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  1. Technical Teachers and Technical Teacher Education - Research Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrovská

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Chartered engineers who are new teachers of technical subjects at various educational institutions receive technical teacher education in the accredited bachelor programme at the Czech Technical University in Prague. This paper presents the results of a recent survey in which engineers expressed their opinions on technical teacher education.

  2. Technical Teachers and Technical Teacher Education - Research Results

    OpenAIRE

    D. Dobrovská; Andres, P.

    2002-01-01

    Chartered engineers who are new teachers of technical subjects at various educational institutions receive technical teacher education in the accredited bachelor programme at the Czech Technical University in Prague. This paper presents the results of a recent survey in which engineers expressed their opinions on technical teacher education.

  3. Mathematics Teachers' Knowledge Base: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Guershon; Lim, Kien H.

    2004-01-01

    Student learning depends on the teacher's actions, which are, in turn, dependent on the teacher's knowledge base--defined here by three components: knowledge of mathematics content, knowledge of student epistemology, and knowledge of pedagogy. The purpose of this study is to construct models for teachers' knowledge base and for their development…

  4. What Will Classroom Teachers Do With Shared Research Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.; Weissel, J. K.; Cormier, M.; Newman, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists are passionate about the research problems they investigate, and wish to share their discoveries as widely as possible. Similarly, classroom teachers who are passionate about their subject can better foster student learning. One way to enhance such passions involves bringing teachers and scientists together to discuss cutting-edge discoveries and develop curricular materials based on the respective strengths of educators and investigators. Our presentation describes one example of this approach based on research about gas blowout structures offshore Virginia and North Carolina. Methane venting processes along continental margins may have important climatic, geotechnical, hazard, and resource implications. In 2000, shipboard surveys documented that large structures offshore VA-NC resulted from massive gas expulsion. Gas appears to be trapped in shelf edge deltas and stresses resulting from downslope creep is favoring its release. Scientists undertook a new expedition in 2004 to determine if there is present-day discharge of methane-rich fluids through the floors or walls of the blowouts or whether these seepage sites are relict features, and to gain insight into the origin of the vented methane. In July 2005, 12 teachers from New York and New Jersey met with the co-PIs (Weissel and Cormier), graduate student (Newman), and educational specialist (Passow) over a 2-day workshop to learn about how scientific problems are identified, how a research cruise is organized, what was learned through the measurements and analysis, and what might be possible significant impacts from such understandings. Based on what they learned, participants began development of classroom activities, Internet-based investigations, and constructed-response assessment items utilizing data and concepts from the project and other sources. The resulting curriculum units are designed for use in middle and high school chemistry, physics, earth science, and technology courses. Curricular units include "Using Real-Life Problems to Learn Scientific Principles," "Mapping the Unseen Floors," "Landslide or Not," and a board game based on conducting a scientific research cruise. Materials are available through www.earth2class.org. Over the following academic year, participants will continue to develop instructional materials, field-test them, and provide peer training through in-district and regional professional development opportunities. The scientists and educational specialist will provide support to ensure scientific accuracy and pedagogical soundness. The project will utilize DLESE as an additional effective dissemination and evaluation mechanism. In these ways, the scientists and core of educators may be able to share these discoveries with hundreds of teachers and thousands of students.

  5. Results of Romanian Teachers Survey on Assessment in Early Education

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Sporea; Adelina Sporea

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of the European Union funded project “Creative Little Scientists” our team conducted a national survey among preschool and primary school teachers in order to provide radiography on teachers perception and practice in relation to the development of creativity along with science and mathematics education, in the context of inquiry-based teaching and learning. The survey included more than 40 questions, each divided into additional sub-questions. Over 275 Romanian teachers took par...

  6. What Makes Professional Development Effective? Results from a National Sample of Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garet, Michael S.; Porter, Andrew C.; Desimone, Laura; Birman, Beatrice F.; Yoon, Kwang Suk

    2001-01-01

    Used a national probability sample of 1,027 mathematics and science teachers to provide a large-scale empirical comparison of effects of different characteristics of professional development on teachers' learning. Results identify three core features of professional development that have significant positive effects on teachers' self-reported…

  7. Incentive Pay Programs Do Not Affect Teacher Motivation or Reported Practices: Results from Three Randomized Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Le, Vi-Nhuan; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Springer, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    This study drew on teacher survey responses from randomized experiments exploring three different pay-for-performance programs to examine the extent to which these programs motivated teachers to improve student achievement and the impact of such programs on teachers' instruction, number of hours worked, job stress, and collegiality. Results showed…

  8. Subject Knowledge and Perceptions of Bioenergy among School Teachers in India: Results from a Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Pradipta Halder; Sari Havu-Nuutinen; Janne Pietarinen; Anas Zyadin; Paavo Pelkonen

    2014-01-01

    Teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of bioenergy, and their motivation to teach such a topic, can largely determine the success of implementing bioenergy related education in schools. The study aimed to explore science teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of bioenergy in India. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among 28 science teachers from four urban schools in India. Results indicated that the science teachers were fairly knowledgeable regarding bioenergy and they also demonstrated...

  9. Physical development of students of teacher training college as a result of exercises of cheerleading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslyak I. P.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to define the extent of influence of exercises of cheerleading on physical development of students of teacher training college. Material: researches were conducted on the basis of training college of Kharkov humanitarian teacher training college. 385 students of the I-III courses of not a sports profile took part in them from whom 3 control and 3 experimental groups were created. Results: the level of physical development on indicators of a harmony of a constitution, functionality of the system of breath and resistance of an organism to the hypoxemic phenomena, regulation of the cardiovascular system is determined; the age distinctions on the studied indicators are considered; the positive influence of exercises of cheerleading on indicators of functionality of the system of breath and resistance of an organism to the hypoxemic phenomena, regulation of the cardiovascular system is revealed. Conclusions: 1. As a result of the primary research the "low" level of physical development of students of 15-17 years old is established. 2. The application of exercises of cheerleading in the course of physical training positively wagged on the level of physical development of students of teacher training college.

  10. Teacher's emotional stability: preliminary results of self-other agreement.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    H?ebí?ková, Martina

    Brno : Nakladatelství K?epela, 2003, s. 107-120. [U?itelé a zdraví /5./. Brno (CZ), 26.09.2002-27.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA406/01/1507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : teachers * emotional stability * neuroticism Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  11. Results of a radioactive waste course for high school teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A week-long three-credit graduate-level course was taught in the summer of 1991 for high school science and social science teachers. Instruction was at the layperson's level, and no prior knowledge was presumed. The objectives of the course were to present factual information about radioactive waste, measure recipient's changes in perception about this topic, and measure the effect of the course on others. The technical half of the course involved discussions of basic nuclear physics, radiation control, biological effects of radiation, nuclear fuel cycle, waste management principles, Hanford waste issues, and transport of radioactive waste. The social half of the course included a discussion of values and attitudes, risk perception and communication, and public participation in a decision-making role-playing session. Discussions about radioactive-waste issues with high school teachers, especially of an extended nature such as discussed in this paper, are an effective tool because high school teachers are a critical link to reaching the next generation. Armed with facts presented in an open, nonconfrontational format, these teachers tend to become more understanding and accepting of radioactive-waste issues

  12. The Results of an Era of Teacher Professional Development at McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, K. D.; Hemenway, M. K.; Preston, S.; Wetzel, M.; Meyer, J.; Rood, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the past decade, McDonald Observatory has been developing and refining its Teacher Professional Development Workshops, many of which have been supported by NASA. Metrics include attendance, perceived knowledge gain, and readiness to apply what was learned in the classroom. Evaluations show impact through the classroom application at five to six months after the workshops and through consistently high positive workshop results. This paper will show that a) our Teacher Professional Development Workshops are consistently well attended, b) the workshops improve teachers' confidence and their understanding of concepts, c) teachers enjoy unique interactions with astronomers and engineers, d) teachers appreciate hands-on and inquiry-based activities that are modeled and tied to state and national standards, and e) many teachers experience using the activities in their classrooms with good results.

  13. Burnout hazard in teachers results of a clinical-psychological intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegner Ralf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study investigates whether established in-patient therapy for teachers with burnout results in long-acting success and whether gender gaps and differences between teachers of different school levels exist. According to our knowledge, our study is the most extensive inpatient intervention study on the burnout of a defined occupational group, i.e., teachers. Methods 200 teachers participated, 150 took part in a later performed katamnestic survey. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was used and work-related data were recorded. The days of incapacity for work and the percentage of teachers endangered by burnout decreased, which supports the long-term success of the treatment. Results Significant differences between males and females and between teacher levels were found. However, the differences between teacher levels only showed up before treatment. Because males only underwent treatment at a more severe stage, further efforts in persuading males to start therapy earlier are needed. Conclusions The proven and long-term success of the performed intervention could have greater effects if people, especially males, undergo treatment more frequently. Our results are based on selectively high proposition of teachers of advanced age. Thus it is possible that the long term effect of the intervention, particularly on retirement age, is greater when the intervention is started earlier. Regular burnout tests could help to identify risk cases among teachers at an early stage and to offer a therapeutic intervention.

  14. The American Elementary Teacher Today: Results of Instructor's First National Teacher Poll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a brief summary of the responses to this magazine's August 1979 opinion poll, covering a wide range of topics, such as likes and dislikes about teaching, school violence, use of audiovisuals, teacher unionization, national educational and political issues, and respondents' personal characteristics, interests, and income. (SJL)

  15. Teaching Anxieties Revealed: Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Reflections on Their Mathematics Teaching Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Westenskow, Arla; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, there has been ample research dedicated to mathematics anxiety in contexts of teaching and learning. However, there has been less attention focused on pre-service teachers' anxieties about teaching mathematics in classroom settings. This study analyzed pre-service teachers' reflections at the conclusion of an elementary…

  16. [Stress and Burnout Risk in Nursery School Teachers: Results from a Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, J; Ehlen, S

    2015-06-01

    This article presents results from a study of 834 nursery school teachers in Germany, investigating working conditions, stress, and stress-related health problems. In order to evaluate the extent of mental and psychosomatic troubles, as well as the risk of burnout, we used the standardised questionnaire "Burnout Screening Scales" (BOSS I). Data analysis yielded a high percentage of nursery school teachers who reported a remarkably high stress level; nearly 20% can be considered as a high-risk group for burnout. Poor staff conditions in many nurseries turned out to be the crucial stress source, along with large groups, insufficient teacher-child ratio, time pressure and multitasking. In the concluding discussion of the study results, we consider possible measures to reduce stress and to improve working conditions for nursery school teachers. PMID:25025291

  17. AVID Teacher Leadership: Administrator and Teacher Perceptions of Leadership Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shirley J.; Huerta, Jeffery J.; Watt, Karen M.; Martinez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of teachers and administrators with regard to AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination) teacher leaders. The purpose was to compare whether teachers and administrators agree on the types of attributes needed for teacher leaders involved in implementing AVID as a school reform effort. Results revealed that…

  18. Measuring classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers: A video-based assessment approach and statistical results

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes König

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged (involving the challenges to manage transitions, instructional time, student behavior, and instructional feedback) and by applying three cognitive demands po...

  19. Using Classroom Scenarios to Reveal Mathematics Teachers' Understanding of Sociomathematical Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembat, Ismail Ozgur; Yasa, Seyit Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the degree to which in-service teachers understand sociomathematical norms and the nature of that understanding without having to enter and observe their classes. We therefore developed five classroom scenarios exemplifying classroom interactions shaped by certain sociomathematical norms. We then…

  20. Symbolic Drawings Reveal Changes in Preservice Teacher Mathematics Attitudes after a Mathematics Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C.; Harrell, Mary H.

    2006-01-01

    A new method of analyzing mathematics attitudes through symbolic drawings, situated within the field of Jungian-oriented analytical psychology, was applied to 52 preservice elementary teachers before and after a mathematics methods course. In this triangulation mixed methods design study, pretest images related to past mathematics experiences…

  1. STEM Images Revealing STEM Conceptions of Pre-Service Chemistry and Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaygun, Sevil; Aslan-Tutak, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has been an integral part of many countries' educational policies. In last decade, various practices have been implemented to make STEM areas valuable for 21st century generation. These actions require reconsideration of both pre- and in-service teacher education because those who…

  2. Revealing the Invisible Hand: The Role of Teachers in Children's Peer Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Lines, Meghan McAuliffe; Hamm, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    To introduce this special issue, the concept of the teacher as an ''invisible hand'' is presented as a metaphor to describe the potentially influential but relatively understudied contribution that educators are likely to have on children's peer relationships and their broader interpersonal growth. Building from conceptual work distinguishing…

  3. Revealing the Invisible Hand: The Role of Teachers in Children's Peer Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Lines, Meghan McAuliffe; Hamm, Jill V.

    2011-01-01

    To introduce this special issue, the concept of the teacher as an ''invisible hand'' is presented as a metaphor to describe the potentially influential but relatively understudied contribution that educators are likely to have on children's peer relationships and their broader interpersonal growth. Building from conceptual work distinguishing…

  4. Can Teachers' Summative Assessments Produce Dependable Results and Also Enhance Classroom Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Paul; Harrison, Christine; Hodgen, Jeremy; Marshall, Bethan; Serret, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    Summative assessments that are integrated within the daily pedagogy of teachers are problematic. Some argue that they cannot both be helpful to pedagogy and yield results that are comparable across and between schools. Others claim that there is enough evidence to show that these targets can be achieved. The project described in this paper…

  5. Using Self-Efficacy to Measure Primary School Teachers' Perception of ICT: Results from Two Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanni, F.; Rega, I.; Cantoni, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, the final results of two research projects, which investigated the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on primary schools teachers in disadvantaged areas in Brazil (BET k-12) and South Africa (MELISSA), are presented and discussed. Second, the Self-Efficacy construct is proposed as a…

  6. Changes in the social aspects of hypertensive patients through physical activity: revealing the importance of physical education teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italla Maira Pinheiro Bezerra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and treatment of hypertension, underscoring the importance of physical education teachers in guidance and direction of this treatment. The methodological approach was based on a qualitative approach consisting of 15 hypertensive patients enrolled in a project offered by the Fire Department as a group defined the Golden Age, in the municipality of Crato-Ce-Brazil. To this end, we used the technique to collect data, the interview was focused on groups of hypertensive patients who were physically active on a regular basis. With the purpose of organizing the material obtained in interviews, conducted an analysis of their content, which allowed the identification of themes and construction of the following categories: 1 heredity, and lifestyle concerns: the perception of the causes of hypertension Hypertension, 2 Practical exercise training: a tool for prevention and promotion hypertensive patients, 3 Benefits of Physical Activity: the importance of awareness of hypertension, 4 Revealing the importance of continuing the practice of exercise. Thus, considering that for an effective control, prevention and promotion of hypertensive patients is necessary if there is an interaction between teacher / patient in order to provide, in addition to the benefits of activities, the motivation for continuing care. To do so, it is the physical education teachers see their importance and their role in guiding, monitoring and promoting health in the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, so you can carry and to reveal the practices of physical exercise as an essential tool in controlling this pathology.

  7. Are High School Economics Teachers the Same as Other Social Studies Teachers? The Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Mark C.; Dieterle, David; Clark, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on how well students are learning economics, how teachers are trained, and other outcomes associated with improved understanding of economics. However, almost nothing is reported in the research literature on economics teachers' views of the curriculum, how they teach their subject, their views on public issues, and…

  8. High School Physics Teacher Preparation: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    This report examines teachers' self-assessed preparedness to teach physics, their membership in professional organizations, and where they turn for help when they have questions. Almost every teacher reports feeling at least adequately prepared to teach basic physics knowledge and the application of physics to everyday experience. The smallest…

  9. Are High School Economics Teachers the Same as Other Social Studies Teachers? The Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Mark C.; Dieterle, David; Clark, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on how well students are learning economics, how teachers are trained, and other outcomes associated with improved understanding of economics. However, almost nothing is reported in the research literature on economics teachers' views of the curriculum, how they teach their subject, their views on public issues, and…

  10. Creation and Results of a Research Project with a Focus on School Management for Teachers

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    Piso?ová Mária

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the process of preparation, solution and the results of the research project titled “Content innovation of the course School Management”, followed by preparation of a modern university course book for an e-course situated in LMS Moodle environment for the field of study Education and for the purposes of the continuing education of teachers. The content of the paper includes a detailed characterization of the backgrounds of the solved research tasks, which have been validated by the undertaken researches and surveys not only in Slovakia, but also abroad. Based on the results, the main output of the project has been specified as well as its importance for the quality of undergraduate training of future teachers, for training of managing teaching staff, but also for contemporary headmasters.

  11. Teacher Responses to Pay-for-Performance Policies: Survey Results from Four High-Poverty, Urban School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John

    2011-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly adopting "pay-for-performance" policies in which teachers are compensated based on their performance as measured by classroom evaluations and/or student achievement test results. Prior research has produced largely inconclusive findings concerning support among teachers for these policies and their effects on…

  12. Measuring classroom management expertise (CME of teachers: A video-based assessment approach and statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes König

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged (involving the challenges to manage transitions, instructional time, student behavior, and instructional feedback and by applying three cognitive demands posed on respondents when responding to test items related to the video clips (accuracy of perception, holistic perception, and justification of action. Research questions are raised regarding reliability, testlet effects (related to the four video clips applied for measurement, intercorrelations of cognitive demands, and criterion-related validity of the instrument. Evidence is provided that (1 using a video-based assessment CME can be measured in a reliable way, (2 the CME total score represents a general ability that is only slightly influenced by testlet effects related to the four video clips, (3 the three cognitive demands conceptualized for the measurement of CME are highly intercorrelated, and (4 the CME measure is positively correlated with declarative-conceptual general pedagogical knowledge (medium effect size, whereas it shows only small size correlations with non-cognitive teacher variables.

  13. Different Cell Viability Assays Reveal Inconsistent Results After Bleomycin Electrotransfer In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakštys, Baltramiejus; Ruzgys, Paulius; Tamoši?nas, Mindaugas; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different and commonly used cell viability assays after CHO cells treatment with anticancer drug bleomycin (20 nM), high voltage (HV) electric pulses (4 pulses, 1200 V/cm, 100 µs, 1 Hz), and combination of bleomycin and HV electric pulses. Cell viability was measured using clonogenic assay, propidium iodide (PI) assay, MTT assay, and employing flow cytometry modality to precisely count cells in definite volume of the sample (flow cytometry assay). Results showed that although clonogenic cell viability drastically decreased correspondingly to 57 and 3 % after cell treatment either with HV pulses or combination of bleomycin and HV pulses (bleomycin electrotransfer), PI assay performed ~15 min after the treatments indicated nearly 100 % cell viability. MTT assay performed at 6-72 h time points after these treatments revealed that MTT cell viability is highly dependent on evaluation time point and decreased with later evaluation time points. Nevertheless, in comparison to clonogenic cell viability, MTT cell viability after bleomycin electrotransfer at all testing time points was significantly higher. Flow cytometry assay if used at later times, 2-3 days after the treatment, allowed reliable evaluation of cell viability. In overall, our results showed that in order to estimate cell viability after cell treatment with combination of the bleomycin and electroporation the most reliable method is clonogenic assay. Improper use of PI and MTT assays can lead to misinterpretation of the experimental results. PMID:26077843

  14. Effects of Professional Development on Teachers' Instruction: Results from a Three-year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, Laura M.; Porter, Andrew C.; Garet, Michael S.; Yoon, Kwang Suk; Birman, Beatrice F.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of professional development on teachers' instruction using a purposeful sample of about 207 teachers across 5 states for 1996-1999. Professional development focused on specific instructional practices increased teachers' use of those practices in the classroom, and specific features, such as active learning opportunities,…

  15. Teachers' Attitudes towards Proof of Mathematical Results in the Secondary School Curriculum: The Case of Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaumwe, Lovemore; Buzuzi, George

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' attitudes towards proofs in the secondary school mathematics curriculum. The study was motivated by a desire to fill a gap existing in the literature in relation to teachers' attitudes towards proofs. Thirty-four secondary school mathematics teachers' responses to a Likert type questionnaire and interviews were…

  16. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto João

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might not fully correspond to the two A. gambiae incipient species in their entire geographical range. These limits are discussed and operational suggestions on the choice of the most convenient method for large-scale M- and S-form identification are provided, also taking into consideration technical aspects related to the epidemiological characteristics of different study areas.

  17. Results from pre- and post- tests of professional development astronomy workshops for teachers in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deustua, Susana; Ros, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Since 2009, the Network for Astronomy School Education (NASE) has held 55+ workshops in countries in Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America, training more than 1200 teachers and potentially reaching one million or more students. Like modern professional development programs, NASE’s emphasis is on interactive, hands-on learning. However, our emphasis is on “low-tech” tools that are readily available, and, inexpensive. Teachers are led through a series of activities that cover a wide range of topics in astronomy, more or less equivalent to that covered in the typical 1st year astronomy course in US colleges.In 2014 we adopted the Astronomy Diagnostic Test as pre- and post- workshop tests to guage the change in teachers’ knowledge as a result of participation in this intervention. In this paper we discuss the first results using the Astronomy Diagnostic Test in astronomy workshops in Peru during March 2014 and February 2015. NASE workskhops were held at the facilities of the Observatorio de Radio de Sicaya of the Instituto Geofisico del Peru, in Chupaca, a farming community approximately 20 km from the Andean city, Huancayo. Sponsors of the Chupaca workshop were the IGP, NASE and the UGEL (regional school district). The second workshop was held at the University of Ica, in the coastal city of Ica, 250 km south of Lima, sponsored by the Instituto Geofisico del Peru and the University, and the 3rd workshop in Lima.We will discuss our results, which for the most part do indeed show a positive change in knowledge, but in a couple of areas the change is either null or negative.

  18. How Are Notions of Childcare Similar or Different among American, Chinese, Japanese and Swedish Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Taylor, Satomi; Lee, Yu-Yuan; Franceschini, Louis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine similarities and differences in the perceptions of childcare among American, Chinese, Japanese and Swedish early childhood teachers. Participants consisted of 78 American teachers, 156 Chinese teachers, 158 Japanese teachers, and 157 Swedish teachers. The results of quantitative analysis revealed that these…

  19. Results of experimental testing of system of future physical culture teachers’ training for art pedagogic means’ application in pedagogic functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizhevska T.V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the research is devoted to seeking of ways to rising of quality of future physical culture teachers. Material: in experiment 436 students and 29 teachers participated. Results: it was found that readiness of future physical culture teachers for application of art pedagogic means in professional functioning is achieved through realization of appropriate block system. Such system ensures mastering by students of the following: theoretical principles of art pedagogic; mastering of art pedagogic skills in teaching and quasi professional functioning; acquiring of practical experience of art means’ application in period of pedagogic practice at schools. It was also determined that training system of future teachers includes the following three blocks: conceptual-target, knowledge-procedural; control-correcting. Conclusions: it is recommended to use such criteria of students’ readiness for application of art means in pedagogic functioning: motivation-axiological, cognitive-active, personality’s-reflexive.

  20. Is Teacher Professional Development an Effective Way to Mitigate Teachers' Gender Differences in Technology? Result from a Statewide Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed data from a statewide professional development (PD) program to investigate whether gender difference towards technology usage was mitigated after participation in the program. Teachers responded to pre- and post-questionnaires regarding their perceptions and use of technology before and after participating in PD courses.…

  1. Demandas de Professores Decorrentes da Inclusão Escolar / Teacher Demands Resulting from School Inclusion

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Selma Norberto, MATOS; Enicéia Gonçalves, MENDES.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available com a implementação das políticas públicas em inclusão escolar, cresce o número de alunos com Necessidades Educacionais Especiais (NEEs) em classes comuns, fato que ajuda a compor um cenário nas escolas que tem desvelado limitações e contradições do sistema educacional brasileiro. Atores e autores e [...] ducacionais são desafiados a construir saberes capazes de responder às demandas do cotidiano escolar relacionadas à convivência e aprendizagem na diversidade. Considerando que este processo inclusivo é novo nas escolas, o estudo teve como objetivo analisar as demandas dos professores decorrentes da inclusão escolar. A pesquisa foi qualitativa do tipo exploratório, participando seis professoras, seus alunos com NEEs e três profissionais do Núcleo de Educação Inclusiva da Secretaria Municipal de Educação. Para coleta de dados, foram utilizados: técnica de observação participante, diário de campo, entrevista semiestruturada, questionário e, para discussão dos dados, análise de conteúdo. Os resultados indicam que existem conquistas e contradições na realidade das escolas que se propõem inclusivas; avanços e limitações resultantes da política municipal, e que o modelo de atuação da equipe de educação especial no contexto analisado pode ser revisto ou ampliado. Indicam que os professores apresentam demandas no domínio da política pública, da formação, e demandas dirigidas ao psicólogo. Abstract in english After implementingpublic policiesforschool inclusion, the number of students with special educational needs in regular classes has increased. This fact has helped to compose the picture in schools in whichthe limitations and contradictions of the Brazilian educational system have appeared. Education [...] al actors and authors are challenged to build knowledge capable of responding to the demands of daily school related to living together and learning in diversity. Since this inclusive process is new to schools, the study aimed to analyze teacherdemands in the school inclusion context. The research was qualitative and exploratory, and the participants were six teachers, their students with special educational needs and three professionals in the Nucleus of Inclusive Education from the Municipal Department of Education. Data was collected using the participant observationtechnique, a field diary, semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, and the discussion of the data was carried out through analysis of content. The results indicate that there are achievements and contradictions in the reality of schools that assign themselves as inclusive schools; there have been advances and limitations resulting from municipal policies; the model of performance of the group of special education, in the analyzedcontext, may be revised or expanded; and teachers have demands with regard to public policy, training, and issues to be raised with psychologists.

  2. SECONDARY SCHOOL HEAD TEACHERS’ JOB SATISFACTION IN SAUDI ARABIA: THE RESULTS OF A MIXED METHODS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    AHMED MOHAMED ALZAIDI

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the factors which might affect secondary school head teachers’ job satisfaction in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. This study adopts a sequential exploratory strategy based on a mixed methods approach. The qualitative data generated identified the factors leading to job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. The factors fall into eight major themes: relationship with the educational administration, head teachers’ practices, the school environment, relationships with ...

  3. Revealing the Experience of Children and Teachers Even in Their Absence: Documenting in the Early Childhood Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Will

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the educational approach in the municipal pre-primary schools and infant-toddler centers of Reggio Emilia, Italy, two studio teachers and a researcher participant in Portland, Oregon capture classroom work, make investigations and interpretations in the studio as a laboratory space of learning, help children represent thinking, and…

  4. Strengthening TPACK: A Broader Notion of Context and the Use of Teacher's Narratives to Reveal Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Hernandez, Laura Helena; Salinas-Amescua, Bertha

    2013-01-01

    Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) as a framework to understand and foster teachers' knowledge for efficient technology integration has the value of unveiling new types of knowledge and departing from technocentric approaches. In this article, we consider two approaches to advance this framework. One of these opens the discussion…

  5. Teachers' Sense of Efficacy: Examining the Relationship of Teacher Efficacy and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefaei, Nouf

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which teachers' characteristics have an impact on teachers' sense of efficacy. In addition, the relationship between mathematics and science fifth grade teachers' sense of efficacy and student achievement was examined. Two characteristics related to teachers were examined: teachers' years of teaching experience and teachers' highest degree. Participants included 62 mathematics and science teachers from three school districts in Northwest Arkansas. When comparing fifth grade mathematics and science teachers' efficacy beliefs based on their highest degree, a significant difference in teachers' efficacy beliefs was found based on their degrees. Teachers with a Bachelor degree have higher total efficacy than teachers who hold Master's degrees. Moreover, an investigation to determine if there is a difference in mathematics and science teachers' efficacy beliefs in the three subscale of teachers' efficacy (for classroom management, for student engagement, and for instructional strategies) revealed a significant difference in teachers' efficacy for two of the three constructs. However, when examining teachers' sense of efficacy based on their teaching experience, no differences in teachers' efficacy were found. A correlation was conducted and the results indicated that there was no significant relationship between fifth grade teachers' sense of efficacy and students' achievement in the benchmark test in mathematics and science. The recommendations from this study should be used to inform other scholars and administrators of the importance of teachers' sense of efficacy in order to improve students' achievement gains.

  6. An educational campaign about epilepsy among Italian primary school teachers. 2. The results of a focused training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecarelli, Oriano; Messina, Paolo; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Michelucci, Roberto; Romeo, Antonino; Beghi, Ettore; De Simone, Roberto; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Vecchi, Marilena; Boniver, Clementina; Monti, Fabrizio; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Baldassarri, Chiara; Cesaroni, Elisabetta; Stranci, Giuseppe; Elia, Maurizio; Severi, Sauro; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Ausserer, Harald; Montalenti, Elisa; Pieri, Ilaria; Germano, Michele; Cantisani, Teresa; Casellato, Susanna; Pruna, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A cohort of 582 Italian primary school teachers underwent a questionnaire survey to test their knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy and verify whether an intensive and focused educational program could result in improvement of knowledge and attitudes. The program consisted of a presentation of the clinical manifestations of epilepsy and the distribution of informative brochures and an educational kit on the disease and its management to be used with their students. After several months, 317 teachers were retested using the same questions. Upon retest, the number of "don't know" answers decreased significantly for almost all questions. This was not the case for negative attitudes. The same holds true for teachers believing that epilepsy is a source of learning disability and social disadvantage. These findings support the beliefs that education on epilepsy is more likely to affect ignorance than prejudice and that stronger interventions are needed to counteract stigmatizing behaviors. PMID:25500360

  7. What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom? Results from a Survey of AMI and AMS Teacher Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2011-01-01

    There are two major types of Montessori teacher education in the United States: (1) AMI-USA (the American branch of the Association Montessori Internationale, founded by Dr. Montessori to carry on her work); and (2) AMS (American Montessori Society, founded by Nancy Rambusch to represent Montessori in America). This article presents the results…

  8. Lithospheric geometries revealed through electromagnetic imaging: SAMTEX (Southern Africa MagnetoTelluric Experiment) observations and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Evans, R. L.; Miensopust, M. P.; Khoza, D. T.; Samtex Team

    2011-12-01

    The Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) is imaging the properties and geometries of the lithosphere below southern Africa to depths of 200+ km. Electrical conductivity is highly sensitive to ambient temperature, and to the presence of an interconnected conducting phase, such as a solid phase like graphite or sulphides, a fluid phase like partial melt, or bound water through hydrogen diffusion. Thus, primary geometrical information can be readily obtained from lithospheric-scale MT experiments about the three-dimensional variation in conductivity that can be related to formation and deformation processes. One important piece of information easily obtained from MT data is the depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), due to the sensitivity of conductivity to small fractions (water. SAMTEX measurements have been made at a total of more than 750 MT sites over an area in excess of a million square kilometres, making it by far the largest-ever regional MT project undertaken. One of the most significant results from SAMTEX is the mapping of the LAB beneath the Archean cratons and bounding mobile belts of Southern Africa, particularly of the previously unknown regions of Namibia and Botswana. The LAB is shallow (150 km) beneath the mobile belts, deep (250 km) in the centres of the cratons, and transitional at the edges. Diamondiferous kimberlites are located primarily where lithosphere is transitional in thickness, or where there is a change in its anisotropy properties, both of which are craton edge effects. The electrical properties of the continental mantle derived from SAMTEX data can be compared with seismic ones derived from data from the South African Seismic Experiment (SASE) of the Kaapvaal Project. Generally there is very good predictive linear agreement between seismic velocity and log(conductivity), indicative of both being influenced by the same bulk property factors, such as temperature, Mg# and composition.

  9. The Teacher Internship Experiences of Prospective High School Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Kathryn; Radu, Iuliana; Weber, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Nine prospective secondary mathematics teachers were interviewed about their teaching internship experience. The results of these interviews revealed that 7 of the 9 participants professed to value reform-oriented teaching and conceptual understanding in mathematics, yet all were paired with cooperating teachers who seemed to value traditional…

  10. What Do the California Standards Test Results Reveal about the Movement toward Eighth-Grade Algebra for All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian-Hua; Heckman, Paul E.; Abedi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    In California, an increasing number of 8th graders have taken algebra courses since 2003. This study examines students' California Standards Test (CST) results in grades 7 through 11, aiming to reveal who took the CST for Algebra I in 8th grade and whether the increase has led to a rise in students' taking higher-level mathematics CSTs and an…

  11. What it’s like being a Waldorf teacher. Results of an empirical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Graudenz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2011 Dirk Randoll carried out a major study on job satisfaction among Waldorf teachers. He looked at their working conditions, various aspects of work-load as well their general attitude to their profession. This article presents a comprehensive summary of his findings. Work-load and modes of coping with it were considered in relation both to conditions in the school system in general and to certain ones peculiar to Waldorf schools (e.g., management by the college of teachers, pedagogical ethos. In selected areas of concern answers given by state teachers were included by way of comparison. The questionnaire was filled in by a representative sample of 1,807 Waldorf teachers from 105 Waldorf schools in Germany. In addition to the areas already mentioned, the following aspects were addressed: training, salary levels, professional behaviour, and challenges for the future. The findings demonstrate a fairly high level of job satisfaction, although the pressure of work-load was felt to be high. A number of critical points also emerged, such as questions about the efficiency of participatory management and the prognosis for future development.

  12. Learner Orientation through Professional Development of Teachers? Empirical Results from Cascade Training in Anglophone Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of a professional development programme on the attitudes towards the teaching and learning of teachers in the Anglophone part of Cameroon. The development programme combines a multiplier system with school-based in-service training. The research compares the effects that the training had on the attitudes of three…

  13. Teachers Making Sense of Result-Oriented Teams: A Cognitive Anthropological Approach to Educational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierenga, Sijko J.; Kamsteeg, Frans H.; Simons, P. Robert Jan; Veenswijk, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Studies on educational change efforts abound but generally limit themselves to post hoc explanations of failure and success. Such explanations are rarely turned into attempts at providing models for predicting change outcomes. The present study tries to develop such a model based on the teachers' impact analysis of a management-driven…

  14. TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS IN RELATION TO EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Bhagat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to analyse the impact of Emotional Intelligence on teacher effectiveness of secondary school teachers. The sample of the present investigation was drawn randomly from Govt. and Private schools of Jammu province and comprised of 600 teachers (300 Male and 300 Female. Emotional Intelligence inventory developed and validated by Dr. (Mrs. Shubra Mangal and Teacher Effectiveness Scale (TES developed and validated by Promodh Kumar and D.N. Mutha was used in the study. Three way analysis of variance (2x2x2 was used to test proposed hypotheses. The results revealed that, emotional intelligence and teacher effectiveness are dependent on each other and there is impact of emotional intelligence on teacher effectiveness of secondary school teachers. Significant sex differences were found in teacher effectiveness of teachers. First order interaction between emotional intelligence and experience and second order interaction among emotional intelligence, sex and experience was found to impact teacher effectiveness significantly.

  15. A Comparative Study Of Environmental Awareness Among Teacher Trainees Of West Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    Birbal Saha

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to provide information and difference about the level of environmental awareness of teacher trainees in West Bengal, India. Data was collected through self made questionnaire of 200 teacher trainees of Birbhum & Burdwan Districts in West Bengal, by randomly. The result revealed that 1) in-service teacher trainees are more aware than pre-service teacher trainees, 2) Science teacher trainees are more aware than humanities teacher trainees, 3) male teac...

  16. Achieving results in History and the role of the teacher: A learner's perspective

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maxine F, Gibb.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Matriculating in December 2013 from a co-educational government school in the Western Cape, the writer was the top student in the National Senior Certificate examinations for History in the Province. She shares her personal experience, by providing insight from a learner's perspective, on the import [...] ance of studying history. She further shares her opinion on how a learner's achievement can be directly affected by a teacher's input and method of teaching. Based on her experience, she comments on the traits present in a superior teacher, teaching methods and techniques which she found effective in her learning experience, and what aspects of teaching contributed to her academic success, passion for history and its utility, and development as a person.

  17. Common Pressures, Same Results? Recent Reforms in Professional Standards and Competences in Teacher Education for Secondary Teachers in England, France and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the introduction of professional standards and competences in initial teacher education for secondary teachers in England, France and Germany has provided the cornerstone of education reform in all three countries. The precise number and specific content of a measurable set of skills for teachers have offered challenges for…

  18. Case, Teacher and School Characteristics Influencing Teachers' Detection and Reporting of Child Physical Abuse and Neglect: Results from an Australian Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kerryann; Bridgstock, Ruth; Farrell, Ann; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Schweitzer, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify the influence of multiple case, teacher and school characteristics on Australian primary school teachers' propensity to detect and report child physical abuse and neglect using vignettes as short hypothetical cases. Methods: A sample of 254 teachers completed a self-report questionnaire. They responded to a series of 32…

  19. Teachers making sense of result-oriented teams : A cognitive anthropological approach to educational change

    OpenAIRE

    Wierenga, Sijko J.; Kamsteeg, Frans H.; Simons, P. Robert Jan; Veenswijk, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Studies on educational change efforts abound but generally limit themselves to post hoc explanations of failure and success. Such explanations are rarely turned into attempts at providing models for predicting change outcomes. The present study tries to develop such a model based on the teachers’ impact analysis of a management-driven intervention, introducing new public management principles at a Dutch school for vocational education and training. The study uses a mixed method approach, the ...

  20. History teaching, learning and Junior Certificate (JC) examination results in Lesotho, 2000 - 2006: implications for teacher education.

    OpenAIRE

    Ntabeni, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the status of History teaching and learning in Lesotho which is at its lowest ebb. Very few schools teach the subject and the poor Junior Certificate (JC) examination results exacerbate the situation. An analysis of the examiners' comments in the last seven years points to poor and/or lack of essay writing skills among the candidates as one of the main reasons behind the high failure rate in JC History. In recognition of the situation's implications for 'quality' teacher ...

  1. An examination of an aspect of the worldview of female college science teachers as revealed by their concepts of nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Lisa A.

    American citizens are confronted every day with scientific issues such as global warming, alternative energy technologies, stem cell research, and the use of genetically modified foods. A scientifically literate adult should be able to understand these issues, see how they relate to their own lives, and make choices that reflect their knowledge of the problems at hand. Research has indicated that the majority of U.S. students are not prepared to take a proactive role in current scientific issues and so undergraduate educators are being charged with the task of improving the relevancy of science to the nonscience student. One method for exploring this problem has been the application of worldview theory, which seeks to analyze the thoughts and attitudes of teachers and students with regard to science in their lives. This qualitative case study sought to uncover the worldviews of female science college professors particularly as they related to nature and to examine how these educators felt their worldviews might influence their students. A series of established card sort activities used in previous worldview studies, in combination with an in-depth interview facilitated the data collection from female science professors teaching at universities in New England.

  2. Emotional Competence and Stressors of Female School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeyannavar, P. G.; Itagi, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    A study on emotional competence and stressors of 105 primary school teachers was conducted in Dharwad in 2009. Emotional competence was assessed using EC- scale and stressors by stress inventory for teachers (SIT). Results revealed that majority of the teachers (89.5%) showed average to competent levels of emotional competence, followed by 6.7 and…

  3. Emotional Competence and Stressors of Female School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeyannavar, P. G.; Itagi, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    A study on emotional competence and stressors of 105 primary school teachers was conducted in Dharwad in 2009. Emotional competence was assessed using EC- scale and stressors by stress inventory for teachers (SIT). Results revealed that majority of the teachers (89.5%) showed average to competent levels of emotional competence, followed by 6.7 and…

  4. Inspiring Minds through a Professional Alliance of Community Teachers (IMPACT): Evaluation Results of the Cohort 1 Math and Science Apprentice Teachers. CRESST Report 826

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Schweig, Jon; Griffin, Noelle; Baldanza, Michelle; Rivera, Nichole M.; Hsu, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation reports findings from a study of a UCLA teacher education program called IMPACT, Inspiring Minds through a Professional Alliance of Community Teachers. To measure program quality and goal attainment, the evaluation team used a comprehensive, multiple measures approach which included instructional artifacts, classroom logs, measures…

  5. Helping Italian science teachers to make earth and climate active lessons. Results of 3 years support with the ICLEEN project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattadori, M.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that in Italy Earth and Climate System Sciences Education (ESS) is one of the scientific disciplines where science teachers show a greatest need in terms of professional support. Among the causes that have been reported we should mention: the predominance of science teachers with a degree in biological disciplines rather then geo-logical or physical topics, and the high interdisciplinarity of certain topics, in particular those related to the climate system. Furthermore, it was found that ESS topics are predominant in the science curricula of those grades in which have been reported the major students dropout rates during the whole italian school cycle . In this context, in 2010, the MUSE, the Museum of Science of Trento (Italy), created a web-based service named I-Cleen (Inquring on Climate and Energy www.icleen.muse.it). This is a tool aimed at promoting the collaboration among science teachers in order to share resources and enhance the professional collaboration by means of participatory methods and models belonging to the world of open source and open content. The main instrument of the I-CLEEN project is an online repository (with metadata compliant with the DCMI and LOM international standards) of teaching resources focused on Earth and Climate Sciences all published under the Creative Commons license Attribution 3.0 and therefore, belonging to the model of OER (Open Educational Resources). The service has been designed, developed and managed by a team consisting of very experiencing science teachers and scientists from the Museum and other partners research institutions. The editorial work is carried out online utilizing a specific platform made with LifeRay, a CMS (Content Management System) software that is open source and manageable in a single Java-frameworked environment using the dbase, the website, the editorial process and several web 2.0 services. The project has been subjected to two distinct testing activities in collaboration with the University of Trento dealing with the effectiveness of the service as well as the usability of the graphic user interface (GUI). The present work aims to illustrate the essential features of the service I-cleen and the results achieved during the last three years of operation. It will be display and interpret for the first time data with web traffic, and other data from downloading and publishing documents of the teaching resources and the main outcomes of the above mentioned tests. The purpose of this contribution is to highlight strengths and weaknesses of this experience and potentially able to provide valuable information on the role of today's web based services and online communities to help support teachers in earth and climate sciences subjects.

  6. Colonic perforation resulting from ingested chicken bone revealing previously undiagnosed colonic adenocarcinoma: report of a case and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Douglas H; Liu, Xiaoying; Ulusarac, Ozlem; Ponnuru, Kimberly D; Schnepp, Stephanie L

    2011-01-01

    An 86 year old male with a four-day history of nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms was found on colonoscopy to have evidence of sigmoid colon obstruction and possible perforation. Emergent operative exploration revealed diffuse peritonitis, sigmoid perforation, adjacent dense adhesions, and a foreign body protruding through the perforated area. Pathologic examination showed the foreign body to be a sliver of bone consistent with chicken bone and the sigmoid subacute perforation to be associated distally with a circumferential ulcerated obstructing mass, microscopically seen to be transmurally infiltrating adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell type. There was extensive acute and organizing peritonitis, 100% Escherichia coli was cultured from peritoneal fluid, and the patient died two days postoperatively with sepsis and hypotension. This appears to be the fifth reported case of colonic perforation resulting from foreign body perforation due to previously undiagnosed adenocarcinoma. The four previously reported cases were all deeply invasive adenocarcinoma of sigmoid colon, and the foreign bodies included three chicken/poultry bones and a metallic staple. These five cases are highly unusual examples of a potentially lethal malignant neoplasm being clinically revealed by a usually (but not always) innocuous event, the ingestion of a small foreign body. PMID:21333012

  7. Colonic perforation resulting from ingested chicken bone revealing previously undiagnosed colonic adenocarcinoma: report of a case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulusarac Ozlem

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 86 year old male with a four-day history of nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms was found on colonoscopy to have evidence of sigmoid colon obstruction and possible perforation. Emergent operative exploration revealed diffuse peritonitis, sigmoid perforation, adjacent dense adhesions, and a foreign body protruding through the perforated area. Pathologic examination showed the foreign body to be a sliver of bone consistent with chicken bone and the sigmoid subacute perforation to be associated distally with a circumferential ulcerated obstructing mass, microscopically seen to be transmurally infiltrating adenocarcinoma, signet-ring cell type. There was extensive acute and organizing peritonitis, 100% Escherichia coli was cultured from peritoneal fluid, and the patient died two days postoperatively with sepsis and hypotension. This appears to be the fifth reported case of colonic perforation resulting from foreign body perforation due to previously undiagnosed adenocarcinoma. The four previously reported cases were all deeply invasive adenocarcinoma of sigmoid colon, and the foreign bodies included three chicken/poultry bones and a metallic staple. These five cases are highly unusual examples of a potentially lethal malignant neoplasm being clinically revealed by a usually (but not always innocuous event, the ingestion of a small foreign body.

  8. Analysis of changes in teachers concerning constructivist perceptions, philosophies, and practices resulting from the year-long Iowa Chautauqua Professional Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Hamid, Nor Hashidah

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which teachers were able to make changes needed to move toward the use of more constructivist behaviors after being involved in the year long Iowa Chautauqua Professional Development Program (ICPDP). Constructivist behaviors were investigated from four perspectives; namely, actual classroom performances as viewed from videotapes, teachers and student perceptions of teacher use of constructivist teaching practices, teacher philosophy as revealed from the open-ended Philosophy of Teaching and Learning Instrument (PTL), and teacher reflections about their inquiry classrooms and uses of questioning strategies. Twenty-seven teacher participants and 321 of their students volunteered to participant in this study. Four types of data were collected to answer the research questions, namely (a) Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), (b) Philosophies of Teaching and Learning (PTL), (c) Videotapes evaluated with the Expert Science Teaching Evaluation Model (ESTEEM), and (d) Teacher Reflections regarding teaching strategies and questioning. Major findings include the following: (1) Teachers in the project showed significant growth concerning constructivist perceptions over time and for all six sub-scales of TCLES, namely personal relevance, scientific uncertainty, critical voice, shared control, student negotiation, and attitude toward science. (2) Teachers in the project indicated significant growth concerning philosophy of teaching and learning as measured by the PTL. (3) Teachers in the project indicated significant growth concerning constructivist teaching practices as evaluated by videotapes (using the ESTEEM instrument); significant differences were found for all four sub-scales of the ESTEEM. (4) Students in the project indicated significant growth concerning their constructivist perceptions over time for the total SCLES score and on the sub-scales of scientific uncertainty, shared control, and student negotiation. There were no significant differences found for the sub-scales, personal relevance, critical voice, and attitude toward science. (5) There were significant differences when comparing both teacher and student perceptions for the total CLES and for the sub-scales scientific uncertainty, critical voice, shared control, and student negotiation but not for personal relevance and attitude toward science. (6) Teacher reflections provided positive reflections concerning their experiences with improving questioning skills and treating science as inquiry.

