate their own understandings of curricular integrĂĄtion, designing action research projects to explore their newfound understandings. Teachers kept journals and participated in extensive group discussions and interviews that provided the data sources for this article. Results revealed the influence of teachers' scholarly and pedagogical orientations on the way they think about science-language-arts connections and the influence of personal experiences in convincing teachers that science-language-arts connections are worth fostering in the classroom.

  3. Rural Elementary School Teachers' Technology Integration

    Howley, Aimee; Wood, Lawrence; Hough, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Based on survey responses from more than 500 third-grade teachers, this study addressed three research questions relating to technology integration and its impact in rural elementary schools. The first analyses compared rural with non-rural teachers, revealing that the rural teachers had more positive attitudes toward technology integration. Then…

  4. Rural Elementary School Teachers' Technology Integration

    Howley, Aimee; Wood, Lawrence; Hough, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Based on survey responses from more than 500 third-grade teachers, this study addressed three research questions relating to technology integration and its impact in rural elementary schools. The first analyses compared rural with non-rural teachers, revealing that the rural teachers had more positive attitudes toward technology integration. Then


  5. How Well Elementary Teachers Identify Parallelogram?

    Duatepe-Paksu, Asuman; Iymen, Esra; Pakmak, Gul Sinem

    2012-01-01

    This report summarises a study examining preservice elementary teachers' geometry content knowledge with a focus on parallelogram. It was a descriptive study examining 45 preservice teachers' reasoning in the process of determining which quadrilateral can be classified as a parallelogram. Findings have revealed that these elementary teachers do


  6. Synthesis of Research on Teachers' Questioning.

    Gall, Meredith

    1984-01-01

    Reseach on use of questioning in classroom teaching reveals that recitation is a poor method, but teachers use it anyway because it is effective in teaching curriculum that is largely textbook based. Teacher educators may be advised to help teachers learn to use recitation well. (MD)

  7. How Malaysian School Teachers View Professional Development?

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Nimehchisalem, Vahid; Hajimohammadi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted on a group of Malaysian Math and Science teachers to investigate their needs in the professional development activities. The findings indicated a majority of these teachers' needs for such activities. Analysis of the data also revealed that most of the teachers regarded these activities as moderately or highly…

  8. Teacher Induction: Implications for Physical Education Teacher Development and Retention

    Banville, Dominique; Rikard, G. Linda

    2009-01-01

    Data show that 46% of all teachers in public schools will leave the profession within their first 5 years of teaching (Ingersoll, 2003). These data refer to teachers from all disciplines including physical education. To address these problems school districts have developed teacher induction programs that show promising results. Our literature


  9. African-American English: Teacher Beliefs, Teacher Needs and Teacher Preparation Programs

    Gupta, Abha

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate elementary school teachers' self-perceived beliefs regarding African-American English (AAE), and their professional preparedness to address linguistic needs of AA students in the classrooms. The findings revealed three central issues: (1) teachers had limited understanding of the linguistic


  10. Toxic pyrene metabolism in Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK results in the expression of mammalian cell entry genes as revealed by transcriptomics study.

    Badejo, Abimbola Comfort; Chung, Won Hyong; Kim, Nam Shin; Kim, Se Kye; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Hyo Joon; Chai, Young Gyu

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK is a bacterial strain under study for its bioremediation use on heavy hydrocarbon pollutants in the environment. During the course of our study, mammalian cell entry (mce) genes, known to facilitate pathogenicity in M. tuberculosis, were highly expressed during a comparative and substrate-related cultural global transcriptomic study. RNA sequencing of the global transcriptome of the test strain in two different substrates, pyrene and glucose, showed high expression of the mce genes based on the differential results. After validating the expression of these genes with quantitative real-time PCR, we arrived at the conclusion that the genes were expressed based on the pyrene substrate (a phytosterol compound), and sterol metabolism is said to activate the expression of the mce genes in some actinomycetes bacteria, M. gilvum PYR-GCK in this case. This study is believed to be important based on the fact that some mycobacterial strains are undergoing a continuous research as a result of their use in practical bioremediation of anthropogenic exposure of toxic organic wastes in the environment. PMID:24912554

  11. Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors and the Influence of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors on Student Motivation to Learn Science

    Littlejohn, Vania

    The National Assessment on Educational Progress signals that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete globally in an ever changing scientific society. As a result, legislation mandated that all students be assessed and show proficiency in scientific literacy beginning in Grade 4 with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002 also known as No Child Left Behind. Research indicates a disturbing decline in the number of U.S. students pursuing more rigorous science courses in high school, majoring in scientific areas in college, and choosing future careers in science. With a need to improve science instruction and enhance science literacy for all students, this study focuses on immediate communication behaviors of the classroom teacher as a deciding factor in the opinions of high school students towards science. The purpose of this study was to reveal high school science student perceptions of teacher communication patterns, both verbal and nonverbal, and how they influence their motivation to learn science. The researcher utilized a nonexperimental, quantitative research design to guide this study. Teacher and student data were collected using the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ). The Student Motivation to Learn Instrument (SMLI) across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status survey was used to evaluate student motivation in science. Participants were encouraged to be honest in reporting and sharing information concerning teacher communication behaviors. The data revealed that teacher immediacy behaviors, both verbal and nonverbal, were perceived differently in terms of student gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The results showed that teachers who display positive communication behaviors and use challenging questioning followed with positive responses create pathways to potentially powerful relationships. These relationships between teachers and students can lead to increased student motivation and academic achievement in the science classroom.

  12. The Experiences of Neophyte Teachers: A Critical Constructivist Assessment.

    Goddard, J. Tim; Foster, Rosemary Y.

    2001-01-01

    Interviewed beginning teachers to examine their experiences and the extent to which their preservice programs adequately prepared them for teaching. Results revealed six conceptual and temporal states through which they passed during their initial experiences: archetype; approaching the gates; clearing the gates; the gloss wears off;…

  13. Genetic analysis of the plantaricin EFI locus of Lactobacillus plantarum PCS20 reveals an unusual plantaricin E gene sequence as a result of mutation.

    Cho, Gyu-Sung; Huch, Melanie; Hanak, Alexander; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Franz, Charles M A P

    2010-07-31

    Lactobacillus plantarum strains produce a variety of chromosomally encoded bacteriocins and often multiple bacteriocins are encoded by a single strain. In this study, the genetic loci for bacteriocin production of L. plantarum strains BFE 5092 and PCS20 were studied. These strains were investigated for their possible application as protective cultures in food preservation. The bacteriocin locus of strain BFE 5092 showed remarkable similarity to the plantaricin loci previously described for L. plantarum strains C11 and WCFS1. However, the locus of the L. plantarum PCS20 strain was unusual in that it showed an interesting mutation as a result of deletions within the plnE gene. These deletions led to a hypothetically produced peptide which is 2 amino acids shorter than plantaricin E. Furthermore, it differs by 24 amino acids, while it shares 30 identical amino acids i.e., 15 at the amino end and 15 at the carboxyl end of the hypothetical peptide. As a consequence, the amino acid sequence is changed such that a double-glycine-type leader peptide would not be encoded. This raises the question whether a functional peptide is being produced, even though RT-PCR studies showed that the plnE gene is obviously expressed. Furthermore, a transposase gene was located upstream of the plnEFI gene cluster and was inserted into a bacteriocin regulatory gene, the histidine protein kinase gene. Taken together, these facts indicate a loss of plantaricin gene function in L. plantarum PCS20 as a result of transposition and mutation. PMID:20303195

  14. Teachers' teaching practices and beliefs regarding context-based tasks and their relation with students' difficulties in solving these tasks

    Wijaya, Ariyadi; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Doorman, Michiel

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated teachers' teaching practices and their underlying beliefs regarding context-based tasks to find a possible explanation for students' difficulties with these tasks. The research started by surveying 27 Junior High School teachers from seven schools in Indonesia through a written questionnaire. Then, to further examine teachers' teaching practices related to context-based tasks, four teachers were observed and video recorded in two mathematics lessons in which they were asked to deal with context-based tasks. The questionnaire data revealed that the teachers had a tendency toward a view on teaching and learning mathematics which includes encouraging students to be actively involved in solving problems in various contexts. Although this finding suggests that the teachers may offer opportunities to learn context-based tasks to students, the questionnaire data also revealed that the teachers saw context-based tasks as plain word problems. Furthermore, the observations disclosed that their teaching was mainly teacher-centered and directive, which is not considered to be supportive for learning to solve context-based tasks. Combining the findings of this study with the results from our earlier study on Indonesian students' errors when solving context-based tasks, we found a relationship between how Indonesian teachers teach context-based tasks and the errors Indonesian students make in solving these tasks. These findings support the conclusion that insufficient opportunity-to-learn to solve context-based tasks offered by teachers is a possible explanation for students' difficulties in solving these tasks.

  15. The Changing Distribution of Teacher Qualifications Across Schools: A Statewide Perspective Post-NCLB

    Karen J. DeAngelis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of recent policy initiatives, including NCLB's highly qualified teacher provisions, have sought to improve the qualifications of teachers and their distribution across schools. Little is known, however, about the impact of these policies. In this study, we use population data on teachers and schools in Illinois to examine changes in the level and distribution of teacher qualifications from 2001 to 2006. We find that schools in Chicago, especially those serving the highest percentages of low-income and minority students, experienced the greatest improvements in teacher qualifications during the period. In addition, high-poverty schools in most other locales in the state registered small to moderate improvements, which narrowed the gap in teacher qualifications between high- and low-poverty schools across Illinois. Improvements in the certification status of experienced teachers and the recruitment of new teachers with stronger academic qualifications both contributed to these gains. The results reveal a tradeoff for disadvantaged schools seeking to improve both teacher qualifications and teacher experience levels, thereby calling into question the near-term feasibility of NCLB provisions that aim to simultaneously eliminate inequities across schools in both.       

  16. Teacher beliefs and practices of grammar teaching: focusing on meaning, form, or forms?

    Hacer Hande Uysal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide curriculum innovations to teach English through meaning-focused communicative approaches over the years, studies report that most language teachers still follow transmission-based grammar-oriented approaches. It is known that the success of any curriculum innovation is dependent on teachers. Therefore, given that teaching grammar has always been a central, but problematic domain for language teachers, what teachers believe and do regarding grammar instruction is an important issue that needs to be investigated. However, studies that research teachers and their grammar teaching are rare, and almost non-existent at the elementary-level English teaching contexts. Therefore, through a questionnaire given to 108 teachers and afocus-group interview, the present study investigated Turkish primary-level English language teachers' beliefs and practice patterns of teaching grammar, and the reasons behind these patterns. The results revealed that teachers predominantly prefer the traditional focus-on-formS approach, which indicates a serious clash with teachers and curriculum goals, on the one hand, and theoretical suggestions on the other. The paper ends with discussions and suggestions for teacher education and language policy-making.

  17. Impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers on NHS registered conceptions and terminations: final results of cluster randomised trial

    Henderson, M; Wight, D.; Raab, G M; Abraham, C; Parkes, A.; Scott, S; Hart, G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers compared with conventional education in terms of conceptions and terminations registered by the NHS.Design Follow-up of cluster randomised trial 4.5 years after intervention.Setting NHS records of women who had attended 25 secondary schools in east Scotland.Participants 4196 women (99.5% of those eligible) Intervention SHARE programme (intervention group) v existing sex education (con...

  18. Impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers on NHS registered conceptions and terminations: final results of cluster randomised trial

    Wright, D.; Raab, G.M.; Abraham, C; Scott, S.; Hart, G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers compared with conventional education in terms of conceptions and terminations registered by the NHS. Design Follow-up of cluster randomised trial 4.5 years after intervention. Setting: NHS records of women who had attended 25 secondary schools in east Scotland. Participants: 4196 women (99.5% of those eligible). Intervention: SHARE programme (intervention group) v ...

  19. Comparison of experimental fine-mapping to in silico prediction results of HIV-1 epitopes reveals ongoing need for mapping experiments

    Roider, Julia; Meissner, Tim; Kraut, Franziska; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Stirner, Renate; Bogner, Johannes R; Draenert, Rika

    2014-01-01

    Methods for identifying physiologically relevant CD8 T-cell epitopes are critically important not only for the development of T-cell-based vaccines but also for understanding host–pathogen interactions. As experimentally mapping an optimal CD8 T-cell epitope is a tedious procedure, many bioinformatic tools have been developed that predict which peptides bind to a given MHC molecule. We assessed the ability of the CD8 T-cell epitope prediction tools syfpeithi, ctlpred and iedb to foretell nine experimentally mapped optimal HIV-specific epitopes. Randomly – for any of the subjects' HLA type and with any matching score – the optimal epitope was predicted in seven of nine epitopes using syfpeithi, in three of nine epitopes using ctlpred and in all nine of nine epitopes using iedb. The optimal epitope within the three highest ranks was given in four of nine epitopes applying syfpeithi, in two of nine epitopes applying ctlpred and in seven of nine epitopes applying iedb when screening for all of the subjects' HLA types. Knowing the HLA restriction of the peptide of interest improved the ranking of the optimal epitope within the predicted results. Epitopes restricted by common HLA alleles were more likely to be predicted than those restricted by uncommon HLA alleles. Epitopes with aberrant lengths compared with the usual HLA-class I nonamers were most likely not predicted. Application of epitope prediction tools together with literature searches for already described optimal epitopes narrows down the possibilities of optimal epitopes within a screening peptide of interest. However, in our opinion, the actual fine-mapping of a CD8 T-cell epitope cannot yet be replaced. PMID:24724694

  20. Evaluating Teacher-Candidates’ Teaching in the Extended Practicum

    Brian W. Noonan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the aggregate results of the evaluations of the teaching performance of 17 cohorts of teacher-candidates (n = 374, who completed their extended practicum during their pre-service teacher-education program at one Western Canadian university. Over a 15-year period, one of the researchers served as the College Supervisor for these cohorts in their respective four-month internship in schools in a variety of locations throughout the province. The teacher-candidates’ final evaluations on nine categories of teaching performance revealed varying levels of strength among the skill areas. Implications of the findings are drawn: (a for the undergraduate program administrators, faculty members, and practicum-program personnel at the university connected to this study, and (b for other teacher-education institutions interested in making use of this information to help inform their deliberations in assessing/improving their own pre-service and practicum initiatives.

  1. Teacher Support Resources, Need Satisfaction and Well-Being.

    Doménech-Betoret, Fernando; Lloret-Segura, Susana; Gómez-Artiga, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Based on Job Demands-Resources Model (JD-R), this study examines the relationships among teacher support resources, psychological need satisfaction, engagement and burnout in a sample of 282 Spanish secondary school teachers. Nine teacher psychological needs were identified based on the study of Bess and on the Self-Determination Theory (SDT). Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the constructs selected for this study and their interrelationships were examined by structural equation modeling. The results reveal a good model fit to the data (NNFI = .88; CFI = .90; GFI = .90; RMSEA = .061). The analyses indicate a positive and significant effect of latent variable Psychological Need Satisfaction on engagement (ÎČ = .74, p Satisfaction in the relationship between teacher support resources and both engagement and burnout (additional paths did not improve the model fit: Δχ2(2) = 2.428, p = .29). Finally, practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26055095

  2. Training the novice teacher in the Pedagogy Department of Education of the University of the Andes, Tachira

    Mireya Vivas de ChacĂłn

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a case study whose objective was to describe the process of training first-year college teachers. The information was collected through in-depth interviews. In the context investigated, the novice teachers do not get enough institutional support in their new jobs and develop their work alone, since they do not carry on research or learn to teach alongside more-experienced teachers. The new teachers said they felt nervous, insecure, rejected, distressed, alone and disoriented. The results of this study reveal a disparity between what is demanded by the rules established for the training of new university teachers, and what actually happens in the departments. This is because training plans are not carried out, and training is considered to be the responsibility of the novice teacher. Finally, recommendations are made for the development of a training policy for new faculty members.

  3. Changing Teachers.

    Berlin, Barney M.; Jensen, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Discussions of ways that teachers should change emphasize the need for a better curriculum, instructional method, or organization for learning that will improve student outcomes. However, models of teacher change recognize that teachers must "buy into" the change or school improvement process. (MW)

  4. Teacher Evaluation

    Tolefat, Saleh

    1987-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is considered to be a significant issue in education. However, the quality of educational output depends heavily on the quality of the teacher. Therefore, this paper focuses on several factors such as Evaluation Techniques, Evaluative Team, Teacher Competence and so forth.

  5. Educating Pre-Primary Teachers to Teach for Multiple Intelligences

    Cheung, Kwok Cheung

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents experiences of in-service teacher education in Macao which seeks to educate preprimary teachers to teach for multiple intelligences. A thematic topic unit designed by a group of teachers is included to reveal what teachers can do to achieve the ideal of individually configured education. Argument: This paper starts…

  6. How revealing is revealed preference?

    Blundell, R.

    2005-01-01

    This lecture address the following two key criticisms of the empirical application of revealed preference theory: When the RP conditions do not reject, they do not provide precise predictions; and when they do reject, they do not help characterize the nature of irrationality or the degree/direction of changing tastes. Recent developments in the application of RP theory are shown to have rendered these criticisms unfounded. A powerful test of rationality is available that also provides a natur...

  7. Factors influencing exemplary science teachers' levels of computer use

    Hakverdi, Meral

    This study examines exemplary science teachers' use of technology in science instruction, factors influencing their level of computer use, their level of knowledge/skills in using specific computer applications for science instruction, their use of computer-related applications/tools during their instruction, and their students' use of computer applications/tools in or for their science class. After a relevant review of the literature certain variables were selected for analysis. These variables included personal self-efficacy in teaching with computers, outcome expectancy, pupil-control ideology, level of computer use, age, gender, teaching experience, personal computer use, professional computer use and science teachers' level of knowledge/skills in using specific computer applications for science instruction. The sample for this study includes middle and high school science teachers who received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching Award (sponsored by the White House and the National Science Foundation) between the years 1997 and 2003 from all 50 states and U.S. territories. Award-winning science teachers were contacted about the survey via e-mail or letter with an enclosed return envelope. Of the 334 award-winning science teachers, usable responses were received from 92 science teachers, which made a response rate of 27.5%. Analysis of the survey responses indicated that exemplary science teachers have a variety of knowledge/skills in using computer related applications/tools. The most commonly used computer applications/tools are information retrieval via the Internet, presentation tools, online communication, digital cameras, and data collection probes. Results of the study revealed that students' use of technology in their science classroom is highly correlated with the frequency of their science teachers' use of computer applications/tools. The results of the multiple regression analysis revealed that personal self-efficacy related to the exemplary science teachers' level of computer use suggesting that computer use is dependent on perceived abilities at using computers. The teachers' use of computer-related applications/tools during class, and their personal self-efficacy, age, and gender are highly related with their level of knowledge/skills in using specific computer applications for science instruction. The teachers' level of knowledge/skills in using specific computer applications for science instruction and gender related to their use of computer-related applications/tools during class and the students' use of computer-related applications/tools in or for their science class. In conclusion, exemplary science teachers need assistance in learning and using computer-related applications/tool in their science class.

  8. The Role of Teacher and Faculty Trust in Forming Teachers' Job Satisfaction: Do Years of Experience Make a Difference?

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    This study relates trust at the level of both the teacher and the faculty to teachers' job satisfaction. Teaching experience is explored as a moderator of the trust-satisfaction relationship. Multilevel analyses on data of 2091 teachers across 80 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) revealed positive associations between teacher trust in


  9. Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development

    Bertram, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments focus on the benefits scientists received from networking with K-12 teachers. The classroom lessons resulting from STEP have been so popular among teachers, the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development recently contracted with the PI to create a website that will make the STEP database open to teachers across Alaska. When the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development launched the new website in August 2011, the name of the STEP program was changed to the Alaska K-12 Science Curricular Initiative (AKSCI). The STEP courses serving as the foundation to the new AKSCI site are located under the "History" tab of the new website.

  10. Autonomy and self-determination theory in different contexts: A comparison of middle school science teachers' motivation and instruction in China and the United States

    Robertson, Laura Elizabeth

    This study examined factors that contribute to Chinese and United States middle school science teachers' perceptions of autonomy support. Autonomy is one component of self-determination theory and has been associated with intrinsic motivation. The study used a mixed methods design including quantitative data collected through an online survey and qualitative data collected through open-ended interview questions. The online survey consisted of four assessments related to teachers' self-determination, perceptions of constraints at work, perceptions of students' self-determination, and level of autonomy support for students and allowed for the testing of the structural model developed by Pelletier, Seguin-Levesque, and Legault (2002). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of responses for the combined teacher sample (n=201) was carried out for each of the survey assessments. Significance testing for Chinese (n=107) and U.S. (n=94) teachers, based on the factors resulting from EFA, revealed significant differences in teachers' self-determination and perceptions of constraints at work. No significant differences were found for teachers' perceptions of students' self-determination or level of autonomy support for students. Multiple regression was used to predict teachers' autonomy support for students. For the Chinese teachers, perceptions of constraints at work, teachers' self-determination, and teachers' perceptions of student motivation were found to significantly predict teachers' autonomy support. For the U.S. teachers, teacher motivation was the only significant predictor of teachers' autonomy support. A sub-sample of the Chinese and U.S. science teachers (n=19) were interviewed about their perceived levels of autonomy support, constraints at work, and their students' self determination. The analyses of the interviews showed that teachers in both countries reported that autonomy was important to their motivation and the quality of instruction they provided to students. Teachers from the two countries differed in their satisfaction with current levels of autonomy and reported different constraints on teaching science related to materials, lab space, curriculum standards, and assessment.

  11. Examining two Turkish teachers' questioning patterns in secondary school science classrooms

    Cikmaz, Ali

    This study examined low and high level teachers' questioning patterns and classroom implementations within an argument-based inquiry approach known as the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach, which addresses issues on negotiation, argumentation, learning, and teaching. The level of the teachers was determined by the students' writing scores. This study was conducted in Turkey with seven teacher for preliminary study. Because scoring writing samples examines the students' negotiation level with the different sources and students learn scientific process, as negotiation, which they may transfer into their writing, in classroom, two teachers were selected to represent low and high level teachers. Data collection involved classroom observation through video recordings. The comparative qualitative method was employed throughout the data analysis process with including quantitative results. The research questions that guided the present study were: (1) How are low and high level teachers, determined according to their students' writing scores, questioning patterns different from each other during classroom discourse? (2) Is there a relationship between students' writings and teachers' questioning styles in the classroom? Analysis of Qualitative data showed that teachers' classroom implementations reveal big differences based on argumentation patterns. The high level teacher, whose students had high scores in writing samples, asked more questions and the cognitive levels of questions were higher than the low level teacher. Questions promote an argumentative environment and improve critical thinking skills by discussing different ideas and claims. Asking more questions of teacher influences students to initiate (ask questions) more and to learn the scientific process with science concepts. Implicitly, this learning may improve students' comparison in their writing. Moreover, high level teacher had a more structured and organized classroom than low level teacher.

  12. Dilemmas of reform: An exploration of science teachers' collective sensemaking of formative assessment practices

    Heredia, Sara Catherine

    Current reform efforts in science education call for significant shifts in how science is taught and learned. Teachers are important gatekeepers for reform, as they must enact these changes with students in their own classrooms. As such, professional development approaches need to be developed and studied to understand how teachers interpret and make instructional plans to implement these reforms. However, traditional approaches to studying implementation of reforms often draw on metrics such as time allotted to new activities, rather than exploring the ways in which teachers make sense of these reforms. In this dissertation I draw upon a body of work called sensemaking that has focused on locating learning in teachers' conversations in departmental work groups. I developed a conceptual and analytic framework to analyze how teachers make sense of reform given their local contexts and then used this framework to perform a case study of one group of teachers that participated in larger professional development project that examined the impact of a learning progression on science teachers' formative assessment practices. I draw upon videotapes of three years of monthly professional development meetings as my primary source of data, and used an ethnographic approach to identify dilemmas surfaced by teachers, sources of ambiguity and uncertainty, and patterns of and resources for teacher sensemaking. The case study reveals relationships between the type of dilemma surfaced by the teachers and different patterns of sensemaking for modification of teaching practices. When teachers expressed concerns about district or administrative requirements, they aligned their work in the professional development to those external forces. In contrast, teachers were able to develop and try out new practices when they perceived coherence between the professional development and school or district initiatives. These results underscore the importance of coherence between various components of teachers' work environments.

  13. Job Burnout among Iranian Elementary School Teachers of Students with Autism: a Comparative Study

    Hadi Zarafshan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Teachers often experience burnout and challenges during their active career. Different studies have shown that those directly involved with teaching children with special needs are more subject to burnout. Due to advance screening tools, more children with autism are now diagnosed and involved in special education. The aim of the present study was to investigate the professional burnout in teachers of children with autism compared to teachers of other children with special needs.Methods: Casual Comparative study design was used for this research. Three self-reported measures (Maslach Burnout Inventory, Job Descriptive Index, and General Health Questionnaire were distributed; clustered sampling selection was conducted to select participants. Ninety three female teachers (32 teachers of children with autism, 30 teachers in schools for deaf and 31 for teachers of children with mental retardation from 12 schools located in 4 districts of Tehran were selected. Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation statistical tests, analysis of variances and regression were used to analyze the results.Results: Results of the current study revealed a significant difference in criterion validity between the three groups of teachers The three groups were different in terms of general health (p=0.010, emotional exhaustion (p=0.005 and depersonalization (p<0.001; however considering other variables no significant differences were observed. Comparison between groups showed that the average scores of teachers of children with autism were significantly higher than teachers of deaf and hard of hearing and mentally retarded children in general health, fatigue, and depersonalization variables. No significant differences were observed in average scores of teachers for mentally retarded and deaf children.Conclusions: Female teachers’ of children with autism are experiencing significantly higher levels of burnout and general mental health problems compared to teachers of children with other disabilities requiring special education.

  14. An Investigation on the Relationship between Prospective Teachers' Early Teacher Identity and Their Need for Cognition

    Arpaci, Dilara; Bardakçi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the relationship between them can reveal important implications vital for classroom practice in teacher education institutions. Therefore, this study investigated the relationship between pre-service teachers' early teacher identity and their need for cognition. The research data was collected with the sample which consists of 449


  15. Teacher community in elementary charter schools.

    Marisa Cannata

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The organizational context of charter schools may facilitate the formation of a strong teacher community. In particular, a focused school mission and increased control over teacher hiring may lead to stronger teacher professional communities. This paper uses the 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey to compare the level of teacher community in charter public and traditional public schools. It also estimates the effect of various charter policy variables and domains of school autonomy on teacher community. Charter school teachers report higher levels of teacher community than traditional public school teachers do, although this effect is less than one-tenth of a standard deviation and is dwarfed by the effect of a supportive principal, teacher decision-making influence, and school size. Charter public schools authorized by universities showed lower levels of teacher community than those authorized by local school districts. Teachers in charter schools that have flexibility over tenure requirements and the school budget report higher levels of teacher community. This study reveals that charter schools do facilitate the formation of strong teacher communities, although the effect is small. The analysis also suggests that the institutional origin of the charter school and specific areas of policy flexibility may influence teacher community.

  16. Social and psychological characteristics of the class teacher interaction with students

    E.B. Petrushikhina

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the results of socio-psychological studies of classroom management, performed on the basis of a theoretical model of value exchange, developed by R.L.Krichevsky. Classroom management is understood as a kind of management activity of a teacher, aimed at organizing group of students. Factor analysis revealed two major factors of the effectiveness of classroom management: the nature of the relationship between the students and their relations to the class teacher. As teacher’s activ...

  17. DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH ABOUT FIRST AID TEACHING BY PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Ruben Navarro Patón; Víctor Arufe Giråldez; Silvia Basanta Camiño

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to know the current situation of first aid teaching at Elementary School as a Physical Education content. The research population consisted of active teachers who taught Physical Education in Elementary School, in the Lugo province schools. The sample consisted of 36 teachers (N=36). An ad hoc questionnaire with 22 questions about the interest topic was applied to obtain data. The statistical program SPSS version 20.0 was used to analyze data. The results reveal a poor use ...

  18. Personal and Job Related Predictors of Teacher Stress and Job Performance among School Teachers

    Rubina Hanif

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to find out role of personal and job related variables in teacher stress and job performance of school teachers. Furthermore, levels and sources of stress and their relationship with job performance among teachers were also explored. The measures used in this study were indigenously developed i.e., Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI-Urdu, Teachers Job Performance Scale and personal and job related Information sheet. Two independent samples were selected from Government and Private Schools of Islamabad (Pakistan. Sample I was comprised of 400 teachers (men and women from Primary and secondary schools. For the evaluation of teachers’ job performance another sample of 1200 students from the classes of teachers of sample I was selected. Three students were randomly selected from each teacher’s class. The students were requested to evaluate their respective teachers’ job performance. The findings revealed that negative significant relationship exists between teachers stress and job performance. The step-wise regression analysis revealed school system, gender, job experience, number of family members, and number of students as significant predictors of teacher stress and gender, school system, family members, job experience and age as significant predictors of teachers’ job performance.

  19. Exploratory Research on the Attitudes and Behaviors of Teachers from Chile in the Immigrant Student School Setting

    Susan Valeria Sanhueza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research assesses the opinion of elementary and high school students (n=339 on the instructional attitudes and behaviors of teachers at schools in Chile that enroll children and young foreigners. For this purpose, we used the Teacher Attitude and Behavior Towards Diversity Scale (Sanhueza, 2010, whose exploratory factor analysis groups 16 items on two factors, enabling the distinction between the teachers Attitude of Respect and their Fair Treatment towards students, including 12 items, and the Teachers Instructional Behavior, including four items. The results reveal that respondents perceived their teachers’ attitudes and behaviors largely inclusive and they greatly value the respect, careful listening and support teachers show them when they have learning difficulties. Regarding gender, there were statistically significant differences in the responses on female students’ favor, while comparing responses depending on educative stage, high school students find more inclusive attitudes and practices in their teachers.

  20. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION EFFECTS ON TEACHERS’ ACHIEVEMENT

    Naji SALEH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effects of technology integration on teachers’ achievement. The previous literature in this regard was reviewed and a sample of teachers was chosen from 7-9 grade teachers. The sample consisted of 50 teachers males and females with different years of experience and different number of training courses. The questionnaire included paragraphs about the effect of technology integration on their achievement in school and in teaching. The results showed a great effect of technology integration on teachers’ achievement. The results also showed no differences attributed to teacher’s gender and that there were differences attributed to teacher’s years of experience and number of training courses. The article shows the aspects in which the achievement of teachers was influenced by technology integration.

