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  1. Technical Teachers and Technical Teacher Education - Research Results

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrovska?, D.; Andres, P.

    2002-01-01

    Chartered engineers who are new teachers of technical subjects at various educational institutions receive technical teacher education in the accredited bachelor programme at the Czech Technical University in Prague. This paper presents the results of a recent survey in which engineers expressed their opinions on technical teacher education.

  2. Early Childhood Teacher Research: From Questions to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    What is early childhood teacher research and why is it important? How does a teacher researcher formulate a research question and a plan for doing research? How do teachers apply research results to effect change? "Early Childhood Teacher Research" is an exciting new resource that will address the sorts of questions and concerns that pre- and…

  3. Student Teacher Reflective Writing: What Does It Reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Marcos, Juanjo; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria-Luisa; Tillema, Harm

    2013-01-01

    Some researchers claim that reflection helps student teachers to better understand their practice teaching. This study aims to explore how deliberate reflection by student teachers is encouraged as a way to prepare, analyse and evaluate their practice. A total of 104 student teachers in primary education participated in this study during their…

  4. Teacher Reflection: Supports, Barriers, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Elizabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of rapidly changing classroom environments, it is crucial that teachers be able to make appropriate decisions. Those teachers who reflect on their practice, particularly while they are teaching (what Schon terms reflection-in-action), are best able to do so. It is the intent of this article to investigate the role of teacher

  5. Do teachers have more health problems? Results from a French cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerrière Eléna

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although only a few studies have been published on teachers' health, certain ideas are widely accepted, such as for example, the preconceived notion that teachers suffer from an excessively high rate of mental health problems. The objective of this study is to compare teachers' mental and physical health to that of a control group. Methods A cross-sectional postal survey was conducted among a sample of 3,679 teachers and 1,817 non-teachers aged 20 to 60 years old. Results No lifetime prevalence of any psychiatric disorder (with the exception of undifferentiated somatoform disorder in men or mean scores of psychological distress were found to be significantly higher in teachers. However, multiple analyses, adjusted for all confounding variables, revealed a higher risk of lifetime anxiety disorders in male teachers. On the other hand, significant differences were observed for some physical ailments: a higher lifetime prevalence of rhinopharyngitis/laryngitis in both male and female teachers, of conjunctivitis and lower urinary tract infection in male teachers and of bronchitis, eczema/dermatitis and varicose veins in female teachers. No significant difference was found for chronic pain between the two groups. Conclusion Teachers do not seem to have poorer mental health. However, their physical condition is characterized by a higher prevalence of health problems related to the ENT tract, and to a lesser extent, depending on the gender, to skin, eyes, legs and lower urinary tract.

  6. What Makes Art Teachers Still Enjoy Teaching Art? Summary of results from an empirical action research training project

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    Charlotte Heinritz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the results of a research training project undertaken by four German academic institutions investigating the factors involved in art teachers’ continued motivation to carry out their profession even after ten years or more of teaching art in schools. The study is based on interviews carried out by art students and targeting art teachers who have had a minimum of ten professional years of experience. The analysis of this study reveals interesting perspectives on the expectations and motivations leading to successful art teaching careers and offers particular consequences to be drawn for art teacher training in general. One important consequence is that the study provides a model for how scientific research can be included in the training of art teachers to promote their self-reflection.

  7. From Gardeners to Tour Guides: The Epistemological Struggle Revealed in Teacher-Generated Metaphors of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Terri; Crawford, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between epistemological beliefs and perceptions of practice through the analysis of teacher-generated metaphors. In a multilevel qualitative examination of the self-descriptive metaphors of 32 working teachers, the authors uncovered a dissonance between teachers' metaphors and their epistemological positions.…

  8. Incentive Pay Programs Do Not Affect Teacher Motivation or Reported Practices: Results from Three Randomized Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Le, Vi-Nhuan; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Springer, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    This study drew on teacher survey responses from randomized experiments exploring three different pay-for-performance programs to examine the extent to which these programs motivated teachers to improve student achievement and the impact of such programs on teachers' instruction, number of hours worked, job stress, and collegiality. Results showed…

  9. Initial teacher education and continuing professional development for science teachers : A review of recent research results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry

    2011-01-01

    Research into ways of improving the initial education and continuing professional development of science teachers is closely related to both common and unique strands. The field is complex since science teachers teach at different educational levels, are often educated in different science subjects, and belong to various cultures, both educationally and socially. Section 1 presents a review of the research literature across these dimensions and looks at the knowledge, skills and competences needed for teaching science, specific issues within science teacher education, and strategies for educating and developing science teachers.

  10. The Results of an Era of Teacher Professional Development at McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, K. D.; Hemenway, M. K.; Preston, S.; Wetzel, M.; Meyer, J.; Rood, M.

    2014-07-01

    During the past decade, McDonald Observatory has been developing and refining its Teacher Professional Development Workshops, many of which have been supported by NASA. Metrics include attendance, perceived knowledge gain, and readiness to apply what was learned in the classroom. Evaluations show impact through the classroom application at five to six months after the workshops and through consistently high positive workshop results. This paper will show that a) our Teacher Professional Development Workshops are consistently well attended, b) the workshops improve teachers' confidence and their understanding of concepts, c) teachers enjoy unique interactions with astronomers and engineers, d) teachers appreciate hands-on and inquiry-based activities that are modeled and tied to state and national standards, and e) many teachers experience using the activities in their classrooms with good results.

  11. Using Self-Efficacy to measure primary school teachers’ perception of ICT: results from two studies

    OpenAIRE

    Fanni, Francesca; Rega, Isabella; Cantoni, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, the final results of two research projects, which investigated the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on primary schools teachers in disadvantaged areas in Brazil (BET k-12) and South Africa (MELISSA), are presented and discussed. Second, the Self-Efficacy construct is proposed as a tool to measure how teachers’ perception of being able to use technology (CSE - Computer Self-Efficacy) affects teachers’ perception of being ...

  12. Teacher's emotional stability: preliminary results of self-other agreement.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    H?ebí?ková, Martina

    Brno : Nakladatelství K?epela, 2003, s. 107-120. [U?itelé a zdraví /5./. Brno (CZ), 26.09.2002-27.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA406/01/1507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z7025918 Keywords : teachers * emotional stability * neuroticism Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  13. Results of a Survey of Pupils and Teachers Regarding Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Patricia; Rapoport, Max

    To test the validity of hypotheses regarding television violence and social behavior of viewers, a survey was conducted of a large stratified sample of sixth grade and kindergarten pupils and of teachers. The student survey identified: (1) frequency with which pupils watch television; (2) parental control of television viewing; (3) family…

  14. Teacher Autonomy Perceptions of Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining Iranian (N= 218 and Turkish (N=142 high school EFL teachers’ opinions about teacher autonomy over (a the choice of appropriate teaching methods, strategies and techniques and implementation of the established curriculum (b teacher involvement in decision making processes and (c teachers’ use of personal initiative in solving their work problems. An 11-item questionnaire (?= .758 was used to measure autonomy perceptions of the participants. The results revealed that Turkish teachers’ autonomy perceptions were greater than that of Iranian teachers in the three teacher autonomy dimensions. Moreover, it was observed that male and master- holder teachers perceive less autonomy than female and bachelor-holder ones; whereas, no significant relationship were observed for the age and marital status variables with any teacher autonomy dimensions. Lastly, decision making dimension was the strongest predictor of teacher autonomy among both Iranian and Turkish teachers.

  15. Teacher Autonomy Perceptions of Iranian and Turkish EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim KHEZERLOU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining Iranian (N= 218 and Turkish (N=142 high school EFL teachers’ opinions about teacher autonomy over (a the choice of appropriate teaching methods, strategies and techniques and implementation of the established curriculum (b teacher involvement in decision making processes and (c teachers’ use of personal initiative in solving their work problems. An 11-item questionnaire (?= .758 was used to measure autonomy perceptions of the participants. The results revealed that Turkish teachers’ autonomy perceptions were greater than that of Iranian teachers in the three teacher autonomy dimensions. Moreover, it was observed that male and master- holder teachers perceive less autonomy than female and bachelor-holder ones; whereas, no significant relationship were observed for the age and marital status variables with any teacher autonomy dimensions. Lastly, decision making dimension was the strongest predictor of teacher autonomy among both Iranian and Turkish teachers.

  16. Changes in the social aspects of hypertensive patients through physical activity: revealing the importance of physical education teachers

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    Italla Maira Pinheiro Bezerra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and treatment of hypertension, underscoring the importance of physical education teachers in guidance and direction of this treatment. The methodological approach was based on a qualitative approach consisting of 15 hypertensive patients enrolled in a project offered by the Fire Department as a group defined the Golden Age, in the municipality of Crato-Ce-Brazil. To this end, we used the technique to collect data, the interview was focused on groups of hypertensive patients who were physically active on a regular basis. With the purpose of organizing the material obtained in interviews, conducted an analysis of their content, which allowed the identification of themes and construction of the following categories: 1 heredity, and lifestyle concerns: the perception of the causes of hypertension Hypertension, 2 Practical exercise training: a tool for prevention and promotion hypertensive patients, 3 Benefits of Physical Activity: the importance of awareness of hypertension, 4 Revealing the importance of continuing the practice of exercise. Thus, considering that for an effective control, prevention and promotion of hypertensive patients is necessary if there is an interaction between teacher / patient in order to provide, in addition to the benefits of activities, the motivation for continuing care. To do so, it is the physical education teachers see their importance and their role in guiding, monitoring and promoting health in the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, so you can carry and to reveal the practices of physical exercise as an essential tool in controlling this pathology.

  17. [Stress and Burnout Risk in Nursery School Teachers: Results from a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, J; Ehlen, S

    2014-07-15

    This article presents results from a study of 834 nursery school teachers in Germany, investigating working conditions, stress, and stress-related health problems. In order to evaluate the extent of mental and psychosomatic troubles, as well as the risk of burnout, we used the standardised questionnaire "Burnout Screening Scales" (BOSS I). Data analysis yielded a high percentage of nursery school teachers who reported a remarkably high stress level; nearly 20% can be considered as a high-risk group for burnout. Poor staff conditions in many nurseries turned out to be the crucial stress source, along with large groups, insufficient teacher-child ratio, time pressure and multitasking. In the concluding discussion of the study results, we consider possible measures to reduce stress and to improve working conditions for nursery school teachers. PMID:25025291

  18. Early Childhood Teachers' Perceived Competence during Transition from Teacher Education to Work: Results from a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischo, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The transition from education to work is a challenge for early childhood teachers. In this study, competence self-ratings of 348 German early childhood teachers were investigated one year before, at the end of and four months after early childhood teacher education at universities and vocational schools. Perceived competence was assessed by means…

  19. Teacher Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    When discussing the teacher quality gap, policy makers have tended to focus on teacher certification, degrees, and experience. These indicators have become key benchmarks for progress toward equality of educational opportunity, in part for lack of additional teacher quality indicators. This article turns attention to teachers' academic skills. National data on teachers' entrance examination scores and college selectivity reveal substantial disparities by school poverty level. The findings com...

  20. Do Reinforcement and Induction Increase Prosocial Behavior? Results of a Teacher-Based Intervention in Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Vidya; Bergin, Christi

    2009-01-01

    Teachers were trained to use reinforcement and induction to increase prosocial behavior in a sample of 98 children in Head Start-affiliated preschools, using a peer coaching model. There was one control group and three intervention groups: reinforcement-only, induction-only, and reinforcement-and-induction. Results indicated that the intervention…

  1. Are High School Economics Teachers the Same as Other Social Studies Teachers? The Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Mark C.; Dieterle, David; Clark, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on how well students are learning economics, how teachers are trained, and other outcomes associated with improved understanding of economics. However, almost nothing is reported in the research literature on economics teachers' views of the curriculum, how they teach their subject, their views on public issues, and…

  2. Interrogating Practice in Culturally Diverse Classrooms: What Can an Analysis of Student Resistance and Teacher Response Reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ninetta; Forghani-Arani, Neda

    2015-01-01

    As classrooms have increasingly become diverse and complex, developing culturally responsive pedagogies is a professional imperative for teachers. However, considerable international research suggests that meeting the needs of diverse pupil cohorts is challenging for many teachers. In this article, we highlight how curriculum and teaching…

  3. Teacher Inequality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Wayne

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available When discussing the teacher quality gap, policy makers have tended to focus on teacher certification, degrees, and experience. These indicators have become key benchmarks for progress toward equality of educational opportunity, in part for lack of additional teacher quality indicators. This article turns attention to teachers' academic skills. National data on teachers' entrance examination scores and college selectivity reveal substantial disparities by school poverty level. The findings commend attention to the gap in academic skills in the formulation of future policy and research on the teacher quality gap.

  4. The Construction of the Teacher’s Authority in Pedagogic Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wenren

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the discursive construction of the authoritative identity of teachers in relation to a number of issues in the classroom context, including identity negotiation, pedagogic discourse and teacher-student power relationship. A variety of classroom teacher talks are analyzed from a discourse analytical perspective, revealing the core constituent parts of the teacher’s authoritative identity and the constructive process of the authoritative discourse. The analysis shows that different combinations of the constituent parts make up distinctive frameworks of the teacher’s authoritative status. The discursive choices that emerge in the negotiation of the authoritative identity result in a strong or a weak form of authority. The article concludes with a discussion of the relevance of the teacher’s authoritative identity to pedagogic discourse and teacher-student power relations.

  5. Effects of Sex and Setting on Students' Interpretation of Teachers' Excessive Use of Immediacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rester, Carolyn H.; Edwards, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Using a message interpretation perspective, this study (N = 379) examined how sex of the student, sex of the teacher, and the setting affect the messages students receive from a teacher's excessive use of immediacy. Results reveal that students interpret excessive immediacy from female teachers as caring, but the same behavior from male teachers

  6. The Leadership Role of the Teacher Librarian in Technology Integration: Early Results of a Survey of Highly Certified Teacher Librarians in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Nancy; Mardis, Marcia A.; Johnston, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the United States' Institute for Museum and Library Services funded Project Leadership-in-Action (LIA) that included surveys of the technology integration practices of teacher librarian leaders with National Board Certification. Preliminary 2009 survey results suggested that the 295 respondents worked in well-resourced libraries with…

  7. Getting in Touch with Your PCK: A Look into Discovering and Revealing Science Teachers' Hidden Expert Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Many experienced teachers make rolling out a science class appear to be easy. In reality, there is usually deep and complex thinking behind their practice. This knowledge is sometimes so intrinsic and part of their everyday practice, that it remains hidden and unexplored. This article presents data from a study that attempted to draw out such…

  8. Teachers Using Continuous GPS Data to Learn About Earthquakes - Sharing Research Results in the Classroom Through Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, R. M.; McGill, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    This EarthScope-funded project is a collaboration between high school science teachers and their students, undergraduate and graduate students, and faculty from California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB), University of Arizona, and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). As high school teachers and their students work alongside one another, they are exposed to and contribute to an authentic research process that will lead to publishable results. The scientific goal of this project is to measure plate tectonic movement within the San Bernardino mountain area and the Inland Empire region of Southern California utilizing the Global Positioning System (GPS). Teachers and high school students collected survey-mode GPS data from 11 sites (among a total of 25 sampled by the larger group of participants) during a 5-day campaign from July 14 -19, 2011. The information obtained will be useful for understanding and characterizing seismic hazards in that region of Southern California. To enhance this experience, all of the teachers and their students have been invited to present their results at the SCEC Annual Meeting in September 2011. As part of the classroom implementation phase of the program the teachers are introduced to the Lesson Study approach. Lesson Study is a professional development process where teachers systematically examine their practice with the goal of becoming more effective. This process centers on teachers working collaboratively on a small number of Research Lessons. First, they identify the areas where their students are encountering challenges in learning standards-based content. The challenging areas are identified through results from standardized exams (e.g. California Standards Tests) or other assessment tools. To address areas of difficulty the teachers develop, test, and improve an instructional experience that promotes student learning of that standards-based material. Lesson Study is different from "lesson planning" because it focuses on what teachers want students to learn rather than on what teachers plan to teach. The 2011 teachers divided into three groups and each group is developing a Research Lesson. One of each of the group members teaches the lesson while the others observe the student learning. After the Research Lesson is taught the entire group comes together to debrief the lesson, make revisions, and another member of the group re-teaches the lesson (at a later date and at a different school) to incorporate what has been learned. This presentation will discuss how the CSUSB project has developed a successful framework for providing teachers with a valuable research experience as well as allowing an opportunity for them to think systematically about their craft, learn from experience, and become members of a learning community of practice.

  9. Emotional Competence and Stressors of Female School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holeyannavar, P. G.; Itagi, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    A study on emotional competence and stressors of 105 primary school teachers was conducted in Dharwad in 2009. Emotional competence was assessed using EC- scale and stressors by stress inventory for teachers (SIT). Results revealed that majority of the teachers (89.5%) showed average to competent levels of emotional competence, followed by 6.7 and…

  10. A Study on Pertinent Influencing Factors on Teachers' Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guangwen; Wei, Shuhua

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the present state of teachers' professional identity (TPI), 177 teachers in primary and secondary schools in Zibo of Shandong Province of China were surveyed by a questionnaire designed by the authors. The results reveals: (1) high professional identity for the overall level of teachers; (2) significant difference in genders…

  11. Teacher Misconceptions and Understanding of Cooperative Learning: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutselini, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The study presents the results of an educational intervention during in-service training of secondary school teachers in Cyprus, which led to participants' development. The aim was twofold, first to reveal teachers' conception about cooperative learning and second to help teachers through simulation of cooperative learning to construct the…

  12. The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project: Results of a Summer High-School Student, Teacher, University Scientist Partnership Using a Capstone Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Duane F.; Snow, Gregory R.; Claes, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports results from evaluation of the Cosmic Ray Observatory Project (CROP), a student, teacher, scientist partnership to engage high-school students and teachers in school based cosmic ray research. Specifically, this study examined whether an intensive summer workshop experience could effectively prepare teacher-student teams to…

  13. CONTINUOUS AND COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION- A STUDY OF TEACHERS’ ATTITUDE

    OpenAIRE

    Indu Rathee

    2014-01-01

    This study is an attempt to find out teachers’ attitude about the system of continuous and comprehensive evaluation. The sample consisted of 100 teachers from government and non-government schools of Dist. Sonipat, Haryana. For the collection of data, the investigator used, “Teachers attitude scale towards continuous comprehensive evaluation” developed by Dr. Vishal Sood and Dr. Arti Anand. The result of the study revealed that most of the teachers have highly favour...

  14. Teachers' Statistical Problem Solving with Dynamic Technology: Research Results across Multiple Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hollylynne Stohl; Kersaint, Gladis; Harper, Suzanne; Driskell, Shannon O.; Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a random stratified sample (n = 62) of prospective teachers' work across eight institutions on three tasks that utilized dynamic statistical software. The authors considered how teachers utilized their statistical knowledge and technological statistical knowledge to engage in cycles of investigation. This paper characterizes…

  15. Demandas de Professores Decorrentes da Inclusão Escolar / Teacher Demands Resulting from School Inclusion

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Selma Norberto, MATOS; Enicéia Gonçalves, MENDES.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available com a implementação das políticas públicas em inclusão escolar, cresce o número de alunos com Necessidades Educacionais Especiais (NEEs) em classes comuns, fato que ajuda a compor um cenário nas escolas que tem desvelado limitações e contradições do sistema educacional brasileiro. Atores e autores e [...] ducacionais são desafiados a construir saberes capazes de responder às demandas do cotidiano escolar relacionadas à convivência e aprendizagem na diversidade. Considerando que este processo inclusivo é novo nas escolas, o estudo teve como objetivo analisar as demandas dos professores decorrentes da inclusão escolar. A pesquisa foi qualitativa do tipo exploratório, participando seis professoras, seus alunos com NEEs e três profissionais do Núcleo de Educação Inclusiva da Secretaria Municipal de Educação. Para coleta de dados, foram utilizados: técnica de observação participante, diário de campo, entrevista semiestruturada, questionário e, para discussão dos dados, análise de conteúdo. Os resultados indicam que existem conquistas e contradições na realidade das escolas que se propõem inclusivas; avanços e limitações resultantes da política municipal, e que o modelo de atuação da equipe de educação especial no contexto analisado pode ser revisto ou ampliado. Indicam que os professores apresentam demandas no domínio da política pública, da formação, e demandas dirigidas ao psicólogo. Abstract in english After implementingpublic policiesforschool inclusion, the number of students with special educational needs in regular classes has increased. This fact has helped to compose the picture in schools in whichthe limitations and contradictions of the Brazilian educational system have appeared. Education [...] al actors and authors are challenged to build knowledge capable of responding to the demands of daily school related to living together and learning in diversity. Since this inclusive process is new to schools, the study aimed to analyze teacherdemands in the school inclusion context. The research was qualitative and exploratory, and the participants were six teachers, their students with special educational needs and three professionals in the Nucleus of Inclusive Education from the Municipal Department of Education. Data was collected using the participant observationtechnique, a field diary, semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, and the discussion of the data was carried out through analysis of content. The results indicate that there are achievements and contradictions in the reality of schools that assign themselves as inclusive schools; there have been advances and limitations resulting from municipal policies; the model of performance of the group of special education, in the analyzedcontext, may be revised or expanded; and teachers have demands with regard to public policy, training, and issues to be raised with psychologists.