  9. Primary School Student Teachers' Understanding of Climate Change: Comparing the Results Given by Concept Maps and Communication Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinen, Ilkka; Viiri, Jouni; Lehesvuori, Sami

    2012-11-01

    Climate change is a complex environmental problem that can be used to examine students' understanding, gained through classroom communication, of climate change and its interactions. The present study examines a series of four science sessions given to a group of primary school student teachers (n = 20). This includes analysis of the communication styles used and the students' pre- and post-conceptualisation of climate change based on results obtained via essay writing and drawings. The essays and drawings concerned the students' unprompted pre- and post-conceptions about climate change, collected before and after each of the four inquiry-based science sessions (in physics, chemistry, biology and geography). Concept mapping was used in the analysis of the students' responses. The communication used in the four sessions was analysed with a communicative approach in order to find out the discussion about climate change between teacher and students. The analyses indicated that the students did not have the knowledge or the courage to participate in discussion, but post-conceptualisation map showed that students' thinking had become more coherent after the four sessions. Given the results of the present study, proposals for using concepts maps and/or communication analysis in studying students' conceptions are presented.

  10. CONTINUOUS AND COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION- A STUDY OF TEACHERS’ ATTITUDE

    OpenAIRE

    Indu Rathee

    2014-01-01

    This study is an attempt to find out teachers’ attitude about the system of continuous and comprehensive evaluation. The sample consisted of 100 teachers from government and non-government schools of Dist. Sonipat, Haryana. For the collection of data, the investigator used, “Teachers attitude scale towards continuous comprehensive evaluation” developed by Dr. Vishal Sood and Dr. Arti Anand. The result of the study revealed that most of the teachers have highly favourable a...

  11. Environmental Awareness Among Upper Primary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Vipinder Nagra; Kulwant Kaur

    2013-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to identify the environmental education awareness of upper primary school teachers (Grade VI to VIII) in relation to type of school, gender and subject streams. Environmental Awareness Test was used for collecting data from a random sample of 200 upper primary school teachers. Statistical techniques such as mean, standard deviation and t test were applied for analysis of data. The results revealed that upper primary school teachers have average level of environ...

  12. Metabolic Profiling Reveals Distinct Variations Linked to Nicotine Consumption in Humans — First Results from the KORA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Sattler, Rui; Yu, Yao; Mittelstrass, Kirstin; Lattka, Eva; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Gieger, Christian; Ladwig, Karl H.; Dahmen, Norbert; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Hao, Pei; Liu, Lei; Li, Yixue; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Adamski, Jerzy; Suhre, Karsten; Illig, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to nicotine during smoking causes a multitude of metabolic changes that are poorly understood. We quantified and analyzed 198 metabolites in 283 serum samples from the human cohort KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg). Multivariate analysis of metabolic profiles revealed that the group of smokers could be clearly differentiated from the groups of former smokers and non-smokers. Moreover, 23 lipid metabolites were identified as nicotine-dependent biomarkers. The levels of these biomarkers are all up-regulated in smokers compared to those in former and non-smokers, except for three acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines (e.g. plasmalogens). Consistently significant results were further found for the ratios of plasmalogens to diacyl-phosphatidylcolines, which are reduced in smokers and regulated by the enzyme alkylglycerone phosphate synthase (alkyl-DHAP) in both ether lipid and glycerophospholipid pathways. Notably, our metabolite profiles are consistent with the strong down-regulation of the gene for alkyl-DHAP (AGPS) in smokers that has been found in a study analyzing gene expression in human lung tissues. Our data suggest that smoking is associated with plasmalogen-deficiency disorders, caused by reduced or lack of activity of the peroxisomal enzyme alkyl-DHAP. Our findings provide new insight into the pathophysiology of smoking addiction. Activation of the enzyme alkyl-DHAP by small molecules may provide novel routes for therapy. PMID:19057651

  13. Teaching in the Foundation Stage--How Current Systems Support Teachers' Knowledge and Understanding of Children's Speech and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the knowledge, skills and understandings of Foundation Stage teachers in relation to children's speech and language development. Results from a questionnaire to 294 teachers reveal limited initial and post qualification training. Teachers' knowledge of specific aspects of children's language revealed that key areas for…

  14. Mindfulness Training and Reductions in Teacher Stress and Burnout: Results from Two Randomized, Waitlist-Control Field Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Robert W.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Jha, Amishi; Cullen, Margaret; Wallace, Linda; Wilensky, Rona; Oberle, Eva; Thomson, Kimberly; Taylor, Cynthia; Harrison, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The effects of randomization to mindfulness training (MT) or to a waitlist-control condition on psychological and physiological indicators of teachers' occupational stress and burnout were examined in 2 field trials. The sample included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female) from Canada and the United States. Measures were…

  15. Assessing Teacher Change in Facilitating Mathematizing in Urban Middle Schools: Results of an Effective Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlow, Lynn D.

    2014-01-01

    This study documents the change in teaching practices of a group of mathematics teachers in urban middle schools as they participated in a program of professional development to promote standards-based learning environments. The teachers made a shift in their classroom practice from a traditional, didactic lecture approach towards a role of…

  16. Technology Use and Acceptance in the Classroom: Results from an Exploratory Survey Study among Secondary Education Teachers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Heather; Ozok, Ant; Rada, Roy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the current usage and acceptance of classroom technologies by secondary math/science education teachers in one community. Design/methodology/approach: Forty-seven secondary education math and science teachers in one American city responded to a survey about their use and perceptions of technology in…

  17. Teacher Perceptions of NeuroEducation: A Mixed Methods Survey of Teachers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpati, Lauren; Loughan, Ashlee R.

    2012-01-01

    Pickering and Howard-Jones (2007) reported educators' enthusiasm for NeuroEducation from a sample of teachers attending neuroscience professional development courses. Their results revealed teachers: (1) are enthusiastic about the role of neuroscience in education; (2) believe an understanding of the brain for educational program development is…

  18. Interobserver reliability in musculoskeletal ultrasonography: results from a “Teach the Teachers” rheumatologist course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naredo, E; Möller, I; Moragues, C; de Agustín, J J; Scheel, A K; Grassi, W; de Miguel, E; Backhaus, M; Balint, P; Bruyn, G A W; D'Agostino, M A; Filippucci, E; Iagnocco, A; Kane, D; Koski, J M; Mayordomo, L; Schmidt, W A; Swen, W A A; Szkudlarek, M; Terslev, L; Torp?Pedersen, S; Uson, J; Wakefield, R J; Werner, C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the interobserver reliability of the main periarticular and intra?articular ultrasonographic pathologies and to establish the principal disagreements on scanning technique and diagnostic criteria between a group of experts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography. Methods The shoulder, wrist/hand, ankle/foot, or knee of 24 patients with rheumatic diseases were evaluated by 23 musculoskeletal ultrasound experts from different European countries randomly assigned to six groups. The participants did not reach consensus on scanning method or diagnostic criteria before the investigation. They were unaware of the patients' clinical and imaging data. The experts from each group undertook a blinded ultrasound examination of the four anatomical regions. The ultrasound investigation included the presence/absence of joint effusion/synovitis, bony cortex abnormalities, tenosynovitis, tendon lesions, bursitis, and power Doppler signal. Afterwards they compared the ultrasound findings and re?examined the patients together while discussing their results. Results Overall agreements were 91% for joint effusion/synovitis and tendon lesions, 87% for cortical abnormalities, 84% for tenosynovitis, 83.5% for bursitis, and 83% for power Doppler signal; ? values were good for the wrist/hand and knee (0.61 and 0.60) and fair for the shoulder and ankle/foot (0.50 and 0.54). The principal differences in scanning method and diagnostic criteria between experts were related to dynamic examination, definition of tendon lesions, and pathological v physiological fluid within joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. Conclusions Musculoskeletal ultrasound has a moderate to good interobserver reliability. Further consensus on standardisation of scanning technique and diagnostic criteria is necessary to improve musculoskeletal ultrasonography reproducibility. PMID:15941835

  19. Teacher Supply and Demand: Surprises from Primary Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Wayne

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of primary research studies on public school teacher supply and demand revealed four surprises. Projections show that enrollments are leveling off. Relatedly, annual hiring increases should be only about two or three percent over the next few years. Results from studies of teacher attrition also yield unexpected results. Excluding retirements, only about one in 20 teachers leaves each year, and the novice teachers who quit mainly cite personal and family reasons, not job dissatisfaction. Each of these findings broadens policy makers' options for teacher supply.

  20. Contextual Attributes of Indirect Bullying Situations that Influence Teachers' Decisions to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain-Arcaro, Christine; Smith, J. David; Cunningham, Charles E.; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Rimas, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Indirect bullying occurs frequently yet receives little attention by teachers. Using conjoint analysis, we examined the influence of situational attributes on teachers' decisions to intervene in indirect bullying. Results revealed that teachers (N = 235) were most influenced by victimized children's distress. Additional analyses identified two…

  1. A Comparative Study Of Environmental Awareness Among Teacher Trainees Of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birbal Saha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to provide information and difference about the level of environmental awareness of teacher trainees in West Bengal, India. Data was collected through self made questionnaire of 200 teacher trainees of Birbhum & Burdwan Districts in West Bengal, by randomly. The result revealed that 1 in-service teacher trainees are more aware than pre-service teacher trainees, 2 Science teacher trainees are more aware than humanities teacher trainees, 3 male teacher trainees and female teacher trainees, level of environmental awareness are not differ significantly, 4 govt.-aided college teacher trainees and private college teacher trainees are not differ significant in connection with level of environmental awareness.

  2. Characteristics and Contributions of School Subjects at the Elementary Level: Results of a Survey of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers from Four Quebec Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Johanne; Lenoir, Yves; Oliveira, Anderson Araujo; Morin, Marie-Pier; McConnell, Anne Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of a survey questionnaire involving 841 third and fourth year students enrolled in a French language Bachelors degree program in Elementary Education at four Quebec universities. The questionnaire dealt with pre-service elementary teachers' representations of the teaching and learning of four school subjects:…

  3. Social and Musical Objectives or Experiences School Music Teachers Anticipate Their Students Will Achieve as a Result of Attending a Summer Music Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate specific social and musical objectives or experiences school music teachers anticipate their students will achieve as a result of attending a summer music camp. A survey instrument was developed to collect demographic data and responses to questions regarding 14 specific musical and social variables.…

  4. Linking Resources to Results: The Chicago Public Education Fund's Master Teacher Initiative. Principles for Effective Education Grantmaking. Case in Brief Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantmakers for Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Linking Resources to Results" explores the deliberate approach--including specific goals, a clearly articulated grantmaking strategy and benchmarks for measuring progress--the Chicago Public Education Fund used to help the Chicago Public Schools recognize, reward and deploy high-quality teachers. The case study is intended to help grantmakers see…

  5. Comparison of vocal tract discomfort scale results with objective and instrumental phoniatric parameters among teacher rehabilitees from voice disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Wo?nicka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of occupational dysphonia play a major role in voice self-assessment, which is one of the elements of a comprehensive evaluation of voice disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the applicability of the Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTD scale to monitor the effectiveness of voice rehabilitation and compare the VTD results with objective and instrumental methods of phoniatric diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The study included 55 teachers (mean age, 47.2 with occupational dysphonia. A comprehensive diagnosis took into account self-assessment by VTD scale, phoniatric examination, including laryngovideostroboscopy (LVSS and objective measurements of the aerodynamic parameter - the maximum phonation time (MPT. After 4 months of intense rehabilitation, post-therapy examination was performed using the methods specified above. Results: After the treatment, a significant improvement was obtained in the subjective symptoms measured on a VTD scale - assessed both for the frequency (p = 0.000 and the severity (p = 0.000 subscales. Positive effects of the therapy were also observed for the parameters evaluated in the phoniatric study (p < 0.01 and laryngovideostroboscopy (p < 0.01. After voice therapy, there was also an improvement in the objective parameter MCF, which was about 5 seconds longer. Studies have shown that the VTD scale is characterized by high reliability - Cronbach's alpha coefficient in the preliminary test was as follows: for the frequency subscale symptoms - 0.826, and severity - 0.845; similarly high reliability was achieved in the control test, 0.908 and 0.923, respectively. Conclusions: Vocal Tract Discomfort scale can be a valuable tool for assessing voice, and can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of therapy of the occupational dysphonia. Med Pr 2013;64(2:199–206

  6. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Chundi Vinay; Swetha, Rayapadi G; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between the wild type protein structure and the mutant protein structure. The mutation T118M resulted in the overall increase in the stability of the mutant protein. The superimposed structure shows marked structural variation between the wild type and the mutant protein structures. PMID:25400662

  7. Science Research 4: Results of Implementation of Student-Facilitated Teacher Training and Student Mentorship Programs Promoting Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2014-12-01

    A high school curriculum allowing students previously involved in a 3-year Science Research Program to continue into a 4th year was developed in 2013 and implemented in 2014. The goals of this curriculum were to allow 3-year students to utilize their expertise in research methods and data acquisition technology to mentor both incoming research students and their teachers in the development and implementation of original scientific research. Student responsibilities involved the mentorship of both 8th Grade Honors Geoscience students and 9th grade Science Research students during the development and implementation of original research. Science Research 4 students also conducted teacher training sessions facilitating the use of electronic sensors and data acquisition devices in the classroom for general education and scientific research applications. The development, testing and presentation via teacher workshops, of the utilization of the Daily Inquiry method of promoting original scientific research in the middle school and high school classroom were also undertaken. Mentored students successfully completed and presented original research projects and teachers involved in training sessions reported increased and effective utilization of data acquisition technology and Daily Inquiry methods in the classroom.

  8. Primary School Student Teachers' Understanding of Climate Change: Comparing the Results Given by Concept Maps and Communication Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinen, Ilkka; Viiri, Jouni; Lehesvuori, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is a complex environmental problem that can be used to examine students' understanding, gained through classroom communication, of climate change and its interactions. The present study examines a series of four science sessions given to a group of primary school student teachers (n?=?20). This includes analysis of the…

  9. German-Algerian University Exchange from the Perspective of Students and Teachers: Results of an Intercultural Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doring, Nicola; Lahmar, Kamel; Bouabdallah, Mohamed; Bouafia, Mohamed; Bouzid, Djamel; Gobsch, Gerhard; Runge, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Academic exchange programs provide students and teachers with the opportunity to study or work temporarily at educational institutions abroad. For exchange programs to be successful in promoting intercultural education, they must be designed with their participants in mind. The present study constitutes an investigation of attitudes and…

  10. Are teacher candidates able to use educational technologies effectively? A case study in terms of standards

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar; Hatice Ferhan Odaba??

    2010-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating the educational technology use of teacher candidates attending education faculties in Turkey in terms of NETS*T standards. The study employed 2.566 senior teacher candidates from 7 different universities in Turkey. As a result of the study, it was revealed that the teacher candidates considered themselves to have a high level of self-efficacy with respect to educational technology standards as a whole. Considering the factors, teacher candidates reporte...

  11. Teacher collaboration praxis: conflicts, borders, and ideologies from a micropolitical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Keranen; Fátima Encinas Prudencio

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at a feature of teacher collaboration within Achinstein’s (2002) micropolitics of collaboration but from an intrapersonal perspective. Results discussed feature issues of conflict, borders, and ideologies within each participating teacher rather than between teachers. Unresolved or unacknowledged intrapersonal conflict might lead to interpersonal conflict of the type that does not enrich collaborative efforts. Findings from this study reveal that participating teachers did ex...

  12. Computational Analysis Reveals the Association of Threonine 118 Methionine Mutation in PMP22 Resulting in CMT-1A

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Chundi Vinay; Swetha, Rayapadi G.; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The T118M mutation in PMP22 gene is associated with Charcot Marie Tooth, type 1A (CMT1A). CMT1A is a form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations in CMT related disorder are seen to increase the stability of the protein resulting in the diseased state. We performed SNP analysis for all the nsSNPs of PMP22 protein and carried out molecular dynamics simulation for T118M mutation to compare the stability difference between th...

  13. DNA Hydroxymethylation Profiling Reveals that WT1 Mutations Result in Loss of TET2 Function in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raajit Rampal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in IDH1/IDH2 and TET2 result in impaired TET2-mediated conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The observation that WT1 inactivating mutations anticorrelate with TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML led us to hypothesize that WT1 mutations may impact TET2 function. WT1 mutant AML patients have reduced 5hmC levels similar to TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutant AML. These mutations are characterized by convergent, site-specific alterations in DNA hydroxymethylation, which drive differential gene expression more than alterations in DNA promoter methylation. WT1 overexpression increases global levels of 5hmC, and WT1 silencing reduced 5hmC levels. WT1 physically interacts with TET2 and TET3, and WT1 loss of function results in a similar hematopoietic differentiation phenotype as observed with TET2 deficiency. These data provide a role for WT1 in regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and suggest that TET2 IDH1/IDH2 and WT1 mutations define an AML subtype defined by dysregulated DNA hydroxymethylation.

  14. Teachers’ Professional Development in the Framework of the New Federal State Educational Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Sidenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a contradiction between the great demand for teachers’ professional development, induced by the new Federal State Educational Standards, and the lack of relevant training programs for school teachers. The author has conducted a survey to assess teachers’ readiness for innovative activity required by the new educational standards. The survey reveals that 97% of teachers denote either difficulty or disapproval of imple- menting the above standards. Investigating the reasons for teachers’ negative attitude, the author puts forward a hypothesis of their insufficient motivation and commitment. In theoretical part of the research teachers’ motivation is considered as a goal, intention, necessity, and personal quality that can be developed. As a result, a method of teachers’ motivation development is suggested actuating the motivation mechanism of achievements. The method is based on the project technique facilitating teachers’ professional and individual goal-setting ability. The program modules for teachers’ further training and prospective results are given. 

  15. THE ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS AND PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS RELATED TO THE GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Ä°PEK

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in Turkish work life as well as in other countries. There are some social and personal barriers preventing women from managerial positions. One of the area in which women are underrepresented is school leadership. The main purpose of this study is to describe the attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions in schools. In accordance with the main purpose of the study it was investigated whether there were any differences between the attitudes and the views of the primary teacher and the primary pre-service teachers. The attitudes and the views about the barriers facing female teachers in school leadership were also compared according to gender and the grades of the primary pre-service teachers. Data were collected from 114 primary teachers working in primary schools in Çayeli district and 192 primary pre-service teachers attending primary school teacher training program in the Faculty of Education in Rize University.The attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions were described in two dimensions, personal attitudes and views, and social attitudes and views. Study results revealed that the attitudes and views differentiated significantly due to gender and position (teacher or pre-service teacher in both dimensions. Moreover, it was indicated that gender and the position of the primary teachers and the primary pre-service teachers have significant joint effects on the personal attitudes and views whereas joint effects of the gender and positions on the social attitudes and views were not observed at statistically significant level. As a conclusion, study results indicated that female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers have not negative attitudes and views for female promoting to school leadership as much as their male counterparts. However, female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers seemed to accept voluntarily the social female roles more than male primary teachers and male primary pre-service teachers.In accordance with the study results some suggestions were developed. First of all, it was proposed that traditional gender roles should be redefined in Turkish Educational System. Secondly, gender discrimination subject might take place in teacher training programs. Moreover, further gender studies were recommended in terms of motivation, stress, work satisfaction, work performance, work commitment and organizational culture.

  16. Metabolic profiling reveals altered pattern of central metabolism in navel orange plants as a result of boron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guidong; Dong, Xiaochang; Liu, Leichao; Wu, Lishu; Peng, Shu'ang; Jiang, Cuncang

    2015-04-01

    We focused on the changes of metabolite profiles in navel orange plants under long-term boron (B) deficiency using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) approach. Curling of the leaves and leaf chlorosis were observed only in the upper leaves (present before start of the treatment) of B-deficient plants, while the lower leaves (grown during treatment) did not show any visible symptoms. The metabolites with up-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly proline, l-ornithine, lysine, glucoheptonic acid, fucose, fumarate, oxalate, quinate, myo-inositol and allo-inositol, while the metabolites with down-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly serine, asparagine, saccharic acid, citrate, succinate, shikimate and phytol. The levels of glucose and fructose were increased only in the upper leaves by B deficiency, while starch content was increased in all the leaves and in roots. The increased levels of malate, ribitol, gluconic acid and glyceric acid occurred only in the lower leaves of B-deficient plants. The increased levels of phenols only in the upper leaves indicated that the effects of B on phenol metabolism in citrus plants may be a consequence of disruptions in leaf structure. Metabolites with opposite reactions in upper and lower leaves were mainly glutamine, glycine and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. To our knowledge, the phenomena of allo-inositol even higher than myo-inositol occurred characterized for the first time in this species. These results suggested that the altered pattern of central metabolism may be either specific or adaptive responses of navel orange plants to B deficiency. PMID:25212059

  17. [Investigations into the significance of routine health examinations for tuberculosis in teachers based on the analysis of results of extraordinary health examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M

    1998-11-01

    School teachers are regarded as one of the danger groups in contracting tuberculosis infection and are subjected to strict tuberculosis controls, since when they develop tuberculosis, many school children are exposed to infection to the disease. However, the recent decrease in the incidence of tuberculosis in Japan has led to disputes concerning the significance of routine mass health examinations for tuberculosis. In this study, the significance of routine health examinations for tuberculosis in teachers was investigated by the analysis of the results of extraordinary health examinations carried out for tuberculosis in teachers as the index cases. A total of 496 extraordinary health examinations were carried out by Nagoya City from 1975 to 1986 and by Aichi Prefecture from 1980 to 1995. In 49 instances of these examinations, teachers were regarded as index cases, which included 25 teachers of public primary, middle or high schools and 14 teachers of private schools, including private instructors for piano, painting or calligraphy, and teachers for supplementary education. The results of these examinations in both groups were compared, regarding the routes of notification, the disease status of the index cases, and the frequency and the scale of the infections of tuberculosis observed among contacts with the index cases. "Group infections of tuberculosis" was defined as instances the infection in which 20 or more cases were infected by the index case, "small scale group infection" as 5-19 infected cases, and "cases with infection" as 1-4 infected cases. The result obtained were as follows. 1. The response rates to routine health examinations were 99.9% in the teachers of public primary, middle or high schools, and about 20-30% in the teachers of private schools. 2. The proportion of the cases notefied by routine examinations were 68.0% in the former group and 21.4% in the latter group. The cases notefied before the onset of the symptoms in the former group was significantly more frequent than in the latter group. 3. In the former group, no far advanced cases were identified, whereas 2 (14.3%) far advanced cases were identified in the latter group. The cases with amount of tubercle bacilli in sputum exceed 3 on the Gaffky scale were 32.0% in the former group and 61.5% in the latter group. 4. One (4.0%) case of the "group infections of tuberculosis" was observed in the former group, and 2 (14.3%) cases in the latter group. "Small scale group infection" was observed in 4.0% of the former group and in 21.4% of the latter group, and "cases with infection" in 8.0% of the former group and in 35.7% of the latter group. The frequency and the scale of the infections of tuberculosis observed among contacts with the index cases was significantly smaller in the former group than in the latter group. In conclusion, routine health examinations for tuberculosis for teachers seems valuable for the early diagnosis of tuberculosis cases and for the prevension of the infection of tuberculosis in schools. PMID:9866923

  18. Changes in teacher efficacy and beliefs during a one-year teacher preparation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockman, Alison Schirmer

    This study attempted to further understanding of factors affecting the teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary science preservice teachers, and to develop a model relating teacher efficacy to beliefs about teaching and students. A mixed quantitative and qualitative methodology was utilized in order to track participants' beliefs both broadly and in depth throughout a one-year teacher preparation program. Results from this analysis revealed that preservice teachers at the end of the program had significantly higher personal science teaching efficacy beliefs than at the beginning of the program. No significant difference in science teaching outcome expectancy beliefs was found, although individual preservice teachers did develop alternate beliefs. Teacher efficacy beliefs were directly affected by three of Bandura's four sources of self-efficacy beliefs---Mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, and verbal persuasion---with the influence of each source of self-efficacy information appearing to change during the course of the teacher preparation program. No evidence was found that affective states by themselves had resulted in belief changes, although many of the other experiences were more powerful because they were accompanied by an emotional incident. Connections between teacher efficacy beliefs, beliefs about students, and beliefs about teaching were uncovered, as was the importance of content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge on a teacher's sense of efficacy.

  19. Measurements of occupational ultraviolet exposure and the implications of timetabled yard duty for school teachers in Queensland, Australia: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, N J; Parisi, A V; Igoe, D

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous personal measurements of the occupational ultraviolet exposure weighted to the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection hazard sensitivity spectrum (UVICNIRP) were made over a five week period (44 person-days) in the second half of the summer school term of 2012 in Queensland, Australia for individual high school teachers located at latitudes of 27.5°S and 23.5°S. These teachers were employed for the duration of the study in a predominately indoor classroom teaching role, excluding mandatory periods of lunch time yard duty and school sport supervisions. Data is presented from personal measurements made to the shirt collar using polyphenylene oxide (PPO) film UV dosimeters. UVICNIRP exposure data is presented for each week of the study period for the shirt collar measurement site and are further expressed relative to the measured ambient horizontal plane exposure. Personal exposures were correlated with time outdoors, showing a higher exposure trend on days when teachers were required to supervise outdoor areas for more than 2h per week (mean daily exposure: 168Jm(-2)UVICNIRP±5Jm(-2) (1?)) compared to the study average (mean daily exposure: 115Jm(-2)UVICNIRP±91Jm(-2) (1?)). Time spent in an open playground environment was found to be the most critical factor influencing the occupational UVICNIRP exposure. A linear model was developed showing a correlation (R(2)=0.77) between the time teachers spent on yard duty and UVICNIRP exposure, expressed relative to ambient. The research findings indicate a greater reduction in personal exposure can be achieved by timetabling for yard duty periods in playground areas which offer more shade from trees and surrounding buildings. All mean daily personal exposures measured at the shirt collar site were higher than the ICNIRP occupational daily exposure limit of 30Jm(-2) for outdoor workers. PMID:24509070

  20. The Role of Teacher Leaders in School Improvement through the Perceptions of Principals and Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Akert; Barbara N Martin

    2012-01-01

    These researchers examined the perceptions of fifteen principals and 96 classroom teachers regarding the role of teacher leadership in school improvement. The data revealed significant differences in how principals and teachers perceive teachers’ involvement in teacher leadership roles, in ratings of involvement of teachers in leadership roles when compared to the ratings of how involved they would like to be in those same roles, and how principals and teachers perceived the impact of teacher...

  1. Finnish Cooperating Physics Teachers' Conceptions of Physics Teachers' Teacher Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2010-06-01

    This article examines Finnish cooperating physics teachers’ conceptions of teacher knowledge in physics. Six experienced teachers were interviewed. The data was analyzed to form categories concerning the basis of teacher knowledge, and the tradition of German Didaktik and Shulman’s theory of teacher knowledge were used in order to understand the results. The results show that the teachers strongly emphasize knowledge related to day-to-day teaching practice. In German Didaktik, this means knowledge of the best instructional methods, while in Shulman’s categorization it belongs to the category of representations, strategies, and methods. It was also found that the teachers appear to lack some of the essential key ideas of modern physics teacher education, such as a holistic view of instructional approaches.

  2. A COMPARISON OF ORAL EVALUATION RATINGS BY NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS AND NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Baitman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to explore the differences and similarities between native English speaker (NES teachers and non-native English speaker (NNES teachers in their oral evaluation ratings of the same university level English language learners. To this effect, the iBT/Next Generation TOEFL Test Independent Speaking Rubric and a questionnaire were employed. The results reveal that NES teachers are more lenient in their oral evaluation ratings than NNES teachers. In regards to the questionnaire employed, it was found that NES teachers take into consideration the aspects of fluency and pronunciation more so than NNES teachers when orally assessing students, while NNES teachers take more into consideration the aspects of grammatical accuracy and vocabulary. Further research is required in the area of oral assessment specifically pertaining to nationality, age, work experience, and knowledge of a second language.

  3. An analysis of zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek-Sandor, Joy

    Informal science institutions are a significant provider of science teacher professional development. As pressure continues to critically analyze the work of teachers and their effectiveness in the classroom, it is important to understand how informal science institutions contribute to effective change in teacher science content knowledge and pedagogy. This research study analyzed zoo and aquarium provided teacher professional development to respond to the research questions: How do zoos and aquaria determine and assess their goals for teacher professional development? How do these goals align with effective teacher change for science content knowledge and pedagogy? Theoretical frameworks for high quality teacher professional development, effective evaluation of teacher professional development, and learning in informal science settings guided the research. The sample for the study was AZA accredited zoos and aquariums providing teacher professional development (N=107). Data collection consisted of an online questionnaire, follow-up interviews, and content analysis of teacher professional development artifacts. Analysis revealed that by and large zoos and aquariums are lacking in their provision of science teacher professional development. Most professional development focuses on content or resources, neglecting pedagogy. Assessments mismatch the goals and rely heavily on self-report and satisfaction measures. The results demonstrate a marked difference between those zoos and aquariums that are larger in capacity versus those that are medium to small in size. This may be an area of research for the future, as well as analyzing the education resources produced by zoos and aquariums as these were emphasized heavily as a way they serve teachers.

  4. Primary teachers’ and primary pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes toward teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin ?pek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Abstract The main purpose of this study is to compare the primary teachers and pre-service primary teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes toward teaching profession in Turkey. Descriptive method was used in the study and the study was carried out on 180 first grade and 107 fourth grade primary pre-service teachers at the Faculty of Education in Rize University and 131 primary teachers working in the primary schools located in Çayeli (Rize district. The Attitude Scale towards Teaching Profession (Özgür, 1994 and the Turkish form of the Ohio State Teacher Efficacy Scale (Balo?lu and Karada?, 2008 were used as data gathering instrument in the study. The study results revealed that the first grade primary pre-service teachers’ scores on the attitudes towards teaching professions were statistically higher than the scores of the fourth grade primary pre-service teachers and of the primary teachers. However, the study results indicated that the teaching self-efficacy scores of the first grade pre-service teachers were statistically lower than the teaching self-efficacy scores of the fourth grade pre-service teachers and primary teachers. On the other hand, the study results showed that females’ attitudes towards teaching profession were higher than the attitudes of their male counterparts whereas self-efficacy scores did not differentiate due to the gender of the primary pre-service teachers and primary teachers. Moreover, the study results indicated that there were not any significant correlation between the self-efficacy and attitudes scores of the pre-service teachers and primary teachers.

  5. The status of history teaching, learning and examination results in Lesotho, 2000 - 2004: implications for teacher education.

    OpenAIRE

    Ntabeni, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of History teaching and learning in Lesotho which is at its lowest ebb. Very few schools teach the subject and their poor performance, particularly in the senior classes, exacerbates the situation. On the basis of the examiners' comments in the last five years, the study has identified lack of essay writing skills among the candidates as the main reason behind the high failure rate in History. It also suggests pursuit of quality pre-service & in-service teacher ...

  6. Secondary Science Teachers' Development of Pedagogical Content Knowledge as Result of Integrating Nanoscience Content in Their Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischow, Emily D.; Bryan, Lynn; Bodner, George M.

    2013-06-01

    Nanoscale science is a rapidly-developing, multidisciplinary field of science and research that combines engineering, chemistry, physics, biology, and information technology pushes and the boundary between the science and the technology required to conduct it. Nanoscale science involves investigating and working with matter on the scale of 1-100 microns and has broad societal implications for new technologies. It is estimated that the worldwide workforce necessary to support the field of nanoscale science and nanotechnology will be close to 2 million by 2015 (National Nanotechnology Initiative, 2005). With such rapid developments in nanoscale science and technology, it is becoming more incumbent upon K-12 science teachers to provide the learning experiences necessary for students to understand the principles that govern behavior at the nanoscale and develop the skills needed to apply these concepts to improve everyday life. While onlya limited amount of nanoscale curricular materials are available for K-12 and undergraduate education many important unanswered questions exist, including: How do science teachers learn to teach nanoscale science?

  7. Teachers and Bullying Developing a Deeper Understanding of Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher-to-Student Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerillo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Students report that teachers bully them, but a review of the literature indicates that little attention has been given to teacher-to-student bullying. This study used a mixed-methods approach to investigate elementary teachers' perceptions of seriousness and their intent to intervene in teacher bullying incidents. Results indicated that teachers…

  8. Japanese EFL Teachers' Perceptions of Communicative, Audiolingual and Yakudoku Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Gorsuch

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the learning of English as a Foreign Language in Japanese high schools has become the focus of new educational policies applied at the national level. One of these is The Course of Study issue by the Ministry of Education, in which teachers are, for the first time in a long series of curriculum guidelines, adjured to develop students' "positive attitudes towards communicating in English." Another is the JET program, which has put thousands of native English speaking assistant language teachers (ALTs into Japanese secondary classrooms for the purpose of team teaching with Japanese teachers. Data resulting from a survey project of 876 Japanese high school English teachers was used to provide empirical evidence of teachers' levels of approval of communicative, audiolingual and traditional (yakudoku activities. Teachers were also asked to rate the strengths of a variety of influences on their instruction, including university entrance exams, and pre- and in-service teacher education programs. Teachers' perceptions of both activities and instructional influences were examined in light of teachers' length of career, type of school (private versus public, academic versus vocational, and level of contact with an ALT. The data revealed the complexities of imposing broad, national educational policies on a diverse group of teachers, and in an educational culture which likely precludes teachers' use of communicative activities.

  9. Burnout among Low and High Experienced Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedehhava Mousavy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a serious psychological syndrome that can affect not only an individual’s well-being, but also the functioning of whole organisations, such as schools. It is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment.The level of burnout among teachers in the field of education has a negative impact on student success. The present investigation examines the level of burn out among high and low experienced teachers. It focused on a group of English teachers from different nationalities: Iranian, and Malaysian at UPM to examine if there is any relation between burnout and experience level. The sample consisted of 30 English teachers. Two instruments namely, The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Demographic Questionnaire were used to collect data. Data analysis revealed that there is no significant difference in depersonalization and personal accomplishment scores between low and high experienced teachers. But the result of this study also revealed that there is a significant difference in Emotional Exhaustion scores between low and high experienced teachers. Further research is required to explore the roots and the causes of burnout.Keywords: teacher burnout, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment

  10. Are Quebec’s Future Teachers Ready to Use ICT in Class? The Case of Prospective Teachers in Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Karsenti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Are Quebec’s future teachers ready to integrate information and communication technologies (ICT into the scholastic context? To answer this question, a study was conducted with some 2,065 future teachers, 410 associate professors and 90 supervisors of teaching practices from nine French-speaking Quebec universities offering a beginning teacher-training program. The results show that these prospective teachers have access to the equipment needed to become familiar with ICT, and that they use basic technology skills well. Furthermore, the data collected revealed that teachers in training use ICT regularly and reflectively to plan their classes, communicate, search for information, prepare didactic materials, solve problems, or improve themselves professionally. Although the profile shown is promising, the study results also indicate a very low proportion of future teachers who use ICT in the classroom.

  11. Excellent Mentor Teachers’ Skills in Mentoring for Pre-Service Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Hsiung Liu

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identify the performances of 76 Taiwanese awarded mentor teachers inmentoring pre-service teachers by analyzing their written reports related to mentoringprocesses. An inductive content analysis method was used to construct headings and codes inrelation to mentoring skills. The analytical result reveals that 448 headings were formed andwere further categorized into six groups, reported as six mentoring skills. The mentoringskills rank-order from high to low frequencies are ...

  12. Formação continuada de professores e resultados dos alunos no SARESP: propostas e realizações Teacher continued education and the results of pupils in the SARESP exam: proposals and achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bauer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho apresenta resultados obtidos por meio da pesquisa realizada entre 2005 e 2006, intitulada Uso dos resultados do SARESP: o papel da avaliação nas políticas de formação docente, cujo propósito foi analisar possibilidades e limites da utilização dos resultados obtidos pelos alunos no Sistema de Avaliação do Rendimento Escolar do Estado de São Paulo (SARESP para a formulação e o direcionamento de políticas de formação de professores. As preocupações recaíram sobre os programas de formação em língua portuguesa para o ensino fundamental. Foram visitadas quatro das treza diretorias regionais de ensino da capital do Estado de São Paulo a fim de conhecer o trabalho de formação docente realizado e analisar em que medida ele se relacionava aos dados obtidos no SARESP. O estudo qualitativo teve como principal estratégia a enquete exploratória, com uso de roteiros de entrevista e de observação semiestruturados. O referencial teórico sintetizou contribuições de Dennis Palumbo (1998 e de Marcus Figueiredo e Argelina Figueiredo (1986 para a compreensão do conceito e das etapas da política pública, assim como de Elba Barreto e Regina Pinto (2001, Blaine Worthen, James Sanders e Jody Fitzpatrick (2004 e Almerindo Afonso (1998 a respeito da discussão da avaliação de programas, entre outros. Concluiu-se que, apesar de a documentação dos programas de formação e o SARESP declararem que há relação entre os resultados da avaliação e os programas propostos, a concretização desse propósito depende do engajamento dos profissionais presentes nas diretorias de ensino. As ações formais da Secretaria da Educação para induzir esse uso de resultados não se mostraram suficientes para assegurar o pretenso vínculo entre avaliação e formação docente.This work presents results of a study conducted between 2005 and 2006 entitled The use of the results of the SARESP Exam: the role of assessment in teacher education policies (Uso dos resultados do SARESP: o papel da avaliação nas políticas de formação docente, whose purpose was to analyze possibilities and limits of the use of the results obtained by pupils in the SARESP Exam (School Performance Assessment System of the State São Paulo to formulate and direct teacher education policies. The attention was focused on education programs for teachers of Portuguese Language to pupils in fundamental education. Four out of the thirteen Regional Education Directorships of the State of São Paulo were visited to gain acquaintance with the teacher education programs they developed and to investigate to what extent they could be related to the results achieved in the SARESP exam. The qualitative study adopted as its main strategy the exploratory survey, with the use of semi-structured interview and observation scripts. The theoretical framework employed brought together contributions by Dennis Palumbo (1998 and Marcus Figueiredo and Argelina Figueiredo (1986 to understand the concept and stages of public policy, as well as by Elba Barreto and Regina Pinto (2001, Blaine Worthen, James Sanders and Jody Fitzpatrick (2004, and by Almerindo Afonso (1998 on the discussion about assessment programs, among others. It concludes that, the statements in the teacher education program and in the SARESP documentations about the correlation between the former and pupil assessment results notwithstanding, the actual achievement of positive results depends on the effective commitment of the professionals working at the Education Directorships. Formal actions by the Secretariat for Education to foster this use of the results have proved insufficient to ensure the proposed link between pupil assessment and teacher education.

  13. Formação continuada de professores e resultados dos alunos no SARESP: propostas e realizações / Teacher continued education and the results of pupils in the SARESP exam: proposals and achievements

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriana, Bauer.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho apresenta resultados obtidos por meio da pesquisa realizada entre 2005 e 2006, intitulada Uso dos resultados do SARESP: o papel da avaliação nas políticas de formação docente, cujo propósito foi analisar possibilidades e limites da utilização dos resultados obtidos pelos alunos n [...] o Sistema de Avaliação do Rendimento Escolar do Estado de São Paulo (SARESP) para a formulação e o direcionamento de políticas de formação de professores. As preocupações recaíram sobre os programas de formação em língua portuguesa para o ensino fundamental. Foram visitadas quatro das treza diretorias regionais de ensino da capital do Estado de São Paulo a fim de conhecer o trabalho de formação docente realizado e analisar em que medida ele se relacionava aos dados obtidos no SARESP. O estudo qualitativo teve como principal estratégia a enquete exploratória, com uso de roteiros de entrevista e de observação semiestruturados. O referencial teórico sintetizou contribuições de Dennis Palumbo (1998) e de Marcus Figueiredo e Argelina Figueiredo (1986) para a compreensão do conceito e das etapas da política pública, assim como de Elba Barreto e Regina Pinto (2001), Blaine Worthen, James Sanders e Jody Fitzpatrick (2004) e Almerindo Afonso (1998) a respeito da discussão da avaliação de programas, entre outros. Concluiu-se que, apesar de a documentação dos programas de formação e o SARESP declararem que há relação entre os resultados da avaliação e os programas propostos, a concretização desse propósito depende do engajamento dos profissionais presentes nas diretorias de ensino. As ações formais da Secretaria da Educação para induzir esse uso de resultados não se mostraram suficientes para assegurar o pretenso vínculo entre avaliação e formação docente. Abstract in english This work presents results of a study conducted between 2005 and 2006 entitled The use of the results of the SARESP Exam: the role of assessment in teacher education policies (Uso dos resultados do SARESP: o papel da avaliação nas políticas de formação docente), whose purpose was to analyze possibil [...] ities and limits of the use of the results obtained by pupils in the SARESP Exam (School Performance Assessment System of the State São Paulo) to formulate and direct teacher education policies. The attention was focused on education programs for teachers of Portuguese Language to pupils in fundamental education. Four out of the thirteen Regional Education Directorships of the State of São Paulo were visited to gain acquaintance with the teacher education programs they developed and to investigate to what extent they could be related to the results achieved in the SARESP exam. The qualitative study adopted as its main strategy the exploratory survey, with the use of semi-structured interview and observation scripts. The theoretical framework employed brought together contributions by Dennis Palumbo (1998) and Marcus Figueiredo and Argelina Figueiredo (1986) to understand the concept and stages of public policy, as well as by Elba Barreto and Regina Pinto (2001), Blaine Worthen, James Sanders and Jody Fitzpatrick (2004), and by Almerindo Afonso (1998) on the discussion about assessment programs, among others. It concludes that, the statements in the teacher education program and in the SARESP documentations about the correlation between the former and pupil assessment results notwithstanding, the actual achievement of positive results depends on the effective commitment of the professionals working at the Education Directorships. Formal actions by the Secretariat for Education to foster this use of the results have proved insufficient to ensure the proposed link between pupil assessment and teacher education.

  14. Teacher Sorting, Teacher Quality, and Student Composition : Evidence from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Bonesrønning, Hans; Falch, Torberg; Strøm, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    Using panel data for Norwegian schools, we establish a two-equation supply and demand model for teachers with approved education. Taking into account nationally determined teacher pay and a strict teacher appointment rule, the data enable us to separately estimate supply and demand functions for certified teachers. The results clearly indicate that the student body composition, and in particular students belonging to ethnic minorities, influences both teacher supply and teacher demand. The im...

  15. A case study of a mathematics teacher's and science teacher's use of teacher wisdom in integrating middle school mathematics and science content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saam, Julie Reinhardt

    The National Science Education Standards, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Curriculum Standards, the Interdisciplinary Team Organization structure and the Middle School movement collectively suggest to teachers to make connections between their subject areas. This case study of a middle school mathematics teacher and science teacher utilizes the framework of teacher wisdom to bring a unique perspective to the process of developing and implementing integrated curriculum. Data collection consisted of interviews with the teachers, students, and their principal; documents such lesson plans, team meeting minutes and teacher journal entries; and field notes acquired within team meetings and classroom instruction. The interpretations of this study reveal that teacher development of integrated curriculum occurs in two ways: naturally and intentionally. The natural label used to describe when teachers comfortably share information that could serve as connections between subjects. The intentional label used to describe when the teachers purposely plan integrated lessons and units. These findings also provide an image of middle school integration. This image exhibits more than connections between subject area content; it also shows connections with away-from-school skills and events, lifeskills, and lifelong guidelines. Although these teachers found it frustrating and overwhelming to meet the many views of integration, they assembled integration curriculum that followed their philosophy of education, coincided with their personal characteristics and met the needs of their students. The interpretations of this study reveal a new model of middle school integration. Teachers can use this model as a collection of integration examples. Integration researchers can use this model as a conceptual framework to analyze the integration efforts of middle level teachers. Additional research needs to focus on: developing new modeling and evaluation tools for teachers, evaluating middle school professional development programs, investigating middle school teachers' characteristics, and continuing the study of integration's worth. The results of this study and additional research may help: (a) administrators to target specific teachers for middle school positions, (b) educators to plan and implement new programs for inservice and preservice middle school teachers, and (c) teachers to experiment with new and innovative strategies for middle school integration.

  16. The Impact of Lifelong Learning Teacher Education in Secondary School Results El Impacto de la Formación Permanente del Profesorado de Educación Secundaria en los Resultados Escolares.

    OpenAIRE

    Paula González-Vallinas; David Oterino; José Luis San Fabián

    2006-01-01

    Studies dealing with factors which have an influence on students outcomes are reviewed, teacher variables and teacher training are among their most common findings to influence school achievement. This study analyses the variable in-service teacher training on students? academic achievement. The analysis levels are departments and schools, being department the level where the relation among variables is more significative. There are significative correlations between the in-service teacher tr...

  17. THE KING’S CARPET: DRAMA PLAY IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Kerekes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Trying to develop new perspectives of teaching is never easy, but trying to cultivate ownership and initiative among teacher education students is a still greater aspiration that is infrequently realized. This article addresses each of these highly valued goals for teacher educators as a case study reveals the impact of involving teacher candidates in interdisciplinary focused, constructivist and reflective models and planning for teaching, and then student teaching, which reaffirms this approach. Most significant is the phenomenon of several teacher candidates continuing their development and study of innovative drama play projects with their classes after the semester finishes. The resulting transformations in professional identity development, self-efficacy and student-teacher relationships confirm the value of the teacher education model which has developed over a decade of practice (Lyublinskaya & Kerekes, 2009.

  18. Who Needs to Fit in? Who Gets to Stand out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers Through an Ableism Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic will impact students with disabilities in the domain of special education is explored. Data was drawn from six special education school teachers from one school in Calgary, Alberta. Five sub-themes (social acceptance, not adding to the impairment, fear of judgement by society, pursuing “normality” and meeting the demands of society were identified that fit under the main identified theme of “fitting in by not standing out”. Findings demonstrate a dichotomy in participant views of non- or socially acceptable communication devices. The perception of BMI technology was also explored among special education school teachers, revealing benefits and challenges with the uptake of this technology for students with disabilities. Perceptions of people with disabilities and ableism are presented as conceptual frameworks to interpret the influence and impact of the findings.

  19. A descriptive study of the middle school science teacher behavior for required student participation in science fair competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisanick, Laura M.

    This descriptive study explores three aspects of teacher behavior related to student participation in science fair competitions: teacher attitudes, teacher preference for different student-learning modes, and teacher motives for required student participation. Teacher motives for required student participation may stem from curriculum and standardized test requirements, school administrators' expectations, teacher preference for a competitive student-learning mode, and teacher attitudes towards science fair competitions. Survey data collected for this study included teacher attitudes about science fair competitions, teacher preference for different student-learning modes, and demographic data about middle school teachers who sponsor students in PJAS science fair competitions. The theoretical framework in this study is the theory of planned behavior proposed by Ajzen. The results from the analysis of data in this study showed that the majority of the teachers in this sample held positive attitudes towards science fair competitions and required their students to conduct science fair projects but did not require their students to participate in science fair competitions. The middle school science teachers in the sample would involve their students in PJAS competitions even if their districts did not require them to participate. The teachers in this study preferred the cooperative and individualistic student-learning modes. Teacher gender did not influence a preference for a particular student-learning mode. Using the theoretical framework from this study revealed teachers who required their students to participate in science fair competitions also required their students to conduct science fair projects.