  1. Assessment practices of Iowa science teachers from a constructivist perspective

    Harris Freedman, Robin Lee

    How do students learn? What can they do? When assessments evolve out of instruction as is expected in inquiry and constructivist based classrooms, one can derive definitive results. It was the purpose of this study to describe the assessment environment found in the Iowa SS&C compared to those in other Iowa science classrooms. Science instruction in classrooms of Iowa SS&C teachers is based on NSES, Constructivist theory, and an STS approach. In Iowa SS&C classrooms the primary focus is to make science personal and relevant to students. Iowa science teachers were surveyed. Survey results revealed that the two groups of teachers had different perceptions regarding their grading philosophies and in the use of traditional and non-traditional assessments. The two groups were similar in their ability to identify appropriate uses for assessments and the use of a variety of assessments that make up a student's grade. Several methods were used to gain understanding of how the two teacher groups were different, i.e., in-depth interviews, a collection of assessment artifacts, and a student survey of a sub-sample of teachers. Artifact analysis revealed that the Iowa SS&C teachers used more application items, were more familiar and more likely to use non-traditional assessments, and used more assessments of higher order thinking skills than other Iowa science teachers. Student perspectives regarding assessments were surveyed. Students who completed the survey felt competent to assess themselves. Iowa SS&C students perceived that they have an active role in establishing the classroom assessment environment, share and listen to each others' ideas, and have a voice in how and by what means they are assessed. Synthesis of interview data revealed an assessment environment that reflected NSES philosophy and the STS approach. The assessment environment according to Iowa SS&C teachers was defined by teacher beliefs and practices, how teachers engage students, and internal and external influences. Variety was evident from the interview data and included such factors as: design, inquiry, application, various social configurations, and several learning styles.

  2. Teachers Attitude towards English in Batu Anam

    Mah Zhi Jian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the attitude of 60 primary and secondary school teachers towards English in Batu Anam. A questionnaire was administered to find out whether they have a positive or a negative attitude towards the English language. Results indicate that teachers in Batu Anam generally have a positive attitude towards English. Comparison between male and female teachers, optionist and non-optionist teachers and teachers from different types of schools are also analyzed.

  3. Individual Action Planning in Initial Teacher Training: A Course Review.

    Harrison, Jennifer K.; Lawson, Tony

    1997-01-01

    Survey data from 225 student teachers, 45 coordinators, and 130 tutors at Leicester University (England) revealed how Individual Action Planning helped solve logistical and instructional problems. Its effective use depended on the relationship between tutors and student teachers. (SK)

  4. THE PERCEPTIONS OF TEACHERS’ TOWARDS PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDE CONTEMPORARY TEACHERS QUALIFICATIONS

    Abdurrahman İLĞAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research in general aims to determine the relationship between teacher candidates’ attitudes towards teaching who are trained in Science and Art Faculties taking pedagogical formation and the level of importance that a contemporary teacher place on the necessary qualifications required for a teacher. In order to achieve this aim, whether overall teacher candidates’ attitudes towards teaching and the level of importance that a contemporary teacher place on the necessary qualifications required for a teacher change according to teacher candidates’ gender, age, graduation, marital status, working for a wage, graduation grade point averages, working sector, the predominant reason their taking pedagogical formation and the educational level of their parents have been investigated. This study adopted correlational research design which is survey and relational example of descriptive research. Data were collected from 269 prospective teachers by scales called “Attitudes towards Teaching (ATT” and “Contemporary Teacher Qualifications” (CTQ. The ATT included 17 items with 5-point Likert-scale responses such as: (1 Strongly disagree, (2 disagree, (3 neutral, (4 agree, (5 strongly agree. Exploratory factor analysis managed for he ATT scale revealed that KMO was .945 and Bartlett test (,000 was significant. According to this result, it can be said that the data of ATT was factorable. Factor loadings of the ATT’s items ranged from ,568 to ,87; and item-total correlation values ranged from ,514 to ,834. Due to the ATT explained 53.9% of total variance it is suitable to use ATT as a unidimensional. The ATT has an internal consistency coefficient alpha of ,86. Accordingly, it is possible to say that the ATT is valid and reliable. The CTQ included 18 items with 5-point Likert-scale responses such as: (1 Never, (2 rarely, (3 average, (4 much, (5 very much. Exploratory factor analysis managed for he CTQ scale revealed that KMO was .930 and Bartlett test (,000 was significant. According to this result, it can be said that the data of CTQ was factorable. Factor loadings of the CTQ’s items ranged from ,457 to ,739; and item-total correlation values ranged from ,402 to ,693. Due to the CTQ explained 42.1% of total variance it is suitable to use CTQ as a unidimensional. The CTQ has an internal consistency coefficient alpha of ,92. Accordingly, it is possible to say that the CTQ is valid and reliable. For demographic variables frequency and percentages and t-test was used in order to evaluate attitudes towards teaching profession according to gender, age, type of education, graduation, marital status, working for a wage. Finally, the relationship between attitudes towards teaching profession and contemporary teacher qualifications was tested by using Pearson correlation technique. The research found out that attitudes towards teaching profession did not change significantly according to teacher candidates’ gender, age, type of education, marital status, working for a regular wage but it changed according to the area of training. Accordingly, prospective teachers who have bachelor's degree in social sciences have more positive attitudes towards teaching than science and mathematics. While, teacher candidates' attitudes towards teaching did not change significantly according to undergraduate grade point average and working area, the dominant point of rationale in choosing pedagogical formation certificate program is different attitudes. Accordingly, prospective teachers who choose pedagogical formation certificate program because of having positive attitudes towards teaching profession take higher scores than those who believe this certificate provides ease of finding a job and those who prefer taking pedagogical certificate because of the pressure of family or surroundings. Prospective teachers’ emphasis on the qualifications of contemporary teachers are expected to correspond to the full level. With reference to this, prospective teachers attributing importance to the qualifications of contemporary teacher at full level. While teacher candidates attach the highest importance to the sentence of “teachers should have adequate sense of responsibility to train students”, attach least importance to the expression “teachers should be adequate in using computer technology. In order to determine the relationship between scores of teacher attitudes towards teaching and qualifications of the contemporary a positive and statistically significant relationship between these two variables was found by using Pearson correlation technique. By taking into consideration the demographic variables attitudes of teacher candidates differed in terms of field which is graduated. Prospective teachers who have graduated from departments of social sciences have higher scores. The findings contrary to this research or supporting the results of this research can be explained by the help of studies searching the attitudes of teacher candidates towards teaching profession in different years and different areas. There are differences about dominant reason to continue the pedagogical formation program. Teacher candidates who have positive attitudes towards teaching profession have higher attitude scores. This result is consistent with several studies in the literature. Majority of candidate teachers attributed high level of importance to the qualifications of contemporary teachers. There is a positive and low-level significant relationship between the scores of candidate teachers’ attitudes towards teaching and the qualifications of contemporary teachers. Hence, if the scores of attitudes towards teaching profession increase, the importance given to the qualifications of contemporary teachers increase a small amount.

  5. Teachers’ intuition and knowledge in detecting specific learning disabilities

    Obradovi? Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate primary school teachers’ proficiency in detecting the ability-achievement discrepancy as a landmark of possible specific developmental learning disabilities (SLD. Twenty-two teachers in five schools attempted to select, in accordance with their perception and out of a larger preliminary sample, those students whose school results revealed: (a discrepancy between school achievement and general abilities (the group of purportedly disharmonic children, GPD or (b concordance between general abilities and achievement (the group of purportedly harmonic children, GPH. The children were tested by REVISK, while teachers re-assessed students’ reading, writing and arithmetic performance against a simple structured questionnaire based on demands of the approved elementary school program delineated by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Serbia. Research results indicate that more than 60% of children originally qualified to GPH have actually shown significant discrepancy between targeted scholastic skills and (normal general intelligence. The data suggested some association between students’ disparity in attainment and teachers’ attribution accuracy, while the only homogenous quantitative marker of misplaced children were decreased values on some of the REVISK Verbal subscale tests. This study has shown that teachers can use their professional knowledge to enhance their capability to detect children with specific learning disabilities. In absence of criterion-referenced tests of reading, writing and mathematics, a structured approach to the projected course of skill progress might support teachers’ confidence regarding likely SLD.

  6. The Interplay between EFL High School Teachers' Beliefs and Their Instructional Practices Regarding Reading Strategies

    Mahin SALIMI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has revealed the influential role of teachers’ beliefs in determining their professional behavior; that is, the ways they plan their lessons, the kinds of decision they make, and the methods they apply in their classrooms. The present study aimed, first, to investigate the construct of teachers’ belief systems about reading strategies among EFL high school teachers, then to explore the degree of discrepancies or consistencies between teachers’ beliefs about reading strategies and their practical teaching activities in the context of English teaching as a foreign language in high schools of Iran, Mazandaran. Based on questionnaire data from 57 teachers, teachers’ beliefs and their self-reported classroom employment of reading strategies were explored. Findings indicated that teachers believe that reading strategies play an important role in reading comprehension and that it is necessary to teach reading strategies in reading classes. The results also revealed that there is inconsistency between teachers' beliefs and their self reported classroom practice.

  7. Extending TAM to Understand E-Governance Adoption by Teachers in Greece

    Karavasilis, Ioannis; Zafiropoulos, Kostas; Vrana, Vasiliki

    The study uses the Technology Acceptance Model, the Diffusion of innovation model and constructs of trust, risk and personal innovativeness in order to build a model for teachers' adoption of e-governance in Greece. Primary and secondary education teachers responded to an online survey resulting to 230 questionnaires. A SEM validation of the proposed model reveals that Personal Innovativeness, Compatibility and Relative advantage are stronger predictors of intention to use, compared to trust, and perceived risk. Even though the study offers the first piece of evidence on e-governance website adoption by teachers, the recommendations would be helpful in developing and implementing new e-governance plans.

  8. Sustaining Lesson Study: Resources and Factors that Support and Constrain Mathematics Teachers' Ability to Continue After the Grant Ends

    Druken, Bridget Kinsella

    Lesson study, a teacher-led vehicle for inquiring into teacher practice through creating, enacting, and reflecting on collaboratively designed research lessons, has been shown to improve mathematics teacher practice in the United States, such as improving knowledge about mathematics, changing teacher practice, and developing communities of teachers. Though it has been described as a sustainable form of professional development, little research exists on what might support teachers in continuing to engage in lesson study after a grant ends. This qualitative and multi-case study investigates the sustainability of lesson study as mathematics teachers engage in a district scale-up lesson study professional experience after participating in a three-year California Mathematics Science Partnership (CaMSP) grant to improve algebraic instruction. To do so, I first provide a description of material (e.g. curricular materials and time), human (attending district trainings and interacting with mathematics coaches), and social (qualities like trust, shared values, common goals, and expectations developed through relationships with others) resources present in the context of two school districts as reported by participants. I then describe practices of lesson study reported to have continued. I also report on teachers' conceptions of what it means to engage in lesson study. I conclude by describing how these results suggest factors that supported and constrained teachers' in continuing lesson study. To accomplish this work, I used qualitative methods of grounded theory informed by a modified sustainability framework on interview, survey, and case study data about teachers, principals, and Teachers on Special Assignment (TOSAs). Four cases were selected to show the varying levels of lesson study practices that continued past the conclusion of the grant. Analyses reveal varying levels of integration, linkage, and synergy among both formally and informally arranged groups of teachers. High levels of integration and linkage among groups of teachers supported them in sustaining lesson study practices. Groups of teachers with low levels of integration but with linked individuals sustained some level of practices, whereas teachers with low levels of integration and linkage constrained them in continuing lesson study at their site. Additionally, teachers' visions of lesson study and its uses shaped the types of activities teachers engaged, with well-developed conceptions of lesson study supporting and limited visions constraining the ability to attract or align resources to continue lesson study practices. Principals' support, teacher autonomy, and cultures of collaboration or isolation were also factors that either supported or constrained teachers' ability to continue lesson study. These analyses provide practical implications on how to support mathematics teachers in continuing lesson study, and theoretical contributions on developing the construct of sustainability within mathematics education research.

  9. Teachers' professional development in a community

    Ryymin, Essi; Lallimo, Jiri; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article was to study teachers' professional development related to web-based learning in the context of the teacher community. The object was to learn in what kind of networks teachers share the knowledge of web-based learning and what are the factors in the community that support or challenge teachers professional development of web-based learning. The findings of the study revealed that there are teachers who are especially active, called the central actors in this study, i...

  10. Echoes from teacher discourse: an inside-out perspective Echoes from teacher discourse: an inside-out perspective

    Adriana de Carvalho Kuerten Dellagnelo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in teacher education have paid increasing attention to teacher reflectivity and its relevance for teaching/learning practices. However, to our knowledge, there has been no investigation of teacher reflectivity from the perspective of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL. In this paper we draw mainly on SFL to examine aspects of the relationship between teachers and learners as construed in self-evaluative reports written by 4 Brazilian teacher-trainees. These reports – self-reflections on the trainees’ own teaching practices – were collected as part of work developed in a Teaching Practicum Course taken by these trainees. In addition to SFL, in our discussion of results we also draw on research related to teacher education/reflectivity (e.g., Freeman & Johnson, 1998; Richards & Lockart, 1996. The linguistic structures described and interpreted in order to unravel the roles these trainees ascribe to themselves and their students reveal a selfcentered positioning of the trainees as social participants whose practices are shaped by conceptions traditionally established by a culture of schooling which maintains the emphasis of teaching on the transmission of knowledge. Results also reveal asymmetry between teachers and students inasmuch as the latter are construed as playing a secondary role, with little responsibility in the process of teaching/learning a foreign language. The study may contribute to enhance the search for awareness of contrasts between new views of language teaching/learning and traditional perceptions such as the ones conveyed in the reports analyzed. Researchers in teacher education have paid increasing attention to teacher reflectivity and its relevance for teaching/learning practices. However, to our knowledge, there has been no investigation of teacher reflectivity from the perspective of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL. In this paper we draw mainly on SFL to examine aspects of the relationship between teachers and learners as construed in self-evaluative reports written by 4 Brazilian teacher-trainees. These reports – self-reflections on the trainees’ own teaching practices – were collected as part of work developed in a Teaching Practicum Course taken by these trainees. In addition to SFL, in our discussion of results we also draw on research related to teacher education/reflectivity (e.g., Freeman & Johnson, 1998; Richards & Lockart, 1996. The linguistic structures described and interpreted in order to unravel the roles these trainees ascribe to themselves and their students reveal a selfcentered positioning of the trainees as social participants whose practices are shaped by conceptions traditionally established by a culture of schooling which maintains the emphasis of teaching on the transmission of knowledge. Results also reveal asymmetry between teachers and students inasmuch as the latter are construed as playing a secondary role, with little responsibility in the process of teaching/learning a foreign language. The study may contribute to enhance the search for awareness of contrasts between new views of language teaching/learning and traditional perceptions such as the ones conveyed in the reports analyzed.

  11. Investigation of urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements: Are urban science teachers culturally responsive?

    Udokwu, Chukwudi John

    This study utilized mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative research approach to explore the current pedagogical engagements of twenty middle school urban science teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. It qualitatively examined twelve of these teachers' knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy. The study investigated the following questions: What are the current pedagogical practices of urban middle school science teachers? To what extent are middle school science teachers' pedagogical practices in urban schools culturally responsive? What are urban students' perspectives of their teachers' current pedagogical engagements? The design of the study was qualitative and quantitative methods in order to investigate these teachers' pedagogical practices. Data collections were drawn from multiple sources such as lesson plans, students' sample works, district curriculum, surveys, observational and interview notes. Analysis of collected data was a mixed methodology that involved qualitative and quantitative methods using descriptive, interpretative, pattern codes, and statistical procedures respectively. Purposeful sampling was selected for this study. Thus, demographically there were twenty participants who quantitatively took part in this study. Among them were seven (35%) males and thirteen (65%) females, three (15%) African Americans and seventeen (85%) Caucasians. In determining to what extent urban science teachers' pedagogical practices were culturally responsive, eight questions were analyzed based on four cluster themes: (a) teachers' social disposition, (b) culturally responsive curriculum, (c) classroom interactions, and (d) power pedagogy. Study result revealed that only five (25%) of the participants were engaged in culturally responsive pedagogy while fifteen (75%) were engaged in what Haberman (1991) called the pedagogy of poverty. The goal was to investigate urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements and to examine urban students' perspective of their science teachers' pedagogical practices, and ensure that all students have a sense of ownership of their knowledge, a sense that is empowering and liberating. The implications of these findings were to promote urban students' achievements in science and see them employed in science and engineering. I hope this study helps in developing better professional development that will be culturally responsive and to ensure that all students have a sense of ownership of their knowledge.

  12. Teachers as mediators

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike; Pratt, Nick

    Within the context of lower secondary English teaching in South West England, this study identifies in broad terms the competing goals between which English teachers mediate and the explicit and hidden tensions that result. To understand the interactions of competing goals, teachers’ goal...... cultural influences on practice. Yet the teachers observed moved smoothly between goal-oriented behaviours in a continuous and comfortable style, easily and without reflecting any tensions between them. Thus, this article elaborates an account of situated English teaching....

  13. 'ICTs' IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    Girdhar lal Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Education in the Indian region faces a number of problems. These problems include the shortage of qualified teachers, very large student populations, high drop-out rates of students and teachers, and weak curriculum. All of these negative aspects result in poor delivery of education. The education crisis is worsened by the devastating effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, increasing poverty, a brain drain in the teaching community, budgetary constraints, poor communication, and inadequa...

  14. Teachers in Anglophone Africa : Issues in Teacher Supply, Training, and Management

    Mulkeen, Aidan

    2010-01-01

    Based on case studies of education systems and practices in eight English-speaking African countries, the publication closely examines issues of teacher supply, deployment, management and finance. The book suggests that these issues are closely interrelated. Low numbers of qualified teaching graduates may result in teacher shortages; these shortages may make it difficult to deploy teachers effectively. Problems with teacher deployment may result in inefficient utilization of the teachers avai...

  15. The Effect of Trust on Teacher Empowerment: The Mediation of Teacher Efficacy

    Yin, Hong-biao; Lee, John Chi-Kin; Jin, Yu-le; Zhang, Zhong-hua

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of teachers' perception of trust in colleagues on their sense of empowerment in Mainland China, with a particular focus on the mediating role of teacher efficacy. The results of a survey of 1646 teachers indicate that although teachers scored positively on trust in colleagues, efficacy and empowerment, they had…

  16. Redirecting the Teacher's Gaze: Teacher Education, Youth Surveillance and the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    Raible, John; Irizarry, Jason G.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses an apparent contradiction in American teacher education that results in conflicting goals for educators. It asks: How do we prepare teachers to interrogate their inherited professional roles in the surveillance and disciplining of youth? How might teacher education inspire pre-service teachers to care more about youth who


  17. Teachers' Professional Agency and Learning--From Adaption to Active Modification in the Teacher Community

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine teacher learning in terms of teachers' professional agency in the professional community of the school. Altogether 2310 Finnish comprehensive school teachers completed a survey. Results showed that teachers' active efforts to learn in the professional community and to promote school development cannot be…

  18. The Effect of Trust on Teacher Empowerment: The Mediation of Teacher Efficacy

    Yin, Hong-biao; Lee, John Chi-Kin; Jin, Yu-le; Zhang, Zhong-hua

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of teachers' perception of trust in colleagues on their sense of empowerment in Mainland China, with a particular focus on the mediating role of teacher efficacy. The results of a survey of 1646 teachers indicate that although teachers scored positively on trust in colleagues, efficacy and empowerment, they had


  19. The State Role in Teacher Professional Development and Education throughout Teachers' Careers

    Loeb, Susanna; Miller, Luke C.; Strunk, Katharine O.

    2009-01-01

    Professional development and teacher education policies have the potential to greatly affect teachers' abilities to teach and, as a result, students' abilities to learn. States can play varied roles in the provision of teacher education and professional development. This policy brief summarizes states' policy approaches to teacher professional


  20. Factor structure of the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire in Portuguese children Estrutura fatorial do Questionårio de Rutter para Professores numa amostra de crianças portuguesas

    Ana Telma Pereira; Berta Rodrigues Maia; Mariana Marques; Sandra Carvalho Bos; Maria JoĂŁo Soares; Ana Gomes; AntĂłnio Macedo; Maria Helena Pinto De Azevedo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the factor structure of the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire in Portuguese primary school children. METHOD: The Rutter Teacher Questionnaire, a 26-item scale covering a variety of behavioral problems, was completed by teachers of 877 children, aged 6 to 11 years. Data were subjected to factor analysis using the principal components solution with varimax rotation. RESULTS: The factorial analysis in total sample revealed three factors explaining 38.88% of the total variance. T...

  1. Model Teachers

    Reeves, Douglas B.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of teachers' influence is confirmed by a recent survey the author and his colleagues conducted of more than 300 teachers and administrators representing a mix of urban, rural, and suburban schools. In analyzing responses to an open-ended question about the greatest influences on respondents' professional practice, they found that


  2. Special and General Education Biology Teachers Working Together Collaboratively

    Gagne-Grosso, Melissa

    Collaborative teaching, between special education and general education teachers working together, came about as a result of the No Child Left Behind and Individuals with Disabilities Education Acts. Despite the positive intentions of those acts, teachers are not always ready to teach collaboratively. Guided by the theories of fundamental change and inclusion, this study was based on a lack of understanding about collaborative teaching at 3 high schools. The research questions focused on the benefits, process, and concerns related to collaborative teaching. The perspectives of 4 special education and 8 regular education teachers in 3 urban, public high schools were collected through interviews and observations. Data were analyzed descriptively and inductively using coding, reconstruction, and interpretation of the underlying meanings. The findings revealed that teachers benefitted from being in these classrooms by having a reduced work load and shared responsibility; however, they needed more time for collaboration and modifying instruction, professional development, and stronger support. Students in these classrooms benefitted from social interactions with other students and by getting direct answers to questions. Based on these findings, a professional development training was created based on how collaborative teachers can work together to promote successful learning. This project study can have a positive impact by assisting collaborative teachers with support, communication, strategies for modifications and accommodations, and an enhanced experience, and additionally by improving the academic outcomes for their students.

  3. Elementary Teacher's Conceptions of Inquiry Teaching: Messages for Teacher Development

    Ireland, Joseph E.; Watters, James J.; Brownlee, Jo; Lupton, Mandy

    2011-09-01

    This study explored practicing elementary school teacher's conceptions of teaching in ways that foster inquiry-based learning in the science curriculum (inquiry teaching). The advocacy for inquiry-based learning in contemporary curricula assumes the principle that students learn in their own way by drawing on direct experience fostered by the teacher. That students should be able to discover answers themselves through active engagement with new experiences was central to the thinking of eminent educators such as Pestalozzi, Dewey and Montessori. However, even after many years of research and practice, inquiry learning as a referent for teaching still struggles to find expression in the average teachers' pedagogy. This study drew on interview data from 20 elementary teachers. A phenomenographic analysis revealed three conceptions of teaching for inquiry learning in science in the elementary years of schooling: (a) The Experience-centered conception where teachers focused on providing interesting sensory experiences to students; (b) The Problem-centered conception where teachers focused on engaging students with challenging problems; and (c) The Question-centered conception where teachers focused on helping students to ask and answer their own questions. Understanding teachers' conceptions has implications for both the enactment of inquiry teaching in the classroom as well as the uptake of new teaching behaviors during professional development, with enhanced outcomes for engaging students in Science.

  4. Multiple case studies of STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering design

    Rupp, Madeline

    The following master's thesis is composed of two manuscripts describing STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering within the context of the Science Learning through Engineering Design (SLED) partnership. The framework guiding both studies was science teaching orientations, a component of pedagogical content knowledge. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, multi-day classroom observations, pre- and post-observation interviews, implementation plans, and written reflections. Data sources were analyzed to generate two orientations to science teaching through engineering design for each participant. The first manuscript illustrates a single case study conducted with a sixth grade STEM teacher. Results of this study revealed a detailed picture of the teacher's goals, practices, assessments, and general views when teaching science through engineering design. Common themes across the teacher's instruction were used to characterize her orientations to science teaching through engineering design. Overall, the teacher's orientations showed a shift in her practice from didactic to student-centered methods of teaching as a result of integrating engineering design-based curriculum. The second manuscript describes a comparative case study of two sixth grade SLED participants. Results of this study revealed more complex and diverse relationships between the teachers' orientations to teaching science through engineering design and their instruction. Participants' orientations served as filters for instruction, guided by their divergent purposes for science teaching. Furthermore, their orientations and resulting implementation were developed from knowledge gained in teacher education, implying that teacher educators and researchers can use this framework to learn more about how teachers' knowledge is used to integrate engineering and science practices in the K-12 classroom.

  5. The Impact of Lifelong Learning Teacher Education in Secondary School Results El Impacto de la FormaciĂłn Permanente del Profesorado de EducaciĂłn Secundaria en los Resultados Escolares.

    Paula Gonzålez-Vallinas; David Oterino; José Luis San Fabiån

    2006-01-01

    Studies dealing with factors which have an influence on students outcomes are reviewed, teacher variables and teacher training are among their most common findings to influence school achievement. This study analyses the variable in-service teacher training on students? academic achievement. The analysis levels are departments and schools, being department the level where the relation among variables is more significative. There are significative correlations between the in-service teacher tr...

  6. Senior science teachers' experience of teaching in a changing multicultural classroom: A case study

    Ryan, Mark

    Demographic changes within the US are bringing significant changes in the cultural make-up of the classrooms in our schools. Results from national and state assessments indicate a growing achievement gap between the science scores of white students and students from minority communities. This gap indicates a disconnect somewhere in the science classrooms. This study examines the teacher's perspective of the changing learning environment. The study focuses on senior teachers with traditional Midwestern backgrounds and little multicultural experience assuming these teachers had little or no education in multicultural education. Senior teachers are also more likely to have completed their science education within a traditional Universalist perspective of science and likewise have little or no education in multicultural science. The research method was comparative case studies of a purposeful sample of nine science teachers within a community experiencing significant demographic change, seven core senior teachers and two frame of reference teachers. The interviews examined the teachers' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and the impact of those beliefs on classroom practices, the teachers' understanding of cultural influences on the students' academic performance, and the relationships between the teachers' understanding of the cultural aspects of the nature of science and their classroom practices. Analysis of the interview data revealed that the teachers maintain a strong, traditional Midwestern worldview for classroom expectations and they are generally unaware of the impact of those standards on the classroom environment. The teachers were supportive of minority students within their classroom, changing several practices to accommodate student needs, but they were unaware of the broader cultural influences on student learning. The teachers had a poor understanding of the nature of science and none of them recognized a cultural element of NOS. They maintained a Universalist perspective of science with a strong commitment to the philosophy of scientism which left no room for a multicultural view of science. These results have implications for the broad science community with respect to the philosophy and nature of science. There are also implications in pre- and in-service teacher education and professional development aimed at raising cultural awareness of science teachers and providing a broader understanding of NOS. The problems raised by this research appear to be systemic requiring a commitment beyond the level of the individual teacher to implement a multicultural education that matches the composition of our classrooms.

  7. A comparison of bilingual education and generalist teachers' approaches to scientific biliteracy

    Garza, Esther

    The purpose of this study was to determine if educators were capitalizing on bilingual learners' use of their biliterate abilities to acquire scientific meaning and discourse that would formulate a scientific biliterate identity. Mixed methods were used to explore teachers' use of biliteracy and Funds of Knowledge (Moll, L., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N., 1992; Gonzales, Moll, & Amanti, 2005) from the students' Latino heritage while conducting science inquiry. The research study explored four constructs that conceptualized scientific biliteracy. The four constructs include science literacy, science biliteracy, reading comprehension strategies and students' cultural backgrounds. There were 156 4th-5th grade bilingual and general education teachers in South Texas that were surveyed using the Teacher Scientific Biliteracy Inventory (TSBI) and five teachers' science lessons were observed. Qualitative findings revealed that a variety of scientific biliteracy instructional strategies were frequently used in both bilingual and general education classrooms. The language used to deliver this instruction varied. A General Linear Model revealed that classroom assignment, bilingual or general education, had a significant effect on a teacher's instructional approach to employ scientific biliteracy. A simple linear regression found that the TSBI accounted for 17% of the variance on 4th grade reading benchmarks. Mixed methods results indicated that teachers were utilizing scientific biliteracy strategies in English, Spanish and/or both languages. Household items and science experimentation at home were encouraged by teachers to incorporate the students' cultural backgrounds. Finally, science inquiry was conducted through a universal approach to science learning versus a multicultural approach to science learning.

  8. The variations of the teacher profile as reflected in the curricula of teacher training in Cyprus

    Neophytou, Lefkios

    2012-01-01

    This paper will review the various curricula underpinning teacher education for elementary school teachers in Cyprus and describe the variations of the indented teacher profile from the English colonial period to the present day. We will discuss how and why the intended teacher profile has shifted from a clear, concise and consistent ethnocentric perspective to a more vague and ambiguous approach that resulted from the allocation of the responsibility for teacher training, from the state to t...

  9. An Analysis of the Information Behaviour of Geography Teachers in a Developing African Country–Lesotho

    Constance BITSO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Information behaviour studies have the potential to inform the design of effective information services that incorporate the information needs, information-seeking and preferences for information sources of target users; hence a doctoral study was conducted on the information behaviour of geography teachers in Lesotho with the aim of guiding the design and implementation of an information service model for these teachers. This paper focuses on the analysis of the information behaviour of geography teachers in Lesotho as a contribution of original knowledge on geography teachers’ information behaviour. The analysis established the information behaviour of geography teachers using the information behaviour concept that encompasses information needs, information-seeking and information sources. Data were collected and analyzed through focus group discussions and conceptual content analysis respectively.The analysis reveals that these geography teachers need current and accurate information covering a variety of aspects in teaching and learning, such as content, pedagogy, classroom management and learners’ assessment. Owing to the increasing number of orphans in schools as a result of the HIV and AIDS pandemic, most teachers expressed the need for information on social assistance for orphans and vulnerable children. Recommendations include information literacy training for teachers and access to the Internet in schools, including the use of open access journals on the Internet by the teachers.