  16. What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom? Results from a Survey of AMI and AMS Teacher Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2011-01-01

    There are two major types of Montessori teacher education in the United States: (1) AMI-USA (the American branch of the Association Montessori Internationale, founded by Dr. Montessori to carry on her work); and (2) AMS (American Montessori Society, founded by Nancy Rambusch to represent Montessori in America). This article presents the results

  17. AN EFFORT TO CLASSIFY GREEK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS BASED ON THE RESULTS OF A SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    Elias ATHANASSIADIS; Yota XANTHAKOU; Rezan TATLIDIL

    2007-01-01

    Greek schoolteachers (the term, as used in this text, signifies only elementary school teachers) do not constitute a homogenous group, since there are differentiations in terms of the gender, age, social origin, studies, viewpoints and preferences of the men and women who teach in Greece’s elementary schools. The survey that was conducted on a representative sample, with the help of Cluster Analysis, has led to the grouping of elementary school teachers into nine clusters on the basis of the ...

  18. Finnish Mentor Mathematics Teachers’ Views of the Teacher Knowledge Required For Teaching Mathematics

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    Mervi A. Asikainen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven Finnish mentor mathematics teachers were interviewed about their views regarding the teacher knowledge required for teaching mathematics. The results of the interviews revealed not only the teachers' spontaneous views of the knowledge base needed for effective mathematics teaching but also their views of the particular types of teacher knowledge required for teaching mathematics that have been emphasized in the research literature. When the teachers freely described their views, issues related to content knowledge and the requisite knowledge for teaching mathematics were emphasized. The teachers valued most of the knowledge types available, even if only a few of them had highlighted them earlier in the interview. Some types, however, remained ambiguous from the teachers’ perspective. Our findings suggest that even if the mentor teachers are considered experts in mathematics teaching, they are not necessarily able to conceptualize their view of the knowledge required for mathematics teaching, or they may have their own views of the necessary types of knowledge. This in turn may impede student teachers in connecting their educational studies with mathematics studies during student teaching. In addition, it was found that mentor teachers frequently hold personal views about the importance of the types of mathematics teacher knowledge that may be valuable for student teachers when they are reflecting their own view of the requisite knowledge for teaching and the type of a teacher they want to become.

  19. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto João

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might not fully correspond to the two A. gambiae incipient species in their entire geographical range. These limits are discussed and operational suggestions on the choice of the most convenient method for large-scale M- and S-form identification are provided, also taking into consideration technical aspects related to the epidemiological characteristics of different study areas.

  20. Common Pressures, Same Results? Recent Reforms in Professional Standards and Competences in Teacher Education for Secondary Teachers in England, France and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the introduction of professional standards and competences in initial teacher education for secondary teachers in England, France and Germany has provided the cornerstone of education reform in all three countries. The precise number and specific content of a measurable set of skills for teachers have offered challenges for…

  1. Self-efficacy, school resources, job stressors and burnout among Spanish primary and secondary school teachers : a structural equation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dome?nech Betoret, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between school resources, teacher selfefficacy, potential multi-level stressors and teacher burnout using structural equation modelling. The causal structure for primary and secondary school teachers was also examined. The sample was composed of 724 primary and secondary Spanish school teachers. The changes occurring in the Spanish teacher role in the last decade were taken into account to select job stressors. The results obtained reveal...

  2. Examining the Heterotypic Continuity of Aggression Using Teacher Reports: Results from a National Canadian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessie L.; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the heterotypic continuity of aggression hypothesis (physical to indirect) using independent teacher reports of aggression drawn from a nationally representative sample of 749 Canadian girls and boys. Confirmatory factor analysis using an accelerated longitudinal design confirmed a two-factor model of physical and indirect…

  3. Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematical Beliefs: What Is the Relationship in Elementary Pre-Service Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Guney

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred-one pre-service teachers enrolled in elementary teacher education program were administered two surveys to measure mathematics anxiety and mathematical beliefs. Results of the study revealed that there were significant differences between third year and fourth year pre-service teachers regarding their mathematics anxiety and…

  4. An Inquiry into the Development of Critical Reflection in Secondary Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkelman, Todd

    2000-01-01

    Examined the development of critical reflection in preservice secondary social studies teachers during one student teaching semester. Using action research, the study investigated student teachers' deliberation about the ethical and moral basis of their work as teachers and reflection on the broader social conditions of teaching. Results revealed

  5. Teachers' Views of the Effectiveness of United Arab Emirates Kindergarten Curriculum, Instructional Strategies, and Assessment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momani, Ibrahim Al- A.; Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Momani, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating kindergarten teachers' views of the curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Data were collected by an open-ended questionnaire, interviews, and observations. Forty-four kindergarten teachers in the United Arab Emirates responded to the questionnaire; six teachers were later interviewed. Results revealed

  6. Contextual Attributes of Indirect Bullying Situations that Influence Teachers' Decisions to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain-Arcaro, Christine; Smith, J. David; Cunningham, Charles E.; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Rimas, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Indirect bullying occurs frequently yet receives little attention by teachers. Using conjoint analysis, we examined the influence of situational attributes on teachers' decisions to intervene in indirect bullying. Results revealed that teachers (N = 235) were most influenced by victimized children's distress. Additional analyses identified two…

  7. Student Teacher Challenges: Using the Cognitive Load Theory as an Explanatory Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Daniel C.; Pitton, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive load theory (CLT) can explain the challenges faced by student teachers. This study, guided by the CLT, included 26 pre-service teachers. Participants completed a cognitive load self-report questionnaire and were interviewed at two points during their student teaching. Results revealed that student teachers decreased mental effort related…

  8. History teaching, learning and Junior Certificate (JC) examination results in Lesotho, 2000 - 2006: implications for teacher education.

    OpenAIRE

    Ntabeni, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the status of History teaching and learning in Lesotho which is at its lowest ebb. Very few schools teach the subject and the poor Junior Certificate (JC) examination results exacerbate the situation. An analysis of the examiners' comments in the last seven years points to poor and/or lack of essay writing skills among the candidates as one of the main reasons behind the high failure rate in JC History. In recognition of the situation's implications for 'quality' teacher ...

  9. Achieving results in History and the role of the teacher: A learner's perspective

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maxine F, Gibb.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Matriculating in December 2013 from a co-educational government school in the Western Cape, the writer was the top student in the National Senior Certificate examinations for History in the Province. She shares her personal experience, by providing insight from a learner's perspective, on the import [...] ance of studying history. She further shares her opinion on how a learner's achievement can be directly affected by a teacher's input and method of teaching. Based on her experience, she comments on the traits present in a superior teacher, teaching methods and techniques which she found effective in her learning experience, and what aspects of teaching contributed to her academic success, passion for history and its utility, and development as a person.

  10. The Relationships between Child Temperament, Teacher-Child Relationships, and Teacher-Child Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Oren

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships between child temperament, teacher-child relationships, and teacher-child interactions in four preschool classrooms. The preliminary analyses revealed classroom differences for all variables. In all the classrooms except one, the temperament factor Reactivity had positive and high correlations with Conflict in the relationship. Task Orientation was positively correlated to the Closeness subscale in three of the classrooms. In two of the classrooms, Task Orientation was negatively correlated with the Conflict subscale. Behavior Management was the only teacher interaction behavior that was somewhat related to temperament in all of the classrooms. Although the effect of temperament on each teacher was different, the results suggest that teachers’ relationships and interactions with children are affected by child temperament; however, there might be other factors affecting the relationships, such as teacher temperament.  The results and suggestions are discussed further in the article.

  11. LETs and NETs: Exploring How Teachers from Diverse Cultural Backgrounds Impact Student Motivation and Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Wong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper, an exploratory case study, examines how students’ preferences and motivation to learn English are influenced by their perceptions of teaching practices – both of native English teachers and local English teachers. To better understand the context of this research question, this study adopts a method of triangulation in collecting data: classroom observation, student interviews and teacher interviews. For intrinsic motivation, results reveal that Chinese students prefer a native-English-speaking teacher’s approach to communication language teaching. However, for extrinsic motivations, students preferred the curriculum-oriented approach of local teachers due to the relevance to the ultimately- important English examinations.

  12. What Do the California Standards Test Results Reveal about the Movement toward Eighth-Grade Algebra for All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian-Hua; Heckman, Paul E.; Abedi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    In California, an increasing number of 8th graders have taken algebra courses since 2003. This study examines students' California Standards Test (CST) results in grades 7 through 11, aiming to reveal who took the CST for Algebra I in 8th grade and whether the increase has led to a rise in students' taking higher-level mathematics CSTs and an…

  13. THE ATTITUDES AND VIEWS OF TEACHERS AND PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS RELATED TO THE GENDER DISCRIMINATION IN SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin ?PEK

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Women are underrepresented in leadership positions in Turkish work life as well as in other countries. There are some social and personal barriers preventing women from managerial positions. One of the area in which women are underrepresented is school leadership. The main purpose of this study is to describe the attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions in schools. In accordance with the main purpose of the study it was investigated whether there were any differences between the attitudes and the views of the primary teacher and the primary pre-service teachers. The attitudes and the views about the barriers facing female teachers in school leadership were also compared according to gender and the grades of the primary pre-service teachers. Data were collected from 114 primary teachers working in primary schools in Çayeli district and 192 primary pre-service teachers attending primary school teacher training program in the Faculty of Education in Rize University.The attitudes and the views of the primary teachers and primary pre-service teachers related to the barriers preventing female teachers from attaining leadership positions were described in two dimensions, personal attitudes and views, and social attitudes and views. Study results revealed that the attitudes and views differentiated significantly due to gender and position (teacher or pre-service teacher in both dimensions. Moreover, it was indicated that gender and the position of the primary teachers and the primary pre-service teachers have significant joint effects on the personal attitudes and views whereas joint effects of the gender and positions on the social attitudes and views were not observed at statistically significant level. As a conclusion, study results indicated that female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers have not negative attitudes and views for female promoting to school leadership as much as their male counterparts. However, female primary teachers and female primary pre-service teachers seemed to accept voluntarily the social female roles more than male primary teachers and male primary pre-service teachers.In accordance with the study results some suggestions were developed. First of all, it was proposed that traditional gender roles should be redefined in Turkish Educational System. Secondly, gender discrimination subject might take place in teacher training programs. Moreover, further gender studies were recommended in terms of motivation, stress, work satisfaction, work performance, work commitment and organizational culture.

  14. The Interplay between EFL High School Teachers' Beliefs and Their Instructional Practices Regarding Reading Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin SALIMI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has revealed the influential role of teachers’ beliefs in determining their professional behavior; that is, the ways they plan their lessons, the kinds of decision they make, and the methods they apply in their classrooms. The present study aimed, first, to investigate the construct of teachers’ belief systems about reading strategies among EFL high school teachers, then to explore the degree of discrepancies or consistencies between teachers’ beliefs about reading strategies and their practical teaching activities in the context of English teaching as a foreign language in high schools of Iran, Mazandaran. Based on questionnaire data from 57 teachers, teachers’ beliefs and their self-reported classroom employment of reading strategies were explored. Findings indicated that teachers believe that reading strategies play an important role in reading comprehension and that it is necessary to teach reading strategies in reading classes. The results also revealed that there is inconsistency between teachers' beliefs and their self reported classroom practice.

  15. Helping Italian science teachers to make earth and climate active lessons. Results of 3 years support with the ICLEEN project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattadori, M.

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that in Italy Earth and Climate System Sciences Education (ESS) is one of the scientific disciplines where science teachers show a greatest need in terms of professional support. Among the causes that have been reported we should mention: the predominance of science teachers with a degree in biological disciplines rather then geo-logical or physical topics, and the high interdisciplinarity of certain topics, in particular those related to the climate system. Furthermore, it was found that ESS topics are predominant in the science curricula of those grades in which have been reported the major students dropout rates during the whole italian school cycle . In this context, in 2010, the MUSE, the Museum of Science of Trento (Italy), created a web-based service named I-Cleen (Inquring on Climate and Energy www.icleen.muse.it). This is a tool aimed at promoting the collaboration among science teachers in order to share resources and enhance the professional collaboration by means of participatory methods and models belonging to the world of open source and open content. The main instrument of the I-CLEEN project is an online repository (with metadata compliant with the DCMI and LOM international standards) of teaching resources focused on Earth and Climate Sciences all published under the Creative Commons license Attribution 3.0 and therefore, belonging to the model of OER (Open Educational Resources). The service has been designed, developed and managed by a team consisting of very experiencing science teachers and scientists from the Museum and other partners research institutions. The editorial work is carried out online utilizing a specific platform made with LifeRay, a CMS (Content Management System) software that is open source and manageable in a single Java-frameworked environment using the dbase, the website, the editorial process and several web 2.0 services. The project has been subjected to two distinct testing activities in collaboration with the University of Trento dealing with the effectiveness of the service as well as the usability of the graphic user interface (GUI). The present work aims to illustrate the essential features of the service I-cleen and the results achieved during the last three years of operation. It will be display and interpret for the first time data with web traffic, and other data from downloading and publishing documents of the teaching resources and the main outcomes of the above mentioned tests. The purpose of this contribution is to highlight strengths and weaknesses of this experience and potentially able to provide valuable information on the role of today's web based services and online communities to help support teachers in earth and climate sciences subjects.

  16. Changes in teacher efficacy and beliefs during a one-year teacher preparation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockman, Alison Schirmer

    This study attempted to further understanding of factors affecting the teacher efficacy beliefs of secondary science preservice teachers, and to develop a model relating teacher efficacy to beliefs about teaching and students. A mixed quantitative and qualitative methodology was utilized in order to track participants' beliefs both broadly and in depth throughout a one-year teacher preparation program. Results from this analysis revealed that preservice teachers at the end of the program had significantly higher personal science teaching efficacy beliefs than at the beginning of the program. No significant difference in science teaching outcome expectancy beliefs was found, although individual preservice teachers did develop alternate beliefs. Teacher efficacy beliefs were directly affected by three of Bandura's four sources of self-efficacy beliefs---Mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, and verbal persuasion---with the influence of each source of self-efficacy information appearing to change during the course of the teacher preparation program. No evidence was found that affective states by themselves had resulted in belief changes, although many of the other experiences were more powerful because they were accompanied by an emotional incident. Connections between teacher efficacy beliefs, beliefs about students, and beliefs about teaching were uncovered, as was the importance of content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge on a teacher's sense of efficacy.

  17. Results of integrated geological-geophysical investigations in Makhtesh Ramon (Israel) aimed to revealing diamondiferous associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, L.; Kouznetsov, S.; Sazonova, L.; Korotaeva, N.; Surkov, A.; Smirnov, S.; Vaksman, V.; Klepatch, C.; Itkis, S.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of several geological, mineralogical, petrological and geophysical factors makes possible to select the Makhtesh Ramon erosional-tectonic structure (southern Israel) for searching of diamondiferous associations. About 200 kg of geological associations (concentrate) have been withdrawn in this area (during 2001-2002 field works) from the depth of 0.2-1 m for mineralogical-geochemical analyses. The following minerals of the anticipating diamondiferous association were revealed in the selected probes: (first group) - chrome-diopside, orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope, picroilmenite, moissanite, corundum, perovskite, black spinel, olivine, anatase, titanomagnetite and tourmaline (including black samples). Chrome-diopside as an indicator mineral may be found only in the neighboring zone of basic pipe occurrence. Orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope and tourmaline also are essential indicators of the presence of diamondiferous association in the studied district. Moissanite and corundum are the rarely occurring minerals indicating certain presence of buried kimberlite pipes. These minerals do not rolled and oxidized that is additional evidence of the neighboring occurrence of the indigenous rocks. Data of electronic microscopy show that the grains of (1) picroilmenite and (2) pyrope contain, respectively: (1) cobalt, chrome, magnesium and nickel and (2) chrome, magnesium and aluminum. These data indicate that both picroilmenite and pyrope have the hyper-abyssal origin. Besides above mentioned minerals, list of indicator minerals (second group) in the probes includes: hexagonal quartz, feldspars, pyroxenes (black, green, dark-green, gray-green, brown-green), magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, galenite, pyrite, limonite, small magnetic spheres (quant. matter), mica, hydro-mica, chromite, leucoxene, zircon, rutile, secondary minerals of cuprum (green and blue), calcite, etc. The last minerals (by their combined considering with the first group) are also indicators of diamond-bearing of the studied area. It should be noted that the amount of these minerals (first and second groups) is extremely high: in 200 kg of the investigated geological concentrate (selected from the loose deposits and conglomerate) till the present time (January 2003) altogether were detected more than 14,000 grains of the proposed diamondiferous association. Identification of small plates of Au and Ag as well as tracing of La, Ce, Th, Nb and Ta also maybe linked with the nearest kimberlite rock occurrence. Analysis of the studied polymineral fractions has been performed using electronic scanning raster microscope CAMSCAN-4DV with energy-dispersion Roentgen micro-analyzer Link AN10000 (binocular microscopes were applied only by initial analyzing). Examination of the performed geophysical investigations: (1a) magnetic field (applied ground observations were integrated with the previous airborn measurements), (1b) magnetic susceptibility measurements; (2) self-potential field and (3) set of physical-chemical examinations of significant features (S2+, CO2-_3, Eh{-}Pt, N0^-_3, Br^-, F^-, I^-, Cl^-, Ca2+, B^+, ClO^-_4, pH, Hg2+, Na^+, K^+, Cd2+, Cu2+ &Pb2+) using ion-selective electrodes (gradient mode was applied) testifies to high probability of discovering diamondiferous pipes (dykes) at the depths from several meters up to 30 meters. The latest important petrological identifications include discovering of blue clay (usually occurring at the top of kimberlite pipe) and yttrium phosphate (it is a known signature of kimberlite associations). Finally, the total number of recognized diamonds exceeds 400 units (size of the largest crystal is about of 1.5 mm). On basis of the mentioned positive features we can unambiguously estimating that the Makhtesh Ramon Canyon is highly perspective area for discovering indigenous diamond-containing targets.

  18. A longitudinal study of the professional dispositions of teacher candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Ignico

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the professional disposition scores of Physical Education teacher candidates over time. In ad-dition, differences between teacher and student ratings were investigated. Participants were 65 students who completed three methods courses (A, B, and C across a two-year period. Both the teacher and the students completed a profes-sional dispositions instrument in each of the three classes. Results indicated a decrease in disposition self ratings and teacher ratings over time. A 2 (Rater x 3 (Time ANOVA revealed that the student and teacher ratings were different for classes A and B but not for class C. The findings are encouraging in light of the strong alignment between teacher and student ratings in the upper-level class. The dispositions in-strument appears to be a valid and reliable method to assess the professional behaviors of teacher candidates.

  19. Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Results from the First Year of a Randomized Controlled Study. NCEE 2009-4034

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazerman, Steven; Dolfin, Sarah; Bleeker, Martha; Johnson, Amy; Isenberg, Eric; Lugo-Gil, Julieta; Grider, Mary; Britton, Edward; Ali, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    In practice, teacher induction is common, but induction that is intensive, comprehensive, structured, and sequentially delivered in response to teachers' emerging pedagogical needs is less so. Congressional interest in formal, comprehensive teacher induction has grown in recent years. The National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional…

  20. Exoplanet hosts reveal lithium depletion: Results from a homogeneous statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Figueira, P; Delgado-Mena, E; Adibekyan, V Zh; Sousa, S G; Santos, N C; Israelian, G

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We study the impact of the presence of planets on the lithium abundance of host stars and evaluate the previous claim that planet hosts exhibit lithium depletion when compared to their non-host counterparts. Methods. Using previously published lithium abundances, we remove the confounding effect of the different fundamental stellar parameters by applying a multivariable regression on our dataset. In doing so, we explicitly make an assumption made implicitly by different authors: that lithium abundance depends linearly on fundamental stellar parameters. Using a moderator variable to distinguish stars with planets from those without, we evaluate the existence of an offset in lithium abundances between the two groups. We perform this analysis first for stars that present a clear lithium detection exclusively and include in a second analysis upper lithium measurements. Results. Our analysis shows that under the above-mentioned assumption of linearity, a statistically significant negative offset in lithium a...