  20. Attitude of teachers towards the inclusion of special needs children in general education classroom: the case of teachers in some selected schools in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Olufemi ADENIYI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes about inclusion are extremely complex and vary from teacher to teacher and schoolto school. This article explores the attitudes of teachers about inclusion of special needschildren in their secondary schools in general education. This study adopted a descriptivesurvey research design, with 60 teachers as participants from selected secondary schools inOyo State, Nigeria. Four hypotheses were postulated at the significant level of .05. Theinstrument, a questionnaire with question items on demographic information like gender,marital status, professionalism and teaching experience has a general reliability coefficientalpha of .83. A t-test method of analysis was the main statistical method used to test the 4generated hypotheses. The findings revealed that the attitude of male teachers is 39.4, whilethat of female teacher is 43.3, thus, the t-test analysis shows that the calculated t-test is2.107, which is greater than the critical t (t=1.960. This implies that female teachers havemore positive attitude towards the inclusion of special needs students than their malecounterparts. Furthermore, the results reveal that significant difference exists betweenmarried and single teachers in their attitude towards special need students. And thatprofessionally qualified teacher tends to have a more favourable attitude towards theinclusion of special need students than their non-professional qualified teachers. It wasrecommended that teachers should attend seminars and conferences to improve theirknowledge about ways of practicing and accepting inclusion for a better tomorrow for ourspecial needs children in Nigeria.

  1. Teachers’ Attitudes Towards inclusive Education in Austria

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    Peter Rossmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the results of several empirical studies on teachers’ attitudes towards the inclusion of pupils with special education needs in different academic settings. The survey’s data sets of altogether 578 primary school teachers in Austria, queried in 1998 and 2009, were reanalyzed. The chosen instrument of investigation was Reicher’s scale “Einstellung zur Integration in der Schule (EIS [attitudes towards inclusion in school]“ (1988. Concerning reliability and factorial structure, the scale fulfills the requirements which an instrument of investigation has to achieve. With regards to content, the analysis of the data showed that teachers evaluate the inclusion of pupils with mental retardation as a greater challenge than the inclusion of pupils with physical or learning disabilities. With reference to the general attitude towards academic inclusion, there were no differences between primary school teachers and special education teachers. However, the results revealed a moderate effect of the field of work the respondents were engaged in. Teachers working in inclusive fields declare a more positive attitude towards academic inclusion than teachers in non-inclusive settings, disregarding the type of disability.

  2. AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE ATTITUDES OF TEACHERS' TOWARDS SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT IN DIFFERENT SCHOOLS AROUND CHENNAI DISTRICT

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekar, S; Sridhar, R.

    2013-01-01

    The present research paper is an attempt to study the attitude of school teachers towards school environment of Chennai district. The sample comprised of 250 teachers, teaching in different schools affiliated to CBSE, State board and Matriculation board of study. Normative survey method was applied and null hypothesis was framed. R. Prasad's (2006) school environment inventory was used to collect data from school teachers. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results revealed that ther...

  3. Connections between Mathematics and Arts & Culture: An exploratory Study with Teachers in a South African school

    OpenAIRE

    Dhlamini, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of a two year study, at Master’s level, which was undertaken to investigate how two Grade 9 Arts and Culture teachers incorporated mathematics in their Arts and Culture lessons in their classrooms in South Africa. Data from concept mapping activities and subsequent interviews with both teachers were collected and analysed using typological methods of analysis. Data collected from the study revealed that teachers still continue to grapple with the notion of integ...

  4. Teacher Control and Affiliation: Do Students and Teachers Agree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekelmans, Mieke; Mainhard, Tim; den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo

    2011-01-01

    Using an interpersonal circumplex model, we examined whether teachers and students in secondary education apply a similar frame of reference when thinking about how a teacher relates to students. We also examined the alignment of teacher and student perceptions of two dimensions of the teacher-student relationship: Control and Affiliation. Results…

  5. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that…

  6. Attitudes toward Communication Skills among Students'-Teachers' in Jordanian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the positive and negative attitudes among 289 students of class teachers and childhood teachers' disciplines using the communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) in Jordanian public universities. GPA, year level of students were recorded. Overall results of study revealed that the mean of positive…

  7. Trait Emotional Intelligence of Greek Special Education Teachers in Relation to Burnout and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platsidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates perceived emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to burnout syndrome and job satisfaction in primary special education teachers from Greece. EI was measured by the EIS developed by Schutte et al. (1998). Factor analysis revealed that four factors can be identified in the EIS. Results showed that Greek teachers reported…

  8. Investigation of the impacts of physical environment on teacher-child communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Erbay*

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to reveal the effects of physical environment in pre-school education on teacher-child communication. The sample of the study is composed of 42 nursery classes and their teachers in primary schools affiliated with Konya Provincial Directorate of National Education. The study was conducted in survey model. In the study, “The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- the sub-dimensions of Classroom Space and Furnishings” was used to assess physical environment and “Teacher-Child Communication Questionnaire” which was developed by the researchers was used to assess teacher-child communication. The relation between physical environment and teacher-child communication was tested with Spearman Correlation. The results of the study revealed that teacher-child communication is a significantly related with ECER-S daily care, play and learning space sub-scale and furnishings for relaxation and comfort sub-scale.

  9. Administrational Factors as Predictors of Teacher Burnout across Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at measuring the perceived burnout levels of Iranian (N= 230 and Turkish (N=156 EFL teachers and determining the role of four administrational factors (i.e., Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, Fairness, and Fringe Benefits in predicting EE, DP and PA burnout processes across Iranian and Turkish EFL teachers. The MBI-ES was used to measure the perceived burnout levels of the participants, and a four-dimension scale (41 items was developed based on the literature study to measure the participants’ perceptions in these four areas. The average internal consistency reliability of the 41-item scale was r = 0.703. The results of t-tests analyses showed that there was a slight significant difference between Iranian and Turkish groups only in EE burnout processes. Moreover, the results of regression analyses showed that EE, DP, and PA subscales were better predicted by Fairness factor among Iranian teachers, while by Teacher Autonomy among Turkish teachers. Finally, the contrasted results also revealed that Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, and Fairness factors had cross-culturally discriminatory roles, while Fringe Benefits factor did not have.

  10. Administrational Factors as Predictors of Teacher Burnout across Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at measuring the perceived burnout levels of Iranian (N= 230 and Turkish (N=156 EFL teachers and determining the role of four administrational factors (i.e., Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, Fairness, and Fringe Benefits in predicting EE, DP and PA burnout processes across Iranian and Turkish EFL teachers. The MBI-ES was used to measure the perceived burnout levels of the participants, and a four-dimension scale (41 items was developed based on the literature study to measure the participants’ perceptions in these four areas. The average internal consistency reliability of the 41-item scale was r = 0.703. The results of t-tests analyses showed that there was a slight significant difference between Iranian and Turkish groups only in EE burnout processes. Moreover, the results of regression analyses showed that EE, DP, and PA subscales were better predicted by Fairness factor among Iranian teachers, while by Teacher Autonomy among Turkish teachers. Finally, the contrasted results also revealed that Teacher Autonomy, Reward Adequacy, and Fairness factors had cross-culturally discriminatory roles, while Fringe Benefits factor did not have.

  11. Mathematics teacher candidates’ evaluations of teaching and learning process in faculty of education

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    Sava? Ba?türk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher has an important role in the formation of subjects that society needs. Therefore teacher training programs should be continuously reviewed and improved to have well-trained teachers. This study aimed to investigate master's non-thesis program in education faculty according to student teachers' opinions. A questionnaire included one open-ended question was administered to 36 student teachers in Secondary School Mathematics Education. Data were examined and qualitatively analyzed for the common themes by means of qualitative analysis software. The results revealed that while relations between student teachers and lecturers were considered as positive by student teachers, there were some problems in courses, courses' organizations and given homework.

  12. Choice and control in a museal environment: a study with science teachers

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    Charles Tiago dos Santos Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand teachers’ strategies of planning students’ visits to science museums and how they intend to relate this visit to formal science teaching. The study was conducted with 21 teachers of Science, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, randomly identified among visitors to a science museum, who were accompanying their students. Interviews and written records of teachers about teachers strategies were analyzed using the textual discursive analysis revealed five levels of control (or choice adopted by teachers for planning and tracking of students' visits to the museum. The results showed that most teachers surveyed use control elements, requesting notes for reports to be retrieved in school. The evaluation mechanisms planned by teachers after the visit showed an intention for preserving and contextualization of the museum experience in other contexts, like in school.

  13. Lost at Sea: Summary Results of a Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Teacher Induction and Implications for Administrative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Robert; Watlington, Eliah; Felsher, Rivka

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes a qualitative meta-analysis of the empirical research on the effectiveness of teacher induction programs over the last decade for the purpose of identifying the essential elements that make them effective in reducing teacher attrition. The study used Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as the theoretical framework for…

  14. Lost at Sea: Summary Results of a Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Teacher Induction and Implications for Administrative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Robert; Watlington, Eliah; Felsher, Rivka

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes a qualitative meta-analysis of the empirical research on the effectiveness of teacher induction programs over the last decade for the purpose of identifying the essential elements that make them effective in reducing teacher attrition. The study used Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as the theoretical framework for…

  15. Regression analysis exploring teacher impact on student FCI post scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeo, Jonathan V.; Manthey, Seth R.; Brewe, Eric

    2013-01-01

    High School Modeling Workshops are designed to improve high school physics teachers' understanding of physics and how to teach using the Modeling method. The basic assumption is that the teacher plays a critical role in their students' physics education. This study investigated teacher impacts on students' Force Concept Inventory scores, (FCI), with the hopes of identifying quantitative differences between teachers. This study examined student FCI scores from 18 teachers with at least a year of teaching high school physics. This data was then evaluated using a General Linear Model (GLM), which allowed for a regression equation to be fitted to the data. This regression equation was used to predict student post FCI scores, based on: teacher ID, student pre FCI score, gender, and representation. The results show 12 out of 18 teachers significantly impact their student post FCI scores. The GLM further revealed that of the 12 teachers only five have a positive impact on student post FCI scores. Given these differences among teachers it is our intention to extend our analysis to investigate pedagogical differences between them.

  16. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

  17. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

  18. Over-Graduate Thesis Physical Education and Sports Teacher’s Self Efficacy of Their Jobs (Nev?ehir City Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürkan YILMAZ

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is, to examine the physical education and sports teacher’s self-efficacy expectation level throughdifferent variances, who teach in Nev?ehir. To the purpose of determining the physical education and sports teacher’s (selfefficacy levels, the data of the study collected with Teacher Competence Expectation Inventory (TCE? which was developedby Yavuz and Koç which was used before. The study was processed with the 92 physical education and sports teachers in thecity of Nevsehir. The data obtained about the teacher’s teacher efficacy expectation were analyzed by ‘Single Way VarianceAnalyze’ and ‘the test of the importance of the the difference between two means’ (t-test. There have been significantdifferences identified in gender (p<0.05, marital status (p<0.05 and in education levels (p<0.01 of subjects. According to thecomparison related with the residence place of the subjects the ANOVA results revealed that there was significant differencebetween groups. And post-hoc tests pointed that the difference was between the city and town, which was in favor of city.There was not any significant difference identified on the other variables of the research. The results related to teacher efficacylevels of the physical education and sports teacher’s in the city of Nev?ehir generally show that the teacher’s self efficiency levelsare at high level. The study results show that the between gender, marital statue, localization and the education step variancesand self-efficiency levels showed meaningful differences. Between the age and the school type variances and self-efficiencylevels no meaningful differences were found.

  19. Internationally Educated Teachers and Student Teachers in Iceland: Two Qualitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnarsdottir, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    This article draws upon two qualitative studies with internationally educated teachers and teacher assistants in preschools in Iceland as well as ethnic minority student teachers at the Iceland University of Education. The common research question in both studies is whether the experiences of these teachers reveal barriers to integration within…

  20. Model of the Research Master Program: Results of Testing the New Modules of Basic Educational Programs in the Moscow City Teacher Training University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesmanov S.V.,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of testing new modules of basic educational master programs at the Moscow City Teacher Training University. The authors present quantitative and qualitative test characteristics of the modules of research master program, the formation of competencies as units of meaningful activities. The additions to working curricula of disciplines, practices and research were lit in the form of specified learning outcomes in four groups of competencies developed in the framework in the research master’s. The changes in the Federal State Educational Standard for Higher Education of the training direction # 44.04.01 «Pedagogical education» and «Order of organization and implementation of educational activity on bachelor, specialty, and master educational programs of higher education» are proposed. According to the testing results authors carried out correction of new modules of the research master's and a number of the measures directed on increase of efficiency educational programs implemented in the research master’s

  1. Climatic effects on soil trophic networks and the resulting humus profiles in holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) forests in the High Atlas of Morocco as revealed by correspondence analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaka, Nassima; Ponge, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate methods have been widely used for revealing the structures of communities, and in this paper we explore one particular method, namely correspondence analysis (also called reciprocal averaging), for studying humus profiles by the 'method of small volumes'. The present study was done on humus profiles under holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia), an evergreen Mediterranean species, in the High Atlas of Morocco. Three sites (1500 m, 1700 m, 1900 m altitude) and 2 years (1999 and 2002) were...

  2. Science teachers’ conceptions of nature of science: The case of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbub Alam SARKAR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored Bangladeshi science teachers’ conceptions of nature of science (NOS with a particular focus on the nature of (a scientific knowledge, (b scientific inquiry and (c scientific enterprise. The tentative, inferential, subjective and creative NOS, in addition to the myths of the scientific method and experimentation, the nature of scientific laws and theories, the social and cultural embeddedness, and cooperation and collaboration in science were considered in the conceptual framework. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected concurrently using the Myths of Science Questionnaire (MOSQ from 145 science teachers. Results showed that the majority of the teachers in this study held uninformed conceptions about most of the target NOS aspects. Also, an inconsistent response pattern was revealed in teachers’ response to the aspects directly related NOS. The results suggest that further research is required to better understand how Bangladeshi teachers model NOS in their classes and how the pedagogies of teacher education inform this modelling.

  3. Teachers who bully students: a hidden trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Twemlow, S. W.; Fonagy, P; Sacco, F. C.; Brethour, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The study examined teachers' perceptions of bullying by other teachers to see what causes and characteristics were attributed to such bullying teachers, and how often teachers were themselves bullied by students.Method: 116 teachers from seven elementary schools completed an anonymous questionnaire reflecting their feelings and perceptions about their own experiences of bullying, and how they perceive colleagues over the years.Results: Results confirmed that teachers who experience...

  4. University Teachers' Job Dissatisfaction: Application of Two-Factor Theory--A Case of Pakistani Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Imran Anwar

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study presents the reasons of teachers' job dissatisfaction in the government educational institutes in Pakistan. This case study is based on the two factor theory of Herzberg. The results of this case study reveal four core factors that cause job dissatisfaction among teachers in the public sector universities in developing…

  5. The Effects of Transformational Leadership and the Sense of Calling on Job Burnout among Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Zimmerli, Laurie; Hoffer, Harry E.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transformational leadership of supervisors and the sense of calling on job burnout among special education teachers. A total of 256 special education teachers completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and rated their supervisors on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. The results reveal that transformational…

  6. Effects on the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Early Childhood Teacher Candidates Using Digital Storytelling to Teach Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildan, Abdullah Oguzhan; Incikabi, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present early childhood teacher candidates' experiences preparing digital stories and to reveal the resulting changes, if any, in self-reported technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). This study was quasi-experimental and indicated that teacher candidates' evaluations of digital storytelling were affected by their…

  7. The Impact of Lifelong Learning Teacher Education in Secondary School Results El Impacto de la Formación Permanente del Profesorado de Educación Secundaria en los Resultados Escolares.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula González-Vallinas

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies dealing with factors which have an influence on students outcomes are reviewed, teacher variables and teacher training are among their most common findings to influence school achievement. This study analyses the variable in-service teacher training on students? academic achievement. The analysis levels are departments and schools, being department the level where the relation among variables is more significative. There are significative correlations between the in-service teacher training in their own subject and the subject pedagogy in 50% of the analysed departments. In-service teacher training is recommended to be organized, taking into account these differences (context, teacher variables, in- service teacher training variables among departments, schools and districts to compensate the unequal school variables. Existe evidencia sobre la influencia de algunos factores en el rendimiento escolar de los centros y entre ellos de manera consistente aparecen las características del profesorado y su formación. Este estudio analiza la formación del profesorado con los resultados escolares de los centros de educación secundaria en Asturias. De las variables de formación, es únicamente la formación en la asignatura y su didáctica la que se asocia a los resultados en la asignatura. Se realizan análisis en dos niveles de agregación, departamento y centro, observándose que es en los niveles de departamento donde existen las correlaciones más significativas. Se aporta evidencia para la organización de una formación del profesorado que asigne recursos de formación en los diferentes niveles en base a sus desigualdades de origen (contexto, variables del profesorado y de formación y que garantice una efectiva igualdad de oportunidades para el conjunto de la población escolar de la Comunidad Autónoma.

  8. Using Large Scale Test Results for Pedagogical Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens

    The use and influence of large scale tests (LST), both national and international, has increased dramatically within the last decade. This process has revealed a tension between the legitimate need for information about the performance of the educational system and teachers to inform policy, and the teachers’ and students’ use of this information for pedagogical purposes in the classroom. We know well how the policy makers interpret and use the outcomes of such tests, but we know less about how teachers make use of LSTs to inform their pedagogical practice. An important question is whether there is a contradiction between the political system’s use of LST and teachers’ (possible) pedagogical use of LST. And if yes: What is a contradiction based on? This presentation will give some results from a systematic review on how tests have influenced the pedagogical practice. The research revealed many of the fatal wash back effects known from other research but gave additionally some insight in teachers’ attitudes towards LSTs. To account for these findings results from another research project - the Validation of PISA – will be included. This project analyzed how PISA has influenced the Danish educational system and the different theoretical foundations of PISA and most teachers’ pedagogically oriented, formative assessment, thus explaining the teacher resentment towards LSTs. Finally, some principles for linking LSTs to teachers’ pedagogical practice will be presented.

  9. Resultats de l'enquete nationale sur les programmes de formation des enseignants de francais langue seconde au Canada (Results of the National Study for Teacher Education Programs for French Second Language Teachers in Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, France; Chinien, Christian; Boutin, Jean-Luc

    The implications of Canada's national study of core French instruction for second language (L2) teacher education in that country are examined. Literature on the study's impact on language teaching philosophy and policy and on French immersion instruction is reviewed, and a survey of 36 Canadian schools of education is reported. The questionnaire…

  10. The Schools Teachers Leave: Teacher Mobility in Chicago Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allensworth, Elaine; Ponisciak, Stephen; Mazzeo, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This report reveals that about 100 Chicago schools suffer from chronically high rates of teacher turnover, losing a quarter or more of their teaching staff every year, and many of these schools serve predominantly low-income African American children. In the typical Chicago elementary school, 51 percent of the teachers working in 2002 had left…

  11. Teaching How Language Reveals Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this Voices Inside Schools essay, a veteran teacher shares her reflections on a classroom unit entitled "How Language Reveals Character." The goal of the unit is to help adolescents read and write critically through an exploration of literary characters' language. Beginning by drawing on adolescents' fascination with one another, Metzger first…

  12. New emerging results on molecular gas, stars, and dust at z~2, as revealed by low star formation rate and low stellar mass star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel; Combes, Francoise; Egami, Eiichi; Swinbank, Mark; Richard, Johan; Sklias, Panos; Rawle, Tim D.

    2015-08-01

    The large surveys of main sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at z~2, made at near-IR and mm wavelengths, have revolutionized our picture of galaxies at this critical epoch, where the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) density is at its peak and the stellar mass (Ms) assembly is rapid. They reveal that ~70% of SFGs are young, rotation dominated disk-like systems, yet dynamically hotter and geometrically thicker than local spirals, with larger molecular gas fractions (fgas).It is time to refine this modern picture of z~2 galaxies by extending the current studies toward the more numerous and typical SFGs, characterized by SFR1 from the literature, and allow us to revisit and propose new correlations between IR and CO luminosities, molecular gas, stellar and dust masses, specific SFR, molecular gas depletion timescales (tdepl), fgas, dust-to-gas ratios, and redshift, to be directly compared with galaxy evolution models.We find an increase of tdepl with Ms, as now revealed by low-Ms SFGs at z>1 and also observed at z=0, which contrasts with the acknowledged constant tdepl in "bathtub" models and refutes the linearity of the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. A steady increase of fgas with redshift is predicted by cosmological models and is observed from z~0 to z~1.5, but is followed by a mild increase toward higher redshifts, which we further confirm with our highest redshift CO measurement in an SFR* galaxy at z=3.6. We provide the first fgas measure in z>1 SFGs at the low-Ms end 109.4

  13. DIAGNOSIS OF FUTURE TEACHER’S IMAGE COMPONENTS IN HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baydak Elena Igorevna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The research results of future teacher’s image components, the analysis of image as a "positively assessed" and "negative assessment" of the teacher. The characteristics dynamics of the teacher’s image in high school in the assessments of students at different educational levels (from 1 to 5 year is described.

  14. An Investigation of Students’ Face Wants in Chinese English Teachers’ Classroom Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to create a new teacher-student relationship and raise students’ politeness awareness and pragmatic competence in cross-cultural communication, this paper investigated and analyzed students’ face wants and English teachers’ awareness of students’ face want in their classroom feedback. The main data-gathering instruments are MP3-recording, non-participant observation, follow-up structured-interviews and closed- questionnaires. The results reveal that 60.6% of the teacher participants are frequently aware of their students’ face wants, and 27.2% of them are sometimes, while the other teachers seldom or never consider the students’ face want. Because of being influenced by the Chinese traditional culture in which teachers are superiors, not thoroughly understanding English Curriculum Standard which calls for human concern, and knowing a little about pragmatic theories, some Chinese English teachers ignore students’ face want. Suggestions on how to save students’ face want are put forward.

  15. Constructing constructivism: The voyage of elementary science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Andrea Beth

    This study examined how participation in a professional development institute, which provided a constructivist learning environment affected the interactions between teachers and students in elementary science classrooms. The investigation considered teacher gender and experience, and also compared the less experienced participants with their non-participating mentors. A multiple case study design was utilized. Six self-selected teachers participated. Data was gathered through videotaped observations of science lessons and audiotaped teacher interviews. The research was guided by the following questions: (1) How do teachers perceive changes in their own teaching as a result of participation in a two week professional development institute using constructivist strategies? (2) How do teachers' perceptions of the changes in their teaching as a result of the summer institute measure against what is seen during the observations? (3) Are the teaching strategies of the less experienced participating teachers distinguishable from the strategies used by the non-participating teachers who were judged similar in style prior to the institute, but did not attend the institute? (4) Do differences emerge based on length of teaching experience? This study revealed some interesting findings: (1) results based on gender indicated that the women in the study interacted approximately twice as often as the men; (2) a marked difference existed between the interactions of TASK participants compared with the interactions of the non-TASK participants; and (3) a professional development experience that provides a constructivist learning environment for participants may be effective in helping teachers to transfer the experience to their classrooms or in reinforcing and validating teachers' current practices.

  16. Secondary Mathematics Teacher Differences: Teacher Quality and Preparation in a New Yourk City Alternative Certification Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Evans

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing students in urban settings with quality teachers is important for student achievement. This study examined the differences in content knowledge, attitudes toward mathematics, and teacher efficacy among several different types of alternatively certified teachers in a sample from the New York City Teaching Fellows program in order to determine teacher quality. Findings revealed that high school teachers had significantly higher content knowledge than middle school teachers; teachers with strong mathematics backgrounds had significantly higher content knowledge than teachers who did not have strong mathematics backgrounds; and mathematics and science majors had significantly higher content knowledge than other majors. Further, it was found that mathematics content knowledge was not related to attitudes toward mathematics and teacher efficacy; thus, teachers had the same high positive attitudes toward mathematics and same high teacher efficacy, regardless of content ability.

  17. Deriving Instructional Objectives for Teacher Corps Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Norman; Rabe, Bonnie

    The collaborative procedures used to derive the instructional objectives for Arizona State University's Teacher Corps training programs for inservice teachers, preservice teachers, and teacher aides were time consuming and costly, but have resulted in increased respect and better working relationships between teachers, parents, and teacher…

  18. TEACHERS’ PERCEPTION OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT IN TURKISH PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin ?PEK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate organizational culture and organizational commitment perceptions of the primary school teachers in Turkey. Two different scales (Organizational Culture Scale and Organizational Commitment Scale were used as data gathering instrument. Statistical analyses were utilized to examine the organizational culture and commitment perceptions of teachers in terms of their some demographic factors like gender, teaching levels, marital status, and experience. Correlation analysis was also made to describe the links between subscales of organizational culture and subscales of organizational commitment. The results revealed that primary school teachers’ perceptions of organizational culture and organizational commitment vary due to their gender, teaching levels, marital status, and experience. In terms of gender, female teachers perceived more power and supportive culture in their schools. First level teachers expressed more achievement culture and more commitment at identification level than second level teachers. Also, married teachers revealed more achievement and supportive culture and more organizational commitment at identification and internalization levels. Other findings of the study indicated that although more experienced teachers perceived more cultural orientation in all cultural dimensions and more committed to their schools at identification and internalization levels, the less experienced teachers indicated more commitment at compliance level. Finally, as commitment based on compliance positively correlated power and role cultures, and negatively correlated achievement and support culture; commitments based on identification and internalization positively related with achievement and support cultures.

  19. Normalization of CALL and TPACK: Discovering Teachers' Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Rahmany

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at investigating the effect of technology integration in general and normalization of CALL in particular on Iranian teachers' technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK. It also examines teachers' main opportunities and challenges with normalization of CALL. In this regard, 16 teachers taught a course with the goal to integrate computer technology fully. The researchers implemented a TPACK questionnaire before and after the course and a semi-structured interview after the course. Observations also helped the researchers to gain a complementary understanding of the process of CALL normalization and how teachers deal with their new roles. The results revealed that technology-related knowledge domains developed significantly. The results also showed that Iranian educational society is highly sensitive to instructional technology and its use in education.

  20. Revealing Interactions between Human Resources, Quality of Life and Environmental Changes within Socially-oriented Observations : Results from the IPY PPS Arctic Project in the Russian North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    Socially-oriented Observations (SOO) in the Russian North have been carried out within multidisciplinary IPY PPS Arctic project under the leadership of Norway and supported by the Research Council of Norway as well as Russian Academy of Sciences. The main objective of SOO is to increase knowledge and observation of changes in quality of life conditions (state of natural environment including climate and biota, safe drinking water and foods, well-being, employment, social relations, access to health care and high quality education, etc.) and - to reveal trends in human capital and capacities (health, demography, education, creativity, spiritual-cultural characteristics and diversity, participation in decision making, etc.). SOO have been carried out in industrial cities as well as sparsely populated rural and nature protection areas in observation sites situated in different bioms (from coastal tundra to southern taiga zone) of Murmansk, Arkhangelsk Oblast and Republic of Komi. SOO were conducted according to the international protocol included in PPS Arctic Manual. SOO approaches based both on local people's perceptions and statistics help to identify main issues and targets for life quality, human capital and environment improvement and thus to distinguish leading SOO indicators for further monitoring. SOO have revealed close interaction between human resources, quality of life and environmental changes. Negative changes in human capital (depopulation, increasing unemployment, aging, declining physical and mental health, quality of education, loss of traditional knowledge, marginalization etc.), despite peoples' high creativity and optimism are becoming the major driving force effecting both the quality of life and the state of environment and overall sustainability. Human induced disturbances such as uncontrolled forests cuttings and poaching are increasing. Observed rapid changes in climate and biota (ice and permafrost melting, tundra shrubs getting taller and more numerous, etc.) have become an add factor in accelerating or influencing land use and overall sustainability. In relation to the future sustainability in nature and society it is northern communities, their adaptive capacities and creativity that are decisive. SOO enables to identify and monitor the implementation of local strategies that will stimulate the human capital improvement and act not only as the agent of economic modernization but as an important solutions for better state of environment and society.

  1. Revealing pre-earthquake signatures in atmosphere and ionosphere associated with 2015 M7.8 and M7.3 events in Nepal. Preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Davidenko, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We analyze retrospectively/prospectively the transient variations of three different physical parameters of atmosphere during the time of M7.8 and M7.3 events in Nepal: outgoing earth radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC and the thermodynamic proprieties in the lower atmosphere. We found that in mid March 2015 a rapid augment of satellite observed earth radiation in atmosphere and the anomaly located in close vicinity to the future M7.8 epicenter reached the maximum on April 21-22. Our continuous satellite analysis revealed prospectively the new strong anomaly on May 3th, which was the reason to contemplate another large event in the area. On May 12, 2015 a large aftershock of M7.3 occurred. The analysis of air temperature from weather ground station near Katmandu shows analogous patterns with offset 1-2 days earlier to the satellite anomalies. The GPS/TEC data analysis indicates an augment and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value during April 22-24 period. A strong negative TEC anomaly in the crest of ...

  2. The Atlas-3D project - IX. The merger origin of a fast and a slow rotating Early-Type Galaxy revealed with deep optical imaging: first results

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Serra, Paolo; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Ferriere, Etienne; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    The mass assembly of galaxies leaves imprints in their outskirts, such as shells and tidal tails. The frequency and properties of such fine structures depend on the main acting mechanisms - secular evolution, minor or major mergers - and on the age of the last substantial accretion event. We use this to constrain the mass assembly history of two apparently relaxed nearby Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) selected from the Atlas-3D sample, NGC 680 and NGC 5557. Our ultra deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope reach 29 mag/arcsec^2 in the g-band. They reveal very low-surface brightness (LSB) filamentary structures around these ellipticals. Among them, a gigantic 160 kpc long tail East of NGC 5557 hosts gas-rich star-forming objects. NGC 680 exhibits two major diffuse plumes apparently connected to extended HI tails, as well as a series of arcs and shells. Comparing the outer stellar and gaseous morphology of the two ellipticals with that predicted from models of colliding galax...

  3. How Malaysian School Teachers View Professional Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Nimehchisalem, Vahid; Hajimohammadi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted on a group of Malaysian Math and Science teachers to investigate their needs in the professional development activities. The findings indicated a majority of these teachers' needs for such activities. Analysis of the data also revealed that most of the teachers regarded these activities as moderately or highly…

  4. Rural Elementary School Teachers' Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Aimee; Wood, Lawrence; Hough, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Based on survey responses from more than 500 third-grade teachers, this study addressed three research questions relating to technology integration and its impact in rural elementary schools. The first analyses compared rural with non-rural teachers, revealing that the rural teachers had more positive attitudes toward technology integration. Then…

  5. "The Kids Keep Me Fresh!" Results of a Follow-Up Survey of Graduates from Two Special Education Teacher Education Programs Who Are Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Ann; Thousand, Jacqueline; Parsons, A. Sandy; Lilly, M. Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Assessed the extent to which special education teacher education program graduates applied instructional methods they had learned to the classroom. Survey, observation, and interview data highlighted seven themes: commitment to student success; strategies for successfully teaching all students; knowledge of legal supports; active searching for…

  6. Teachers' Opinions on the Evaluation of ELT Teachers' Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haedong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify differences in opinions on the evaluation of ELT teachers' books between pre-service and in-service teachers. In literature, it has been argued that the development of teachers' books for EFL teachers can be assisted by the results of a needs analysis. A total of 65 pre-service and 50 in-service secondary…

  7. African-American English: Teacher Beliefs, Teacher Needs and Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abha

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate elementary school teachers' self-perceived beliefs regarding African-American English (AAE), and their professional preparedness to address linguistic needs of AA students in the classrooms. The findings revealed three central issues: (1) teachers had limited understanding of the linguistic…

  8. Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors and the Influence of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors on Student Motivation to Learn Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Vania

    The National Assessment on Educational Progress signals that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete globally in an ever changing scientific society. As a result, legislation mandated that all students be assessed and show proficiency in scientific literacy beginning in Grade 4 with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002 also known as No Child Left Behind. Research indicates a disturbing decline in the number of U.S. students pursuing more rigorous science courses in high school, majoring in scientific areas in college, and choosing future careers in science. With a need to improve science instruction and enhance science literacy for all students, this study focuses on immediate communication behaviors of the classroom teacher as a deciding factor in the opinions of high school students towards science. The purpose of this study was to reveal high school science student perceptions of teacher communication patterns, both verbal and nonverbal, and how they influence their motivation to learn science. The researcher utilized a nonexperimental, quantitative research design to guide this study. Teacher and student data were collected using the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ). The Student Motivation to Learn Instrument (SMLI) across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status survey was used to evaluate student motivation in science. Participants were encouraged to be honest in reporting and sharing information concerning teacher communication behaviors. The data revealed that teacher immediacy behaviors, both verbal and nonverbal, were perceived differently in terms of student gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The results showed that teachers who display positive communication behaviors and use challenging questioning followed with positive responses create pathways to potentially powerful relationships. These relationships between teachers and students can lead to increased student motivation and academic achievement in the science classroom.

  9. The Experiences of Neophyte Teachers: A Critical Constructivist Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, J. Tim; Foster, Rosemary Y.

    2001-01-01

    Interviewed beginning teachers to examine their experiences and the extent to which their preservice programs adequately prepared them for teaching. Results revealed six conceptual and temporal states through which they passed during their initial experiences: archetype; approaching the gates; clearing the gates; the gloss wears off;…

  10. Teacher beliefs and practices of grammar teaching: focusing on meaning, form, or forms?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hacer Hande, Uysal; Mehmet, Bardakci.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide curriculum innovations to teach English through meaning-focused communicative approaches over the years, studies report that most language teachers still follow transmission-based grammar-oriented approaches. It is known that the success of any curriculum innovation is dependen [...] t on teachers. Therefore, given that teaching grammar has always been a central, but problematic domain for language teachers, what teachers believe and do regarding grammar instruction is an important issue that needs to be investigated. However, studies that research teachers and their grammar teaching are rare, and almost non-existent at the elementary-level English teaching contexts. Therefore, through a questionnaire given to 108 teachers and afocus-group interview, the present study investigated Turkish primary-level English language teachers' beliefs and practice patterns of teaching grammar, and the reasons behind these patterns. The results revealed that teachers predominantly prefer the traditional focus-on-formS approach, which indicates a serious clash with teachers and curriculum goals, on the one hand, and theoretical suggestions on the other. The paper ends with discussions and suggestions for teacher education and language policy-making.

  11. Teacher beliefs and practices of grammar teaching: focusing on meaning, form, or forms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Hande Uysal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide curriculum innovations to teach English through meaning-focused communicative approaches over the years, studies report that most language teachers still follow transmission-based grammar-oriented approaches. It is known that the success of any curriculum innovation is dependent on teachers. Therefore, given that teaching grammar has always been a central, but problematic domain for language teachers, what teachers believe and do regarding grammar instruction is an important issue that needs to be investigated. However, studies that research teachers and their grammar teaching are rare, and almost non-existent at the elementary-level English teaching contexts. Therefore, through a questionnaire given to 108 teachers and afocus-group interview, the present study investigated Turkish primary-level English language teachers' beliefs and practice patterns of teaching grammar, and the reasons behind these patterns. The results revealed that teachers predominantly prefer the traditional focus-on-formS approach, which indicates a serious clash with teachers and curriculum goals, on the one hand, and theoretical suggestions on the other. The paper ends with discussions and suggestions for teacher education and language policy-making.

  12. Teachers' teaching practices and beliefs regarding context-based tasks and their relation with students' difficulties in solving these tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Ariyadi; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Doorman, Michiel

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated teachers' teaching practices and their underlying beliefs regarding context-based tasks to find a possible explanation for students' difficulties with these tasks. The research started by surveying 27 Junior High School teachers from seven schools in Indonesia through a written questionnaire. Then, to further examine teachers' teaching practices related to context-based tasks, four teachers were observed and video recorded in two mathematics lessons in which they were asked to deal with context-based tasks. The questionnaire data revealed that the teachers had a tendency toward a view on teaching and learning mathematics which includes encouraging students to be actively involved in solving problems in various contexts. Although this finding suggests that the teachers may offer opportunities to learn context-based tasks to students, the questionnaire data also revealed that the teachers saw context-based tasks as plain word problems. Furthermore, the observations disclosed that their teaching was mainly teacher-centered and directive, which is not considered to be supportive for learning to solve context-based tasks. Combining the findings of this study with the results from our earlier study on Indonesian students' errors when solving context-based tasks, we found a relationship between how Indonesian teachers teach context-based tasks and the errors Indonesian students make in solving these tasks. These findings support the conclusion that insufficient opportunity-to-learn to solve context-based tasks offered by teachers is a possible explanation for students' difficulties in solving these tasks.

  13. Evaluating Teacher-Candidates’ Teaching in the Extended Practicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. Noonan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the aggregate results of the evaluations of the teaching performance of 17 cohorts of teacher-candidates (n = 374, who completed their extended practicum during their pre-service teacher-education program at one Western Canadian university. Over a 15-year period, one of the researchers served as the College Supervisor for these cohorts in their respective four-month internship in schools in a variety of locations throughout the province. The teacher-candidates’ final evaluations on nine categories of teaching performance revealed varying levels of strength among the skill areas. Implications of the findings are drawn: (a for the undergraduate program administrators, faculty members, and practicum-program personnel at the university connected to this study, and (b for other teacher-education institutions interested in making use of this information to help inform their deliberations in assessing/improving their own pre-service and practicum initiatives.

  14. Changing Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Barney M.; Jensen, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Discussions of ways that teachers should change emphasize the need for a better curriculum, instructional method, or organization for learning that will improve student outcomes. However, models of teacher change recognize that teachers must "buy into" the change or school improvement process. (MW)

  15. Impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers on NHS registered conceptions and terminations: final results of cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, D; Raab, G M; Abraham, C; Scott, S; Hart, G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers compared with conventional education in terms of conceptions and terminations registered by the NHS. Design Follow-up of cluster randomised trial 4.5 years after intervention. Setting: NHS records of women who had attended 25 secondary schools in east Scotland. Participants: 4196 women (99.5% of those eligible). Intervention: SHARE programme (intervention group) v ...

  16. Impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers on NHS registered conceptions and terminations: final results of cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, M; Wight, D.; Raab, G M; Abraham, C; Parkes, A.; Scott, S; Hart, G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers compared with conventional education in terms of conceptions and terminations registered by the NHS.Design Follow-up of cluster randomised trial 4.5 years after intervention.Setting NHS records of women who had attended 25 secondary schools in east Scotland.Participants 4196 women (99.5% of those eligible) Intervention SHARE programme (intervention group) v existing sex education (con...

  17. Educating Pre-Primary Teachers to Teach for Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Kwok Cheung

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents experiences of in-service teacher education in Macao which seeks to educate preprimary teachers to teach for multiple intelligences. A thematic topic unit designed by a group of teachers is included to reveal what teachers can do to achieve the ideal of individually configured education. Argument: This paper starts…

  18. The relationship between school environment, preservice science teachers' science teaching self-efficacy, and their use of instructional strategies at teachers' colleges in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshalaan, Nasser A.

    Studies indicate that many teachers have negative beliefs about science, which translates into low teacher efficacy, resulting in avoidance of science teaching or in ineffective science teaching behaviors. Highly efficacious teachers have been found to be more likely to use inquiry and student-centered teaching strategies, while teachers with a low sense of science-teaching efficacy are more likely to use teacher-directed strategies, such as didactic lectures and reading from the textbook (Czemiak, 1990). The purpose of this study was to investigate preservice science teachers' science-teaching self-efficacy changes and their correlation to teaching environment factors during the student teaching semester. Moreover, it explains how teaching environment factors and preservice teachers' science-teaching self-efficacy beliefs may relate to their use of teaching strategies in the science classroom during their student teacher training at teachers' colleges in Saudi Arabia. The population of this study is consisted of 184 middle and elementary preservice science teachers who were doing their student teaching at nine teachers' colleges (i.e., teachers' colleges of Riyadh, Dammam, Alrras, Almadinah, Alihsa, Jeddah, Makah, Altaief, and Abha) in Saudi Arabia during the spring semester of 2005. Three instruments were used to collect data for this study: (1) to measure science teaching self-efficacy, the researcher adapted the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument form B designed specifically for preservice teachers (STEBI-B); (2) to measure the school environment, the researcher adapted the Organizational Health Inventory (OHI), developed by Hoy, Tarter & Kottkamp (1991); and (3) to measure the type and frequency of instructional strategies that preservice science teachers use in the classroom, the researcher adapted the teaching practice subscale from The Local Systemic Change through Teacher Enhancement Science K-8 Teacher Questionnaire (Horizon Research, Inc., 2000). Descriptive statistics, simple correlation, t-test, multiple regression, and content analysis procedures were used to analyze research questions. Findings of this study revealed that both dimensions of teaching efficacy, PSTE and STOE, were increased significantly during the student teaching semester. Certain school factors were related to preservice science teachers' teaching efficacy and their use of instructional strategies. Only personal science teaching efficacy was found to affect preservice science teachers' use of instructional strategies. Implications for the findings of this study, as well as recommendations for future research, are discussed.

  19. Mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1979-01-01

    Mathematics Revealed focuses on the principles, processes, operations, and exercises in mathematics.The book first offers information on whole numbers, fractions, and decimals and percents. Discussions focus on measuring length, percent, decimals, numbers as products, addition and subtraction of fractions, mixed numbers and ratios, division of fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The text then examines positive and negative numbers and powers and computation. Topics include division and averages, multiplication, ratios, and measurements, scientific notation and estim

  20. Genetic analysis of the plantaricin EFI locus of Lactobacillus plantarum PCS20 reveals an unusual plantaricin E gene sequence as a result of mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gyu-Sung; Huch, Melanie; Hanak, Alexander; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Franz, Charles M A P

    2010-07-31

    Lactobacillus plantarum strains produce a variety of chromosomally encoded bacteriocins and often multiple bacteriocins are encoded by a single strain. In this study, the genetic loci for bacteriocin production of L. plantarum strains BFE 5092 and PCS20 were studied. These strains were investigated for their possible application as protective cultures in food preservation. The bacteriocin locus of strain BFE 5092 showed remarkable similarity to the plantaricin loci previously described for L. plantarum strains C11 and WCFS1. However, the locus of the L. plantarum PCS20 strain was unusual in that it showed an interesting mutation as a result of deletions within the plnE gene. These deletions led to a hypothetically produced peptide which is 2 amino acids shorter than plantaricin E. Furthermore, it differs by 24 amino acids, while it shares 30 identical amino acids i.e., 15 at the amino end and 15 at the carboxyl end of the hypothetical peptide. As a consequence, the amino acid sequence is changed such that a double-glycine-type leader peptide would not be encoded. This raises the question whether a functional peptide is being produced, even though RT-PCR studies showed that the plnE gene is obviously expressed. Furthermore, a transposase gene was located upstream of the plnEFI gene cluster and was inserted into a bacteriocin regulatory gene, the histidine protein kinase gene. Taken together, these facts indicate a loss of plantaricin gene function in L. plantarum PCS20 as a result of transposition and mutation. PMID:20303195

  1. The Role of Teacher and Faculty Trust in Forming Teachers' Job Satisfaction: Do Years of Experience Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Maele, Dimitri; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    This study relates trust at the level of both the teacher and the faculty to teachers' job satisfaction. Teaching experience is explored as a moderator of the trust-satisfaction relationship. Multilevel analyses on data of 2091 teachers across 80 secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium) revealed positive associations between teacher trust in…

  2. Individual Work Orientation and Teacher Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Pedro

    1990-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship among teacher work orientation, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction of public school teachers (N=133). Results indicated that work orientation was related to the degree of job satisfaction among teachers. Apparently, organizational commitment was not related to teachers' work orientation.…

  3. In their words, through their eyes: Novice teachers reflect on teaching and their preservice education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, James Edward

    In recent years, cries for reform in science teacher education have come from many directions. Teachers often leave the profession after a few years, and the teachers that stay are perceived as insufficiently prepared for the challenges they will face. One pervasive problem is that teachers themselves are rarely consulted in efforts to reform science teacher education. This study is an attempt to address that lack of input, by investigating the "lived reality" of prospective science teachers and trying to see the process through their eyes, to discover what they wanted and needed from their teacher preparation program, and to assess how well their preservice program met those needs. During the semester of their student teaching, six prospective teachers were asked questions about their experiences and asked to reflect on their preservice education. The researcher continued to follow the progress of one of the cohort members through his first year as a full-time teacher with a series of interviews. The study revealed a number of skills and attitudes that the student teachers felt were essential to their success: a sense of "caring," classroom management skills, organizational skills, and science content knowledge. Unfortunately, the study also reveals that the student teachers also felt that their preservice education did very little to help meet these needs. Also disturbing was the fact that all but one of the student teachers had bad experiences with their cooperating host teachers. The study makes a number of suggestions for improving teacher preparation. Field experiences need to be frequent, and varied, with extensive opportunities for reflection on those experiences. Also, teacher education programs should more closely integrate the three elements of preservice education: extensive field experiences, courses in education theory, and courses in science content. Student teachers need at least one mentor who is dedicated to their success, and is not in a position to evaluate them. The results of this study should provide affirmation to innovative teacher preparation programs, such as the UTeach Program at the University of Texas at Austin.