  10. Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of teacher self-disclosure

    Ali Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher self-disclosure (TSD as a communication behavior can influence students' learning by increasing their engagement and class participation as well as helping them establish effective interpersonal relationships. Owning to its context-sensitive and culture-dependent nature, however, TSD topics, purposes, and considerations may vary cross-culturally. This study was an attempt to explore Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of TSD as well as to investigate whether there was a significant difference between male and female teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of TSD. To this end, the Appropriateness of Teacher Self-Disclosure Scale was distributed among 68 Iranian EFL teachers (34 females and 34 males from six language institutes. The results of the study indicated the extent to which the Iranian EFL teachers perceived TSD topics, purposes, and considerations to be appropriate or inappropriate. Furthermore, the study found convergence and divergence between male and female teachers' perceptions in terms of the topics used in TSD, the purposes TSD serves in classroom, and considerations the teachers take into account when practicing TSD. The results of the study suggest that Iranian EFL teachers can practice TSD as a pedagogical tool to enhance learning although they should be wary of its consequences in some aspects as TSD is contingent upon context and culture.

  11. TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF OTHER TEACHERS’ SPONTANEOUS HAND GESTURING IN THE EFL CLASSROOM

    John Michael THOMPSON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for gesture being a vital element in the classroom is becoming insurmountable; however, it remains to be seen how long it will take to be fully utilized in the EFL classroom. This study, using a qualitative descriptive methodology, briefly examines how a group of teachers perceive gesturing after viewing a video performance of an EFL practitioner. All of the data was collected online via a questionnaire and a recorded semi-structured interview. Volunteers were, or had been, teaching English within the past twelve months and approached the researcher to take part in the study via social media. The results of the study suggest that teachers fully acknowledge the importance of gesture and commonly attribute similar functions to specific gestures within a teaching performance. Overall, the results offer numerous pedagogical implications for gesture and SLA and support previous assertions regarding the need to make teachers fully aware of the gestures they use in the classroom. Analysis of the questionnaires also revealed that teachers seldom have the opportunity to view their own teaching and suggests that gesture needs to play a much greater role within critical reflective practice.

  12. Towards Constructivist Teacher Professional Development

    V. J. Pitsoe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In recent years, much has been written about constructivist learning theories and their applications to outcomes-based teaching and learning environments in South Africa. Approach: Little, if any, has been said about the implications of these ideas and practices for teacher professional development and teacher education. The introduction of the National Curriculum Statement (NCS Policy requires teachers to acquire new skills, knowledge, attitudes and values and to employ a wide variety of teaching strategies, in order to enable students to construct their own knowledge. Results: The purpose of this desktop review is to rethink teacher professional development within a constructivist framework. Conclusion: In this article, we argue that teacher professional development can fit the context and, more specifically, in outcomes-based settings, as well as proposed a move away from a mechanistic world-view (modernist and behaviorist approach to a holistic world-view (constructivist and situational or contextual approach of teacher professional development.

  13. Teacher Effectiveness in Urban High Schools

    Richard Buddin; Gema Zamarro

    2009-01-01

    This research examines whether teacher licensure test scores and other teacher qualifications affect high school student achievement. The results are based on longitudinal student-level data from Los Angeles. The achievement analysis uses a value-added approach that adjusts for both student and teacher fixed effects. The results show little relationship between traditional measures of teacher quality (e.g., experience and education level) and student achievement in English Language Arts (ELA)...

  14. THE COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF FUTURE TEACHERS

    Pakhomova Irina Yurevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the concept of "communicative competence of future teachers," describes the essential characteristics and features of pedagogical communication. Objective: To define the notion of "communicative competence of future teachers' Methodology of work: competence approach. Scope of the results: the preparation of future teachers at the Pedagogical University. Results: This article describes the concept of "communicative competence of future teachers," describes the essential characteristics and features of pedagogical communication.

  15. Job satisfaction of Jamaican elementary school teachers

    Rodgers-Jenkinson, Fay; Chapman, David W.

    1990-09-01

    This study investigated correlates of job satisfaction among public (N=190) and private (N=100) Jamaican elementary school teachers. Emphasis was on the identification of factors that could be affected through administrative intervention. Results indicated that the quality of school working conditions and respondents' relationships with other teachers were significantly related to satisfaction for both public and private school teachers. School prestige and parental encouragement were also significant predictors for public school teachers; leadership style, organizational structure, and teacher-parent relationships predicted job satisfaction for private school teachers. Implications of these findings for Jamaican education are discussed.

  16. A comparison between the views of teachers in South Africa and six other countries on involvement in school change

    Cassie Swanepoel

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, and especially in South Africa, change and decentralised decision-making have been topical issues in the provision of education for the past years. It appears that teachers - the key agents in implementing the policies concerned - are largely ignored in the pre-implementation phases, and treated merely as implementers of these policies. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that the teachers in the South African sample expressed an exceptional degree of eagerness to ...

  17. How Novice EFL Teachers Regulate Their Negative Emotions

    Silvia Arizmendi Tejeda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research report shares the findings that emerged from a qualitative study in which the main objective was to discover whether or not novice English as a foreign language teachers regulate their negative emotions during their initial teaching practice, and if so, how they do this. The data were collected by semi-structured interviews and observations, and analyzed by microanalysis and constant comparative analysis. The participants were five novice teachers who study English at the same university, and who were giving classes as part of their internship. The results from this research revealed that these particular novice English as a foreign language teachers use different emotional strategies to regulate their negative emotions.

  18. Teacher agency

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Robinson, Sarah

    The concept of teacher agency has emerged in recent literature as an alternative means of understanding how teachers might enact practice and engage with policy (e.g. Lasky, 2005; Leander & Osbourne, 2008; Ketelaar et al., 2012; Priestley, Biesta & Robinson, 2013). But what is agency? Agency...... remains an inexact and poorly conceptualised construct in much of the literature, where it is often not clear whether the term refers to an individual capacity of teachers to act agentically or to an emergent ‘ecological’ phenomenon dependent upon the quality of individuals’ engagement with their...... environments (Biesta & Tedder, 2007). In this chapter, we outline the latter conception of agency, developing a conceptual model for teacher agency that emphasizes the temporal and relational dimension of the achievement of agency. Why does this matter? Recent curriculum policy in many countries heralds a [re...

  19. Including a learner with physical disabilities: stressful for teachers?

    I. Eloff

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Learners with physical disabilities have been entering mainstream schools for some years now. Whereas early research on inclusive education necessitated a strong focus on the needs of the learners, there has also been a recent interest in the role of the teachers in inclusive education. By adopting constructivism as the paradigm for inquiry a study was undertaken to establish the stress factors for teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability in their mainstream classes. The rationale for the study is threefold: i Learners with physical disabilities are entering mainstream schools increasingly, ii it is often assumed that inclusive education is too stressful for teachers to cope with, and iii related research has shown that increased contact with individuals with disabilities has a positive effect on attitudes towards individuals with disabilities. In accordance with the dialectical methodology of constructivism, the Teacher Stress and Coping Questionnaire and in-depth interviews were utilised to establish the stress factors and the extent of the stress factors that may be present. The aim of the constructivist inquiry process is to promote understanding and reconstruction. In this article the quantitative results indicate overall low or non-existent levels of stress in teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability, and the results therefore contribute to our understanding of this situation. The qualitative results reconstruct the meanings that these teachers attach to the inclusion of a learner with a physical disability and reveal some albeit limited concerns about the communication processes between parents and teachers and a perceived lack of pre-service training.

  20. A comparison of Australian and Chinese teachers' attributions for student problem behaviors

    Ho, IT

    2004-01-01

    The present study compared Australian and Chinese teachers' causal attributions for student behavior. A total of 204 Australian teachers and 269 Chinese teachers rated the importance of four causes (ability, effort, family, teacher) of six student problem behaviors. Results showed that both groups of teachers attributed misbehaviors most to student effort and least to teacher factors. Chinese teachers emphasized family factors more while Australian teachers placed greater importance on abilit...

  1. Values Education and Some Suggestions to Teachers

    Demirhan Iscan, Canay

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process, approaches and teacher roles in values education and offers recommendations for teachers. It uses print materials and Internet sources on values education. These sources were analyzed and synthesized to reveal certain cases and/or opinions. In addition to contemporary sources, older reference materials were also


  2. A Corporate Partnership to Enhance Teacher Training

    Fine, Bethann

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a corporate partnership with SMART Technologies that changed what teacher candidates learned and how they learned. The experience of the partnership has revealed five best practices for implementing white board technology. Teacher training benefits of the partnership are evident in descriptions of three instructional


  3. Methodical preparation of future teachers of mathematics

    Mamontova Tatiyana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Question is considered In article about organizations of methodical preparing the future teacher math-ematicians on base competencial approach to education; revealled essence of the notion "professional-methodical competencie" future teacher mathematicians, are determined professional-methodical competencies, falling into it’s composition, and is considered one of the approach to determination level it’s shaping.

  4. Florida Teachers' Attitudes about Teaching Evolution

    Fowler, Samantha R.; Meisels, Gerry G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of Florida teachers reveals many differences in comfort level with teaching evolution according to the state's science teaching standards, general attitudes and beliefs about evolution, and the extent to which teachers are criticized, censured, disparaged, or reprehended for their beliefs about the teaching of evolution.

  5. Teacher Expectations of the Communication Apprehensive Student.

    Schaller, Kristi A.; Comadena, Mark E.

    Previous studies have revealed that the correlation between communication apprehension (CA) and academic achievement may be significantly different for male and female elementary school students. A study investigated the effects of CA, sex of student, and three teacher characteristics on teacher expectations of academic achievement. Subjects, 221


  6. Teacher Performance and Pupil Achievement on Teacher-Made Tests.

    Ellett, Chad D.; And Others

    This study investigated the predictive validity of the Teacher Performance Assessment Instruments (TPAI) using pupil gains on teacher-made tests (TMT) as a criterion. The TPAI and the TMT's were administered to 56 elementary and secondary classrooms in Georgia. Results supported the validity of the TPAI with a large number of correlations ranging


  7. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, RosĂĄria

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  8. Quality of Distance Education in Turkey: Preschool Teacher Training Case

    Mehmet Gultekin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is used for teacher training at different levels and fields in Turkey. Launched in the 2000-2001 academic year and still applied by Anadolu University, the Pre-School Teacher Training Program is one of those programs offered by distance education. This study aims to evaluate Anadolu University’s Preschool Teacher Training Program in Turkey by obtaining student opinions. A total of 1,026 senior students enrolled in the Preschool Education major at the Open Education Faculty of Anadolu University participated in the survey. A questionnaire to determine the opinions of students on the program was used as a means of data collection. Means (X and standard deviations (SD were employed to analyze the survey data. The results showed that although the teacher candidates study at a good level, they do not have a good record of watching the television programs. The results also revealed that the opinions of teacher candidates about the textbooks, television programs, teaching practices, and academic assistance services are positive.

  9. Main Factors of Teachers' Professional Well-Being

    Yildirim, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to reveal the main factors of teachers' professional well being. Theoretically constructed model was tested on large scale data belong to 72.190 teachers working at lower secondary level. Theoretical model included teachers' individual, professional and organizational characteristics. Professional well-being


  10. The Dark Side of Motivation: Teachers' Perspectives on "Unmotivation"

    Sakui, Keiko; Cowie, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Motivation is a well-researched construct; however, few studies have investigated how teachers perceive and make sense of situations in which learners are not motivated to learn. Thirty-two EFL teachers working in Japanese universities were surveyed and interviews with three of these teachers were conducted to reveal their perceptions of student


  11. Challenging Teacher Beliefs about Student Engagement in Mathematics

    Bobis, Janette; Way, Jennifer; Anderson, Judy; Martin, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the beliefs about student engagement in mathematics of three Year 5 and 6 teachers, focusing on the shifts that occurred during a 10-week intervention. Data obtained from teacher surveys, interviews, video-recorded workshop observations and artefacts from teachers' classrooms reveal variations in their reactions to the


  12. Opinions of the Geography Teacher Candidates toward Mind Maps

    Seyihoglu, Aysegul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the opinions of the teacher candidates about mind mapping technique used in Geography education of undergraduate program. In this study, the qualitative research techniques were used. The study group consists of 55 teacher candidates. The teacher candidates have been asked for their opinions about the process…

  13. Main Factors of Teachers' Professional Well-Being

    Yildirim, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to reveal the main factors of teachers' professional well being. Theoretically constructed model was tested on large scale data belong to 72.190 teachers working at lower secondary level. Theoretical model included teachers' individual, professional and organizational characteristics. Professional well-being…

  14. Influence of Children's Physical Attractiveness on Teacher Expectations.

    Kenealy, Pamela; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Ratings of the physical attractiveness of 11-to-12-year-old children were obtained, and the association between physical attractiveness and teachers' judgements of these children were examined. Teachers revealed a systematic tendency to rate girls higher than boys, and significant sex differences were observed in teachers' ratings of


  15. Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching

    Boz, Yezdan; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the beliefs of Turkish prospective chemistry teachers about teaching chemistry, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 prospective teachers. Analysis of the interviews revealed that most of the prospective teachers held intermediate (transition between constructivist and traditional) beliefs about chemistry teaching.…

  16. University Student Perception of Teacher Confirmation as Perceived by Instructors at the Faculty of Educational Science at the Hashemite University

    Ahmad M. Mahasneh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine university students’ perceptions of teacher confirmation in the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 258 students participated in the study, completing the Teacher Confirmation Scale (TCS. Results indicated the means for the first dimension: teacher response to questions, as 3.58, the means for the second dimension: demonstrating interest, as 3.62, and the means for the third dimension: teaching style, as 3.48. Findings also revealed that there were statistically significant differences between male and female students’ perceptions regarding the teacher response questions, and also indicated significant differences among the four academic level groups regarding the teaching styles, as well as significant differences among the four GPA level groups regarding teacher demonstration of interest.

  17. The Attitudes of Teachers and Students towards Using Arabic in EFL Classrooms in Saudi Public Schools- A Case Study

    Haifa Al-NOFAIE

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the attitudes of Saudi teachers and students towards employing Arabic as a facilitating tool in English classes, a topic which has gained wide attention recently. The present study was a case study which investigated teachers' and students' attitudes towards this issue in a Saudi intermediate school for females. To reach a clear understanding of this issue, the study focused on one intermediate classroom which had 30 students and three teachers of English in the entire school. Three research tools were used for gathering data: questionnaires, interviews and four observations of one classroom. The results revealed that the attitudes of the teachers and the students about using Arabic were generally positive. The participants preferred using Arabic in certain situations and for specific reasons. Although the attitudes of the teachers and the students received agreements, there were other points on which they disagreed. Recommendations for future studies and solutions were discussed.

  18. Cross Cultural Marketing Teachers' Profile

    Vila, Natalia; Boluda, Ines Kuster

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Marketing has attracted increased interested over the past 15 years in both academic and commercial circles and there has been a market rise in the number of students. At the university level, the characteristics of the teacher play an essential role in student/teacher interaction and influence academic results and future professional


  19. Deliberate Practice in Teacher Education

    Bronkhorst, Larike H.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Koster, Bob; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Deliberate practice is increasingly recognised as necessary for professional development. This paper sets out to explore in what ways student teachers' learning activities in a teacher education programme can be characterised as deliberate practice. Based on an in-depth exploration of 574 learning activities, our results highlight the


  20. Teachers' Perceptions about Grammar Teaching

    Thu, Tran Hoang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates English as a second language (ESL) teachers' beliefs in grammar teaching. A 32-item questionnaire was administered to 11 ESL teachers in a language school in California. The results show that the participants generally believe that the formal study of grammar is essential to the eventual mastery of a foreign or second


  1. Cross Cultural Marketing Teachers' Profile

    Vila, Natalia; Boluda, Ines Kuster

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Marketing has attracted increased interested over the past 15 years in both academic and commercial circles and there has been a market rise in the number of students. At the university level, the characteristics of the teacher play an essential role in student/teacher interaction and influence academic results and future professional…

  2. Can Teachers Cope with Creationism?

    Pearson, Craig

    1981-01-01

    The creation/evolution controversy has gained renewed popularity in the last few years. This has resulted in serious implications for science teachers. All classroom teachers need to protect themselves by learning the distinctions between scientific law and theory and to acquire knowledge of the various theories of evolution. (JN)

  3. Whistle-Blowing Intentions of Prospective Teachers: Education Evidence

    Asiye Toker Gökçe

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whistle-blowing intentions of prospective teachers. Firstly, overall ethical awareness of the participants was examined, and then their underlying ethical reasons of whistle-blowing were investigated. Besides, impact on the intention to blow whistle to internal or external parties offering their job guarantee were searched. Three ethical dilemmas were constructed in three scenarios, and The Multi-dimensional Ethics Scale was used in the study. The results revealed that...

  4. Are Emotionally Intelligent EFL Teachers More Satisfied Professionally?

    Mohammad Hossein Hekmatzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that Intelligence Quotient (IQ is an important factor in one’s success in terms of working environment, it is believed that emotional quotient or EQ plays a more important role. With that in mind, this study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of English as Foreign Language (EFL teachers who work at private language institutes in Iran/Shiraz. Furthermore, this study tried to answer whether there is a significant difference between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of Iranian’s EFL teachers in terms of gender.  A 90-item Bar-On questionnaire was used to measure the teachers’ emotional intelligence; also, a modified version of Karavas’s (2010 job satisfaction scale was used to see how satisfied our teachers are with their teaching career. To answer the research question, Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient statistical test was run. The results showed that there was a positive and significant correlation between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of EFL teachers in Iran/Shiraz. Furthermore, the results revealed that there was a statistically significant difference in emotional intelligence between EFL male and female teachers, but there was no statistically significant relationship between Iranian EFL teachers’ job satisfaction in terms of gender. Based on our findings, it is suggested that some preparatory courses aiming at enhancing the important psychological traits such as emotional intelligence should be incorporated in educational programs designed for novice teachers so that it will contribute to pedagogical improvement.Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Job satisfaction, EFL teachers

  5. Qualities of Ideal Teacher Educators

    Nihal Tunca

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Generally, the relationship between the teacher educators' qualities and the quality of teacher education has not been discussed extensively in the literature. At the same time, various studies can be found in the eastern literature examining the characteristics of faculty members at the education faculties. The effect of teacher educators over teacher candidates has not been explored, and in this sense, there is limited number of studies examining faculty members at education faculties in Turkey. Mostly employing quantitative research designs, these studies have focused on faculty members in terms of various characteristics However, which qualities that faculty members should have as a whole have not been studied. However, faculty members, as well as teachers who are a matter of debate in terms of the qualities they are supposed to have should be examined in research studies. In this context, this study aims to identify the qualities that an ideal teacher educator should have from the perspective of education faculty students as future teachers. The current research is a qualitative study in phenomenology design. The participants of the study are third and fourth year 214 pre-service teachers from the departments of Science and Technology Teaching, Pre-School Teacher Education, Classroom Teacher Education, Social Studies Teaching and Turkish Language Teaching. Criterion sampling was used for participant selection. The data gathering tool consisted of an open-ended question that would reveal the qualities that an ideal teacher educator should have based on teacher candidates’ views. Junior and senior teacher candidates’ views were asked and the data were analyzed according to content analysis approach. As a result, the qualities that an ideal teacher educator should have been gathered under five main themes including ‘professional roles and responsibilities, professional values, personal characteristics, professional ethic principles and social responsibilities’. Keywords: Ideal teacher educator, teacher candidates, qualities of teacherÖz DĂŒnyada Ă¶ÄŸretmen eğitimcilerinin niteliği ile Ă¶ÄŸretmen yetiƟtirmenin kalitesi arasındaki iliƟki yeterli dĂŒzeyde tartÄ±ĆŸÄ±lmamaktadır. Bununla birlikte, Batı alan yazınında eğitim fakĂŒltelerindeki Ă¶ÄŸretim ĂŒyelerinin özelliklerini inceleyen çeƟitli araƟtırmalara rastlanmaktadır. Öğretmen eğitimcilerinin Ă¶ÄŸretmen adayları ĂŒzerindeki etkilerinin bilinmediği TĂŒrkiye’de ise eğitim fakĂŒltelerindeki Ă¶ÄŸretim elemanlarıyla ilgili sınırlı sayıda araƟtırma bulunmaktadır. Çoğu nicel araƟtırma yaklaĆŸÄ±mıyla desenlenen bu çalÄ±ĆŸmalarda, Ă¶ÄŸretmen eğitimcilerinin bazı özellikleri açısından değerlendirildikleri dikkat çekmektedir. Öğretmen eğitimcilerinin, bir bĂŒtĂŒn olarak hangi özelliklere sahip olmaları gerektiği ise araƟtırma konusu olmamÄ±ĆŸtır. Oysa sahip olması gereken özellikler açısından sĂŒrekli tartÄ±ĆŸma konusu olan Ă¶ÄŸretmenler kadar Ă¶ÄŸretmen eğitimcileri de araƟtırma konusu olmalıdır. Bu gerekçeden hareketle araƟtırmada, geleceğin Ă¶ÄŸretmenleri olan eğitim fakĂŒltesi Ă¶ÄŸrencilerinin bakÄ±ĆŸ açısıyla ideal bir Ă¶ÄŸretim ĂŒyesinin sahip olması gereken niteliklerin belirlenmesi amaçlanmÄ±ĆŸtır. AraƟtırma, olgu bilim (fenomonoloji deseninde nitel bir araƟtırmadır. AraƟtırmanın katılımcılarını,  Fen ve Teknoloji Öğretmenliği, Okulöncesi Öğretmenliği, Sınıf Öğretmenliği, Sosyal Bilgiler Öğretmenliği ve TĂŒrkçe Öğretmenliği programlarında, ĂŒĂ§ĂŒncĂŒ ve dördĂŒncĂŒ sınıflarda Ă¶ÄŸrenim gören toplam 214 Ă¶ÄŸretmen adayı oluƟturmaktadır. AraƟtırma verileri, yapılandırılmÄ±ĆŸ görĂŒĆŸme tekniklerinden açık uçlu anket ile (29 Nisan-18 Mayıs 2013 toplanmÄ±ĆŸtır. AraƟtırmada elde edilen veriler, NVivo8.0. Paket Programı kullanılarak içerik analizi yaklaĆŸÄ±mına göre analiz edilmiƟtir. AraƟtırmada Ă¶ÄŸretmen adaylarının görĂŒĆŸleri doğrultusunda ideal Ă¶ÄŸretim ĂŒyesinde bulunması gereken nitelikler “mesleki rol ve sorumluluklar, mesleki değerler, kiƟisel özellikler, mesleki etik ilkeler ve toplumsal sorumluluk” olmak ĂŒzere beƟ ana tema altında toplanmÄ±ĆŸtır. Öğretmen adaylarının ideal bir Ă¶ÄŸretim ĂŒyesinde bulunması gereken nitelikler arasında en çok vurgu yaptıkları nitelik “mesleki rol ve sorumluluklar” iken; en az vurgu yaptıkları nitelik ise “toplumsal sorumluluklar” olmuƟtur. Anahtar SözcĂŒkler: Ä°deal Ă¶ÄŸretmen eğitimcisi, Ă¶ÄŸretmen adayları, Ă¶ÄŸretmen eğitimcisinin nitelikleri

  6. Predicting Teachers' Achievement Goals for Teaching: The Role of Perceived School Goal Structure and Teachers' Sense of Efficacy

    Cho, YoonJung; Shim, Sungok Serena

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated contextual and personal factors associated with teachers' achievement goals for teaching. A total of 211 teachers completed an online survey. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that perceived school mastery goal structure and performance goal structure predicted teachers' mastery goals and


  7. Relationship among science teacher personality characteristics and degree of teacher classroom implementation after in-service workshop

    Sechler, Phares Lochiel Coleman

    State departments of public instruction require that teachers periodically update their licenses throughout their teaching careers. Various professional development events such as in-service workshops, university offerings, and special innovative programs provide opportunities for novice and experienced teachers to grow professionally. The "Team Science" workshop was designed from models supported by research that described guidelines for successful workshop strategies. In evaluating the workshop, the question was asked "Why did not all teachers implement the ideas from the workshop in their science classrooms?" This study investigates the possible relationship between teacher personality characteristics and implementation of technology innovations. Team Science was an extensive workshop program planned to develop science teachers' expertise in using computer and video technology to teach in physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms in rural school in North Carolina. Upon evaluating the four-year effort, it was found that the 23 participants implemented the technological strategies at various levels. At the higher end of the range of technology use, some teachers exhibited complete integration of the computers and interfacing devices into both the laboratory work and the classroom inquiry. At the lower end of the range, some teachers used the technology very little. The resulting question emerged from the data collected: Do specific teacher personality characteristics (independent variables) correlate with the degree of implementation (dependent variable) of the innovative ideas and tools used in the teacher's science classroom after the in-service workshop? To determine if there were any significant personality traits, each teacher was given five personality tests. The tests were Hunt's Conceptual Development Test, the Paragraph Completion Test; James Rest's Defining Issues Test; Simmons Personal Survey, an emotional tendency test; the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; and Riggs and Enochs Self-Efficacy Test. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression, and factor analysis to see what variables were predictors of implementation. The regression analysis revealed that subtests from Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Simmons Personal Survey, Hunt's Paragraph Completion Test, and Rest's Defining Issues Test could be used to predict implementation. Factor analysis indicated teachers who implemented the technology were "risk takers" and "flexible planners."

  8. The Social Cognitive Model of Job Satisfaction among Teachers: Testing and Validation

    Badri, Masood A.; Mohaidat, Jihad; Ferrandino, Vincent; El Mourad, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    The study empirically tests an integrative model of work satisfaction (0280, 0140, 0300 and 0255) in a sample of 5,022 teachers in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The study provided more support for the Lent and Brown (2006) model. Results revealed that this model was a strong fit for the data and accounted for 82% of the variance in work…

  9. Motivating Pre-Service Teachers in Technology Integration of Web 2.0 for Teaching Internships

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Jang, Hwan Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of pre-service teachers' use of Web 2.0 tools during a teaching internship, after a course that emphasized the use of the tools for instructional activities. Results revealed that integrating Web 2.0 tools during their teaching internship was strongly predicted by participants' perceived


  10. Holistic Wellness and Perceived Stress: Predicting Job Satisfaction among Beginning Teachers

    Watson, Joshua C.; Harper, Sallie; Ratliff, Lindon; Singleton, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted with 53 beginning teachers, each with less than 3 years of classroom experience, to determine the amount of variance in their job satisfaction that could be accounted for by holistic wellness and perceived stress. The results of a regression analysis revealed that both holistic wellness and perceived stress were


  11. The Social Cognitive Model of Job Satisfaction among Teachers: Testing and Validation

    Badri, Masood A.; Mohaidat, Jihad; Ferrandino, Vincent; El Mourad, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    The study empirically tests an integrative model of work satisfaction (0280, 0140, 0300 and 0255) in a sample of 5,022 teachers in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The study provided more support for the Lent and Brown (2006) model. Results revealed that this model was a strong fit for the data and accounted for 82% of the variance in work


  12. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    , locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study of...... virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning...

  13. Reshaping Teacher Education through the Professional Continuum

    McMahon, Margery; Forde, Christine; Dickson, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The current policy gaze on teacher quality is resulting in significant shifts in how teacher education is conceptualized, designed and delivered. Traditional approaches to teacher preparation and continuing professional development (CPD) are being challenged, and often displaced, by new models that expedite the process and experience of becoming a


  14. Teachers with a Passion for the Profession

    Phelps, Patricia H.; Benson, Tammy R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe commonalities among teachers who have sustained passion for the teaching profession, identify ways to instill a similar passion in teacher education candidates, and encourage teacher educators to maintain and model an enthusiastic passion. The authors present the results of a study that consisted of…

  15. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability of the nation's preservice agricultural education teachers. Based on the results of this study, preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems, and agricultural teacher education programs require basic and intermediate mathematics as their…

  16. Promoting Teacher Adoption of GIS Using Teacher-Centered and Teacher-Friendly Design

    Hong, Jung Eun

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a case study that employed user-centered design to develop training tutorials for helping middle school social studies teachers use Web-based GIS in their classrooms. This study placed teachers in the center of the design process in planning, designing, and developing the tutorials. This article describes how


  17. Southern Federal University in Relation to Teacher Education Modernization Project: Strategic Reflection of the Testing Results of Integrative Modules of the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” Research Master’s Program

    Chernaya A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of a strategic reflection of the Southern Federal University participation in the project of modernization of teacher education. It analyses how theoretical, methodological and organizational-activity basis of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research master’s program designed by Moscow State University of Psychology & Education relates to the strategic objectives of Southern Federal University. Priorities and forward-looking statements in the strategy for the training of specialists in education based on action-competence approach, integrative principle of educational modules construction, network forms of cooperation of educational institutions are shown. Basic methodological ideas of culturalhistorical psychology and activity theory and their applicability to the needs of modern education objectified in the draft are specially considered. The article presents the preliminary test results of integrative modules of research master’s program for Southern Federal University

  18. Formação continuada de professores e resultados dos alunos no SARESP: propostas e realizaçÔes Teacher continued education and the results of pupils in the SARESP exam: proposals and achievements

    Adriana Bauer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho apresenta resultados obtidos por meio da pesquisa realizada entre 2005 e 2006, intitulada Uso dos resultados do SARESP: o papel da avaliação nas polĂ­ticas de formação docente, cujo propĂłsito foi analisar possibilidades e limites da utilização dos resultados obtidos pelos alunos no Sistema de Avaliação do Rendimento Escolar do Estado de SĂŁo Paulo (SARESP para a formulação e o direcionamento de polĂ­ticas de formação de professores. As preocupaçÔes recaĂ­ram sobre os programas de formação em lĂ­ngua portuguesa para o ensino fundamental. Foram visitadas quatro das treza diretorias regionais de ensino da capital do Estado de SĂŁo Paulo a fim de conhecer o trabalho de formação docente realizado e analisar em que medida ele se relacionava aos dados obtidos no SARESP. O estudo qualitativo teve como principal estratĂ©gia a enquete exploratĂłria, com uso de roteiros de entrevista e de observação semiestruturados. O referencial teĂłrico sintetizou contribuiçÔes de Dennis Palumbo (1998 e de Marcus Figueiredo e Argelina Figueiredo (1986 para a compreensĂŁo do conceito e das etapas da polĂ­tica pĂșblica, assim como de Elba Barreto e Regina Pinto (2001, Blaine Worthen, James Sanders e Jody Fitzpatrick (2004 e Almerindo Afonso (1998 a respeito da discussĂŁo da avaliação de programas, entre outros. Concluiu-se que, apesar de a documentação dos programas de formação e o SARESP declararem que hĂĄ relação entre os resultados da avaliação e os programas propostos, a concretização desse propĂłsito depende do engajamento dos profissionais presentes nas diretorias de ensino. As açÔes formais da Secretaria da Educação para induzir esse uso de resultados nĂŁo se mostraram suficientes para assegurar o pretenso vĂ­nculo entre avaliação e formação docente.This work presents results of a study conducted between 2005 and 2006 entitled The use of the results of the SARESP Exam: the role of assessment in teacher education policies (Uso dos resultados do SARESP: o papel da avaliação nas polĂ­ticas de formação docente, whose purpose was to analyze possibilities and limits of the use of the results obtained by pupils in the SARESP Exam (School Performance Assessment System of the State SĂŁo Paulo to formulate and direct teacher education policies. The attention was focused on education programs for teachers of Portuguese Language to pupils in fundamental education. Four out of the thirteen Regional Education Directorships of the State of SĂŁo Paulo were visited to gain acquaintance with the teacher education programs they developed and to investigate to what extent they could be related to the results achieved in the SARESP exam. The qualitative study adopted as its main strategy the exploratory survey, with the use of semi-structured interview and observation scripts. The theoretical framework employed brought together contributions by Dennis Palumbo (1998 and Marcus Figueiredo and Argelina Figueiredo (1986 to understand the concept and stages of public policy, as well as by Elba Barreto and Regina Pinto (2001, Blaine Worthen, James Sanders and Jody Fitzpatrick (2004, and by Almerindo Afonso (1998 on the discussion about assessment programs, among others. It concludes that, the statements in the teacher education program and in the SARESP documentations about the correlation between the former and pupil assessment results notwithstanding, the actual achievement of positive results depends on the effective commitment of the professionals working at the Education Directorships. Formal actions by the Secretariat for Education to foster this use of the results have proved insufficient to ensure the proposed link between pupil assessment and teacher education.