  1. Exoplanet hosts reveal lithium depletion. Results from a homogeneous statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We study the impact of the presence of planets on the lithium abundance of host stars and evaluate the previous claim that planet hosts exhibit lithium depletion when compared to their non-host counterparts. Methods: Using previously published lithium abundances, we remove the confounding effect of the different fundamental stellar parameters by applying a multivariable regression on our dataset. In doing so, we explicitly make an assumption made implicitly by different authors: that lithium abundance depends linearly on fundamental stellar parameters. Using a moderator variable to distinguish stars with planets from those without, we evaluate the existence of an offset in lithium abundances between the two groups. We perform this analysis first for stars that present a clear lithium detection exclusively and include in a second analysis upper lithium measurements. Results: Our analysis shows that under the above-mentioned assumption of linearity, an offset in lithium abundance between planet hosts and non-hosts is recovered. This offset is negative, showing an enhanced depletion for planetary hosts, and is a statistically significant result. By bootstrapping the error bars, we concluded that an inflation on the lithium uncertainty estimations by a factor of larger than 5 is required to render the measured offset compatible with zero at less than 3-4? and make it non-significant. We demonstrated that the offset as delivered by our method depends on the different nature of the stars in the two samples. We did so by showing that the offset is reduced down to zero if the planet-host stars are replaced by comparison stars in a mock planet-host sample. The offset is also shown to be significant at 3.75? when compared with that of a population in which planet-host and comparison tags are shuffled, representing a situation in which the tagging is decorrelated from the presence of orbiting planets. Moreover, the measured depletion is still significant when one imposes different constraints on the dataset, such as a limit in planetary mass or constrain the host temperature to around solar value. We conclude then that planet-host stars exhibit enhanced lithium depletion when compared with non-host stars.

  2. Educação Ambiental no ensino formal: narrativas de professores sobre suas experiências e perspectivas / Environmental Education within schools: revealing teachers' experiences and perspectives

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Regina, Mendes; Arnaldo, Vaz.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta dados da dissertação de mestrado O Papel da Escola na Educação Ambiental: experiências e perspectivas de professores, na qual investigamos o que os professores consideram relevante para a abordagem de temas de Educação Ambiental (EA) na escola. Para tanto, levantamos e classi [...] ficamos experiências e perspectivas de professores com relação à EA no ensino formal. No presente artigo, enfatizamos: (i) a estratégia metodológica que utilizamos nesse levantamento e (ii) a maneira como os saberes docentes permeiam as experiências e as perspectivas desses professores. Esta pesquisa, através da composição de um repertório de conhecimentos sobre educação ambiental em espaços formais de ensino, sinaliza a importância dos saberes docentes para a formação desses profissionais e para a pesquisa em educação ambiental. Abstract in english This paper is based on the monographic work "O Papel da Escola na Educação Ambiental: experiências e perspectivas de professores" ("The role of school on Environmental Education: teachers' experiences and perspectives") in which we investigate how teachers have been contributing to the implementatio [...] n of environmental education practices in basic schools, conducted through the analysis of the teachers' experiences and perspectives on formal environmental education. In this article, we have emphasized: (i) the methodological design used and (ii) the way the teachers' knowledge interweave with their experiences and perspectives in this area. As consequence, we would like to point out the importance of this knowledge for teachers and for researches in environmental education - through the composition of a repertory of knowledge on environmental education within formal schooling.

  3. Educação Ambiental no ensino formal: narrativas de professores sobre suas experiências e perspectivas Environmental Education within schools: revealing teachers' experiences and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Mendes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta dados da dissertação de mestrado O Papel da Escola na Educação Ambiental: experiências e perspectivas de professores, na qual investigamos o que os professores consideram relevante para a abordagem de temas de Educação Ambiental (EA na escola. Para tanto, levantamos e classificamos experiências e perspectivas de professores com relação à EA no ensino formal. No presente artigo, enfatizamos: (i a estratégia metodológica que utilizamos nesse levantamento e (ii a maneira como os saberes docentes permeiam as experiências e as perspectivas desses professores. Esta pesquisa, através da composição de um repertório de conhecimentos sobre educação ambiental em espaços formais de ensino, sinaliza a importância dos saberes docentes para a formação desses profissionais e para a pesquisa em educação ambiental.This paper is based on the monographic work "O Papel da Escola na Educação Ambiental: experiências e perspectivas de professores" ("The role of school on Environmental Education: teachers' experiences and perspectives" in which we investigate how teachers have been contributing to the implementation of environmental education practices in basic schools, conducted through the analysis of the teachers' experiences and perspectives on formal environmental education. In this article, we have emphasized: (i the methodological design used and (ii the way the teachers' knowledge interweave with their experiences and perspectives in this area. As consequence, we would like to point out the importance of this knowledge for teachers and for researches in environmental education - through the composition of a repertory of knowledge on environmental education within formal schooling.

  4. America Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    The tagline on the America Revealed website says it all: "America Revealed explores the hidden patterns and rhythms that make America work." A remarkable series from PBS, the show talks about everything from how fresh seafood is sourced to how farmers combat crop pests. The Stories section includes a collage of images that, when scrolled over, provide accounts from a variety of people and industries. First-time visitors might want to watch the "Introduction to Manufacturing" series, which explores items that are made in the United States. Visitors can also use the Map section to look for stories of note from around the country, from Long Island to Southern California. The Teachers area includes ten lesson plans and links to additional resources. Finally, visitors can click on the Episodes area to watch complete episodes of the program.

  5. CONTINUOUS AND COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION- A STUDY OF TEACHERS’ ATTITUDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Rathee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to find out teachers’ attitude about the system of continuous and comprehensive evaluation. The sample consisted of 100 teachers from government and non-government schools of Dist. Sonipat, Haryana. For the collection of data, the investigator used, “Teachers attitude scale towards continuous comprehensive evaluation” developed by Dr. Vishal Sood and Dr. Arti Anand. The result of the study revealed that most of the teachers have highly favourable attitude towards CCE. The overall results indicated that there is significant difference between the attitude of school teachers towards continuous comprehensive evaluation in relation to the nature of the school but teachers have a same kind of attitude towards CCE in relation to their subjects and teaching experience.

  6. Burnout among Low and High Experienced Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedehhava Mousavy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a serious psychological syndrome that can affect not only an individual’s well-being, but also the functioning of whole organisations, such as schools. It is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment.The level of burnout among teachers in the field of education has a negative impact on student success. The present investigation examines the level of burn out among high and low experienced teachers. It focused on a group of English teachers from different nationalities: Iranian, and Malaysian at UPM to examine if there is any relation between burnout and experience level. The sample consisted of 30 English teachers. Two instruments namely, The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Demographic Questionnaire were used to collect data. Data analysis revealed that there is no significant difference in depersonalization and personal accomplishment scores between low and high experienced teachers. But the result of this study also revealed that there is a significant difference in Emotional Exhaustion scores between low and high experienced teachers. Further research is required to explore the roots and the causes of burnout.Keywords: teacher burnout, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment

  7. Japanese EFL Teachers' Perceptions of Communicative, Audiolingual and Yakudoku Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Gorsuch

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the learning of English as a Foreign Language in Japanese high schools has become the focus of new educational policies applied at the national level. One of these is The Course of Study issue by the Ministry of Education, in which teachers are, for the first time in a long series of curriculum guidelines, adjured to develop students' "positive attitudes towards communicating in English." Another is the JET program, which has put thousands of native English speaking assistant language teachers (ALTs into Japanese secondary classrooms for the purpose of team teaching with Japanese teachers. Data resulting from a survey project of 876 Japanese high school English teachers was used to provide empirical evidence of teachers' levels of approval of communicative, audiolingual and traditional (yakudoku activities. Teachers were also asked to rate the strengths of a variety of influences on their instruction, including university entrance exams, and pre- and in-service teacher education programs. Teachers' perceptions of both activities and instructional influences were examined in light of teachers' length of career, type of school (private versus public, academic versus vocational, and level of contact with an ALT. The data revealed the complexities of imposing broad, national educational policies on a diverse group of teachers, and in an educational culture which likely precludes teachers' use of communicative activities.

  8. Exploring the Role of Individual and Socially Constructed Knowledge Mobilization Tasks in Revealing Preservice Elementary Teachers' Understandings of a Triangle Fraction Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Paul J.; Golden, Constance Feldt

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two forms of a knowledge mobilization task on preservice elementary teachers' (n = 65) performance in solving a triangle fraction problem. The study then identifies the source of the successful solutions by linking solutions to earlier activities. One group worked with the triangle fraction task…

  9. Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Results from the Second Year of a Randomized Controlled Study. NCEE 2009-4072

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Eric; Glazerman, Steven; Bleeker, Martha; Johnson, Amy; Lugo-Gil, Julieta; Grider, Mary; Dolfin, Sarah; Britton, Edward

    2009-01-01

    One of the main policy responses to the problems of turnover and inadequate preparation among beginning teachers is to support them with a formal, comprehensive induction program. Congressional interest in formal, comprehensive teacher induction has grown in recent years. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), which reauthorized the…

  10. Technology Use and Acceptance in the Classroom: Results from an Exploratory Survey Study among Secondary Education Teachers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Heather; Ozok, Ant; Rada, Roy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the current usage and acceptance of classroom technologies by secondary math/science education teachers in one community. Design/methodology/approach: Forty-seven secondary education math and science teachers in one American city responded to a survey about their use and perceptions of technology in…

  11. Teachers2Teachers (Math)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teacher2Teacher is "a peer-mentored question-and-answer service" and intended to serve as "a resource for teachers and parents who have questions about teaching mathematics." Visitors to the website can search or browse the archived discussions by topic area or grade level, ask a question, discuss math education in the Teachers' Lounge, or look up some Frequently Asked Questions. When posting a message or question, you are asked to provide your name and email. Registration is not required, but will qualify you for a free copy of their newsletter via email. Questions are answered by Teacher2Teacher Associates. The wide range of topics and levels covered here will prove helpful to students or instructors with questions on Developmental Math, ESL instruction, Logic, Calculus and many more. In addition, anyone interested in becoming a Teacher2Teacher Associate can learn more about how to apply in the About T2T section.

  12. Learners' Performance in Doing Task with and without Teacher’s Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Rahimpour

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently task-based language teaching has attracted many researchers’, testers’ and syllabus designers’ attention and consequently a lot of studies are carried out in this field. This study was conducted in the task-based realm too. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of teacher’s presence on learners’ performance in doing task with and without teacher presence. The participants of this were forty (40 EFL intermediate male and female English learners who were chosen randomly. The results of statistical analysis of the collected data revealed that teacher’s presence affected the participants’ oral performance in terms of fluency but not their accuracy and complexity. The findings of this study have implications for language teaching, testing and syllabus design.

  13. Incidental Focus on Form Techniques in Iranian EFL Classrooms: A Comparison between Expert and Novice Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahman Farrokhi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to test whether there is an association between teachers' level of experience and frequency and type of FFEs they use in EFL classes. Also, it investigated the distribution of FFEs across two different proficiency levels, which were elementary and pre-intermediate. Six teachers (three experienced and three less experienced participated in this study. Thirty-six classes were audio-recorded, with six sessions for each teacher. Then data was first transcribed, codified, and was then analyzed statistically. The results of statistical analysis revealed that less-experienced teachers used FFEs more frequently than experienced teachers. Also with regard to level of proficiency, both groups of teachers were found to use more FFEs at pre-intermediate level. It was also found out that more experienced teachers were different in terms of type of FFEs compared with their novice counterparts. These findings may have implications for teacher training programs.

  14. Excellent Mentor Teachers’ Skills in Mentoring for Pre-Service Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsiung Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the performances of 76 Taiwanese awarded mentor teachers inmentoring pre-service teachers by analyzing their written reports related to mentoringprocesses. An inductive content analysis method was used to construct headings and codes inrelation to mentoring skills. The analytical result reveals that 448 headings were formed andwere further categorized into six groups, reported as six mentoring skills. The mentoringskills rank-order from high to low frequencies are as follows: employing the built model as aframework for teaching guidance, guiding interpersonal interactions, fostering careercompetitive ability, encouraging reflections on internship experiences, creating mentoringplan through discussions with pre-service teachers, and giving emotional supports. Like theprevious studies, the study finding reveals that the person-oriented supports like givingemotional supports, only accounting for 1.3%, seem to be unusually used by Taiwanesementor teachers.

  15. A case study of a mathematics teacher's and science teacher's use of teacher wisdom in integrating middle school mathematics and science content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saam, Julie Reinhardt

    The National Science Education Standards, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Curriculum Standards, the Interdisciplinary Team Organization structure and the Middle School movement collectively suggest to teachers to make connections between their subject areas. This case study of a middle school mathematics teacher and science teacher utilizes the framework of teacher wisdom to bring a unique perspective to the process of developing and implementing integrated curriculum. Data collection consisted of interviews with the teachers, students, and their principal; documents such lesson plans, team meeting minutes and teacher journal entries; and field notes acquired within team meetings and classroom instruction. The interpretations of this study reveal that teacher development of integrated curriculum occurs in two ways: naturally and intentionally. The natural label used to describe when teachers comfortably share information that could serve as connections between subjects. The intentional label used to describe when the teachers purposely plan integrated lessons and units. These findings also provide an image of middle school integration. This image exhibits more than connections between subject area content; it also shows connections with away-from-school skills and events, lifeskills, and lifelong guidelines. Although these teachers found it frustrating and overwhelming to meet the many views of integration, they assembled integration curriculum that followed their philosophy of education, coincided with their personal characteristics and met the needs of their students. The interpretations of this study reveal a new model of middle school integration. Teachers can use this model as a collection of integration examples. Integration researchers can use this model as a conceptual framework to analyze the integration efforts of middle level teachers. Additional research needs to focus on: developing new modeling and evaluation tools for teachers, evaluating middle school professional development programs, investigating middle school teachers' characteristics, and continuing the study of integration's worth. The results of this study and additional research may help: (a) administrators to target specific teachers for middle school positions, (b) educators to plan and implement new programs for inservice and preservice middle school teachers, and (c) teachers to experiment with new and innovative strategies for middle school integration.

  16. Thick Description of the Teacher-student Relationship in the Educational Context of School: Results of an Ethnographic Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Raufelder

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Complexities of essential aspects of the teacher-student relationship were identified in a group of German adolescents and their teachers through participant observation. It is already known that the determinants of the teacher-student relationship cannot be simply categorized and analyzed as univariate features. Using Clifford Geertz’s concept of “thick description,” empirical data were collected during a six-month field study at a secondary school in the south of Germany. Thematic analyses of the extant empirical database identified six sociological principles that constitute fundamental components of the teacher-student relationship: power, dualism, solidarity, productivity, sympathy, and identity. Analyses showed that meaningful ritualized structures limit teachers and students to institutional roles that are incongruent with the general aim of having productive interactions in educational settings. The complexity of educational settings can only be grasped if the teacher-student relationship is understood as an interpersonal process. When reduced to their institutional roles, both teachers and students experienced their relationship and educational settings as unsatisfactory.

  17. Attitude of teachers towards the inclusion of special needs children in general education classroom: the case of teachers in some selected schools in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Olufemi ADENIYI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes about inclusion are extremely complex and vary from teacher to teacher and schoolto school. This article explores the attitudes of teachers about inclusion of special needschildren in their secondary schools in general education. This study adopted a descriptivesurvey research design, with 60 teachers as participants from selected secondary schools inOyo State, Nigeria. Four hypotheses were postulated at the significant level of .05. Theinstrument, a questionnaire with question items on demographic information like gender,marital status, professionalism and teaching experience has a general reliability coefficientalpha of .83. A t-test method of analysis was the main statistical method used to test the 4generated hypotheses. The findings revealed that the attitude of male teachers is 39.4, whilethat of female teacher is 43.3, thus, the t-test analysis shows that the calculated t-test is2.107, which is greater than the critical t (t=1.960. This implies that female teachers havemore positive attitude towards the inclusion of special needs students than their malecounterparts. Furthermore, the results reveal that significant difference exists betweenmarried and single teachers in their attitude towards special need students. And thatprofessionally qualified teacher tends to have a more favourable attitude towards theinclusion of special need students than their non-professional qualified teachers. It wasrecommended that teachers should attend seminars and conferences to improve theirknowledge about ways of practicing and accepting inclusion for a better tomorrow for ourspecial needs children in Nigeria.

  18. Teacher "Restlessness" and Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keef, James L.

    1979-01-01

    When teachers strike, most people assume their grievance is money. But a recent survey of 18 Montana schools reveals that much teacher discontent stems from their lack of involvement in site-level decision making. A Faculty Senate Policy Committee is proposed to facilitate teacher participation in policy formulation. (SJL)

  19. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within two different management regimes: An assessment-based accountability regime and regime without external pressure on results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut-Andreas Christophersen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management systems: (1 teachers working under assessment-based accountability (N = 236 and (2 folk–high school teachers who work without tests and examinations and, thereby, without external accountability devices (N = 366. The purpose of the study is to estimate the path coefficients in structural equation modeling in the two regimes and compare the significance of relationships between concepts in the structural models. Through this comparison, inferences are drawn suggesting how accountability repercussions and other leadership organizational antecedents may influence teachers' fostering of students' efforts and how qualitative aspects among school professionals may influence the fostering of effort. Implications for practice and directions for future research are discussed.Christopherson, K, Elstad, E, & Turmo, A. (2012. Antecedents of teachers fostering effort within two different management regimes: an assessment-based accountability regime and regime without external pressure on results. International Journal of Education Policy and Leadership 7(6. Retrieved from www.ijepl.org.

  20. Interobserver reliability in musculoskeletal ultrasonography: results from a "Teach the Teachers" rheumatologist course.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, ee.; MØller, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the interobserver reliability of the main periarticular and intra-articular ultrasonographic pathologies and to establish the principal disagreements on scanning technique and diagnostic criteria between a group of experts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography. METHODS: The shoulder, wrist/hand, ankle/foot, or knee of 24 patients with rheumatic diseases were evaluated by 23 musculoskeletal ultrasound experts from different European countries randomly assigned to six groups. The participants did not reach consensus on scanning method or diagnostic criteria before the investigation. They were unaware of the patients' clinical and imaging data. The experts from each group undertook a blinded ultrasound examination of the four anatomical regions. The ultrasound investigation included the presence/absence of joint effusion/synovitis, bony cortex abnormalities, tenosynovitis, tendon lesions, bursitis, and power Doppler signal. Afterwards they compared the ultrasound findings and re-examined the patients together while discussing their results. RESULTS: Overall agreements were 91% for joint effusion/synovitis and tendon lesions, 87% for cortical abnormalities, 84% for tenosynovitis, 83.5% for bursitis, and 83% for power Doppler signal; kappa values were good for the wrist/hand and knee (0.61 and 0.60) and fair for the shoulder and ankle/foot (0.50 and 0.54). The principal differences in scanning method and diagnostic criteria between experts were related to dynamic examination, definition of tendon lesions, and pathological v physiological fluid within joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. CONCLUSIONS: Musculoskeletal ultrasound has a moderate to good interobserver reliability. Further consensus on standardisation of scanning technique and diagnostic criteria is necessary to improve musculoskeletal ultrasonography reproducibility.

  1. Social and Musical Objectives or Experiences School Music Teachers Anticipate Their Students Will Achieve as a Result of Attending a Summer Music Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate specific social and musical objectives or experiences school music teachers anticipate their students will achieve as a result of attending a summer music camp. A survey instrument was developed to collect demographic data and responses to questions regarding 14 specific musical and social variables.…

  2. Teachers’ Beliefs in Teaching English for Kids at a Kindergarten: A Case Study of Students from the Department of Applied English

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-wei Chu

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore the changes in teachers’ beliefs before and after teachings among four students from the Department of Applied English at Hungkuang University, who were conducting English teaching at a kindergarten. Teacher’s beliefs included four aspects in terms of English teaching, teacher-student interaction in class, curriculum planning and English learning. The study results revealed that before and after teachings, there were no significant differences in ...

  3. LETs and NETs: Exploring How Teachers from Diverse Cultural Backgrounds Impact Student Motivation and Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Wong

    2013-01-01

    This paper, an exploratory case study, examines how students’ preferences and motivation to learn English are influenced by their perceptions of teaching practices – both of native English teachers and local English teachers. To better understand the context of this research question, this study adopts a method of triangulation in collecting data: classroom observation, student interviews and teacher interviews. For intrinsic motivation, results reveal that Chinese students prefer a nativ...

  4. INSERVICE TRAINING (INSET) PROGRAMS VIA DISTANCE EDUCATION: PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ OPINIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Rasit OZEN

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe aim of this study is to investigate primary school teachers’ opinions in relation to inservice training (INSET) programs via distance education. The subjects of this study were primary school teachers (n=70) working in the city center of Bolu-Turkey in the spring semester of 2006–2007 academic year. During the study, the qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with primary school teachers by the researcher. The results of the interviews revealed...

  5. An Investigation of Students’ Face Wants in Chinese English Teachers’ Classroom Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Wanli Zhao

    2010-01-01

    In order to create a new teacher-student relationship and raise students’ politeness awareness and pragmatic competence in cross-cultural communication, this paper investigated and analyzed students’ face wants and English teachers’ awareness of students’ face want in their classroom feedback. The main data-gathering instruments are MP3-recording, non-participant observation, follow-up structured-interviews and closed- questionnaires. The results reveal that 60.6% of the teacher parti...

  6. Elementary Preservice Teachers’ Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Lipovec

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades investigation of teachers’ beliefs and conceptions and teachers‘possibilities for change has been one of the points of emphasis in mathematics education. We propose the concept and design of an intervention program including five stakeholders on the basis of a teacher–student–parent–preservice teacher–teacher educator relation. The main idea is comprised of reversed roles in teaching and learning process i.e. elementary school preservice teachers should adopt beliefs and conceptions from the mathematically promising students (age 6-12. The program is defined by 10 relationships among stakeholders and was evaluated from various viewpoints. In this paper, we highlight the effect on the preservice teachers’ competencies during the longitudinal study. We have focused on the gap between desired and achieved competences as viewed by the preservice teachers. Overall results speak in favour of presented approach.