  4. Comparison of experimental fine-mapping to in silico prediction results of HIV-1 epitopes reveals ongoing need for mapping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Julia; Meissner, Tim; Kraut, Franziska; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Stirner, Renate; Bogner, Johannes R; Draenert, Rika

    2014-01-01

    Methods for identifying physiologically relevant CD8 T-cell epitopes are critically important not only for the development of T-cell-based vaccines but also for understanding host–pathogen interactions. As experimentally mapping an optimal CD8 T-cell epitope is a tedious procedure, many bioinformatic tools have been developed that predict which peptides bind to a given MHC molecule. We assessed the ability of the CD8 T-cell epitope prediction tools syfpeithi, ctlpred and iedb to foretell nine experimentally mapped optimal HIV-specific epitopes. Randomly – for any of the subjects' HLA type and with any matching score – the optimal epitope was predicted in seven of nine epitopes using syfpeithi, in three of nine epitopes using ctlpred and in all nine of nine epitopes using iedb. The optimal epitope within the three highest ranks was given in four of nine epitopes applying syfpeithi, in two of nine epitopes applying ctlpred and in seven of nine epitopes applying iedb when screening for all of the subjects' HLA types. Knowing the HLA restriction of the peptide of interest improved the ranking of the optimal epitope within the predicted results. Epitopes restricted by common HLA alleles were more likely to be predicted than those restricted by uncommon HLA alleles. Epitopes with aberrant lengths compared with the usual HLA-class I nonamers were most likely not predicted. Application of epitope prediction tools together with literature searches for already described optimal epitopes narrows down the possibilities of optimal epitopes within a screening peptide of interest. However, in our opinion, the actual fine-mapping of a CD8 T-cell epitope cannot yet be replaced. PMID:24724694

  5. Involving Practicing Scientists in K-12 Science Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Science Teacher Education Program (STEP) offered a unique framework for creating professional development courses focused on Arctic research from 2006-2009. Under the STEP framework, science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training was delivered by teams of practicing Arctic researchers in partnership with master teachers with 20+ years experience teaching STEM content in K-12 classrooms. Courses based on the framework were offered to educators across Alaska. STEP offered in-person summer-intensive institutes and follow-on audio-conferenced field-test courses during the academic year, supplemented by online scientist mentorship for teachers. During STEP courses, teams of scientists offered in-depth STEM content instruction at the graduate level for teachers of all grade levels. STEP graduate-level training culminated in the translation of information and data learned from Arctic scientists into standard-aligned lessons designed for immediate use in K-12 classrooms. This presentation will focus on research that explored the question: To what degree was scientist involvement beneficial to teacher training and to what degree was STEP scientist involvement beneficial to scientist instructors? Data sources reveal consistently high levels of ongoing (4 year) scientist and teacher participation; high STEM content learning outcomes for teachers; high STEM content learning outcomes for students; high ratings of STEP courses by scientists and teachers; and a discussion of the reasons scientists indicate they benefited from STEP involvement. Analyses of open-ended comments by teachers and scientists support and clarify these findings. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze teacher and scientist qualitative feedback. Comments were coded and patterns analyzed in three databases. The vast majority of teacher open-ended comments indicate that STEP involvement improved K-12 STEM classroom instruction, and the vast majority of scientist open-ended comments focus on the benefits scientists received from networking with K-12 teachers. The classroom lessons resulting from STEP have been so popular among teachers, the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development recently contracted with the PI to create a website that will make the STEP database open to teachers across Alaska. When the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development launched the new website in August 2011, the name of the STEP program was changed to the Alaska K-12 Science Curricular Initiative (AKSCI). The STEP courses serving as the foundation to the new AKSCI site are located under the "History" tab of the new website.

  6. The perceptions of teachers and school principals of each other's disposition towards teacher involvement in school reform

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cassie, Swanepoel.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide teachers are faced with the task of continuously facilitating and implementing educational reform that has been designed without their participation. This exclusion of the key agents, who must mediate between the change agenda and actual change in the classroom, from the planning and decis [...] ion-making processes, is detrimental to educational reform. Although school-based management has recently emerged as the instrument to accomplish the decentralisation of decision-making powers to school level, the success thereof depends largely on school principals' disposition regarding teacher involvement. It is argued that the expectation of principals regarding their own leadership role, as well as the professional role teachers should fulfil, is a primary determinant of principals' willingness to involve teachers in responsibility-taking processes outside the classroom. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that principals' perception, of the wishes of teachers regarding involvement, significantly underestimated teachers' actual involvement wishes. Likewise, the expectation of teachers regarding the willingness of principals to involve them was a significant underestimation of the involvement level principals are actually in favour of. These misperceptions probably discourage actual school-based management and could jeopardize the implementation of educational reform in general.

  7. Autonomy and self-determination theory in different contexts: A comparison of middle school science teachers' motivation and instruction in China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura Elizabeth

    This study examined factors that contribute to Chinese and United States middle school science teachers' perceptions of autonomy support. Autonomy is one component of self-determination theory and has been associated with intrinsic motivation. The study used a mixed methods design including quantitative data collected through an online survey and qualitative data collected through open-ended interview questions. The online survey consisted of four assessments related to teachers' self-determination, perceptions of constraints at work, perceptions of students' self-determination, and level of autonomy support for students and allowed for the testing of the structural model developed by Pelletier, Seguin-Levesque, and Legault (2002). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of responses for the combined teacher sample (n=201) was carried out for each of the survey assessments. Significance testing for Chinese (n=107) and U.S. (n=94) teachers, based on the factors resulting from EFA, revealed significant differences in teachers' self-determination and perceptions of constraints at work. No significant differences were found for teachers' perceptions of students' self-determination or level of autonomy support for students. Multiple regression was used to predict teachers' autonomy support for students. For the Chinese teachers, perceptions of constraints at work, teachers' self-determination, and teachers' perceptions of student motivation were found to significantly predict teachers' autonomy support. For the U.S. teachers, teacher motivation was the only significant predictor of teachers' autonomy support. A sub-sample of the Chinese and U.S. science teachers (n=19) were interviewed about their perceived levels of autonomy support, constraints at work, and their students' self determination. The analyses of the interviews showed that teachers in both countries reported that autonomy was important to their motivation and the quality of instruction they provided to students. Teachers from the two countries differed in their satisfaction with current levels of autonomy and reported different constraints on teaching science related to materials, lab space, curriculum standards, and assessment.

  8. Are teacher candidates able to use educational technologies effectively? A case study in terms of standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at investigating the educational technology use of teacher candidates attending education faculties in Turkey in terms of NETS*T standards. The study employed 2.566 senior teacher candidates from 7 different universities in Turkey. As a result of the study, it was revealed that the teacher candidates considered themselves to have a high level of self-efficacy with respect to educational technology standards as a whole. Considering the factors, teacher candidates reported the highest level of self-efficacy for the factor of productivity and professional practices and the lowest level of f-self-efficacy for the factor of social, ethical, legal and human issues. Gender caused differences for certain factors. In addition, the department being attended was another variable that resulted in difference when the departments of the teacher candidates were taken into consideration. 

  9. Dilemmas of reform: An exploration of science teachers' collective sensemaking of formative assessment practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Sara Catherine

    Current reform efforts in science education call for significant shifts in how science is taught and learned. Teachers are important gatekeepers for reform, as they must enact these changes with students in their own classrooms. As such, professional development approaches need to be developed and studied to understand how teachers interpret and make instructional plans to implement these reforms. However, traditional approaches to studying implementation of reforms often draw on metrics such as time allotted to new activities, rather than exploring the ways in which teachers make sense of these reforms. In this dissertation I draw upon a body of work called sensemaking that has focused on locating learning in teachers' conversations in departmental work groups. I developed a conceptual and analytic framework to analyze how teachers make sense of reform given their local contexts and then used this framework to perform a case study of one group of teachers that participated in larger professional development project that examined the impact of a learning progression on science teachers' formative assessment practices. I draw upon videotapes of three years of monthly professional development meetings as my primary source of data, and used an ethnographic approach to identify dilemmas surfaced by teachers, sources of ambiguity and uncertainty, and patterns of and resources for teacher sensemaking. The case study reveals relationships between the type of dilemma surfaced by the teachers and different patterns of sensemaking for modification of teaching practices. When teachers expressed concerns about district or administrative requirements, they aligned their work in the professional development to those external forces. In contrast, teachers were able to develop and try out new practices when they perceived coherence between the professional development and school or district initiatives. These results underscore the importance of coherence between various components of teachers' work environments.

  10. Job Burnout among Iranian Elementary School Teachers of Students with Autism: a Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Zarafshan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Teachers often experience burnout and challenges during their active career. Different studies have shown that those directly involved with teaching children with special needs are more subject to burnout. Due to advance screening tools, more children with autism are now diagnosed and involved in special education. The aim of the present study was to investigate the professional burnout in teachers of children with autism compared to teachers of other children with special needs.Methods: Casual Comparative study design was used for this research. Three self-reported measures (Maslach Burnout Inventory, Job Descriptive Index, and General Health Questionnaire were distributed; clustered sampling selection was conducted to select participants. Ninety three female teachers (32 teachers of children with autism, 30 teachers in schools for deaf and 31 for teachers of children with mental retardation from 12 schools located in 4 districts of Tehran were selected. Pearson’s and Spearman’s correlation statistical tests, analysis of variances and regression were used to analyze the results.Results: Results of the current study revealed a significant difference in criterion validity between the three groups of teachers The three groups were different in terms of general health (p=0.010, emotional exhaustion (p=0.005 and depersonalization (p<0.001; however considering other variables no significant differences were observed. Comparison between groups showed that the average scores of teachers of children with autism were significantly higher than teachers of deaf and hard of hearing and mentally retarded children in general health, fatigue, and depersonalization variables. No significant differences were observed in average scores of teachers for mentally retarded and deaf children.Conclusions: Female teachers’ of children with autism are experiencing significantly higher levels of burnout and general mental health problems compared to teachers of children with other disabilities requiring special education.

  11. Communicative Competency as Teacher’s Integrative Ability for Musical Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Sergeevna Kobozeva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to finding of ways of development of communicative competence of students of pedagogical higher education institution. Authors analyzed the main tendencies of researches in this problem area. Authors see development of communicative competence of the teacher as the solution of a question which allows to carry out communication of the teacher with pupils means of music. As a result of research personal signs of communicative competence were revealed and its professional importance is defined. In work diagnostics of level of formation of musical and communicative culture at students of pedagogical higher education institutions is described. These researches were conducted in Federal public budgetary educational institution of higher education "The Mordovian state teacher training college of M. E. Evsevyev" and in Federal public budgetary educational institution of higher education "The Yaroslavl state pedagogical university of K. D. Ushinsky". As a result of research characteristics of communicative competence were found out and the educational and concert component of training of the teacher-musician which opens author's approach to development of communicative competence as to integrative ability of musical communication of the teacher is allocated.

  12. Characteristics of Teacher Induction Programs and Turnover Rates of Beginning Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok; Berliner, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The federal School and Staffing Survey (SASS) and Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) were used to examine the impacts of induction activities on beginning teacher turnover. This study excluded those teachers who moved or left schools for unavoidable and involuntary reasons, a confounding factor in previous research. This analysis revealed that three…

  13. Trainee Teachers' Use of the Internet--Opportunities and Challenges for Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann; Twidle, John; Sorensen, Pete; Godwin, Janet

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on 12 in-depth case studies of trainee science teachers' use of the Internet in their science teaching from teacher training programmes in four UK universities. The findings reveal many opportunities and challenges trainee teachers face in using the Internet and these are examined in the light of the promotion of the use of ICT…

  14. How revealing is revealed preference?

    OpenAIRE

    Blundell, R.

    2005-01-01

    This lecture address the following two key criticisms of the empirical application of revealed preference theory: When the RP conditions do not reject, they do not provide precise predictions; and when they do reject, they do not help characterize the nature of irrationality or the degree/direction of changing tastes. Recent developments in the application of RP theory are shown to have rendered these criticisms unfounded. A powerful test of rationality is available that also provides a natur...

  15. Qualities of Ideal Teacher Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Tunca

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Generally, the relationship between the teacher educators' qualities and the quality of teacher education has not been discussed extensively in the literature. At the same time, various studies can be found in the eastern literature examining the characteristics of faculty members at the education faculties. The effect of teacher educators over teacher candidates has not been explored, and in this sense, there is limited number of studies examining faculty members at education faculties in Turkey. Mostly employing quantitative research designs, these studies have focused on faculty members in terms of various characteristics However, which qualities that faculty members should have as a whole have not been studied. However, faculty members, as well as teachers who are a matter of debate in terms of the qualities they are supposed to have should be examined in research studies. In this context, this study aims to identify the qualities that an ideal teacher educator should have from the perspective of education faculty students as future teachers. The current research is a qualitative study in phenomenology design. The participants of the study are third and fourth year 214 pre-service teachers from the departments of Science and Technology Teaching, Pre-School Teacher Education, Classroom Teacher Education, Social Studies Teaching and Turkish Language Teaching. Criterion sampling was used for participant selection. The data gathering tool consisted of an open-ended question that would reveal the qualities that an ideal teacher educator should have based on teacher candidates’ views. Junior and senior teacher candidates’ views were asked and the data were analyzed according to content analysis approach. As a result, the qualities that an ideal teacher educator should have been gathered under five main themes including ‘professional roles and responsibilities, professional values, personal characteristics, professional ethic principles and social responsibilities’. Keywords: Ideal teacher educator, teacher candidates, qualities of teacherÖz Dünyada ö?retmen e?itimcilerinin niteli?i ile ö?retmen yeti?tirmenin kalitesi aras?ndaki ili?ki yeterli düzeyde tart???lmamaktad?r. Bununla birlikte, Bat? alan yaz?n?nda e?itim fakültelerindeki ö?retim üyelerinin özelliklerini inceleyen çe?itli ara?t?rmalara rastlanmaktad?r. Ö?retmen e?itimcilerinin ö?retmen adaylar? üzerindeki etkilerinin bilinmedi?i Türkiye’de ise e?itim fakültelerindeki ö?retim elemanlar?yla ilgili s?n?rl? say?da ara?t?rma bulunmaktad?r. Ço?u nicel ara?t?rma yakla??m?yla desenlenen bu çal??malarda, ö?retmen e?itimcilerinin baz? özellikleri aç?s?ndan de?erlendirildikleri dikkat çekmektedir. Ö?retmen e?itimcilerinin, bir bütün olarak hangi özelliklere sahip olmalar? gerekti?i ise ara?t?rma konusu olmam??t?r. Oysa sahip olmas? gereken özellikler aç?s?ndan sürekli tart??ma konusu olan ö?retmenler kadar ö?retmen e?itimcileri de ara?t?rma konusu olmal?d?r. Bu gerekçeden hareketle ara?t?rmada, gelece?in ö?retmenleri olan e?itim fakültesi ö?rencilerinin bak?? aç?s?yla ideal bir ö?retim üyesinin sahip olmas? gereken niteliklerin belirlenmesi amaçlanm??t?r. Ara?t?rma, olgu bilim (fenomonoloji deseninde nitel bir ara?t?rmad?r. Ara?t?rman?n kat?l?mc?lar?n?,  Fen ve Teknoloji Ö?retmenli?i, Okulöncesi Ö?retmenli?i, S?n?f Ö?retmenli?i, Sosyal Bilgiler Ö?retmenli?i ve Türkçe Ö?retmenli?i programlar?nda, üçüncü ve dördüncü s?n?flarda ö?renim gören toplam 214 ö?retmen aday? olu?turmaktad?r. Ara?t?rma verileri, yap?land?r?lm?? görü?me tekniklerinden aç?k uçlu anket ile (29 Nisan-18 May?s 2013 toplanm??t?r. Ara?t?rmada elde edilen veriler, NVivo8.0. Paket Program? kullan?larak içerik analizi yakla??m?na göre analiz edilmi?tir. Ara?t?rmada ö?retmen adaylar?n?n görü?leri do?rultusunda ideal ö?retim üyesinde bulunmas? gereken nitelikle

  16. Teacher community in elementary charter schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Cannata

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The organizational context of charter schools may facilitate the formation of a strong teacher community. In particular, a focused school mission and increased control over teacher hiring may lead to stronger teacher professional communities. This paper uses the 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey to compare the level of teacher community in charter public and traditional public schools. It also estimates the effect of various charter policy variables and domains of school autonomy on teacher community. Charter school teachers report higher levels of teacher community than traditional public school teachers do, although this effect is less than one-tenth of a standard deviation and is dwarfed by the effect of a supportive principal, teacher decision-making influence, and school size. Charter public schools authorized by universities showed lower levels of teacher community than those authorized by local school districts. Teachers in charter schools that have flexibility over tenure requirements and the school budget report higher levels of teacher community. This study reveals that charter schools do facilitate the formation of strong teacher communities, although the effect is small. The analysis also suggests that the institutional origin of the charter school and specific areas of policy flexibility may influence teacher community.

  17. Personal and Job Related Predictors of Teacher Stress and Job Performance among School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Hanif

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to find out role of personal and job related variables in teacher stress and job performance of school teachers. Furthermore, levels and sources of stress and their relationship with job performance among teachers were also explored. The measures used in this study were indigenously developed i.e., Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI-Urdu, Teachers Job Performance Scale and personal and job related Information sheet. Two independent samples were selected from Government and Private Schools of Islamabad (Pakistan. Sample I was comprised of 400 teachers (men and women from Primary and secondary schools. For the evaluation of teachers’ job performance another sample of 1200 students from the classes of teachers of sample I was selected. Three students were randomly selected from each teacher’s class. The students were requested to evaluate their respective teachers’ job performance. The findings revealed that negative significant relationship exists between teachers stress and job performance. The step-wise regression analysis revealed school system, gender, job experience, number of family members, and number of students as significant predictors of teacher stress and gender, school system, family members, job experience and age as significant predictors of teachers’ job performance.

  18. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION EFFECTS ON TEACHERS’ ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naji SALEH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the effects of technology integration on teachers’ achievement. The previous literature in this regard was reviewed and a sample of teachers was chosen from 7-9 grade teachers. The sample consisted of 50 teachers males and females with different years of experience and different number of training courses. The questionnaire included paragraphs about the effect of technology integration on their achievement in school and in teaching. The results showed a great effect of technology integration on teachers’ achievement. The results also showed no differences attributed to teacher’s gender and that there were differences attributed to teacher’s years of experience and number of training courses. The article shows the aspects in which the achievement of teachers was influenced by technology integration.

  19. Interdisciplinarity and Teacher Education: The Teacher’s Training of the Secondary School in Rio de Janeiro—Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Augusto Fidalgo-Neto; Renato Matos Lopes; José Leopoldo Cerqueira Magalhães; Max Fonseca Pierini; Luiz Anastácio Alves

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the teacher’s perception and knowledge about interdisciplinarity on public secondary school in Rio de Janeiro. Among the participants, 101 teachers completed the questionnaire on the subject investigated. All data about the perceptions of teachers were faced with lesson plans prepared by teachers who reported having strong knowledge on interdisciplinary practice. Our results suggest that there is a lack of support in schools, and competence of te...

  20. The Relationship between Didactics and Classroom Management: Towards New Tools for the Training of Math Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoin, Michel; Lanaris, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the interest of the “instrumental conflict” concept, developed by Marquet (2005), to understand the relationship between didactics and classroom management in the training programs of math teachers. It also shows some results of a survey, conducted in 2008 among pre-service teachers in the Université du Québec en Outaouais (Canada), revealing a perceived gap between both domains. However, those two domains are closely related during teaching in the classroom. The paper ...

  1. Towards a Personal Knowledge Model (PKM) in Collaborative Environment of School Teachers’ Community

    OpenAIRE

    Rusli Abdullah 3; Amir Mohamed Talib

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of teachers’ community of practice (CoP) based on personal knowledge management (PKM) in order to facilitate knowledge sharing among them. There are some knowledge are scatted and not well manage around the school teachers. This is lead toward waste of time, cost, and difficulties to find and applying the knowledge when it was needed. In order to solve these problems a PKM model is proposed. The result reveals that in managing the knowledge, the process distri...

  2. Importance of Laboratory Skills Necessary for Teaching Chemistry in Secondary Schools As Percieved by Chemistry Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Al Faleh, Nasser A. [???? ??? ?????? ??????

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the importance Importance of Laboratory Skills Necessary for Teaching Chemistry in Secondary Schools As Percieved by Chemistry Teachers. A questionnaire consisting of ( 74 ) items were distributed to a random sample of (171) chemistry teachers . The results revealed the following: - (73) skills obtained a mean range between 3.28 - 3.90. - There were no statistically significant differences in the mean scores between the secondary school c...

  3. Location and Gender Differences in Deviant Behavior among Primary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Muhamamd Sarwar; Riffat-un-Nisa Awan; Muhammad Alam; Muhammad Nadeem Anwar

    2010-01-01

    Any behavior that does not conform to social organizational norms is considered deviant. Observing schooltimings, teaching classes regularly and behaving properly with students and colleagues are basic school norms.This study was conducted to test whether there is any deviation in organizational, interpersonal, behavior, amongrural-urban male-female primary school teachers. The results revealed higher organizational deviations amongprimary school teachers as compared to interpersonal deviatio...

  4. Practicing Teachers' Perceptions of Teacher Trainees: Implications for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoda, Alice Merab; Sentongo, John

    2015-01-01

    Practicing teachers are partners in preparation of teacher trainees. However, little is known about their perceptions of the teacher trainees they receive every year in their schools. Ninety three practicing teachers from twenty schools participated in this study. The objectives were to find out the practicing teachers' perceptions of teacher…

  5. Teachers Attitude towards English in Batu Anam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah Zhi Jian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the attitude of 60 primary and secondary school teachers towards English in Batu Anam. A questionnaire was administered to find out whether they have a positive or a negative attitude towards the English language. Results indicate that teachers in Batu Anam generally have a positive attitude towards English. Comparison between male and female teachers, optionist and non-optionist teachers and teachers from different types of schools are also analyzed.

  6. Assessment practices of Iowa science teachers from a constructivist perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris Freedman, Robin Lee

    How do students learn? What can they do? When assessments evolve out of instruction as is expected in inquiry and constructivist based classrooms, one can derive definitive results. It was the purpose of this study to describe the assessment environment found in the Iowa SS&C compared to those in other Iowa science classrooms. Science instruction in classrooms of Iowa SS&C teachers is based on NSES, Constructivist theory, and an STS approach. In Iowa SS&C classrooms the primary focus is to make science personal and relevant to students. Iowa science teachers were surveyed. Survey results revealed that the two groups of teachers had different perceptions regarding their grading philosophies and in the use of traditional and non-traditional assessments. The two groups were similar in their ability to identify appropriate uses for assessments and the use of a variety of assessments that make up a student's grade. Several methods were used to gain understanding of how the two teacher groups were different, i.e., in-depth interviews, a collection of assessment artifacts, and a student survey of a sub-sample of teachers. Artifact analysis revealed that the Iowa SS&C teachers used more application items, were more familiar and more likely to use non-traditional assessments, and used more assessments of higher order thinking skills than other Iowa science teachers. Student perspectives regarding assessments were surveyed. Students who completed the survey felt competent to assess themselves. Iowa SS&C students perceived that they have an active role in establishing the classroom assessment environment, share and listen to each others' ideas, and have a voice in how and by what means they are assessed. Synthesis of interview data revealed an assessment environment that reflected NSES philosophy and the STS approach. The assessment environment according to Iowa SS&C teachers was defined by teacher beliefs and practices, how teachers engage students, and internal and external influences. Variety was evident from the interview data and included such factors as: design, inquiry, application, various social configurations, and several learning styles.

  7. Pay differences between teachers and other occupations: some empirical evidence from Bangladesh: SKOPE Research Paper No. 58, November 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Niaz Asadullah, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a popular debate on teacher pay in a developing country context, namely whether teachers are under-paid or over-paid. Using national level household survey data from Bangladesh, we find that teachers are significantly under-paid in comparison to non-teachers who possess similar human capital and other observed characteristics. A decomposition exercise of the teacher non-teacher wage gap reveals that the teacher non-teacher salary difference is driven mostly by differentia...

  8. Individual Action Planning in Initial Teacher Training: A Course Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jennifer K.; Lawson, Tony

    1997-01-01

    Survey data from 225 student teachers, 45 coordinators, and 130 tutors at Leicester University (England) revealed how Individual Action Planning helped solve logistical and instructional problems. Its effective use depended on the relationship between tutors and student teachers. (SK)

  9. Technology of Future Teacher Development as the Subject of Professional Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzel Insharovna Gaysina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to present the educational technologies that develop subjective qualities of future teachers. Ourexperimental research of this process is based on the culturological approach that is one of the modernmethodological approaches in pedagogy. The results of the theoretical and experimental research work in thefield of teacher professional culture formation are presented. It is needed to rely on a stating that subject of theprofessional and pedagogical culture actively learns the pedagogical culture’ artifacts, realizes creativity, designsa cultural educational area for the pupils. In the structure of the teacher professional culture there are threecomponents: evaluative, active and creative. Their subjective development requires educational training processreconstruction on the principles of culturological approach. Pedagogical experiment has confirmed the effect ofproposed conditions and means of teacher professional culture formation. The problem revealed in the article,may be useful for higher school teachers; researchers in the pedagogical problem of education and cultureintegration; students of pedagogical skills.

  10. Teachers’ intuition and knowledge in detecting specific learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradovi? Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate primary school teachers’ proficiency in detecting the ability-achievement discrepancy as a landmark of possible specific developmental learning disabilities (SLD. Twenty-two teachers in five schools attempted to select, in accordance with their perception and out of a larger preliminary sample, those students whose school results revealed: (a discrepancy between school achievement and general abilities (the group of purportedly disharmonic children, GPD or (b concordance between general abilities and achievement (the group of purportedly harmonic children, GPH. The children were tested by REVISK, while teachers re-assessed students’ reading, writing and arithmetic performance against a simple structured questionnaire based on demands of the approved elementary school program delineated by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Serbia. Research results indicate that more than 60% of children originally qualified to GPH have actually shown significant discrepancy between targeted scholastic skills and (normal general intelligence. The data suggested some association between students’ disparity in attainment and teachers’ attribution accuracy, while the only homogenous quantitative marker of misplaced children were decreased values on some of the REVISK Verbal subscale tests. This study has shown that teachers can use their professional knowledge to enhance their capability to detect children with specific learning disabilities. In absence of criterion-referenced tests of reading, writing and mathematics, a structured approach to the projected course of skill progress might support teachers’ confidence regarding likely SLD.

  11. The Interplay between EFL High School Teachers' Beliefs and Their Instructional Practices Regarding Reading Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin SALIMI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has revealed the influential role of teachers’ beliefs in determining their professional behavior; that is, the ways they plan their lessons, the kinds of decision they make, and the methods they apply in their classrooms. The present study aimed, first, to investigate the construct of teachers’ belief systems about reading strategies among EFL high school teachers, then to explore the degree of discrepancies or consistencies between teachers’ beliefs about reading strategies and their practical teaching activities in the context of English teaching as a foreign language in high schools of Iran, Mazandaran. Based on questionnaire data from 57 teachers, teachers’ beliefs and their self-reported classroom employment of reading strategies were explored. Findings indicated that teachers believe that reading strategies play an important role in reading comprehension and that it is necessary to teach reading strategies in reading classes. The results also revealed that there is inconsistency between teachers' beliefs and their self reported classroom practice.

  12. Interrelationships between Parenting Styles and Teachers Involvement: From Children’s Emotion Regulation Competence Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ju Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the effects of different parenting styles and teachers’ strategies in classroom interaction for emotion regulation development in preschool children. The quantitative approach employed instruments to measure parenting style and emotion regulation scores. The qualitative approach involved classroom observations and interviews with the teachers. The data revealed to implement an authoritative parenting style. In addition, there is a significant difference in the emotion regulation scores. The results indicated that teachers’ act strategies in classroom interactions widely affected children’s emotion regulation. The study suggested both professional development programs and workshops should be applied to develop a consistent approach to classroom interaction.

  13. Teachers' professional development in a community

    OpenAIRE

    Ryymin, Essi; Lallimo, Jiri; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article was to study teachers' professional development related to web-based learning in the context of the teacher community. The object was to learn in what kind of networks teachers share the knowledge of web-based learning and what are the factors in the community that support or challenge teachers professional development of web-based learning. The findings of the study revealed that there are teachers who are especially active, called the central actors in this study, i...

  14. Teachers’ Perceptions of Using Technology in Teaching EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mollaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No longer are students’ experiences with new languages limited to their textbooks or immediate environment. With the pervasiveness of the internet and the increased awareness of the importance of having technology in a classroom, both teachers and students all over the world are being provided with technological tools that will further accelerate their ability to acquire or teach a second or foreign language. Technology integration in the classroom has become an important aspect of successful teaching. It has triggered many researchers to investigate different aspects of such integration. In addition, it could be an effective teaching tool when used to engage all students in the learning process. The results of the study show that teachers have positive attitudes toward the use of technology, particularly computer. The focal point of the project was to promote students’ communicative competence and autonomy via the implementation of technological tools. This study aimed at investigating the perceptions of EFL teachers about the use of technology in their classes and factors affecting technology implementation in Iranian Language Institutes. Descriptive statistics and sample t-test were used to analyze the questionnaire data. Results obtained from both the quantitative and qualitative data revealed teachers’ perceptions about integrating technology in their classes, incentives for teachers who use technology, types of technology used, facilitating and inhibiting factors affecting technology implementation, and the different attitudes of male and female teachers toward using technology. According to the results, teachers had positive attitudes regarding the use of technology, in particular computer, in their classrooms. Keywords: Technology, computer, EFL teachers

  15. Echoes from teacher discourse: an inside-out perspective Echoes from teacher discourse: an inside-out perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Carvalho Kuerten Dellagnelo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in teacher education have paid increasing attention to teacher reflectivity and its relevance for teaching/learning practices. However, to our knowledge, there has been no investigation of teacher reflectivity from the perspective of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL. In this paper we draw mainly on SFL to examine aspects of the relationship between teachers and learners as construed in self-evaluative reports written by 4 Brazilian teacher-trainees. These reports – self-reflections on the trainees’ own teaching practices – were collected as part of work developed in a Teaching Practicum Course taken by these trainees. In addition to SFL, in our discussion of results we also draw on research related to teacher education/reflectivity (e.g., Freeman & Johnson, 1998; Richards & Lockart, 1996. The linguistic structures described and interpreted in order to unravel the roles these trainees ascribe to themselves and their students reveal a selfcentered positioning of the trainees as social participants whose practices are shaped by conceptions traditionally established by a culture of schooling which maintains the emphasis of teaching on the transmission of knowledge. Results also reveal asymmetry between teachers and students inasmuch as the latter are construed as playing a secondary role, with little responsibility in the process of teaching/learning a foreign language. The study may contribute to enhance the search for awareness of contrasts between new views of language teaching/learning and traditional perceptions such as the ones conveyed in the reports analyzed. Researchers in teacher education have paid increasing attention to teacher reflectivity and its relevance for teaching/learning practices. However, to our knowledge, there has been no investigation of teacher reflectivity from the perspective of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL. In this paper we draw mainly on SFL to examine aspects of the relationship between teachers and learners as construed in self-evaluative reports written by 4 Brazilian teacher-trainees. These reports – self-reflections on the trainees’ own teaching practices – were collected as part of work developed in a Teaching Practicum Course taken by these trainees. In addition to SFL, in our discussion of results we also draw on research related to teacher education/reflectivity (e.g., Freeman & Johnson, 1998; Richards & Lockart, 1996. The linguistic structures described and interpreted in order to unravel the roles these trainees ascribe to themselves and their students reveal a selfcentered positioning of the trainees as social participants whose practices are shaped by conceptions traditionally established by a culture of schooling which maintains the emphasis of teaching on the transmission of knowledge. Results also reveal asymmetry between teachers and students inasmuch as the latter are construed as playing a secondary role, with little responsibility in the process of teaching/learning a foreign language. The study may contribute to enhance the search for awareness of contrasts between new views of language teaching/learning and traditional perceptions such as the ones conveyed in the reports analyzed.

  16. 'ICTs' IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Girdhar lal Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Education in the Indian region faces a number of problems. These problems include the shortage of qualified teachers, very large student populations, high drop-out rates of students and teachers, and weak curriculum. All of these negative aspects result in poor delivery of education. The education crisis is worsened by the devastating effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, increasing poverty, a brain drain in the teaching community, budgetary constraints, poor communication, and inadequa...

  17. Teachers as mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike; Pratt, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of lower secondary English teaching in South West England, this study identifies in broad terms the competing goals between which English teachers mediate and the explicit and hidden tensions that result. To understand the interactions of competing goals, teachers’ goal-oriented behaviours are referenced to a set of idealised ‘role types’ based on the dimensions of goals, norms, discourses and practices. It is asserted that competing goals, significant to particular educationa...

  18. The Effect of Trust on Teacher Empowerment: The Mediation of Teacher Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong-biao; Lee, John Chi-Kin; Jin, Yu-le; Zhang, Zhong-hua

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of teachers' perception of trust in colleagues on their sense of empowerment in Mainland China, with a particular focus on the mediating role of teacher efficacy. The results of a survey of 1646 teachers indicate that although teachers scored positively on trust in colleagues, efficacy and empowerment, they had…

  19. Teachers' Professional Agency and Learning--From Adaption to Active Modification in the Teacher Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine teacher learning in terms of teachers' professional agency in the professional community of the school. Altogether 2310 Finnish comprehensive school teachers completed a survey. Results showed that teachers' active efforts to learn in the professional community and to promote school development cannot be…

  20. Teacher agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Robinson, Sarah

    circumscribed by features of the contexts within which teachers work – for example accountability mechanisms and other forms of output regulation of teachers’ work – leading to engagement with policy that is often instrumental and blighted by unintended consequences. In the chapter, we illustrate how a detailed...

  1. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning:

    OpenAIRE

    Keuvelaar - van den Bergh, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to enhance student learning. In 2006, the Dutch Inspectorate of Education concluded from classroom observations that it is difficult for Dutch teachers to give their students good feedback in order to stimulate students’ learning process and developmental progress. Similar problems were revealed in other school levels and countries, for example in secondary education and in Finland. Giving feedback during active learning may be even ...

  2. Elementary Teacher's Conceptions of Inquiry Teaching: Messages for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Joseph E.; Watters, James J.; Brownlee, Jo; Lupton, Mandy

    2011-09-01

    This study explored practicing elementary school teacher's conceptions of teaching in ways that foster inquiry-based learning in the science curriculum (inquiry teaching). The advocacy for inquiry-based learning in contemporary curricula assumes the principle that students learn in their own way by drawing on direct experience fostered by the teacher. That students should be able to discover answers themselves through active engagement with new experiences was central to the thinking of eminent educators such as Pestalozzi, Dewey and Montessori. However, even after many years of research and practice, inquiry learning as a referent for teaching still struggles to find expression in the average teachers' pedagogy. This study drew on interview data from 20 elementary teachers. A phenomenographic analysis revealed three conceptions of teaching for inquiry learning in science in the elementary years of schooling: (a) The Experience-centered conception where teachers focused on providing interesting sensory experiences to students; (b) The Problem-centered conception where teachers focused on engaging students with challenging problems; and (c) The Question-centered conception where teachers focused on helping students to ask and answer their own questions. Understanding teachers' conceptions has implications for both the enactment of inquiry teaching in the classroom as well as the uptake of new teaching behaviors during professional development, with enhanced outcomes for engaging students in Science.

  3. Factor structure of the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire in Portuguese children Estrutura fatorial do Questionário de Rutter para Professores numa amostra de crianças portuguesas

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Telma Pereira; Berta Rodrigues Maia; Mariana Marques; Sandra Carvalho Bos; Maria João Soares; Ana Gomes; António Macedo; Maria Helena Pinto de Azevedo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the factor structure of the Rutter Teacher Questionnaire in Portuguese primary school children. METHOD: The Rutter Teacher Questionnaire, a 26-item scale covering a variety of behavioral problems, was completed by teachers of 877 children, aged 6 to 11 years. Data were subjected to factor analysis using the principal components solution with varimax rotation. RESULTS: The factorial analysis in total sample revealed three factors explaining 38.88% of the total variance. T...

  4. A Qualitative Study on The Motivation of Turkish EFL Teachers Working At State Universities / Devlet Üniversitelerinde Çal??an Türk ?ngilizce Ö?retmenlerinin Motivasyonu Üzerine Nitel Bir Ara?t?rma

    OpenAIRE

    ÖLMEZER ÖZTÜRK, Elçin

    2015-01-01

    Following a qualitative research design, this study examines the motivation of Turkish EFL teachers working at state universities in Turkey. Purposeful sampling was used in the selection of participants and 20 teachers working at different universities participated in the study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and daily reflection entries. In the analysis of data, qualitative content analysis scheme of Creswell (2011) was used. The results revealed that teacher moti...

  5. Teacher expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    practice through development of better models for bridging the teaching at college and the internship teaching. The study was a longitudinal research and development project that followed teacher students during their first three years of a four year teacher education program after the teacher education...... reform of 2007. The study included four teacher training colleges at two university colleges and about 100 students. In the reform and in the study focus was on professional development. Each of the colleges implemented a number of actions in order to see whether they had potential for bridging the gap...... between college and practice teaching. These actions were evaluated in relation to a two-dimensional framework of criteria for teacher expertise. One dimension consists of three different knowledge forms (scientific, professional, and practice knowledge), the other in the goals set in the national...

  6. Special and General Education Biology Teachers Working Together Collaboratively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne-Grosso, Melissa

    Collaborative teaching, between special education and general education teachers working together, came about as a result of the No Child Left Behind and Individuals with Disabilities Education Acts. Despite the positive intentions of those acts, teachers are not always ready to teach collaboratively. Guided by the theories of fundamental change and inclusion, this study was based on a lack of understanding about collaborative teaching at 3 high schools. The research questions focused on the benefits, process, and concerns related to collaborative teaching. The perspectives of 4 special education and 8 regular education teachers in 3 urban, public high schools were collected through interviews and observations. Data were analyzed descriptively and inductively using coding, reconstruction, and interpretation of the underlying meanings. The findings revealed that teachers benefitted from being in these classrooms by having a reduced work load and shared responsibility; however, they needed more time for collaboration and modifying instruction, professional development, and stronger support. Students in these classrooms benefitted from social interactions with other students and by getting direct answers to questions. Based on these findings, a professional development training was created based on how collaborative teachers can work together to promote successful learning. This project study can have a positive impact by assisting collaborative teachers with support, communication, strategies for modifications and accommodations, and an enhanced experience, and additionally by improving the academic outcomes for their students.

  7. Multiple case studies of STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Madeline

    The following master's thesis is composed of two manuscripts describing STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering within the context of the Science Learning through Engineering Design (SLED) partnership. The framework guiding both studies was science teaching orientations, a component of pedagogical content knowledge. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, multi-day classroom observations, pre- and post-observation interviews, implementation plans, and written reflections. Data sources were analyzed to generate two orientations to science teaching through engineering design for each participant. The first manuscript illustrates a single case study conducted with a sixth grade STEM teacher. Results of this study revealed a detailed picture of the teacher's goals, practices, assessments, and general views when teaching science through engineering design. Common themes across the teacher's instruction were used to characterize her orientations to science teaching through engineering design. Overall, the teacher's orientations showed a shift in her practice from didactic to student-centered methods of teaching as a result of integrating engineering design-based curriculum. The second manuscript describes a comparative case study of two sixth grade SLED participants. Results of this study revealed more complex and diverse relationships between the teachers' orientations to teaching science through engineering design and their instruction. Participants' orientations served as filters for instruction, guided by their divergent purposes for science teaching. Furthermore, their orientations and resulting implementation were developed from knowledge gained in teacher education, implying that teacher educators and researchers can use this framework to learn more about how teachers' knowledge is used to integrate engineering and science practices in the K-12 classroom.

  8. Senior science teachers' experience of teaching in a changing multicultural classroom: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Mark

    Demographic changes within the US are bringing significant changes in the cultural make-up of the classrooms in our schools. Results from national and state assessments indicate a growing achievement gap between the science scores of white students and students from minority communities. This gap indicates a disconnect somewhere in the science classrooms. This study examines the teacher's perspective of the changing learning environment. The study focuses on senior teachers with traditional Midwestern backgrounds and little multicultural experience assuming these teachers had little or no education in multicultural education. Senior teachers are also more likely to have completed their science education within a traditional Universalist perspective of science and likewise have little or no education in multicultural science. The research method was comparative case studies of a purposeful sample of nine science teachers within a community experiencing significant demographic change, seven core senior teachers and two frame of reference teachers. The interviews examined the teachers' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and the impact of those beliefs on classroom practices, the teachers' understanding of cultural influences on the students' academic performance, and the relationships between the teachers' understanding of the cultural aspects of the nature of science and their classroom practices. Analysis of the interview data revealed that the teachers maintain a strong, traditional Midwestern worldview for classroom expectations and they are generally unaware of the impact of those standards on the classroom environment. The teachers were supportive of minority students within their classroom, changing several practices to accommodate student needs, but they were unaware of the broader cultural influences on student learning. The teachers had a poor understanding of the nature of science and none of them recognized a cultural element of NOS. They maintained a Universalist perspective of science with a strong commitment to the philosophy of scientism which left no room for a multicultural view of science. These results have implications for the broad science community with respect to the philosophy and nature of science. There are also implications in pre- and in-service teacher education and professional development aimed at raising cultural awareness of science teachers and providing a broader understanding of NOS. The problems raised by this research appear to be systemic requiring a commitment beyond the level of the individual teacher to implement a multicultural education that matches the composition of our classrooms.

  9. A comparison of bilingual education and generalist teachers' approaches to scientific biliteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Esther

    The purpose of this study was to determine if educators were capitalizing on bilingual learners' use of their biliterate abilities to acquire scientific meaning and discourse that would formulate a scientific biliterate identity. Mixed methods were used to explore teachers' use of biliteracy and Funds of Knowledge (Moll, L., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N., 1992; Gonzales, Moll, & Amanti, 2005) from the students' Latino heritage while conducting science inquiry. The research study explored four constructs that conceptualized scientific biliteracy. The four constructs include science literacy, science biliteracy, reading comprehension strategies and students' cultural backgrounds. There were 156 4th-5th grade bilingual and general education teachers in South Texas that were surveyed using the Teacher Scientific Biliteracy Inventory (TSBI) and five teachers' science lessons were observed. Qualitative findings revealed that a variety of scientific biliteracy instructional strategies were frequently used in both bilingual and general education classrooms. The language used to deliver this instruction varied. A General Linear Model revealed that classroom assignment, bilingual or general education, had a significant effect on a teacher's instructional approach to employ scientific biliteracy. A simple linear regression found that the TSBI accounted for 17% of the variance on 4th grade reading benchmarks. Mixed methods results indicated that teachers were utilizing scientific biliteracy strategies in English, Spanish and/or both languages. Household items and science experimentation at home were encouraged by teachers to incorporate the students' cultural backgrounds. Finally, science inquiry was conducted through a universal approach to science learning versus a multicultural approach to science learning.

  10. Pratical Implementation of Practical Chemistry among Secondary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmi Copriady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at identifying differences in terms of the practical implementation of practical Chemistry teaching on the basis of teachers’ perspectives based on gender and location. Implementation of practical Chemistry in the current study focuses on four major aspects such as the design, preparation, implementation and evaluation. Furthermore, the study also explored the relationship among the aspects of design, preparation, implementation and evaluation. The study used a survey approach by using questionnaire. The study sample comprised of 236 Chemistry teachers, randomly selected in Pekan Baru, Riau in Indonesia. Pilot test involved 40 teachers and the findings of the pilot test revealed that the Cornbach Alpha value of the instrument constructs was between 0.81 and 0.91, hightening that the instrument has high level of reliability. The data was analyzed using inferential statistics such as independent t-test and Pearson correlation employing SPSS 19. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in practical implementation of practical Chemistry science among the teachers regarding the aspects of the design, preparation, implementation and evaluation based on gender and location. However, there is a significant different in relation to the aspect of preparation based on location. Meanwhile, Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there are significant correlations between and among all aspects associated with implementation of practical Chemistry. It is suggested that training and workshops for chemical science teachers can be implemented by the related organizations including the Ministry of Education, the Board of Education Quality Assurance as well as Center for Development and Empowerment of Educators for science. Besides, the collaboration is also highlighted for experienced teachers to be able to train and teach practical skills to novice teachers, especially in preparing tools and materials needed for practical activities.

  11. Efficacy in German Teacher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald Kiel; Sabine Weiß; Thomas Eberle

    2012-01-01

    At the present time German teacher training is confronted with a great political will to bring about change. International comparative studies of recent years have shown a dissatisfying learning outcome. The most dramatic result is a strong interdependence of school success and social background. German teachers experience their profession as problematic. At present only 35% work until the normal pension age. The article discusses structural differences in teacher training compared to other c...

  12. A professional development study of technology education in secondary science teaching in Benin: Issues of teacher change and self-efficacy beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelani, Razacki Raphael E. D.

    This study has two purposes. The practical purpose of the study was to provide Benin middle school science teachers with an effective technology education professional development (TEPD) program which granted teachers with content knowledge in technology education (TE), PCK in TE, design hands-on models in TE, and design rubrics assessing students' works. The research purpose of the study was to explore teachers' TE content knowledge and PCK, changes in teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in teaching the TE portion of the curriculum, and teachers' perceptions of their TEPD experience after participating in the program. Four sessions of the TEPD program were carried out with two groups of teachers (N = 23 & 28). A mixed methods research design was utilized to collect data. Pre-experimental one-group pretest-posttest research design was used to collect quantitative data. Two instruments, the technology education teacher self-efficacy beliefs instrument (TETEBI) and the TE Awareness instrument, were designed. The qualitative research design employed a case study with participating teachers' after-session journals and after-session evaluation, classroom observations, teachers' and students' interviews. Overall results of the study revealed that the TEPD program impacted positively participating teachers. Salient results indicated that (1) the TEPD program was effective; (2) although quantitative analysis was inconclusive, through documents analysis, teachers' self-efficacy beliefs were enhanced after participating in the program; (3) teachers did acquire TE content knowledge and PCK; (4) teachers were effectively teaching the TE lessons integrated in the science curriculum; and (5) teachers expressed positive perceptions about the program and acknowledged its soundness, relevancy and effectiveness. Other characteristics of effective PD have been founded such as trainers' expertise and consideration of cultural and contextual issues of the trainees. Interpretations of the results led to ten educational implications that could improve TE teaching in secondary school settings in Benin, as well as in other developing countries with similar features. Finally, five recommendations were made for further investigations.

  13. The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrak Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effective Iranian EFL teacher questionnaire (Moafian, & Pishghadam, 2009. They also filled in Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (GhorbanDordinejad & ImamJomeh, 2011 that assessed their motivation towards learning English as a foreign language. Achievement in English was established based on formal grades students received at the end of the academic year. The results showed that EFL teachers reward and praise students for good behavior and they are not very authoritarian. Further, teaching effectiveness, motivation and achievement in learning English were all found to be related to discipline strategies. The results of path analysis showed that those teachers who used involvement and recognition strategies more frequently were perceived to be more effective teachers; however, students perceived teachers who used punitive strategies as being less effective in their teaching. It was also revealed that in classes where teachers managed disruptive behaviors by using punitive strategies, students had problems in learning as punitive strategies lowered students’ motivation. Teaching effectiveness was found to mediate the effect of punishment on motivation while motivation mediated the effect of punitive strategies on achievement. Motivation was found to have the strongest effect on achievement.

  14. Characteristics of an Effective English Language Teacher as Perceived by Iranian Teachers and Learners of English

    OpenAIRE

    Homa Babai Shishavan; Karim Sadeghi

    2009-01-01

    This study attempted to characterize qualities of an effective English language teacher (EELT) as perceived by Iranian English language teachers and learners. For this purpose, a tailor-made questionnaire was administered to 59 English language teachers and 215 learners of English at universities, high schools and language institutes in Iran. The results indicated significant differences between teachers’ and learners’ views on some characteristics of EELTs. Teachers seemed to agree more stro...