  19. Pratical Implementation of Practical Chemistry among Secondary School Teachers

    Jimmi Copriady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at identifying differences in terms of the practical implementation of practical Chemistry teaching on the basis of teachers’ perspectives based on gender and location. Implementation of practical Chemistry in the current study focuses on four major aspects such as the design, preparation, implementation and evaluation. Furthermore, the study also explored the relationship among the aspects of design, preparation, implementation and evaluation. The study used a survey approach by using questionnaire. The study sample comprised of 236 Chemistry teachers, randomly selected in Pekan Baru, Riau in Indonesia. Pilot test involved 40 teachers and the findings of the pilot test revealed that the Cornbach Alpha value of the instrument constructs was between 0.81 and 0.91, hightening that the instrument has high level of reliability. The data was analyzed using inferential statistics such as independent t-test and Pearson correlation employing SPSS 19. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in practical implementation of practical Chemistry science among the teachers regarding the aspects of the design, preparation, implementation and evaluation based on gender and location. However, there is a significant different in relation to the aspect of preparation based on location. Meanwhile, Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there are significant correlations between and among all aspects associated with implementation of practical Chemistry. It is suggested that training and workshops for chemical science teachers can be implemented by the related organizations including the Ministry of Education, the Board of Education Quality Assurance as well as Center for Development and Empowerment of Educators for science. Besides, the collaboration is also highlighted for experienced teachers to be able to train and teach practical skills to novice teachers, especially in preparing tools and materials needed for practical activities.

  20. Life in the Pressure Cooker--School League Tables and English and Mathematics Teachers' Responses to Accountability in a Results-Driven Era

    Perryman, Jane; Ball, Stephen; Maguire, Meg; Braun, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on case-study research in four English secondary schools. It explores the pressure placed on English and mathematics departments because of their results being reported in annual performance tables. It examines how English and maths departments enact policies of achievement, the additional power and extra resources the pressure


  1. Evidence, explanations, and recommendations for teachers' field trip strategies

    Rebar, Bryan

    Field trips are well recognized by researchers as an educational approach with the potential to complement and enhance classroom science teaching by exposing students to unique activities, resources, and content in informal settings. The following investigation addresses teachers' field trip practices in three related manuscripts: (1) A study examining the details of teachers' pedagogical strategies intended to facilitate connections between students' experiences and the school curricula while visiting an aquarium; (2) A study documenting and describing sources of knowledge that teachers draw from when leading field trips to an aquarium; (3) A position paper that reviews and summarizes research on effective pedagogical strategies for field trips. Together these three pieces address key questions regarding teachers' practices on field trips: (1) What strategies are teachers employing (and not employing) during self-guided field trips to facilitate learning tied to the class curriculum? (2) What sources of knowledge do teachers utilize when leading field trips? (3) How can teachers be better prepared to lead trips that promote learning? The Oregon Coast Aquarium served as the field trip site for teachers included in this study. The setting suited these questions because the aquarium serves tens of thousands of students on field trips each year but provides no targeted programming for these students as they explore the exhibits. In other words, the teachers who lead field trips assume much of the responsibility for facilitating students' experience. In order to describe and characterize teachers' strategies to link students' experiences to the curriculum, a number of teachers (26) were observed as they led their students' visit to the public spaces of the aquarium. Artifacts, such as worksheets, used during the visit were collected for analysis as well. Subsequently, all teachers were surveyed regarding their use of the field trip and their sources of knowledge for their practices. A subset of eight teachers were interviewed using guided conversations in order to shed further light on their use of the aquarium field trip and their pedagogical preparation. Data from all sources were organized by repeating ideas relevant to the questions of interest. The resulting evidence was interpreted to support distinct categories of teacher strategies and experience and related claims about these strategies and experiences. Thus, findings reveal that teachers attempt to link the curriculum to the activities, resources, and content encountered on the trip using a variety of connections. However, these curriculum connections are characterized as products of opportunistic situations and reveal limited depth. Evidence further indicates that teachers treat the aquarium visit as a background experience for their students rather than as an opportunity to introduce new concepts or do an activity that is integrated into the curriculum. Nevertheless, teachers included in this study were leading field trips that created countless learning opportunities for their students. Because training specific to field trips is rarely included in preservice programs, teachers were asked about influences on their field trip practice with specific focus on observed strategies. Findings suggest four categories of training experiences that teachers apply to their practice: (1) informal mentoring; (2) past experience trip leading; (3) outdoor education training; (4) traditional education training. Overall findings along with a review of previous research are suggestive of many ways in which efforts to enhance students' learning opportunities may be developed by means of support for teachers. Foremost among recommendations is the idea that field trip pedagogy be integrated into science methods courses required for preservice teachers (the premise for the final manuscript). Furthermore, the findings of this study may serve as a starting point for museums interested in the development of specific support and teacher professional development activities intended to enhance teachers' use of their resources as learning opportunities for their students. Among the implications is the idea that museums and other institutions developing teacher professional development activities might capitalize on teachers' existing sources of knowledge, for example by providing structured support for peer-mentoring and guided reflections related to field trip preparations and skills.

  2. Teachers at Sea with the ARMADA Project

    Farrell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Two science teachers accompanied an international scientific party of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program on a 6-week expedition to the high Arctic Ocean this summer. Kathy Couchon, a middle school science teacher from Narragansett, RI, was sponsored by the NSF-funded ARMADA Project (www.armadaproject.org), directed by the Office of Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island. Erik Zetterberg, a high school teacher from Sweden, was sponsored by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. The purpose of the expedition was to collect rock and sediment cores in order to reconstruct environmental and climatic conditions in the polar region over the past 60 million years. The $12.5M expedition involved over 200 people from more than 10 countries, three icebreakers, and two helicopters. Cores collected on one vessel were transferred to a laboratory on another, where 20 scientists analyzed microfossils as well as sedimentology, chemistry, and lithology. The teachers participated early in all aspects of the expedition, including coring operations, helicopter flights for ice reconnaissance, laboratory work, and science meetings. Formal education, such as learning how to prepare sediment samples for micropaleontological analysis, was complemented by informal education during one-on-one conversations with scientists over meals, or in social gatherings. The teachers posted reports regularly on websites (e.g., http://tea.rice.edu tea_cuchonfrontpage.html) and participated in a teleconference via Iridium satellite phone. When asked to compare preconceived notions with actual experience, the teachers noted the following: (1) there are many things that scientists don't know (and they are often the first to admit this); (2) the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery does not diminish with age and experience; (3) teamwork among the scientists was greater than expected, and competition among individuals was not observed; and (4) much in the natural world is unknown and opportunities exist to make major discoveries (in other words, science isn't dead). The scientists made the following observations regarding participation by the teachers: (1) they assisted in the laboratory, and got a taste of scientific research; (2) conversations revealed what they know, and how they convey it to students, and thus how scientists may assist in the educational process; (3) the teachers did not hesitate to ask basic questions, a healthy exercise, because it required the scientists to re-examine and re-explain some of their fundamental assumptions; (4) the presence of the teachers encouraged the scientists to describe their results in a manner that is more accessible to a wider audience; and (5) the teachers increased awareness among the scientists by reminding them about their responsibilities to the broader world, beyond their particular subdisciplines. Suggestions for enhancing the experience, for both the teachers and the scientists, will be presented.

  3. Teacher as Researcher: Teacher Action Research in Teacher Education

    Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Historically, "teacher action research" and "teacher research" have been terms mostly used at the PK-12 level. Yet, embracing it fully and visibly in the teacher education realm is important because it raises awareness of the critical and transformative aspects of teaching and learning. It allows teacher research to be made visible and validated


  4. Pedagogical beliefs and attitudes of computer science teachers in Greece

    Georgios Fessakis; Tsampika Karakiza

    2011-01-01

    Pedagogical beliefs and attitudes significantly determine the professional skills and practice of teachers. Many professional development programs for teachers aim to the elaboration of the pedagogical knowledge in order to improve teaching quality. This paper presents the study of pedagogical beliefs of computer science teachers in Greece. The research data reveal that computer science teachers usually hold mixed traditional and constructivist theories which are generally irrelevant to eithe...

  5. Development of Teachers as Scientists in Research Experiences for Teachers Programs

    Faber, Courtney; Hardin, Emily; Klein-Gardner, Stacy; Benson, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the teachers' development as scientists for participants in three National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Teachers. Participants included secondary science and math teachers with varying levels of education and experience who were immersed in research environments related to engineering and science topics. Teachers' functionality as scientists was assessed in terms of independence, focus, relationships with mentors, structure, and ability to create new concepts. Hierarchies developed within these constructs allowed tracking of changes in functionality throughout the 6-week programs. Themes were further identified in teachers' weekly journal entries and exit interviews through inductive coding. Increases in functionality as scientists were observed for all teachers who completed both the program and exit interview ( n = 27). Seven of the 27 teachers reached high science functionality; however, three of the teachers did not reach high functionality in any of the constructs during the program. No differences were observed in demographics or teaching experience between those who did and did not reach high functionality levels. Inductive coding revealed themes such as teachers' interactions with mentors and connections made between research and teaching, which allowed for descriptions of experiences for teachers at high and low levels of functionality. Teachers at high functionality levels adjusted to open-ended environments, transitioned from a guided experience to freedom, felt useful in the laboratory, and were self-motivated. In contrast, teachers at low functionality levels did not have a true research project, primarily focused on teaching aspects of the program, and did not display a transition of responsibilities.

  6. Questioning Strategies of Literature Teachers among Grade 8 Filipino Students

    Magdalena M. Ocbian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Questioning is a useful and relevant tool to facilitate classroom discussion in a literature class. This study identified the levels of questions teachers use in their literature class, determined the different question strategies they utilized and proposed activities to enhance the questioning strategies of literature teachers. Video analysis was the main instrument used. These videos were provided during the conduct of class observations by the researchers. There were eight respondents in the study selected through total enumeration. They are teachers from Gubat Cluster of secondary schools of Sorsogon Province. To identify the levels of questions and questioning strategies, question tally form and percentage were used. Results revealed that knowledge was the most used level of questions followed by comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. The most used question technique is the participation, followed by proving, sequencing, wait time, balance and student questions. It was recommended that literature teachers vary their level of questions when discussing literary pieces. They may utilize different question techniques to develop critical thinking skills of their students. The use of the proposed activities may enhance the questioning strategies of literature teachers. Likewise, school heads and program supervisors may utilize video analysis technique as a mode for classroom observation.

  7. Assessment Beliefs and Practices of Language Teachers in Primary Education

    Ka?an Büyükkarc?

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of assessment, the process of collecting information on student achievement and performance, has long been advocated so that learning cycles can properly be planned; instruction can be adjusted during the course of learning, and programs can be developed to enhance student learning. Shifting to a more pedagogical conception, the assessment moves from source of information to an inseparable part of teaching and learning. Theory and research propose that especially formative assessment can play a critical role in adjusting teaching for student learning because assessment for learning (formative assessment provides information to be used as feedback to adjust the teaching and learning activities in which the students and teachers are engaged. This study aims to show primary school teachers’ beliefs about formative assessment. Besides, the study reveals the information about English language teachers’ real assessment practices in the primary education context. Despite course requirements, teachers’ positive beliefs and attitudes, the results of the study show that language teachers do not apply formative assessment practices as required in the national curriculum. Instead of using assessment formatively, they mostly use assessment for summative purposes.

  8. Evaluation of Teachers’ Instructional Technologies Integration Skills: A Qualitative Need Analysis for New Pedagogical Approaches

    Abdullah Ad?güzel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at identifying the teachers’ needs of new pedagogical approaches in technology-assisted courses. Data were collected through semi-structured interview form from 12 voluntary teachers from different branches at a technology-supported private school. Findings showed that teachers perceived smart boards and PowerPoint presentations as the fundamentals in classes. Results also indicated that the participants had troubles of integrating technologies at times despite of participating training on the use of instructional technologies. The study also revealed that in technology supported courses excessive concentration on technology hinders dealing with the students, and that the students' individual characteristics were neglected. Finally, the findings of the study indicated that different teaching strategies and approaches were not applied, the authentic materials and models were not used in classes. In the study it is recommended that teachers should be informed about integration of technology and pedagogy.

  9. A Qualitative Study on The Motivation of Turkish EFL Teachers Working At State Universities / Devlet Üniversitelerinde ÇalÄ±ĆŸan TĂŒrk Ä°ngilizce Öğretmenlerinin Motivasyonu Üzerine Nitel Bir AraƟtırma

    ÖLMEZER ÖZTÜRK, Elçin

    2015-01-01

    Following a qualitative research design, this study examines the motivation of Turkish EFL teachers working at state universities in Turkey. Purposeful sampling was used in the selection of participants and 20 teachers working at different universities participated in the study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and daily reflection entries. In the analysis of data, qualitative content analysis scheme of Creswell (2011) was used. The results revealed that teacher moti...

  10. EDUCATION CORRUPTION AND TEACHER ABSENTEEISM IN NIGERIA

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Education corruption displays ample evidence that warrants inefficiencies and absenteeism among teachers. Teachers are the transmitters of knowledge who help to ensure that children learn, they are role models and in most rural communities they are the most educated and respected personages. High teacher absenteeism can exist when teachers have very low levels of motivation to work and little commitment to the profession, and when there is lack of accountability in the education sector. Because of the importance of education to society, international bodies emphasize the need for attracting, developing and retaining effective teachers. It is necessary to state that reducing official corruption in the education sector, promoting teacher welfare, designing better systems for monitoring and reducing invalid absences are among the critical measures of combating teacher absenteeism. The survey research design was used for the study and the result supports that education corruption has significant positive relationship with teacher absenteeism

  11. The Teacher and Student as Pygmalions: Joint Effects of Teacher and Student Expectations.

    Feldman, Robert S.; Theiss, Andrew J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examined the joint effects of teachers' expectations about students and vice versa on the performance and attitudes of both participants. Results showed that student performance was a function of the teacher's expectations. (Author/GK)

  12. Public schools’ characteristics and teacher turnover in Oman

    Khairuddin Idris

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Teachers are the backbone of the educational systems and their turnover may threaten the whole educational system in any country. In Oman, teacher turnover is a neglected area of study and this article may help in shedding some light on teacher turnover phenomenon in Oman. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of school characteristics (e.g., school size, gender, time-shift, education type, and school location on the turnover intentions of teachers in public schools in Oman. Survey questionnaires were used to collect data from 214 public schools in Oman. 142 schools from all educational regions in Oman were participated in this study. Data analyses tools for this study were descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation, in addition to independents t-test and analysis of variance. The study revealed that teacher intentions to transfer to other schools are influenced by almost all the studied school characteristics. Policy makers and human resource recruiters in Ministry of Education should be aware of teachers’ preferences for certain schools to avoid teachers’ shortage in non-preferred schools. Further studies about the influence of school time-shift and teachers’ intentions to quit or transfer are needed to affirm the results in this study. This is the first study about the influence of school characteristics on teacher turnover in public schools in Oman. Thus, the value of this study stems from the uniqueness of this study which may serve as an eye opening indicator about teacher turnover in Oman.

  13. Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy

    Cox, Elena K.

    The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

  14. Characteristics of Public, Private, and Bureau of Indian Education Elementary and Secondary School Teachers in the United States: Results From the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey. First Look. NCES 2009-324

    Coopersmith, Jared

    2009-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the school teacher data files of the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public, private, and Bureau of Indian Education-funded (BIE) K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The public school


  15. The Ideal Psychology Teacher: Qualitative Analysis of Views from Brunei GCE A-Level Students and Trainee Psychology Teachers

    Nurul Azureen Omar; Sri Ridhwanah Matarsat; Nur Hafizah Azmin; Veronica Chung Ai Wei; Mohd Mu izzuddin Mohd Nasir; Ummi Kalthum Syahirah Sahari; Masitah Shahrill; Lawrence Mundia

    2014-01-01

    We qualitatively explored the notion of the ideal teacher from the context of pre-university Brunei General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (GCE A-Level) psychology students and trainee psychology teachers. Both previous research and our own analyses on this concept revealed that the so-called ideal teacher was neither a perfect nor a super teacher but rather an effective instructor who was firm, fair, and a good communicator. Psychology students of various ability levels (high achiev...

  16. Adult teachers

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I examine the research into the process of adult teachers’ practice-based learning as a part of an on-going project titled “Competence development through practice-based learning – a study of adult teacher’s learning processes”. The project relies on the notion of the adult teacher as...... a 'reflective practitioner’, who develops 'the language of practice’, through experience and learns when she is exposed to 'disjuncture’. Research done on continuing professional development and the inquiries done in the field of teacher thinking and within this the research on novices becoming...

  17. TEACHER NEEDED

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  18. Importance in Instructional Text: Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Task Demands.

    Broekkamp, Hein; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; van den Bergh, Huub

    2002-01-01

    History teachers and their 11th-grade students rated the relative importance of sections of instructional text on which teachers would be giving a test. Multilevel analysis revealed only a moderate correspondence between teachers in importance ratings. This suggested there were large differences between task demands of individual teachers

  19. Teacher's creative competence

    Anna Babicka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article's aim is to study what 180 Polish teachers understand by creativity and how they put it into practice. The Creative competency of teachers was evaluated, using 6 variables: 1 understanding of teaching as a creative action; 2 knowledge of opportunities and secure limits in implementing creative changes; 3 ability to create and change elements of classroom work; 4 understanding of educational entities and having the ability to act in order to increase the autonomy of such entities; 5 critical thinking; 6 ability to research their own practice. To do so both a semi-structured interview and direct observation in their classroom were utilized. Results point out the need to foster teachers' innovative and creative capabilities.

  20. Resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills

    Beaver, Melanie S.

    This study examined the resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills. Reading instruction in the middle school years should follow the natural cognitive progression that occurs in the adolescent brain from learning to read to reading to learn. Scientific reading is a different type of reading than most middle school students are accustomed to. It is important to understand that students will continue to be expected to read non-fiction critically for success in the 21st century. Effective teachers know this, and they perceive themselves as teachers of reading regardless of the content area in which their expertise lies. This qualitative research study was conducted at a rural middle school with three science teachers who employ before, during, and after literacy strategies when reading the textbook content with their students. The methodologies used in this study were interviews, observations, and document collection. The results of this study revealed the students' reading difficulties perceived by the teacher participants, the literacy strategies used by the teacher participants, the instructional resources the teacher participants used to improve comprehension, and the need for professional development in content area literacy.

  1. Self-efficacy in Environmental Education: Experiences of elementary education preservice teachers

    Gardner, Cynthia Crompton

    Despite research showing Environmental Education can provide positive student outcomes in academic achievement, critical thinking, motivation and engagement (Ernst, 2007; Lieberman & Hoody, 1998; Orr, 1992; Palmer, 1998; Powers, 2004; Volk & Cheak, 2003), Environmental Education is currently not a critical element in American public school K-12 education. The present study investigates self-efficacy in Environmental Education through a mixed methods research approach. The data reveal the participants' perspectives of their sense of self-efficacy in Environmental Education. It adds to the body of work on Environmental Education and self-efficacy by specifically investigating the topics through interviews with preservice teachers. Purposeful sampling is used to identify preservice elementary education teachers in their senior year of college with a high measure of self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is measured using the Environmental Education Efficacy Belief Instrument (Sia, 1992). Forty-six preservice teachers completed the instrument. Six preservice teachers were interviewed to determine experiences that impact their self-efficacy in Environmental Education. Continual comparison and cross-case analysis are used to analyze the data. The results reveal a relationship between personal experiences with nature as a young child and current beliefs toward their personal efficacy and teaching outcome efficacy in Environmental Education. Similar to the findings of Sia (1992), the researcher discovered that preservice teachers realize that they lack sufficient knowledge and skill in Environmental Education but believe that effective teaching can increase students understanding of Environmental Education. While the preservice teachers do not believe they will teach Environmental Education as well as other subjects, they will continually seek out better ways to teach Environmental Education. Interviews with participants who had a high self-efficacy revealed the importance of playing outdoors as young children and having an adult role model with whom to share nature. Results showed that experiences with nature are absent in formal schooling, including courses in teacher education programs.

  2. Organization a Culture of Self-Education of Music Teachers

    Dyganova, Elena Aleksandrovna; Yavgildina, Ziliya Mukhtarovna

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the culture of self-education of music teacher as a professionally necessary quality of a modern specialist in the field of music education. The author proposes finalized definitions of basic concepts; consistently reveals the essence, structure, criteria and indicators of self-culture of music teacher; reveals the potential


  3. Attracting and Retaining Teachers: A Question of Motivation

    Muller, Karin; Alliata, Roberta; Benninghoff, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Attracting and retaining competent teachers is a key concern when it comes to managing the supply and demand for teachers. This article examines the motivation that prompts people to enter or leave the teaching profession with the aim of identifying a decision framework for defining teacher policies. The results are based on the teacher workforce


  4. Teacher Empowerment and Receptivity in Curriculum Reform in China

    Lee, John Chi-Kin; Yin, Hong-Biao; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Jin, Yu-Le

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between teacher empowerment, teacher receptivity toward, and perceived outcomes of, a system-wide curriculum change, particularly national curriculum reform in basic education in China. The results of a survey of 1,646 teachers from six provinces indicate that teachers were positive in their receptivity and


  5. Critical Friends Group for EFL Teacher Professional Development

    Vo, Long Thanh; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2010-01-01

    For the best student outcomes, teachers need to engage in continuous professional development. As a result, models of teacher professional development have been developed, among which is the Critical Friends Group (CFG) technique. However, whether it works well with EFL teachers in an Asian context like Vietnam, where EFL teachers in particular do


  6. Toward Reconstructing the Narrative of Teacher Education: A Rhetorical Analysis of "Preparing Teachers"

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on insights from literary critic and theorist Kenneth Burke, this rhetorical analysis of "Preparing Teachers" (2010), a publication of the National Research Council, reveals then critiques' key assumptions that are shaping policies and current reform efforts in teacher education, including changes in U.S. teacher


  7. Infusing Science, Technology, and Society Into an Elementary Teacher Education Program: The Impact on Preservice Teachers

    Henning, Mary Beth; Peterson, Barbara R.; King, Kenneth Paul

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve science and social studies instruction, preservice teachers developed original science, technology, and society units to teach in elementary and middle school classrooms during their clinical field experience. Data revealed that the preservice teachers fell into categories of being skeptics, open-minded instructors, or


  8. Teacher expertise

    Rasmussen, Jens

    reform of 2007. The study included four teacher training colleges at two university colleges and about 100 students. In the reform and in the study focus was on professional development. Each of the colleges implemented a number of actions in order to see whether they had potential for bridging the gap...

  9. language teachers

    2007-01-01

    The Le Rosey Institute at Rolle (autumn and spring) and Gstaad (winter) is looking for part-time language teachers of ‹Bulgarian, Farsi, Hindi, Korean and Romanian for the start of the autumn term in September 2007. For further details, please contact : www.rosey.ch Please send applications with CVs to job@rosey.ch

  10. Teachers' beliefs about culturally relevant teaching in the science classroom

    Kelly-Jackson, Charlease Plushette

    In many of our nations' schools, African American students are experiencing inequitable opportunities to quality science. Since science teachers are one of the most influential factors on science learning and they are charged with instructing African American students, their beliefs and practices are vital to the understanding of this paradox. This mixed method study sought to investigate science teachers' beliefs about the importance of culturally relevant teaching in the classroom and their beliefs about critical issues and practices of culturally relevant teaching. Two research questions guided the conceptualization and implementation of this study: (1) Do science teachers believe culturally relevant teaching is an important part of their instruction; (2) What are science teachers' perceptions about critical issues and practices of culturally relevant teaching? The study was conducted in three phases. Survey data in Phase One revealed that 100% of the respondents believed culturally relevant teaching is important when working with culturally diverse students. Data also showed a significant consensus among the following pluralist statements; 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16, and 17. The statement, "culturally relevant practice is essential for creating an inclusive classroom environment" was endorsed (75%) by the respondents while 25% strongly agreed with the statement. Similarly, respondents strongly agreed (75%) with the statement "encouraging respect for cultural diversity is essential for creating an inclusive classroom environment" while 25% agreed. Interview results in Phase Two revealed that teachers had a general idea about culturally relevant pedagogy. Data further showed that three of the four teachers supported culturally relevant teaching in theory, but their support was not reflected in their daily classroom instruction. Misconceptions and/misunderstandings about culturally relevant teaching fell under several common themes: knowledge, teacher beliefs, practices and implementations, and barriers and challenges. Phase Three illustrated a case of culturally relevant science teaching in a holistic manner by way of interviews, observations, and documents. Documents (i.e. lesson plans, student assignments, philosophy of teaching statement, and students' standardized assessment results) collected from one exemplary teacher further illustrated how culturally relevant teaching is demonstrated in a science classroom.

  11. TEACHER PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISOR-TEACHER INTERACTION.

    AMIDON, EDMUND; BLUMBERG, ARTHUR

    TEACHER PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISOR-TEACHER INTERACTION WERE ANALYZED TO SUPPORT THE HYPOTHESIS THAT FOUR GROUPS, REPRESENTING DIFFERENT PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISORY BEHAVIOR, WOULD DIFFER WITH RESPECT TO TEACHER EVALUATIONS OF CONFERENCE PRODUCTIVITY, CONFERENCE LEARNING, AND THE COMMUNICATIVE ATMOSPHERE. THE 166 GRADUATE INSERVICE TEACHERS AT TEMPLE


  12. Attitudes of Teacher Education Students toward Teachers.

    Miller, A. H.; And Others

    Cognitive dissonance theory implies that teacher education students will optimally internalize and most fully use pedagogical learnings compatible with their attitude systems. In order to determine the self-reported attitudes of teacher education students toward teachers, a pilot-study sample of graduate students reacted to four teacher-types


  13. The effects of a four-semester pre-service secondary teacher education program on the perceptions and practices of pre-service science teachers concerning constructivist perspectives to teaching

    Masene, Robert Sinvula

    This is an exploratory study that examines: (a) changes in pre-service teachers philosophical and pedagogical conceptions concerning teaching and learning, (b) changes in pre-service teachers' perceptions concerning the instruction they received in their methods courses, and (c) the relationships among pre-service teachers pedagogical and philosophical conceptions, perceptions about the methods course instruction and their own instructional practices, and their actual instructional practices as revealed on videotapes over a four-semester sequence. A sample of thirty-six pre-service teachers (18 males and 18 females) from the Iowa-SSTEP four-semester sequence volunteered to participate in the study. Three instruments were used to generate the main data to answer the research questions. The three instruments were: (a) Teachers Pedagogical and Philosophical Interview (TPPI), (b) Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), and (c) videotape portfolio evaluated with the Expert Science Teaching Evaluation Model (ESTEEM). Major results include the following: (1) As pre-service teachers enrolled in a four-semester sequence progressed through the teacher education program, their conceptions concerning teaching and learning became significantly and increasingly more student-centered in terms of what students need to do to enhance their understanding of science concepts and processes as well as in their espoused philosophies of teaching and learning. (2) Pre-service teachers integrated their newly acquired student-centered conceptions from their methods courses, with their previous teacher-centered conceptions to develop mixed conceptions about teaching and learning. (3) Pre-service teachers' espoused conceptions and their perceptions about classroom practices rarely align observed teaching practices in their classroom. (4) Pre-service teacher cohort level in the Iowa-SSTEP sequence proved to have a positive and significant effect on pre-service teachers' constructivist practices of teaching and learning. Their student-centered practices increased as they ascended the hierarchy of the Iowa-SSTEP four-semester sequence. (5) Though reported conceptions, perceptions, and practices were increasingly student-centered as pre-service teachers progressed through the teacher education program, they were characterized as both teacher-centered and student-centered indicating that they retained some teacher-centered beliefs.

  14. A Mixed Method Analysis of the Interaction between Teacher Variables, Teacher Absences, School District Policies, and Student Achievement

    Dillehay, Glenn Woodrow, III.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher absenteeism is expensive, disrupts the continuity of educational activities, and results in students attending classes with less qualified substitute teachers. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships among teacher variables, teacher absenteeism, student achievement, and school district policy governing teacher


  15. Teacher Efficacy and Career Indecision among Pre-Service Teachers: A Model of Direct and Indirect Effects

    Slone, Mary Beth; Hancock, Mary D.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigates, through path analytic techniques, the influence of teacher efficacy on the career indecision of pre-service teachers. The sample consists of 305 students enrolled in Teacher Education programs at two southeastern universities. Results indicate that general teacher efficacy and career self-efficacy have significant


  16. Teacher Leaders: Boosting Teacher Effectiveness and Student Achievement. The Progress of Education Reform. Volume 11, Number 6

    Education Commission of the States (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Teacher leaders are teachers who aspire to stretch beyond their classrooms to engage in leadership roles that take many shapes and forms, both "informal" and "formal." These teachers view the school as a whole, see the "big picture" and focus on how they can help improve aspects of the school to result in increases in student achievement. Teacher…

  17. Benefits of teaching voice amplification as related to subjective laryngeal symptoms in teachers, and to the listening conditions for pupils

    Jonsdottir, Valdis

    2005-04-01

    Teachers unfavorable working conditions-large classrooms with poor acoustics, background noise and the great distance between teacher and pupils often are the main reasons for teachers voice problems. For pupils, the same circumstances simultaneously create unfavorable listening conditions. One way to diminish the vocal load of teaching is by making use of technical equipment. This Icelandic study explores whether voice amplification usage: (1) diminishes the teachers subjective symptoms of vocal fatigue; (2) makes it easier for pupils to listen and follow lessons; and (3) reveals other benefits and/or disadvantages of the usage of amplification in classrooms. Thirty-three teachers with their students (total 791), from grade school to university level, volunteered as subjects. The teachers used amplification in class for at least a week. At the end of the research period, the participants answered questionnaires, except the pupils between 6-9 years of age who were asked two questions. The results showed: (1) the majority of teachers found it easier to talk and experienced less fatigue using vocal amplification; (2) the students found it easier to hear the teacher through class chatter and to follow the lessons; (3) the disadvantages mentioned were mainly technical problems.