  7. The Investigation of the Attitudes of Geography Teachers towards Environment in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Ufuk

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to reveal whether the attitudes of the geography teachers in Turkey towards the environment change according to different variables, using ''Attitude Scale" for 404 geography teachers working in various high schools throughout the country. The data were analysed by SPSS statistical software. The result

  8. Attitudes toward Communication Skills among Students'-Teachers' in Jordanian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the positive and negative attitudes among 289 students of class teachers and childhood teachers' disciplines using the communication skills attitude scale (CSAS) in Jordanian public universities. GPA, year level of students were recorded. Overall results of study revealed that the mean of positive…

  9. Trait Emotional Intelligence of Greek Special Education Teachers in Relation to Burnout and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platsidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates perceived emotional intelligence (EI) in relation to burnout syndrome and job satisfaction in primary special education teachers from Greece. EI was measured by the EIS developed by Schutte et al. (1998). Factor analysis revealed that four factors can be identified in the EIS. Results showed that Greek teachers reported…

  10. A new modeling of circumsolar dust distribution near the Earth revealed by the IKAROS-ALADDIN results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Takayuki; Yano, Hajime

    One of the primary scientific objectives of the dust detector ``ALADDIN'' onboard the solar sail spacecraft ``IKAROS'' is to shed light on spatial distribution of >10-mum-sized dust particles between 0.7-1 AU heliocentric distance. The ALADDIN dust impact data have successfully revealed the local structure of the circumsolar dust distribution composed of the dust clump at the trailing side of the Earth and the gap region in the vicinity of the Earth, for the first time of in-situ dust detection in the interplanetary space. Dust number density calculated by the ALADDIN flux data for >10-mum-sized dust obtained at the trailing side of the Earth was clearly higher than that by the existing dust flux model at 1 AU heliocentric distance (i.e., Grün model), which was mainly established with past in-situ dust impacts detection in the close vicinity of the Earth and with microcrater counting on lunar rock samples. The observed discrepancy suggests difficulty in use of the Grün model to estimate the number density of >10-mum-sized dust at 1 AU heliocentric distance other than the vicinity of the Earth. Furthermore, the discrepancy cannot be explained by existing numerical simulations of the circumsolar dust distribution, in which only an effect of dust capturing by Earth’s mean motion resonances (MMRs) is considered. In addition to such dust-planets MMRs, mutual collisions among these dust particles may play a crucial role in determining the structure of dust distribution not only in the present Solar System but also in any planetary systems with debris disks. However, there has not been, so far, a universal model to simulate the dust distribution in planetary systems with considerations of the effects from both dust-planets MMRs and dust-dust collisions. In this study, a new hybrid modeling for the circumsolar dust distribution near the Earth was developed by combining the existing MMRs-only simulation results and the collision-only model. The newly developed model demonstrates a consistent estimate for the azimuthal discrepancy of the dust number density near the Earth revealed by the ALADDIN.

  11. Investigation of the impacts of physical environment on teacher-child communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Erbay*

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to reveal the effects of physical environment in pre-school education on teacher-child communication. The sample of the study is composed of 42 nursery classes and their teachers in primary schools affiliated with Konya Provincial Directorate of National Education. The study was conducted in survey model. In the study, “The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- the sub-dimensions of Classroom Space and Furnishings” was used to assess physical environment and “Teacher-Child Communication Questionnaire” which was developed by the researchers was used to assess teacher-child communication. The relation between physical environment and teacher-child communication was tested with Spearman Correlation. The results of the study revealed that teacher-child communication is a significantly related with ECER-S daily care, play and learning space sub-scale and furnishings for relaxation and comfort sub-scale.

  12. Effective Teacher Professionalization in Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Roelande H.; Dijkstra, Bernadette J.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher professionalization has been focused too strongly on external experts and a one-size-fits-all set of solutions that often fail to distinguish between the needs of different teachers. This article describes a research into teacher networks that might be more successful vehicles for professional development of teachers. The results show that…

  13. Preservice and Inservice Teachers' Perceptions of Appropriateness of Teacher Self-Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoan; Shi, Qingmin; Tonelson, Stephen; Robinson, Jack

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated preservice and inservice teachers' perceptions of appropriateness of teacher self-disclosure. A sample of 180 preservice teachers and 135 preK-12 teachers participated in the study. Results showed statistically significant differences between the groups of teachers in their perceptions of appropriateness of teacher

  14. A Study of Students and Teachers' Preferences and Attitudes towards Correction of Classroom Written Errors in Saudi EFL Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arafat Hamouda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is no doubt that teacher written feedback plays an essential role in teaching writing skill. The present study, by use of questionnaire, investigates Saudi EFL students' and teachers' preferences and attitudes towards written error corrections. The study also aims at identifying the difficulties encountered by teachers and students during the feedback process. The questionnaire findings reveal that both teachers and students have positive attitudes towards written error correction. The study also shows that while teachers and students share such common preferences as the importance of error correction and the types of errors, there are considerable discrepancies as to the techniques of error correction. For instance, students favor the overall correction, whereas most teachers do not. However, the results show that students prefer teacher correction to peer and self-correction. Moreover, both the teachers and students have encountered a number of difficulties, so suggestions have been investigated so as to deal with the problems.

  15. Choice and control in a museal environment: a study with science teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Tiago dos Santos Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand teachers’ strategies of planning students’ visits to science museums and how they intend to relate this visit to formal science teaching. The study was conducted with 21 teachers of Science, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, randomly identified among visitors to a science museum, who were accompanying their students. Interviews and written records of teachers about teachers strategies were analyzed using the textual discursive analysis revealed five levels of control (or choice adopted by teachers for planning and tracking of students' visits to the museum. The results showed that most teachers surveyed use control elements, requesting notes for reports to be retrieved in school. The evaluation mechanisms planned by teachers after the visit showed an intention for preserving and contextualization of the museum experience in other contexts, like in school.

  16. HIGHER SECONDARY TEACHER'S ATTITUDE TOWARDS E-LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Naga Subramani, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The study was intended to find out the Attitude towards E-Learning of Higher Secondary Teachers in Madurai District, Tamil Nadu, India. Random Sampling Technique was used to compose a sample of 700 Higher Secondary Teachers. Mean, Standard Deviation and t values were calculated for the analysis of data. The result revealed that the Gender, Locality had no significant difference but, Teaching subject, Teaching experience and Internet users exhibited significant difference in respect of their A...

  17. Who Needs to Fit in? Who Gets to Stand out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers Through an Ableism Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic will impact students with disabilities in the domain of special education is explored. Data was drawn from six special education school teachers from one school in Calgary, Alberta. Five sub-themes (social acceptance, not adding to the impairment, fear of judgement by society, pursuing “normality” and meeting the demands of society were identified that fit under the main identified theme of “fitting in by not standing out”. Findings demonstrate a dichotomy in participant views of non- or socially acceptable communication devices. The perception of BMI technology was also explored among special education school teachers, revealing benefits and challenges with the uptake of this technology for students with disabilities. Perceptions of people with disabilities and ableism are presented as conceptual frameworks to interpret the influence and impact of the findings.

  18. Science Research 4: Results of Implementation of Student-Facilitated Teacher Training and Student Mentorship Programs Promoting Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker, K.

    2014-12-01

    A high school curriculum allowing students previously involved in a 3-year Science Research Program to continue into a 4th year was developed in 2013 and implemented in 2014. The goals of this curriculum were to allow 3-year students to utilize their expertise in research methods and data acquisition technology to mentor both incoming research students and their teachers in the development and implementation of original scientific research. Student responsibilities involved the mentorship of both 8th Grade Honors Geoscience students and 9th grade Science Research students during the development and implementation of original research. Science Research 4 students also conducted teacher training sessions facilitating the use of electronic sensors and data acquisition devices in the classroom for general education and scientific research applications. The development, testing and presentation via teacher workshops, of the utilization of the Daily Inquiry method of promoting original scientific research in the middle school and high school classroom were also undertaken. Mentored students successfully completed and presented original research projects and teachers involved in training sessions reported increased and effective utilization of data acquisition technology and Daily Inquiry methods in the classroom.

  19. German-Algerian University Exchange from the Perspective of Students and Teachers: Results of an Intercultural Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doring, Nicola; Lahmar, Kamel; Bouabdallah, Mohamed; Bouafia, Mohamed; Bouzid, Djamel; Gobsch, Gerhard; Runge, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Academic exchange programs provide students and teachers with the opportunity to study or work temporarily at educational institutions abroad. For exchange programs to be successful in promoting intercultural education, they must be designed with their participants in mind. The present study constitutes an investigation of attitudes and…

  20. Teacher as Inquiring Professional: Does This Help the Children To Raise Their Game? A Theoretical and Empirical Study; Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecknoe, Mervyn; Saeidi, Saeideh

    This report argues that the most effective way to raise academic achievement is for teachers to become inquiring professionals with action-research and reflective-thinking skills. The report defines effectiveness and examines the views of various stakeholders about what qualities they value in school, arguing that effectiveness is a complex…

  1. Regression analysis exploring teacher impact on student FCI post scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeo, Jonathan V.; Manthey, Seth R.; Brewe, Eric

    2013-01-01

    High School Modeling Workshops are designed to improve high school physics teachers' understanding of physics and how to teach using the Modeling method. The basic assumption is that the teacher plays a critical role in their students' physics education. This study investigated teacher impacts on students' Force Concept Inventory scores, (FCI), with the hopes of identifying quantitative differences between teachers. This study examined student FCI scores from 18 teachers with at least a year of teaching high school physics. This data was then evaluated using a General Linear Model (GLM), which allowed for a regression equation to be fitted to the data. This regression equation was used to predict student post FCI scores, based on: teacher ID, student pre FCI score, gender, and representation. The results show 12 out of 18 teachers significantly impact their student post FCI scores. The GLM further revealed that of the 12 teachers only five have a positive impact on student post FCI scores. Given these differences among teachers it is our intention to extend our analysis to investigate pedagogical differences between them.

  2. Combat Neurosis in the Battered Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the effect of school violence on classroom teachers. The study of 253 Los Angeles inner city classroom teachers reveals that many of them have developed conditions similar to the combat neurosis found in soldiers at war. (HM)

  3. Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

  4. Beginning Student Teachers' Teacher Identities Based on Their Practical Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Katariina; Karlsson, Liisa; Pitkaniemi, Harri; Maaranen, Katriina

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate first-year student teachers' teacher identities through their practical theories and ask what these practical theories reveal about their emerging teacher identities? This study approaches teacher identity from a dialogical viewpoint where identity is constructed through various positions. The empirical part of…

  5. Reflection in Teacher Education Programmes for Novice EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota G. Karkaletsi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the concept of reflection as an integral component of professional English Foreign Language teacher education. Many scholars have acknowledged its paramount importance in teachers’ training and development and the relevant literature reveals that reflection may herald the beginning of a true learning process towards professional growth, productive change and professional autonomy. Thus, it appears as an imperative need to evaluate whether teacher preparation programmes develop reflective abilities in their trainees. It is primarily for this reason that the study seeks to investigate whether the compulsory, induction training programme offered by the Greek State for the newly appointed English Foreign Language teachers (P.E.K. induction training programme grants them sufficient space, time and support to engage in reflective thought and action consciously and creatively. The research that is conducted employs the questionnaire as its methodological tool with a view to collecting sufficient data, whose analysis will lead to valuable conclusions. The results show that the training programme under investigation bears a great weakness since it marginalises the role of reflection leaving its rich potential unexploited. The findings provide a strong case for assigning greater value to reflective practices and for enhancing the quality of reflection in the specific induction training programme through the adoption of various promising techniques.

  6. EFL Teachers’ Perceptions on Blackboard Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ali Mohsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The widespread availability of technological infrastructure has enhanced the adoption of learning management systems (LMSs in educational institutions. Blackboard is one of the most popular marketable LMSs adopted in higher education institutions. As some previous studies have viewed that positive perceptions played a vital role in adopting new technologies, this paper aims to investigate teachers’ perceptions on blackboard applications in the context of teaching English as a foreign language (EFL. To gather data, 32 EFL university teachers from Saudi Arabia were surveyed and interviewed about their perceptions toward the use of the blackboard. The results from the data instruments reveal that EFL teachers have positive perceptions on Blackboard applications to English language teaching. Most teachers view Blackboard as a structured e-learning platform that helps improve the teacher-student relationship in a course and aids to make teaching English more successful. The study findings; however, revealed that the use of blackboard as a blending learning is still focusing on administrative issues rather than pedagogical significance for language learning. Recommendations and directions for future research are highlighted at the end of this article.

  7. Views of parents, teachers and children on health promotion in kindergarten : first results from formative focus groups and observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansolios, Sanne; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to capture the views of children, parents and teachers on the topic of physical activity in kindergarten through observation and focus group interviews. The study was conducted in the kindergartens from the sampling group in the Danish part of PERISCOPE. 1 st methodology : Children interviewed inside by the researcher on preferable movements and settings and then observed outside during their playtime. 2 nd methodology : Children asked to draw themselves playing their most preferred physical activity. Parents and kindergarten teachers interviewed in two different groups, using an identical guide. Children are skilled in taking advantage of the space and facilities available for physical activity; girls need more support than boys to initiate physical activity; children are happy with the facilities and the toys available in the kindergarten. Teachers feel an increasing pressure to take more responsibility and initiatives for the children ’ s health habits. Parents state that if more physical activity is initiated in the kindergarten, it could make children request domestic activity. Physical activity and movement concept are too abstract for children of this age to talk about: they quickly lose their focus and concentration. The new methodology of videotaping gives the researcher the chance to interpret facial expressions to capture movement, talk and actions, and to make a distinction among children, as they tend to interrupt each other. However, this method contains a weakness, if used alone, by the fact that the shooting is only a refl ection of what the video camera has recorded.

  8. Classroom Behaviour Management: The Effects of In-Service Training on Elementary Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Nancy; Royer, Égide; Frenette, Éric; Beaumont, Claire; Flanagan, Tara

    2013-01-01

    We examined a training program in classroom management in relation to the efficacy beliefs of elementary school teachers. The training program used a quasi-experimental design with a waitlist control group. Twenty-seven elementary school teachers in the greater Quebec City area participated. The repeated measures ANOVA results revealed positive…

  9. An Investigation of Students’ Face Wants in Chinese English Teachers’ Classroom Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to create a new teacher-student relationship and raise students’ politeness awareness and pragmatic competence in cross-cultural communication, this paper investigated and analyzed students’ face wants and English teachers’ awareness of students’ face want in their classroom feedback. The main data-gathering instruments are MP3-recording, non-participant observation, follow-up structured-interviews and closed- questionnaires. The results reveal that 60.6% of the teacher participants are frequently aware of their students’ face wants, and 27.2% of them are sometimes, while the other teachers seldom or never consider the students’ face want. Because of being influenced by the Chinese traditional culture in which teachers are superiors, not thoroughly understanding English Curriculum Standard which calls for human concern, and knowing a little about pragmatic theories, some Chinese English teachers ignore students’ face want. Suggestions on how to save students’ face want are put forward.

  10. Normalization of CALL and TPACK: Discovering Teachers' Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Rahmany

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at investigating the effect of technology integration in general and normalization of CALL in particular on Iranian teachers' technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK. It also examines teachers' main opportunities and challenges with normalization of CALL. In this regard, 16 teachers taught a course with the goal to integrate computer technology fully. The researchers implemented a TPACK questionnaire before and after the course and a semi-structured interview after the course. Observations also helped the researchers to gain a complementary understanding of the process of CALL normalization and how teachers deal with their new roles. The results revealed that technology-related knowledge domains developed significantly. The results also showed that Iranian educational society is highly sensitive to instructional technology and its use in education.

  11. Pre-service Primary Teachers’ Ideas about Lunar Phases

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    ?ule BAYRAKTAR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers’ ideas about how lunar phases occur. 154 third year primary student teachers were asked to explain “why the moon is seen in different shapes when we look at the sky at different times”. They have given enough time to explain their answers in writing. Then, their responses were examined and categorized as scientific explanations and misconceptions. Results of the study showed that while the 54 % of the student teachers’ ideas about the lunar phases are scientific, the remaining 46 % of them could be categorized as misconceptions. Some of the misconceptions detected from the student teachers’ explanations of the causes of the moon phases are: earth’s shadow on the moon, earth’s rotation or varying distance between the earth and the moon. The study revealed similar results with the previous studies conducted in other cultures.

  12. Exploring Factors Related to Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Sawyer, Brook; Tompkins, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how teacher (teaching experience, perceptions of teacher collaboration and teacher influence) and classroom (children's engagement) characteristics predicted teacher self-efficacy for 48 preschool teachers in the U.S. Results showed a significant interaction effect between teachers' perceptions of collaboration and children's…

  13. Teacher Perceptions of Gender-Based Differences among Elementary School Teachers

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    Tracy Darrin Wood

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine teacher perceptions of gender-based differences among elementary school teachers. In this mixed-methods study, the researcher utilized an online survey to collect data. Quantitative analysis revealed no statistically significant differences; however, qualitative analysis showed that there were more negative responses to survey statements pertaining to males. More than half of the participants perceived differences between female and male elementary teachers, including beliefs that female teachers are more nurturing, that male teachers are more laidback, and that male teachers are more dominant and commanding with students. Four conclusions were drawn: elementary teachers perceive differences between female and male teachers, male elementary teachers are perceived more negatively than female colleagues, a vast majority of participants feel that more male elementary teachers are needed in the elementary schools, and differences between female and male elementary teachers remain unclear.

  14. Teacher Induction: Implications for Physical Education Teacher Development and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banville, Dominique; Rikard, G. Linda

    2009-01-01

    Data show that 46% of all teachers in public schools will leave the profession within their first 5 years of teaching (Ingersoll, 2003). These data refer to teachers from all disciplines including physical education. To address these problems school districts have developed teacher induction programs that show promising results. Our literature…

  15. Preservice Teachers: Teacher Preparation, Multicultural Curriculum and Culturally Relevant Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins-Gillispie, Delphina

    2009-01-01

    This study is part of a larger study that uses mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) to investigate preservice teachers' knowledge and understanding of multiculturalism and to prepare preservice teachers to work in diverse classrooms. The results indicate two findings: 1) that preservice teachers come from homogeneous backgrounds;…

  16. Rural Elementary School Teachers' Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Aimee; Wood, Lawrence; Hough, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Based on survey responses from more than 500 third-grade teachers, this study addressed three research questions relating to technology integration and its impact in rural elementary schools. The first analyses compared rural with non-rural teachers, revealing that the rural teachers had more positive attitudes toward technology integration. Then…

  17. Synthesis of Research on Teachers' Questioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Meredith

    1984-01-01

    Reseach on use of questioning in classroom teaching reveals that recitation is a poor method, but teachers use it anyway because it is effective in teaching curriculum that is largely textbook based. Teacher educators may be advised to help teachers learn to use recitation well. (MD)

  18. Teacher Power--Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Donald Allen

    2007-01-01

    The author reviews four factors that contribute to the reduction of the authority and power of teachers: the Far Right, the Christian Right, the standards movement, and the decline in the use of collective bargaining. As a result of these initiatives, teachers are forced to abandon many progressive educational practices and embrace educational…

  19. Training of adult education teachers : experiences from a teacher training programme in cooperative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The background of the study was that a group of teachers should develop competences in order to apply a new pedagogical approach, cooperative learning (CL), in a skilled manner. The total competence development process included theoretical knowledge about the method, practical training in its use, and ongoing and extensive coaching related to the teachers' experiences of implementing CL. It was assumed that the competence development process would result in a higher usage of CL as well as an increasingly professional and more reflected application of the teaching method over the year. The results from the study, as indicated by the teachers’ completed logs, and supplemented by the data from the focus group interviews, show a different picture. Two months into the project, the teachers were using CL on a large scale. The average level of their use did not increase during the academic year. By two months into the course, teachers already perceived themselves as being able to apply the method. They also reported that their skills were developed further during the course. They found that they became better at solving educational challenges, that they became more satisfied with their own teaching, and that they were better able to solve the problems deriving from the heterogeneous composition of the student group. The data thus documents measurable but limited developments in the teachers competences after the first two month. Our analysis of the teachers’ reflection skills reveals that as early as two months into the project, a high level of reflection was taking place. Contrary to our initial assumptions, there is no gradual and continuous rise of the teachers’ competence. The increase in teaching competence is located relatively early in the academic year; after that there is only modest improvement.

  20. The Impact of Lifelong Learning Teacher Education in Secondary School Results El Impacto de la Formación Permanente del Profesorado de Educación Secundaria en los Resultados Escolares.