  15. An Analysis of the Information Behaviour of Geography Teachers in a Developing African Country–Lesotho

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    Constance BITSO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Information behaviour studies have the potential to inform the design of effective information services that incorporate the information needs, information-seeking and preferences for information sources of target users; hence a doctoral study was conducted on the information behaviour of geography teachers in Lesotho with the aim of guiding the design and implementation of an information service model for these teachers. This paper focuses on the analysis of the information behaviour of geography teachers in Lesotho as a contribution of original knowledge on geography teachers’ information behaviour. The analysis established the information behaviour of geography teachers using the information behaviour concept that encompasses information needs, information-seeking and information sources. Data were collected and analyzed through focus group discussions and conceptual content analysis respectively.The analysis reveals that these geography teachers need current and accurate information covering a variety of aspects in teaching and learning, such as content, pedagogy, classroom management and learners’ assessment. Owing to the increasing number of orphans in schools as a result of the HIV and AIDS pandemic, most teachers expressed the need for information on social assistance for orphans and vulnerable children. Recommendations include information literacy training for teachers and access to the Internet in schools, including the use of open access journals on the Internet by the teachers.

  16. Empower Teachers Who Break the Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Frances A.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers who are positive deviants are the most effective teachers, able to produce results and solutions to problems that others in the learning community cannot. As a result, students in their classrooms usually produce assessment scores that are higher than those of students in their colleagues' classrooms. Teachers willing to learn from their…

  17. Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of teacher self-disclosure

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    Ali Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher self-disclosure (TSD as a communication behavior can influence students' learning by increasing their engagement and class participation as well as helping them establish effective interpersonal relationships. Owning to its context-sensitive and culture-dependent nature, however, TSD topics, purposes, and considerations may vary cross-culturally. This study was an attempt to explore Iranian EFL teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of TSD as well as to investigate whether there was a significant difference between male and female teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of TSD. To this end, the Appropriateness of Teacher Self-Disclosure Scale was distributed among 68 Iranian EFL teachers (34 females and 34 males from six language institutes. The results of the study indicated the extent to which the Iranian EFL teachers perceived TSD topics, purposes, and considerations to be appropriate or inappropriate. Furthermore, the study found convergence and divergence between male and female teachers' perceptions in terms of the topics used in TSD, the purposes TSD serves in classroom, and considerations the teachers take into account when practicing TSD. The results of the study suggest that Iranian EFL teachers can practice TSD as a pedagogical tool to enhance learning although they should be wary of its consequences in some aspects as TSD is contingent upon context and culture.

  18. TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF OTHER TEACHERS’ SPONTANEOUS HAND GESTURING IN THE EFL CLASSROOM

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    John Michael THOMPSON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for gesture being a vital element in the classroom is becoming insurmountable; however, it remains to be seen how long it will take to be fully utilized in the EFL classroom. This study, using a qualitative descriptive methodology, briefly examines how a group of teachers perceive gesturing after viewing a video performance of an EFL practitioner. All of the data was collected online via a questionnaire and a recorded semi-structured interview. Volunteers were, or had been, teaching English within the past twelve months and approached the researcher to take part in the study via social media. The results of the study suggest that teachers fully acknowledge the importance of gesture and commonly attribute similar functions to specific gestures within a teaching performance. Overall, the results offer numerous pedagogical implications for gesture and SLA and support previous assertions regarding the need to make teachers fully aware of the gestures they use in the classroom. Analysis of the questionnaires also revealed that teachers seldom have the opportunity to view their own teaching and suggests that gesture needs to play a much greater role within critical reflective practice.

  19. Towards Constructivist Teacher Professional Development

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    V. J. Pitsoe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In recent years, much has been written about constructivist learning theories and their applications to outcomes-based teaching and learning environments in South Africa. Approach: Little, if any, has been said about the implications of these ideas and practices for teacher professional development and teacher education. The introduction of the National Curriculum Statement (NCS Policy requires teachers to acquire new skills, knowledge, attitudes and values and to employ a wide variety of teaching strategies, in order to enable students to construct their own knowledge. Results: The purpose of this desktop review is to rethink teacher professional development within a constructivist framework. Conclusion: In this article, we argue that teacher professional development can fit the context and, more specifically, in outcomes-based settings, as well as proposed a move away from a mechanistic world-view (modernist and behaviorist approach to a holistic world-view (constructivist and situational or contextual approach of teacher professional development.

  20. THE COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF FUTURE TEACHERS

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    Pakhomova Irina Yurevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the concept of "communicative competence of future teachers," describes the essential characteristics and features of pedagogical communication. Objective: To define the notion of "communicative competence of future teachers' Methodology of work: competence approach. Scope of the results: the preparation of future teachers at the Pedagogical University. Results: This article describes the concept of "communicative competence of future teachers," describes the essential characteristics and features of pedagogical communication.

  1. Job satisfaction of Jamaican elementary school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers-Jenkinson, Fay; Chapman, David W.

    1990-09-01

    This study investigated correlates of job satisfaction among public (N=190) and private (N=100) Jamaican elementary school teachers. Emphasis was on the identification of factors that could be affected through administrative intervention. Results indicated that the quality of school working conditions and respondents' relationships with other teachers were significantly related to satisfaction for both public and private school teachers. School prestige and parental encouragement were also significant predictors for public school teachers; leadership style, organizational structure, and teacher-parent relationships predicted job satisfaction for private school teachers. Implications of these findings for Jamaican education are discussed.

  2. How effective are Los Angeles elementary teachers and schools?

    OpenAIRE

    Buddin, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This study uses value-added methods to examine the effectiveness of Los Angeles elementary teachers and schools. The results show that teacher effectiveness varies substantially across the school district. Most of the variance in teacher effectiveness is within schools and not across schools. Traditional measures of teacher quality like experience and advanced degrees are weakly related to teacher effectiveness. Teacher effectiveness is more variable in mathematics than in language arts.

  3. A comparison of Australian and Chinese teachers' attributions for student problem behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, IT

    2004-01-01

    The present study compared Australian and Chinese teachers' causal attributions for student behavior. A total of 204 Australian teachers and 269 Chinese teachers rated the importance of four causes (ability, effort, family, teacher) of six student problem behaviors. Results showed that both groups of teachers attributed misbehaviors most to student effort and least to teacher factors. Chinese teachers emphasized family factors more while Australian teachers placed greater importance on abilit...

  4. A STUDY OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN RELATION TO LEVEL OF ASPIRATION OF B.ED STUDENT TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Jawed Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of study was to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and level of aspiration in terms of subject background of B.Ed student teachers. The sample size was 600, among them 300 are boys and 300 are girls. The tool used for this study is 'Emotional Intelligence Scale' developed by Ankool Hyde, Sanjyot Pethe and Upinder Dhar. The result revealed the Positive correlation between EI with level of aspiration. The science student teachers shows positive co...

  5. A comparison between the views of teachers in South Africa and six other countries on involvement in school change

    OpenAIRE

    Cassie Swanepoel

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, and especially in South Africa, change and decentralised decision-making have been topical issues in the provision of education for the past years. It appears that teachers - the key agents in implementing the policies concerned - are largely ignored in the pre-implementation phases, and treated merely as implementers of these policies. The results from an empirical investigation revealed that the teachers in the South African sample expressed an exceptional degree of eagerness to ...

  6. Matching music teacher’s self conception with students’ perception on teaching effectiveness in an unfavourable secondary classroom context

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    Bo Wah Leung

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at identifying and recording good music teaching practices that promote social inclusion, and at developing effective teaching strategies that incorporate student perspectives into the pedagogies. A music teacher in Hong Kong was selected for this study, and two different classes of Form 2 (ages 12-13 were observed. The teaching process was videotaped and reviewed. Afterwards the teacher and a group of students were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview to solicit their ideas towards good practice of music teaching. Findings reveal that the good practices observed were attributed to four factors: 1 teacher’s personality, 2 teacher’s pedagogy, 3 teacher’s musical competence, and 4 teacher’s philosophy of teaching.

  7. Formas de enseñanza y evaluación utilizadas por los docentes de Odontología: resultados y su clasificación psicopedagógica / Forms of teaching and assessment used by teachers in dental sciences: results and psycho-pedagogical classification

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Olivia, Espinosa-Vázquez; Adrián, Martínez-González; Frida, Díaz-Barriga Arceo.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se presenta un estudio de la manera de enseñar y evaluar de los profesores que imparten el Plan de Estudios de Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología (FO), UNAM, vigente desde 1992. Objetivo: Identificar las principales formas de enseñanza y evaluación utilizadas por los docen [...] tes de la FO, y clasificarlas psicopedagógicamente. Método: Estudio observacional, transversal, exploratorio tipo encuesta con escala Likert. Los datos se analizaron con SPSS (Alfa de Cronbach=0.880) a través de estadística descriptiva y con un análisis factorial exploratorio. Resultados: De una muestra de 484 profesores (45.6% mujeres, 54.4% hombres), se determinó que las principales formas de enseñanza utilizadas son: los profesores realizan preguntas sobre temas vistos previamente y la exposición de temas por parte del profesor; las que menos: el dictado y la exposición por parte de los estudiantes. Respecto a las estrategias de enseñanza-aprendizaje utilizan principalmente: demostraciones, ilustraciones y análisis de casos. Las formas de evaluación de la teoría más utilizadas son: participación en clase, exámenes de opción múltiple y listas de control; y en la práctica: exámenes de opción múltiple, número de trabajos y listas de control. Discusión: De las formas de enseñanza y evaluación que los profesores utilizan, algunas son más eficaces ya que fomentan la solución de problemas, y promueven una fuerte motivación en el estudiante. Conclusiones: Los profesores utilizan pocas formas de enseñanza y evaluación con diferente enfoque; prevalece la enseñanza centrada en el profesor y el uso excesivo de formas de evaluación relacionadas con el área cognoscitiva, el cumplimiento de tratamientos y el saber teórico de los procedimientos. Se sugiere crear conciencia y enriquecer las prácticas educativas habituales con capacitación continua y actualización constante, respecto a las formas de evaluación fundamentadas en la construcción del conocimiento y en el desarrollo de habilidades y actitudes profesionales. Abstract in english Introduction: We report a study of the way of teaching and assessment is performed by the professors at the School of Dentistry (Facultad de Odontología, FO), of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The curriculum of dental surgeon has been in use since 1992. The object of the study [...] is to identify the main forms of teaching and assessments used by teachers at the School of Dentistry (FO), and classify them both psychologically and pedagogically. Method: An observational, cross-type exploratory survey with a Likert scale. Data were analyzed with SPSS (Cronbach's Alpha=0.880) through descriptive statistics and an exploratory factor analysis. Results: From a sample of 484 teachers (45.6% female, 54.4% male), it was determined that the main ways of teaching were: teachers prepare questions on topics previously seen, and give a seminar on the day's topic. Few give: dictation or have presentation by students. Regarding teaching strategies the most used are: demonstrations, illustrations and case analysis. The forms of assessment most often used are: class participation, multiple-choice tests and checklists; and in practice: multiple choice exams, number of assignments and checklists. Discussion: Among all forms of teaching and assessment that teachers use, some are more effective if they encourage problem solving, and promote a strong motivation in the student. Conclusions: Teachers use a few ways of teaching and evaluation with a different approach; prevailing teacher-centered teaching and excessive use of evaluation forms related to the cognitive area, fulfillment of treatments and theoretical knowledge of procedures. It is suggested to create awareness and enrich the regular educational practices with continuous training and updating regarding the evaluation forms grounded in knowledge construction and the development of skills and professional attitudes.

  8. Including a learner with physical disabilities: stressful for teachers?

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    I. Eloff

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Learners with physical disabilities have been entering mainstream schools for some years now. Whereas early research on inclusive education necessitated a strong focus on the needs of the learners, there has also been a recent interest in the role of the teachers in inclusive education. By adopting constructivism as the paradigm for inquiry a study was undertaken to establish the stress factors for teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability in their mainstream classes. The rationale for the study is threefold: i Learners with physical disabilities are entering mainstream schools increasingly, ii it is often assumed that inclusive education is too stressful for teachers to cope with, and iii related research has shown that increased contact with individuals with disabilities has a positive effect on attitudes towards individuals with disabilities. In accordance with the dialectical methodology of constructivism, the Teacher Stress and Coping Questionnaire and in-depth interviews were utilised to establish the stress factors and the extent of the stress factors that may be present. The aim of the constructivist inquiry process is to promote understanding and reconstruction. In this article the quantitative results indicate overall low or non-existent levels of stress in teachers who have to include a learner with a physical disability, and the results therefore contribute to our understanding of this situation. The qualitative results reconstruct the meanings that these teachers attach to the inclusion of a learner with a physical disability and reveal some albeit limited concerns about the communication processes between parents and teachers and a perceived lack of pre-service training.

  9. ??????????????????????????? Student Teacher Perception of Teacher Education and Professional Knowledge Acquisition, Use, and Importance in Taiwan

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    ??? Jia-Li Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????11 ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? Student teachers who were interns at local schools were recruited as participants in this study to determine the outcome of teacher education and teaching preparedness of student teachers. A total of 422 valid surveys were retrieved at a rate of 74.95% from 11 universities with teacher education program. Subsequently, mean, standard deviation, an independent samples t test, one-way analysis of variance, and exploratory factor analysis were employed. The following conclusions were deduced from this study: (1 The teacher professional knowledge and ability that student teachers learned primarily include reflective thinking, class management, and pedagogical content knowledge that emphasizes what and how to teach. (2 The teacher professional knowledge and ability that student teachers used include instructional design, communicative counseling, and professionalism, indicating that internships are valuable for becoming a teacher. (3 The teacher professional knowledge and ability that student teachers emphasize are teaching commitment, curriculum design, and self-confidence, revealing that fostering community or social resources and teaching confidence must be enhanced. (4 Acquisition, use, and importance of teacher professional knowledge and ability do not differ according to gender, academic background, or location of the internship school. The relativity of reflective thinking with instruction design is the highest, and pedagogical content knowledge and teaching commitment do not differ significantly. (5 The relativities among the three assessments of teacher professional knowledge and ability are all positive. It dedicated that participants had a considerable degree of common knowledge and abilities from framework of education professional curriculum.

  10. Transition Management: The Student Teacher's Achilles Heel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dawn Vincent

    Classroom observation of four student teachers during the first, seventh, and fourteenth weeks of their teaching semester focused on their management of transition periods between lesson segments. Videotapes and stimulated recall analysis of the differences revealed that: (1) the most effective student teachers averaged fewer transitions per…

  11. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  12. Teacher Expectations of the Communication Apprehensive Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Kristi A.; Comadena, Mark E.

    Previous studies have revealed that the correlation between communication apprehension (CA) and academic achievement may be significantly different for male and female elementary school students. A study investigated the effects of CA, sex of student, and three teacher characteristics on teacher expectations of academic achievement. Subjects, 221…

  13. Florida Teachers' Attitudes about Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Samantha R.; Meisels, Gerry G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of Florida teachers reveals many differences in comfort level with teaching evolution according to the state's science teaching standards, general attitudes and beliefs about evolution, and the extent to which teachers are criticized, censured, disparaged, or reprehended for their beliefs about the teaching of evolution.

  14. DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY IN TECHNOPEDAGOGICAL KNOWLEDGE COMPETENCIES OF PRE-SERVICE GERMAN TEACHERS

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    Bahar ???GÜZEL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the level of proficiency in technopedagogical knowledge competencies of pre-service German teachers. The participants of the study consist of 335 pre-service German teachers from nine higher education institutions in Turkey during the 2012–2013 education year. The data were collected by the “Technopedagogical Education Competency Scale” and a set of questions. The results reveal that pre-service German teachers had a high level technopedagogical knowledge competency. The teachers also have a high level of the four technopedagogical knowledge factors design, exertion, ethics and proficiency. The teachers have the highest level of technopedagogical knowledge competency by the factor proficiency and the least level by the factor ethics. The result of the analyses shows that there was a significant difference between the pre-service German teachers` level of proficiency in technopedagogical knowledge competency and the independent variables: having a personal computer, frequency of internet usage, an easy access to internet and following the technological developments in the field of German language teaching. Consequently, there was no significant difference between the pre-service German teachers’ level of proficiency in technopedagogical knowledge competency and the independent variables: gender and academic average. The results show that the participants have no significant difference among these independent variables.

  15. How Should an Effective Performance Appraisal Be: EFL Teachers’ Perspective

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    Holi Ibrahim Holi Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is set to examine EFL teachers’ perceptions, views about what makes an effective performance appraisal system by adopting a quantitative survey design for data collection. A total number of 45 college instructors in the Sultanate of Oman responded to survey on: how is an effective performance appraisal perceived by EFL teachers? How do teachers perceive their participation in developing the appraisal system? And how might the present performance appraisal practices be improved? The result reveals that staff participation in developing performance appraisal system and goals, feedback confidentiality, quality appraiser, quality of place and time of appraisal, appraiser-appraisee relationships, and developmental nature of performance appraisal would help in making effective appraisal and the overall PA effectiveness depends mostly on these factors. The result has a significant implication for improving the process of teacher performance appraisal in Oman and enriches the body knowledge of PA in general. The study puts forwards suggestions and recommendations for improving PA practices and exercises in EFL contexts.Keywords: Effective Performance appraisal, FL teachers' perceptions, critical errors in performance appraisal, Colleges instructors in the Sultanate of Oman

  16. Opinions of the Geography Teacher Candidates toward Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyihoglu, Aysegul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the opinions of the teacher candidates about mind mapping technique used in Geography education of undergraduate program. In this study, the qualitative research techniques were used. The study group consists of 55 teacher candidates. The teacher candidates have been asked for their opinions about the process…

  17. Main Factors of Teachers' Professional Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to reveal the main factors of teachers' professional well being. Theoretically constructed model was tested on large scale data belong to 72.190 teachers working at lower secondary level. Theoretical model included teachers' individual, professional and organizational characteristics. Professional well-being…

  18. Interpersonal Behaviour Styles of Primary Education Teachers during Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell; den Brok, Perry; Waldrip, Bruce; Dorman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the first development in Australia of primary science teacher typologies of teacher-student interpersonal behaviour, which was measured by students' perceptions using the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI). Earlier work with the QTI in The Netherlands has revealed eight different interpersonal styles, which were later…

  19. Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boz, Yezdan; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the beliefs of Turkish prospective chemistry teachers about teaching chemistry, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 prospective teachers. Analysis of the interviews revealed that most of the prospective teachers held intermediate (transition between constructivist and traditional) beliefs about chemistry teaching.…

  20. Influence of Children's Physical Attractiveness on Teacher Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenealy, Pamela; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Ratings of the physical attractiveness of 11-to-12-year-old children were obtained, and the association between physical attractiveness and teachers' judgements of these children were examined. Teachers revealed a systematic tendency to rate girls higher than boys, and significant sex differences were observed in teachers' ratings of…

  1. Teachers' Use and Children's Preferences of Rewards in Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzo, John W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined teacher reports of reward use and students' preferences for rewards across elementary school grades. Findings revealed high reward use by teachers. Children reported a wide variety of reward preferences, with no significant gender or age differences found. There was no clear relationship between teacher use and children's preferences.…

  2. The Attitudes of Teachers and Students towards Using Arabic in EFL Classrooms in Saudi Public Schools- A Case Study

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    Haifa Al-NOFAIE

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the attitudes of Saudi teachers and students towards employing Arabic as a facilitating tool in English classes, a topic which has gained wide attention recently. The present study was a case study which investigated teachers' and students' attitudes towards this issue in a Saudi intermediate school for females. To reach a clear understanding of this issue, the study focused on one intermediate classroom which had 30 students and three teachers of English in the entire school. Three research tools were used for gathering data: questionnaires, interviews and four observations of one classroom. The results revealed that the attitudes of the teachers and the students about using Arabic were generally positive. The participants preferred using Arabic in certain situations and for specific reasons. Although the attitudes of the teachers and the students received agreements, there were other points on which they disagreed. Recommendations for future studies and solutions were discussed.

  3. Cross Cultural Marketing Teachers' Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Natalia; Boluda, Ines Kuster

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Marketing has attracted increased interested over the past 15 years in both academic and commercial circles and there has been a market rise in the number of students. At the university level, the characteristics of the teacher play an essential role in student/teacher interaction and influence academic results and future professional…

  4. Teachers' Verbal Abuse: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    In a case involving a somewhat sarcastic elementary teacher, a Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court reversed the state commissioner of education's affirmation of her dismissal based on persistent negligence. Results of teachers' alleged verbal abuse of students depends on the nature of the claim, not just specific evidence. (MLH)

  5. Butterflies, Bugs, and Supervising Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Sid T.

    This study replicated one conducted in Texas in 1979. Student teachers were asked to list the beautiful things their supervising teachers did for them as well as the things that "bugged" them. Comparison of the results of the 1979 and 1989 studies indicated that the positive factors in the relationships were very similar. Positive factors…

  6. Teachers' Perceptions about Grammar Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Tran Hoang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates English as a second language (ESL) teachers' beliefs in grammar teaching. A 32-item questionnaire was administered to 11 ESL teachers in a language school in California. The results show that the participants generally believe that the formal study of grammar is essential to the eventual mastery of a foreign or second…

  7. Can Teachers Cope with Creationism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Craig

    1981-01-01

    The creation/evolution controversy has gained renewed popularity in the last few years. This has resulted in serious implications for science teachers. All classroom teachers need to protect themselves by learning the distinctions between scientific law and theory and to acquire knowledge of the various theories of evolution. (JN)

  8. Effective science teachers: Their content knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debbie Kinne

    Subject matter and pedagogy have been components of teacher education since its origin, and research shows that they will continue to be debated in research and policy circles (Sosniak, 1999). Both components of teacher education are necessary, and research exists in both areas; however, explicit research about the content knowledge involved in effective teaching is lacking. This study focuses on the content knowledge of effective secondary science teachers and the role their content knowledge plays in planning and instruction. Case studies were developed for National Board Certified chemistry teachers. Data collected included classroom observations, interviews, concept maps, and classroom materials. The data were analyzed using the theoretical frameworks of Wertsch (1998), Shulman (1987), and Applebee (1996), and five themes were revealed. First, the teachers had various depths of content knowledge. Second, all of the teachers had experience working in a scientific laboratory; they had experience "doing" science. Third, each of the teachers planned with the goals of their students in mind. Fourth, all of the teachers were able to relate chemistry to the lives of their students. And finally, each of the teachers cited the context of his or her situation as being integral in decision making regarding planning and instruction. These findings were compared with literature in science teacher education to extend the possible implications. The themes have implications for teacher education programs, including the importance of (1) student knowledge, (2) discussing content in relationship to teaching, (3) scientific laboratory research, and (4) determining good and bad instructional representations.

  9. Are Emotionally Intelligent EFL Teachers More Satisfied Professionally?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Hekmatzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that Intelligence Quotient (IQ is an important factor in one’s success in terms of working environment, it is believed that emotional quotient or EQ plays a more important role. With that in mind, this study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of English as Foreign Language (EFL teachers who work at private language institutes in Iran/Shiraz. Furthermore, this study tried to answer whether there is a significant difference between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of Iranian’s EFL teachers in terms of gender.  A 90-item Bar-On questionnaire was used to measure the teachers’ emotional intelligence; also, a modified version of Karavas’s (2010 job satisfaction scale was used to see how satisfied our teachers are with their teaching career. To answer the research question, Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient statistical test was run. The results showed that there was a positive and significant correlation between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction of EFL teachers in Iran/Shiraz. Furthermore, the results revealed that there was a statistically significant difference in emotional intelligence between EFL male and female teachers, but there was no statistically significant relationship between Iranian EFL teachers’ job satisfaction in terms of gender. Based on our findings, it is suggested that some preparatory courses aiming at enhancing the important psychological traits such as emotional intelligence should be incorporated in educational programs designed for novice teachers so that it will contribute to pedagogical improvement.Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Job satisfaction, EFL teachers

  10. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Reflection on Narrative Images of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Christine M.; Davis, Elizabeth A.

    2009-06-01

    Preservice elementary teachers face challenges in learning to teach science. Educative curriculum materials, designed to promote teacher learning, can provide support for overcoming these challenges. The educative curriculum materials used in this study provide narrative vignettes describing a teacher’s decision making with regard to lesson plans. As part of an elementary science methods course, 40 preservice teachers were asked to reflect on and respond to the narratives. Results suggest that descriptions of teaching situated in lesson plans can promote productive reflection for preservice teachers. This study informs the design of educative curriculum materials and elementary science teacher education experiences and helps improve the pedagogical content knowledge of elementary science teacher educators.

  11. Whistle-Blowing Intentions of Prospective Teachers: Education Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Asiye Toker Gökçe

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whistle-blowing intentions of prospective teachers. Firstly, overall ethical awareness of the participants was examined, and then their underlying ethical reasons of whistle-blowing were investigated. Besides, impact on the intention to blow whistle to internal or external parties offering their job guarantee were searched. Three ethical dilemmas were constructed in three scenarios, and The Multi-dimensional Ethics Scale was used in the study. The results revealed that...

  12. Teacher Enhancement Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bradley, Tina

    1994-01-01

    During the 1980's, a period of intense concern over educational quality in the United States, few indicators of U.S. student achievement garnered the interest of policy makers and pundits as successfully as the results of international testing in mathematics and science. This concern was so great that as a part of the Goals 2000 initiative, President George Bush indicated that 'By the year 2000, U.S. students should be first in the world in mathematics and science.' The Clinton Administration is placing a major emphasis, not only on rigorous academic standards and creating a new system for assessing students' progress, but also including professional development as a major focus. The argument being that teachers need more sustained, intensive training to prepare them to teach to higher standards. Executive order 12821 mandates that national laboratories 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science'. These and other issues led to the development of ideas for a project that addresses the need for excellence in mathematics, science and technology instruction. In response to these initiatives the NASA/LaRC Teacher Enhancement Institute was proposed. The TEI incorporated systemic reform perspectives, enhanced content knowledge for teachers, and teacher preparation. Emphasis was also placed on recruiting those educators who teach in impoverished urban school districts with at-risk student populations who have been traditionally under represented in science, mathematics, technology and engineering. Participants in the Teacher Enhancement Institute were 37 teachers from grades K-8, teaching in Region 2 in the state of Virginia, as well as 2 preservice teachers from Norfolk State University and one teacher from Dublin, Virginia, where a Science/Mathematics model school has been established. Teachers selected for this project represented school systems where income levels are extremely low, and students served tend not to receive innovative instruction in mathematics and science and their use of technology is limited. The Teacher Enhancement Institute contained several features, that when combined, allowed for a unique experience. Some of these features included local teachers, administrators and school board members as presenters, instruction and use of technology every day, tours of select features of the research facility, briefings by NASA/LaRC scientists, engineers and researchers as well as individuals from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Another unique feature of this program is to have participants convene on three separate occasions throughout the academic year to discuss strategies for information dissemination and implementation results. Teachers' attitudes towards the use of technology, their ability to develop lessons using technology and their ability to develop lessons using information obtained through TEI were assessed using instruments developed by TEI summer faculty members. Data from these instruments were analyzed and reported in a final report submitted to the director of the Office of Education.

  13. Child-to-Teacher Ratio and Day Care Teacher Sickeness Absenteeism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GØrtz, Mette; Andersson, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The literature on occupational health points to work pressure as a trigger of sickness absence. However, reliable, objective measures of work pressure are in short supply. This paper uses Danish day care teachers as an ideal case for analysing whether work pressure measured by the child-to-teacher ratio, that is, the number of children per teacher in an institution, affects teacher sickness absenteeism. We control for individual teacher characteristics, workplace characteristics, and family background characteristics of the children in the day care institutions. We perform estimations for two time periods, 2002–2003 and 2005–2006, by using generalized method of moments with lagged levels of the child-to-teacher ratio as instrument. Our estimation results are somewhat mixed. Generally, the results indicate that the child-to-teacher ratio is positively related to short-term sickness absence for nursery care teachers, but not for preschool teacher

  14. Predicting Teachers' Achievement Goals for Teaching: The Role of Perceived School Goal Structure and Teachers' Sense of Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, YoonJung; Shim, Sungok Serena

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated contextual and personal factors associated with teachers' achievement goals for teaching. A total of 211 teachers completed an online survey. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that perceived school mastery goal structure and performance goal structure predicted teachers' mastery goals and…

  15. Relationship among science teacher personality characteristics and degree of teacher classroom implementation after in-service workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechler, Phares Lochiel Coleman

    State departments of public instruction require that teachers periodically update their licenses throughout their teaching careers. Various professional development events such as in-service workshops, university offerings, and special innovative programs provide opportunities for novice and experienced teachers to grow professionally. The "Team Science" workshop was designed from models supported by research that described guidelines for successful workshop strategies. In evaluating the workshop, the question was asked "Why did not all teachers implement the ideas from the workshop in their science classrooms?" This study investigates the possible relationship between teacher personality characteristics and implementation of technology innovations. Team Science was an extensive workshop program planned to develop science teachers' expertise in using computer and video technology to teach in physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms in rural school in North Carolina. Upon evaluating the four-year effort, it was found that the 23 participants implemented the technological strategies at various levels. At the higher end of the range of technology use, some teachers exhibited complete integration of the computers and interfacing devices into both the laboratory work and the classroom inquiry. At the lower end of the range, some teachers used the technology very little. The resulting question emerged from the data collected: Do specific teacher personality characteristics (independent variables) correlate with the degree of implementation (dependent variable) of the innovative ideas and tools used in the teacher's science classroom after the in-service workshop? To determine if there were any significant personality traits, each teacher was given five personality tests. The tests were Hunt's Conceptual Development Test, the Paragraph Completion Test; James Rest's Defining Issues Test; Simmons Personal Survey, an emotional tendency test; the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; and Riggs and Enochs Self-Efficacy Test. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression, and factor analysis to see what variables were predictors of implementation. The regression analysis revealed that subtests from Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Simmons Personal Survey, Hunt's Paragraph Completion Test, and Rest's Defining Issues Test could be used to predict implementation. Factor analysis indicated teachers who implemented the technology were "risk takers" and "flexible planners."

  16. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    , locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study of...... virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning...

  17. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability of the nation's preservice agricultural education teachers. Based on the results of this study, preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems, and agricultural teacher education programs require basic and intermediate mathematics as their…

  18. Teachers with a Passion for the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Patricia H.; Benson, Tammy R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe commonalities among teachers who have sustained passion for the teaching profession, identify ways to instill a similar passion in teacher education candidates, and encourage teacher educators to maintain and model an enthusiastic passion. The authors present the results of a study that consisted of…

  19. Reshaping Teacher Education through the Professional Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Margery; Forde, Christine; Dickson, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The current policy gaze on teacher quality is resulting in significant shifts in how teacher education is conceptualized, designed and delivered. Traditional approaches to teacher preparation and continuing professional development (CPD) are being challenged, and often displaced, by new models that expedite the process and experience of becoming a…

  20. Why Teachers Need To Be Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolloff, Penny Britton

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses survey results indicating teachers are not reading books for pleasure. The benefits of having teachers who know a vast repertoire of literature are discussed, along with strategies for encouraging reading in teacher education programs, including mentioning authors in class discussions and asking students about their favorite…

  1. A Study on Student Teachers' Misconceptions and Scientifically Acceptable Conceptions About Mass and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, Selahattin

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were considered under three headings. The first was to elicit misconception that science and physics student teachers (pre-service teachers) had about the terms, ``inertial mass'', ``gravitational mass'', ``gravity'', ``gravitational force'' and "weight". The second was to understand how prior learning affected their misconceptions, and whether teachers' misconceptions affected their students' learning. The third was to determine the differences between science and physics student teachers' understanding levels related to mass and gravity, and between their logical thinking ability levels and their attitudes toward physics lessons. A total of 267 science and physics student teachers participated in the study. Data collection instruments included the physics concept test, the logical thinking ability test and physics attitude scale. All instruments were administered to the participants at the end of the 3rd semester of their university years. The physics test consisting of paper and pencil test involving 16 questions was designed, but only four questions were related to mass and gravity; the second test consisted of 10 questions with two stages. The third test however, consisted of 15 likert type items. As a result of the analysis undertaken, it was found that student teachers had serious misconceptions about inertia, gravity, gravitational acceleration, gravitational force and weight concepts. The results also revealed that student teachers generally had positive attitudes toward physics lessons, and their logical thinking level was fairly good.

  2. Personal Digital Assistants - teachers prefer the personal

    OpenAIRE

    Wishart, Jocelyn

    2006-01-01

    This paper was presented at the Mlearn 06 conference in Banff October 2006. It presents the results of a small-scale project, funded by the UK Teacher Development Agency, where 13 teachers and 3 trainee teachers in one secondary school science department were given handhelds (Personal Digital Assistants or PDAs) with cameras and internet access for the academic year. The aims were: * to build capacity - enabling trainee teachers to share their mlearning practice; * to enable school based asso...

  3. VIOLENCE AGAINST TEACHERS- RULE OR EXCEPTION?

    OpenAIRE

    Siniša Opi?; Maja Lokmi?; Vesna Bili?

    2013-01-01

    Abstract- The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence of violence against teachers by students. The study included 175 teachers, five primary and five secondary schools. The age of respondents (teachers) ranges from 20 to 65, with average age being 44,33 years. The used  instrument has assessed violence against teachers and has consisted of  data about the characteristics of respondents, frequency and type of violence experienced from students.The results suggest that violence ag...

  4. The Social Cognitive Model of Job Satisfaction among Teachers: Testing and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Masood A.; Mohaidat, Jihad; Ferrandino, Vincent; El Mourad, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    The study empirically tests an integrative model of work satisfaction (0280, 0140, 0300 and 0255) in a sample of 5,022 teachers in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The study provided more support for the Lent and Brown (2006) model. Results revealed that this model was a strong fit for the data and accounted for 82% of the variance in work…

  5. Factors Affecting Learners' Attention to Teacher Talk in Nine ESL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqing

    2015-01-01

    With classroom observation and stimulated recall interviews as research instruments, the present study investigated some of the factors that affected learners' attention to teacher talk in nine English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms. The results revealed five such factors, namely, learners' self evaluation of their language knowledge, the…

  6. Motivating Pre-Service Teachers in Technology Integration of Web 2.0 for Teaching Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Jang, Hwan Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of pre-service teachers' use of Web 2.0 tools during a teaching internship, after a course that emphasized the use of the tools for instructional activities. Results revealed that integrating Web 2.0 tools during their teaching internship was strongly predicted by participants' perceived…

  7. Selected Characteristics and Perceptions of Rural School Teachers, Administrators and School Board Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Luiza B.; And Others

    A review of partial results of a survey of 265 rural schools in the North Central Association's 9 westernmost states revealed interesting trends in the characteristics of rural school personnel. Among the 192 teachers, 43 principals, and 46 school board members responding to the survey, women held fewer leadership positions than men, who held 91%…

  8. Examining Elementary Education Pre-Service Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Beste ÇEV?K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary education pre-service teachers? self-efficacy beliefs by gender, grade level and age. Participants were 163 elementary education pre-service teachers. An instrument titled “Music Education Self-Efficacy Scale” (Afacan, 2008 was used as a means of data collection. Descriptive statistics and t test was used to analyze the data. Results revealed that elementary education pre-service teachers? music education self-efficacy was, in general, moderate. Results revealed that participants? self-efficacy beliefs differ by gender, grade level and age. Women?s self-efficacy beliefs were higher than men. Junior (3rd year students? self-efficacy was higher than sophomores (2nd year. Similarly, self-efficay scores of particiapants with an age of between 22 and 24 was higher than those with an age of between 19–21.

  9. Representation of Teachers’ Identity in EFL Classroom Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meinarni Susilowati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This sociocultural linguistic study aimed investigating the teachers’ identity representation in their classroom interactions. This study was conducted by considering the significant roles the teachers played in orchestrating classroom activities which involved the accumulation of the teachers’ efforts, values and beliefs. The findings revealed that the teachers exposed their identity in differentways for both different roles and local positioning which were culturally, socially, politically, and religiously constructed. The teachers also perceived their identity which could be clustered into four broad areas which showed their understanding and the significant functions of their identity representation. Some pedagogical implications were derived from these findingsKey Words: teachers’ identity representation, classroom interactions

  10. Job Satisfaction and Performance of School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chamundeswari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a highly noble profession and teachers are always a boon to the society. The ultimate process of education could be simplified as a meaningful interaction between the teacher and the taught. The teacher thus plays a direct and crucial role in moulding a pupil towards education. Since a teacher is a role model for the students, job satisfaction and eventually performance of teachers become very vital in the fields of education. Thus the researcher felt the need to investigate the job satisfaction and performance of teachers in different categories of schools following different systems of education. From the total population, a sample of 196 teachers from state board schools, 198 teachers from matriculation board schools and 194 teachers from central board schools were drawn. The results of the study indicated that teachers in central board schools were significantly better in their job satisfaction and performance compared to their counterparts in matriculation and state board schools. This may be attributed to the fact that central board school teachers enjoy better infrastructure facilities and congenial working environment than the matriculation and state board teachers. It is for the school authorities, policy makers and society at large to ensure factors contributing to job satisfaction of teachers to the maximum possible extent and thereby enhancing their teaching perforrmance to its optimum.

  11. Evidence, explanations, and recommendations for teachers' field trip strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Bryan

    Field trips are well recognized by researchers as an educational approach with the potential to complement and enhance classroom science teaching by exposing students to unique activities, resources, and content in informal settings. The following investigation addresses teachers' field trip practices in three related manuscripts: (1) A study examining the details of teachers' pedagogical strategies intended to facilitate connections between students' experiences and the school curricula while visiting an aquarium; (2) A study documenting and describing sources of knowledge that teachers draw from when leading field trips to an aquarium; (3) A position paper that reviews and summarizes research on effective pedagogical strategies for field trips. Together these three pieces address key questions regarding teachers' practices on field trips: (1) What strategies are teachers employing (and not employing) during self-guided field trips to facilitate learning tied to the class curriculum? (2) What sources of knowledge do teachers utilize when leading field trips? (3) How can teachers be better prepared to lead trips that promote learning? The Oregon Coast Aquarium served as the field trip site for teachers included in this study. The setting suited these questions because the aquarium serves tens of thousands of students on field trips each year but provides no targeted programming for these students as they explore the exhibits. In other words, the teachers who lead field trips assume much of the responsibility for facilitating students' experience. In order to describe and characterize teachers' strategies to link students' experiences to the curriculum, a number of teachers (26) were observed as they led their students' visit to the public spaces of the aquarium. Artifacts, such as worksheets, used during the visit were collected for analysis as well. Subsequently, all teachers were surveyed regarding their use of the field trip and their sources of knowledge for their practices. A subset of eight teachers were interviewed using guided conversations in order to shed further light on their use of the aquarium field trip and their pedagogical preparation. Data from all sources were organized by repeating ideas relevant to the questions of interest. The resulting evidence was interpreted to support distinct categories of teacher strategies and experience and related claims about these strategies and experiences. Thus, findings reveal that teachers attempt to link the curriculum to the activities, resources, and content encountered on the trip using a variety of connections. However, these curriculum connections are characterized as products of opportunistic situations and reveal limited depth. Evidence further indicates that teachers treat the aquarium visit as a background experience for their students rather than as an opportunity to introduce new concepts or do an activity that is integrated into the curriculum. Nevertheless, teachers included in this study were leading field trips that created countless learning opportunities for their students. Because training specific to field trips is rarely included in preservice programs, teachers were asked about influences on their field trip practice with specific focus on observed strategies. Findings suggest four categories of training experiences that teachers apply to their practice: (1) informal mentoring; (2) past experience trip leading; (3) outdoor education training; (4) traditional education training. Overall findings along with a review of previous research are suggestive of many ways in which efforts to enhance students' learning opportunities may be developed by means of support for teachers. Foremost among recommendations is the idea that field trip pedagogy be integrated into science methods courses required for preservice teachers (the premise for the final manuscript). Furthermore, the findings of this study may serve as a starting point for museums interested in the development of specific support and teacher professional development activities intended to enhance teachers' use of their resources as learning opportunities for their students. Among the implications is the idea that museums and other institutions developing teacher professional development activities might capitalize on teachers' existing sources of knowledge, for example by providing structured support for peer-mentoring and guided reflections related to field trip preparations and skills.

  12. Teachers at Sea with the ARMADA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Two science teachers accompanied an international scientific party of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program on a 6-week expedition to the high Arctic Ocean this summer. Kathy Couchon, a middle school science teacher from Narragansett, RI, was sponsored by the NSF-funded ARMADA Project (www.armadaproject.org), directed by the Office of Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island. Erik Zetterberg, a high school teacher from Sweden, was sponsored by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. The purpose of the expedition was to collect rock and sediment cores in order to reconstruct environmental and climatic conditions in the polar region over the past 60 million years. The $12.5M expedition involved over 200 people from more than 10 countries, three icebreakers, and two helicopters. Cores collected on one vessel were transferred to a laboratory on another, where 20 scientists analyzed microfossils as well as sedimentology, chemistry, and lithology. The teachers participated early in all aspects of the expedition, including coring operations, helicopter flights for ice reconnaissance, laboratory work, and science meetings. Formal education, such as learning how to prepare sediment samples for micropaleontological analysis, was complemented by informal education during one-on-one conversations with scientists over meals, or in social gatherings. The teachers posted reports regularly on websites (e.g., http://tea.rice.edu tea_cuchonfrontpage.html) and participated in a teleconference via Iridium satellite phone. When asked to compare preconceived notions with actual experience, the teachers noted the following: (1) there are many things that scientists don't know (and they are often the first to admit this); (2) the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery does not diminish with age and experience; (3) teamwork among the scientists was greater than expected, and competition among individuals was not observed; and (4) much in the natural world is unknown and opportunities exist to make major discoveries (in other words, science isn't dead). The scientists made the following observations regarding participation by the teachers: (1) they assisted in the laboratory, and got a taste of scientific research; (2) conversations revealed what they know, and how they convey it to students, and thus how scientists may assist in the educational process; (3) the teachers did not hesitate to ask basic questions, a healthy exercise, because it required the scientists to re-examine and re-explain some of their fundamental assumptions; (4) the presence of the teachers encouraged the scientists to describe their results in a manner that is more accessible to a wider audience; and (5) the teachers increased awareness among the scientists by reminding them about their responsibilities to the broader world, beyond their particular subdisciplines. Suggestions for enhancing the experience, for both the teachers and the scientists, will be presented.

  13. Development of Teachers as Scientists in Research Experiences for Teachers Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Courtney; Hardin, Emily; Klein-Gardner, Stacy; Benson, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the teachers' development as scientists for participants in three National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Teachers. Participants included secondary science and math teachers with varying levels of education and experience who were immersed in research environments related to engineering and science topics. Teachers' functionality as scientists was assessed in terms of independence, focus, relationships with mentors, structure, and ability to create new concepts. Hierarchies developed within these constructs allowed tracking of changes in functionality throughout the 6-week programs. Themes were further identified in teachers' weekly journal entries and exit interviews through inductive coding. Increases in functionality as scientists were observed for all teachers who completed both the program and exit interview ( n = 27). Seven of the 27 teachers reached high science functionality; however, three of the teachers did not reach high functionality in any of the constructs during the program. No differences were observed in demographics or teaching experience between those who did and did not reach high functionality levels. Inductive coding revealed themes such as teachers' interactions with mentors and connections made between research and teaching, which allowed for descriptions of experiences for teachers at high and low levels of functionality. Teachers at high functionality levels adjusted to open-ended environments, transitioned from a guided experience to freedom, felt useful in the laboratory, and were self-motivated. In contrast, teachers at low functionality levels did not have a true research project, primarily focused on teaching aspects of the program, and did not display a transition of responsibilities.

  14. Assessment Beliefs and Practices of Language Teachers in Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka?an Büyükkarc?

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of assessment, the process of collecting information on student achievement and performance, has long been advocated so that learning cycles can properly be planned; instruction can be adjusted during the course of learning, and programs can be developed to enhance student learning. Shifting to a more pedagogical conception, the assessment moves from source of information to an inseparable part of teaching and learning. Theory and research propose that especially formative assessment can play a critical role in adjusting teaching for student learning because assessment for learning (formative assessment provides information to be used as feedback to adjust the teaching and learning activities in which the students and teachers are engaged. This study aims to show primary school teachers’ beliefs about formative assessment. Besides, the study reveals the information about English language teachers’ real assessment practices in the primary education context. Despite course requirements, teachers’ positive beliefs and attitudes, the results of the study show that language teachers do not apply formative assessment practices as required in the national curriculum. Instead of using assessment formatively, they mostly use assessment for summative purposes.

  15. Investigating high school teachers’ views on cram schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sava? Ba?türk

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, the preparation process for the university entrance exam gives rise to the centres of private courses known as “dershane” which is the Turkish counterpart of cram schools. Dershanes has significant impact on high school education. Sure, people who directly feel positive or negative reflections of this impact are high school teachers.   The purpose of this study is to investigate high school mathematics teachers’ views on cram schools. To this end, a questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions was administered to 28 teachers from different high school in Anatolian side of Istanbul. Data were analyzed and interpreted by using document analysis as a qualitative research method.Some of the important results of this study revealed that according to the teacher, students are going to cram schools for gaining practice, learning test techniques and passing the university entrance exam. In the same time, the teachers are not very happy that cram schools become to an economic sector and they own alone students’ success in the exams.

  16. A STUDY ON THE DIFFICULTIES FACED BY PRESCHOOL TEACHERS IN THE PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doç. Dr. Adalet KANDIR

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Both teacher characteristics and professional knowledge and skills are required for teachers to offer quality preschool education. Even though teachers may know the basics of planning educational contexts, various reasons may bring them face to face with difficulties in planning and implementation. When such diffculties arise, support should be provided to teachers according to their needs so that quality preschool curricula emerge. Starting from this need, the present study aims to reveal the difficulties faced by preschool teachers in the planning and implementation of curricula and to offer suggestions accordingly.The study sample consisted of a total of 154 teachers working at private and official preschool education institutions in Ankara and Afyon. Data was collected by using a questionnaire with two sections. It included questions about teachers’ personal information and their views on planning educational contexts. The general data pertaining to teachers was analyzed with percentile and frequency values while Chi-Square test was used to analyze whether the teachers’ views on planning educational contexts varied with respect to variables such as their professional seniority, the institution they are working for and the type of school they graduated from.The results showed that the biggest difficulties teachers faced in preparing annual plans were distributing objectives and achievements over the year and evaluating the annual plan. At the same time, teachers were also found to experience difficulties with planning and evaluating the educational context in their daily plans. The first and foremost difficulty in connection with planning educational contexts seemed to be big class size, followed by materials selection and design, arranging the educational context, lack of physical facilities, attitude of families, selecting methods and techniques, respectively. A meaningful difference was also found between the type of institution that teachers were working for and the difficulties that arose when planning educational contexts (p<0,05. In light of these results, it may be suggested that the quality of education will be maximized if the size of preschool classes is reduced and the number of preschools increased; if school administrators are informed and appropriate measures are taken to improve the physical condition of classrooms such as space, materials, temperature and lighting, the lack of which may pose major problems in planning and implementing curricula; if preservice teachers, who initially experience more difficulties than senior teachers with regard to physical conditions, are taken to preschools with a diversity of conditions for their practice teaching during their university education so that they gain a multitude of rich experiences.