  18. Using authentic intellectual assessment to determine level of instructional quality of teacher practice of new elementary school teachers based on teacher preparation route

    Cassidy, Kimberly E.

    This study was designed to determine whether or not differences existed in the effectiveness between teachers from traditional and alternative teacher preparation routes. The NCLB requirement of having a highly qualified teacher in every classroom has brought close attention to the assessment of teacher effectiveness and the preparation of teacher candidates. The study population included elementary school teachers, within their first three years of teaching who taught science, from five southeastern Virginia schools. For this study, an authentic intellectual assessment rubric created by Newmann, Bryk, and Nagaoka (1997) was utilized to measure teacher effectiveness in terms of the level of instructional quality of new teachers. Chi-square and t test analyses were conducted to investigate the difference between scores of science lesson assignments of new elementary teachers based on type of teacher preparation route the teachers completed. The critical finding of the study was that whereas there were no statistically significant differences in the science assignment scores between traditionally and alternatively prepared teachers, there were significant weaknesses in all teacher participants in the areas of construction of knowledge and connection to students' lives. The results of this study have implications for teachers, teacher preparation routes, teacher development coordinators of school divisions, and those in charge of instructional policies.

  19. Job satisfaction among secondary school teachers

    Muhammad Madi Abdullah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides empirical evidence on the differences in the job satisfaction among secondary school teachers in Sabah with respect to gender, service category, job title, tenure and place of origin. It also attempts to identify the work dimension factors that affect the job satisfaction of the teachers and to ascertain how these factors relate to the aforementioned teachers’ characteristics. A survey was conducted with the participation of 200 teachers. The teachers’ job satisfaction were determined by two separate measures namely overall and facet specific overall job satisfaction. The work dimension factors were clustered into six comprising pay, working conditions, co-workers, promotion, work itself and supervision. This study reveals that secondary school teachers in Tawau, Sabah were generally satisfied with their job; there is a significant relationship between job satisfaction and gender, whereby the male teachers were generally more satisfied than female teachers. The graduate teachers were more satisfied than non-graduate teachers. The higher ranking teachers were more satisfied than the ordinary teachers while the older teachers were more satisfied than their younger counterparts. However, there is no significant relationship between places of origin of teachers with job satisfaction. Based on the bivariate correlation tests, six work dimensions of teaching job are significantly related to teachers’ job satisfaction. In addition, there were significant different between the six dimensions by gender and service category of teachers. Only co-workers dimension is not significantly different among teachers’ career stage and their tenure of service. There was no significant difference between all the work dimensions and teachers’ place of origin. Based on the findings of the study several recommendations are forwarded.

  20. Tangled paths: Three experienced teachers' growth in understanding during an extended science community of practice professional development effort

    Brown, Nancy Melamed

    This qualitative investigation extends the study of teacher learning within a reform-based community of practice model of professional development. This long-term, multiple case study examined three experienced teachers' transformations in thinking about science instruction. Data were collected during the three years of the Guided Inquiry supporting Multiple Literacies research project, designed to develop instructional practices informed by a socio-cultural, inquiry-based orientation. Data sources included: transcripts of semi-structured interviews collected at strategic points, the teacher's journals, initial application information, and teachers' written case studies. Using an interpretive case study approach, tenets of the teachers' orientations were identified through a recursive process. Results are organized to reflect two principles that were integral to the design of the professional development community. The first principle describes changes in teachers' orientations about the goals and characteristics of science instruction in the elementary grades. The second describes changes about teachers' knowledge about themselves as learners and the influence of this knowledge on their thinking about science instruction and student learning. Illustrative findings indicate that: (a) it is possible for teachers' language regarding conceptions of their practice to change with only superficial change in their orientations, (b) teachers can hold dualistic ways of thinking about their practice, (c) in some cases, teachers use a significant amount of autobiography about their own learning to explain their practice; over time, this was replaced with warrants using the language that developed within the professional development community, and (d) long-term case studies revealed differences in orientations that emerged and were refined over time. These findings provide strong support for communities of practice as a model of professional development and hold implications for advancing teacher learning.

  1. Research Plan: Teacher Learning For CLIL Teachers

    Bovenlander, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed research questions of the participating schools in the embedded research of the U-Teach programme demonstrate a notion of a lack of teacher learning in bilingual education and a lack of collaboration between teachers of English and other subject teachers. (How) can bilingual education in the Netherlands -TTO- be improved by (more) collaboration between the teacher of English and the other subject teachers? Two of the schools (Herman Wesselink College & Regionale Scholengemeenscha...

  2. 'To Touch a Life Forever': A Discourse on Trainee Teachers' Perceptions of What It Means To be an Effective Teacher in the Primary School.

    Lunn, Paul; Bishop, Alison

    2003-01-01

    Presents the results of a study that examined trainee teachers' perceptions of themselves as effective teachers. Focuses on the perceptions, ascertained through a questionnaire, of a Year 3 group (n=75) enrolled in a primary education teacher trainee course. (CMK)

  3. Chinese Middle School Teacher Job Satisfaction and Its Relationships with Teacher Moving

    Chen, Junjun

    2010-01-01

    This study examined teacher job satisfaction in Chinese middle schools from the aspects of school, community, and life and the relationships between these factors and teacher moving. A convenience sample of 294 teachers was approached through a 35-item questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Three major results were found: (1) Chinese middle


  4. Head Start Mentor Teachers Impact Child Outcomes in Protege Teachers' Classrooms

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Abbott-Shim, Martha; VandeWiele, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the results of an evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention, a mentoring program for early childhood educators. This mentoring program includes 3 components: Mentor Teacher Seminar, Mentor teachers supporting professional development of Protege teachers throughout the school year, and Mentor coordinator meetings


  5. Associations of Teacher Credibility and Teacher Affinity with Learning Outcomes in Health Classrooms

    Gray, DeLeon L.; Anderman, Eric M.; O'Connell, Ann A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study (N = 633), we examine the role of teacher credibility and teacher affinity in classrooms. We explore the relations among these two characteristics and student gains in knowledge and valuing of learning about HIV and pregnancy prevention across high school classrooms. Results marshaled support for the notion that teacher…

  6. Secondary School Teachers’ Perception of “Teacher Professional Development”: A Case Study of Teachers from Five Districts of Uganda.

    Alice Merab Kagoda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher professional development (TPD is important in keeping teachers abreast with changes that characterise the 21st century schools. However, TPD will only be valuable if teachers perceive it as important. Moreover the varying perceptions of teacher professional development by teachers are likely to affect their view of TPD. Using data collected from secondary school teachers, this study explored teachers’ understanding of the concept “teacher professional development, TPD approaches used by teachers and barriers/constraints they face. Results show that teachers have narrow understanding of the concept, and that to many TPD meant subject content upgrading by going back to teacher training college, while others view it as attending workshops and seminars. Barriers mentioned included shortage of time, lack of funds, lack of motivation and support by head teachers and government as a whole. Researchers recommend that teacher education should incorporate a component of professional teacher development in the initial teacher training. The head teachers and Ministry of Education and Sports should support in-service teachers in their endeavour to develop professionally. Teachers with low selfesteem should be motivated through attendance of conferences, workshops and group activities at local level.

  7. Teachers as Learners

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    In "Teachers as Learners", a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning. Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teaching…

  8. Helping Teachers Discover Empathy

    Aspy, David N.

    1975-01-01

    This article suggests four steps for interpersonal training for teachers. The four steps are: 1) establishing a common definition for the term "empathy"; 2) helping each teacher appreciate past empathic understanding; 3) helping teachers assess other teachers' levels of empathic understanding; and 4) helping teachers become fairly precise judges


  9. Teacher Self-Concept and Teacher Effectiveness as Perceived by Teachers of English and Students of Senior High Schools

    Chuzaimah Dahlan Diem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether self-concept of EFL teachers influenced their effectiveness in teaching English as a foreign language, as perceived by both teachers and students. The study involved 275 EFL teachers and 88 senior high school students in South Sumatra. Variables of education, teaching experience, and age were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, and specific hypotheses were tested to see whether the addition of the other independent variables could add to the effectiveness of the teacher. The results showed significant relationships between self-concept and all the four factors used to define teacher effectiveness. The combination of self-concept and experience serves as the first salient factor influencing the four factors of teacher effectiveness in addition to self-concept alone. Education was also found to be a factor which influenced teacher effectiveness

  10. EFL Teachers' Self-regulation and Job Performance

    Atiyeh Kamyabi Gol; Nahid Royaei

    2013-01-01

    The current study explored the relationship between Iranian EFL teachers' self-regulation and job performance. To empirically explore the postulated correlation between teachers' self-regulation and job performance, 80 EFL teachers from various language institutes in Mashhad were asked to complete the "Teachers Self-Regulation Scale" and the "Job Performance Scale". The results of the finding confirmed the hypothesized relationship between teachers' self-regulation and job performance. Moreov...

  11. TEACHERS NEEDED

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  12. A comparison of teacher and principal perception of an outstanding biology teacher

    Searles, William E.; Ng, Raymond W. M.

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the level of agreement or disagreement between principals and teachers when using established criteria to measure the effectiveness of a biology teacher. To obtain information regarding their perceptions of an outstanding biology teacher, twenty-two principals and forty-one biology teachers were chosen randomly from English-speaking high schools within a 50 km radius of metropolitan Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The measuring instrument was a modified version of Dieter's questionnaire that evolved from his doctoral study of the National Association of Biology Teachers-Outstanding Biology Teacher Award Program. The data collected from the two populations were tested using one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance) or by applying normal approximation. Results indicated that both the principals and teachers agree on the relative importance of most criteria, particularly those related to the teacher's classroom behavior and academic background in biology. From such results, it was possible to construct one stereotype of the outstanding biology teacher. A number of recommendations were made from the results of the study, which were directed to the (a) teachers and their professional organization, (b) principals and the school boards, (c) teacher training institutions, and (d) researchers in teacher evaluation.

  13. Not without the Art!! the Importance of Teacher Artistry When Applying Drama as Pedagogy for Additional Language Learning

    Dunn, Julie; Stinson, Madonna

    2011-01-01

    For more than 30 years drama has been promoted as a valuable teaching tool for language learning. Recent research results have reinforced this position. However, these and other earlier studies reveal that the overall success of the work is dependent, at least in part, upon the artistry of the teacher and the quality of the pretext materials used


  14. E-LEARNING-BASED TRAINING MODEL FOR ACCOUNTING TEACHERS

    Endang Sri Andayani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: E-Learning-Based Training Model for Accounting Teachers. To improve the competencies of teachers located on remote and diverse areas, it is viable and commendable to implement e-learning-based training. In view of this purpose, the present action research examines the effectiveness of e-learning-based training for accounting teachers. The findings reveal that teachers with poor ICT skills need to take orientation around online class first in order to get familiar with the use of ICT for learning purposes. Meanwhile, teachers with good ICT skills are able to engage directly in the training. The re­search project also shows that the effectiveness of training can be achieved through sequentially organ­ized materials and accessed through the learning progress of the trainees. Encouragement to the trainees for active involvement in the discussion forums during the training results in high final scores at the end of the training session. Keywords: E-learning, teacher training, accounting, East Java Abstrak: Model Pelatihan Berbasis E-Learning bagi Guru Akunting. Program pengembangan pro­fessional bagi para guru merupakan agenda utama untuk meningkatkan kualitas pendidikan. Untuk meningkatkan kompetensi guru, implementasi pelatihan berbasis e-learning dimungkinkan untuk men­jangkau para guru yang berasal dari berbagai wilayah terpencil. Penelitian tindakan ini menguji efek­tivitas pelatihan berbasis e-learning pada guru-guru akuntansi di Jawa Timur. Temuan penelitian meng­ungkap bahwa para guru yang memiliki kecakapan ICT rendah harus mengambil pelatihan orientasi pembelajaran online terlebih dahulu agar akrab dengan penggunaan ICT untuk tujuan-tujuan pembela­jaran. Sedangkan para guru yang sudah memiliki kecakapan ICT memadai dapat langsung mengikuti pelatihan. Efektivias pelatihan dapat dicapai dengan cara mengorganisasikan materi pelatihan secara berurutan dan hanya dapat diakses sesuai dengan kemajuan belajar peserta pelatihan. Dorongan partisi­pasi bagi peserta untuk terlibat aktif dalam forum diskusi menghasilkan nilai akhir yang tinggi pada akhir pelatihan. Kata kunci: E-learning, pelatihan guru, akuntansi, Jawa Timur

  15. Teacher-student interactions and domain-specific motivation: The relationship between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and motivation in middle school science

    Smart, Julie Brockman

    2009-11-01

    This study examined interactions between middle school science students' perceptions of teacher-student interactions and their motivation for learning science. Specifically, in order to better understand factors affecting middle school students' motivation for science, this study investigated the interactions between middle school students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior in their science classroom and their efficacy, task value, mastery orientations, and goal orientation for learning science. This mixed methods study followed a sequential explanatory model (Cresswell & Plano-Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in two phases, with quantitative data in the first phase informing the selection of participants for the qualitative phase that followed. The qualitative phase also helped to clarify and explain results from the quantitative phase. Data mixing occurred between Phase One and Phase Two (participant selection) and at the interpretation level (explanatory) after quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately. Results from Phase One indicated that students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors were predictive of their efficacy for learning science, task value for learning science, mastery orientation, and performance orientation. These results were used to create motivation/perception composites, which were used in order to select students for the qualitative interviews. A total of 24 students with high motivation/high perceptions, low motivation/low perceptions, high motivation/low perceptions, and low motivation/high perceptions were selected in order to represent students whose profiles either supported or refuted the quantitative results. Results from Phase Two revealed themes relating to students' construction of their perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and dimensions of their efficacy and task value for science. Students who reported high motivation and high perceptions of teacher-student interactions during the quantitative phase described the most instances of teacher cooperative behaviors, such as teacher helpfulness and understanding. Conversely, students reporting low motivation and low perceptions of teacher-student interactions described the most instances of teacher oppositional behavior, such as harsh and impatient behaviors. An in-depth description of categories and subcategories is also provided. This study concludes with an interpretive analysis of quantitative and qualitative results considered both separately and together. Implications for middle grades science education are discussed, including recommendations for behavior management, scaffolding students' transition to middle school, making explicit connections to science careers, and providing opportunities for small successes within the science classroom. Implications for science teacher education, limitations of the study, and future research directions are also discussed.

  16. The Impact of Lifelong Learning Teacher Education in Secondary School Results El Impacto de la FormaciĂłn Permanente del Profesorado de EducaciĂłn Secundaria en los Resultados Escolares.

    Paula GonzĂĄlez-Vallinas

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies dealing with factors which have an influence on students outcomes are reviewed, teacher variables and teacher training are among their most common findings to influence school achievement. This study analyses the variable in-service teacher training on students? academic achievement. The analysis levels are departments and schools, being department the level where the relation among variables is more significative. There are significative correlations between the in-service teacher training in their own subject and the subject pedagogy in 50% of the analysed departments. In-service teacher training is recommended to be organized, taking into account these differences (context, teacher variables, in- service teacher training variables among departments, schools and districts to compensate the unequal school variables. Existe evidencia sobre la influencia de algunos factores en el rendimiento escolar de los centros y entre ellos de manera consistente aparecen las caracterĂ­sticas del profesorado y su formaciĂłn. Este estudio analiza la formaciĂłn del profesorado con los resultados escolares de los centros de educaciĂłn secundaria en Asturias. De las variables de formaciĂłn, es Ășnicamente la formaciĂłn en la asignatura y su didĂĄctica la que se asocia a los resultados en la asignatura. Se realizan anĂĄlisis en dos niveles de agregaciĂłn, departamento y centro, observĂĄndose que es en los niveles de departamento donde existen las correlaciones mĂĄs significativas. Se aporta evidencia para la organizaciĂłn de una formaciĂłn del profesorado que asigne recursos de formaciĂłn en los diferentes niveles en base a sus desigualdades de origen (contexto, variables del profesorado y de formaciĂłn y que garantice una efectiva igualdad de oportunidades para el conjunto de la poblaciĂłn escolar de la Comunidad AutĂłnoma.

  17. The Results of Teaching Middle School Students Two Relaxation Techniques as Part of a Conflict Prevention Program.

    Dacey, John S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Boston College Conflict Prevention Program techniques for relaxation and self-control were taught to middle-school students in two Boston schools. Preliminary results from teacher interviews revealed that students spontaneously used these methods to calm their "fight-or-flight" reactions in real conflicts. Results also indicated that females


  18. DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH ABOUT FIRST AID TEACHING BY PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Ruben Navarro PatĂłn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the current situation of first aid teaching at Elementary School as a Physical Education content. The research population consisted of active teachers who taught Physical Education in Elementary School, in the Lugo province schools. The sample consisted of 36 teachers (N=36. An ad hoc questionnaire with 22 questions about the interest topic was applied to obtain data. The statistical program SPSS version 20.0 was used to analyze data. The results reveal a poor use of first aid as a classroom programming content in Elementary School.

  19. Framing the debate over teacher unions

    William C. Smith

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The power of teacher unions in the U.S. has waned since the 2010 mid-term elections.  The convergence of business conservatism and teacher accountability ideologies has led to an intense targeting of public teacher unions as a problem, both economically and educationally.  Using the target audience framework of Schneider and Ingram (1993, I break down the framing used in the present anti-union movement and explore a local example of anti-union legislation in Pennsylvania.  The analysis reveals a socially constructed dichotomy in which victimized children are pitted against greedy teachers.  To stem this wave of anti-unionism, teacher unions must recognize their position as public contenders and rearticulate their message using child-first rhetoric.

  20. Dissonant Feedback about Achievement and Teachers' Expectations.

    Bognar, Carl J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates impact of achievement test results (N=285) on 13 sixth-grade teachers' expectations using hypotheses from cognitive dissonance theory. Shows teacher expectations changed very little as a result of feedback, and test results for both under- and overestimated students were rejected. (AH)

  1. Teacher Test Accountability.

    Larry H. Ludlow

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the high stakes of teacher testing, there is no doubt that every teacher test should meet the industry guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Unfortunately, however, there is no public or private business or governmental agency that serves to certify or in any other formal way declare that any teacher test does, in fact, meet the psychometric recommendations stipulated in the Standards. Consequently, there are no legislated penalties for faulty products (tests nor are there opportunities for test takers simply to raise questions about a test and to have their questions taken seriously by an impartial panel. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems (NES in their 1999 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT Technical Report, and more specifically, to identify those technical characteristics of the MECT that are inconsistent with the Standards. A second purpose of this article is to call for the establishment of a standing test auditing organization with investigation and sanctioning power. The significance of the present analysis is twofold: a psychometric results for the MECT are similar in nature to psychometric results presented as evidence of test development flaws in an Alabama class-action lawsuit dealing with teacher certification (an NES-designed testing system; and b there was no impartial enforcement agency to whom complaints about the Alabama tests could be brought, other than the court, nor is there any such agency to whom complaints about the Massachusetts tests can be brought. I begin by reviewing NES's role in Allen v. Alabama State Board of Education, 81-697-N. Next I explain the purpose and interpretation of standard item analysis procedures and statistics. Finally, I present results taken directly from the 1999 MECT Technical Report and compare them to procedures, results, and consequences of procedures followed by NES in Alabama.

  2. Social and psychological characteristics of the class teacher interaction with students

    E.B. Petrushikhina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the results of socio-psychological studies of classroom management, performed on the basis of a theoretical model of value exchange, developed by R.L.Krichevsky. Classroom management is understood as a kind of management activity of a teacher, aimed at organizing group of students. Factor analysis revealed two major factors of the effectiveness of classroom management: the nature of the relationship between the students and their relations to the class teacher. As teacher’s activity characteristics, we considered manifestations of his attitudes toward students, leadership style, characteristics of individual interaction with students. It is shown that the activity of the class teacher, aimed at meeting the critical social needs of students, has two major dimensions: taking care about students and development of their motivation. We analyze the impact of social and perceptual characteristics of the teacher on the effectiveness of his interaction with students. We reveal the features of self-assessment and reflective evaluation of personality and activity of a class teacher, the specifics of causal attributions of success and failure of students in different areas of school life.

  3. Processes of negotiation of meanings on algebraic thinking in a community of practice of pre-service mathematics teacher education

    MĂĄrcia Cristina de Costa Trindade Cyrino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We presented in this paper results of a research which aimed to investigate how the community of practice context of pre-service mathematics teacher education collaborates for learning on algebraic thinking by these future teachers. We analyzed, taking into account the Social Theory of Learning developed by Wenger (1998 as a theoretical frame, processes of negotiation of meanings present in participants' algebraic thinking in the development of tasks in one of the actions of the project "Mathematical Education of Teachers of Mathematics" inside the program "Universidade sem Fronteiras". This analysis allowed us to define some forms of member participation and explicit reification of algebraic thinking, due to some interactions in the processes of negotiation of meanings, which revealed changes in the identity of participants in become teachers of mathematics.

  4. The Implications of Teacher Effectiveness Requirements for Initial Teacher Education Reform

    S. G. Pretorius

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: School effectiveness research shows that teacher effectiveness is the single most important school-based factor in student success. The effects of poor teaching linger and can be measured for at least three years after students have left the classroom. It is too late to wait until secondary school level for backlogs to be eradicated. Education systems, such as the South African system, which grapple with large numbers of dysfunctional schools, should look anew at teacher effectiveness in all school phases. The urgent need for highly effective teachers in every classroom requires that education systems develop a comprehensive definition of teacher effectiveness and create training programmes to develop it. Thus, the problem investigated is: What are the characteristics, skills, attitudes and behaviors associated with effective teachers and what is the best way in which schools of education can adapt initial teacher education to meet the challenges of today’s classrooms? Approach: A mixed method approach was adopted. In addition to an in-depth literature review, open-ended questionnaires, probing perceptions of teacher effectiveness issues were distributed to teachers, school principals, policy officials and teacher educators. Interviews were conducted with a variety of educational experts. Classroom observations of experienced and novice teachers were conducted in a variety of contexts using open-ended classroom observation checklists. Results: Based on the findings of the research a synthesis of the characteristics, knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors associated with effective teachers was developed. Conclusion: If teachers are to be effective their initial training will have to be effective. This study has identified the characteristics and behaviours associated with effective teachers. These indicators are broad guidelines for schools of education to stimulate teacher education reform. Covering the curriculum, structuring of content, appropriate pacing and alignment, clear goal setting, clarity of content and presentation, are a few requirements for effective teachers which have direct implications for teacher education.

  5. ATTITUDES OF ENGLISH TEACHER CANDIDATES TOWARD ICT

    HISMANOGLU, Murat; HISMANOGLU, SIBEL

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of English teacher candidates at formal and distance higher education contexts toward ICT and reveal whether there was a significant difference between these two groups in terms of their attitudes toward ICT. The sample of the study consisted of 175 prospective English teachers at two different higher education contexts. The participants were randomly selected among forth-year students at the ELT departments of Euopean University of L...

  6. Secondary Science Teachers' Beliefs and Persistence: A Longitudinal Mixed-Methods Study

    Wong, Sissy S.; Luft, Julie A.

    2015-11-01

    While many studies focus on why teachers leave the classroom, there remains a need to study why teachers persist in teaching. One area to study is the beliefs of teachers, which may impact persistence in the field. This 5-year mixed-methods study explored whether 35 beginning secondary science teachers' beliefs were related to their persistence in teaching. Quantitative analysis of the teachers' responses to annual semi-structured interviews revealed that teachers with more student-centered beliefs were more likely to persist at the end of the third year of teaching. Additionally, the teaching beliefs of teachers were more teacher-centered, while the learning beliefs of teachers were more student-centered. A case study of one persisting teacher and one non-persisting teacher revealed that personal experiences and knowledge impacted beliefs about teaching and learning. Bruce, who had extensive inquiry-based school experiences, believed in teaching via student-centered methods. Oscar, who underwent mostly direct instruction during his school experiences, believed in teacher-centered instruction and focused on classroom management. This longitudinal study contributes to the field of science education by examining beginning secondary science teacher persistence over time. Implications from this study call for challenging teacher beliefs during the induction period, proper placement of new teachers into their first teaching positions, and understanding the impact of prior experiences on teachers' beliefs.

  7. Beginning Chemistry Teachers Use of the Triplet Relationship During their First Three Years in the Classroom

    Adams, Krista

    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been described as the knowledge teachers' use in the process of designing and implementing lessons to a particular group of students. This includes the most effective representations that make the content understandable to students, together with the preconceptions and misconceptions that students hold. For chemistry, students have been found to have difficulty with the discipline due to its reliance upon three levels of representation called the triplet: the macro, the submicro, and the symbolic. This study examines eight beginning chemistry teachers' depiction of the chemistry content through the triplet relationship and modifications as a result of considering students' understanding across the teacher's first three years in the classroom. The data collected included classroom observations, interviews, and artifacts for the purpose of triangulation. The analysis of the data revealed that beginning chemistry teachers utilized the abstract components, submicro and symbolic, primarily in the first year. However, the teachers began to engage more macro representations over time building a more developed instructional repertoire. Additionally, teachers' developed an awareness of and responded to their students' understanding of learning atomic structure during the second and third year teaching. The results of this study call for preservice and induction programs to help novice chemistry teachers build a beginning repertoire that focuses on the triplet relationship. In so doing, the teachers enter the classroom with a repertoire that allows them to address the needs of their students. Finally, the study suggests that the triplet relationship framework should be revisited to include an additional component that frames learning to account for socioscientific issues and historical contributions.

  8. REDUCED EFFICIENCY AS A FACTOR MANIFESTING THE EMOTIONAL BURNOUT OF TEACHERS OF PRE-SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS

    Zhanna Viktorovna Vodenitskaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the working efficiency of teachers of pre-school educational institutions. Professional work of teachers is one of the most psychologically intense social activities. Lack of uniform requirements from the administration, complex relationships between colleagues, external restraint of emotions lead to increased emotional stress, which adversely affects the health. The traces of stressful experiences of teachers manifest themselves in teachers’ negative attitude to work, constant fatigue, distraction, reduced work efficiency, and dissatisfaction with professional activity. The article describes the reduced efficiency (fatigue, monotony, mental satiation, stress as a factor manifesting the emotional burnout of teachers of kindergartens and analyzes the causes of the syndrome of "emotional burnout". The article presents the results of the empirical research of decreased performance of teachers of preschool educational institutions in the conditions of implementing the Federal state educational standards, which allow not only to reveal the interdependence of the factors of burnout symptoms of kindergarten teachers, but also to provide them timely with psychological support, knowledge of the laws of preservation and strengthening of mental health in pedagogical work, and the ability to manage their own negative emotions.

  9. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    Sara Jalali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

  10. Teachers' Views of Moral Education Topics - Taiwan and the USA

    Lin, Huey-Ya; Davidman, Patricia; Petersen, George; Thomas, R. Murray

    1998-01-01

    In a questionnaire survey, 94 teachers in Taiwan and 140 in the United States judged which topics among 20 moral issues would be appropriate subjects of study in grade six of the primary school and in the first year of the university. The issues related to religion, ethnicity, gender, health care, crime, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, guns, government corruption, birth control, caring for the elderly, and television programming. The results revealed great diversity of opinion within each group of respondents. No single topic was approved by all teachers in either group, nor was any topic rejected by all. Among the 234 teachers, no two offered precisely the same configuration of answers over the 20 topics. Nevertheless, some group trends could be identified for individual topics. For example, in both countries the great majority of respondents would teach about industrial pollution, whereas very few would approve of trying to identify the best religion. In the rationales teachers offered in support of their choices, the four reasons that figured most prominently in both countries were that a topic would contribute to the nation's welfare, would help students to make wise decisions, would be interesting for students, and would represent a peaceful way to face social problems.

  11. An Analysis on Proactive-Reactive Personality Profiles in Student-Teacher Relationship through the Metaphorical Thinking Approach

    Yucel, A. Seda; Kocak, Canan; Cula, Serpil

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the proactive and reactive personality traits in teachers and students. These traits were interpreted with the help of the ideas and images revealed through metaphors. With the help of these metaphors, the certain imaginative categories and statements of student teachers about the teacher, the student and teacher-student


  12. An Interpretive Inquiry of the Case Law of Teacher Evaluation in the Southern Regional Education Board States: Forecasting Pressing Problems

    Kidder-Wilkerson, Kathy S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze case law related to teacher evaluation between 1980 and 2008 in the SREB states to determine the problems associated with teacher evaluation and if these problems were documented in the literature. Content analysis of teacher dismissal cases revealed many types of teacher evaluation problems. The two most


  13. An Analysis on Proactive-Reactive Personality Profiles in Student-Teacher Relationship through the Metaphorical Thinking Approach

    Yucel, A. Seda; Kocak, Canan; Cula, Serpil

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the proactive and reactive personality traits in teachers and students. These traits were interpreted with the help of the ideas and images revealed through metaphors. With the help of these metaphors, the certain imaginative categories and statements of student teachers about the teacher, the student and teacher-student…

  14. Plant nutrition from teachers thinking

    González Rodríguez, Concepción;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, itŽs analyzed which contents related to plant nutrition are considered important by a group of secondary education teachers. Its objective is also to determine the existence of any correlations among teachers, depending on the selected and most valued contents in the evaluation activities and questions.The analysis of the obtained results has shown that the contents in which teachers are more focused are those describing the differences between autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition, the photosynthesis process and the structures involved on it (plant and cellular organs. On the other hand, the less considered contents are related to the nutrition general concept, breathing concept and those associated to the ecological dimension of plant nutrition. The existence of certain trends among the teachers taking part in this study has been confirmed; a prevailing correlation has also been found. The majority trend is the physiogical.