    OpenAIRE

    Paula González-Vallinas; David Oterino; José Luis San Fabián

    2006-01-01

    Studies dealing with factors which have an influence on students outcomes are reviewed, teacher variables and teacher training are among their most common findings to influence school achievement. This study analyses the variable in-service teacher training on students? academic achievement. The analysis levels are departments and schools, being department the level where the relation among variables is more significative. There are significative correlations between the in-service teacher tr...

  1. Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors and the Influence of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors on Student Motivation to Learn Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Vania

    The National Assessment on Educational Progress signals that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete globally in an ever changing scientific society. As a result, legislation mandated that all students be assessed and show proficiency in scientific literacy beginning in Grade 4 with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002 also known as No Child Left Behind. Research indicates a disturbing decline in the number of U.S. students pursuing more rigorous science courses in high school, majoring in scientific areas in college, and choosing future careers in science. With a need to improve science instruction and enhance science literacy for all students, this study focuses on immediate communication behaviors of the classroom teacher as a deciding factor in the opinions of high school students towards science. The purpose of this study was to reveal high school science student perceptions of teacher communication patterns, both verbal and nonverbal, and how they influence their motivation to learn science. The researcher utilized a nonexperimental, quantitative research design to guide this study. Teacher and student data were collected using the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ). The Student Motivation to Learn Instrument (SMLI) across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status survey was used to evaluate student motivation in science. Participants were encouraged to be honest in reporting and sharing information concerning teacher communication behaviors. The data revealed that teacher immediacy behaviors, both verbal and nonverbal, were perceived differently in terms of student gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The results showed that teachers who display positive communication behaviors and use challenging questioning followed with positive responses create pathways to potentially powerful relationships. These relationships between teachers and students can lead to increased student motivation and academic achievement in the science classroom.

  2. Content and Methods of Teacher Professional Culture Forming

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    Guzel I. Gaysina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of scientific attention to the problem of culture functioning at all levels is due to several factors: scientific interest in gumanistica; comprehension of culture as a phenomenon that penetrates all social spheres; scientific integrative processes strengthening; the actualization of humanitarian thinking. Article aims to develop the content, ways and pedagogical means of future teacher professional culture formation. Our research of this process is based on the culturological approach that is one of the modern methodological approaches in pedagogy. The results of the theoretical and experimental research work in the field of teacher professional culture formation are presented. It is needed to rely on a stating that the professional competence of a teacher is not the only goal-result of higher professional education. Modern school education also needs a teacher of high professional culture. In the structure of the teacher professional culture there are three components: evaluative, active and creative. Their formation requires educational training process reconstruction on the principles of culturological approach. Pedagogical experiment has confirmed the effect of proposed conditions and means of teacher professional culture formation The problem revealed in the article, may be useful for higher school teachers; researchers in the pedagogical problem of education and culture integration; students of pedagogical skills.

  3. Constructing Outcomes in Teacher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Marilyn Cochran-Smith

    2001-01-01

    As we enter the twenty-first century, the outcomes, consequences, and results of teacher education have become critical topics in nearly all of the state and national policy debates about teacher preparation and licensure as well as in the development of many of the privately and publicly funded research agendas related to teacher and student learning. In this article, I argue that teacher education reform over the last fifty years has been driven by a series of questions about policy and pra...

  4. Teacher beliefs and practices of grammar teaching: focusing on meaning, form, or forms?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hacer Hande, Uysal; Mehmet, Bardakci.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide curriculum innovations to teach English through meaning-focused communicative approaches over the years, studies report that most language teachers still follow transmission-based grammar-oriented approaches. It is known that the success of any curriculum innovation is dependen [...] t on teachers. Therefore, given that teaching grammar has always been a central, but problematic domain for language teachers, what teachers believe and do regarding grammar instruction is an important issue that needs to be investigated. However, studies that research teachers and their grammar teaching are rare, and almost non-existent at the elementary-level English teaching contexts. Therefore, through a questionnaire given to 108 teachers and afocus-group interview, the present study investigated Turkish primary-level English language teachers' beliefs and practice patterns of teaching grammar, and the reasons behind these patterns. The results revealed that teachers predominantly prefer the traditional focus-on-formS approach, which indicates a serious clash with teachers and curriculum goals, on the one hand, and theoretical suggestions on the other. The paper ends with discussions and suggestions for teacher education and language policy-making.

  5. Students’ Perceptions of their Teachers’ Teaching of Mathematics: The Case of Ghana

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    Ernest Ampadu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine students’ perceptions of their teachers’ teaching practices and how it impact on their learning experiences. The sample of the study involved 358 students from 12 Junior High Schools (12-14years who were randomly selected to complete a semi-structured questionnaire. The study revealed that students’ perceptions of their teachers’ teaching varies as the results established that both teacher-centred and student-centred teaching approaches were used by mathematics teachers. The study also established that teachers’ actions and inactions impact positively or negatively on students learning experiences as majority of the respondents reported that their learning experiences are to a larger extent controlled by that teacher. Majority of the respondents indicated that their teachers normally tell them which questions to solve and which methods to use. Although the study was limited only to 12 schools, the findings provide a conceptual framework for further research into how students’ views could be used by both teachers and educational authorities in improving the teaching and learning of mathematics as students’ are in a better position to provide useful information regarding their teachers teaching and how it impacts on their learning. Among others, it is recommended that students’ ratings or evaluation of their teaachers’ teaching should be considered in evaluating teachers’ teaching and effectiveness.© 2012 IOJES. All rights reserved

  6. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Romanov, Alexey; Romanov, Alexander; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March ...

  7. Secondary School Teachers’ Perception of “Teacher Professional Development”: A Case Study of Teachers from Five Districts of Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Merab Kagoda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher professional development (TPD is important in keeping teachers abreast with changes that characterise the 21st century schools. However, TPD will only be valuable if teachers perceive it as important. Moreover the varying perceptions of teacher professional development by teachers are likely to affect their view of TPD. Using data collected from secondary school teachers, this study explored teachers’ understanding of the concept “teacher professional development, TPD approaches used by teachers and barriers/constraints they face. Results show that teachers have narrow understanding of the concept, and that to many TPD meant subject content upgrading by going back to teacher training college, while others view it as attending workshops and seminars. Barriers mentioned included shortage of time, lack of funds, lack of motivation and support by head teachers and government as a whole. Researchers recommend that teacher education should incorporate a component of professional teacher development in the initial teacher training. The head teachers and Ministry of Education and Sports should support in-service teachers in their endeavour to develop professionally. Teachers with low selfesteem should be motivated through attendance of conferences, workshops and group activities at local level.

  8. DNA Hydroxymethylation Profiling Reveals that WT1 Mutations Result in Loss of TET2 Function in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Raajit Rampal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in IDH1/IDH2 and TET2 result in impaired TET2-mediated conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. The observation that WT1 inactivating mutations anticorrelate with TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML led us to hypothesize that WT1 mutations may impact TET2 function. WT1 mutant AML patients have reduced 5hmC levels similar to TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutant AML. These mutations are characterized by convergent, site-specific alterations in DNA hydroxymethylation, which drive differential gene expression more than alterations in DNA promoter methylation. WT1 overexpression increases global levels of 5hmC, and WT1 silencing reduced 5hmC levels. WT1 physically interacts with TET2 and TET3, and WT1 loss of function results in a similar hematopoietic differentiation phenotype as observed with TET2 deficiency. These data provide a role for WT1 in regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and suggest that TET2 IDH1/IDH2 and WT1 mutations define an AML subtype defined by dysregulated DNA hydroxymethylation.

  9. Revealing the sequence and resulting cellular morphology of receptor-ligand interactions during Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Greta E; Gilson, Paul R; Taechalertpaisarn, Tana; Tham, Wai-Hong; de Jong, Nienke W M; Harvey, Katherine L; Fowkes, Freya J I; Barlow, Paul N; Rayner, Julian C; Wright, Gavin J; Cowman, Alan F; Crabb, Brendan S

    2015-02-01

    During blood stage Plasmodium falciparum infection, merozoites invade uninfected erythrocytes via a complex, multistep process involving a series of distinct receptor-ligand binding events. Understanding each element in this process increases the potential to block the parasite's life cycle via drugs or vaccines. To investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions, they were systematically blocked using a combination of genetic deletion, enzymatic receptor cleavage and inhibition of binding via antibodies, peptides and small molecules, and the resulting temporal changes in invasion and morphological effects on erythrocytes were filmed using live cell imaging. Analysis of the videos have shown receptor-ligand interactions occur in the following sequence with the following cellular morphologies; 1) an early heparin-blockable interaction which weakly deforms the erythrocyte, 2) EBA and PfRh ligands which strongly deform the erythrocyte, a process dependant on the merozoite's actin-myosin motor, 3) a PfRh5-basigin binding step which results in a pore or opening between parasite and host through which it appears small molecules and possibly invasion components can flow and 4) an AMA1-RON2 interaction that mediates tight junction formation, which acts as an anchor point for internalization. In addition to enhancing general knowledge of apicomplexan biology, this work provides a rational basis to combine sequentially acting merozoite vaccine candidates in a single multi-receptor-blocking vaccine. PMID:25723550

  10. English Language Teachers’ Efficacy Beliefs: Validation of the Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Rezvani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the vast studies on the measurement of teachers’ sense of efficacy, little has been done in the domain of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL. Hence, this study was motivated by a practical need to develop and validate a teacher efficacy questionnaire in TEFL. To this end, the questionnaire (English Language Teachers’ Efficacy Beliefs Questionnaire (ELTEBQ was developed through semi-structured interviews with English university instructors of universities in Iran and a review of relevant literature. In order to validate the instrument it was administrated to 65 English language instructors. The result of factor analysis revealed a six-factor solution with a reliability index (Cronbach’s Alpha of 0.82.Keywords: English language instructors, Teacher efficacy, Factor analysis    

  11. Evaluating Teacher-Candidates’ Teaching in the Extended Practicum

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    Edwin G. Ralph

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the aggregate results of the evaluations of the teaching performance of 17 cohorts of teacher-candidates (n = 374, who completed their extended practicum during their pre-service teacher-education program at one Western Canadian university. Over a 15-year period, one of the researchers served as the College Supervisor for these cohorts in their respective four-month internship in schools in a variety of locations throughout the province. The teacher-candidates’ final evaluations on nine categories of teaching performance revealed varying levels of strength among the skill areas. Implications of the findings are drawn: (a for the undergraduate program administrators, faculty members, and practicum-program personnel at the university connected to this study, and (b for other teacher-education institutions interested in making use of this information to help inform their deliberations in assessing/improving their own pre-service and practicum initiatives.

  12. TESOL in-Service Teachers’ Attitudes towards Computer Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Rezaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The way education is being delivered has been altered via the rapid development of computer technology. This is especially the case in the delivery of English language teaching where the combination of various variables is pertinent to computer attitudes to enhance instructional outcomes. This paper reports the study undertaken to elucidate whether the correlation exists between TESOL in-service teachers’ attitudes towards computer and their computer attributes scale and to explore the proportion of variance in TESOL in-service teachers’ attitudes towards computer that can be explained by their cultural perception scale and computer competence scale. A questionnaire (ATCT was utilized to obtain the necessary information about teachers’ characteristics, their computer attributes, cultural perceptions, computer competence and attitudes of the sample (45 TESOL in-service teachers at Universiti Sains Malaysia. The results revealed that there was a significant correlation between teachers’ computer attitudes and computer attributes. A further finding revealed that both of cultural perception scale and computer competence scale were predictors of teachers’ computer attitudes; yet, cultural perception scale was the best predictor. Suggestions based on these outcomes have been offered in this paper.

  13. Teacher Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, L. Dean

    1983-01-01

    A growing emphasis on teacher accountability, coupled with declining enrollments and reduced revenues, has increased the importance of teacher evaluations as a basis for staffing decisions, even though there is no clear definition of teacher effectiveness. Accordingly, legal standards are provided for the procedural and substantive issues of due…

  14. Break-seq reveals hydroxyurea-induced chromosome fragility as a result of unscheduled conflict between DNA replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; McCulley, Andrew; Haarer, Brian; Arnak, Remigiusz; Feng, Wenyi

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication, checkpoint inactivation via a mec1 mutation leads to chromosome breakage at replication forks initiated from virtually all origins after transient exposure to hydroxyurea (HU), an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase. Here we sought to determine whether all replication forks containing single-stranded DNA gaps have equal probability of producing double-strand breaks (DSBs) when cells attempt to recover from HU exposure. We devised a new methodology, Break-seq, that combines our previously described DSB labeling with next generation sequencing to map chromosome breaks with improved sensitivity and resolution. We show that DSBs preferentially occur at genes transcriptionally induced by HU. Notably, different subsets of the HU-induced genes produced DSBs in MEC1 and mec1 cells as replication forks traversed a greater distance in MEC1 cells than in mec1 cells during recovery from HU. Specifically, while MEC1 cells exhibited chromosome breakage at stress-response transcription factors, mec1 cells predominantly suffered chromosome breakage at transporter genes, many of which are the substrates of those transcription factors. We propose that HU-induced chromosome fragility arises at higher frequency near HU-induced genes as a result of destabilized replication forks encountering transcription factor binding and/or the act of transcription. We further propose that replication inhibitors can induce unscheduled encounters between replication and transcription and give rise to distinct patterns of chromosome fragile sites. PMID:25609572

  15. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Romanov, Alexey; Romanov, Alexander; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positiv...

  16. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Romanov, Alexey; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positive correlation between the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies and the Tohoku earthquake. This study may lead to a better understanding of the response of the atmosphere/ionosphere to the Great Tohoku earthquake.

  17. ICT Teachers' Assigned Roles and Expectations from Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topu, Fatma Burcu; Goktas, Yuksel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a better understanding of ICT teachers' assigned position and to determine school administrators' and other teachers' perceptions towards ICT teachers and these teachers' positions, and to reveal the similar and discrepant aspects of their tertiary education and the roles (work and responsibilities) assigned to…

  18. Metabolic profiling reveals altered pattern of central metabolism in navel orange plants as a result of boron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guidong; Dong, Xiaochang; Liu, Leichao; Wu, Lishu; Peng, Shu'ang; Jiang, Cuncang

    2015-04-01

    We focused on the changes of metabolite profiles in navel orange plants under long-term boron (B) deficiency using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) approach. Curling of the leaves and leaf chlorosis were observed only in the upper leaves (present before start of the treatment) of B-deficient plants, while the lower leaves (grown during treatment) did not show any visible symptoms. The metabolites with up-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly proline, l-ornithine, lysine, glucoheptonic acid, fucose, fumarate, oxalate, quinate, myo-inositol and allo-inositol, while the metabolites with down-accumulation in B-deficient leaves were mainly serine, asparagine, saccharic acid, citrate, succinate, shikimate and phytol. The levels of glucose and fructose were increased only in the upper leaves by B deficiency, while starch content was increased in all the leaves and in roots. The increased levels of malate, ribitol, gluconic acid and glyceric acid occurred only in the lower leaves of B-deficient plants. The increased levels of phenols only in the upper leaves indicated that the effects of B on phenol metabolism in citrus plants may be a consequence of disruptions in leaf structure. Metabolites with opposite reactions in upper and lower leaves were mainly glutamine, glycine and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. To our knowledge, the phenomena of allo-inositol even higher than myo-inositol occurred characterized for the first time in this species. These results suggested that the altered pattern of central metabolism may be either specific or adaptive responses of navel orange plants to B deficiency. PMID:25212059

  19. How Nigerian Teachers Select Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe-Bassey, George S.

    1988-01-01

    Examines how teachers from Nigerian secondary schools and teacher training colleges select instructional materials. Results of questionnaires and interviews from 89 teachers are analyzed, influences on teachers when selecting materials are described, and implications for instructional design are discussed. (22 references) (LRW)

  20. The Relationship between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Self-efficacy among Iranian EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahanbakhsh Nikoopour

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the relationship between Iranian EFL teachers’ trait EI (trait EI and Self-efficacy. To this end, 336 teachers were asked to complete “Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire–Short Form (TEIQue–SF” (Petrides and Furnham, 2006 and “Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES” (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001. Pearson product-moment correlation showed a significant relationship between trait EI and self-efficacy. Trait EI subconstructs also showed significant relationship with Self-efficacy subconstructs as well as total self-efficacy. To investigate which subconstructs of trait emotional intelligence might have more predictive power in predicting teacher’s self-efficacy, regression analysis was run. Results revealed all subconstructs of trait EI to be moderate predictors of Self-efficacy. In addition, the ANOVA were employed to investigate the influence of teachers’ age, gender, and years of teaching experience on EI and Self-efficacy.  Results showed teachers with more years of teaching experience to have achieved higher levels in both trait EI and self-efficacy. However no effect of EFL teachers’ age, gender and their interactions on teachers’ trait EI and Self-efficacy were observed.

  1. In their words, through their eyes: Novice teachers reflect on teaching and their preservice education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, James Edward

    In recent years, cries for reform in science teacher education have come from many directions. Teachers often leave the profession after a few years, and the teachers that stay are perceived as insufficiently prepared for the challenges they will face. One pervasive problem is that teachers themselves are rarely consulted in efforts to reform science teacher education. This study is an attempt to address that lack of input, by investigating the "lived reality" of prospective science teachers and trying to see the process through their eyes, to discover what they wanted and needed from their teacher preparation program, and to assess how well their preservice program met those needs. During the semester of their student teaching, six prospective teachers were asked questions about their experiences and asked to reflect on their preservice education. The researcher continued to follow the progress of one of the cohort members through his first year as a full-time teacher with a series of interviews. The study revealed a number of skills and attitudes that the student teachers felt were essential to their success: a sense of "caring," classroom management skills, organizational skills, and science content knowledge. Unfortunately, the study also reveals that the student teachers also felt that their preservice education did very little to help meet these needs. Also disturbing was the fact that all but one of the student teachers had bad experiences with their cooperating host teachers. The study makes a number of suggestions for improving teacher preparation. Field experiences need to be frequent, and varied, with extensive opportunities for reflection on those experiences. Also, teacher education programs should more closely integrate the three elements of preservice education: extensive field experiences, courses in education theory, and courses in science content. Student teachers need at least one mentor who is dedicated to their success, and is not in a position to evaluate them. The results of this study should provide affirmation to innovative teacher preparation programs, such as the UTeach Program at the University of Texas at Austin.

  2. Communicative Competency as Teacher’s Integrative Ability for Musical Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Sergeevna Kobozeva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to finding of ways of development of communicative competence of students of pedagogical higher education institution. Authors analyzed the main tendencies of researches in this problem area. Authors see development of communicative competence of the teacher as the solution of a question which allows to carry out communication of the teacher with pupils means of music. As a result of research personal signs of communicative competence were revealed and its professional importance is defined. In work diagnostics of level of formation of musical and communicative culture at students of pedagogical higher education institutions is described. These researches were conducted in Federal public budgetary educational institution of higher education "The Mordovian state teacher training college of M. E. Evsevyev" and in Federal public budgetary educational institution of higher education "The Yaroslavl state pedagogical university of K. D. Ushinsky". As a result of research characteristics of communicative competence were found out and the educational and concert component of training of the teacher-musician which opens author's approach to development of communicative competence as to integrative ability of musical communication of the teacher is allocated.

  3. Examining two Turkish teachers' questioning patterns in secondary school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikmaz, Ali

    This study examined low and high level teachers' questioning patterns and classroom implementations within an argument-based inquiry approach known as the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach, which addresses issues on negotiation, argumentation, learning, and teaching. The level of the teachers was determined by the students' writing scores. This study was conducted in Turkey with seven teacher for preliminary study. Because scoring writing samples examines the students' negotiation level with the different sources and students learn scientific process, as negotiation, which they may transfer into their writing, in classroom, two teachers were selected to represent low and high level teachers. Data collection involved classroom observation through video recordings. The comparative qualitative method was employed throughout the data analysis process with including quantitative results. The research questions that guided the present study were: (1) How are low and high level teachers, determined according to their students' writing scores, questioning patterns different from each other during classroom discourse? (2) Is there a relationship between students' writings and teachers' questioning styles in the classroom? Analysis of Qualitative data showed that teachers' classroom implementations reveal big differences based on argumentation patterns. The high level teacher, whose students had high scores in writing samples, asked more questions and the cognitive levels of questions were higher than the low level teacher. Questions promote an argumentative environment and improve critical thinking skills by discussing different ideas and claims. Asking more questions of teacher influences students to initiate (ask questions) more and to learn the scientific process with science concepts. Implicitly, this learning may improve students' comparison in their writing. Moreover, high level teacher had a more structured and organized classroom than low level teacher.