  17. The Teacher and Student as Pygmalions: Joint Effects of Teacher and Student Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.; Theiss, Andrew J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examined the joint effects of teachers' expectations about students and vice versa on the performance and attitudes of both participants. Results showed that student performance was a function of the teacher's expectations. (Author/GK)

  18. Evaluation of Teachers’ Instructional Technologies Integration Skills: A Qualitative Need Analysis for New Pedagogical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ad?güzel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at identifying the teachers’ needs of new pedagogical approaches in technology-assisted courses. Data were collected through semi-structured interview form from 12 voluntary teachers from different branches at a technology-supported private school. Findings showed that teachers perceived smart boards and PowerPoint presentations as the fundamentals in classes. Results also indicated that the participants had troubles of integrating technologies at times despite of participating training on the use of instructional technologies. The study also revealed that in technology supported courses excessive concentration on technology hinders dealing with the students, and that the students' individual characteristics were neglected. Finally, the findings of the study indicated that different teaching strategies and approaches were not applied, the authentic materials and models were not used in classes. In the study it is recommended that teachers should be informed about integration of technology and pedagogy.

  19. Southern Federal University in Relation to Teacher Education Modernization Project: Strategic Reflection of the Testing Results of Integrative Modules of the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” Research Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernaya A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of a strategic reflection of the Southern Federal University participation in the project of modernization of teacher education. It analyses how theoretical, methodological and organizational-activity basis of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research master’s program designed by Moscow State University of Psychology & Education relates to the strategic objectives of Southern Federal University. Priorities and forward-looking statements in the strategy for the training of specialists in education based on action-competence approach, integrative principle of educational modules construction, network forms of cooperation of educational institutions are shown. Basic methodological ideas of culturalhistorical psychology and activity theory and their applicability to the needs of modern education objectified in the draft are specially considered. The article presents the preliminary test results of integrative modules of research master’s program for Southern Federal University

  20. TEACHER NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  1. Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Elena K.

    The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

  2. Enhancing and Evaluating Prospective Teachers’ Techno-pedagogical Knowledge Integration Towards Science Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necati HIRÇA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate educational computer aided teaching materials (CATM which designed by skilled prospective class teachers towards 4 and 5th grade science level according to the principles of an educational software and teaching methods and techniques. Therefore, materials were firstly scored with an educational software assessment scale and findings were presented in the tables after calculated by Microsoft Excel. Secondly, prospective teachers’ using level of teaching methods and techniques, and measurement and assessment methods and techniques were revealed from their CATM's interface. The sample of the study was consisted 29 prospective class teachers. As a result of the study, although prospective teachers designed successive materials, it is understood that they have paid more attention to visual design properties and functionality such as linking between pages, colored backgrounds, interactive buttons, interactive guidance and assistance properties, and multi-media properties excluding principles of editing content criteria. They tried to present science subject by concept mapping, brainstorming, case study and demonstration as teaching methods/techniques with assessment techniques such as multiple-choice test, matching, concept map as assessment respectively. In general, the findings of the study showed that designing and developing CATM allowed prospective teachers to increase their educational technology competencies, self-esteem and confidence. In conclusion, it is revealed that prospective teachers are in need of experiences and environment about how to integrate pedagogy and technology knowledge.

  3. Teacher Performance of the State Vocational High School Teachers in Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiartuti Kusumaningtyas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Teacher Performance of the State Vocational High School Teachers in Surabaya   Dr. Amiartuti Kusumaningtyas, MM Faculty of Economics, 17 Agustus 1945 University, Surabaya, Indonesia Email: amiartuti.k@gmail.com Abstract State Vocational High School Teacher is a professional educator with major duties to educate, teach, build, direct, coach, assess and evaluate learners on the vocational high school education. Teacher as a professional educator should has the academic qualification. Academic qualification required for a teacher is he or she at least should be educated of bachelor degree or diploma four. Fundamentaly, teacher performance is determined by the expertise and ability of teacher concerned. These achievement factor is so thick and so critical in its relation to competence, compensation, and also job satisfaction that may become the obstacle in the enhancement of teacher performance. Population in this research was the teachers of the State Vocational High School Teachers in Surabaya, amounted to 317, educated in bachelor degree or diploma four, had have service of minimal 5 years. Data analysis used the simple random sampling, structural equation model (SEM analysis, by the assistance of PLS 2 software, conducted on 92 respondents and able to explain the effect of competence and compensation on the job satisfaction and the performance of the State Vocational High School Teachers in Surabaya. The results of research indicated that: Competence and compensation significantly influential on teacher job satisfaction;  Competence and compensation significantly influential on teacher performance; Teacher Job satisfaction signifiacntly influential on the performance of the State Vocational High School Teachers in Surabaya. The largest effect of the three variables hipothesized on teacher performance in this research was the direct relatedness between compensation and teacher performance.   Key Words: competence, compensation, teacher job satisfaction, teacher performance

  4. MODERN PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER’S TIFLOINFORMATION COMPETENCES ????????????????? ?????????????? ????????? ??????? ?????????? ??????

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.?. ?o????

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Tendencies of integration of visual impaired children to the mass schools as well as significant value of information-communication technologies (ICT in the education of these children require corresponding training of primary school teachers. The purpose of this article is to analyse the approaches to the concept of ICT-competence with further definition of primary school teacher’s tifloinformation competences. Literature analysis has discovered that there is no connection between ICT-competences and pupil with visual impairments yet. As a result, the list of primary school teacher’s tifloinformation competences was formulated. The objective of further investigations consist in the development of techniques essential for creation of corresponding competences.????????? ?? ???????? ????? ? ?????????? ???? ? ??????? ?????? ? ????????????? ????????????-?????????????? ?????????? (??? ????????? ????? ?????? ?? ??????????? ?????????? ???????? ?????????? ??????. ????? ?????? ? ?????? ???????? ?? ???????????? ??????? ???????????/?????????????? ? ?????? ??? ? ????????? ??????????? ?????? ??????????? ??????????????? ???????? ?????????? ??????, ??? ???????????? ??????? ???????????????????. ?? ???????? ??????? ??????????, ???????? ???????? ??? ??????????? ? ?????? ???-???????????/???????????????, ???'?????? ?? ???'????? ???????? ? ?????????? ???? ? ????????????? ??????? ?????????????????? ??????????????? ??????? ?????????? ??????. ????????? ??? ????????? ?????????? ? ???????? ??????? ?????????? ??????????? ???????????????.

  5. The Ideal Psychology Teacher: Qualitative Analysis of Views from Brunei GCE A-Level Students and Trainee Psychology Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Nurul Azureen Omar; Sri Ridhwanah Matarsat; Nur Hafizah Azmin; Veronica Chung Ai Wei; Mohd Mu izzuddin Mohd Nasir; Ummi Kalthum Syahirah Sahari; Masitah Shahrill; Lawrence Mundia

    2014-01-01

    We qualitatively explored the notion of the ideal teacher from the context of pre-university Brunei General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (GCE A-Level) psychology students and trainee psychology teachers. Both previous research and our own analyses on this concept revealed that the so-called ideal teacher was neither a perfect nor a super teacher but rather an effective instructor who was firm, fair, and a good communicator. Psychology students of various ability levels (high achiev...

  6. Importance in Instructional Text: Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Task Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekkamp, Hein; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; van den Bergh, Huub

    2002-01-01

    History teachers and their 11th-grade students rated the relative importance of sections of instructional text on which teachers would be giving a test. Multilevel analysis revealed only a moderate correspondence between teachers in importance ratings. This suggested there were large differences between task demands of individual teachers

  7. Teacher's creative competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Babicka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article's aim is to study what 180 Polish teachers understand by creativity and how they put it into practice. The Creative competency of teachers was evaluated, using 6 variables: 1 understanding of teaching as a creative action; 2 knowledge of opportunities and secure limits in implementing creative changes; 3 ability to create and change elements of classroom work; 4 understanding of educational entities and having the ability to act in order to increase the autonomy of such entities; 5 critical thinking; 6 ability to research their own practice. To do so both a semi-structured interview and direct observation in their classroom were utilized. Results point out the need to foster teachers' innovative and creative capabilities.

  8. Teachers as mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike; Pratt, Nick

    Within the context of lower secondary English teaching in South West England, this study identifies in broad terms the competing goals between which English teachers mediate and the explicit and hidden tensions that result. To understand the interactions of competing goals, teachers’ goal......-oriented behaviours are referenced to a set of idealised ‘role types’ based on the dimensions of goals, norms, discourses and practices. It is asserted that competing goals, significant to particular educational circumstances, emanate from various sometimes contradictory local, national and perhaps broader social and...... cultural influences on practice. Yet the teachers observed moved smoothly between goal-oriented behaviours in a continuous and comfortable style, easily and without reflecting any tensions between them. Thus, this article elaborates an account of situated English teaching....

  9. Life in the Pressure Cooker--School League Tables and English and Mathematics Teachers' Responses to Accountability in a Results-Driven Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, Jane; Ball, Stephen; Maguire, Meg; Braun, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on case-study research in four English secondary schools. It explores the pressure placed on English and mathematics departments because of their results being reported in annual performance tables. It examines how English and maths departments enact policies of achievement, the additional power and extra resources the pressure…

  10. Links between Mental and Behavioral Health among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS and Teachers’ Assessments of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Hongfei; LI, Xiaoming; WEINSTEIN, Traci L.; CHI, Peilian; ZHAO, Junfeng; ZHAO, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are considered to be one of the most important influences in the lives of students. Teachers’ assessments of students may be a primary source of information on children’s mental and behavioral health; however, this topic has received little attention in research. We examined this issue through linking teachers’ ratings of students and mental and behavioral outcomes of children affected by HIV. The hypothesis is that teacher ratings will be predictive of specific child mental and behavioral health outcomes. A quantitative cross-sectional design with self-administered paper-and-pencil instruments was used. The sample included 1221 children (ages 6-18, grades 1-11) affected by HIV including 755 orphans who lost one or both parents to AIDS and 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents in a central province of China. The corresponding teacher sample included 185 participants. Each child completed an assessment inventory of demographic information, mental and behavioral health measures. Teachers completed a questionnaire about children’s school performance. SEM analyses revealed a good model fit according to all fit indices, CFI = .93, RMSEA = .07, SRMR = .04. Structural equation modeling revealed that problem ratings by teachers were positively associated with child loneliness and behavioral problems, social competence ratings by teachers were negatively related to child depression, and personal growth and social interaction ratings by teachers were negatively related to child loneliness, depression, and trauma. The current study represents a unique contribution to the field, in that it recognizes that teachers can be a valuable source of information on children’s psychological health. Results from this study have implications for health prevention and intervention for children and families suffering from HIV /AIDS. PMID:25703050

  11. Critical viewpoint to early childhood education teachers’ well-being at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi Ylitapio-Mäntylä

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Early childhood education teachers’ happiness at work reflects in children. Finnish day care system has faced plenty of changes and they can also reflect in well-being at day care. The aim of this article to dissect the state of well-being and thriving at work in Finnish day care centers from early childhood education teachers’ point of view and to discuss how well-being could be promoted. The data comprises group interviews (N=9 collected with memory-work method among North-Finnish early childhood education teachers (N=4. The results revealed that several factors were reported as threatening early childhood education teachers’ well-being. These kinds of factors were, among others, increasing amount of administrative tasks as well as concern about their educational task becoming narrower, the sufficiency of one’s own resources, and how the economic measures for efficiency have started to extend to day care as well. Perceived well-being increases when early childhood education teachers have time to encounter an individual child and concentrate on their basic work, rearing and teaching children. Based on the findings, suggestions how to enhance early childhood education teachers’ well-being are discussed. Promotion of well-being necessitates development actions both at the level of society, day care system and early childhood education teachers’ personal level. In this article, we highlight how organizational structures enhance or hinder well-being.

  12. Resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Melanie S.

    This study examined the resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills. Reading instruction in the middle school years should follow the natural cognitive progression that occurs in the adolescent brain from learning to read to reading to learn. Scientific reading is a different type of reading than most middle school students are accustomed to. It is important to understand that students will continue to be expected to read non-fiction critically for success in the 21st century. Effective teachers know this, and they perceive themselves as teachers of reading regardless of the content area in which their expertise lies. This qualitative research study was conducted at a rural middle school with three science teachers who employ before, during, and after literacy strategies when reading the textbook content with their students. The methodologies used in this study were interviews, observations, and document collection. The results of this study revealed the students' reading difficulties perceived by the teacher participants, the literacy strategies used by the teacher participants, the instructional resources the teacher participants used to improve comprehension, and the need for professional development in content area literacy.

  13. Critical Friends Group for EFL Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Long Thanh; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2010-01-01

    For the best student outcomes, teachers need to engage in continuous professional development. As a result, models of teacher professional development have been developed, among which is the Critical Friends Group (CFG) technique. However, whether it works well with EFL teachers in an Asian context like Vietnam, where EFL teachers in particular do…

  14. language teachers

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Le Rosey Institute at Rolle (autumn and spring) and Gstaad (winter) is looking for part-time language teachers of 
Bulgarian, Farsi, Hindi, Korean and Romanian for the start of the autumn term in September 2007. For further details, please contact : www.rosey.ch Please send applications with CVs to job@rosey.ch

  15. Teacher workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  16. Adult teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I examine the research into the process of adult teachers’ practice-based learning as a part of an on-going project titled “Competence development through practice-based learning – a study of adult teacher’s learning processes”. The project relies on the notion of the adult teacher as...

  17. Organization a Culture of Self-Education of Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyganova, Elena Aleksandrovna; Yavgildina, Ziliya Mukhtarovna

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the culture of self-education of music teacher as a professionally necessary quality of a modern specialist in the field of music education. The author proposes finalized definitions of basic concepts; consistently reveals the essence, structure, criteria and indicators of self-culture of music teacher; reveals the potential…

  18. Teachers' Understanding of Learning Goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog Skott, Charlotte; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    The national curriculum for Danish primary and lower secondary schools has recently changed in a goal-oriented direction. The intention is to increase the teachers´ and students´attention to learning outcome, by making learning goals visible. Danish surveys show that teachers did not use the previous curriculum in the intended way in relation to goals (Danmarks Evaluerings Institut, 2012). The surveys also indicate that teachers in general do not articulate learning goals (Skovgaard et al, 2014). Our research investigates how the requirements for goal-orientation influence teachers' practice in mathematics and Danish-as-a-Mother-Tongue in regard to planning, teaching and assessment. Our research is framed by an explorative design. The informants take part in the research- and development project “Digitally Supported Learning Goals”. In addition to observe teaching, we conduct qualitative interviews with 20-30 affiliated teachers before and after the intervention. Each interview is conducted after an observation of a lesson performed by the teacher. For analyzing the interviews, we are inspired by grounded theory (Charmaz 2006). At the congress, preliminary results based on the interviews will be presented. We expect to deepen our understanding of the relations between the various parameters in the teachers' practice in relation to learning goals and goal-oriented teaching. There is conducted research on the effects of goal-oriented teaching on students' learning both internationally and in the Nordic countries (Skaalvik & Skaalvik, 2013; Hattie, 2009). Our study contributes by exploring how goal-oriented teaching influence teachers' practices.

  19. Infusing Science, Technology, and Society Into an Elementary Teacher Education Program: The Impact on Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Mary Beth; Peterson, Barbara R.; King, Kenneth Paul

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve science and social studies instruction, preservice teachers developed original science, technology, and society units to teach in elementary and middle school classrooms during their clinical field experience. Data revealed that the preservice teachers fell into categories of being skeptics, open-minded instructors, or…

  20. The Networked Teacher: How New Teachers Build Social Networks for Professional Support. Series on School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

    2011-01-01

    New teachers need support from their peers and mentors to locate resources, information, new ideas, emotional support, and inspiration. This timely book explains the research and theory behind social networks (face-to-face and online), describes what effective social networking for educators looks like, reveals common obstacles that new teachers…

  1. Attitudes of Teacher Education Students toward Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. H.; And Others

    Cognitive dissonance theory implies that teacher education students will optimally internalize and most fully use pedagogical learnings compatible with their attitude systems. In order to determine the self-reported attitudes of teacher education students toward teachers, a pilot-study sample of graduate students reacted to four teacher-types…

  2. Teacher Efficacy and Career Indecision among Pre-Service Teachers: A Model of Direct and Indirect Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Mary Beth; Hancock, Mary D.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigates, through path analytic techniques, the influence of teacher efficacy on the career indecision of pre-service teachers. The sample consists of 305 students enrolled in Teacher Education programs at two southeastern universities. Results indicate that general teacher efficacy and career self-efficacy have significant…

  3. Teacher Leaders: Boosting Teacher Effectiveness and Student Achievement. The Progress of Education Reform. Volume 11, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Commission of the States (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Teacher leaders are teachers who aspire to stretch beyond their classrooms to engage in leadership roles that take many shapes and forms, both "informal" and "formal." These teachers view the school as a whole, see the "big picture" and focus on how they can help improve aspects of the school to result in increases in student achievement. Teacher…

  4. Teachers' beliefs about culturally relevant teaching in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Jackson, Charlease Plushette

    In many of our nations' schools, African American students are experiencing inequitable opportunities to quality science. Since science teachers are one of the most influential factors on science learning and they are charged with instructing African American students, their beliefs and practices are vital to the understanding of this paradox. This mixed method study sought to investigate science teachers' beliefs about the importance of culturally relevant teaching in the classroom and their beliefs about critical issues and practices of culturally relevant teaching. Two research questions guided the conceptualization and implementation of this study: (1) Do science teachers believe culturally relevant teaching is an important part of their instruction; (2) What are science teachers' perceptions about critical issues and practices of culturally relevant teaching? The study was conducted in three phases. Survey data in Phase One revealed that 100% of the respondents believed culturally relevant teaching is important when working with culturally diverse students. Data also showed a significant consensus among the following pluralist statements; 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 16, and 17. The statement, "culturally relevant practice is essential for creating an inclusive classroom environment" was endorsed (75%) by the respondents while 25% strongly agreed with the statement. Similarly, respondents strongly agreed (75%) with the statement "encouraging respect for cultural diversity is essential for creating an inclusive classroom environment" while 25% agreed. Interview results in Phase Two revealed that teachers had a general idea about culturally relevant pedagogy. Data further showed that three of the four teachers supported culturally relevant teaching in theory, but their support was not reflected in their daily classroom instruction. Misconceptions and/misunderstandings about culturally relevant teaching fell under several common themes: knowledge, teacher beliefs, practices and implementations, and barriers and challenges. Phase Three illustrated a case of culturally relevant science teaching in a holistic manner by way of interviews, observations, and documents. Documents (i.e. lesson plans, student assignments, philosophy of teaching statement, and students' standardized assessment results) collected from one exemplary teacher further illustrated how culturally relevant teaching is demonstrated in a science classroom.

  5. The effects of a four-semester pre-service secondary teacher education program on the perceptions and practices of pre-service science teachers concerning constructivist perspectives to teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masene, Robert Sinvula

    This is an exploratory study that examines: (a) changes in pre-service teachers philosophical and pedagogical conceptions concerning teaching and learning, (b) changes in pre-service teachers' perceptions concerning the instruction they received in their methods courses, and (c) the relationships among pre-service teachers pedagogical and philosophical conceptions, perceptions about the methods course instruction and their own instructional practices, and their actual instructional practices as revealed on videotapes over a four-semester sequence. A sample of thirty-six pre-service teachers (18 males and 18 females) from the Iowa-SSTEP four-semester sequence volunteered to participate in the study. Three instruments were used to generate the main data to answer the research questions. The three instruments were: (a) Teachers Pedagogical and Philosophical Interview (TPPI), (b) Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), and (c) videotape portfolio evaluated with the Expert Science Teaching Evaluation Model (ESTEEM). Major results include the following: (1) As pre-service teachers enrolled in a four-semester sequence progressed through the teacher education program, their conceptions concerning teaching and learning became significantly and increasingly more student-centered in terms of what students need to do to enhance their understanding of science concepts and processes as well as in their espoused philosophies of teaching and learning. (2) Pre-service teachers integrated their newly acquired student-centered conceptions from their methods courses, with their previous teacher-centered conceptions to develop mixed conceptions about teaching and learning. (3) Pre-service teachers' espoused conceptions and their perceptions about classroom practices rarely align observed teaching practices in their classroom. (4) Pre-service teacher cohort level in the Iowa-SSTEP sequence proved to have a positive and significant effect on pre-service teachers' constructivist practices of teaching and learning. Their student-centered practices increased as they ascended the hierarchy of the Iowa-SSTEP four-semester sequence. (5) Though reported conceptions, perceptions, and practices were increasingly student-centered as pre-service teachers progressed through the teacher education program, they were characterized as both teacher-centered and student-centered indicating that they retained some teacher-centered beliefs.

  6. Using authentic intellectual assessment to determine level of instructional quality of teacher practice of new elementary school teachers based on teacher preparation route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Kimberly E.

    This study was designed to determine whether or not differences existed in the effectiveness between teachers from traditional and alternative teacher preparation routes. The NCLB requirement of having a highly qualified teacher in every classroom has brought close attention to the assessment of teacher effectiveness and the preparation of teacher candidates. The study population included elementary school teachers, within their first three years of teaching who taught science, from five southeastern Virginia schools. For this study, an authentic intellectual assessment rubric created by Newmann, Bryk, and Nagaoka (1997) was utilized to measure teacher effectiveness in terms of the level of instructional quality of new teachers. Chi-square and t test analyses were conducted to investigate the difference between scores of science lesson assignments of new elementary teachers based on type of teacher preparation route the teachers completed. The critical finding of the study was that whereas there were no statistically significant differences in the science assignment scores between traditionally and alternatively prepared teachers, there were significant weaknesses in all teacher participants in the areas of construction of knowledge and connection to students' lives. The results of this study have implications for teachers, teacher preparation routes, teacher development coordinators of school divisions, and those in charge of instructional policies.

  7. Gender equity: A study of classroom interactions of sixth-grade science teachers before and after gender equity training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Joanne

    The researcher investigated teachers' perceptions of their interactions with students in their 6th grade science classrooms and the effects of gender equity training on teachers' interactions with students. Teacher perceptions were measured at pretest and posttest using the Gender Equity Teacher-Student Interaction Questionnaire (GETSIQ). The outcomes from one day of gender equity training, using the Gender Equity Video and Instructional Guide, were measured at pretest, posttest, and follow-up using the INTERSECT scale. A non-random sample of twenty 6th grade science teachers from five middle schools participated in the study. Ten teachers were assigned to each of the control or experimental groups. The first hypothesis posited that teacher perceptions of and actions toward male and female students in sixth grade science classrooms would be different as reflected by scores on the GETSIQ. The hypothesis was partially supported. Teachers reported significantly different amounts of acknowledgment, attention in general, and attention to questions, responses, and comments for boys and girls, and different evaluations based on their expectations for a student. Following training, teachers from the experimental group obtained somewhat higher scores, though the differences were not statistically significant. Hypothesis 2 stated that gender equity training would increase equitable teacher interactions with male and female students as demonstrated by scores on the INTERSECT Checklist. This hypothesis was partially supported. A comparison of the Intersect checklist (praise, acceptance, remediation, criticism) revealed that teachers were observed to more equally give praise to boys and girls following training, male teachers engaged in more acceptance responses with girls, and female teachers had more equitable distribution of acceptance. Male teachers increased the amount of remediation to girls, and female teachers continued to provide more remediation to boys. The differences between pretest and posttest were statistically significant. There was some reversion to pretest levels interactions at follow-up. The results of the study support the effectiveness of gender equity training in facilitating increased awareness and behavioral change in teachers. However, training needs to be of longer duration for continued effectiveness.

  8. Research Plan: Teacher Learning For CLIL Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Bovenlander, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed research questions of the participating schools in the embedded research of the U-Teach programme demonstrate a notion of a lack of teacher learning in bilingual education and a lack of collaboration between teachers of English and other subject teachers. (How) can bilingual education in the Netherlands -TTO- be improved by (more) collaboration between the teacher of English and the other subject teachers? Two of the schools (Herman Wesselink College & Regionale Scholengemeenscha...

  9. Secondary School Teachers’ Perception of “Teacher Professional Development”: A Case Study of Teachers from Five Districts of Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Merab Kagoda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher professional development (TPD is important in keeping teachers abreast with changes that characterise the 21st century schools. However, TPD will only be valuable if teachers perceive it as important. Moreover the varying perceptions of teacher professional development by teachers are likely to affect their view of TPD. Using data collected from secondary school teachers, this study explored teachers’ understanding of the concept “teacher professional development, TPD approaches used by teachers and barriers/constraints they face. Results show that teachers have narrow understanding of the concept, and that to many TPD meant subject content upgrading by going back to teacher training college, while others view it as attending workshops and seminars. Barriers mentioned included shortage of time, lack of funds, lack of motivation and support by head teachers and government as a whole. Researchers recommend that teacher education should incorporate a component of professional teacher development in the initial teacher training. The head teachers and Ministry of Education and Sports should support in-service teachers in their endeavour to develop professionally. Teachers with low selfesteem should be motivated through attendance of conferences, workshops and group activities at local level.

  10. Student Perception of Teacher Effectiveness Based on Teacher Employment and Course Skill Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Donald K.; Schramm, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    A study looked at student (n=10,270) evaluations of tenure- and nontenure-track teachers (n=30), nonskill versus skill courses, and tenure- and nontenure-track for nonskill and skill courses. Results indicate that students rate tenure-track teachers and skill course teachers significantly higher. They give similar ratings to tenure- and…

  11. Head Start Mentor Teachers Impact Child Outcomes in Protege Teachers' Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Abbott-Shim, Martha; VandeWiele, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the results of an evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention, a mentoring program for early childhood educators. This mentoring program includes 3 components: Mentor Teacher Seminar, Mentor teachers supporting professional development of Protege teachers throughout the school year, and Mentor coordinator meetings…

  12. From the Classroom to the Keyboard: How Seven Teachers Created Their Online Teacher Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jennifer C.; Alsup, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Teacher identity is defined as a sense of teacher self that results from a productive combination of key personal and professional subjectivities or beliefs. Much empirical research has been done on the development of teacher identity in the K-12 arena, with a great deal of theoretical and philosophical scholarship about teaching at the college…

  13. Associations of Teacher Credibility and Teacher Affinity with Learning Outcomes in Health Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, DeLeon L.; Anderman, Eric M.; O'Connell, Ann A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study (N = 633), we examine the role of teacher credibility and teacher affinity in classrooms. We explore the relations among these two characteristics and student gains in knowledge and valuing of learning about HIV and pregnancy prevention across high school classrooms. Results marshaled support for the notion that teacher…

  14. Teachers as Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    In "Teachers as Learners", a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning. Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teaching…

  15. Mature Teachers Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  16. Teachers and Educational Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Dee Ann

    1996-01-01

    Examines the recent phenomenon of educators attacking their own on the issue of professionalizing teachers and improving teacher education. Explores the issue of the professionalization of teaching and discusses the role of teachers in educational reform. Concludes that teacher "bashing" may hamper attracting potential teacher education students…

  17. Programa de Formação Continuada para Docentes da Educação Superior: um estudo avaliativo a partir dos resultados de uma tese / Continuing Education Program for Higher Education Teachers: an evaluative study based on thesis results

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sueli Petry da, Luz; Newton César, Balzan.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar considerações avaliativas sobre os resultados de uma tese de doutorado intitulada "Programa de Formação Continuada para Docentes do Ensino Superior: um estudo de caso",desenvolvida na Universidade do Vale do Itajaí - UNIVALI, Itajaí, Santa Catarina, e apresentada [...] na Faculdade de Educação, da Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, em Campinas, Estado de São Paulo, em novembro de 2007. A metodologia utilizada na pesquisa foi um estudo de caso, por meio de narrativa. O plano de desenvolvimento do artigo está dividido em quatro partes. A primeira contextualiza a instituição e o referido Programa em sua primeira edição. A segunda apresenta a metodologia e a análise dos dados da pesquisa. A terceira parte aborda os resultados do estudo de caso. A quarta parte avalia os resultados alcançados. Ao final, efetuam- se considerações que sinalizam para a importância da continuidade de estudos, em favor do estado da arte sobre formação continuada para docentes do ensino superior, que objetive caracterizar a identidade e profissionalidade docente, em nível nacional, principalmente a partir dos saberes e fazeres desses programas. Abstract in english This article offers some evaluative considerations of the results of a doctorate thesis entitled "Programa de FormaçãoContinuada para Docentes do Ensino Superior: um estudo de caso" (Continuing Education Program for Higher Education Teachers: A case study), carried out at the Universidade do Vale do [...] Itajaí (University of Vale do Itajaí) - UNIVALI, in Itajaí, Santa Catarina, and presented at the School of Education of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, in Campinas, State of São Paulo, in November 2007. The methodology used in the research was a case study, by means of a narrative. The article is divided into four sections. The first section outlines the context of the institution that developed the Program and the Program itself in its first edition. The second presents the research methodology used and the data analysis. The third addresses the results of the case study, and the fourth section evaluates the results obtained. At the end, some considerations are made that point to the importance of further studies on the state- of- the- art in the area of continuing education for higher education teachers, seeking to characterize the identity of the teaching professional, at the national level, particularly based on the knowledge and activities of these programs.

  18. EFL Teachers' Self-regulation and Job Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Atiyeh Kamyabi Gol; Nahid Royaei

    2013-01-01

    The current study explored the relationship between Iranian EFL teachers' self-regulation and job performance. To empirically explore the postulated correlation between teachers' self-regulation and job performance, 80 EFL teachers from various language institutes in Mashhad were asked to complete the "Teachers Self-Regulation Scale" and the "Job Performance Scale". The results of the finding confirmed the hypothesized relationship between teachers' self-regulation and job performance. Moreov...

  19. Investigating High School Teachers’ Belief Regarding Teaching Grammar

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Farahian

    2011-01-01

    Although there is an ever increasing interest in the issue of teacher belief systems in mainstream education studies, the beliefs of EFL teachers, especially Iranian teachers?, about grammar and the influence of such beliefs on their instruction remain relatively unexplored. The present study seeks to examine high school teachers? belief regarding teaching grammar. To do so a grammar belief questionnaire and an interview were administered. The result showed that although teachers were compell...

  20. TEACHERS NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  1. Multicultural Education and teacher’s social well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Taboada, Cristina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The configuration of new intergroup and interpersonal relations that take place in the receiving social context as a result of migratory processes, owns direct influences over the school scene. Having in account there are different paradigms and models in multicultural education (Banks, 2009, the aim of the study is to analyse the impact that has on teacher’s social well-being, the main or minor percentage of immigrant students in the schools. The Social Well-Being Scale of Keyes (1998, adapted by Blanco & Diaz (2005 was applied on a sample of 281 primary education teachers from Guipúzcoa, (Spain. They were distributed in three groups for its comparison. The results indicate, that those teachers that carry out their work in schools with greater concentration of immigrant students, presented the greater level of social well-being with respect to their colleagues who belong to schools characterized by the sociocultural homogeneity of the pupils.

  2. Literacy Study of TCFL Teacher Competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available TCFL teachers competencies are a new and popular field of research in the Chinese language. These competencies will relate to the knowledge and skills that TCFL teachers should have, such as the knowledge in linguistics and Chinese linguistics, theory of the second language, learning strategies and teaching methodologies. Besides that, teacher should have a good awareness, psychological and emotional control. This article summarizes the results of literacy study of TCFL teachers competencies. At first, these seem difficult to achieve, but by consistently accumulating teachers' knowledge and skills, its can help to give new TCFL teachers a clearer understanding of their role in education and help them make preparations. Accumulating knowledge and skills, controlling the role of psychology and emotions are very important that TCFL teachers must have as their lifestyle.

  3. Teacher Support Resources, Need Satisfaction and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech-Betoret, Fernando; Lloret-Segura, Susana; Gómez-Artiga, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Based on Job Demands-Resources Model (JD-R), this study examines the relationships among teacher support resources, psychological need satisfaction, engagement and burnout in a sample of 282 Spanish secondary school teachers. Nine teacher psychological needs were identified based on the study of Bess and on the Self-Determination Theory (SDT). Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the constructs selected for this study and their interrelationships were examined by structural equation modeling. The results reveal a good model fit to the data (NNFI = .88; CFI = .90; GFI = .90; RMSEA = .061). The analyses indicate a positive and significant effect of latent variable Psychological Need Satisfaction on engagement (? = .74, p burnout (? = -.78, p ? .05). Furthermore, the results show the mediator role played by Psychological Need Satisfaction in the relationship between teacher support resources and both engagement and burnout (additional paths did not improve the model fit: ??2(2) = 2.428, p = .29). Finally, practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26055095

  4. The effects of the SUN project on teacher knowledge and self-efficacy regarding biological energy transfer are significant and long-lasting: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Ann Finney; Gruhl, Mary; Zhang, Bo; Harrington, Tom; Roberts, Marisa; LaFlamme, Donna; Haasch, Mary Anne; Knopp, Jonathan; Vogt, Gina; Goodsell, David; Hagedorn, Eric; Marcey, David; Hoelzer, Mark; Nelson, Dave

    2013-06-01

    Biological energy flow has been notoriously difficult to teach. Our approach to this topic relies on abiotic and biotic examples of the energy released by moving electrons in thermodynamically spontaneous reactions. A series of analogical model-building experiences was supported with common language and representations including manipulatives. These materials were designed to help learners understand why electrons move in a hydrogen explosion and hydrogen fuel cell, so they could ultimately understand the rationale for energy transfer in the mitochondrion and the chloroplast. High school biology teachers attended a 2-wk Students Understanding eNergy (SUN) workshop during a randomized controlled trial. These treatment group teachers then took hydrogen fuel cells, manipulatives, and other materials into their regular biology classrooms. In this paper, we report significant gains in teacher knowledge and self-efficacy regarding biological energy transfer in the treatment group versus randomized controls. Significant effects on treatment group teacher knowledge and self-efficacy were found not only post-SUN workshop but even 1 yr later. Teacher knowledge was measured with both a multiple-choice exam and a drawing with a written explanation. Teacher confidence in their ability to teach biological energy transfer was measured by a modified form of the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument, In-Service A. Professional development implications regarding this topic are discussed. PMID:23737635

  5. "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff:" Understanding Teacher Resilience at the Chalkface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Caroline F.; Beltman, Susan; Price, Anne; McConney, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how graduating and early career teachers perceive resilient teachers. Informed by survey data from 200 graduating and early career teachers, the study's results indicate that graduating and early career teachers perceive that resilience for teachers comprises characteristics that are multi-dimensional and overlapping, and…

  6. E-LEARNING-BASED TRAINING MODEL FOR ACCOUNTING TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Sri Andayani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: E-Learning-Based Training Model for Accounting Teachers. To improve the competencies of teachers located on remote and diverse areas, it is viable and commendable to implement e-learning-based training. In view of this purpose, the present action research examines the effectiveness of e-learning-based training for accounting teachers. The findings reveal that teachers with poor ICT skills need to take orientation around online class first in order to get familiar with the use of ICT for learning purposes. Meanwhile, teachers with good ICT skills are able to engage directly in the training. The re­search project also shows that the effectiveness of training can be achieved through sequentially organ­ized materials and accessed through the learning progress of the trainees. Encouragement to the trainees for active involvement in the discussion forums during the training results in high final scores at the end of the training session. Keywords: E-learning, teacher training, accounting, East Java Abstrak: Model Pelatihan Berbasis E-Learning bagi Guru Akunting. Program pengembangan pro­fessional bagi para guru merupakan agenda utama untuk meningkatkan kualitas pendidikan. Untuk meningkatkan kompetensi guru, implementasi pelatihan berbasis e-learning dimungkinkan untuk men­jangkau para guru yang berasal dari berbagai wilayah terpencil. Penelitian tindakan ini menguji efek­tivitas pelatihan berbasis e-learning pada guru-guru akuntansi di Jawa Timur. Temuan penelitian meng­ungkap bahwa para guru yang memiliki kecakapan ICT rendah harus mengambil pelatihan orientasi pembelajaran online terlebih dahulu agar akrab dengan penggunaan ICT untuk tujuan-tujuan pembela­jaran. Sedangkan para guru yang sudah memiliki kecakapan ICT memadai dapat langsung mengikuti pelatihan. Efektivias pelatihan dapat dicapai dengan cara mengorganisasikan materi pelatihan secara berurutan dan hanya dapat diakses sesuai dengan kemajuan belajar peserta pelatihan. Dorongan partisi­pasi bagi peserta untuk terlibat aktif dalam forum diskusi menghasilkan nilai akhir yang tinggi pada akhir pelatihan. Kata kunci: E-learning, pelatihan guru, akuntansi, Jawa Timur

  7. Teacher-student interactions and domain-specific motivation: The relationship between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and motivation in middle school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Julie Brockman

    2009-11-01

    This study examined interactions between middle school science students' perceptions of teacher-student interactions and their motivation for learning science. Specifically, in order to better understand factors affecting middle school students' motivation for science, this study investigated the interactions between middle school students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior in their science classroom and their efficacy, task value, mastery orientations, and goal orientation for learning science. This mixed methods study followed a sequential explanatory model (Cresswell & Plano-Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in two phases, with quantitative data in the first phase informing the selection of participants for the qualitative phase that followed. The qualitative phase also helped to clarify and explain results from the quantitative phase. Data mixing occurred between Phase One and Phase Two (participant selection) and at the interpretation level (explanatory) after quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately. Results from Phase One indicated that students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors were predictive of their efficacy for learning science, task value for learning science, mastery orientation, and performance orientation. These results were used to create motivation/perception composites, which were used in order to select students for the qualitative interviews. A total of 24 students with high motivation/high perceptions, low motivation/low perceptions, high motivation/low perceptions, and low motivation/high perceptions were selected in order to represent students whose profiles either supported or refuted the quantitative results. Results from Phase Two revealed themes relating to students' construction of their perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and dimensions of their efficacy and task value for science. Students who reported high motivation and high perceptions of teacher-student interactions during the quantitative phase described the most instances of teacher cooperative behaviors, such as teacher helpfulness and understanding. Conversely, students reporting low motivation and low perceptions of teacher-student interactions described the most instances of teacher oppositional behavior, such as harsh and impatient behaviors. An in-depth description of categories and subcategories is also provided. This study concludes with an interpretive analysis of quantitative and qualitative results considered both separately and together. Implications for middle grades science education are discussed, including recommendations for behavior management, scaffolding students' transition to middle school, making explicit connections to science careers, and providing opportunities for small successes within the science classroom. Implications for science teacher education, limitations of the study, and future research directions are also discussed.

  8. Primary Pre-Serv?ce Teachers’ Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Att?tudes Toward Educat?onal Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yusuf ACUNER

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate primary pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards educational technologies. The study was performed on 217 primary pre-service teachers in the Faculty of Education in Rize University. Data were collected through the applications of Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (A?kar and Umay, 2001 and Technology Attitude Scale (Yavuz, 2005. Pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards educational technologies were compared based on the variables such as class level, gender, computer ownership, and computer experiences. Moreover, pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs were predicted from their attitudes toward educational technologies. The study results revealed that male pre-service teachers have higher computer self-efficacy beliefs than their female counter parts and pre-service teachers owning personal computer have higher computer self-efficacy beliefs than those do not have personal computer. The study results also indicated that the pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs can be predicted from their attitudes towards educational technologies.

  9. Reciprocal Relations between Student-Teacher Relationship and Children's Behavioral Problems: Moderation by Child-Care Group Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalická, Vera; Belsky, Jay; Stenseng, Frode; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In this Norwegian study, bidirectional relations between children's behavior problems and child-teacher conflict and closeness were examined, and the possibility of moderation of these associations by child-care group size was tested. Eight hundred and nineteen 4-year-old children were followed up in first grade. Results revealed reciprocal…

  10. Framing the debate over teacher unions

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    William C. Smith

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The power of teacher unions in the U.S. has waned since the 2010 mid-term elections.  The convergence of business conservatism and teacher accountability ideologies has led to an intense targeting of public teacher unions as a problem, both economically and educationally.  Using the target audience framework of Schneider and Ingram (1993, I break down the framing used in the present anti-union movement and explore a local example of anti-union legislation in Pennsylvania.  The analysis reveals a socially constructed dichotomy in which victimized children are pitted against greedy teachers.  To stem this wave of anti-unionism, teacher unions must recognize their position as public contenders and rearticulate their message using child-first rhetoric.

  11. The Importance of Teacher's Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Block; Fran Crochet; Leslie Jones; Tiffany Papa

    2012-01-01

    Heightened emphases are on teachers and effective teaching particularly linked to the performances of students in K-12 schools. The purpose of this article is to review perspectives of teaching over a period of several decades in the literature and to investigate the perceptions of practicing teachers enrolled in graduate school regarding necessary components of effective teaching. Results indicate that many of the notions indicated in the literature as essential for effective teaching are al...

  12. The relationship between the critical thinking skills and the academic language proficiency of prospective teachers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M M (Mary), Grosser; Mirna, Nel.

    Full Text Available We report on the relationships that exist between the critical thinking skills and the academic language proficiency ofa group of first-year prospective teachers at a South African university (n = 89). The results revealed the nature of the critical thinking skills as well as the academic language p [...] roficiency of the students. Significant correlations between academic language proficiency and making inferences, as well as between academic language proficiency and critical thinking as a general competency, were noted. The article concludes with recommendations on how to enhance critical thinking and language proficiency in the teacher-training curriculum.

  13. Dissonant Feedback about Achievement and Teachers' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognar, Carl J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigates impact of achievement test results (N=285) on 13 sixth-grade teachers' expectations using hypotheses from cognitive dissonance theory. Shows teacher expectations changed very little as a result of feedback, and test results for both under- and overestimated students were rejected. (AH)

  14. Teacher Test Accountability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Ludlow

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the high stakes of teacher testing, there is no doubt that every teacher test should meet the industry guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Unfortunately, however, there is no public or private business or governmental agency that serves to certify or in any other formal way declare that any teacher test does, in fact, meet the psychometric recommendations stipulated in the Standards. Consequently, there are no legislated penalties for faulty products (tests nor are there opportunities for test takers simply to raise questions about a test and to have their questions taken seriously by an impartial panel. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems (NES in their 1999 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT Technical Report, and more specifically, to identify those technical characteristics of the MECT that are inconsistent with the Standards. A second purpose of this article is to call for the establishment of a standing test auditing organization with investigation and sanctioning power. The significance of the present analysis is twofold: a psychometric results for the MECT are similar in nature to psychometric results presented as evidence of test development flaws in an Alabama class-action lawsuit dealing with teacher certification (an NES-designed testing system; and b there was no impartial enforcement agency to whom complaints about the Alabama tests could be brought, other than the court, nor is there any such agency to whom complaints about the Massachusetts tests can be brought. I begin by reviewing NES's role in Allen v. Alabama State Board of Education, 81-697-N. Next I explain the purpose and interpretation of standard item analysis procedures and statistics. Finally, I present results taken directly from the 1999 MECT Technical Report and compare them to procedures, results, and consequences of procedures followed by NES in Alabama.

  15. Pay, working conditions, and teacher quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanushek, Eric A; Rivkin, Steven G

    2007-01-01

    Eric Hanushek and Steven Rivkin examine how salary and working conditions affect the quality of instruction in the classroom. The wages of teachers relative to those of other college graduates have fallen steadily since 1940. Today, average wages differ little, however, between urban and suburban districts. In some metropolitan areas urban districts pay more, while in others, suburban districts pay more. But working conditions in urban and suburban districts differ substantially, with urban teachers reporting far less administrator and parental support, worse materials, and greater student problems. Difficult working conditions may drive much of the difference in turnover of teachers and the transfer of teachers across schools. Using rich data from Texas public schools, the authors describe in detail what happens when teachers move from school to school. They examine how salaries and student characteristics change when teachers move and also whether turnover affects teacher quality and student achievement. They note that both wages and student characteristics affect teachers' choices and result in a sorting of teachers across schools, but they find little evidence that teacher transitions are detrimental to student learning. The extent to which variations in salaries and working conditions translate into differences in the quality of instruction depends importantly on the effectiveness of school personnel policies in hiring and retaining the most effective teachers and on constraints on both entry into the profession and the firing of low performers. The authors conclude that overall salary increases for teachers would be both expensive and ineffective. The best way to improve the quality of instruction would be to lower barriers to becoming a teacher, such as certification, and to link compensation and career advancement more closely with teachers' ability to raise student performance. PMID:17407923

  16. The Implications of Teacher Effectiveness Requirements for Initial Teacher Education Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Pretorius

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: School effectiveness research shows that teacher effectiveness is the single most important school-based factor in student success. The effects of poor teaching linger and can be measured for at least three years after students have left the classroom. It is too late to wait until secondary school level for backlogs to be eradicated. Education systems, such as the South African system, which grapple with large numbers of dysfunctional schools, should look anew at teacher effectiveness in all school phases. The urgent need for highly effective teachers in every classroom requires that education systems develop a comprehensive definition of teacher effectiveness and create training programmes to develop it. Thus, the problem investigated is: What are the characteristics, skills, attitudes and behaviors associated with effective teachers and what is the best way in which schools of education can adapt initial teacher education to meet the challenges of today’s classrooms? Approach: A mixed method approach was adopted. In addition to an in-depth literature review, open-ended questionnaires, probing perceptions of teacher effectiveness issues were distributed to teachers, school principals, policy officials and teacher educators. Interviews were conducted with a variety of educational experts. Classroom observations of experienced and novice teachers were conducted in a variety of contexts using open-ended classroom observation checklists. Results: Based on the findings of the research a synthesis of the characteristics, knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors associated with effective teachers was developed. Conclusion: If teachers are to be effective their initial training will have to be effective. This study has identified the characteristics and behaviours associated with effective teachers. These indicators are broad guidelines for schools of education to stimulate teacher education reform. Covering the curriculum, structuring of content, appropriate pacing and alignment, clear goal setting, clarity of content and presentation, are a few requirements for effective teachers which have direct implications for teacher education.

  17. Social and psychological characteristics of the class teacher interaction with students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Petrushikhina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the results of socio-psychological studies of classroom management, performed on the basis of a theoretical model of value exchange, developed by R.L.Krichevsky. Classroom management is understood as a kind of management activity of a teacher, aimed at organizing group of students. Factor analysis revealed two major factors of the effectiveness of classroom management: the nature of the relationship between the students and their relations to the class teacher. As teacher’s activity characteristics, we considered manifestations of his attitudes toward students, leadership style, characteristics of individual interaction with students. It is shown that the activity of the class teacher, aimed at meeting the critical social needs of students, has two major dimensions: taking care about students and development of their motivation. We analyze the impact of social and perceptual characteristics of the teacher on the effectiveness of his interaction with students. We reveal the features of self-assessment and reflective evaluation of personality and activity of a class teacher, the specifics of causal attributions of success and failure of students in different areas of school life.