  15. State Teacher Evaluation and Teacher Education

    Marchant, Gregory J.; David, Kristine A.; Rodgers, Deborah; German, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Current accountability trends suggest an increasing role in state mandates regarding teacher evaluation. With various evaluation models and components serving as the basis for quality teaching, teacher education programs need to recognize the role teacher evaluation plays and incorporate aspects where appropriate. This article makes that case and


  16. Teacher Collaboration: Implications for New Mathematics Teachers

    Gellert, Laura M.; Gonzalez, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    One increasingly popular way of supporting new teachers is through the use of mentoring. New teachers are often paired with mentors as one of a number of supports meant to aid new teachers as they begin their career. The various types of mentoring range from school based mentors assigned by the school to specialty mentors, such as math coaches.…

  17. Perceptions of Secondary Education School Principals on Geography Teachers and Lessons

    Mustafa Sagdic

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the perceptions of secondary school principals’ on geography teachers and geography lessons. For this purpose a semi structured interview form containing some open ended questions was given to the participants consisting of school principals working at various secondary schools in Istanbul. The answers to these questions were examined via text content analysis method and various results were obtained. Results revealed that school principals mostly d...

  18. Links between teacher assessment and child self-assessment of mental health and behavior among children affected by HIV/AIDS.

    Du, Hongfei; Li, Xiaoming; Weinstein, Traci L; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are considered to be one of the most important influences in the lives of students. Teachers' assessments of students may be a primary source of information on children's mental and behavioral health; however, this topic has received little attention in research. We examined this issue through linking teachers' ratings of students and mental and behavioral outcomes of children affected by HIV. The hypothesis is that teacher ratings will be predictive of specific child mental and behavioral health outcomes. A quantitative cross-sectional design with self-administered paper-and-pencil instruments was used. The sample included 1221 children (aged 6-18, grades 1-11) affected by HIV including 755 orphans who lost one or both parents to AIDS and 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents in a central province of China. The corresponding teacher sample included 185 participants. Each child completed an assessment inventory of demographic information and mental and behavioral health measures. Teachers completed a questionnaire about children's school performance. SEM analyses revealed a good model fit according to all fit indices: comparative fit index = 0.93, root mean square error of approximation = 0.07, and standardized root mean square residual = 0.04. Structural equation modeling revealed that problem ratings by teachers were positively associated with child loneliness and behavioral problems, social competence ratings by teachers were negatively related to child depression, and personal growth and social interaction ratings by teachers were negatively related to child loneliness, depression, and trauma. The current study represents a unique contribution to the field in that it recognizes that teachers can be a valuable source of information on children's psychological health. Results from this study have implications for health prevention and intervention for children and families suffering from HIV/AIDS. PMID:25703050

  19. English as a foreign language—teachers’ perspectives on implementing online instruction in the Iranian EFL context

    Reza Dashtestani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to explore Iranian English as a foreign language (EFL teachers’ perceptions on the implementation of online EFL instruction. A mixed-methods design, including semi-structured interviews and questionnaires, was employed for the specific purposes of this study. A total of 242 EFL teachers participated in the questionnaire phase of the study. In addition, 46 EFL teachers participated in the interview phase of the study. The teachers worked at a number of universities, schools and language-teaching institutions in Iran. Results suggest that although the Iranian EFL teachers adopted moderately positive attitudes towards the implementation of online instruction, the majority of them preferred blended instruction to online instruction. At the same time, the study revealed that the implementation of online EFL instruction in Iran is challenging due to a number of perceived impediments and obstacles. The most considerable perceived challenges to the implementation of online EFL instruction comprise lack of online facilities and resources, lack of interaction in online instruction, cultural resistances to online instruction and teachers’ limited knowledge of online instruction. The findings of this study provided crucial insights into teachers’ perspectives on a number of measures that can be adopted to facilitate the integration of online instruction in the EFL context of Iran. The findings would provide valuable insights for educational authorities and course designers to integrate online instruction into the EFL curriculum.

  20. Teaching and nature: Middle school science teachers' relationship with nature in personal and classroom contexts

    Ball, Nadine Butcher

    2000-10-01

    This qualitative study describes three middle-school science teachers' relationship-with-nature in personal and classroom contexts. Participating teachers had more than 7 years experience and were deemed exemplary practitioners by others. Interview data about personal context focused on photographs the teacher took representing her/his relationship-with-nature in daily life. Interview data for classroom context explored classroom events during three or more researcher observations. Transcripts were analyzed using a multiple-readings approach to data reduction (Gilligan, Brown & Rogers, 1990; Miles & Huberman, 1994, p. 14, 141). Readings generated categorical information focused on portrayals of: nature; self; and relationship-with-nature. Categorical data were synthesized into personal and teaching case portraits for each teacher, and cross case themes identified. Participants indicated the portraits accurately represented who they saw themselves to be. Additional readings identified sub-stories by plot and theme. Narrative data were clustered to highlight elements of practice with implications for the relationship-with-nature lived in the classroom. These individual-scale moments were compared with cultural-scale distinctions between anthropocentric and ecological world views. Cross case themes included dimensions of exemplary middle-school science teaching important to teacher education and development, including an expanded conception of knowing and skillful use of student experience. Categorical analysis revealed each teacher had a unique organizing theme influencing their interpretation of personal and classroom events, and that nature is experienced differently in personal as opposed to teaching contexts. Narrative analysis highlights teachers' stories of classroom pets, dissection, and student dissent, illustrating an interplay between conceptual distinctions and personal dimensions during moments of teacher decision making. Results suggest teachers' competing commitments are resolved by balancing values in unique ways for the context. More productive resolutions involve transformation of the teacher's tensions so that competing goals better coexist. Foci helpful for teacher education and development are identified. Also discussed are complex ways cultural-scale world view is reproduced, or occasionally challenged, in the classroom life of three scientifically literate, skilled, and environmentally concerned teachers. The study concludes education in schools is more likely to reproduce than challenge elements of world view contributing to ecological decline.

  1. Mathematics teachers' beliefs and curriculum reform

    Handal, Boris; Herrington, Anthony

    2003-05-01

    This paper discusses the role of mathematics teachers' beliefs and their impact on curriculum reform. It is argued that teachers' beliefs about the teaching and learning mathematics are critical in determining the pace of curriculum reform. Educational change is a complex process in which teachers hold strong beliefs about the quality and the process of innovation. Curriculum implementation may only occur through sufferance as many teachers are suspicious of reform in mathematics education given its equivocal success over the past decades. It is not surprising then that many teachers, when they come to enact the curriculum in their classes, rely more on their own beliefs than on current trends in pedagogy. These beliefs, conservative as they might be, have their own rationality in the practical and daily nature of the teaching profession, and in the compelling influence of educational systems from which these teachers are paradoxically the social product. The literature indicates that many of these teachers hold behaviourist beliefs, a fact that has strong implications for the success of constructivist-oriented curriculum reform. In general, studies of teachers' pedagogical beliefs reveal the extreme complexity of bringing about educational change, and largely explains the failure of many past reform endeavours.

  2. Enhancing Preservice Teachers' Sense of Efficacy and Attitudes toward School Diversity through Preparation: A Case of One U.S. Inclusive Teacher Education Program

    Gao, Wei; Mager, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Conducted in one inclusive teacher education program in the United States, this study explored the trajectory of and the relationships between preservice teachers' sense of efficacy and attitudes toward school diversity through the course of preparation. Findings revealed that, in general, changes of preservice teachers' perceived efficacy,


  3. Changing Roles of Teachers: Prospective Teachers’ Thoughts

    Çakmak, Melek; Gazi University

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly aims to determine prospective teachers’ (n=186) thoughts regarding the changing roles of teachers. For this main purpose, a descriptive study was conducted and data were gathered through both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The main research technique was based on a questionnaire. The results indicated that prospective teachers dwell on guiding, motivating to learn, transmitting knowledge, self-development and being a role model as most important teacher roles...

  4. Enrich Practicum to Cultivate Effective Teachers

    Evan Ortlieb

    2013-01-01

    To advance systems of teacher education, curriculums must be enhanced with relevant activities aligned with practicum experiences to enhance the value of their education. Acting as a bridge to connect knowledge learned at the university and practical teacher applications in schools throughout the community, a research project involving several constructive activities was embedded within four literacy courses during the last two years of teacher candidates’ undergraduate education. Results of...

  5. Effective teaching in the contexts of Internet science projects: American and Russian teachers' perspectives of best practices

    Mumma, Brian

    Statement of the problem. Science education literature had agreed that an important goal in students' learning is the development of scientific and technological literacy. One effort that teachers have integrated into their practices for addressing this goal has been teaching within the contexts of Internet Science Projects. Greater awareness of teachers' perspectives of their best practices and their beliefs and reasons for these practices in the contexts of Internet Science Projects can improve the quality of science education programs. Methods. A series of pilot interviews was conducted during the 2000--2001 school year to develop the guiding questions for inquiring into teachers' perspectives of their best practices within the contexts of Internet Science Projects. This series of interviews resulted in the understanding of the need to select teachers with experiences with Internet Science Projects and to conduct in-depth phenomenological interviews for learning from their voices. Two teachers were purposefully selected as the participant-informants for this study, one an American elementary teacher from Walker County, Georgia, and one a Russian teacher from St. Petersburg, Russia. The study was conducted from October through December 2001. The data collected for this qualitative study consisted of a series of in-depth phenomenological interviews, classroom observations, and the collection and analysis of various artifacts including teacher journals, student products, and e-mail/bulletin board transcripts. The interview structure was based upon a modification of expanding Seidman's (1998) three interview series into multiple interviews concluded upon the determination of saturation of the topic. The series of interviews were composed of (1) life history focus; (2) the details of the experience of teaching within the contexts of Internet Science Projects; and (3) reflection on the meanings. The data analysis consisted of applying Strauss & Corbin's (1990) open coding structure. Results. The results of this study revealed that these teachers carried their best practices from traditional teaching into their practices in the contexts of Internet Science Projects. The teachers created student-centered learning environments by focusing upon their classroom structure over that of the Internet Science Project. The teachers created strong local learning experiences inside an outside of their classroom environments where students were able to build strong understandings of the topic area before becoming engaged in virtual collaborations and Internet communications. This engagement allowed success in the face of any contingencies that might prevent or limit the ability for the teachers' classrooms to actively collaborate across the Internet. The teachers built their practices in Internet Science Projects upon questions prompted by their students' real world experiences, developed local understandings before progressing into exchanges for global collaborations, and built worldview perspectives.

  6. Teacher Learning by Script

    Reeves, Jenelle

    2010-01-01

    Scripted instruction (SI) programs, which direct teachers to teach, even to talk, from a standardized written script, are roundly criticized for inhibiting teacher creativity and teacher learning. In fact, such programs utilize scripting for exactly that reason: to reduce teacher interference with (and presumed weakening of) the prescribed


  7. Should Teachers Be Authentic?

    Bialystok, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Authenticity is often touted as an important virtue for teachers. But what do we mean when we say that a teacher ought to be "authentic"? Research shows that discussions of teacher authenticity frequently refer to other character traits or simply to teacher effectiveness, but authenticity is a unique concept with a long philosophical


  8. Effective Teachers of Literacy.

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David; Poulson, Louise; Fox, Richard

    A study was commissioned to help the Teacher Training Agency and teachers in England to understand more clearly how effective teachers help children to become literate. Research aims were to: identify the key factors of what effective teachers know, understand, and do that enables them to put effective literacy teaching into practice; identify the


  9. Inservicing the Teachers.

    Sharma, Toni

    1982-01-01

    Compares many teacher inservice programs to the artificial insemination of cows--decisions are made without teacher participation, teachers do not get to join in the act, and no one has much fun. Suggests that teachers be allowed to set their own goals and control their own learning. (Author/WD)

  10. Teacher Education in Canada

    Van Nuland, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Teacher education programmes within Canada are markedly different in structure and duration across the provinces, which affects programme delivery for teacher candidates and their opportunities for clinical practice. This paper provides a brief overview of Canadian pre-service teacher education, a summary of new teacher induction and mentoring


  11. The National Teacher Examinations (NTE) Commons Revision Survey: Final Report of the Results of a National Survey to Review Proposed Specifications for the Revised Commons Examinations of the NTE.

    Rosner, Frieda; Grandy, Jerilee

    In July of 1981, the Policy Council of the National Teacher Examinations (NTE), in conjunction with the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey, completed a series of national surveys to review proposed changes in the NTE Commons Examinations. The survey was designed to tap varying perspectives on the proposed test content and its


  12. Sustained programs in physics teacher education

    Scherr, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    For over a decade, physics teacher education programs have been transformed at a number of institutions around the country through support from the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society in partnership with the American Association of Physics Teachers. In 2012-2013, PhysTEC supported an independent study on the sustainability of its sites after project funding ends. The study sought to measure the extent to which programs have been sustained and to identify what features should be prioritized for building sustainable physics teacher education programs. Most PhysTEC legacy sites studied have sustained their production of physics teachers. A few sites studied have thriving physics teacher education programs, that is, programs that have continued to substantially increase their production of teachers since the PhysTEC award. All of the studied sites that sustained their production of physics teachers have a champion of physics teacher education and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment. The necessity of the champion was known from the Report of the Task Force on Teacher Education in Physics (T-TEP report) and borne out by this study. The necessity of institutional motivation and commitment is a finding of this study. At some sites, PhysTEC support has precipitated an institutional focus on physics teacher education, leveraging other resources (including both awards and personnel) benefiting physics teacher education. The study also documented the sustainability of components of physics teacher education programs, such as recruitment, early teaching experiences, and a teacher in residence. Sustained components tend to be those that have direct benefit to undergraduates in the physics department, whereas less-sustained components seem to be those that primarily benefit secondary teachers. The number of sustained components does not appear to correspond to teacher production; that is, sites that have sustained more (or fewer) components do not produce larger (or smaller) numbers of teachers. This result further supports the finding that the presence of the champion and corresponding institutional motivation and commitment are the key features of successful physics teacher education programs.

  13. Emotional intelligence (EQ levels of the senior students in secondary education system in Turkey based on teacher’s perceptions

    Osman Titrek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available As in all sciences, interpersonal interactions develop new approaches. One of them is emotional intelligence (EQ, “observing and understanding capacity own and other’s emotion, definition of different type of emotion; and knowledge that you learned using to know other’s emotion and understanding. The purpose of this study is to determine EQ competence acquisition levels of senior students in secondary education system according to teacher perceptions. A survey method was used as the main research approach. Participants were 262 teachers who were selected from seven secondary schools in Adapazari that were selected randomly. Research questions were tested with ANOVA that includes Observed Power and Partial Eta analysis and t-test that includes Cohen d analysis. Results revealed that students, who have higher academic achievements, have the highest level in EQ traits as well. Science and Anatolian Secondary Schools’ students have higher EQ levels as cognitive skills.

  14. Pedagogical and conflict situations of teacher of physical training

    Pechko O.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the essence of pedagogical and conflict situations between teacher and student. Considered ways of solving and preventing pedagogical and conflict situations in school. Principal reasons of conflict situations are selected, situations of activity, conduct and relations. The receptions of influence of teacher of physical culture are separated on personality of schoolchildren. It is well-proven that the profession of teacher of physical culture supposes possibility of conflict situations.

  15. Perception of Teaching Efficacy by Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    Gülay Bedir

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to identify how teaching efficacy is perceived by teachers working at state schools. Having a survey model design, this study hosts a total of 678 primary and secondary school teachers -401 females and 277 males- working in the province of Tokat during the academic year of 2013 and 2014. Research data has been collected through teaching efficacy scale consisting of 28 items and 6 sub-dimensions. Analyses have revealed that teachers mostly regard themselves as efficient espe...

  16. THE KING’S CARPET: DRAMA PLAY IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    Judit Kerekes; Kathleen P. King

    2010-01-01

    Trying to develop new perspectives of teaching is never easy, but trying to cultivate ownership and initiative among teacher education students is a still greater aspiration that is infrequently realized. This article addresses each of these highly valued goals for teacher educators as a case study reveals the impact of involving teacher candidates in interdisciplinary focused, constructivist and reflective models and planning for teaching, and then student teaching, which reaffirms this appr...

  17. Teachers and Non-Teachers Perceptions of a Chinese Learner’s Oral Performances

    Guangyan Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explores whether teachers differ from non-teachers (naïve native speakers in their perceptions of a learner’s oral performances. The oral language performances of an American university student in a fourth-year Chinese class were videotaped. Descriptive items were generated for use in evaluating the learner’s performances. Then 343 Chinese teachers and non-teachers used these items to evaluate the performances. The data were analyzed by means of exploratory factor analysis and analysis of variance. No significant differences were found between teachers and non-teachers in their rating criterion patterns. This result suggests that experience as a teacher does not necessarily out weight culturally-influenced perceptions. The implication is that experts in language assessment should make studying the underlying perceptual judgments of native speakers in the assessment of oral performance a top priority.

  18. Especially for High School Teachers

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-10-01

    Writing Across the Curriculum The notion that student learning is enhanced through writing is widely accepted at all educational levels if the product is fairly assessed and the learner is provided with feedback. Finding the time to critically evaluate student papers is difficult at best and competes with time needed to prepare laboratory investigations. A few weeks ago a teacher who has extensive extracurricular responsibilities that include extensive interaction with parents and community members shared with me his frustration in not being able to grade written reports. This teacher is the head football coach at his school, but many readers experience the same difficulties due to a variety of duties. There are no easy or completely satisfying answers to this problem, but this issue contains an account of a successful approach (Writing in Chemistry: An Effective Learning Tool, pp 1399-1403). Although they are based on experience in college courses, several ideas described in the article could be applied in high school chemistry courses. In another article, the author of Precise Writing for a Precise Science (pp 1407-1408) identifies 20 examples of familiar, but incorrect, grammatical constructions and explains how to phrase each one correctly. Chemical Education Research: Improving Chemistry Learning The results from research on how students learn have greatly increased our understanding of cognition in recent years. However, the results are often published in the science education research literature and are not readily accessible to the classroom teacher. Additionally, the research reports are couched in specialized terminology. This issue contains a Viewpoints article (pp 1353-1361) that bridges the gap between research results and classroom application. It was written by two veteran chemical educators, Dudley Herron and Susan Nurrenbern. The shift from behaviorism to constructivism as the dominant theory of learning is described briefly to provide a context for constructivist approaches. In the section titled "What Research Has Revealed", the authors provide a succinct summary of specific research findings under three tantalizing subheadings: "What You Think You Know May Not Be the Way It Is", "Learning Is Not a Spectator Sport!", and "Appropriate Outcomes Must Be Identified and Measured". The authors' insight into future research challenges is detailed in a sidebar. ChemEd'99: A Great Success The 1999 ChemEd Conference was a great success, judging by the many very favorable comments of high school teachers who attended. Thanks and congratulations go to Babu George and to the many volunteers who made this event possible through a great deal of hard work, ingenuity, and creativity. Many of the volunteers who gave so generously of their time, before and during the conference, are high school teachers. The program reflected the broad range of needs and interests of high school teachers. Credit for the success also should go to the many presenters. The workshops, demonstrations, papers, and posters that I attended were of high quality and useful to teachers. Conversation with other attendees convinced me that the same degree of quality and utility was characteristic of the entire conference program. Demonstrations are always an outstanding feature of ChemEd conferences and the Signature Demonstrations continued this tradition, as did the large number of demonstration sessions scheduled throughout the general program. The Reg Friesen Memorial Lecture, delivered by Steve Spangler, featured spectacular and stimulating demonstrations in the context of building connections between chemical concepts and real-world applications. Some other themes that permeated the general program were Internet applications, methods of assessment, safety and waste disposal, calculator and computer based laboratory methods, and ideas for making classroom instruction interesting and effective. Thank you to each reader who visited the JCE Exhibit or participated in our workshop on using JCE Activities. We enjoyed talking with you and appreciate the many helpful suggestions and comments. We want to express special thanks to the large number of new subscribers. Finally, the conference was fun. The opening ceremony parade included flags of all countries represented at the conference, individual element flags carried students, and moles of all descriptions. The Lobster/Clam Bake was an obvious success, evidenced by the mountains of mouth-watering food that was consumed. Seeing the periodic table emerge from the assemblage of large blocks of ice was a fitting sequel to witnessing the world's largest periodic table being put together at ChemEd'95 in Norfolk. It is exciting to anticipate how the periodic table might be represented at future ChemEd conferences. Start planning now to attend ChemEd'2001 in Toronto. Mole Day 1999 Remember National Mole Day is October 23! Read about the mole of the year on page 1335. National Chemistry Week 1999 Celebrate National Chemistry Week! starting on November 7th. An announcement on page 1338 describes this year's activity on finding creative uses for sodium polyacrylate. Secondary School Feature Articles * JCE Classroom Activity #20: Cleaning Up with Chemistry: Investigating the Action of Zeolite in Laundry Detergent, p 1416A. * Experiments with Zeolites at the Secondary-School Level: Experience from the Netherlands, by Eric N. Coker, Pamela J. Davis, Aonne Kerkstra, Herman van Bekkum, p 1417.

  19. Language teachers and teaching

    Ben Said, Selim

    2013-01-01

    This volume gathers contributions from a range of global experts in teacher education to address the topic of language teacher education. It shows how teacher education involves the agency of teachers, which forms part of their identity, and which they take on when integrating into the teaching community of practice. In addition, the volume explores the teachers' situated practice dynamic negotiation of classroom situations, socialization into the professional teaching culture, and ""on the ground experimentation"" with pedagogical skills/techniques.

  20. Research interests of secondary science teachers

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; Samuel, K. V.; Helgeson, Stanley; Novak, Joseph; Butzow, John

    In the past few years, science educators and the nation at large have become increasingly concerned about the Crisis in Science Education. An underlying cause of this crisis is the nonuniform quality of instruction delivered by secondary science teachers. One way to improve the quality of teaching in the schools is the application of science education research findings to teaching. Most teachers are unaware of the research findings and/or do not apply them in their classrooms. This study helps determine the areas of research which are of greatest interest to secondary science teachers. Results will be used by NSTA to determine the contents of future volumes of the monograph What Research Says to the Science Teacher. A random sample of 600 secondary science teachers was obtained from the National Registry of NSTA. Teachers were sent a 23 item questionnaire that asked them to rate their interest in each research topic on a five point scale. The questionnaire contained the 12 items prepared by a NARST-NSTA committee in 1979 and an additional 11 items using the same format. Demographic data collected from the survey included sex, teaching assignment, role in school, type of school, type of community, years of teaching experience, and familiarity with What Research Says. Data were analyzed using this demographic data as well as according to whether teachers returned the original or a follow-up questionnaire. Teachers who returned the first questionnaire had basically the same preferences as those who returned the follow-up questionnaire. Sixty percent of the teachers completed the questionnaire in usable form. Overall results of the study based on both frequency of response and on mean rating indicate that the following five topics are of greatest interest to secondary science teachers: laboratory experiences, motivational techniques, effect on college courses, problem solving, and meaningful learning. Analysis of data according to the subject taught indicated that chemistry and physics teachers are more interested in problem solving than biology teachers, and that chemistry, physics, and earth science teachers are also interested in the sequence of the content. Males and females had the same top five interests but in a different order. The same is true for teachers of grades 7-9 versus grades 10-12. Rural teachers preferences varied substantially from those in other settings and differences were also found for teachers familiar with What Research Says compared to the rest of the sample. For every classification of teacher, the area of least interest was sex difference research.

  1. Looking at cooperative learning through the eyes of public schools teachers participating in a teacher development program

    López Hurtado, María Eugenia; Viáfara González, John Jairo

    2009-01-01

    An exploration of in-service public schools teachers’ implementation of cooperative learning forms the basis of this article. By means of a qualitative approach to research, two tutors in a teacher development program have studied how a group of English teachers set the conditions to create a cooperative learning environment in their classes. Additionally, they reveal the perceptions that these educators have of themselves as initiators who guide their students in this pedagogical experience....

  2. Preparing Teachers: Expectations and Existing Situation at Faculties of Education

    Tuba Gökmeno?lu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In-depth interviews were conducted to research the expectations of teacher educators from the prospective teachers and their opinions on the existing facilities provided by the faculty of education. Content analysis, performed on the data collected from a sample of eight teacher educators from different departments in one of the faculties of education, suggested that the expectations from teacher candidates had seven dimensions: content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, country specific realities, communication skills, teacher characteristics, scientific knowledge and research skills, and professional development. Regarding the results, implications for teacher education programs were discussed, and suggestions for further research were made

  3. Using the Project Approach in a Teacher Education Practicum

    Teresa Vasconcelos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the early childhood teacher training program and the role of the Project Approach in the final practicum for student teachers in the Lisbon School of Education, Portugal. Student teachers, cooperating teachers, university supervisors, and instructors of teaching methods worked together to involve young children in interesting projects. This cooperation provided an opportunity for innovation and experimentation and, especially, a context for teacher educators to deepen their understanding of their roles and to improve their teaching strategies. As a consequence, the final practicum became central to the teacher education program. The article concludes with seven lessons learned as a result of this process.

  4. PRACTICE-BASED EDUCATION VOCFTIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS, AS A FORM OF READINESS OF TEACHERS TO STADY AT HOME CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Đ•Đ»Đ”ĐœĐ° ĐźŃ€ŃŒĐ”ĐČĐœĐ° ĐšĐŸĐœĐŸĐČĐ°Đ»ĐŸĐČĐ°

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health in system of additional professional education are considered.  The concept "readiness of the teacher for training at home children with limited opportunities of health" is defined.  The advanced training course program "Training at home children with limited opportunities of health" as means of formation of this type of readiness is submitted.Research objective is justification and skilled and experimental check of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.As a result of research special educational needs of children with limited opportunities of the health, defining specifics of activity of the teachers training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed; structural components of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed and scientifically proved; the model of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed; scientific and methodical ensuring process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed.Scope of results: the educational and methodical complex developed by the author (the program, monitors, educational and methodical grants can be used by the faculty of pedagogical highest and average special institutions for development of special courses; the faculty of system of additional professional education of teachers for the purpose of development of curricula and educational programs, didactic and methodical materials for the organization of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-4-21

  5. PRACTICE-BASED EDUCATION VOCFTIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS, AS A FORM OF READINESS OF TEACHERS TO STADY AT HOME CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Konovalova Elena Yurevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health in system of additional professional education are considered. The concept "readiness of the teacher for training at home children with limited opportunities of health" is defined. The advanced training course program "Training at home children with limited opportunities of health" as means of formation of this type of readiness is submitted. Research objective is justification and skilled and experimental check of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health. As a result of research special educational needs of children with limited opportunities of the health, defining specifics of activity of the teachers training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed; structural components of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed and scientifically proved; the model of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed; scientific and methodical ensuring process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed. Scope of results: the educational and methodical complex developed by the author (the program, monitors, educational and methodical grants can be used by the faculty of pedagogical highest and average special institutions for development of special courses; the faculty of system of additional professional education of teachers for the purpose of development of curricula and educational programs, didactic and methodical materials for the organization of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.

  6. The relationship between the perception of distributed leadership in secondary schools and teachers' and teacher leaders' job satisfaction and organizational commitment

    Hulpia, Hester; Devos, Geert; Rosseel, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relation between distributed leadership, the cohesion of the leadership team, participative decision-making, context variables, and the organizational commitment and job satisfaction of teachers and teacher leaders. A questionnaire was administered to teachers and teacher leaders (n=1770) from 46 large secondary schools. Multiple regression analyses and path analyses revealed that the study variables explained significant variance in organizational commitment. The ...

  7. Individual differences as moderators of the relationship between stress and health in university teachers

    Alba Lousinha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the moderating role of certain individual differences, such as Emotional Sensitivity, Tolerance to Uncertainty, and Coping Styles, into the relationship between stress and health in university teachers. To do so, a sample of 211 teachers belonging to different public institutions of higher education from Caracas-Venezuela completed self-report instruments related to the studied variables. Data was subsequently analyzed using hierarchical regression equations to determine the moderating role of the mentioned individual differences. Results revealed that the Emotional Coping Style and the Negative Egocentric Sensitivity acted as moderators into the relationship between stress and perceived health of the participant teachers, specifically acting as risk factors of the process, and confirming the moderating model of these variables previously established in other studies.

  8. The effect of teachers' memory-relevant language on children's strategy use and knowledge.

    Grammer, Jennie; Coffman, Jennifer L; Ornstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Building on longitudinal findings of linkages between aspects of teachers' language during instruction and children's use of mnemonic strategies, this investigation was designed to examine experimentally the impact of instruction on memory development. First and second graders (N = 54, M(age) = 7 years) were randomly assigned to a science unit that varied only in teachers' use of memory-relevant language. Pretest, posttest, and 1-month follow-up assessments revealed that although all participating children learned new information as a result of instruction, those exposed to memory rich teaching exhibited greater levels of strategic knowledge and engaged in more sophisticated strategy use in a memory task involving instructional content than did students exposed to low memory instruction. The findings provide support for a causal linkage between teachers' language and children's strategic efforts. PMID:23574097

  9. Science Teachers' Thinking About the Nature of Science: A New Methodological Approach to Its Assessment

    Vázquez-Alonso, Ángel; García-Carmona, Antonio; Manassero-Mas, María Antonia; Bennàssar-Roig, Antoni

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes Spanish science teachers' thinking about issues concerning the nature of science (NOS) and the relationships connecting science, technology, and society (STS). The sample consisted of 774 in-service and pre-service teachers. The participants responded to a selection of items from the Questionnaire of Opinions on Science, Technology & Society in a multiple response model. These data were processed to generate the invariant indices that are used as the bases for subsequent quantitative and qualitative analyses. The overall results reflect moderately informed conceptions, and a detailed analysis by items, categories, and positions reveals a range of positive and negative conceptions about the topics of NOS dealt with in the questionnaire items. The implications of the findings for teaching and teacher training on the themes of NOS are discussed.

  10. Teacher-Team Development in a School-Based Professional Development Program

    LU PIEN CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents how a team progressed through the five stages of team development as a result of a school-based professional development program using a laboratory class cycle. Six Grade two teachers and their administrator in a primary school in the south eastern United States participated in the study. All the teachers were interviewed at the end of each laboratory class cycle. Their administrator was interviewed after the program ended. A grounded theory approach and constant comparative method were used. The study revealed how the teachers’ participation in the program progressed according to Tuckman and Jenson’s (1997 model of team development in the laboratory class cycle. Establishment of trust among teachers and team support over an extended time were identified as important factors in shaping the team development.