  4. Teacher Educator Identity Emerging through Positioning Self and Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnegar, Stefinee; Murphy, M. Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Research exploring the process of becoming a teacher educator always reveals the difficult balancing act that developing an identity as a teacher educator involves and the articles in this issue do just that. The Rice and McNeil studies of teacher educator identity in this issue are very revealing; they were conducted from the perspective of…

  5. Toward Reconstructing the Narrative of Teacher Education: A Rhetorical Analysis of "Preparing Teachers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on insights from literary critic and theorist Kenneth Burke, this rhetorical analysis of "Preparing Teachers" (2010), a publication of the National Research Council, reveals then critiques' key assumptions that are shaping policies and current reform efforts in teacher education, including changes in U.S. teacher

  6. Trainee Teachers' Use of the Internet--Opportunities and Challenges for Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann; Twidle, John; Sorensen, Pete; Godwin, Janet

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on 12 in-depth case studies of trainee science teachers' use of the Internet in their science teaching from teacher training programmes in four UK universities. The findings reveal many opportunities and challenges trainee teachers face in using the Internet and these are examined in the light of the promotion of the use of ICT…

  7. The effect of self reflections through electronic journals (e-journals) on the self efficacy of pre-service teachers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Zekiye Müge, Tavil.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims both to provide information about the self-reflections of pre-service teachers keeping self-reflective e-journals during the practicum period and to determine the relationship between their self-reflection and self-efficacy levels. Both quantitative and qualitative data were analysed [...] in integration to gain deeper insight into the study. To accommodate the quantitative data, the English for foreign language (EFL) Teacher Efficacy Scale was administered to 40 pre-service English language teachers (ELT), both before and after the practicum period, to measure the differences in their self-efficacy levels. The qualitative data were examined to reveal the most frequently recurring problems among the e-journals and how the data overlapped with the statistical analysis. The results revealed that incorporating reflective e-journals into the field-based experience process helped pre-service teachers become active decision-makers, contributors and efficient, confident teachers.

  8. A program for reducing teacher's resistance to changes in curriculum in centralized education systems. An experience on changes of mathematics text books in Iran based on distinction results

    OpenAIRE

    Ketabdar, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    Curricula in concentrated educational systems are prepared from an upper-stream reference and hand over teachers’ disposal. Curricula in Iran are compiled in the so-called math curriculum development office and then put at the disposal of teachers. The researches in this regard show that such plans provide some resistance against executing it which are named teacher - proof programs, even it changed to some extent for accept ion, its execution is suspeciable. This research first explains ho...

  9. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within two different management regimes: An assessment-based accountability regime and regime without external pressure on results

    OpenAIRE

    Knut-Andreas Christophersen; Eyvind Elstad; Are Turmo

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management systems: (1) teachers working under assessment-based accountability (N = 236) and (2) folk–high school teachers who work without tests and examinatio...

  10. The Relationship between Didactics and Classroom Management: Towards New Tools for the Training of Math Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoin, Michel; Lanaris, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the interest of the “instrumental conflict” concept, developed by Marquet (2005), to understand the relationship between didactics and classroom management in the training programs of math teachers. It also shows some results of a survey, conducted in 2008 among pre-service teachers in the Université du Québec en Outaouais (Canada), revealing a perceived gap between both domains. However, those two domains are closely related during teaching in the classroom. The ...

  11. Teachers' Emphases on General Education Goals: A Study of Norwegian Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallestad, Jan Helge; Olweus, Dan

    1998-01-01

    Teachers' emphases on six general educational goals were studied in samples of 144 and 157 Norwegian teachers over two years. Results suggest that teachers' goal emphases are, to a considerable degree, the result of professional socialization, and that several classroom characteristics are basically unrelated to individual differences in teachers'…

  12. Interdisciplinarity and Teacher Education: The Teacher’s Training of the Secondary School in Rio de Janeiro—Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Augusto Fidalgo-Neto; Renato Matos Lopes; José Leopoldo Cerqueira Magalhães; Max Fonseca Pierini; Luiz Anastácio Alves

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the teacher’s perception and knowledge about interdisciplinarity on public secondary school in Rio de Janeiro. Among the participants, 101 teachers completed the questionnaire on the subject investigated. All data about the perceptions of teachers were faced with lesson plans prepared by teachers who reported having strong knowledge on interdisciplinary practice. Our results suggest that there is a lack of support in schools, and competence of ...

  13. Personal and Job Related Predictors of Teacher Stress and Job Performance among School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Hanif

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to find out role of personal and job related variables in teacher stress and job performance of school teachers. Furthermore, levels and sources of stress and their relationship with job performance among teachers were also explored. The measures used in this study were indigenously developed i.e., Teacher Stress Inventory (TSI-Urdu, Teachers Job Performance Scale and personal and job related Information sheet. Two independent samples were selected from Government and Private Schools of Islamabad (Pakistan. Sample I was comprised of 400 teachers (men and women from Primary and secondary schools. For the evaluation of teachers’ job performance another sample of 1200 students from the classes of teachers of sample I was selected. Three students were randomly selected from each teacher’s class. The students were requested to evaluate their respective teachers’ job performance. The findings revealed that negative significant relationship exists between teachers stress and job performance. The step-wise regression analysis revealed school system, gender, job experience, number of family members, and number of students as significant predictors of teacher stress and gender, school system, family members, job experience and age as significant predictors of teachers’ job performance.

  14. Information and Communication Technology among Excellent Islamic Education Teachers in Selangor Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah Abdul Razak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of technology in the era of the borderless world has grown rapidly in the entire field of human life, including in the field of education. The rapid development in science and technology led to the dissemination of information and knowledge through classroom also changed. Teachers as educators cannot refrain from directly involved in all activities related to information technology. These challenges provide an opportunity for educators to modify the teaching and learning process to become to become more active and more student-centred. This study draws to this issue by investigating the knowledge, skills, and the use of ICT and attitudes of Excellent Islamic Education teachers towards ICT. The participants were 70 Excellent Islamic Education teachers in Selangor, Malaysia. Data is collected using a questionnaire and the findings are analysed by using SPSS software 19.0. The results of the descriptive analysis involving the mean and standard deviation indicate that the knowledge and teachers’ attitudes towards ICT to be at the high level. While the skills and the use of ICT among the teachers at a moderate level. The result also revealed that there is a significant relationship between ICT knowledge and teachers’ attitude towards ICT. However, the strength of the relationship is very weak. There is also a significant relationship between ICT skills and teachers’ attitude towards ICT and the strength of the relationship is also weak. Finding also shows there is a significant relationship between the use of ICT and teachers’ attitude and the strength of the relationship is at moderate level. In conclusion, the use of ICT in teaching and learning of Excellent Islamic Education teachers is very important to determine the objectives achieved. Excellent teachers should consider that ICT only act as a complement, additional tools or aids to teachers who play the key role in delivering information using teaching methods that are more dynamic and efficient; rather than take the place or role of the teacher.

  15. Influences of Teacher Preparation Program on Preservice Science Teachers’ Beliefs

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    Prasart Nuangchalerm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Teacher preparation program is routinely make decisions regarding the best pedagogical methods from field experience studies, it can alter students’ understandings about academic content and some characteristics through professional practices. This study tries to investigate the extent to which individuals learning to be teachers feel what preservice teachers are capable of performing the pedagogical practices. Sixty seven preservice science teachers were described the influences of teacher preparation. Results indicated that preservice teachers enrolled in professional experiences courses perceived themselves as less capable of performing persuasive pedagogical practices than more generally accepted practices. In addition, preservice teachers perceived they were more capable of altering students’ knowledge about content than at modifying their beliefs about content. Implications for research and practice are forwarded.

  16. Compliment Response Strategies by Thai and Chinese EFL Teachers: A Contrastive Study

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    Jun Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated compliment responses (CRs by Thai and Chinese EFL teachers. The data were collected through the written discourse test (DCT in English, containing four settings in terms of appearance, character, ability and possession. A total of 60 Thai and Chinese EFL teachers participated in the study. The results revealed that more similarities were observed than differences in CR strategies used by   Thai and Chinese EFL teachers. The teachers from the two countries followed the same patterns of preferences: that is, they employed Accept strategies the most and Reject strategies the least. However, Accept strategies and Evade strategies used by Chinese participants were slightly more frequent than those used by Thais, whereas Thai teachers employed more Reject strategies than Chinese teachers did. In the four situations, some differences existed between the two groups. Chinese teachers employed more varieties of micro strategies than their Thai counterparts did. Interestingly, Thai and Chinese EFL teachers transferred their native cultures in L1 to L2 in some situations. The findings suggested that EFL teachers’ awareness regarding their L2 pragmatics should be improved.

  17. Teaching Genetics in Secondary Classrooms: a Linguistic Analysis of Teachers' Talk About Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thörne, Karin; Gericke, Niklas

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates Swedish biology teachers' inclusion of proteins when teaching genetics in grade nine (students 15-16 years old). For some years, there has been a call to give attention to proteins when teaching genetics as a means of linking the concepts `gene' and `trait'. Students are known to have problems with this relation because the concepts belong to different organizational levels. However, we know little about how the topic is taught and therefore this case study focuses on how teachers talk about proteins while teaching genetics and if they use proteins as a link between the micro and macro level. Four teachers were recorded during entire genetics teaching sequences, 45 lessons in total. The teachers' verbal communication was then analyzed using thematic pattern analysis, which is based in systemic functional linguistics. The linguistic analysis of teachers' talk in action revealed great variations in both the extent to which they used proteins in explanations of genetics and the ways they included proteins in linking genes and traits. Two of the teachers used protein as a link between gene and trait, while two did not. Three of the four teachers included instruction about protein synthesis. The common message from all teachers was that proteins are built, but none of the teachers talked about genes as exclusively encoding proteins. Our results suggest that students' common lack of understanding of proteins as an intermediate link between gene and trait could be explained by limitations in the way the subject is taught.

  18. An Analysis of the Information Behaviour of Geography Teachers in a Developing African Country–Lesotho

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    Constance BITSO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Information behaviour studies have the potential to inform the design of effective information services that incorporate the information needs, information-seeking and preferences for information sources of target users; hence a doctoral study was conducted on the information behaviour of geography teachers in Lesotho with the aim of guiding the design and implementation of an information service model for these teachers. This paper focuses on the analysis of the information behaviour of geography teachers in Lesotho as a contribution of original knowledge on geography teachers’ information behaviour. The analysis established the information behaviour of geography teachers using the information behaviour concept that encompasses information needs, information-seeking and information sources. Data were collected and analyzed through focus group discussions and conceptual content analysis respectively.The analysis reveals that these geography teachers need current and accurate information covering a variety of aspects in teaching and learning, such as content, pedagogy, classroom management and learners’ assessment. Owing to the increasing number of orphans in schools as a result of the HIV and AIDS pandemic, most teachers expressed the need for information on social assistance for orphans and vulnerable children. Recommendations include information literacy training for teachers and access to the Internet in schools, including the use of open access journals on the Internet by the teachers.

  19. Secondary mathematics teachers' knowledge of slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Sheryl

    1999-09-01

    This study, conducted in the United States, investigated secondary mathematics teachers' concept definitions, mathematical understanding, and pedagogical content knowledge of slope. Surveys were collected from 18 preservice and 21 inservice teachers; 8 teachers from each group were also interviewed. Geometric ratios dominated teachers' concept definitions of slope. Problems involving the recognition of parameters, the interpretation of graphs, and rate of change challenged teachers' thinking. Teachers' descriptions of classroom instruction included physical situations more often than functional situations. Results suggest that mathematics teacher education programs need to specifically address slope as a fundamental concept, emphasising its connection to the concept of function.

  20. A Case Study of Teacher’s Questioning and Students’ Critical Thinking in College EFL Reading Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Shen; Butsakorn Yodkhumlue

    2012-01-01

    The present case study mainly focused on the effects of a teacher’s questions on the development of students’ critical thinking. The purpose was to investigate whether teacher’s questions could facilitate students’ critical thinking which required students to manipulate knowledge instead of direct recalling. Classroom observation and interview were employed in the study. A teacher’s questioning behavior was observed and 17 students were interviewed. The results showed the teacher as...

  1. Malaysian Primary School ESL Teachers’ Questions during Assessment for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Abbasnasab Sardareh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Classroom questioning is a crucial learning and instructional strategy. It has also been regarded as an important aspect of Assessment for Learning (AfL by researchers. Classroom questioning helps students gain a better appreciation of what they are learning as well as how they are learning. It also helps teachers understand students’ learning progress. This qualitative case study is a part of a larger study on classroom questioning during AfL and it has to be reminded that only a part of the study is presented here which involves two ESL teachers (one teaching Year One and the other teaching Year Two class and the types of questions they used during AfL. The current study was conducted in a selected primary school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. To collect data, ten periods of each teacher’s classroom were observed and then interview was conducted with each teacher. Observations and interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed for further analysis. The results of this study showed that the participating teachers were aware of the importance of questioning technique during AfL, however, they asked lower cognitive questions that did not trigger thoughtful reflection. The data also revealed that the teachers in this study formulated questions that at the first sight may seem to be open questions but they expected the students to provide a short-specific answer. Although questions were designed to suit the content of the lesson, it was observed that most of the questions asked by the teachers focused on content, structure and students’ background knowledge and elicited specific, predetermined answers. In short, Most of the questions asked by the teachers in their mixed ability classes were below the students’ Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD and did not help the students promote their thinking skills.

  2. Journeys of science and culture from Hakkari to Istanbul: Reflections of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Oztabak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is scarcity of empirical evidence focusing on teachers working in disadvantaged regions. Research has shown that being a teacher in a disadvantaged region brings psychological and social problems along with the educational ones. This article is based on a project supported by Turkish Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK as a part of science and nature schools project. This project aims to build a bridge between two different cultures, which will ensure an environment of cooperation and experience sharing among students and teachers. This study reveals the reflections of 13 teachers from Hakkari, who participated in the project and took professional development training as well as attending the science and culture oriented activities provided for their students. Face-to-face interviews and focus group discussions were used to collect the experiences of teachers. Two main themes emerged as a result of the content analysis: “interdisciplinary practice experiences” and “reflections related to the process of professional development”.

  3. Teachers’ intuition and knowledge in detecting specific learning disabilities

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    Obradovi? Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate primary school teachers’ proficiency in detecting the ability-achievement discrepancy as a landmark of possible specific developmental learning disabilities (SLD. Twenty-two teachers in five schools attempted to select, in accordance with their perception and out of a larger preliminary sample, those students whose school results revealed: (a discrepancy between school achievement and general abilities (the group of purportedly disharmonic children, GPD or (b concordance between general abilities and achievement (the group of purportedly harmonic children, GPH. The children were tested by REVISK, while teachers re-assessed students’ reading, writing and arithmetic performance against a simple structured questionnaire based on demands of the approved elementary school program delineated by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Serbia. Research results indicate that more than 60% of children originally qualified to GPH have actually shown significant discrepancy between targeted scholastic skills and (normal general intelligence. The data suggested some association between students’ disparity in attainment and teachers’ attribution accuracy, while the only homogenous quantitative marker of misplaced children were decreased values on some of the REVISK Verbal subscale tests. This study has shown that teachers can use their professional knowledge to enhance their capability to detect children with specific learning disabilities. In absence of criterion-referenced tests of reading, writing and mathematics, a structured approach to the projected course of skill progress might support teachers’ confidence regarding likely SLD.

  4. Interrelationships between Parenting Styles and Teachers Involvement: From Children’s Emotion Regulation Competence Perspective

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    Mei-Ju Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the effects of different parenting styles and teachers’ strategies in classroom interaction for emotion regulation development in preschool children. The quantitative approach employed instruments to measure parenting style and emotion regulation scores. The qualitative approach involved classroom observations and interviews with the teachers. The data revealed to implement an authoritative parenting style. In addition, there is a significant difference in the emotion regulation scores. The results indicated that teachers’ act strategies in classroom interactions widely affected children’s emotion regulation. The study suggested both professional development programs and workshops should be applied to develop a consistent approach to classroom interaction.

  5. Lost at Sea: Summary Results of a Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Teacher Induction and Implications for Administrative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Robert; Watlington, Eliah; Felsher, Rivka

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes a qualitative meta-analysis of the empirical research on the effectiveness of teacher induction programs over the last decade for the purpose of identifying the essential elements that make them effective in reducing teacher attrition. The study used Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as the theoretical framework for…

  6. Teachers’ Perceptions of Using Technology in Teaching EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mollaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No longer are students’ experiences with new languages limited to their textbooks or immediate environment. With the pervasiveness of the internet and the increased awareness of the importance of having technology in a classroom, both teachers and students all over the world are being provided with technological tools that will further accelerate their ability to acquire or teach a second or foreign language. Technology integration in the classroom has become an important aspect of successful teaching. It has triggered many researchers to investigate different aspects of such integration. In addition, it could be an effective teaching tool when used to engage all students in the learning process. The results of the study show that teachers have positive attitudes toward the use of technology, particularly computer. The focal point of the project was to promote students’ communicative competence and autonomy via the implementation of technological tools. This study aimed at investigating the perceptions of EFL teachers about the use of technology in their classes and factors affecting technology implementation in Iranian Language Institutes. Descriptive statistics and sample t-test were used to analyze the questionnaire data. Results obtained from both the quantitative and qualitative data revealed teachers’ perceptions about integrating technology in their classes, incentives for teachers who use technology, types of technology used, facilitating and inhibiting factors affecting technology implementation, and the different attitudes of male and female teachers toward using technology. According to the results, teachers had positive attitudes regarding the use of technology, in particular computer, in their classrooms. Keywords: Technology, computer, EFL teachers

  7. Job satisfaction among secondary school teachers

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    Muhammad Madi Abdullah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides empirical evidence on the differences in the job satisfaction among secondary school teachers in Sabah with respect to gender, service category, job title, tenure and place of origin. It also attempts to identify the work dimension factors that affect the job satisfaction of the teachers and to ascertain how these factors relate to the aforementioned teachers’ characteristics. A survey was conducted with the participation of 200 teachers. The teachers’ job satisfaction were determined by two separate measures namely overall and facet specific overall job satisfaction. The work dimension factors were clustered into six comprising pay, working conditions, co-workers, promotion, work itself and supervision. This study reveals that secondary school teachers in Tawau, Sabah were generally satisfied with their job; there is a significant relationship between job satisfaction and gender, whereby the male teachers were generally more satisfied than female teachers. The graduate teachers were more satisfied than non-graduate teachers. The higher ranking teachers were more satisfied than the ordinary teachers while the older teachers were more satisfied than their younger counterparts. However, there is no significant relationship between places of origin of teachers with job satisfaction. Based on the bivariate correlation tests, six work dimensions of teaching job are significantly related to teachers’ job satisfaction. In addition, there were significant different between the six dimensions by gender and service category of teachers. Only co-workers dimension is not significantly different among teachers’ career stage and their tenure of service. There was no significant difference between all the work dimensions and teachers’ place of origin. Based on the findings of the study several recommendations are forwarded.

  8. Echoes from teacher discourse: an inside-out perspective Echoes from teacher discourse: an inside-out perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Carvalho Kuerten Dellagnelo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in teacher education have paid increasing attention to teacher reflectivity and its relevance for teaching/learning practices. However, to our knowledge, there has been no investigation of teacher reflectivity from the perspective of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL. In this paper we draw mainly on SFL to examine aspects of the relationship between teachers and learners as construed in self-evaluative reports written by 4 Brazilian teacher-trainees. These reports – self-reflections on the trainees’ own teaching practices – were collected as part of work developed in a Teaching Practicum Course taken by these trainees. In addition to SFL, in our discussion of results we also draw on research related to teacher education/reflectivity (e.g., Freeman & Johnson, 1998; Richards & Lockart, 1996. The linguistic structures described and interpreted in order to unravel the roles these trainees ascribe to themselves and their students reveal a selfcentered positioning of the trainees as social participants whose practices are shaped by conceptions traditionally established by a culture of schooling which maintains the emphasis of teaching on the transmission of knowledge. Results also reveal asymmetry between teachers and students inasmuch as the latter are construed as playing a secondary role, with little responsibility in the process of teaching/learning a foreign language. The study may contribute to enhance the search for awareness of contrasts between new views of language teaching/learning and traditional perceptions such as the ones conveyed in the reports analyzed. Researchers in teacher education have paid increasing attention to teacher reflectivity and its relevance for teaching/learning practices. However, to our knowledge, there has been no investigation of teacher reflectivity from the perspective of Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL. In this paper we draw mainly on SFL to examine aspects of the relationship between teachers and learners as construed in self-evaluative reports written by 4 Brazilian teacher-trainees. These reports – self-reflections on the trainees’ own teaching practices – were collected as part of work developed in a Teaching Practicum Course taken by these trainees. In addition to SFL, in our discussion of results we also draw on research related to teacher education/reflectivity (e.g., Freeman & Johnson, 1998; Richards & Lockart, 1996. The linguistic structures described and interpreted in order to unravel the roles these trainees ascribe to themselves and their students reveal a selfcentered positioning of the trainees as social participants whose practices are shaped by conceptions traditionally established by a culture of schooling which maintains the emphasis of teaching on the transmission of knowledge. Results also reveal asymmetry between teachers and students inasmuch as the latter are construed as playing a secondary role, with little responsibility in the process of teaching/learning a foreign language. The study may contribute to enhance the search for awareness of contrasts between new views of language teaching/learning and traditional perceptions such as the ones conveyed in the reports analyzed.

  9. Teachers before the 'threshold'

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, David

    2000-01-01

    During the summer of 2000, the government will introduce a new system of pay and performance management for teachers. The Centre for Economic Performance is conducting a ‘before-andafter’ panel study of teachers and schools to ascertain its effects on motivation and performance. This paper reports preliminary findings from the first wave of the survey, before the introduction of the new system. The likely effects of the new system, on the basis of these results, are examined from the poin...