  18. From Education Policy to Class Practices: Indonesian Secondary EFL Teachers’ Self-Efficacy in Developing School-Based EFL Syllabi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dairabi Kamil

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this quantitative inquiry was to examine the self-efficacy of Indonesian secondary school English as foreign language (EFL teachers in developing a school-based EFL syllabus. The data were collected through a survey to 98 secondary school EFL teachers in the District of Kerinci, Jambi Sumatra, Indonesia. The data were analyzed through the Rasch Analysis (Linacre 2004, 2006. The results revealed that the teachers had a high-self efficacy in developing the syllabus. However, they tended to be less efficacious on theoretical tasks in the syllabus development and on tasks that were not part of their responsibility in previous curricula. In addition, this study also produced an instrument for measuring teachers’ self-efficacy in developing the syllabus that can be used for similar purposes in other contexts.

  19. Investigation of Pre-service Teachers’ Attitudes towards Teaching Profession in a Teaching Formation Certification Program(SDÜ Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin ÖZKAN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards teaching profession were examined using different variables. The results reveals that, pre-service teacher candidates are interested in the teaching profession, enjoyed teaching profession, and have a higher level of commitment to teaching profession. Moreover pre-service teachers’ attitudes toward the professional responsibility and the social reputation of the teaching profession were positive according to the data analyzed. There is significant difference were found in terms of the interest of teaching profession, enjoying the profession, Professional commitment in terms of participants’ age and working in a job. However, there is no significant difference found according to the level of education, their graduation area, and the job sector. There is also significant difference was found in the reputation of teaching profession and professional responsibility in terms of the job sector pre-service teachers’ employed.

  20. Processes of negotiation of meanings on algebraic thinking in a community of practice of pre-service mathematics teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina de Costa Trindade Cyrino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We presented in this paper results of a research which aimed to investigate how the community of practice context of pre-service mathematics teacher education collaborates for learning on algebraic thinking by these future teachers. We analyzed, taking into account the Social Theory of Learning developed by Wenger (1998 as a theoretical frame, processes of negotiation of meanings present in participants' algebraic thinking in the development of tasks in one of the actions of the project "Mathematical Education of Teachers of Mathematics" inside the program "Universidade sem Fronteiras". This analysis allowed us to define some forms of member participation and explicit reification of algebraic thinking, due to some interactions in the processes of negotiation of meanings, which revealed changes in the identity of participants in become teachers of mathematics.

  1. Secondary Science Teachers' Beliefs and Persistence: A Longitudinal Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sissy S.; Luft, Julie A.

    2015-11-01

    While many studies focus on why teachers leave the classroom, there remains a need to study why teachers persist in teaching. One area to study is the beliefs of teachers, which may impact persistence in the field. This 5-year mixed-methods study explored whether 35 beginning secondary science teachers' beliefs were related to their persistence in teaching. Quantitative analysis of the teachers' responses to annual semi-structured interviews revealed that teachers with more student-centered beliefs were more likely to persist at the end of the third year of teaching. Additionally, the teaching beliefs of teachers were more teacher-centered, while the learning beliefs of teachers were more student-centered. A case study of one persisting teacher and one non-persisting teacher revealed that personal experiences and knowledge impacted beliefs about teaching and learning. Bruce, who had extensive inquiry-based school experiences, believed in teaching via student-centered methods. Oscar, who underwent mostly direct instruction during his school experiences, believed in teacher-centered instruction and focused on classroom management. This longitudinal study contributes to the field of science education by examining beginning secondary science teacher persistence over time. Implications from this study call for challenging teacher beliefs during the induction period, proper placement of new teachers into their first teaching positions, and understanding the impact of prior experiences on teachers' beliefs.

  2. Documenting Elementary Teachers' Sustainability of Instructional Practices: A Mixed Method Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Bridget A.

    School reform programs focus on making educational changes; however, research on interventions past the funded implementation phase to determine what was sustained is rarely done (Beery, Senter, Cheadle, Greenwald, Pearson, et al., 2005). This study adds to the research on sustainability by determining what instructional practices, if any, of the Teaching SMARTRTM professional development program that was implemented from 2005--2008 in elementary schools with teachers in grades third through eighth were continued, discontinued, or adapted five years post-implementation (in 2013). Specifically, this study sought to answer the following questions: What do teachers who participated in Teaching SMARTRTM and district administrators share about the sustainability of Teaching SMARTRTM practices in 2013? What teaching strategies do teachers who participated in the program (2005--2008) use in their science classrooms five years postimplementation (2013)? What perceptions about the roles of females in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) do teachers who participated in the program (2005--2008) have five years later (2013)? And, What classroom management techniques do the teachers who participated in the program (2005--2008) use five years post implementation (2013)? A mixed method approach was used to answer these questions. Quantitative teacher survey data from 23 teachers who participated in 2008 and 2013 were analyzed in SAS v. 9.3. Descriptive statistics were reported and paired t-tests were conducted to determine mean differences by survey factors identified from an exploratory factor analysis, principal axis factoring, and parallel analysis conducted with teacher survey baseline data (2005). Individual teacher change scores (2008 and 2013) for identified factors were computed using the Reliable Change Index statistic. Qualitative data consisted of interviews with two district administrators and three teachers who responded to the survey in both years (2008 and 2013). Additionally, a classroom observation was conducted with one of the interviewed teachers in 2013. Qualitative analyses were conducted following the constant comparative method and were facilitated by ATLAS.ti v. 6.2, a qualitative analysis software program. Qualitative findings identified themes at the district level that influenced teachers' use of Teaching SMARTRTM strategies. All the themes were classified as obstacles to sustainability: economic downturn, turnover of teachers and lack of hiring, new reform policies, such as Race to the Top, Student Success Act, Common Core State Standards, and mandated blocks of time for specific content. Results from the survey data showed no statistically significant difference through time in perceived instructional practices except for a perceived decrease in the use of hands-on instructional activities from 2008 to 2013. Analyses conducted at the individual teacher level found change scores were statistically significant for a few teachers, but overall, teachers reported similarly on the teacher survey at both time points. This sustainability study revealed the lack of facilitating factors to support the continuation of reform practices; however, teachers identified strategies to continue to implement some of the reform practices through time in spite of a number of system-wide obstacles. This sustainability study adds to the literature by documenting obstacles to sustainability in this specific context, which overlap with what is known in the literature. Additionally, the strategies teachers identified to overcome some of the obstacles to implement reform practices and the recommendations by district level administrators add to the literature on how stakeholders may support sustainability of reform through time.

  3. An investigation of preschool teachers' recognition of possible child abuse and neglect in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Sevinç Ç?rak; Sönmez, Sibel; Dereobal?, Nilay

    2015-03-01

    Child abuse and neglect have a potentially deleterious impact on children's physical, social, and psychological development. Preschool teachers may play a crucial role in the protection, early detection, and the intervention of child abuse and neglect, as they have the opportunity to establish a close contact with the families and to observe day-to-day changes in pupils' behavior. The main purpose of this study is to investigate preschool teachers' experiences and characteristics in relation to their awareness of possible child abuse and neglect signs. A questionnaire survey was designed and administered to 197 preschool teachers who work for the public preschools in the Izmir province of Turkey. In addition to the questionnaire items, a 34-item Likert-type scale measuring the level of familiarity with possible signs of child abuse and neglect was developed. This scale had an internal consistency of 0.94. The results revealed that 10.65% of preschool teachers had training regarding violence against children and 2.03% of them had training in child abuse and neglect. Overall, 35% of all teachers reported that they had prior experience with pupils who were exposed to child abuse and neglect. Moreover, statistical analyses indicated that being a parent and having training in child abuse and neglect, having experience with maltreated children, and having higher job status were significant factors in preschool teachers' ability to recognize the possible signs of child abuse and neglect. Our results support that teacher training in child abuse and neglect can play an important role in preschool teachers' awareness of the possible signs of child abuse and neglect. PMID:24928252

  4. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jalali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

  5. Teachers' Views of Moral Education Topics - Taiwan and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huey-Ya; Davidman, Patricia; Petersen, George; Thomas, R. Murray

    1998-01-01

    In a questionnaire survey, 94 teachers in Taiwan and 140 in the United States judged which topics among 20 moral issues would be appropriate subjects of study in grade six of the primary school and in the first year of the university. The issues related to religion, ethnicity, gender, health care, crime, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, guns, government corruption, birth control, caring for the elderly, and television programming. The results revealed great diversity of opinion within each group of respondents. No single topic was approved by all teachers in either group, nor was any topic rejected by all. Among the 234 teachers, no two offered precisely the same configuration of answers over the 20 topics. Nevertheless, some group trends could be identified for individual topics. For example, in both countries the great majority of respondents would teach about industrial pollution, whereas very few would approve of trying to identify the best religion. In the rationales teachers offered in support of their choices, the four reasons that figured most prominently in both countries were that a topic would contribute to the nation's welfare, would help students to make wise decisions, would be interesting for students, and would represent a peaceful way to face social problems.

  6. Teacher Collaboration: Implications for New Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Laura M.; Gonzalez, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    One increasingly popular way of supporting new teachers is through the use of mentoring. New teachers are often paired with mentors as one of a number of supports meant to aid new teachers as they begin their career. The various types of mentoring range from school based mentors assigned by the school to specialty mentors, such as math coaches.…

  7. State Teacher Evaluation and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Gregory J.; David, Kristine A.; Rodgers, Deborah; German, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Current accountability trends suggest an increasing role in state mandates regarding teacher evaluation. With various evaluation models and components serving as the basis for quality teaching, teacher education programs need to recognize the role teacher evaluation plays and incorporate aspects where appropriate. This article makes that case and…

  8. An Analysis on Proactive-Reactive Personality Profiles in Student-Teacher Relationship through the Metaphorical Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, A. Seda; Kocak, Canan; Cula, Serpil

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the proactive and reactive personality traits in teachers and students. These traits were interpreted with the help of the ideas and images revealed through metaphors. With the help of these metaphors, the certain imaginative categories and statements of student teachers about the teacher, the student and teacher-student…

  9. An Interpretive Inquiry of the Case Law of Teacher Evaluation in the Southern Regional Education Board States: Forecasting Pressing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder-Wilkerson, Kathy S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze case law related to teacher evaluation between 1980 and 2008 in the SREB states to determine the problems associated with teacher evaluation and if these problems were documented in the literature. Content analysis of teacher dismissal cases revealed many types of teacher evaluation problems. The two most…

  10. Plant nutrition from teachers thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Rodríguez, Concepción;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, it´s analyzed which contents related to plant nutrition are considered important by a group of secondary education teachers. Its objective is also to determine the existence of any correlations among teachers, depending on the selected and most valued contents in the evaluation activities and questions.The analysis of the obtained results has shown that the contents in which teachers are more focused are those describing the differences between autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition, the photosynthesis process and the structures involved on it (plant and cellular organs. On the other hand, the less considered contents are related to the nutrition general concept, breathing concept and those associated to the ecological dimension of plant nutrition. The existence of certain trends among the teachers taking part in this study has been confirmed; a prevailing correlation has also been found. The majority trend is the physiogical.

  11. Links between teacher assessment and child self-assessment of mental health and behavior among children affected by HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongfei; Li, Xiaoming; Weinstein, Traci L; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Teachers are considered to be one of the most important influences in the lives of students. Teachers' assessments of students may be a primary source of information on children's mental and behavioral health; however, this topic has received little attention in research. We examined this issue through linking teachers' ratings of students and mental and behavioral outcomes of children affected by HIV. The hypothesis is that teacher ratings will be predictive of specific child mental and behavioral health outcomes. A quantitative cross-sectional design with self-administered paper-and-pencil instruments was used. The sample included 1221 children (aged 6-18, grades 1-11) affected by HIV including 755 orphans who lost one or both parents to AIDS and 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents in a central province of China. The corresponding teacher sample included 185 participants. Each child completed an assessment inventory of demographic information and mental and behavioral health measures. Teachers completed a questionnaire about children's school performance. SEM analyses revealed a good model fit according to all fit indices: comparative fit index = 0.93, root mean square error of approximation = 0.07, and standardized root mean square residual = 0.04. Structural equation modeling revealed that problem ratings by teachers were positively associated with child loneliness and behavioral problems, social competence ratings by teachers were negatively related to child depression, and personal growth and social interaction ratings by teachers were negatively related to child loneliness, depression, and trauma. The current study represents a unique contribution to the field in that it recognizes that teachers can be a valuable source of information on children's psychological health. Results from this study have implications for health prevention and intervention for children and families suffering from HIV/AIDS. PMID:25703050

  12. English as a foreign language—teachers’ perspectives on implementing online instruction in the Iranian EFL context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dashtestani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to explore Iranian English as a foreign language (EFL teachers’ perceptions on the implementation of online EFL instruction. A mixed-methods design, including semi-structured interviews and questionnaires, was employed for the specific purposes of this study. A total of 242 EFL teachers participated in the questionnaire phase of the study. In addition, 46 EFL teachers participated in the interview phase of the study. The teachers worked at a number of universities, schools and language-teaching institutions in Iran. Results suggest that although the Iranian EFL teachers adopted moderately positive attitudes towards the implementation of online instruction, the majority of them preferred blended instruction to online instruction. At the same time, the study revealed that the implementation of online EFL instruction in Iran is challenging due to a number of perceived impediments and obstacles. The most considerable perceived challenges to the implementation of online EFL instruction comprise lack of online facilities and resources, lack of interaction in online instruction, cultural resistances to online instruction and teachers’ limited knowledge of online instruction. The findings of this study provided crucial insights into teachers’ perspectives on a number of measures that can be adopted to facilitate the integration of online instruction in the EFL context of Iran. The findings would provide valuable insights for educational authorities and course designers to integrate online instruction into the EFL curriculum.

  13. Mathematics teachers' beliefs and curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, Boris; Herrington, Anthony

    2003-05-01

    This paper discusses the role of mathematics teachers' beliefs and their impact on curriculum reform. It is argued that teachers' beliefs about the teaching and learning mathematics are critical in determining the pace of curriculum reform. Educational change is a complex process in which teachers hold strong beliefs about the quality and the process of innovation. Curriculum implementation may only occur through sufferance as many teachers are suspicious of reform in mathematics education given its equivocal success over the past decades. It is not surprising then that many teachers, when they come to enact the curriculum in their classes, rely more on their own beliefs than on current trends in pedagogy. These beliefs, conservative as they might be, have their own rationality in the practical and daily nature of the teaching profession, and in the compelling influence of educational systems from which these teachers are paradoxically the social product. The literature indicates that many of these teachers hold behaviourist beliefs, a fact that has strong implications for the success of constructivist-oriented curriculum reform. In general, studies of teachers' pedagogical beliefs reveal the extreme complexity of bringing about educational change, and largely explains the failure of many past reform endeavours.

  14. Teaching and nature: Middle school science teachers' relationship with nature in personal and classroom contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nadine Butcher

    2000-10-01

    This qualitative study describes three middle-school science teachers' relationship-with-nature in personal and classroom contexts. Participating teachers had more than 7 years experience and were deemed exemplary practitioners by others. Interview data about personal context focused on photographs the teacher took representing her/his relationship-with-nature in daily life. Interview data for classroom context explored classroom events during three or more researcher observations. Transcripts were analyzed using a multiple-readings approach to data reduction (Gilligan, Brown & Rogers, 1990; Miles & Huberman, 1994, p. 14, 141). Readings generated categorical information focused on portrayals of: nature; self; and relationship-with-nature. Categorical data were synthesized into personal and teaching case portraits for each teacher, and cross case themes identified. Participants indicated the portraits accurately represented who they saw themselves to be. Additional readings identified sub-stories by plot and theme. Narrative data were clustered to highlight elements of practice with implications for the relationship-with-nature lived in the classroom. These individual-scale moments were compared with cultural-scale distinctions between anthropocentric and ecological world views. Cross case themes included dimensions of exemplary middle-school science teaching important to teacher education and development, including an expanded conception of knowing and skillful use of student experience. Categorical analysis revealed each teacher had a unique organizing theme influencing their interpretation of personal and classroom events, and that nature is experienced differently in personal as opposed to teaching contexts. Narrative analysis highlights teachers' stories of classroom pets, dissection, and student dissent, illustrating an interplay between conceptual distinctions and personal dimensions during moments of teacher decision making. Results suggest teachers' competing commitments are resolved by balancing values in unique ways for the context. More productive resolutions involve transformation of the teacher's tensions so that competing goals better coexist. Foci helpful for teacher education and development are identified. Also discussed are complex ways cultural-scale world view is reproduced, or occasionally challenged, in the classroom life of three scientifically literate, skilled, and environmentally concerned teachers. The study concludes education in schools is more likely to reproduce than challenge elements of world view contributing to ecological decline.

  15. Enhancing Preservice Teachers' Sense of Efficacy and Attitudes toward School Diversity through Preparation: A Case of One U.S. Inclusive Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Mager, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Conducted in one inclusive teacher education program in the United States, this study explored the trajectory of and the relationships between preservice teachers' sense of efficacy and attitudes toward school diversity through the course of preparation. Findings revealed that, in general, changes of preservice teachers' perceived efficacy,…

  16. Enrich Practicum to Cultivate Effective Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Evan Ortlieb

    2013-01-01

    To advance systems of teacher education, curriculums must be enhanced with relevant activities aligned with practicum experiences to enhance the value of their education. Acting as a bridge to connect knowledge learned at the university and practical teacher applications in schools throughout the community, a research project involving several constructive activities was embedded within four literacy courses during the last two years of teacher candidates’ undergraduate education. Results of...

  17. The Changing Role Of The Innovative Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoel, Ricardo; Geraedts, Hay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a research about the changing role and competences of teachers and the willingness of the teachers to change. The researchers developed and conducted a survey at Fontys University of Applied Sciences department engineering to find out how teachers teach and how they would want to teach. The conclusion drawn from this research results in five subjects of attention: 1 To investigate new teaching competences 2 To investigate new teaching strategies 3 To develop coll...

  18. Organizational Learning: Perceptions of Teachers’ in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevat CELEP

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to investigate primary school teacher’s organizational learning experiences and their thoughts about these experiences. In order to realize this aim, educational practices, supportive leadership, communication and education technology, information sharing and cooperation dimensions of organizational learning are analyzed in terms of teachers’ perceptions. When we evaluate research findings, teachers’ perceptions about organizational learning differ meaningfully according to the teacher’s age and their tenure of office. It can be asserted that we can develop schools’ organizational learning ability only if we create systems which make easy and support managers’, teachers’, students’, parents’ and other education workers’ learning course. The results of this study showed that teachers’ perceptions about organizational learning differ according to managers’ use of managerial power in change applications, teacher’s liability to the team work and whether technological advancements is followed or not. The findings of the research also sign the importance of collective learning and application in order to realize organizational learning. When we look at the research findings, it can be asserted that motivating individuals in schools to work and learn collaboratively and to follow technological advancements about education can be effective in transforming schools to learning organizations.

  19. What inspires South African student teachers for their future profession?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Charl, Wolhuter; Hannes, van der Walt; Ferdinand, Potgieter; Louisa, Meyer; Thapelo, Mamiala.

    Full Text Available The need for an inspired professional teacher corps to haul South African school education out of its current low level of quality was the driving force behind this project. Its aim was to determine what counted as sources of inspiration for student teachers and hence for future teachers. Based on a [...] conceptual-theoretical study, a questionnaire that could probe student teachers' sources of inspiration was completed by a sample of student teachers (n = 1,683). A factor analysis of their responses revealed the following as their sources of inspiration, from most to least important: (extended) family, religion, the teacher education institution, teaching practice, friends, and personal life. A comparison with similar research elsewhere revealed that, in this sample of respondents, considerations, such as education being the only accessible profession or being forced to enter the teaching profession because of economic circumstances, did not figure at all.

  20. Inservicing the Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Toni

    1982-01-01

    Compares many teacher inservice programs to the artificial insemination of cows--decisions are made without teacher participation, teachers do not get to join in the act, and no one has much fun. Suggests that teachers be allowed to set their own goals and control their own learning. (Author/WD)

  1. Effective teaching in the contexts of Internet science projects: American and Russian teachers' perspectives of best practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Brian

    Statement of the problem. Science education literature had agreed that an important goal in students' learning is the development of scientific and technological literacy. One effort that teachers have integrated into their practices for addressing this goal has been teaching within the contexts of Internet Science Projects. Greater awareness of teachers' perspectives of their best practices and their beliefs and reasons for these practices in the contexts of Internet Science Projects can improve the quality of science education programs. Methods. A series of pilot interviews was conducted during the 2000--2001 school year to develop the guiding questions for inquiring into teachers' perspectives of their best practices within the contexts of Internet Science Projects. This series of interviews resulted in the understanding of the need to select teachers with experiences with Internet Science Projects and to conduct in-depth phenomenological interviews for learning from their voices. Two teachers were purposefully selected as the participant-informants for this study, one an American elementary teacher from Walker County, Georgia, and one a Russian teacher from St. Petersburg, Russia. The study was conducted from October through December 2001. The data collected for this qualitative study consisted of a series of in-depth phenomenological interviews, classroom observations, and the collection and analysis of various artifacts including teacher journals, student products, and e-mail/bulletin board transcripts. The interview structure was based upon a modification of expanding Seidman's (1998) three interview series into multiple interviews concluded upon the determination of saturation of the topic. The series of interviews were composed of (1) life history focus; (2) the details of the experience of teaching within the contexts of Internet Science Projects; and (3) reflection on the meanings. The data analysis consisted of applying Strauss & Corbin's (1990) open coding structure. Results. The results of this study revealed that these teachers carried their best practices from traditional teaching into their practices in the contexts of Internet Science Projects. The teachers created student-centered learning environments by focusing upon their classroom structure over that of the Internet Science Project. The teachers created strong local learning experiences inside an outside of their classroom environments where students were able to build strong understandings of the topic area before becoming engaged in virtual collaborations and Internet communications. This engagement allowed success in the face of any contingencies that might prevent or limit the ability for the teachers' classrooms to actively collaborate across the Internet. The teachers built their practices in Internet Science Projects upon questions prompted by their students' real world experiences, developed local understandings before progressing into exchanges for global collaborations, and built worldview perspectives.

  2. Science Teachers' Images of Environmental Scientists at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Glenda; Stubbs, Harriett S.; Berenson, Sarah B.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the results of a study on preservice teachers' conceptions of an environmental scientist at work. The teachers (N=65) were participants in a two-week project that focused on integrating environmental science research into the science curriculum. (DDR)

  3. Satisfaction of Jewish and Arab teachers in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogler, Ronit

    2005-02-01

    The author investigated the differences between Jewish Israeli and Arab Israeli teachers in their satisfaction with their work. Initially, the goal of the present study was to investigate whether there were demographic attributes (such as age, gender, and education) that differentiated between the two groups of teachers. Later, the author added two variables, teachers' perceptions of their occupation and teachers' perceptions of their principals' leadership styles, to the analysis to examine their contribution to the level of satisfaction for each group. Regression analyses revealed the significant power of the two added variables in predicting teacher satisfaction among both Jewish and Arab Israeli teachers. The author discussed implications of the findings in relation to principals' roles and teachers' perceptions. PMID:15739776

  4. Teachers and Non-Teachers Perceptions of a Chinese Learner’s Oral Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyan Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explores whether teachers differ from non-teachers (naïve native speakers in their perceptions of a learner’s oral performances. The oral language performances of an American university student in a fourth-year Chinese class were videotaped. Descriptive items were generated for use in evaluating the learner’s performances. Then 343 Chinese teachers and non-teachers used these items to evaluate the performances. The data were analyzed by means of exploratory factor analysis and analysis of variance. No significant differences were found between teachers and non-teachers in their rating criterion patterns. This result suggests that experience as a teacher does not necessarily out weight culturally-influenced perceptions. The implication is that experts in language assessment should make studying the underlying perceptual judgments of native speakers in the assessment of oral performance a top priority.

  5. Pedagogical and conflict situations of teacher of physical training

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    Pechko O.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the essence of pedagogical and conflict situations between teacher and student. Considered ways of solving and preventing pedagogical and conflict situations in school. Principal reasons of conflict situations are selected, situations of activity, conduct and relations. The receptions of influence of teacher of physical culture are separated on personality of schoolchildren. It is well-proven that the profession of teacher of physical culture supposes possibility of conflict situations.

  6. Teacher efficacy scale for classroom diversity (TESCD): a validation study

    OpenAIRE

    Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to validate the Teacher Efficacy Scale for Classroom Diversity (TESCD). This scale was developed to measure preservice teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs in their capability to teach students from diverse backgrounds. Four hundred and seventeen (N=417) preservice teachers participated in the study. Data analyses revealed that overall the TESCD has a good construct and concurrent validity and reliability. Recommendations are made for using ...

  7. Perception of Teaching Efficacy by Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Gülay Bedir

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to identify how teaching efficacy is perceived by teachers working at state schools. Having a survey model design, this study hosts a total of 678 primary and secondary school teachers -401 females and 277 males- working in the province of Tokat during the academic year of 2013 and 2014. Research data has been collected through teaching efficacy scale consisting of 28 items and 6 sub-dimensions. Analyses have revealed that teachers mostly regard themselves as efficient espe...

  8. FACTORS AFFECTING TEACHERS’ USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Mojgan Afshari; Kamariah Abu Bakar; Wong Su Luan; Bahaman Abu Samah; Foo Say Fooi

    2009-01-01

    Research studies in the past decade have shown that computer technology is an effective means for widening educational opportunities, but most teachers neither use technology as an instructional delivery system nor integrate technology into their curriculum. Studies reveal a number of factors influencing teachers’ decisions to use ICT in the classroom: non-manipulative and manipulative school and teacher factors. These factors are interrelated. The success of the implementation of ICT is not ...

  9. THE KING’S CARPET: DRAMA PLAY IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Judit Kerekes; King, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    Trying to develop new perspectives of teaching is never easy, but trying to cultivate ownership and initiative among teacher education students is a still greater aspiration that is infrequently realized. This article addresses each of these highly valued goals for teacher educators as a case study reveals the impact of involving teacher candidates in interdisciplinary focused, constructivist and reflective models and planning for teaching, and then student teaching, which reaffirms this appr...

  10. Language teachers and teaching

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    Ben Said, Selim

    2013-01-01

    This volume gathers contributions from a range of global experts in teacher education to address the topic of language teacher education. It shows how teacher education involves the agency of teachers, which forms part of their identity, and which they take on when integrating into the teaching community of practice. In addition, the volume explores the teachers' situated practice dynamic negotiation of classroom situations, socialization into the professional teaching culture, and ""on the ground experimentation"" with pedagogical skills/techniques.

  11. Comparing Views of Primary School Mathematics Teachers and Prospective Mathematics Teachers about Instructional Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Baki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology is rapidly improving in both hardware and software side. As one of the contemporary needs people should acquire certain knowledge, skills, attitudes and habits to understand this technology, to adapt to it and to make use of its benefits. In addition, as in all domains of life, change and improvement is also unavoidable for educational field. As known, change and improvement in education depends on lots of factors. One of the most important factors is teacher. In order to disseminate educational reforms, teachers themselves should accept the innovation first (Hardy, 1998, Baki, 2002; Oral, 2004. There has been variety of studies investigating teacher and prospective teachers? competences, attitudes and opinions (Paprzychi, Vikovic & Pierson, 1994; Hardy, 1998; Kocasaraç, 2003; Lin, Hsiech and Pierson, 2004; Eliküçük, 2006; Ye?ilyurt, 2006; Fendi, 2007; Teo, 2008; Arslan, Kutluca & Özp?nar, 2009. As the common result of these studies indicate that teachers? interest towards using instructional technology have increased. Accordingly, most of the teachers began to think that using instructional technologies becomes inevitable for teachers. By reviewing the related literature, no studies have been come across comparing the opinions of teachers and teacher candidates about instructional technologies. In this study, it was aimed to investigate and compare the views of mathematics teachers with prospective mathematics teachers about ICT. It was considered that collecting opinions of teachers and teachers candidates about the instructional technologies, comparing and contrasting them will contribute to the field. To follow this research inquiry, a descriptive approach type; case study research design was applied. The reason for choosing such design is that the case study method permits studying one aspect of the problem in detail and in a short time (Yin, 2003; Çepni, 2007. The study was conducted with the total sample of 12. 3 of them were mathematics teachers chosen from 3 different schools of different social stratification among primary schools in Artvin city center in the spring term of 2008-2009 educational year, another 3 of them were mathematics teachers from 3 different schools of different social stratification among primary schools in Trabzon city. Prospective mathematics teachers at their last year were randomly chosen from the elementary mathematics teacher training program of Fatih Faculty of Education in Karadeniz Technical University.The chosen 6 teachers and 6 candidate teachers were interviewed with 9-item semi-structured interviews in duration of 25 to 40 minutes. The opinions of the teachers and candidate teachers were compared and interpreted in a multidimensional point of view by the researchers. Concerning the research inquiries, the obtained data were classified under the titles as; definition of the instructional technology concept, instructional technologies used by the participants, benefits of this usage, competences related to usage of these technologies, suggestions for using these technologies. Based on the data these results were drawn; while the teachers take the instructional technologies concept as technological tool specifically, the candidate teachers, on the other hand, perceive the concept from a broader point of view. The teachers are more acquainted with mainstream technological products like computer and internet however the candidate teachers are also aware of books, magazines and concrete materials. Complying with some previous studies (Baki, 2000; Ye?ilyurt, 2006; Lin, Hsiech and Pierson, 2004; Ayvac? et al., 2007, both teachers and candidate teachers agree on that using instructional technologies matters in a positive way. However, since the teachers are actively in-service, they mentioned on application problems, on the contrary the candidate teachers are unaware of the prospective problems. The reason of this situation may be the problems faced during the application but could not be envisaged in the theoretical pre-service education. T

  12. Emotional intelligence (EQ levels of the senior students in secondary education system in Turkey based on teacher’s perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Titrek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available As in all sciences, interpersonal interactions develop new approaches. One of them is emotional intelligence (EQ, “observing and understanding capacity own and other’s emotion, definition of different type of emotion; and knowledge that you learned using to know other’s emotion and understanding. The purpose of this study is to determine EQ competence acquisition levels of senior students in secondary education system according to teacher perceptions. A survey method was used as the main research approach. Participants were 262 teachers who were selected from seven secondary schools in Adapazari that were selected randomly. Research questions were tested with ANOVA that includes Observed Power and Partial Eta analysis and t-test that includes Cohen d analysis. Results revealed that students, who have higher academic achievements, have the highest level in EQ traits as well. Science and Anatolian Secondary Schools’ students have higher EQ levels as cognitive skills.

  13. Teaching Reaction Stoichiometry: Exploring and Acknowledging Nigerian Chemistry Teachers Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoade Ejiwale Okanlawon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a growing interest in studies of students’ problem-solving strategies and difficulties, and misconceptionsregarding stoichiometry, little is known about the way teachers understand and teach reaction stoichiometry. This articlepresents a case study of pedagogical content knowledge put into actions by chemistry teachers when teaching the topic ofstoichiometry to second year senior secondary school students. Fourteen chemistry teachers with teaching experience rangingfrom 5 to 20 years were involved in this study. Research data were obtained from classroom observations and videotapedrecordings of classroom practice. Analyses of the teachers’ teaching activities revealed their skillfulness, resourcefulness, andweaknesses in terms of pedagogical content knowledge displayed when teaching stoichiometry. The results of this exploratorystudy offer insight into the knowledge systems that need to be expanded, enriched, and elaborated for teaching stoichiometry.To better understand the findings of this study, the results obtained were presented under two separate sections: (1 resultsconcerning introducing reaction stoichiometry to students and (2 results concerning leading students to identify limitingreagents. Implications for instruction and teachers’ professional development are offered.

  14. Factors that motivate Turkish EFL teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkaya, Odiléa Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers’ motivation has been an extensive topic of discussion among researchers for over two decades. What has been missing in the discussion, though, is the perspective of those who teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL, especially those who work in Turkey. Therefore, the purpose of this case study was to investigate factors that motivated Turkish EFL teachers working at a Preparatory English Program of a university in Turkey and ways to enhance their motivation. Eight teachers took part in the study. To collect data, unstructured interviews were used. Then, codes were written and themes on teachers’ motivation and demotivation, and ways to motivate teachers emerged. The results can be understood by looking at expectancy theory, more specifically on the focus of the theory: intrinsic (personal and extrinsic (environmental motives. The analysis of what the teachers believed to be their source of motivation and demotivation helped the researcher to propose ways to enhance their motivation.

  15. Teachers' professional development: Awareness of literacy practices

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Berit, Lundgren; Eileen, Scheckle; Denise, Zinn.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article draws upon our experiences of participating in a Literacy Hub in South Africa. The aim is to describe and analyse how dialogue among Grade Eight teachers in a Literacy Hub around literacy teaching practices might lead to professional development and deepen teachers' understanding of lit [...] eracy practices and teaching. Interviews and observations with eight teachers were conducted to understand their literacy practices. The result indicates that sustainable development is a process that takes time. Furthermore, the study shows that the teachers relate to students' context and own experiences as a means of introducing a topic. While some teachers try to give the students access to cognitively demanding tasks, most tasks and events in the classrooms are cognitively undemanding and context-embedded. The importance of offering teachers examples of varied literacy practices and of making classroom literacy practice visible is noted.

  16. Research interests of secondary science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; Samuel, K. V.; Helgeson, Stanley; Novak, Joseph; Butzow, John

    In the past few years, science educators and the nation at large have become increasingly concerned about the Crisis in Science Education. An underlying cause of this crisis is the nonuniform quality of instruction delivered by secondary science teachers. One way to improve the quality of teaching in the schools is the application of science education research findings to teaching. Most teachers are unaware of the research findings and/or do not apply them in their classrooms. This study helps determine the areas of research which are of greatest interest to secondary science teachers. Results will be used by NSTA to determine the contents of future volumes of the monograph What Research Says to the Science Teacher. A random sample of 600 secondary science teachers was obtained from the National Registry of NSTA. Teachers were sent a 23 item questionnaire that asked them to rate their interest in each research topic on a five point scale. The questionnaire contained the 12 items prepared by a NARST-NSTA committee in 1979 and an additional 11 items using the same format. Demographic data collected from the survey included sex, teaching assignment, role in school, type of school, type of community, years of teaching experience, and familiarity with What Research Says. Data were analyzed using this demographic data as well as according to whether teachers returned the original or a follow-up questionnaire. Teachers who returned the first questionnaire had basically the same preferences as those who returned the follow-up questionnaire. Sixty percent of the teachers completed the questionnaire in usable form. Overall results of the study based on both frequency of response and on mean rating indicate that the following five topics are of greatest interest to secondary science teachers: laboratory experiences, motivational techniques, effect on college courses, problem solving, and meaningful learning. Analysis of data according to the subject taught indicated that chemistry and physics teachers are more interested in problem solving than biology teachers, and that chemistry, physics, and earth science teachers are also interested in the sequence of the content. Males and females had the same top five interests but in a different order. The same is true for teachers of grades 7-9 versus grades 10-12. Rural teachers preferences varied substantially from those in other settings and differences were also found for teachers familiar with What Research Says compared to the rest of the sample. For every classification of teacher, the area of least interest was sex difference research.

  17. Preparing Teachers: Expectations and Existing Situation at Faculties of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Gökmeno?lu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In-depth interviews were conducted to research the expectations of teacher educators from the prospective teachers and their opinions on the existing facilities provided by the faculty of education. Content analysis, performed on the data collected from a sample of eight teacher educators from different departments in one of the faculties of education, suggested that the expectations from teacher candidates had seven dimensions: content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, country specific realities, communication skills, teacher characteristics, scientific knowledge and research skills, and professional development. Regarding the results, implications for teacher education programs were discussed, and suggestions for further research were made

  18. Looking at cooperative learning through the eyes of public schools teachers participating in a teacher development program

    OpenAIRE

    López Hurtado, María Eugenia; Viáfara González, John Jairo

    2009-01-01

    An exploration of in-service public schools teachers’ implementation of cooperative learning forms the basis of this article. By means of a qualitative approach to research, two tutors in a teacher development program have studied how a group of English teachers set the conditions to create a cooperative learning environment in their classes. Additionally, they reveal the perceptions that these educators have of themselves as initiators who guide their students in this pedagogical experience....

  19. Science Teacher Quality and Effectiveness: Gweru Urban Junior Secondary School Students’ Points of View

    OpenAIRE

    Mandina Shadreck; Mambanda Isaac

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions among junior secondary science students from Gweru Urban secondary schools in Zimbabwe towards science teachers' teaching quality and effectiveness. This qualitative study approached and interviewed Form 2 students from 10 different schools in Gweru urban. The results show that three key dimensions of science teacher quality and effectiveness emerged: teacher's scientific knowledge, teacher’s pedagogical skills and teacher's social comp...

  20. PRACTICE-BASED EDUCATION VOCFTIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS, AS A FORM OF READINESS OF TEACHERS TO STADY AT HOME CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ????? ??????? ??????????

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health in system of additional professional education are considered.  The concept "readiness of the teacher for training at home children with limited opportunities of health" is defined.  The advanced training course program "Training at home children with limited opportunities of health" as means of formation of this type of readiness is submitted.Research objective is justification and skilled and experimental check of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.As a result of research special educational needs of children with limited opportunities of the health, defining specifics of activity of the teachers training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed; structural components of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed and scientifically proved; the model of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed; scientific and methodical ensuring process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed.Scope of results: the educational and methodical complex developed by the author (the program, monitors, educational and methodical grants can be used by the faculty of pedagogical highest and average special institutions for development of special courses; the faculty of system of additional professional education of teachers for the purpose of development of curricula and educational programs, didactic and methodical materials for the organization of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-4-21

  1. Teachers´constructions of multilingual students competence levels in literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Based on a theoretical understanding of standardised literacy testing as a social practice (Hamilton, 2001; 2012) this paper explores and discusses teachers´ perceptions of and practices around National standardised literacy testing in a Danish primary class with multilingual students. In the first...... part of the presentation it is explored how these standardised testing instruments and the result of the tests are embedded in teachers´ practices and in their perceptions of multilingual students´ literacy levels. The analysis is based on a six year longitudinal study in one primary school class in...... Denmark. Besides the standardised tests used in the classrooms the data consists of interviews with teachers, of observations of testing practices, and of school-home conferences. The analysis reveals that the validity of the standardised literacy tests is questioned in relation to multilingual students...

  2. From Awareness to Cultural Agency: EFL Colombian Student Teachers’ Travelling Abroad Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Viafara González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombian English as a foreign language student teachers’ opportunities to grow as educators through international sojourns do not usually subsume the traditional study and residence abroad goal. This was the case for our participants who engaged mainly in working abroad with study being ancillary. Fifty student teachers from two public universities reported how their international sojourn bolstered their intercultural learning. Three different programs, disconnected from participants’ academic institutions, became vehicles for their experiences abroad. Surveys and interviews reveal that participants’ origin, selected programs, and contextual circumstances influenced their intercultural learning. As a result, intercultural development gravitated towards awareness of intercultural patterns, critical reading of culture, and pre-service teachers’ repositioning to build cultural agency. Implications suggest the need to connect traveling abroad programs to undergraduate curricula.

  3. Scale development for pre-service mathematics teachers' perceptions related to their pedagogical content knowledge

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Esra, Bukova-Güzel; Berna, Cantürk-Günhan; Semiha, Kula; Zekiye, Özgür; Aysun Nüket, Elçí.

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a scale to determine pre-service mathematics teachers' perceptions related to their pedagogical content knowledge. Firstly, a preliminary perception scale of pedagogical content knowledge was constructed and then administered to 112 pre-service mathematics tea [...] chers who were enrolled in a mathematics teacher education programme. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, item analysis, correlation analysis, internal consistency and descriptive statistic techniques were used to analyse the data. Then validity and reliability of the scale were investigated. The analyses resulted in the development of a five-factor scale of 17 items that was proved valid and reliable. We contend that the scale developed has the merit to contribute to pre-service teachers' self-awareness by revealing their perceptions regarding their pedagogical content knowledge.

  4. Science Teachers' Thinking About the Nature of Science: A New Methodological Approach to Its Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Alonso, Ángel; García-Carmona, Antonio; Manassero-Mas, María Antonia; Bennàssar-Roig, Antoni

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes Spanish science teachers' thinking about issues concerning the nature of science (NOS) and the relationships connecting science, technology, and society (STS). The sample consisted of 774 in-service and pre-service teachers. The participants responded to a selection of items from the Questionnaire of Opinions on Science, Technology & Society in a multiple response model. These data were processed to generate the invariant indices that are used as the bases for subsequent quantitative and qualitative analyses. The overall results reflect moderately informed conceptions, and a detailed analysis by items, categories, and positions reveals a range of positive and negative conceptions about the topics of NOS dealt with in the questionnaire items. The implications of the findings for teaching and teacher training on the themes of NOS are discussed.

  5. Teacher-Team Development in a School-Based Professional Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU PIEN CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents how a team progressed through the five stages of team development as a result of a school-based professional development program using a laboratory class cycle. Six Grade two teachers and their administrator in a primary school in the south eastern United States participated in the study. All the teachers were interviewed at the end of each laboratory class cycle. Their administrator was interviewed after the program ended. A grounded theory approach and constant comparative method were used. The study revealed how the teachers’ participation in the program progressed according to Tuckman and Jenson’s (1997 model of team development in the laboratory class cycle. Establishment of trust among teachers and team support over an extended time were identified as important factors in shaping the team development.

  6. Assessing teachers' positive psychological functioning at work: Development and validation of the Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Tyler L; Long, Anna C J; Cook, Clayton R

    2015-06-01

    This study reports on the initial development and validation of the Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (TSWQ) with 2 samples of educators-a general sample of 185 elementary and middle school teachers, and a target sample of 21 elementary school teachers experiencing classroom management challenges. The TSWQ is an 8-item self-report instrument for assessing teachers' subjective wellbeing, which is operationalized via subscales measuring school connectedness and teaching efficacy. The conceptualization and development processes underlying the TSWQ are described, and results from a series of preliminary psychometric and exploratory analyses are reported to establish initial construct validity. Findings indicated that the TSWQ was characterized by 2 conceptually sound latent factors, that both subscales and the composite scale demonstrated strong internal consistency, and that all scales demonstrated convergent validity with self-reported school supports and divergent validity with self-reported stress and emotional burnout. Furthermore, results indicated that TSWQ scores did not differ according to teachers' school level (i.e., elementary vs. middle), but that they did differ according to unique school environment (e.g., 1 middle school vs. another middle school) and teacher stressors (i.e., general teachers vs. teachers experiencing classroom management challenges). Results also indicated that, for teachers experiencing classroom challenges, the TSWQ had strong short-term predictive validity for psychological distress, accounting for approximately half of the variance in teacher stress and emotional burnout. Implications for theory, research, and the practice of school psychology are discussed. PMID:25642703

  7. Female Teachers’ Perception of Reflective Teaching as a Teacher Development Tool in the Saudi Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Shukri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Teacher development in the EFL context has been well-established in Western educational institutions. However, although there are some limited studies in the Middle East, it is still under-researched in Saudi Arabia. This study investigates the EFL teachers’ perceptions of reflective teaching as a tool for teacher development and its challenges in higher education in Saudi Arabia. It also aims to raise teachers’ awareness of the importance of teacher development and its empowering impact in meeting their students’ needs. Based on a review of previous studies, the present study hypothesized a significant relevance between reflective teaching practice and the promotion of professional development. A structured questionnaire is used as a quantitative methodology followed by qualitative analysis of the findings. The findings support the hypothesis in which the participants’ views revealed a strong relationship between reflective teaching and professionalism in teaching. Finally, further recommendations that suggest methods of reflective teaching are proposed. 

  8. An Investigation into Teacher Turnover in International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odland, Glenn; Ruzicka, Mary

    2009-01-01

    This study explored expatriate teacher turnover in international schools. Two hundred and eighty-one international teachers completed a questionnaire identifying which variables influenced their decision to leave at the end of their first contract. Using both quantitative and qualitative data, this study revealed that three causal factors were…

  9. Disability, Stigma and Otherness: Perspectives of Parents and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalvani, Priya

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the perspectives of parents and teachers in the US with regard to the meaning and implications of disability in the context of schoolling, and of raising a child with a disability. The findings revealed broad conceptual differences in the perspectives of these two groups. Teachers' beliefs were generally consistent…

  10. Leading the Local: Teachers Union Presidents Chart Their Own Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan Moore; Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Munger, Mindy Sick; Papay, John P.; Qazilbash, Emily K.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers unions are among the most powerful, yet least studied, actors in public education today. Although public attention focuses on the influence of national unions, the policies that most affect teachers and schooling are bargained by local unions and school boards. Interviews with 30 recently elected local union presidents reveal that these…

  11. Critically Re-Conceptualising Early Career Teacher Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce; Down, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how and why we adopted a socially critical orientation to early career teacher resilience. In re-conceptualising early career teacher resilience, we expose the normative components of resilience by revealing the implicit values, beliefs and assumptions that underpin most traditional conceptions of resilience. We argue…

  12. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were…

  13. Understanding Inclusion: The Perspectives of Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kathryn A.; Darling, Carol Anderson

    2003-01-01

    In-depth interviews with four family and consumer sciences teachers indicated that none had been prepared for inclusive classrooms and they had positive attitudes about special education students. Classroom observations revealed some instances where students were not included and highlighted the effect of teacher knowledge and behavior. (SK)

  14. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a…

  15. Student Science Teachers' Ideas of the Digestive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardak, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to reveal the levels of understanding of student science teachers regarding the digestive system. In this research, 116 student science teachers were tested by applying the drawing method. Upon the analysis of the drawings they made, it was found that some of them had misconceptions such as "the organs of the…

  16. Turkish Science Student Teachers' Conceptions on the States of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Abdullah; Altuk, Yasemin Gödek

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine science students teachers' conceptions on the concepts related to "the matter and the states of the matter". 112 Turkish science student teachers participated at this research. A questionnaire consisting of thirteen open-ended items was designed to collect the data. The questionnaire aimed to reveal the…

  17. Principal Dispositions Regarding the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Dolph, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) was first implemented during the 2013-14 school term. This study examined principals' dispositions at the end of this school term. Findings revealed several major concerns. The most prominent were (a) not having sufficient time to implement the program properly, (b) basing a teacher's performance heavily…

  18. Becoming a Good Teacher: Struggles from the Swampland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Mary Beth

    2011-01-01

    One seventh-grade English language arts teacher engaged in teacher research in order to become a more understanding, responsive, and confident instructor. Systematic inquiry into her own practice revealed a conflict between what students perceived as their literacy needs and desires (discrete reading skills) with what she perceived to be important…

  19. Does content knowledge matter for new teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Todd D.

    There is considerable evidence that new teachers are ill prepared for classroom practice, including self-reported evidence collected from teachers (e.g., Levine, 2006), and statistical evidence for differences in the achievement of students with new versus more experienced teachers (Rivkin, Hanushek, & Kain, 2005). In light of the challenges encountered by new teachers (e.g., Levine, 2006), this study examined the value of different forms of teacher knowledge for teachers with different levels of experience. In particular, this study investigated the interactive relationship between teaching experience and teacher content knowledge, and student achievement in mathematics and science. In New York City, Boyd et al. (2009) linked practice-focused teacher preparation to student mathematics achievement in the first year of teaching and teacher content preparation to achievement in the second. However, other studies demonstrated interactions between teaching experience and content knowledge with different interpretations (e.g., Kukla-Acevedo, 2009; Monk, 1994). At the same time, this study examined the interactive relationship between teaching experience and teachers' pedagogical content knowledge, and student achievement. Extant models of teacher career development (Huberman, 1989; National Research Council, 2010) and how teacher education affects student achievement (e.g., Desimone, 2009) offered theoretical grounding for the study. With nationally representative samples of fourth and eighth grade U.S. students--participants in the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study--this study employed hierarchical linear modeling to address its research questions among an array of student achievement outcomes in the domains of mathematics and science. This study attempted to account for salient student, teacher, and contextual factors, and the probabilities of teachers' receipt of various teacher education "treatments" (i.e., propensity score analysis) to reduce the plausibility of selection threats to internal validity. The study found no evidence for relationships between teacher content knowledge or pedagogical content knowledge and student mathematics and science achievement in fourth and eighth grade. Furthermore, the results indicated no interactive relationships between forms of teacher knowledge and teaching experience, and student achievement in these grades/subjects. The limitations of cross-sectional, observational studies using large-scale data and directions for further research are discussed.