  11. An observational study of excellence in science teaching based on a sample of outstanding science teachers: Methods of teaching excellence in science

    Mazmanian, Victor

    The aim of this study was to document the teaching and learning strategies utilized by a group of science teachers, who were recipients of the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science and Math Teaching (PAESMT). Six science teachers were observed in their classrooms while they were teaching. Thirty-six lessons were analyzed using a framework of categories of analysis to determine the special traits and common exceptional methods that these teachers had. The findings confirmed the ones predicted by theoretical frameworks of cognitive science and current models of constructivism in teaching. The results of the study supported the importance of the role of the teacher as an active agent in construction of knowledge while also providing sufficient student freedom of exploration and self-realization as needed to grow intellectually and develop skills in metacognition (e.g., reflective critical thought, and learning how to learn). Further, the analyses revealed the complementarity between the teacher's methodology and the processes of student cognition. Some misconceptions that commonly appeared among the observed science students were also documented. The study also explored possible methods to rectify these misconceptions, based in part on prior publications and also on observations of the PAESMT teachers' strategies. The results of this study showed the unique methods of teaching employed by PAESMT recipients to an extent that reached beyond the results of previous research, which published traits and characteristics of such teachers. This study determined the common traits among these teachers and identified their common methods of teaching science. The teacher's role as a facilitator was documented repeatedly among these award-winning teachers and was determined to be an integral tool for the students' successful knowledge construction and development of accurate scientific ways of thinking.

  12. Science Teacher Quality and Effectiveness: Gweru Urban Junior Secondary School Students’ Points of View

    Mandina Shadreck; Mambanda Isaac

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions among junior secondary science students from Gweru Urban secondary schools in Zimbabwe towards science teachers' teaching quality and effectiveness. This qualitative study approached and interviewed Form 2 students from 10 different schools in Gweru urban. The results show that three key dimensions of science teacher quality and effectiveness emerged: teacher's scientific knowledge, teacher’s pedagogical skills and teacher's social comp...

  13. THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC POSITIONS OF TEACHERS AND THE EFFECTS OF TEACHER CHARACTERISTICS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

    Ciftci, Cemil; Ozcan, Abdulvahap

    2014-01-01

    The most important role in the success of the curriculum in the education system belongs to teachers. The socio-economic conditions of teachers affects on the one hand the choice of profession and on the other hand their performance. In this context, the survey results that conducted with 270 teachers in Anatolian and Science high schools in Denizli have been analyzed. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The teaching profession is mostly preferred by family members especially with low le...

  14. How Portuguese and American teachers plan for literacy instruction.

    Spear-Swerling, Louise; Lopes, Joao; Oliveira, Celia; Zibulsky, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    This study explored American and Portuguese elementary teachers' preferences in planning for literacy instruction using the Language Arts Activity Grid (LAAG; Cunningham, Zibulsky, Stanovich, & Stanovich, 2009), on which teachers described their preferred instructional activities for a hypothetical 2-h language arts block. Portuguese teachers (N = 186) completed Portuguese versions of a background questionnaire and LAAG electronically, in Survey Monkey; American teachers (N = 102) completed identical English measures using paper and pencil. Results showed that teachers in both groups usually addressed comprehension and reading fluency on their LAAGs and that they also allocated the most time to these two areas. However, American teachers were more likely to include teacher-directed fluency activities, whereas Portuguese teachers were more likely to include fluency activities that were not teacher directed. Significantly more American than Portuguese teachers addressed phonics in their planning, whereas significantly more Portuguese than American teachers addressed writing processes such as revision. Both groups of educators demonstrated large variability in planning, with many teachers omitting important components of literacy identified by researchers, for writing as well as reading. The study highlights the importance of providing teachers with comprehensive, research-based core literacy curricula as well as professional development on key components of literacy. Study findings also suggest significant relationships between orthographic transparency and teachers' instructional planning. PMID:26271914

  15. Assessing teachers' positive psychological functioning at work: Development and validation of the Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire.

    Renshaw, Tyler L; Long, Anna C J; Cook, Clayton R

    2015-06-01

    This study reports on the initial development and validation of the Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (TSWQ) with 2 samples of educators-a general sample of 185 elementary and middle school teachers, and a target sample of 21 elementary school teachers experiencing classroom management challenges. The TSWQ is an 8-item self-report instrument for assessing teachers' subjective wellbeing, which is operationalized via subscales measuring school connectedness and teaching efficacy. The conceptualization and development processes underlying the TSWQ are described, and results from a series of preliminary psychometric and exploratory analyses are reported to establish initial construct validity. Findings indicated that the TSWQ was characterized by 2 conceptually sound latent factors, that both subscales and the composite scale demonstrated strong internal consistency, and that all scales demonstrated convergent validity with self-reported school supports and divergent validity with self-reported stress and emotional burnout. Furthermore, results indicated that TSWQ scores did not differ according to teachers' school level (i.e., elementary vs. middle), but that they did differ according to unique school environment (e.g., 1 middle school vs. another middle school) and teacher stressors (i.e., general teachers vs. teachers experiencing classroom management challenges). Results also indicated that, for teachers experiencing classroom challenges, the TSWQ had strong short-term predictive validity for psychological distress, accounting for approximately half of the variance in teacher stress and emotional burnout. Implications for theory, research, and the practice of school psychology are discussed. PMID:25642703

  16. Assessing Preschool Teachers' Practices to Promote Self-Regulated Learning

    Adagideli, Fahretdin Hasan; Saraç, Seda; Ader, Engin

    2015-01-01

    Recent research reveals that in preschool years, through pedagogical interventions, preschool teachers can and should promote self-regulated learning. The main aim of this study is to develop a self-report instrument to assess preschool teachers' practices to promote self-regulated learning. A pool of 50 items was recruited through literature


  17. Attitudes of Social Studies Teachers toward Value and Values Education

    Celikkaya, Tekin; Filoglu, Simge

    2014-01-01

    This research was conducted to determine how social studies teachers define value and "values education" as well as reveal the problems they encountered during the implementation. The participants in this study consisted of 17 social studies teachers from 12 primary schools (selected out of 39 primary schools in the city of Kirsehir


  18. Critically Re-Conceptualising Early Career Teacher Resilience

    Johnson, Bruce; Down, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how and why we adopted a socially critical orientation to early career teacher resilience. In re-conceptualising early career teacher resilience, we expose the normative components of resilience by revealing the implicit values, beliefs and assumptions that underpin most traditional conceptions of resilience. We argue


  19. Teacher Dress Codes in Employee Handbooks: An Analysis

    Workman, Jane E.; Freeburg, Beth Winfrey

    2010-01-01

    This study used role theory to analyze dress codes for teachers to discern what dress items expressed role embracement and role distance. Inductive content analysis of teacher dress codes in 103 U.S. K-12 school handbooks revealed three categories of dress: (a) conventional dress (mentioned in 97.1% of the dress codes); (b) casual dress (mentioned


  20. Critically Re-Conceptualising Early Career Teacher Resilience

    Johnson, Bruce; Down, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how and why we adopted a socially critical orientation to early career teacher resilience. In re-conceptualising early career teacher resilience, we expose the normative components of resilience by revealing the implicit values, beliefs and assumptions that underpin most traditional conceptions of resilience. We argue…

  1. Becoming a Good Teacher: Struggles from the Swampland

    Schaefer, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    One seventh-grade English language arts teacher engaged in teacher research in order to become a more understanding, responsive, and confident instructor. Systematic inquiry into her own practice revealed a conflict between what students perceived as their literacy needs and desires (discrete reading skills) with what she perceived to be important…

  2. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a


  3. Organisational Factors and Teachers' Professional Development in Dutch Secondary Schools

    Evers, Arnoud T.; van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Kreijns, Karel; Gerrichhauzen, John T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study that investigates the relationship between organisational factors, Teachers' Professional Development (TPD) and occupational expertise. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was administered among 152 Dutch teachers in secondary education. Findings: Analysis of the data revealed that of


  4. Turkish Science Student Teachers' Conceptions on the States of Matter

    Aydin, Abdullah; Altuk, Yasemin Gödek

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine science students teachers' conceptions on the concepts related to "the matter and the states of the matter". 112 Turkish science student teachers participated at this research. A questionnaire consisting of thirteen open-ended items was designed to collect the data. The questionnaire aimed to reveal the


  5. An Investigation into Teacher Turnover in International Schools

    Odland, Glenn; Ruzicka, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This study explored expatriate teacher turnover in international schools. Two hundred and eighty-one international teachers completed a questionnaire identifying which variables influenced their decision to leave at the end of their first contract. Using both quantitative and qualitative data, this study revealed that three causal factors were…

  6. Principal Dispositions Regarding the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Dolph, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) was first implemented during the 2013-14 school term. This study examined principals' dispositions at the end of this school term. Findings revealed several major concerns. The most prominent were (a) not having sufficient time to implement the program properly, (b) basing a teacher's performance heavily…

  7. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were


  8. Understanding Inclusion: The Perspectives of Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers.

    Harding, Kathryn A.; Darling, Carol Anderson

    2003-01-01

    In-depth interviews with four family and consumer sciences teachers indicated that none had been prepared for inclusive classrooms and they had positive attitudes about special education students. Classroom observations revealed some instances where students were not included and highlighted the effect of teacher knowledge and behavior. (SK)

  9. Reflective practice and instructional uses of analogies by seondary-school chemistry teachers

    Milne, Robert William

    The characteristics of submitted analogies reported used by 15 secondary-school chemistry teachers in classroom instruction during a six-week period were evaluated in light of literature recommendations for effective uses of analogies. Teacher e-mail responses to biweekly, stimulated reflection prompts regarding submitted analogies, in conjunction with exit-interview responses, were also used to investigate teachers' content and pedagogical knowledge. Reported knowledge gains related to instructional uses of analogies resulting from participation in the study were evaluated. Analogy summaries submitted were analyzed for literature-identified characteristics indicative of instructionally effective analogy use. Using grounded theory, e-mail responses and exit interview transcripts were analyzed within a naturalistic framework. Results of these analyses were compared, providing a means for triangulating data and verifying that 15 participants were sufficient for the purposes of the study. Results suggest that analogies employed by participating teachers were largely congruent with major literature-based tenants for effective use, but generally failed to address analogy limitations. However, interview data indicated that participating teachers considered it important to discuss analogical limitations with students. Several data-supported explanations to resolve the discrepancy between expressed importance and actual appearance of analogical limitations in submitted analogy summaries are offered. Further, due to a lack of congruency between analog and target concepts, several submitted analogies had the potential for fostering serious student misconceptions. The study revealed two analogy-use criteria employed by chemistry teachers not found in reported literature: (a) the employed analog should relate to student experience, and, (b) the analogy---if anthropomorphic should be inclusive, not deprecating any segment of society. The prevalence of anthropomorphic analogies submitted by participating teachers---providing evidence of attempts to relate to student experience---raises concerns that student understanding of the nature of science might be adversely impacted by attributing "volition" to physical phenomena. Stimulated reflection as employed in this study permitted non-threatening opportunities to gather information about teacher content and pedagogical knowledge. Evidence suggests that a majority of teachers adopted more thoughtful, analytical perspectives regarding instructional uses of analogies as a result of participating. Teachers also valued exposure to new instructional analogies, allowing them to enlarge their analogy repertoire for classroom use.

  10. To Learn from Teachers at School, Ideal Teacher or E-Learning Applications from the Perspectives of Gifted Students

    Eristi, Bahadir

    2012-01-01

    The present study, aimed at revealing the views of elementary school gifted students about the roles and behaviors of their teachers in class as well as about the in-class roles and behaviors that they expect from an ideal teacher with respect to different variables. Another question in the study was directed to determine students' views about


  11. Preservice Teachers' Emotion-Related Regulation and Cognition: Associations with Teachers' Responses to Children's Emotions in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The present research examines preservice teachers' (N = 24) self-reported emotion-related regulation and cognition as predictors of their observed responses to young children's positive and negative emotional displays. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that teachers reporting greater reappraisal strategies in


  12. Preservice Teachers' Emotion-Related Regulation and Cognition: Associations with Teachers' Responses to Children's Emotions in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The present research examines preservice teachers' (N = 24) self-reported emotion-related regulation and cognition as predictors of their observed responses to young children's positive and negative emotional displays. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that teachers reporting greater reappraisal strategies in…

  13. Teacher Professionalism under the Recent Reform of Performance Pay in Mainland China

    Wang, Lijia; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie Nai-Kwai

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a reform in teachers' pay, linking remuneration to performance, was implemented in China. The intention was to improve the quality of education by making teachers more diligent and creative and removing the inequality in pay between teachers in different schools. A review of this reform reveals that it has resolved the problem of…

  14. The Awful Truth: A Microhistory of Teacher Stress at Westwood High

    Munt, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    This paper is drawn from a recent microhistory of teacher stress, a genealogical inquiry that reveals the debilitating effects of a 'game of truth' called 'economic rationalism' on South Australian teachers during the last two decades of the twentieth century. It explores the everyday stresses of teaching through extracts from the teachers' oral


  15. An Evaluation of a Media Literacy Program Training Workshop for Late Elementary School Teachers

    Scull, Tracy Marie; Kupersmidt, Janis Beth

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of a media literacy education, substance abuse prevention training workshop for late elementary school teachers. Analyses revealed that the randomly assigned intervention (n = 18) and control (n = 23) teachers were similar in demographic characteristics and pre-training beliefs and knowledge. Teachers who…

  16. How Distributed Leadership Can Make a Difference in Teachers' Organizational Commitment? A Qualitative Study

    Hulpia, Hester; Devos, Geert

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relation between distributed leadership and teachers' organizational commitment. Semi-structured interviews with teachers and school leaders of secondary schools were conducted. A comparative analysis of four schools with high and four schools with low committed teachers was carried out. Findings revealed differences…

  17. Tensions and Dilemmas of Teachers in Creativity Reform in a Chinese Context

    Cheng, Vivian M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at revealing the problems experienced by primary teachers of Hong Kong SAR, China, in their initial school-based creativity teaching, through reviewing the teacher reflections in 75 action research reports. A number of teacher tensions and dilemmas emerged. Lack of teaching time and undesirable student performance in creative


  18. How Distributed Leadership Can Make a Difference in Teachers' Organizational Commitment? A Qualitative Study

    Hulpia, Hester; Devos, Geert

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relation between distributed leadership and teachers' organizational commitment. Semi-structured interviews with teachers and school leaders of secondary schools were conducted. A comparative analysis of four schools with high and four schools with low committed teachers was carried out. Findings revealed differences


  19. "I Know I'm Generalizing But
": How Teachers' Perceptions Influence ESL Learner Placement

    Riley, Tasha

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study focuses on the potential influence students' English as a second language (ESL) status has on teachers' placement decisions. Specifically, the study examines 21 teachers' responses to and decisions regarding fictional student record cards. Findings reveal that some teachers' placement decisions were influenced by factors


  20. Is American Teacher Education Fully up to the Common Core Requirements?

    Murray, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    This narrative considers how well equipped today's teacher education students and faculty are to meet the demands of the new Common Core State Standards. Data from the Teacher Education Accreditation Council's national evaluation of teacher education programs gives a mixed picture that, while mostly encouraging, also reveals that some


  1. Superheroes v Demons: Constructing Identities of Male Student Teachers in the Early Years

    Jones, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    This article presents research undertaken among male teachers and it explores their perceptions and experiences of working in early years contexts. It examines prevalent, contrary discourses and their impact on the construction of male teachers' identities. Public discourses in relation to male teachers reveal contradictions and ambiguities


  2. Child Care Teachers' Beliefs and Practices regarding Socialization of Emotion in Young Children

    Ahn, Hey Jun

    2005-01-01

    This study examines teachers' beliefs and their practices of emotional socialization in three child care centers. Interviews with teachers revealed that teachers shared some, but not all, of their beliefs with regard to their role in children's emotional development and views of their own socialization practices. The findings from classroom


  3. Pedagogies of Censorship, Injury, and Masochism: Teacher Responses to Homophobic Speech in Physical Education

    Sykes, Heather

    2004-01-01

    I examine how physical education teachers respond to homophobic name-calling, as revealed in life history interviews with 'lesbian', 'gay', and 'heterosexual' teachers in Canada and the USA. Censoring homophobic name-calling in schools is discussed as an important, but insufficient, response. Several 'lesbian' and 'gay' teachers responded with


  4. Teacher Professionalism under the Recent Reform of Performance Pay in Mainland China

    Wang, Lijia; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie Nai-Kwai

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a reform in teachers' pay, linking remuneration to performance, was implemented in China. The intention was to improve the quality of education by making teachers more diligent and creative and removing the inequality in pay between teachers in different schools. A review of this reform reveals that it has resolved the problem of


  5. Seeking Restorative Experiences: Elementary School Teachers' Choices for Places that Enable Coping with Stress

    Gulwadi, Gowri Betrabet

    2006-01-01

    Teacher stress and coping research and restorative environments research were converged in this study to explore how elementary school teachers in Chicago seek out everyday places in their milieu to implement restorative coping strategies. Seventy-one survey responses revealed that teachers' spontaneous place choices are related to sources of


  6. A case study of secondary teachers facilitating a historical problem-based learning instructional unit

    Pecore, John L.

    Current curriculum trends promote inquiry-based student-centered strategies as a way to foster critical thinking and learning. Problem-based learning (PBL), a type of inquiry focusing on an issue or "problem," is an instructional approach taught on the basis that science reform efforts increase scientific literacy. PBL is a constructivist approach to learning real life problems where understanding is a function of content, context, experiences, and learner goals; historical PBL situates the lesson in a historical context and provides opportunities for teaching NOS concepts. While much research exists on the benefits of historical PBL to student learning in general, more research is warranted on how teachers implement PBL in the secondary science curriculum. The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom-learning environment of four science teachers implementing a historical PBL instructional unit to identify the teachers' understandings, successes and obstacles. By identifying teachers' possible achievements and barriers with implementing a constructivist philosophy when executing historical PBL, educators and curriculum designers may improve alignment of the learning environment to constructivist principles. A qualitative interpretive case study guided this research study. The four participants of this study were purposefully and conveniently selected from biology teachers with at least three years of teaching experience, degrees in education, State Licensure, and completion of a PBL workshop. Data collection consisted of pre and post questionnaires, structured interviews, a card sort activity in which participants categorized instructional outcomes, and participant observations. Results indicated that the four teachers assimilated reform-based constructivist practices to fit within their preexisting routines and highlighted the importance of incorporating teachers' current systems into reform-based teacher instruction. While participating teachers addressed a few NOS tenets, emphasizing the full range of possible NOS objectives included in historical PBL is warranted. This study also revealed the importance of creating a collaborative classroom culture and building positive student-teacher relationships when implementing PBL instruction. The four teachers agreed that the historical PBL instructional unit provided a context for learning state standards, and they positively viewed their experiences teaching the lesson. Thus findings from this study suggest that teaching science in a historical context using PBL can be effective.

  7. Making the transition to middle schooling: A case study of experienced science teachers coping with change

    Strong, Donna Dorough

    The increasing popularity of the middle school movement necessitates a need for more interpretive research in middle level education. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore science teachers' perceptions of the transition to a new middle school and the meanings they attached to this new experience. The participants were three eighth grade science teachers, each with 20 plus years of teaching experience. The primary data for analysis was a series of five interviews with each participant. Data collection also included weekly participant observation of team meetings. Findings revealed that the science teachers all had positive feelings attached to the ability to keep track of students' academic progress and behavior problems as a result of teaming. The changes associated with the first year were very stressful for all three, primarily the loss of the traditional junior high departmentalized structure. The two participants who transferred directly from the junior high school were very skeptical of any benefits from an interdisciplinary curriculum, the appropriateness of the middle school philosophy for eighth grade students, and the move to heterogeneously grouped science classes. In contrast, the former junior high teacher who had spent the past ten years teaching sixth grade at the elementary school had positive beliefs about the potential benefits of an interdisciplinary curriculum and heterogeneous grouping. Teacher stress associated with a change in the school setting and the science teachers' constraints to actualizing a meaningful middle schooling experience are illuminated. Teachers' lack of ownership in the reform decision making process, loss of time with their science teacher peers, diminished compliments from high school counterparts, and need for more empirical evidence supporting proposed changes all served as barriers to embracing the reform initiatives. The participants found taking a very slow approach to be their most useful means of coping with the stress of these changes. The discussion includes meta-assertions and recommendations concerning the leadership and planning process for movement to a middle school philosophy, the most appropriate building structure for meeting needs of science teachers, teachers as curriculum makers, and the nature of middle level professional development for experienced science teachers.

  8. Native and non-native English teachers: secondary school students’ preferences for their English teachers

    MeƟincigiller, Sema; Akcan, Sumru

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the preferences of secondary school students studying at private schools with regard to their native and non-native English teachers. The reasons behind their preferences are also investigated in the study. In order to reveal their preferences, 680 students were surveyed through an attitude scale including a question about which group of English teachers they would prefer while learning English, followed by an open ended question seeking the reasons for their preferences. ...

  9. Applying Knowledge Management in Teacher Evaluation Systems

    Essandoh, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluations are underused in public schools, resulting in the loss of knowledge critical to professional development. Knowledge management (KM) theory offers approaches that can lead to improvements in the effectiveness of evaluations and teacher performance. This multiple case study of 9 campuses in an exemplary school district…

  10. How Teachers Survive in the System.

    Ferren, Ann S.

    1980-01-01

    The author points out how schools place teachers in conflict situations and then fail to understand the drain on energy and productivity which results. Among organizational dilemmas considered are simultaneous demands for predictability and changeability. Possible administrative techniques for supporting teacher survival are described. (CL)

  11. Applying Knowledge Management in Teacher Evaluation Systems

    Essandoh, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluations are underused in public schools, resulting in the loss of knowledge critical to professional development. Knowledge management (KM) theory offers approaches that can lead to improvements in the effectiveness of evaluations and teacher performance. This multiple case study of 9 campuses in an exemplary school district


  12. Special Education Training and Preservice Teachers

    Hadadian, Azar; Chiang, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The role of general education teachers is becoming critical for students with special needs. The purpose of this study was to obtain the perceptions of preservice teachers in order to prepare them for inclusive classrooms. Participants included graduate and undergraduate students (n = 248) from two different universities. Results found experiences


  13. Teacher Burnout in Black and White

    Haberman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses teacher burnout which scholars define as a condition caused by depersonalization, exhaustion, and a diminished sense of accomplishment. A psychological model of how stress leads to burnout describes it as a syndrome resulting from teachers' inability to protect themselves against threats to their self esteem and well-being.…

  14. Teachers' Beliefs about Neuroscience and Education

    Zambo, Debby; Zambo, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Information from neuroscience is readily available to educators, yet instructors of educational psychology and related fields have not investigated teachers' beliefs regarding this information. The purpose of this survey study was to uncover the beliefs 62 teachers held about neuroscience and education. Results indicate there were three types of


  15. Division of Personnel Intensive Teacher Training Program.

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Evaluation.

    The Intensive Teacher Training Program (ITT) was established in response to the critical shortage of special education teachers resulting from the Lora Decree (Education for All Handicapped Children's Act: PL 94-142). Students from ten New York City area colleges were selected to participate in a summer inservice training program. The…

  16. Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology

    Varol, Filiz

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify the relationship between elementary school teachers' ICT engagement with their attitudes towards technology. To this end, one hundred elementary school students were asked to fill out questionnaires related to their ICT knowledge, usage, and attitude towards technology. The results show that teachers' ICT…

  17. Examining Teachers' Decisions to Adopt New Technology

    Sugar, William; Crawley, Frank; Fine, Bethann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined teachers' beliefs about technology adoption as a reasoned, deliberate, intentional decision-making process, as reflected in Ajzen's (1985) Theory of Planned Behavior. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from teachers in four schools located in the southeastern region of the United States. Overall results indicated


  18. Measuring Characteristics of Teacher Professional Development

    Soine, Karen M.; Lumpe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to create and psychometrically test an instrument which measured teachers' perceptions of characteristics of professional development. The sample consisted of elementary teachers from five school districts in Washington State participating in a district improvement initiative. Results of exploratory factor


  19. Research Interests of Secondary Science Teachers.

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses results obtained from a survey of secondary science teachers to determine their research needs. Among the areas considered are priorities of these teachers in general and differences in priorities related to discipline taught, sex, grade level (junior or senior high), type of community, and years of teaching experience. (JN)

  20. Teacher Educators' Digital Competence

    Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2014-01-01

    This position paper focuses on how the new national curriculum for school and the new general plan for teacher education in Norway change the underlying premises for teaching and learning in today's teacher education. This has become particularly pressing as a result of the new educational reform "Knowledge Promotion" in schools,


  1. Teachers' Opinion about the Nature of Giftedness.

    David, Imre; Balogh, Laszlo

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a survey that queried 34 Hungarian teachers of gifted children on the definition of gifted children, developing giftedness, behavior problems of gifted children, enrichment activities, and parent participation. The teachers were attending in-service training on giftedness. Findings of the survey indicate that


  2. Conceptual Change and Science Achievement Related to a Lesson Sequence on Acids and Bases Among African American Alternative High School Students: A Teacher's Practical Arguments and the Voice of the "Other"

    Wood, Lynda Charese

    The study of teaching and learning during the period of translating ideals of reform into classroom practice enables us to understand student-teacher-researcher symbiotic learning. In line with this assumption, the purpose of this study is threefold:(1) observe effects of the Common Knowledge Construction Model (CKCM), a conceptual change inquiry model of teaching and learning, on African American students' conceptual change and achievement; (2) observe the shift in teacher's practical arguments; and (3) narrate the voice of "the Other" about teacher professional learning. This study uses retrospective data from a mixed-method approach consisting of Phenomenography, practical arguments and story-telling. Data sources include audio-recordings of a chemistry teacher's individual interviews of her students' prior- and post-intervention conceptions of acids and bases; results of Acid-Base Achievement Test (ABA-T); video-recordings of a chemistry teacher's enactment of CKCM acid-base lesson sequence; audio-recordings of teacher-researcher reflective discourse using classroom video-clips; teacher interviews; and teacher and researcher personal reflective journals. Students' conceptual changes reflect change in the number of categories of description; shift in language use from everyday talk to chemical talk; and development of a hierarchy of chemical knowledge. ABA-T results indicated 17 students in the experimental group achieved significantly higher scores than 22 students in the control group taught by traditional teaching methods. The teacher-researcher reflective discourse about enactment of the CKCM acid-base lesson sequence reveals three major shifts in teacher practical arguments: teacher inadequate preparedness to adequate preparedness; lack of confidence to gain in confidence; and surface learning to deep learning. The developing story uncovers several aspects about teaching and learning of African American students: teacher caring for the uncared; cultivating student and teacher confidence; converting dependence on teacher and self to peer interdependence. The study outlines six implications: caring conceptual change inquiry model for the often unreached mind; developing simple chemical talk into coherent chemical explanation; using CKCM for alternative high school students' conceptual change and achievement; engaging teachers in elicitation and appraisal of practical arguments for reconstruction of beliefs; overcoming challenges in teacher practical argument research; and "storytelling" as a way of unpacking teacher transformation amidst complexities of classroom teaching and learning.

  3. Prospective Teacher Concerns: A Comparative Study of Departments of English Language Teaching and Language and Literature

    mustafa naci kayaoğlu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Language teachers in Turkey do not take a standard pre-service education as graduates of English Language Teaching (ELT, linguistics, and translation departments all end up with language teaching profession and this, in turn, results in different teaching needs and concerns. The researchers argue that these different concerns may be one of the underlying causes of chronic language education problems in Turkey, in that Turkish Ministry of National Education does not take into consideration the comparative picture of practicing teachers and composes curricula, teaching materials, and compulsory one-shot professional development activities that all reflect “one size fits all” ideology. Therefore, determining the needs and concerns of pre-service language teachers is of vital importance. The current study has arisen from Griffith’s (2012 call for more larger-scale studies on teacher concerns across different contexts via triangulation. The researchers aim at not only investigating teacher concerns but also painting a much detailed comparative picture between ELT and linguistics department prospective teachers. The researchers target convenience sampling, in the full knowledge that this group will not represent the whole population. However, this type of non-probability sampling can serve well when it is easy to gather much informative data. Building on the recent work of Griffiths (2012, the researchers have modified and extended the existing measurement tool of Griffiths (2012 to investigate the issue much deeper and compensate the caveats. They adapted her instrument and asked the participants to add their thoughts as well as deciding their concern level. The results are mainly in line with the referred study in terms of the rating and frequency. The study reveals that there are some differences between the concerns of ELT department students and language and literature department students. While prospective teachers studying at the ELTdepartment were found to be highly concerned about technology, their counterparts studying at the langauge and literature department were not interested in the issue. The study also reveals that despite EIL’s large space in the literature (Cogo, 2012; Sowden, 2012, it was not found as a major concern for the prospective teachers. Methodology was also the least rated concern for the prospective teachers at both departments on the contrary to the well-accepted literature.

  4. FORMATION OF PEDAGOGICAL CULTURE OF FUTURE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Sinelnikova, Nataliia

    2014-01-01

    This article reveals the importance of pedagogical culture for education. There are various approaches to its definition. It considers the problems of the formation of pedagogical culture of future primary school teachers.

  5. "Three Ways Writing Is Thinking" (Writing, Technology, and Teacher Education).

    Polin, Linda

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes the ways in which writing is thinking. Illustrates this claim by showing how writing engages thinking, how writing reveals thinking, and how writing clarifies thinking. Provides concrete ways that writing teachers can model the writing process. (HB)

  6. Student Perceptions of Teacher Violations of Human Rights

    Buxton, Thomas H.; Prichard, Keith W.

    1973-01-01

    Reports on a study conducted among 815 high school students in three schools -- urban, suburban, and rural. The study revealed that 81 percent of the students perceive teachers to be violating the right to respect for their opinions. (Author)

  7. Examination on Expert Chemistry Teachers’ Secondary School Chemistry Textbook Usage

    Canan NAK?BO?LU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine how chemistry textbooks used by expert chemistry teachers are used during teaching process in secondary education, and to find how prospective chemistry teachers evaluate the situation mentioned. Thus, a project concerned with how expert chemistry teachers use them in their classes was carried out. Based on the research context, an interview that was used to interview with expert chemistry teachers by prospective chemistry teachers was prepared by the author. Next, prospective chemistry teachers were asked to evaluate how expert chemistry teachers used textbooks. The sample group of the study consisted of 21 expert high school chemistry teachers working at schools in Bal?kesir and 21 prospective chemistry teachers studying at Education Faculty of Bal?kesir University during 2007-2008 academic years. The findings of the study revealed that expert chemistry teachers did not use textbooks during their teaching process while they used them as the sources of problems and exercises at the end of units. Furthermore, it was found that University Entrance Exam (OSS had an effect on how to use the textbooks by teachers.