  10. 'ICTs' IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Girdhar lal Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Education in the Indian region faces a number of problems. These problems include the shortage of qualified teachers, very large student populations, high drop-out rates of students and teachers, and weak curriculum. All of these negative aspects result in poor delivery of education. The education crisis is worsened by the devastating effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, increasing poverty, a brain drain in the teaching community, budgetary constraints, poor communication, and inadequa...

  11. Redirecting the Teacher's Gaze: Teacher Education, Youth Surveillance and the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, John; Irizarry, Jason G.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses an apparent contradiction in American teacher education that results in conflicting goals for educators. It asks: How do we prepare teachers to interrogate their inherited professional roles in the surveillance and disciplining of youth? How might teacher education inspire pre-service teachers to care more about youth who…

  12. The Effect of Trust on Teacher Empowerment: The Mediation of Teacher Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong-biao; Lee, John Chi-Kin; Jin, Yu-le; Zhang, Zhong-hua

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of teachers' perception of trust in colleagues on their sense of empowerment in Mainland China, with a particular focus on the mediating role of teacher efficacy. The results of a survey of 1646 teachers indicate that although teachers scored positively on trust in colleagues, efficacy and empowerment, they had…

  13. The Sustainability of Change in Teacher Beliefs and Practices as a Result of an Overseas Professional Development Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article examines whether there are changes in students' teaching practices as a result of their experiencing an overseas professional development course (PDC); the process of any such changes; and whether any changes found are sustainable in the long term. Three forms of data gathering are used, lesson observation, in-depth interviews,…

  14. Teacher Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USA Today, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Teacher burnout is characterized by three factors: emotional exhaustion and fatigue; negative, cynical attitudes towards students; and the loss of feelings of accomplishment on the job. Important predictors of burnout include a lack of participation in decision-making, inappropriate job expectations, a lack of teacher autonomy, and role conflict.…

  15. Teacher's Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    This website has information and links to resources for ocean sciences teachers located in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. The resources include professional development opportunities, student opportunities, teaching resources and lessons, and organizations and agencies to connect teachers with ocean science materials.

  16. Creative Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell, Gillian; Reilly, Rosemary C.; Lilly, Frank R.; Kronish, Neomi; Chennabathni, Revathi

    2011-01-01

    Good teaching is creative teaching, yet there is little research focusing on creative teachers themselves. In this article we report a synthesis of 13 qualitative case studies and 2 quantitative studies of teachers who demonstrated everyday or local creativity in their work. Themes and categories were identified through constant comparison and…

  17. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning:

    OpenAIRE

    Keuvelaar - van den Bergh, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful tools teachers can use to enhance student learning. In 2006, the Dutch Inspectorate of Education concluded from classroom observations that it is difficult for Dutch teachers to give their students good feedback in order to stimulate students’ learning process and developmental progress. Similar problems were revealed in other school levels and countries, for example in secondary education and in Finland. Giving feedback during active learning may be eve...

  18. Special and General Education Biology Teachers Working Together Collaboratively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne-Grosso, Melissa

    Collaborative teaching, between special education and general education teachers working together, came about as a result of the No Child Left Behind and Individuals with Disabilities Education Acts. Despite the positive intentions of those acts, teachers are not always ready to teach collaboratively. Guided by the theories of fundamental change and inclusion, this study was based on a lack of understanding about collaborative teaching at 3 high schools. The research questions focused on the benefits, process, and concerns related to collaborative teaching. The perspectives of 4 special education and 8 regular education teachers in 3 urban, public high schools were collected through interviews and observations. Data were analyzed descriptively and inductively using coding, reconstruction, and interpretation of the underlying meanings. The findings revealed that teachers benefitted from being in these classrooms by having a reduced work load and shared responsibility; however, they needed more time for collaboration and modifying instruction, professional development, and stronger support. Students in these classrooms benefitted from social interactions with other students and by getting direct answers to questions. Based on these findings, a professional development training was created based on how collaborative teachers can work together to promote successful learning. This project study can have a positive impact by assisting collaborative teachers with support, communication, strategies for modifications and accommodations, and an enhanced experience, and additionally by improving the academic outcomes for their students.

  19. · Attitude towards Computers and Classroom Management of Language School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jalali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted language learning (CALL is the realization of computers in schools and universities which has potentially enhanced the language learning experience inside the classrooms. The integration of the technologies into the classroom demands that the teachers adopt a number of classroom management procedures to maintain a more learner-centered and conducive language learning environment. The current study explored the relationship between computer attitudes and behavior and instructional classroom management approaches implemented by English institute teachers. In so doing, a total of 105 male (n = 27 and female (n = 78 EFL teachers participated in this study. A computer attitude questionnaire adapted from Albirini (2006 and a Behavior and Instructional Management Scale (BIMS adopted from Martin and Sass (2010 were benefitted from for the purpose of collecting the data. The results of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient revealed that there were no significant relationships between attitude and behavior and instructional management across gender. However, it was found that the more male teachers experience tendency toward using computers in their classes, the more teacher-centered their classes become. In addition, the more female teachers are prone to use computers in their classes, the more student-centered and lenient their classes become.

  20. Multiple case studies of STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Madeline

    The following master's thesis is composed of two manuscripts describing STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering within the context of the Science Learning through Engineering Design (SLED) partnership. The framework guiding both studies was science teaching orientations, a component of pedagogical content knowledge. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, multi-day classroom observations, pre- and post-observation interviews, implementation plans, and written reflections. Data sources were analyzed to generate two orientations to science teaching through engineering design for each participant. The first manuscript illustrates a single case study conducted with a sixth grade STEM teacher. Results of this study revealed a detailed picture of the teacher's goals, practices, assessments, and general views when teaching science through engineering design. Common themes across the teacher's instruction were used to characterize her orientations to science teaching through engineering design. Overall, the teacher's orientations showed a shift in her practice from didactic to student-centered methods of teaching as a result of integrating engineering design-based curriculum. The second manuscript describes a comparative case study of two sixth grade SLED participants. Results of this study revealed more complex and diverse relationships between the teachers' orientations to teaching science through engineering design and their instruction. Participants' orientations served as filters for instruction, guided by their divergent purposes for science teaching. Furthermore, their orientations and resulting implementation were developed from knowledge gained in teacher education, implying that teacher educators and researchers can use this framework to learn more about how teachers' knowledge is used to integrate engineering and science practices in the K-12 classroom.

  1. Elementary Teacher's Conceptions of Inquiry Teaching: Messages for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Joseph E.; Watters, James J.; Brownlee, Jo; Lupton, Mandy

    2011-09-01

    This study explored practicing elementary school teacher's conceptions of teaching in ways that foster inquiry-based learning in the science curriculum (inquiry teaching). The advocacy for inquiry-based learning in contemporary curricula assumes the principle that students learn in their own way by drawing on direct experience fostered by the teacher. That students should be able to discover answers themselves through active engagement with new experiences was central to the thinking of eminent educators such as Pestalozzi, Dewey and Montessori. However, even after many years of research and practice, inquiry learning as a referent for teaching still struggles to find expression in the average teachers' pedagogy. This study drew on interview data from 20 elementary teachers. A phenomenographic analysis revealed three conceptions of teaching for inquiry learning in science in the elementary years of schooling: (a) The Experience-centered conception where teachers focused on providing interesting sensory experiences to students; (b) The Problem-centered conception where teachers focused on engaging students with challenging problems; and (c) The Question-centered conception where teachers focused on helping students to ask and answer their own questions. Understanding teachers' conceptions has implications for both the enactment of inquiry teaching in the classroom as well as the uptake of new teaching behaviors during professional development, with enhanced outcomes for engaging students in Science.

  2. Using Large Scale Test Results for Pedagogical Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens

    The use and influence of large scale tests (LST), both national and international, has increased dramatically within the last decade. This process has revealed a tension between the legitimate need for information about the performance of the educational system and teachers to inform policy, and the teachers’ and students’ use of this information for pedagogical purposes in the classroom. We know well how the policy makers interpret and use the outcomes of such tests, but we know less about how teachers make use of LSTs to inform their pedagogical practice. An important question is whether there is a contradiction between the political system’s use of LST and teachers’ (possible) pedagogical use of LST. And if yes: What is a contradiction based on? This presentation will give some results from a systematic review on how tests have influenced the pedagogical practice. The research revealed many of the fatal wash back effects known from other research but gave additionally some insight in teachers’ attitudes towards LSTs. To account for these findings results from another research project - the Validation of PISA – will be included. This project analyzed how PISA has influenced the Danish educational system and the different theoretical foundations of PISA and most teachers’ pedagogically oriented, formative assessment, thus explaining the teacher resentment towards LSTs. Finally, some principles for linking LSTs to teachers’ pedagogical practice will be presented.

  3. Social and psychological characteristics of the class teacher interaction with students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Petrushikhina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the results of socio-psychological studies of classroom management, performed on the basis of a theoretical model of value exchange, developed by R.L.Krichevsky. Classroom management is understood as a kind of management activity of a teacher, aimed at organizing group of students. Factor analysis revealed two major factors of the effectiveness of classroom management: the nature of the relationship between the students and their relations to the class teacher. As teacher’s activity characteristics, we considered manifestations of his attitudes toward students, leadership style, characteristics of individual interaction with students. It is shown that the activity of the class teacher, aimed at meeting the critical social needs of students, has two major dimensions: taking care about students and development of their motivation. We analyze the impact of social and perceptual characteristics of the teacher on the effectiveness of his interaction with students. We reveal the features of self-assessment and reflective evaluation of personality and activity of a class teacher, the specifics of causal attributions of success and failure of students in different areas of school life.

  4. Senior science teachers' experience of teaching in a changing multicultural classroom: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Mark

    Demographic changes within the US are bringing significant changes in the cultural make-up of the classrooms in our schools. Results from national and state assessments indicate a growing achievement gap between the science scores of white students and students from minority communities. This gap indicates a disconnect somewhere in the science classrooms. This study examines the teacher's perspective of the changing learning environment. The study focuses on senior teachers with traditional Midwestern backgrounds and little multicultural experience assuming these teachers had little or no education in multicultural education. Senior teachers are also more likely to have completed their science education within a traditional Universalist perspective of science and likewise have little or no education in multicultural science. The research method was comparative case studies of a purposeful sample of nine science teachers within a community experiencing significant demographic change, seven core senior teachers and two frame of reference teachers. The interviews examined the teachers' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and the impact of those beliefs on classroom practices, the teachers' understanding of cultural influences on the students' academic performance, and the relationships between the teachers' understanding of the cultural aspects of the nature of science and their classroom practices. Analysis of the interview data revealed that the teachers maintain a strong, traditional Midwestern worldview for classroom expectations and they are generally unaware of the impact of those standards on the classroom environment. The teachers were supportive of minority students within their classroom, changing several practices to accommodate student needs, but they were unaware of the broader cultural influences on student learning. The teachers had a poor understanding of the nature of science and none of them recognized a cultural element of NOS. They maintained a Universalist perspective of science with a strong commitment to the philosophy of scientism which left no room for a multicultural view of science. These results have implications for the broad science community with respect to the philosophy and nature of science. There are also implications in pre- and in-service teacher education and professional development aimed at raising cultural awareness of science teachers and providing a broader understanding of NOS. The problems raised by this research appear to be systemic requiring a commitment beyond the level of the individual teacher to implement a multicultural education that matches the composition of our classrooms.

  5. Pratical Implementation of Practical Chemistry among Secondary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmi Copriady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at identifying differences in terms of the practical implementation of practical Chemistry teaching on the basis of teachers’ perspectives based on gender and location. Implementation of practical Chemistry in the current study focuses on four major aspects such as the design, preparation, implementation and evaluation. Furthermore, the study also explored the relationship among the aspects of design, preparation, implementation and evaluation. The study used a survey approach by using questionnaire. The study sample comprised of 236 Chemistry teachers, randomly selected in Pekan Baru, Riau in Indonesia. Pilot test involved 40 teachers and the findings of the pilot test revealed that the Cornbach Alpha value of the instrument constructs was between 0.81 and 0.91, hightening that the instrument has high level of reliability. The data was analyzed using inferential statistics such as independent t-test and Pearson correlation employing SPSS 19. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in practical implementation of practical Chemistry science among the teachers regarding the aspects of the design, preparation, implementation and evaluation based on gender and location. However, there is a significant different in relation to the aspect of preparation based on location. Meanwhile, Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there are significant correlations between and among all aspects associated with implementation of practical Chemistry. It is suggested that training and workshops for chemical science teachers can be implemented by the related organizations including the Ministry of Education, the Board of Education Quality Assurance as well as Center for Development and Empowerment of Educators for science. Besides, the collaboration is also highlighted for experienced teachers to be able to train and teach practical skills to novice teachers, especially in preparing tools and materials needed for practical activities.

  6. The role of teachers’ classroom discipline in their teaching effectiveness and students’ language learning motivation and achievement: A path method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrak Rahimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of EFL teachers’ classroom discipline strategies in their teaching effectiveness and their students’ motivation and achievement in learning English as a foreign language. 1408 junior high-school students expressed their perceptions of the strategies their English teachers used (punishment, recognition/reward, discussion, involvement, and aggression to discipline the classroom. The students evaluated their teachers’ teaching effectiveness by completing effective Iranian EFL teacher questionnaire (Moafian, & Pishghadam, 2009. They also filled in Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (GhorbanDordinejad & ImamJomeh, 2011 that assessed their motivation towards learning English as a foreign language. Achievement in English was established based on formal grades students received at the end of the academic year. The results showed that EFL teachers reward and praise students for good behavior and they are not very authoritarian. Further, teaching effectiveness, motivation and achievement in learning English were all found to be related to discipline strategies. The results of path analysis showed that those teachers who used involvement and recognition strategies more frequently were perceived to be more effective teachers; however, students perceived teachers who used punitive strategies as being less effective in their teaching. It was also revealed that in classes where teachers managed disruptive behaviors by using punitive strategies, students had problems in learning as punitive strategies lowered students’ motivation. Teaching effectiveness was found to mediate the effect of punishment on motivation while motivation mediated the effect of punitive strategies on achievement. Motivation was found to have the strongest effect on achievement.

  7. A professional development study of technology education in secondary science teaching in Benin: Issues of teacher change and self-efficacy beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelani, Razacki Raphael E. D.

    This study has two purposes. The practical purpose of the study was to provide Benin middle school science teachers with an effective technology education professional development (TEPD) program which granted teachers with content knowledge in technology education (TE), PCK in TE, design hands-on models in TE, and design rubrics assessing students' works. The research purpose of the study was to explore teachers' TE content knowledge and PCK, changes in teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in teaching the TE portion of the curriculum, and teachers' perceptions of their TEPD experience after participating in the program. Four sessions of the TEPD program were carried out with two groups of teachers (N = 23 & 28). A mixed methods research design was utilized to collect data. Pre-experimental one-group pretest-posttest research design was used to collect quantitative data. Two instruments, the technology education teacher self-efficacy beliefs instrument (TETEBI) and the TE Awareness instrument, were designed. The qualitative research design employed a case study with participating teachers' after-session journals and after-session evaluation, classroom observations, teachers' and students' interviews. Overall results of the study revealed that the TEPD program impacted positively participating teachers. Salient results indicated that (1) the TEPD program was effective; (2) although quantitative analysis was inconclusive, through documents analysis, teachers' self-efficacy beliefs were enhanced after participating in the program; (3) teachers did acquire TE content knowledge and PCK; (4) teachers were effectively teaching the TE lessons integrated in the science curriculum; and (5) teachers expressed positive perceptions about the program and acknowledged its soundness, relevancy and effectiveness. Other characteristics of effective PD have been founded such as trainers' expertise and consideration of cultural and contextual issues of the trainees. Interpretations of the results led to ten educational implications that could improve TE teaching in secondary school settings in Benin, as well as in other developing countries with similar features. Finally, five recommendations were made for further investigations.

  8. Efficacy in German Teacher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald Kiel; Sabine Weiß; Thomas Eberle

    2012-01-01

    At the present time German teacher training is confronted with a great political will to bring about change. International comparative studies of recent years have shown a dissatisfying learning outcome. The most dramatic result is a strong interdependence of school success and social background. German teachers experience their profession as problematic. At present only 35% work until the normal pension age. The article discusses structural differences in teacher training compared to other c...

  9. Characteristics of an Effective English Language Teacher as Perceived by Iranian Teachers and Learners of English

    OpenAIRE

    Homa Babai Shishavan; Karim Sadeghi

    2009-01-01

    This study attempted to characterize qualities of an effective English language teacher (EELT) as perceived by Iranian English language teachers and learners. For this purpose, a tailor-made questionnaire was administered to 59 English language teachers and 215 learners of English at universities, high schools and language institutes in Iran. The results indicated significant differences between teachers’ and learners’ views on some characteristics of EELTs. Teachers seemed to agree more stro...

  10. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  11. ?????????????????How Teaching Beliefs of Chinese Language Teachers Influence Their Teaching Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ???Choi-Fung Tam

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? This study aims to investigate the beliefs of Chinese language teachers in Hong Kong and how these beliefs are related to their teaching. Six secondary teachers with teaching experience of 4 to 31 years were studied. They came from schools with high, medium and low quality of student intake. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and classroom observations. The study finds that there are two predominant belief systems held by teachers. The major differences lie on the beliefs about scopes of teaching, instructional approaches, teaching and learning activities, and roles of teachers and students in classroom. The transmission-oriented teachers support the old Chinese language curriculum that requires the teaching of classical and exemplar texts in great detail. However, the view of the heuristics-oriented teachers is in line with the new curriculum. The results also reveal high degrees of consistency between teachers’ professed beliefs and their teaching practices as well as their expectation on students. The findings of this study suggest that successful curriculum implementation depends on whether teachers agree with the aims and values of the new curriculum.

  12. Recommendation for Sustaining the In-service Professional Development of Tertiary EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Meng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing influence of English as a lingua franca or an international language has brought new trends of teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL. But on the way to these new trends some issues have inevitably appeared, and one of them is the continuity of EFL teachers’ in-service professional development. This study aimed to investigate the opinions of the tertiary EFL teachers on the multilayered peer coaching model (the MPC Model that they had employed for their in-service professional development, and make the recommendation of this model for sustaining tertiary EFL teachers’ in-service professional development. The information was obtained from the EFL teachers at Guiyang University in China with the help of such instruments as observation, teacher’s diary, the researcher’s field note, questionnaire and interview, and the data were analyzed in both qualitative and quantitative methods. The results revealed that the tertiary EFL teachers had positive attitudes towards the MPC Model and it could be recommended as one of the effective tools for the tertiary EFL teachers to sustain their in-service professional development.

  13. TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF OTHER TEACHERS’ SPONTANEOUS HAND GESTURING IN THE EFL CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Michael THOMPSON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for gesture being a vital element in the classroom is becoming insurmountable; however, it remains to be seen how long it will take to be fully utilized in the EFL classroom. This study, using a qualitative descriptive methodology, briefly examines how a group of teachers perceive gesturing after viewing a video performance of an EFL practitioner. All of the data was collected online via a questionnaire and a recorded semi-structured interview. Volunteers were, or had been, teaching English within the past twelve months and approached the researcher to take part in the study via social media. The results of the study suggest that teachers fully acknowledge the importance of gesture and commonly attribute similar functions to specific gestures within a teaching performance. Overall, the results offer numerous pedagogical implications for gesture and SLA and support previous assertions regarding the need to make teachers fully aware of the gestures they use in the classroom. Analysis of the questionnaires also revealed that teachers seldom have the opportunity to view their own teaching and suggests that gesture needs to play a much greater role within critical reflective practice.

  14. Teacher Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ms. Schultz

    2007-04-04

    Find links for teachers below: (Please close all windows when done.) Garden City Schools Teacher Account - Use your current email ID as the google ID. Example schultn. Your initial password is "s12345678", and you will be required to change it when you first login. Example MRC Schedule Home - Garden City Public Schools Favorite Resources MI Star (Zangle) Aesoponline Discovery Education (United Streaming) Frontline Teacher Center (PBS) - FREE online videos, lesson plans, and Web-exclusive resources Freeology-Free Printable Graphic Organizers IT Requests -organization account number is ...