  20. Reflective practice and instructional uses of analogies by seondary-school chemistry teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Robert William

    The characteristics of submitted analogies reported used by 15 secondary-school chemistry teachers in classroom instruction during a six-week period were evaluated in light of literature recommendations for effective uses of analogies. Teacher e-mail responses to biweekly, stimulated reflection prompts regarding submitted analogies, in conjunction with exit-interview responses, were also used to investigate teachers' content and pedagogical knowledge. Reported knowledge gains related to instructional uses of analogies resulting from participation in the study were evaluated. Analogy summaries submitted were analyzed for literature-identified characteristics indicative of instructionally effective analogy use. Using grounded theory, e-mail responses and exit interview transcripts were analyzed within a naturalistic framework. Results of these analyses were compared, providing a means for triangulating data and verifying that 15 participants were sufficient for the purposes of the study. Results suggest that analogies employed by participating teachers were largely congruent with major literature-based tenants for effective use, but generally failed to address analogy limitations. However, interview data indicated that participating teachers considered it important to discuss analogical limitations with students. Several data-supported explanations to resolve the discrepancy between expressed importance and actual appearance of analogical limitations in submitted analogy summaries are offered. Further, due to a lack of congruency between analog and target concepts, several submitted analogies had the potential for fostering serious student misconceptions. The study revealed two analogy-use criteria employed by chemistry teachers not found in reported literature: (a) the employed analog should relate to student experience, and, (b) the analogy---if anthropomorphic should be inclusive, not deprecating any segment of society. The prevalence of anthropomorphic analogies submitted by participating teachers---providing evidence of attempts to relate to student experience---raises concerns that student understanding of the nature of science might be adversely impacted by attributing "volition" to physical phenomena. Stimulated reflection as employed in this study permitted non-threatening opportunities to gather information about teacher content and pedagogical knowledge. Evidence suggests that a majority of teachers adopted more thoughtful, analytical perspectives regarding instructional uses of analogies as a result of participating. Teachers also valued exposure to new instructional analogies, allowing them to enlarge their analogy repertoire for classroom use.

  1. Android Emotions Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a method for designing facial interfaces for sociable android robots with respect to the fundamental rules of human affect expression. Extending the work of Paul Ekman towards a robotic direction, we follow the judgment-based approach for evaluating facial expressions to test in which case an android robot like the Geminoid|DK –a duplicate of an Original person- reveals emotions convincingly; when following an empirical perspective, or when following a theoretical one. The methodology includes the processes of acquiring the empirical data, and gathering feedback on them. Our findings are based on the results derived from a number of judgments, and suggest that before programming the facial expressions of a Geminoid, the Original should pass through the proposed procedure. According to our recommendations, the facial expressions of an android should be tested by judges, even in cases that no Original is engaged in the android face creation.

  2. Teachers’ Perceptions of Sex Education of Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Taghdissi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Sex education of children, a complex issue in any culture, has always been a controversial subject. Schools can play a vital role in imparting sex education to children, particularly in more conservative communities. The objective of this study was to find out primary school teachers beliefs, attitudes, values, and understandings regarding sex education of school pupils. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study we employed a community-based approach to design the project. Purposeful, voluntary and maximum variation sampling was used to recruit 22 teachers from selected schools in Western Tehran (21 female and 1 male teacher. Information was collected in 4 focus-group discussion sessions. Grounded theory and thematic analysis were used.Results: Findings revealed three major themes: 1 organizational role, 2 institution construction, and 3 individual characteristics. These themes were described by subthemes as follows: 1. for organizational role: organizational culture and policies; 2. for institution construction: family and educational institutions; 3. for individual characteristics: biology, gender, instincts, curiosity, knowledge, and behaviors.Conclusion: From the participants point of views, the school and the family are two important institutions in children sex education. However, teachers are not sufficiently competent in sex behavior education. Inappropriate policies, resource limitations, and the family cultural structure are obstacles in sex education of children in schools. The participants believe the following are priorities in childrens sex education: changing cultural attitudes in organizations and institutions, such as cultural diffusion; sound training approaches in sex-related topics; providing sufficient resources; improving knowledge and skills of teachers in the area of sex education of pupils; and effective interaction between families and school authorities.

  3. To Learn from Teachers at School, Ideal Teacher or E-Learning Applications from the Perspectives of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eristi, Bahadir

    2012-01-01

    The present study, aimed at revealing the views of elementary school gifted students about the roles and behaviors of their teachers in class as well as about the in-class roles and behaviors that they expect from an ideal teacher with respect to different variables. Another question in the study was directed to determine students' views about…

  4. "A Fly in the Ointment": African American Male Preservice Teachers' Experiences with Stereotype Threat in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sonya V.; Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2015-01-01

    This study draws from a larger phenomenological study on African American academic persistence and career aspirations in education. This article highlights three African American males' experiences with concentrated forms of stereotype threat in teacher education. Their voices revealed dimensions of how power and privilege operate in teacher…

  5. Preservice Teachers' Emotion-Related Regulation and Cognition: Associations with Teachers' Responses to Children's Emotions in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The present research examines preservice teachers' (N = 24) self-reported emotion-related regulation and cognition as predictors of their observed responses to young children's positive and negative emotional displays. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that teachers reporting greater reappraisal strategies in…

  6. Reducing Stress through Guided Imagery and Music for Teachers of Emotionally Handicapped Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandra, Celene

    Four teachers of elementary aged emotionally handicapped students participated in a 10-session relaxation training program using guided imagery and music. Analysis of scores on the A State-Trait Anxiety Inventory revealed that all teachers reduced their stress level through the exercises. Further, all the teachers demonstrated their ability to…

  7. How Distributed Leadership Can Make a Difference in Teachers' Organizational Commitment? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulpia, Hester; Devos, Geert

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relation between distributed leadership and teachers' organizational commitment. Semi-structured interviews with teachers and school leaders of secondary schools were conducted. A comparative analysis of four schools with high and four schools with low committed teachers was carried out. Findings revealed differences…

  8. Teacher Professionalism under the Recent Reform of Performance Pay in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijia; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie Nai-Kwai

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a reform in teachers' pay, linking remuneration to performance, was implemented in China. The intention was to improve the quality of education by making teachers more diligent and creative and removing the inequality in pay between teachers in different schools. A review of this reform reveals that it has resolved the problem of…

  9. Intersecting Domains of Assessment Knowledge: School Typologies Based on Interviews with Secondary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Marged D.; Howley, Aimee; Henning, John E.; Gillam, Mary Beth; Weade, Ginger

    2013-01-01

    This study used qualitative interviewing with teachers at three high schools to answer research questions about teachers' assessment knowledge, school-specific assessment cultures, and teachers' perceptions of the assessment literacy of other key stakeholders. Data analysis revealed shared knowledge and practices across schools--use of formative…

  10. Localism and Teacher Labor Markets: How Geography and Decision Making May Contribute to Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Mimi; Cannata, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    A wide body of evidence indicates that there is a large inequality in the distribution of teachers across schools. Relatedly, recent research has revealed a number of important dimensions of teacher labor markets in the United States. We review the literature in two of these areas: the geography of teacher labor markets and the decision-making…

  11. Which Teachers Choose a Defined Contribution Pension Plan? Evidence from the Florida Retirement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2002, public school teachers in Florida have been permitted to choose between a defined benefit (DB) and a defined contribution (DC) retirement plan. We exploit this unique policy environment to study new teachers' revealed preferences over pension plan structures. Roughly 30 percent of teachers hired between 2003 and 2008 selected the DC…

  12. An Evaluation of a Media Literacy Program Training Workshop for Late Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scull, Tracy Marie; Kupersmidt, Janis Beth

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of a media literacy education, substance abuse prevention training workshop for late elementary school teachers. Analyses revealed that the randomly assigned intervention (n = 18) and control (n = 23) teachers were similar in demographic characteristics and pre-training beliefs and knowledge. Teachers who…

  13. Elementary School Teachers' Perspectives on Health Instruction: Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L.; Bartle, Heidi; Hill, Susan C.; Barnes, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated elementary school teachers' perspectives on barriers and enablers to teaching health in the classroom. Data from teacher interviews and focus groups revealed several barriers and few enablers, with three general thematic areas: existing policies or guidelines for instruction, limited instruction time, and teacher preferences. Overall,…

  14. Constructing the Academic Category of Teacher Educator in Universities' Recruitment Processes in Aotearoa, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Alexandra C.; Berg, David; Hill, Mary F.; Haigh, Mavis

    2015-01-01

    An examination of recruitment materials and interviews with personnel involved in the employment of teacher educators to positions in university-based New Zealand initial teacher education (ITE) courses reveals three constructions of teacher educator as academic worker: the professional expert, the dually qualified, and the traditional academic.…

  15. Which Classroom Behaviours Do Primary School Teachers Say They Find Most Troublesome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheldall, Kevin; Merrett, Frank

    1988-01-01

    A survey of 198 British elementary teachers revealed that 51 percent believe they were spending too much time on behavior problems. Three-quarters of the teachers identifed boys as their most troublesome students. Asked to identify the most troublesome classroom behaviors, the teachers selected "talking out of turn" and "hindering other children."…

  16. Making the transition to middle schooling: A case study of experienced science teachers coping with change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Donna Dorough

    The increasing popularity of the middle school movement necessitates a need for more interpretive research in middle level education. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore science teachers' perceptions of the transition to a new middle school and the meanings they attached to this new experience. The participants were three eighth grade science teachers, each with 20 plus years of teaching experience. The primary data for analysis was a series of five interviews with each participant. Data collection also included weekly participant observation of team meetings. Findings revealed that the science teachers all had positive feelings attached to the ability to keep track of students' academic progress and behavior problems as a result of teaming. The changes associated with the first year were very stressful for all three, primarily the loss of the traditional junior high departmentalized structure. The two participants who transferred directly from the junior high school were very skeptical of any benefits from an interdisciplinary curriculum, the appropriateness of the middle school philosophy for eighth grade students, and the move to heterogeneously grouped science classes. In contrast, the former junior high teacher who had spent the past ten years teaching sixth grade at the elementary school had positive beliefs about the potential benefits of an interdisciplinary curriculum and heterogeneous grouping. Teacher stress associated with a change in the school setting and the science teachers' constraints to actualizing a meaningful middle schooling experience are illuminated. Teachers' lack of ownership in the reform decision making process, loss of time with their science teacher peers, diminished compliments from high school counterparts, and need for more empirical evidence supporting proposed changes all served as barriers to embracing the reform initiatives. The participants found taking a very slow approach to be their most useful means of coping with the stress of these changes. The discussion includes meta-assertions and recommendations concerning the leadership and planning process for movement to a middle school philosophy, the most appropriate building structure for meeting needs of science teachers, teachers as curriculum makers, and the nature of middle level professional development for experienced science teachers.

  17. A case study of secondary teachers facilitating a historical problem-based learning instructional unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecore, John L.

    Current curriculum trends promote inquiry-based student-centered strategies as a way to foster critical thinking and learning. Problem-based learning (PBL), a type of inquiry focusing on an issue or "problem," is an instructional approach taught on the basis that science reform efforts increase scientific literacy. PBL is a constructivist approach to learning real life problems where understanding is a function of content, context, experiences, and learner goals; historical PBL situates the lesson in a historical context and provides opportunities for teaching NOS concepts. While much research exists on the benefits of historical PBL to student learning in general, more research is warranted on how teachers implement PBL in the secondary science curriculum. The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom-learning environment of four science teachers implementing a historical PBL instructional unit to identify the teachers' understandings, successes and obstacles. By identifying teachers' possible achievements and barriers with implementing a constructivist philosophy when executing historical PBL, educators and curriculum designers may improve alignment of the learning environment to constructivist principles. A qualitative interpretive case study guided this research study. The four participants of this study were purposefully and conveniently selected from biology teachers with at least three years of teaching experience, degrees in education, State Licensure, and completion of a PBL workshop. Data collection consisted of pre and post questionnaires, structured interviews, a card sort activity in which participants categorized instructional outcomes, and participant observations. Results indicated that the four teachers assimilated reform-based constructivist practices to fit within their preexisting routines and highlighted the importance of incorporating teachers' current systems into reform-based teacher instruction. While participating teachers addressed a few NOS tenets, emphasizing the full range of possible NOS objectives included in historical PBL is warranted. This study also revealed the importance of creating a collaborative classroom culture and building positive student-teacher relationships when implementing PBL instruction. The four teachers agreed that the historical PBL instructional unit provided a context for learning state standards, and they positively viewed their experiences teaching the lesson. Thus findings from this study suggest that teaching science in a historical context using PBL can be effective.

  18. Applying Knowledge Management in Teacher Evaluation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluations are underused in public schools, resulting in the loss of knowledge critical to professional development. Knowledge management (KM) theory offers approaches that can lead to improvements in the effectiveness of evaluations and teacher performance. This multiple case study of 9 campuses in an exemplary school district…

  19. Division of Personnel Intensive Teacher Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Educational Evaluation.

    The Intensive Teacher Training Program (ITT) was established in response to the critical shortage of special education teachers resulting from the Lora Decree (Education for All Handicapped Children's Act: PL 94-142). Students from ten New York City area colleges were selected to participate in a summer inservice training program. The…

  20. Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Filiz

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify the relationship between elementary school teachers' ICT engagement with their attitudes towards technology. To this end, one hundred elementary school students were asked to fill out questionnaires related to their ICT knowledge, usage, and attitude towards technology. The results show that teachers' ICT…

  1. Teacher Self-Evaluation and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towndrow, Phillip A.; Tan, Kelvin

    2009-01-01

    Positive claims are made for the adoption of practices that permit greater levels of involvement in teacher appraisals. The assumption is that when teachers are more involved in observing and evaluating their teaching, corresponding increases in empowerment and autonomy occur as a direct result. This paper challenges this claim by arguing that…

  2. Teacher Burnout in Black and White

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses teacher burnout which scholars define as a condition caused by depersonalization, exhaustion, and a diminished sense of accomplishment. A psychological model of how stress leads to burnout describes it as a syndrome resulting from teachers' inability to protect themselves against threats to their self esteem and well-being.…

  3. Examining Teachers' Decisions to Adopt New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, William; Crawley, Frank; Fine, Bethann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined teachers' beliefs about technology adoption as a reasoned, deliberate, intentional decision-making process, as reflected in Ajzen's (1985) Theory of Planned Behavior. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from teachers in four schools located in the southeastern region of the United States. Overall results indicated…

  4. Teachers' Beliefs about Neuroscience and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambo, Debby; Zambo, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Information from neuroscience is readily available to educators, yet instructors of educational psychology and related fields have not investigated teachers' beliefs regarding this information. The purpose of this survey study was to uncover the beliefs 62 teachers held about neuroscience and education. Results indicate there were three types of…

  5. Teacher Educators' Digital Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2014-01-01

    This position paper focuses on how the new national curriculum for school and the new general plan for teacher education in Norway change the underlying premises for teaching and learning in today's teacher education. This has become particularly pressing as a result of the new educational reform "Knowledge Promotion" in schools,…

  6. The Relationships between Child Temperament, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Teacher-Child Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Meral Oren; Ithel Jones

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships between child temperament, teacher-child relationships, and teacher-child interactions in four preschool classrooms. The preliminary analyses revealed classroom differences for all variables. In all the classrooms except one, the temperament factor Reactivity had positive and high correlations with Conflict in the relationship. Task Orientation was positively correlated to the Closeness subscale in three of the classrooms. In two of th...

  7. Examination on Expert Chemistry Teachers’ Secondary School Chemistry Textbook Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan NAK?BO?LU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine how chemistry textbooks used by expert chemistry teachers are used during teaching process in secondary education, and to find how prospective chemistry teachers evaluate the situation mentioned. Thus, a project concerned with how expert chemistry teachers use them in their classes was carried out. Based on the research context, an interview that was used to interview with expert chemistry teachers by prospective chemistry teachers was prepared by the author. Next, prospective chemistry teachers were asked to evaluate how expert chemistry teachers used textbooks. The sample group of the study consisted of 21 expert high school chemistry teachers working at schools in Bal?kesir and 21 prospective chemistry teachers studying at Education Faculty of Bal?kesir University during 2007-2008 academic years. The findings of the study revealed that expert chemistry teachers did not use textbooks during their teaching process while they used them as the sources of problems and exercises at the end of units. Furthermore, it was found that University Entrance Exam (OSS had an effect on how to use the textbooks by teachers.

  8. Conceptual Change and Science Achievement Related to a Lesson Sequence on Acids and Bases Among African American Alternative High School Students: A Teacher's Practical Arguments and the Voice of the "Other"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lynda Charese

    The study of teaching and learning during the period of translating ideals of reform into classroom practice enables us to understand student-teacher-researcher symbiotic learning. In line with this assumption, the purpose of this study is threefold:(1) observe effects of the Common Knowledge Construction Model (CKCM), a conceptual change inquiry model of teaching and learning, on African American students' conceptual change and achievement; (2) observe the shift in teacher's practical arguments; and (3) narrate the voice of "the Other" about teacher professional learning. This study uses retrospective data from a mixed-method approach consisting of Phenomenography, practical arguments and story-telling. Data sources include audio-recordings of a chemistry teacher's individual interviews of her students' prior- and post-intervention conceptions of acids and bases; results of Acid-Base Achievement Test (ABA-T); video-recordings of a chemistry teacher's enactment of CKCM acid-base lesson sequence; audio-recordings of teacher-researcher reflective discourse using classroom video-clips; teacher interviews; and teacher and researcher personal reflective journals. Students' conceptual changes reflect change in the number of categories of description; shift in language use from everyday talk to chemical talk; and development of a hierarchy of chemical knowledge. ABA-T results indicated 17 students in the experimental group achieved significantly higher scores than 22 students in the control group taught by traditional teaching methods. The teacher-researcher reflective discourse about enactment of the CKCM acid-base lesson sequence reveals three major shifts in teacher practical arguments: teacher inadequate preparedness to adequate preparedness; lack of confidence to gain in confidence; and surface learning to deep learning. The developing story uncovers several aspects about teaching and learning of African American students: teacher caring for the uncared; cultivating student and teacher confidence; converting dependence on teacher and self to peer interdependence. The study outlines six implications: caring conceptual change inquiry model for the often unreached mind; developing simple chemical talk into coherent chemical explanation; using CKCM for alternative high school students' conceptual change and achievement; engaging teachers in elicitation and appraisal of practical arguments for reconstruction of beliefs; overcoming challenges in teacher practical argument research; and "storytelling" as a way of unpacking teacher transformation amidst complexities of classroom teaching and learning.

  9. Prospective Teacher Concerns: A Comparative Study of Departments of English Language Teaching and Language and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mustafa naci kayao?lu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Language teachers in Turkey do not take a standard pre-service education as graduates of English Language Teaching (ELT, linguistics, and translation departments all end up with language teaching profession and this, in turn, results in different teaching needs and concerns. The researchers argue that these different concerns may be one of the underlying causes of chronic language education problems in Turkey, in that Turkish Ministry of National Education does not take into consideration the comparative picture of practicing teachers and composes curricula, teaching materials, and compulsory one-shot professional development activities that all reflect “one size fits all” ideology. Therefore, determining the needs and concerns of pre-service language teachers is of vital importance. The current study has arisen from Griffith’s (2012 call for more larger-scale studies on teacher concerns across different contexts via triangulation. The researchers aim at not only investigating teacher concerns but also painting a much detailed comparative picture between ELT and linguistics department prospective teachers. The researchers target convenience sampling, in the full knowledge that this group will not represent the whole population. However, this type of non-probability sampling can serve well when it is easy to gather much informative data. Building on the recent work of Griffiths (2012, the researchers have modified and extended the existing measurement tool of Griffiths (2012 to investigate the issue much deeper and compensate the caveats. They adapted her instrument and asked the participants to add their thoughts as well as deciding their concern level. The results are mainly in line with the referred study in terms of the rating and frequency. The study reveals that there are some differences between the concerns of ELT department students and language and literature department students. While prospective teachers studying at the ELTdepartment were found to be highly concerned about technology, their counterparts studying at the langauge and literature department were not interested in the issue. The study also reveals that despite EIL’s large space in the literature (Cogo, 2012; Sowden, 2012, it was not found as a major concern for the prospective teachers. Methodology was also the least rated concern for the prospective teachers at both departments on the contrary to the well-accepted literature.

  10. Student Perceptions of Teacher Violations of Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Thomas H.; Prichard, Keith W.

    1973-01-01

    Reports on a study conducted among 815 high school students in three schools -- urban, suburban, and rural. The study revealed that 81 percent of the students perceive teachers to be violating the right to respect for their opinions. (Author)

  11. "Three Ways Writing Is Thinking" (Writing, Technology, and Teacher Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Linda

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes the ways in which writing is thinking. Illustrates this claim by showing how writing engages thinking, how writing reveals thinking, and how writing clarifies thinking. Provides concrete ways that writing teachers can model the writing process. (HB)

  12. Teacher Involvement in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kevin O.

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers in the field of teacher education have proposed the formation of partnerships between teachers and teacher educators, without explicitly stating what additional roles teachers might play in the teacher preparation process. This article describes how some pre-service teacher education programmes have increased the involvement of…

  13. Do We Produce Enough Mathematics and Science Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research on the supply and demand of math and science teachers finds some surprising results. The employment of qualified math and science teachers has more than kept pace with the demand, and most schools find qualified teachers for those positions. However, about a third of public schools--particularly high-poverty, high-minority, and…

  14. Mathematics Teachers' Approaches to Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Pekka

    1996-01-01

    A six-year case study was conducted on the impact of, and teachers' role in, the use of computers and the Mathcad program in mathematics instruction at a technical college. Results for 2 teachers and 51 of their students showed definite stages in the teachers' use of the computer technology. (SLD)

  15. Impact of Satisfaction and Commitment on Teachers' Organizational Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesen, Harun; Basim, Nejat H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of job satisfaction and organizational commitment on teachers' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in a structural equation model. The study was employed to a group of teachers and their supervisors. The results indicated that job satisfaction and commitment to the school had an impact on OCBs of the teachers…

  16. Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education in Jordanian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zyoudi, Mohammed

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education in Jordan, and the factors that influenced such attitudes. Qualitative research was used to gather information from all general education and special education teachers. The sample consisted of 90 teachers at 7 schools. The results of this study showed…

  17. Developing Teachers' Subject Didactic Competence through Problem Posing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticha, Marie; Hospesova, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Problem posing (not only in lesson planning but also directly in teaching whenever needed) is one of the attributes of a teacher's subject didactic competence. In this paper, problem posing in teacher education is understood as an educational and a diagnostic tool. The results of the study were gained in pre-service primary school teacher…

  18. Effects of Teacher Rewards on Recognition and Job Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Implications of Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory for teacher reward programs were tested by comparing changes in teachers' (N=38) job-enrichment opportunities and recognition after the teachers had chosen one of two rewards (travel to professional training conferences or cash). Results were consistent with the motivation-hygiene theory. (IAH)

  19. EFL Foreign Teacher Stress in Korea: Causes and Coping Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Gregory C.

    2007-01-01

    Survey study of 53 foreign EFL teachers in Jeonju City, South Korea looks at causes of teacher stress and coping mechanisms between the years of 2004 and 2006. Results show foreign EFL teachers report moderate levels of stress and attribute stresses in roughly equal measures to student misbehavior and school director/administrative sources. Survey…

  20. Developments in School-Based Initial Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townshend, John

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of schools in Great Britain's preservice teacher education, noting the political history of the country's teacher education. Research shows that the result of partnerships between schools and institutions of higher education has been teachers who enter the field with satisfactory qualifications. (SM)

  1. Teachers' Opinions about the Use of Body Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Effective communication occurs with non-verbal and verbal tools. In this study the body language as non-verbal communication tool is taken to be examined, and teachers' opinions about the use and importance of body language in education are surveyed. Eight open-ended questions are asked to 100 teachers. As a result, it is shown that teachers…

  2. Examining Teachers' Motivation Level According to School Principals' Humor Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recepoglu, Ergun; Kilinc, Ali Cagatay; Cepni, Osman

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the motivation level of teachers according to school principals' humor styles. The humor styles survey and job motivation scale were used to gather data from 305 randomly selected teachers employed in primary schools in Karabuk. Results indicated that 141 of the teachers claimed school principal had…

  3. Do We Produce Enough Mathematics and Science Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical research on the supply and demand of math and science teachers finds some surprising results. The employment of qualified math and science teachers has more than kept pace with the demand, and most schools find qualified teachers for those positions. However, about a third of public schools--particularly high-poverty, high-minority, and…

  4. Factors Affecting Teachers' Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Hamonangan

    2014-01-01

    The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers' information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers' information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument…

  5. Florida Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability and Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability and efficacy of Florida preservice agricultural education teachers. Results indicated that the preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems. On the other hand, the preservice teachers were efficacious in personal teaching efficacy and personal…

  6. Teachers and Challenging Behavior: Knowledge, Views, and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westling, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Seventy teachers (38 special education and 32 general education teachers) completed a questionnaire using Likert-type scales to describe several traits and conditions about themselves and students with challenging behavior. Results indicated that most teachers did not use many effective strategies or receive sufficient support, and viewed…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions, Beliefs and Concerns about Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Sigal; Heiman, Tali; Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Schools and teachers nowadays face new difficulties and challenges as a result of the fast growth of cyberbullying. The aim of the study is to examine the perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, as well as the needs, of a professionally diverse group of teachers. Three-hundred and twenty-eight teachers (88.4% female, 11.6% male)…

  8. Teacher and student intrinsic motivation in project-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Sf; Cheng, RWY; Ma, WYK

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between teacher and student intrinsic motivation in project-based learning. The participants were 126 Hong Kong secondary school teachers and their 631 students who completed evaluation questionnaires after a semester-long project-based learning program. Both teachers and students were asked to indicate their motivation in the program, and students were also asked to report the instructional support they received from their teachers. The results of h...

  9. Work Motivation of Teachers: Relationship with Organizational Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Thara Sabapathy; Louis George

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: In the modern world of competitive higher education the role of motivated teachers is undeniable. This study aims to find the importance of organizational commitment in motivating the teachers. Data was collected from 450 degree college teachers of Bangalore city. Analysis of data and the discussion is included. The results showed a positive relationship between work motivation and organizational commitment of degree college teachers. More commi...

  10. COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY OF PROSPECTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Ünlü, Hüseyin; Emin SÜEL

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the computer self-efficacy of Turkish prospective physical education teachers. The research group consisted of 173 prospective physical education teachers. In the study “Computer Self-Efficacy Perception Scale” was used as data collection tool. Results indicated that prospective physical education teachers obtained high computer self-efficacy scores. Prospective physical education teachers’ computer self-efficacy was also examined according to their gender and class ye...

  11. Mathematics Special Content Competencies of Elementary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Gülteke; Ekber Tomul; Fikret Korur

    2013-01-01

    According to the results of national and international level examinations, the achievement of students in Turkey in mathematics is low. Elementary school teachers play a significant role in the education of students. Elementary school teachers differ from other teachers in that they are responsible for teaching more than one subject. In determining the competencies and performance indicators of elementary school teachers, the Ministry of National Education has paid regard to the common ground...

  12. STUDENTS’ OPPINION ABOUT PROFESSIONAL ETHICS RELATION OF THE TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Stojanovska

    2013-01-01

    Professional teacher’s ethics is a collection of moral codes of their professional work. It is significant that the teaching profession respects certain designated professional-ethical codes of conduct between the teachers and the students, with their colleagues and other people they professionally cooperate with.     This study is focused on analysis of the professional ethical relation of teachers towards students, seen from student’s point of view. These are the results of student’s report...

  13. The Effect of Gender, Seniority and Subject Matter on the Perceptions of Organizational Justice of Teachers: A Meta-Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkurt, Yahya; Yilmaz, Kursad; Karaman, Gizem

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the results of a meta-analysis conducted with the theses and research studies published in Turkey from 2005 to 2012 regarding organizational justice. The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of gender, seniority and subject matter on the perceptions of organizational justice of teachers. Specific criteria were used…

  14. Teachers' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about child abuse and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, N; Casey, K; Daro, D

    1992-01-01

    In considering the great responsibility placed upon teachers to involve themselves in child abuse prevention, education, and detection, the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse (NCPCA) conducted a nationwide survey of teachers from 40 school districts in 29 randomly selected counties. The survey explores teachers knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about child abuse and its prevention. Five hundred and sixty-eight teachers responded, revealing that while the majority of teachers confront child abuse among their students, they are provided insufficient education on how to address it. Other findings are reported with respect to teachers' reporting behavior, potential barriers to reporting, child assault prevention programs, and corporal punishment in schools. PMID:1559171

  15. Prevalence and attitudes of smoking among secondary school teachers in Hadramout coastal districts, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali Bahaj

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive KAP study about smoking was conducted in all the ten secondary schools in Hadramout coastal districts during October 2004 – April 2005 and a total of 317 teachers were enrolled in the study (182 male, 135 female teachers. The findings revealed that about 8% of the teachers were smokers; all smokers were males (prevalence 14%. Only 10% of teachers had received training to limit smoking among students, and 27% had educational materials about harmful effects of smoking. The study concluded that low smoking prevalence, good knowledge and attitudes of teachers, especially female teachers, toward smoking may offer a chance for smoking prevention strategies in secondary schools.

  16. Factors influencing trust of teachers among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnianingsih, Sri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, Ki Hajar Dewantoro is one of the most respected scholars in education philosophy. He stated the importance of trust earned by teachers in guiding students in their learning activities. The teacher, as the leader in the class, needs to develop mutual trust between students and teachers. Trust to teachers is strongly required by students as a foundation in developing and expanding their relationship and also social network. It is also the fundamental element in their desire to pursue higher education, for it is only through a sense of trust that student will embrace an empowering sense of freedom and pursuit the knowledge. The exercise of this freedom requires a risk on behalf of students based on the trust of their teachers and the learning experience that they provide. If students trust their teachers, they will be more able to focus on the task at hand and to work and learn more effectively. A total number of 291 senior high school students in Yogyakarta (males=147, females=144 completed an open-ended questionnaire developed for this study that asks how much they trust their teachers and the reason why they trust their teachers. The data was analyzed using indigenous psychological approach of analyzing the content of open-ended responses, categorization of the responses and cross-tabulating with demographic/background information. Results indicated that 63% of participants stated that they trusted their teachers. The main reason for trusting their teachers are as follows: they are perceived as being similar to their parents, teachers’ ability in transferring knowledge, the relationship with teacher, and their abilities of guiding students. The study concluded that trust of senior high school students was established because of views that teachers are parents that have competence in delivering knowledge and are formally established as teachers. Therefore a teacher’s behavior that similarly represents a parent’s behavior at home will produce a child’s trust and this will become the foundation for the students to learn better.

  17. What Is the Teacher Doing? What Are the Students Doing? An Application of the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the use of the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test as diagnostic tool for both preservice teacher beliefs about science teaching and science methods course effectiveness. Direct comparison of pre-course to post-course images from 50 preservice elementary teachers was undertaken using McNemar's test. Results indicated statistically…

  18. “Mind Maps” in the Metaphors of Geography Teacher Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ay?egül ?eyiho?lu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to reveal geography teacher candidates’ perceptions related to “mind maps used in Climatology course” via metaphors. The study has been conducted in Trabzon, TURKEY. The study group consists of 32 first-grade teacher candidates studying at Department of Geography Teaching, Fatih Education Faculty in the spring semester of 2010-2011 academic year. In order for the data collection, metaphor technique has been used. Each teacher candidate participating in the research has been asked to associate “mind maps used in Climatology course” with something and to explain the reasons of their associating. After analyzing the data, the metaphors students created have been gathered under five main categories. These categories, according to their percentages, are (from higher percentage to lower percentage: instructive, improving high-level thinking skills, entertaining, visual and subjective. Those which stress on the “instructive” side of the technique are formed of sub-categories as “summarizing, permanent and guiding”. The sub-categories of the main category “improves high-level thinking skills” are formed of “adjusting the associations, imagination, questioning skills”. As a result of the research, the technique has been found instructive and effective in terms of questioning, imagination, showing the associations. Also the technique’s being entertaining, appealing to the eye, reflecting the individual subjectively are among the results of the research.

  19. School teachers' attitude toward population control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaswani, N V; Kapoor, I

    1977-01-01

    A report on a study of 412 school teachers in the Bombay area of India. 82 of the teachers were tested initially, and found to have unclear ideas about the meaning of "population control." As a result, the definition of the term adopted by UNESCO in 1970 was incorporated into the questionnaire, and translated into Hindi/Marathi and Gujarti. The 1st 82 teachers were considered as a pretest group, and the remaining teachers were given a 3-part questionnaire. This included identification data, questions on their opinions and reactions toward teaching population education, and their own views on age of marriage and family size. Tables break down the results in several ways. The main conclusions are that a majority of the teachers responding were still unclear about the meaning of population education, and felt that they were unqualified to teach the subject, while they believed in its importance. PMID:12278138

  20. Leadership that promotes teacher empowerment among urban middle school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Skipper, Joni

    In this study, the focus was on determining leadership strategies that promote teacher empowerment among urban middle school science teachers. The purpose of the paper was to determine if leadership strategies are related to teacher empowerment. The emphasis was on various forms of leadership and the empowerment of teachers in context in restructuring the democratic structure. An effective leadership in science education entails empowering others, especially science teachers. In this regard, no published studies had examined this perspective on empowering teachers and school leadership. Therefore, this study determined if a relationship exists between leadership strategy actions and teacher empowerment. The significance of the study is to determine a relationship between leadership strategies and teacher empowerment as a positive approach toward developing successful schools. Empowerment is essential for implementing serious improvements. Empowering others in schools must form a major component of an effective principal's agenda. It is becoming clearer in research literature that complex changes in education sometimes require active initiation. For this study, a quantitative methodology was used. Primary data enabled the research questions to be answered. The reliability and validity of the research were ensured. The results of this study showed that 40% of the administrators establish program policies with teachers, and 53% of teachers make decisions about new programs in schools. Furthermore, the findings, their implications, and recommendations are discussed.

  1. Teacher Training and Pre-service Primary Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive science teaching efficacy beliefs may be useful for teacher training universities, so that they can adapt their curriculum to accommodate these factors. Participants included 292 pre-service primary teachers, a cross-sectional sample from two different universities in the Netherlands across the four different years of study in the training program. Based upon our results, we conclude that the science teaching self-efficacy of pre-service teachers, in particular, improved during years 1 and 2, and not during years 3 and 4. Higher levels of self-rated subject-matter knowledge and science teaching experience in primary schools both contributed to higher levels of personal self-efficacy for science teaching. Differences at the university level in courses taken during the first year between science content courses and science methods courses also influenced the pre-service teachers' development of science teaching self-efficacy. After their first year, the pre-service teachers from the university with science content courses had significantly higher self-efficacy than pre-service teachers from the university that offered science methods courses. After the second year of teacher training, however, this difference in self-efficacy was no longer present.

  2. Chinese Teachers’ Professional Identity and Beliefs about the Teacher-Student Relationships in an Intercultural Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Li; Du, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study of immigrant Chinese teachers’ professional identity and beliefs about the teacher-student relationship in an intercultural context. Theoretically, this study takes its departure from a sociocultural perspective on understanding professional identity. The empirical analysis in the study drew mainly upon ethnographic interviews with a group of Chinese language teachers in Denmark concerning their life experiences, perceptions, and beliefs. The results of this study suggest that teachers’ beliefs about their roles as teachers and about student-teacher relationships are shaped by both their prior experiences and backgrounds and the current social and cultural contexts in which they are situated. Changes of context (e.g., from China to Denmark) often lead to a transformation of their professional identity and beliefs. Being a teacher in an intercultural context often exposes them to the confrontation of diverse challenges and dilemmas. On one hand, teachers in this study generally experienced a transformation from being a moral role model, subject expert, authority and parental role to being a learning facilitator and culture worker. On the other hand, they developed diverse individualized coping strategies to handle student-teacher interactions and other aspects of teachers’ professional identity.

  3. Job satisfaction among secondary school teachers in Tanzania : the case of Njombe district

    OpenAIRE

    Ngimbudzi, Fredy Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that are associated with teachers? job satisfaction. A study sample of 162 (N=162) teachers was surveyed. The descriptive statistics techniques revealed that teachers are satisfied with aspects under the following dimensions: social benefits, meaningfulness of the job and support from administration. Conversely, the teachers indicated they are least satisfied with the aspects under the job characteristics dimension. Additionally, the inde...

  4. Exploring the Relationship between Teachers' Social Intelligence and Classroom Discipline Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Soleiman Yahyazadeh Jeloudar; Aida Suraya Md.Yunus

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the social intelligence level of teachers employed in government secondary schools in Malaysia based on selected demographic variables such as age, and how they relate to the classroom discipline strategies used. The sample of the study comprises 203 teachers. The study also revealed that there were significant differences between teachers’ age groups and their social intelligence. Further a significant relationship was noted between teachers’ social int...

  5. The Interplay between EFL High School Teachers' Beliefs and Their Instructional Practices Regarding Reading Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Salimi, Mahin; KHONAMRI, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has revealed the influential role of teachers’ beliefs in determining their professional behavior; that is, the ways they plan their lessons, the kinds of decision they make, and the methods they apply in their classrooms. The present study aimed, first, to investigate the construct of teachers’ belief systems about reading strategies among EFL high school teachers, then to explore the degree of discrepancies or consistencies between teachers’ beliefs about reading strategie...

  6. Teacher labor markets in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegas, Emiliana

    2007-01-01

    Emiliana Vegas surveys strategies used by the world's developing countries to fill their classrooms with qualified teachers. With their low quality of education and wide gaps in student outcomes, schools in developing countries strongly resemble hard-to-staff urban U.S. schools. Their experience with reform may thus provide insights for U.S. policymakers. Severe budget constraints and a lack of teacher training capacity have pushed developing nations to try a wide variety of reforms, including using part-time or assistant teachers, experimenting with pay incentives, and using school-based management. The strategy of hiring teachers with less than full credentials has had mixed results. One successful program in India hired young women who lacked teaching certificates to teach basic literacy and numeracy skills to children whose skills were seriously lagging. After two years, student learning increased, with the highest gains among the least able students. As in the United States, says Vegas, teaching quality and student achievement in the developing world are sensitive to teacher compensation. As average teacher salaries in Chile more than doubled over the past decade, higher-quality students entered teacher education programs. And when Brazil increased educational funding and distributed resources more equitably, school enrollment increased and the gap in student test scores narrowed. Experiments with performance-based pay have had mixed results. In Bolivia a bonus for teaching in rural areas failed to produce higher-quality teachers. And in Mexico a system to reward teachers for improved student outcomes failed to change teacher performance. But Vegas explains that the design of teacher incentives is critical. Effective incentive schemes must be tightly coupled with desired behaviors and generous enough to give teachers a reason to make the extra effort. School-based management reforms give decisionmaking authority to the schools. Such reforms in Central America have reduced teacher absenteeism, increased teacher work hours, increased homework assignments, and improved parent-teacher relationships. These changes, says Vegas, are especially promising in schools where educational quality is low. PMID:17407930

  7. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    DR.S.KAYARKANNI

    2012-01-01

    Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusin...

  8. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  9. Prospective Elementary School Teachers’ Views about Socioscientific Issues: A Concurrent Parallel Design Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet ÖZDEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to examine the prospective elementary school teachers’ perceptions on socioscientific issues. The research was conducted on prospective elementary school teachers studying at a university located in western Turkey. The researcher first taught the subjects of global warming and nuclear power plants from a perspective of socioscientific issues in the science and technology education course and then conducted the research. Concurrent parallel design, one of the mixed-method research approaches, was used to conduct the research. In this context, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight teachers in the qualitative strand of the study to explore the phenomenon. The data obtained from the interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. During the quantitative strand of the research, 113 prospective teachers were administered a questionnaire form. The results of the study revealed that none of the participating prospective teachers mentioned about the religious and cultural characteristics of socioscientific issues, and they need training about how to use socioscientific issues in teaching.

  10. A STUDY OF IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE ON JOB STRESS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Study seeks to explain the impact of Emotional Intelligence on Job Stress among secondary school teachers. The sample of the present investigation is drawn from Govt. and Private Schools of Jammu Province by making use of simple random sampling technique and comprised of 600 teachers (300 male a n d 3 0 0 F ema l e . Emo ti o n a l intelligence inventory developed and validated by Dr. (Mrs. Shubra Mangal and Job Stressors Scale developed and validated by Dr. (Mrs. Meena Buddhisagar Rathod and Dr. Madhulika Verma was used in the study. Data analysis involved the use of three way analysis of variance to investigate the impact of emotional intelligence on job stress. The results revealed that emotional intelligence and Job stress were dependent on each other and there was significant impact of emotional intelligence on job stress of secondary school teachers. It was found that teachers with high emotional intelligence were having less job stress. On the basis of findings it is suggested that emotional intelligence programming will benefit teachers immensely in coping with stress.

  11. The impact of hyperacusis and hearing loss on tinnitus perception in German teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra P Meuer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that a notable number of teachers are concerned with conditions of auditory impairment such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss. Studies focussing on characteristics and interdependencies of single hearing disorders (HD are rare. This explorative study examines tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss, and all possible combinations (tinnitus + hyperacusis; tinnitus + hearing loss; hyperacusis + hearing loss; tinnitus, hyperacusis + hearing loss in German teachers. The impact of single HD on perceived distress, depending on the number and kind of comorbid HD, was of special interest. Information was collected via online survey and includes self-reported data as well as data from the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TQ. Results show that most of the 1468 participants (45% suffered from two HD in different combinations, and the fewest (25% were afflicted with only one HD. Considering the seven HD groups, most teachers (30% suffered from all three HD. Across all groups, tinnitus was present in 1096, hyperacusis in 988, and hearing loss in 937 teachers. Multiple intergroup comparisons revealed that self-rated tinnitus-related distress rose significantly with the increasing number of HD. No significant differences were found for distress ratings of hyperacusis between the four groups including hyperacusis and between the four groups with hearing loss. In the Mini-TQ, groups including hyperacusis scored considerably higher than those excluding hyperacusis. The frequent prevalence of HD in German teachers points to a need of better noise prevention in German schools as one priority of occupational safety.

  12. Teachers discovering nuclear science for the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High school and junior high school teachers from across the country have rediscovered nuclear science through summer participation as teacher research associates at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As a result of their new knowledge and awareness of the broad range of applications of nuclear science with obvious positive benefit to society, these teachers are putting nuclear chemistry and physics back into their curriculum. Through direct research participation teachers become a primary resource for students. The Department of Energy is now supporting over 150 teacher research associates in its TRAC program in all areas of science. The eight week teacher research associate appointments provide an in-depth experience for the teacher, and an opportunity for teachers and scientists to become engaged in new curriculum and materials development

  13. STUDENT, TEACHER AND SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS AS ETERMINANTS OF ACHIEVEMENT IN SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL CHEMISTRY IN OYO STATE, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Segun M. OLATUNBOSUN

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The study constructed and tested an eight-variable model for providing a causal explanation of achievement of secondary school students in chemistry in terms of student variables - attitude to learning chemistry, background knowledge in Integrated Science, teacher variables - attitude to chemistry teaching, attendance at chemistry workshop and school environment related variables-class size, laboratory adequacy and school location. The study adopted an ex-post facto research type the population was made up of 621 senior secondary III chemistry students and 27 Senior Secondary III chemistry teachers in Oyo State, Nigeria. Four sets of instruments were used, these were chemistry Achievement Tests (SACS, Teacher. Attitude Towards Chemistry Teaching Scale (TATCTS and Laboratory Adequacy Inventory (LAI. The results revealed that 7.20% of the total effect on achievement in chemistry was accounted for by all the seven predictor variables when taken together. It was also revealed that only four variables -school location(X1 laboratory adequacy (X3, teachers’ attitude to chemistry teaching(X5 and teachers’ attendance at chemistry workshop(X4 had direct causal influence and also made significant contributions to the prediction of achievement in chemistry (X8 (the criterion variable. Recommendations based on the significance of these variables were then highlighted.

  14. Teacher Perceptions Regarding Portfolio-Based Components of Teacher Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Charles I.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results of teachers' and principals' perceptions of the package evaluation process, a process that uses a combination of a traditional evaluation with a portfolio-based assessment tool. In addition, this study contributes to the educational knowledge base by exploring the participants' views on the impact of…

  15. Teacher Education in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Henry

    The trend in Scandinavia is to broaden teacher education and training for academic secondary school teachers in order to overcome excessive specialization. The context of apprenticeship of pre-school, primary teachers is changing toward a more academically oriented program. However, the affective part of the learning/teaching process is becoming…

  16. Assessment Mathematics Teacher's Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoor, A. G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aimed to identifying the professional efficiencies for the intermediate schools mathematics teachers and tries to know at what level the math teachers experience those competencies. The researcher used a descriptive research approach, the study data collected from specialist educators and teacher's experts and previous studies to…

  17. The Master Science Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Kok-Aun; Tsoi, Mun-Fie

    2008-01-01

    The dire need of some schools to boost the academic performance of their students inevitably rests with their ability to attract highly qualified teachers. As such, the UK has put in place the Advanced Skills Teacher (AST) scheme, while the US has set the ball rolling in laying down standards for the certification of the master science teacher, to…

  18. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  19. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  20. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…