  8. Teacher Competence in ICT: Implications for Computer Education in Zimbabwean Secondary Schools

    Richard Bukaliya and Augustine Kudakwashe Mubika

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the ICT competences of rural and urban day secondary school teachers in Chegutu District, Mashonaland West Region. The study looked into the training and literacy levels of computer usage by the practitioners with a view to find out the areas of strengths and weaknesses in ICT usage. Upon identifying weaknesses, the study aimed at providing recommendations for improvement. One hundred and twenty out of 320 secondary school teachers participated in the study by providing data which was sought through the use of questionnaires and a competence practical test. The instruments required information on ICT training background, competence and literacy level of the educators. Results reveal that the majority of the teachers were computer illiterate because they were not exposed to ICT training or the practical hands on experience. A significant number had no formal ICT qualifications. A few, however, had a diploma in computers while none had a degree. Results from the practical test given indicate that the majority of the respondents were not able to use the basic software in computers for lesson delivery. Further indications are that teachers lack the necessary skills and knowledge of computer. In terms of applicability of the packages teacher weak knowledge levels show that their competence in ICTs for classroom use still lags behind. Challenges to ICT competence were identified as lack of adequate computer hardware, limited knowledge on how to make full use of ICTs in the classrooms and limited understanding on how to integrate ICTs into the teaching processes. To counter the effects of challenges, schools should fundraise in order to purchase computers. Staff development in ICTs should also be undertaken. All stakeholders should take part in mobilising resources for ICT resource centres. Teacher training institutions should offer ICT training to student teachers during their residential courses.

  9. STEM Career Changers' Transformation into Science Teachers

    Snyder, Catherine; Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Paska, Lawrence M.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines the transformation (professional growth) of career-changing women scientists who decided to become teachers. Drawing upon Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory, we tracked their transformation for 3 years. Our findings revealed multiple identities, disorientation, a perceived sense of meaninglessness, loss and eventual regain in confidence, gain in pedagogical knowledge and skill, and changed perceptions of the social roles of science teachers and scientists. Driven by personal choice or need (financial, intellectual), such transformations were achieved through active pursuit of meaning in one's work, critical assessment of assumptions, planning, and trying on the unfamiliar role of a science teacher. It is argued that such transition entails complex changes in thinking about science teaching and identifying oneself as a science teacher.

  10. The Effect of Gender, Seniority and Subject Matter on the Perceptions of Organizational Justice of Teachers: A Meta-Analytical Study

    Altinkurt, Yahya; Yilmaz, Kursad; Karaman, Gizem

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the results of a meta-analysis conducted with the theses and research studies published in Turkey from 2005 to 2012 regarding organizational justice. The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of gender, seniority and subject matter on the perceptions of organizational justice of teachers. Specific criteria were used


  11. Pre-Service Teachers' Juxtaposed Memories: Implications for Teacher Education

    Balli, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher education research has long understood that pre-service teachers' beliefs about teaching are well established by the time they enroll in a teacher education program. Based on the understanding that teacher memories help shape pre-service teachers' beliefs, teacher educators have sought ways to both honor such memories and facilitate a


  12. Teacher Involvement in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Mason, Kevin O.

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers in the field of teacher education have proposed the formation of partnerships between teachers and teacher educators, without explicitly stating what additional roles teachers might play in the teacher preparation process. This article describes how some pre-service teacher education programmes have increased the involvement of


  13. Training of adult education teachers

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use......, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The...... results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year...

  14. Training of Adult Education Teachers

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use......, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The...... results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year...

  15. Keeley Probes as a Tool for Uncovering Student Ideas: How Do Teachers Use Formative Assessment Probes to Plan and Adapt Instruction?

    Tobler, Kalin

    Formative assessment probes, known as Keeley probes, are one tool teachers use to reveal students' scientific misconceptions, so that they can move them closer to conceptual understanding. The purpose of this research was to document how four elementary school teachers used formative assessment probes to plan and adapt instruction to improve student learning. Specifically: ‱ How did teachers choose appropriate probes? What learning goals did teachers hope to address by using the probe? ‱ What instructional sequences did teachers envision when planning to use a probe? ‱ What did teachers notice when analyzing student data from a probe? ‱ How did teachers use the information to modify their instructional practice? This exploratory study addresses key issues by exploring through qualitative methods how four elementary teachers used Keeley formative assessment probes in the classroom through a series of individual and group interviews. The results, reported as case studies and themes, indicate that Keeley probes may be used to help teachers strengthen their pedagogical content knowledge and as an anchor for classroom discussions. Teachers reported that students were highly engaged when considering Keeley probing questions. Teachers in this study had questions about how to analyze data collected through formative assessment, and what instructional steps they needed to take to address misconceptions. The central finding of the study is that a teacher's subject-area knowledge as well as the ability to identify students' misconceptions and make instructional decisions based on those ideas, both elements of pedagogical content knowledge, play a key role in how effectively teachers use Keeley formative assessment probes towards improving learning. Ultimately, this study showed that while the use of Keeley probes did improve opportunities for students to deepen scientific understanding, a gap still exists between the potential of formative assessment and the practical work of integrating ongoing formative assessment to improve teaching and learning. This exploratory study underlines the need for a new approach in professional development for elementary science teachers, and sheds light on what happens when teachers try Keeley probes, a promising formative assessment tool and strategy, in the real world of the classroom.

  16. Florida Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability and Efficacy

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability and efficacy of Florida preservice agricultural education teachers. Results indicated that the preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems. On the other hand, the preservice teachers were efficacious in personal teaching efficacy and personal


  17. Conceptions of Teaching Art Held by Secondary School Art Teachers

    Lam, Bick Har; Kember, David

    2004-01-01

    Research into teachers' conceptions of teaching can be justified in that deep seated beliefs impact upon the way teachers teach and influence the learning approaches of their students. This study examined conceptions of teaching art, through interviews with 18 secondary school art teachers in Hong Kong. The analysis resulted in a two-level


  18. EFL Foreign Teacher Stress in Korea: Causes and Coping Mechanisms

    Brundage, Gregory C.

    2007-01-01

    Survey study of 53 foreign EFL teachers in Jeonju City, South Korea looks at causes of teacher stress and coping mechanisms between the years of 2004 and 2006. Results show foreign EFL teachers report moderate levels of stress and attribute stresses in roughly equal measures to student misbehavior and school director/administrative sources. Survey…

  19. The Induction and Needs of Beginning Teacher Educators

    van Velzen, Corinne; van der Klink, Marcel; Swennen, Anja; Yaffe, Elka

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of an exploratory research study into induction practices of novice teacher educators in six different countries. The study was a project carried out by members of the Association of Teacher Educators Europe (ATEE) Research and Development Centre Professional Development of Teacher Educators. Induction is seen as


  20. Mathematics Teachers' Approaches to Computer-Based Instruction.

    Risku, Pekka

    1996-01-01

    A six-year case study was conducted on the impact of, and teachers' role in, the use of computers and the Mathcad program in mathematics instruction at a technical college. Results for 2 teachers and 51 of their students showed definite stages in the teachers' use of the computer technology. (SLD)

  1. Impact of Satisfaction and Commitment on Teachers' Organizational Citizenship

    Sesen, Harun; Basim, Nejat H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of job satisfaction and organizational commitment on teachers' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in a structural equation model. The study was employed to a group of teachers and their supervisors. The results indicated that job satisfaction and commitment to the school had an impact on OCBs of the teachers…

  2. Teachers' Opinions about the Use of Body Language

    Benzer, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Effective communication occurs with non-verbal and verbal tools. In this study the body language as non-verbal communication tool is taken to be examined, and teachers' opinions about the use and importance of body language in education are surveyed. Eight open-ended questions are asked to 100 teachers. As a result, it is shown that teachers…

  3. Teacher Perspectives on Inclusive Education in Rural Alberta, Canada

    McGhie-Richmond, Donna; Irvine, Angela; Loreman, Tim; Cizman, Juna Lea; Lupart, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The results of 123 elementary-to-secondary teacher surveys and 14 in-depth qualitative interviews examining teachers' perspectives regarding inclusion in a rural school district are reported. Four features of inclusive education from the perspective of teachers are elaborated: (1) attitudes toward inclusion; (2) supportive communication and


  4. Effects of Teacher Rewards on Recognition and Job Enrichment.

    Frase, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Implications of Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory for teacher reward programs were tested by comparing changes in teachers' (N=38) job-enrichment opportunities and recognition after the teachers had chosen one of two rewards (travel to professional training conferences or cash). Results were consistent with the motivation-hygiene theory. (IAH)

  5. Do We Produce Enough Mathematics and Science Teachers?

    Ingersoll, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research on the supply and demand of math and science teachers finds some surprising results. The employment of qualified math and science teachers has more than kept pace with the demand, and most schools find qualified teachers for those positions. However, about a third of public schools--particularly high-poverty, high-minority, and


  6. Agents of Change: Voices of Teachers on Response to Intervention

    Stuart, Shannon; Rinaldi, Claudia; Higgins-Averill, Orla

    2011-01-01

    What are teachers' perceptions of Response to Intervention (RTI)? To address this question, we conducted interviews about teacher perceptions of an RTI model during the second year of its implementation at an urban elementary school. Results of this qualitative study suggest that teachers' perceptions of the RTI model grew more positive during the


  7. An Illustrative Case of High-Empathy Teachers.

    Morgan, Sharon R.

    1984-01-01

    Describes personality traits of teachers rated as highly empathic in a study of 24 teachers of emotionally disturbed children. Results suggested that teachers rated high in empathy also rated high on teaching performance. They had moderate feelings of self-worth and altruism but low feelings of acceptability to others. (JAC)

  8. Do We Produce Enough Mathematics and Science Teachers?

    Ingersoll, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research on the supply and demand of math and science teachers finds some surprising results. The employment of qualified math and science teachers has more than kept pace with the demand, and most schools find qualified teachers for those positions. However, about a third of public schools--particularly high-poverty, high-minority, and…

  9. Factors Affecting Teachers' Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    Tambunan, Hamonangan

    2014-01-01

    The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers' information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers' information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument…

  10. Teachers' Perceptions, Beliefs and Concerns about Cyberbullying

    Eden, Sigal; Heiman, Tali; Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Schools and teachers nowadays face new difficulties and challenges as a result of the fast growth of cyberbullying. The aim of the study is to examine the perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, as well as the needs, of a professionally diverse group of teachers. Three-hundred and twenty-eight teachers (88.4% female, 11.6% male)…

  11. Examining Teachers' Motivation Level According to School Principals' Humor Styles

    Recepoglu, Ergun; Kilinc, Ali Cagatay; Cepni, Osman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the motivation level of teachers according to school principals' humor styles. The humor styles survey and job motivation scale were used to gather data from 305 randomly selected teachers employed in primary schools in Karabuk. Results indicated that 141 of the teachers claimed school principal had


  12. Teachers' Perceptions, Beliefs and Concerns about Cyberbullying

    Eden, Sigal; Heiman, Tali; Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Schools and teachers nowadays face new difficulties and challenges as a result of the fast growth of cyberbullying. The aim of the study is to examine the perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, as well as the needs, of a professionally diverse group of teachers. Three-hundred and twenty-eight teachers (88.4% female, 11.6% male)


  13. Organization a Culture of Self-Education of Music Teachers

    Elena Aleksandrovna Dyganova; Ziliya Mukhtarovna Yavgildina

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the culture of self-education of music teacher as a professionally necessary quality of a modern specialist in the field of music education. The author proposes finalized definitions of basic concepts; consistently reveals the essence, structure, criteria and indicators of self-culture of music teacher; reveals the potential of conducting and choral disciplines as pedagogical tool. As the mechanism of formation of pedagogical culture of self-education of the future music...

  14. Work Motivation of Teachers: Relationship with Organizational Commitment

    Thara Sabapathy; Louis George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: In the modern world of competitive higher education the role of motivated teachers is undeniable. This study aims to find the importance of organizational commitment in motivating the teachers. Data was collected from 450 degree college teachers of Bangalore city. Analysis of data and the discussion is included. The results showed a positive relationship between work motivation and organizational commitment of degree college teachers. More commi...

  15. Mathematics Special Content Competencies of Elementary School Teachers

    Mehmet GĂŒlteke; Ekber Tomul; Fikret Korur

    2013-01-01

    According to the results of national and international level examinations, the achievement of students in Turkey in mathematics is low. Elementary school teachers play a significant role in the education of students. Elementary school teachers differ from other teachers in that they are responsible for teaching more than one subject. In determining the competencies and performance indicators of elementary school teachers, the Ministry of National Education has paid regard to the common ground...

  16. Teacher and student intrinsic motivation in project-based learning

    Lam, Sf; Cheng, RWY; Ma, WYK

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between teacher and student intrinsic motivation in project-based learning. The participants were 126 Hong Kong secondary school teachers and their 631 students who completed evaluation questionnaires after a semester-long project-based learning program. Both teachers and students were asked to indicate their motivation in the program, and students were also asked to report the instructional support they received from their teachers. The results of h...

  17. COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY OF PROSPECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

    Ünlü, Hüseyin; Emin SÜEL

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the computer self-efficacy of Turkish prospective physical education teachers. The research group consisted of 173 prospective physical education teachers. In the study “Computer Self-Efficacy Perception Scale” was used as data collection tool. Results indicated that prospective physical education teachers obtained high computer self-efficacy scores. Prospective physical education teachers’ computer self-efficacy was also examined according to their gender and class ye...

  18. Beyond the Right Answer: Exploring How Preservice Elementary Teachers Evaluate Student-Generated Algortihms

    TRACIE McLEMORE SALINAS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tasks regularly completed by elementary teachers reveal the mathematical nature of their work. However, preservice teachers demonstrate a lack of depth of mathematical thought. This study investigated the criteria preservice teachers intuitively used to evaluate algorithms. The intent was to use that knowledge as a foundation for modeling mathematical habits of mind for similar tasks. Journal writings and notes from in-class discussions were collected over three semesters of an introductory course for future teachers. Data were analyzed to discover dominant criteria used by preservice teachers to evaluate student algorithms. Four criteria, namely efficiency, generalizability, mathematical validity, and permissibility, were routinely used by preservice teachers.

  19. Teachers' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about child abuse and its prevention.

    Abrahams, N; Casey, K; Daro, D

    1992-01-01

    In considering the great responsibility placed upon teachers to involve themselves in child abuse prevention, education, and detection, the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse (NCPCA) conducted a nationwide survey of teachers from 40 school districts in 29 randomly selected counties. The survey explores teachers knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about child abuse and its prevention. Five hundred and sixty-eight teachers responded, revealing that while the majority of teachers confront child abuse among their students, they are provided insufficient education on how to address it. Other findings are reported with respect to teachers' reporting behavior, potential barriers to reporting, child assault prevention programs, and corporal punishment in schools. PMID:1559171

  20. In-service teachers' perceptions of project-based learning.

    HabĂłk, Anita; Nagy, Judit

    2016-01-01

    The study analyses teachers' perceptions of methods, teacher roles, success and evaluation in PBL and traditional classroom instruction. The analysis is based on empirical data collected in primary schools and vocational secondary schools. An analysis of 109 questionnaires revealed numerous differences based on degree of experience and type of school. In general, project-based methods were preferred among teachers, who mostly perceived themselves as facilitators and considered motivation and transmission of values central to their work. Teachers appeared not to capitalize on the use of ICT tools or emotions. Students actively participated in the evaluation process via oral evaluation. PMID:26844030

  1. Enhancing problem-solving skills of pre-service elementary school teachers through problem-based learning

    Özlem KORAY

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to enhance pre-service teachers’ problem-solving skills by giving them opportunity to understand the problem solving process. The study, using an experimental approach, was conducted with 85 pre-service elementary school teachers. The experimental group experienced problem based learning (PBL, while the control group experienced traditional instruction (TI in their science instruction course. Independent t-test and content analysis were used to analyse the quantitative and qualitative data. The quantitative results, supported by the qualitative research, revealed that the problem solving skills of the pre-service elementary school teachers experiencing PBL were increased more than those experiencing TI.

  2. Authoritative school climate, aggression toward teachers, and teacher distress in middle school.

    Berg, Juliette K; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-03-01

    Aggression toward teachers is linked to burnout and disengagement from teaching, but a positive school climate may reduce aggression and associated teacher distress. Using authoritative school climate theory, the study examined whether schools with high disciplinary structure and student support were associated with less aggression and less distress. The sample of 9,134 teachers in 389 middle schools came from the Virginia Secondary School Climate Survey, a statewide survey administered to all public schools with 7th and 8th grade enrollment. The majority of teachers (75%) were female. More than half (53%) reported that they had more than 10 years of teaching experience; 23% reported 6 to 10 years; 24% reported 1 to 5 years. Students reported on the degree to which their schools were structured and supportive. Teachers reported on their experiences of aggression by students, their level of distress, and their feelings of safety. Staff-related infractions computed from Department of Education records were also used. Multilevel modeling revealed that teachers in authoritative schools experienced less aggression and felt safer and less distressed. Lower aggression by students mediated the association between more authoritative schools and lower distress such that more structured and supportive schools had greater teacher safety and, in turn, less distress. The findings support the idea that more structured and supportive schools relate to greater safety for teachers and, in turn, less distress. Research limitations and implications for practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26524423

  3. What Is the Teacher Doing? What Are the Students Doing? An Application of the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test

    Minogue, James

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the use of the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test as diagnostic tool for both preservice teacher beliefs about science teaching and science methods course effectiveness. Direct comparison of pre-course to post-course images from 50 preservice elementary teachers was undertaken using McNemar's test. Results indicated statistically…

  4. Assessing Teachers' Beliefs to Facilitate the Transition to a New Chemistry Curriculum: What Do the Teachers Want?

    Coenders, Fer; Terlouw, Cees; Dijkstra, Sanne

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe the results of a study of chemistry high school teachers' beliefs (N = 7) of the chemistry curriculum and their roles, their beliefs on the teacher as developer of materials, and their beliefs about professional development. Teachers' beliefs influence the implementation of a curriculum. We view the use of a new


  5. Research Results Research Results

    2009-04-01

    A Highly Efficient Route for Selective Phenol Hydrogenation to Cyclohexanone A Novel Mechanism Employed by KSHV to Maintain the Latent Infection was Revealed Breakthrough in the Synthesis of Interconnected NW/NT and NT/NW/NT Heterojunctions with Branched Topology GABA Transporter-1 Activity Modulates Hippocampal Theta Oscillation and Theta Burst Stimulation-Induced Long-Term Potentiation Meta-analysis of Vitamin D, Calcium and the Prevention of Breast Cancer New Findings on the Origin of TrpRS PKCd Regulates Cortical Radial Migration by Stabilizing the Cdk5 Activator P35 PKU Research Team Publishes Papers on Inhalation Exposure to Pollutant and Cancer Risk Progress of the Research on Arbitrarily Elliptical Invisibility Cloaks An Advance in Complete Oxidation of Formaldehyde at Low Temperatures

  6. Leadership that promotes teacher empowerment among urban middle school science teachers

    Howard-Skipper, Joni

    In this study, the focus was on determining leadership strategies that promote teacher empowerment among urban middle school science teachers. The purpose of the paper was to determine if leadership strategies are related to teacher empowerment. The emphasis was on various forms of leadership and the empowerment of teachers in context in restructuring the democratic structure. An effective leadership in science education entails empowering others, especially science teachers. In this regard, no published studies had examined this perspective on empowering teachers and school leadership. Therefore, this study determined if a relationship exists between leadership strategy actions and teacher empowerment. The significance of the study is to determine a relationship between leadership strategies and teacher empowerment as a positive approach toward developing successful schools. Empowerment is essential for implementing serious improvements. Empowering others in schools must form a major component of an effective principal's agenda. It is becoming clearer in research literature that complex changes in education sometimes require active initiation. For this study, a quantitative methodology was used. Primary data enabled the research questions to be answered. The reliability and validity of the research were ensured. The results of this study showed that 40% of the administrators establish program policies with teachers, and 53% of teachers make decisions about new programs in schools. Furthermore, the findings, their implications, and recommendations are discussed.

  7. Teacher Training and Pre-service Primary Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive science teaching efficacy beliefs may be useful for teacher training universities, so that they can adapt their curriculum to accommodate these factors. Participants included 292 pre-service primary teachers, a cross-sectional sample from two different universities in the Netherlands across the four different years of study in the training program. Based upon our results, we conclude that the science teaching self-efficacy of pre-service teachers, in particular, improved during years 1 and 2, and not during years 3 and 4. Higher levels of self-rated subject-matter knowledge and science teaching experience in primary schools both contributed to higher levels of personal self-efficacy for science teaching. Differences at the university level in courses taken during the first year between science content courses and science methods courses also influenced the pre-service teachers' development of science teaching self-efficacy. After their first year, the pre-service teachers from the university with science content courses had significantly higher self-efficacy than pre-service teachers from the university that offered science methods courses. After the second year of teacher training, however, this difference in self-efficacy was no longer present.

  8. Job satisfaction among secondary school teachers in Tanzania : the case of Njombe district

    Ngimbudzi, Fredy Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that are associated with teachers? job satisfaction. A study sample of 162 (N=162) teachers was surveyed. The descriptive statistics techniques revealed that teachers are satisfied with aspects under the following dimensions: social benefits, meaningfulness of the job and support from administration. Conversely, the teachers indicated they are least satisfied with the aspects under the job characteristics dimension. Additionally, the inde...

  9. Views of Elementary School Teachers towards Students with Cochlear Implants Inclusion in the Process of Education

    Dulčić, Adinda; Bakota, Koraljka

    2009-01-01

    The paper reveals views of teachers in some regular elementary schools in the Republic of Croatia where students with cochlear implants, who are also rehabilitants of SUVAG Polyclinic, are educated. Survey aimed to research the views of teachers towards education. Survey included 98 teachers. Likert type scale was applied in order to identify the views of teachers towards students with hearing impairment. The survey was carried out in May 2007.Data were processed by SPSS for Windows program, ...

  10. TEACHERS’ PARTICIPATION IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS TEACHING PROFESSION OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Gayatri R. Kottennavar,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between teachers participation in school administration and attitude towards teaching profession of secondary school teachers working in different secondary schools of Belagavi district in Karnataka. A total number of 200 teachers were selected by using random sampling technique for analysis of data correlation technique as adopted, teacher’ participation in school administration scale standardized by Dr. Haseen Taj and teaching attitude scale developed by Ahluwalia, S. P. respectively were administered to collect the required data and the proper objectives were framed and the null hypotheses were setup to test the objectives also the normative survey method was used. For analysis of data simple correlation technique was adopted. The procedure of data collection was also followed. The results of the study reveals that there is a positive and significant relationship between teachers’ participation in school administration and attitude towards teaching profession of male and female, rural and urban, government and private, graduate and post graduate and arts and science teachers working in the secondary schools. Further, it shows that the mean scores of teachers’ participation in school administration is more than the attitude towards teaching profession of teachers.

  11. The impact of hyperacusis and hearing loss on tinnitus perception in German teachers

    Sandra P Meuer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that a notable number of teachers are concerned with conditions of auditory impairment such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss. Studies focussing on characteristics and interdependencies of single hearing disorders (HD are rare. This explorative study examines tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss, and all possible combinations (tinnitus + hyperacusis; tinnitus + hearing loss; hyperacusis + hearing loss; tinnitus, hyperacusis + hearing loss in German teachers. The impact of single HD on perceived distress, depending on the number and kind of comorbid HD, was of special interest. Information was collected via online survey and includes self-reported data as well as data from the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TQ. Results show that most of the 1468 participants (45% suffered from two HD in different combinations, and the fewest (25% were afflicted with only one HD. Considering the seven HD groups, most teachers (30% suffered from all three HD. Across all groups, tinnitus was present in 1096, hyperacusis in 988, and hearing loss in 937 teachers. Multiple intergroup comparisons revealed that self-rated tinnitus-related distress rose significantly with the increasing number of HD. No significant differences were found for distress ratings of hyperacusis between the four groups including hyperacusis and between the four groups with hearing loss. In the Mini-TQ, groups including hyperacusis scored considerably higher than those excluding hyperacusis. The frequent prevalence of HD in German teachers points to a need of better noise prevention in German schools as one priority of occupational safety.

  12. Journeys of science and culture from Hakkari to Istanbul: Reflections of teachers

    Muhammet Oztabak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is scarcity of empirical evidence focusing on teachers working in disadvantaged regions. Research has shown that being a teacher in a disadvantaged region brings psychological and social problems along with the educational ones. This article is based on a project supported by Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK as a part of science and nature schools project. This project aims to build a bridge between two different cultures, which will ensure an environment of cooperation and experience sharing among students and teachers. This study reveals the reflections of 13 teachers from Hakkari, who participated in the project and took professional development training as well as attending the science and culture oriented activities provided for their students. Face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions were used to collect the experiences of teachers. Two main themes emerged as a result of the content analysis: “interdisciplinary practice experiences” and “reflections related to the process of professional development”.

  13. A factor analytic study of teachers' perception of pupils' undesirable behaviours: a rejoinder to Langfeldt (1992).

    Borg, M G; Falzon, J M

    1993-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of teacher sex and pupil sex in the teachers' perception of the seriousness of three extracted patterns of pupils' undesirable behaviours. In contraposition to Langfeldt's (1992) conclusion that gender differences are no longer observable when investigating complex patterns of behaviour as opposed to single behavioural items the present writers argue that where gender is a true effect this will also be evident at a factorial level of abstraction. A sample of 844 primary school teachers in Malta rated the seriousness of 16 selected undesirable behaviours when these are manifest in boy pupils and in girl pupils. A principal components analysis revealed three patterns of perceived problem behaviours labelled 'withdrawal behaviour', 'dissocial/overtly challenging behaviour' and 'disruptive behaviour'. Gender differences were found in each of the three factors: the main effect pupil sex was significant on 'withdrawal behaviour' and 'disruptive behaviour', and teacher sex on 'dissocial/overtly challenging behaviour'. Results also indicated a significant interaction effect involving teacher sex and pupil sex on the factor 'withdrawal behaviour'. PMID:8292549

  14. ICT, Teaching and Leadership: How do Teachers Experience the Importance of ICT-Supportive School Leaders?

    Ove Edvard Hatlevik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relations between teachers’ experiences with ICT-supportive school leaders, perceived usefulness of computers, perceived learning outcomes for students and teachers' use of computers in their teaching. A total of 386 teachers from a nationwide sample of primary and lower secondary schools participated in the study. The correlation analysis revealed that teachers with higher levels of ICT-supportive leaders reported higher levels of perceived usefulness of computers, perceived learning outcomes for students and more frequent use of computers compared with teachers reporting lower levels of ICT-supportive leaders. Regression analysis indicated that two factors, ICT-supportive school leaders and perceived learning outcomes for students using computers, explained 25 percent of the variation in perceived usefulness of computers. Finally, these two factors, ICT-supportive school leaders and perceived learning outcomes for students using computers, explained 5 percent of the variation in how frequently teachers were using computers for reading and writing. The results indicated a need for further studies in order to examine factors that predict teachers’ use of computers in their teaching.

  15. A STUDY OF IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ON JOB STRESS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Darshana Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Study seeks to explain the impact of Emotional Intelligence on Job Stress among secondary school teachers. The sample of the present investigation is drawn from Govt. and Private Schools of Jammu Province by making use of simple random sampling technique and comprised of 600 teachers (300 male a n d 3 0 0 F ema l e . Emo ti o n a l intelligence inventory developed and validated by Dr. (Mrs. Shubra Mangal and Job Stressors Scale developed and validated by Dr. (Mrs. Meena Buddhisagar Rathod and Dr. Madhulika Verma was used in the study. Data analysis involved the use of three way analysis of variance to investigate the impact of emotional intelligence on job stress. The results revealed that emotional intelligence and Job stress were dependent on each other and there was significant impact of emotional intelligence on job stress of secondary school teachers. It was found that teachers with high emotional intelligence were having less job stress. On the basis of findings it is suggested that emotional intelligence programming will benefit teachers immensely in coping with stress.

  16. Teachers discovering nuclear science for the 90's

    High school and junior high school teachers from across the country have rediscovered nuclear science through summer participation as teacher research associates at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As a result of their new knowledge and awareness of the broad range of applications of nuclear science with obvious positive benefit to society, these teachers are putting nuclear chemistry and physics back into their curriculum. Through direct research participation teachers become a primary resource for students. The Department of Energy is now supporting over 150 teacher research associates in its TRAC program in all areas of science. The eight week teacher research associate appointments provide an in-depth experience for the teacher, and an opportunity for teachers and scientists to become engaged in new curriculum and materials development

  17. Effects of teacher training

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  18. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

    DR.S.KAYARKANNI

    2012-01-01

    Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusin...

  19. A RESEARCH ON RESILIENCY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS TEACHERS THAT WORK IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION SCHOOLS ( EXAMPLE OF HATAY PROVINCE

    Yunus YILDIRIM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to analyze whether resiliency of physical education and sports teachers that work in primary and secondary schools vary in terms of some variables. Population of the study comprises of a total of 253 physical education and sports teachers (63 female, 190 male teachers out of 485 physical education and sports teachers that work in primary and secondary schools (Province, District and Village of Hatay Provincial Directorate of National Education have participated in the research. In order to determine resiliency of the participants, personal information form developed by the researchers and “Scale Of Resiliency” developed by GĂŒrgan (2006a have been used. Resiliency levels of teachers have been compared in terms of their genders, marital status, place of work (province, district, village, professional service period and types of schools, in which they work (primary, secondary education. SPSS 16.0 statistics package software has been used for calculation and evaluation of the obtained data. The data has been summarized in percentages (% and frequency tables. Test of normality for the data has been performed through One–Sample Kolmogorov–Simirnov test and it is assumed that the data shows normal distribution. Therefore, the data has been analyzed from parametric tests through independent sample-t test and One Way ANOVA. In this study, error level has been accepted as 0.05.It is observed that there is no a statistically significant difference between female teachers and male teachers when resiliency scores of the teachers are compared in terms of their genders. The research results reveal that elementary education teachers’ scores on positive outlook subtest of “Scale Of Resiliency” is significantly higher in comparison to secondary education teachers. On the other hand, it is suggested that there is no statistically significant difference between teachers that marital status and professional service period when their resiliency scores are compared.

  20. STEM Career Changers' Transformation into Science Teachers

    Snyder, Catherine; Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Paska, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the transformation (professional growth) of career-changing women scientists who decided to become teachers. Drawing upon Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory, we tracked their transformation for 3 years. Our findings revealed multiple identities, disorientation, a perceived sense of meaninglessness, loss and eventual