  15. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-10-01

    Writing Across the Curriculum The notion that student learning is enhanced through writing is widely accepted at all educational levels if the product is fairly assessed and the learner is provided with feedback. Finding the time to critically evaluate student papers is difficult at best and competes with time needed to prepare laboratory investigations. A few weeks ago a teacher who has extensive extracurricular responsibilities that include extensive interaction with parents and community members shared with me his frustration in not being able to grade written reports. This teacher is the head football coach at his school, but many readers experience the same difficulties due to a variety of duties. There are no easy or completely satisfying answers to this problem, but this issue contains an account of a successful approach (Writing in Chemistry: An Effective Learning Tool, pp 1399-1403). Although they are based on experience in college courses, several ideas described in the article could be applied in high school chemistry courses. In another article, the author of Precise Writing for a Precise Science (pp 1407-1408) identifies 20 examples of familiar, but incorrect, grammatical constructions and explains how to phrase each one correctly. Chemical Education Research: Improving Chemistry Learning The results from research on how students learn have greatly increased our understanding of cognition in recent years. However, the results are often published in the science education research literature and are not readily accessible to the classroom teacher. Additionally, the research reports are couched in specialized terminology. This issue contains a Viewpoints article (pp 1353-1361) that bridges the gap between research results and classroom application. It was written by two veteran chemical educators, Dudley Herron and Susan Nurrenbern. The shift from behaviorism to constructivism as the dominant theory of learning is described briefly to provide a context for constructivist approaches. In the section titled "What Research Has Revealed", the authors provide a succinct summary of specific research findings under three tantalizing subheadings: "What You Think You Know May Not Be the Way It Is", "Learning Is Not a Spectator Sport!", and "Appropriate Outcomes Must Be Identified and Measured". The authors' insight into future research challenges is detailed in a sidebar. ChemEd'99: A Great Success The 1999 ChemEd Conference was a great success, judging by the many very favorable comments of high school teachers who attended. Thanks and congratulations go to Babu George and to the many volunteers who made this event possible through a great deal of hard work, ingenuity, and creativity. Many of the volunteers who gave so generously of their time, before and during the conference, are high school teachers. The program reflected the broad range of needs and interests of high school teachers. Credit for the success also should go to the many presenters. The workshops, demonstrations, papers, and posters that I attended were of high quality and useful to teachers. Conversation with other attendees convinced me that the same degree of quality and utility was characteristic of the entire conference program. Demonstrations are always an outstanding feature of ChemEd conferences and the Signature Demonstrations continued this tradition, as did the large number of demonstration sessions scheduled throughout the general program. The Reg Friesen Memorial Lecture, delivered by Steve Spangler, featured spectacular and stimulating demonstrations in the context of building connections between chemical concepts and real-world applications. Some other themes that permeated the general program were Internet applications, methods of assessment, safety and waste disposal, calculator and computer based laboratory methods, and ideas for making classroom instruction interesting and effective. Thank you to each reader who visited the JCE Exhibit or participated in our workshop on using JCE Activities. We e

  16. Elementary teachers' acquisition of science knowledge: Case-studies and implications for teaching preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Morton

    Elementary school is a key time for students to develop their understanding of basic science concepts as well as their attitudes towards science and science learning. Yet many elementary teachers do not feel comfortable teaching science; as a result, they are likely to devote less time on that subject and to be less effective as science teachers. The literature suggests that weaknesses in elementary teachers' knowledge of science could be a main cause of this problem and, furthermore, that current elementary teacher preparation programs have contributed to this weakness. This study aims at gaining more knowledge about how elementary teachers who are successful in teaching science have acquired their science content knowledge and how such knowledge could be best acquired, with the ultimate goal of informing the design of more effective elementary teacher preparation programs. More specifically, this study addresses the following research questions: Which science learning experiences for elementary teachers seem most conducive to develop the kind of science content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge needed to support the teaching of science as called for by the most recent national and state standards? Which of these experiences should be included in elementary teacher preparation programs, and how? The core of this study consists of case studies of eight elementary school teachers who were identified as successful in teaching science. These subjects were selected so as to ensure differences in their teacher preparation programs, as well as gender and years of teaching experience. Information about each teacher's self-efficacy and motivation with respect to teaching science, history of pre-service and in-service preparation with respect to science, and how his/her current science knowledge was acquired, was sought through a series of interviews with each subject and triangulated with data collected from other sources. A cross-case analysis revealed some interesting similarities and differences in how these successful elementary science teachers developed their science knowledge, and identified the following main sources of science learning opportunities: (a) science content courses; (b) methods courses; (c) student teaching; (d) in-service workshops; (e) opportunities to work with colleagues on the design and/or delivery of science units. Based on what was learned from these case studies, a preliminary set of recommendations to improve elementary teacher's science learning opportunities was identified. Two focus groups were held---one with elementary teachers and another with teacher educators---to share these preliminary recommendations and gather feedback and additional suggestions. Informed by the information gathered in these focus groups, a final set of recommendations to improve elementary teacher's preparation to teach science was articulated.

  17. Streaming and Students’ Self-Esteem: A Qualitative Study on Teachers’ Correspondence Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prihadi Kususanto Chin Sook Fui

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This  study  was  aimed  to  investigate  the  effect  of  students’ streaming  practice  in  Malaysian  secondary  on  students’  self-esteem  through teachers’ expectancy.   17 teachers and 20 students from art and science streams of secondary schools  in  Penang,  Malaysia  were  participated  in  this  study.  Unstructured interviews  were  used  on  teachers  to  collect  the  qualitative  data  of  teachers’ expectancy.  The  participating  students  were  from  the  fourth  year  of  secondary school  in  Malaysian  school  system  (between  16-17  years  old,  10  from  science stream  and  10  from  arts  stream  were  interviewed  in  order  to  collect  the qualitative data of teachers’ perceived behavior and self-esteem. Result  of  this  study  shown  that  teachers  expected  science  stream students to have good academic performance but expected arts stream students to  be  involved  in  disciplinary  problems.  Furthermore,  science  stream  students perceived  that  their  teachers  were  academically  supportive  but  arts  stream students  perceived  that  their  teachers  were  focusing  on  controlling  their behavior.  On  the  other  hand,  findings  of  this  study  also  revealed  that  science stream  students  possed  higher  level  of  self-esteem than  arts  stream  students. Accordingly,  it  was  indicated  that  teachers’  perceived  behavior  and  teachers’ expectancy  are  correlated  to  one  another,  and  teachers’  perceived  behavior predicts students’ self-esteem. It was discovered that teachers expected science stream students to be eager to improve their academic performance, and students from arts stream class  were likely to be involved in disciplinary problems. Students  were found to  be  aware  of  their  teachers’  expectancy,  and  their  perception  of  teachers’ expectancy  affected  their  self-esteem.  While  self-esteem  was  referred  to  a discrepancy  between  a  student’s  ideal-self  and  actual-self,  it  was  discovered that  both  groups  of  students  pictured  their  ideal-self  differently  to  each  other. Science  stream  students  pictured  their  ideal-selves  as  a  character  with  overall success, while arts stream students pictured their ideal-selves as a socially well-functioned  character.  Nevertheless,  arts  stream  students  found  to  have  lower self-esteem.  It  was  concluded  that  streaming  affected  the  students’  self-esteem through teachers’ expectancy and perceived behavior.Keywords:   Streaming,  students’  self-esteem,  teachers’  expectancy,  science stream, arts stream, supportive, controlling.

  18. A STUDY OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN RELATION TO LEVEL OF ASPIRATION OF B.ED STUDENT TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Jawed Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of study was to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and level of aspiration in terms of subject background of B.Ed student teachers. The sample size was 600, among them 300 are boys and 300 are girls. The tool used for this study is 'Emotional Intelligence Scale' developed by Ankool Hyde, Sanjyot Pethe and Upinder Dhar. The result revealed the Positive correlation between EI with level of aspiration. The science student teachers shows positive co...

  19. Teacher Perspectives on Career-Relevant Curriculum in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Akos

    2011-01-01

    Relevant, challenging, integrative, and exploratory all describe the curriculum desirable in middle school (National Middle School Association, 2010). Career-relevant curriculum is one prominent strategy used since the 1970s to achieve these goals. Systematic, integrated, and contemporary efforts at career education often engage core teachers who plan and deliver the curriculum. For this study, a measure was created to assess teacher perspectives of career education efforts in middle school. A two-factor structure (career integration and future orientation) was demonstrated in exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the survey. Results from 291 middle school teachers reveal the potential of career education infusion into the core curriculum, with nominal but statistically significant differences in gender, subject matter, and socioeconomic status of the school. Implications for middle school educators are provided.

  20. Working conditions, work style, and job satisfaction among Albanian teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloep, Marion; Tarifa, Fatos

    1994-03-01

    For the first time in Albania, a large-scale study investigating teachers' working conditions was conducted. 349 teachers from many parts of the country and from all school levels answered an extensive questionnaire, providing a comprehensive description of their working situation. As data for parts of the study exist from the USA, Germany, Singapore, England, and Poland, results could be discussed in comparison to the conditions in these countries, showing that self-reported job satisfaction and engagement in effective classroom practices is relatively high among Albanian teachers, while the economic and physical conditions are bad. Stepwise regression analyses reveal that the items measuring professional autonomy account for a considerable part of the variance of the job satisfaction measure; while work efficiency is mainly predicted by items measuring social support and, again, professional autonomy.

  1. The Impact of Lifelong Learning Teacher Education in Secondary School Results El Impacto de la Formación Permanente del Profesorado de Educación Secundaria en los Resultados Escolares.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula González-Vallinas

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies dealing with factors which have an influence on students outcomes are reviewed, teacher variables and teacher training are among their most common findings to influence school achievement. This study analyses the variable in-service teacher training on students? academic achievement. The analysis levels are departments and schools, being department the level where the relation among variables is more significative. There are significative correlations between the in-service teacher training in their own subject and the subject pedagogy in 50% of the analysed departments. In-service teacher training is recommended to be organized, taking into account these differences (context, teacher variables, in- service teacher training variables among departments, schools and districts to compensate the unequal school variables. Existe evidencia sobre la influencia de algunos factores en el rendimiento escolar de los centros y entre ellos de manera consistente aparecen las características del profesorado y su formación. Este estudio analiza la formación del profesorado con los resultados escolares de los centros de educación secundaria en Asturias. De las variables de formación, es únicamente la formación en la asignatura y su didáctica la que se asocia a los resultados en la asignatura. Se realizan análisis en dos niveles de agregación, departamento y centro, observándose que es en los niveles de departamento donde existen las correlaciones más significativas. Se aporta evidencia para la organización de una formación del profesorado que asigne recursos de formación en los diferentes niveles en base a sus desigualdades de origen (contexto, variables del profesorado y de formación y que garantice una efectiva igualdad de oportunidades para el conjunto de la población escolar de la Comunidad Autónoma.

  2. Teachers’ Beliefs in Teaching English for Kids at a Kindergarten: A Case Study of Students from the Department of Applied English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-wei Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to explore the changes in teachers’ beliefs before and after teachings among four students from the Department of Applied English at Hungkuang University, who were conducting English teaching at a kindergarten. Teacher’s beliefs included four aspects in terms of English teaching, teacher-student interaction in class, curriculum planning and English learning. The study results revealed that before and after teachings, there were no significant differences in teachers’ beliefs between the aspects of English teaching (e.g. teaching resources and the preparation of lesson plan and English learning (e.g. understanding of the kids’ learning conditions. Inconsistent viewpoints in the beliefs of teacher-student interaction in class and curriculum planning were reported. Constructive suggestions to the curriculum plans for Module of Teaching Children English at the Department of Applied English were proposed for assisting students interested in teaching children English and undertaking further research on this topic.

  3. Teacher's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Griffith

    Lesson plans and exercises for teachers to use this site and the CD-ROM ?Atomic Archive: Enhanced Edition? in their classrooms. The exercises cover the following subjects: Arms Control, Atomic Physics, Delivery Systems, Fission, Fusion, History and Weapon Effects.

  4. DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY IN TECHNOPEDAGOGICAL KNOWLEDGE COMPETENCIES OF PRE-SERVICE GERMAN TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar ???GÜZEL

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the level of proficiency in technopedagogical knowledge competencies of pre-service German teachers. The participants of the study consist of 335 pre-service German teachers from nine higher education institutions in Turkey during the 2012–2013 education year. The data were collected by the “Technopedagogical Education Competency Scale” and a set of questions. The results reveal that pre-service German teachers had a high level technopedagogical knowledge competency. The teachers also have a high level of the four technopedagogical knowledge factors design, exertion, ethics and proficiency. The teachers have the highest level of technopedagogical knowledge competency by the factor proficiency and the least level by the factor ethics. The result of the analyses shows that there was a significant difference between the pre-service German teachers` level of proficiency in technopedagogical knowledge competency and the independent variables: having a personal computer, frequency of internet usage, an easy access to internet and following the technological developments in the field of German language teaching. Consequently, there was no significant difference between the pre-service German teachers’ level of proficiency in technopedagogical knowledge competency and the independent variables: gender and academic average. The results show that the participants have no significant difference among these independent variables.

  5. What are the roles of prospective teachers on the educational technology use? A metaphor study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar, Hakki Bagci

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Metaphors in qualitative research methods have been used as a data collection technique, which can’t be obtained directly ensure that data is obtained indirectly. In this research, the training of teachers in using technology to determine what role they are estimated at. In this context, Afyon Kocatepe University, a total of 131 teacher candidates from six different sections to the question directed at the metaphor and the data were analyzed with content analysis. Responses to the metaphor of the six different themes have been obtained: being important / useful, assistant / guide, user, producer / designer, learner and attitude. Evaluation of teacher candidates was their most important roles of the time / to be useful, help / guide and user issues have been. As a result of the analysis according to the department of prospective teachers according to the department the role they differ in their evaluation of the results have been revealed

  6. Matching music teacher’s self conception with students’ perception on teaching effectiveness in an unfavourable secondary classroom context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wah Leung

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at identifying and recording good music teaching practices that promote social inclusion, and at developing effective teaching strategies that incorporate student perspectives into the pedagogies. A music teacher in Hong Kong was selected for this study, and two different classes of Form 2 (ages 12-13 were observed. The teaching process was videotaped and reviewed. Afterwards the teacher and a group of students were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview to solicit their ideas towards good practice of music teaching. Findings reveal that the good practices observed were attributed to four factors: 1 teacher’s personality, 2 teacher’s pedagogy, 3 teacher’s musical competence, and 4 teacher’s philosophy of teaching.

  7. Florida Teachers' Attitudes about Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Samantha R.; Meisels, Gerry G.

    2010-01-01

    A survey of Florida teachers reveals many differences in comfort level with teaching evolution according to the state's science teaching standards, general attitudes and beliefs about evolution, and the extent to which teachers are criticized, censured, disparaged, or reprehended for their beliefs about the teaching of evolution.

  8. A Corporate Partnership to Enhance Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Bethann

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a corporate partnership with SMART Technologies that changed what teacher candidates learned and how they learned. The experience of the partnership has revealed five best practices for implementing white board technology. Teacher training benefits of the partnership are evident in descriptions of three instructional…

  9. Teacher Expectations of the Communication Apprehensive Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Kristi A.; Comadena, Mark E.

    Previous studies have revealed that the correlation between communication apprehension (CA) and academic achievement may be significantly different for male and female elementary school students. A study investigated the effects of CA, sex of student, and three teacher characteristics on teacher expectations of academic achievement. Subjects, 221…

  10. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  11. How Junior High School English Teachers in Bengkulu City Utilise Published Textbooks in the Classroom: A Classroom Observation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safnil Safnil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to find out: (1 how the junior high school English teachers in Bengkulu city exploited the commercially published textbooks for classroom use; (2 if there was a difference in the way the experienced and the inexperienced English language teachers exploited the commercially published textbooks in the classroom; and (3 whether the teachers adapted textbooks or produced their own materials for classroom use. Twelve English teachers (6 experienced and 6 inexperienced teachers from four different junior high schools or SMPs (2 favourite and 2 non-favourite in Bengkulu city were the participants in this study. Data were obtained through a questionnaire, classroom observations, and sample lesson plans. The results of the study revealed that: first, the junior high school English language teachers (ET and IT; (1 used the commercially prescribed textbooks to a large extent; (2 there was not much difference between the way experienced teachers and inexperienced teachers exploited the textbooks; (3 both groups of teachers adapted the textbooks or produced their own teaching materials.

  12. Does Teaching Practice Effectively Prepare Student-Teachers to Teach Creative and Performing Arts? The Case of Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdeline C. Mannathoko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Teacher Education involves the policies and procedures designed to equip teachers with the knowledge and skills they require to teach effectively. Teaching practice (TP is an integral part in teacher education because it allows student-teachers to apply the theories into practice. Effective preparation of student-teachers in practical subjects could help them teach the arts efficiently. As a result, promoting learners’ skills specifically; creative and practical skills support healthy development. This qualitative study explored the extent to which teaching practice in primary Colleges of Education prepared student-teachers to teach Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA subjects in primary schools. The study was conducted in three Colleges of Education located in the South East, Central and Francistown districts of Botswana. The participants were third year student-teachers and students who completed in colleges six to two years ago. The findings revealed that student-teachers in the three Colleges of Education were introduced to the general pedagogy skills of teaching in primary schools by their tutors who in most cases were not arts specialists. There were concerns from student-teachers that lecturers rarely assessed the arts during teaching practice and therefore, trainees did not get any assistance to prepare them to teach the CAPA subjects.

  13. How Should an Effective Performance Appraisal Be: EFL Teachers’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holi Ibrahim Holi Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is set to examine EFL teachers’ perceptions, views about what makes an effective performance appraisal system by adopting a quantitative survey design for data collection. A total number of 45 college instructors in the Sultanate of Oman responded to survey on: how is an effective performance appraisal perceived by EFL teachers? How do teachers perceive their participation in developing the appraisal system? And how might the present performance appraisal practices be improved? The result reveals that staff participation in developing performance appraisal system and goals, feedback confidentiality, quality appraiser, quality of place and time of appraisal, appraiser-appraisee relationships, and developmental nature of performance appraisal would help in making effective appraisal and the overall PA effectiveness depends mostly on these factors. The result has a significant implication for improving the process of teacher performance appraisal in Oman and enriches the body knowledge of PA in general. The study puts forwards suggestions and recommendations for improving PA practices and exercises in EFL contexts.Keywords: Effective Performance appraisal, FL teachers' perceptions, critical errors in performance appraisal, Colleges instructors in the Sultanate of Oman

  14. Teacher educators’ conception of teaching and learning in teacher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igwebuike, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of teaching reflects interplay among a number of teacher-variables prominent among which is the teacher’s conceptions of teaching and learning. In educational institutions where teachers are educated, the influence of these conceptions on effectiveness is geometric. This is because teacher educators are teachers of teachers and most teachers teach the way they were taught. Two major conceptions of teaching (traditionalist/transmissive and contemporary/constructivist have been delineated. The purpose of this study was to determine if a majority of teacher educators in Colleges of Education, Delta State Nigeria have contemporary/constructivist conceptions of teaching, and if teacher variables (qualification, discipline and experience would influence their conceptions. A customized instrument was administered to 179 teacher educators selected through the use of cluster sampling technique. Results indicated that; a majority of the teacher educators had traditionalist /transmissive conceptions of teaching and learning, qualification and discipline did not influence their conceptions, inexperienced teacher educators had conceptions that were more inclined to contemporary/constructivist conceptions than the experienced teacher educators. Implications of these results for improvement of teacher education programs and for further research have been drawn.

  15. Smith-Magenis Syndrome Results in Disruption of CLOCK Gene Transcription and Reveals an Integral Role for RAI1 in the Maintenance of Circadian Rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen R.; Zies, Deborah; Mullegama, Sureni V.; Grotewiel, Michael S.; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of RAI1 results in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), a disorder characterized by intellectual disability, multiple congenital anomalies, obesity, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and a disrupted circadian sleep-wake pattern. An inverted melatonin rhythm (i.e., melatonin peaks during the day instead of at night) and associated sleep-phase disturbances in individuals with SMS, as well as a short-period circadian rhythm in mice with a chromosomal deletion of Rai1, support SMS as a circadian-rhythm-dysfunction disorder. However, the molecular cause of the circadian defect in SMS has not been described. The circadian oscillator temporally orchestrates metabolism, physiology, and behavior largely through transcriptional modulation. Data support RAI1 as a transcriptional regulator, but the genes it might regulate are largely unknown. Investigation into the role that RAI1 plays in the regulation of gene transcription and circadian maintenance revealed that RAI1 regulates the transcription of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a key component of the mammalian circadian oscillator that transcriptionally regulates many critical circadian genes. Data further show that haploinsufficiency of RAI1 and Rai1 in SMS fibroblasts and the mouse hypothalamus, respectively, results in the transcriptional dysregulation of the circadian clock and causes altered expression and regulation of multiple circadian genes, including PER2, PER3, CRY1, BMAL1, and others. These data suggest that heterozygous mutation of RAI1 and Rai1 leads to a disrupted circadian rhythm and thus results in an abnormal sleep-wake cycle, which can contribute to an abnormal feeding pattern and dependent cognitive performance. Finally, we conclude that RAI1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CLOCK, pinpointing a novel and important role for this gene in the circadian oscillator. PMID:22578325

  16. Whistle-Blowing Intentions of Prospective Teachers: Education Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Asiye Toker Gökçe

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whistle-blowing intentions of prospective teachers. Firstly, overall ethical awareness of the participants was examined, and then their underlying ethical reasons of whistle-blowing were investigated. Besides, impact on the intention to blow whistle to internal or external parties offering their job guarantee were searched. Three ethical dilemmas were constructed in three scenarios, and The Multi-dimensional Ethics Scale was used in the study. The results revealed that...

  17. EXPLORING MALAYSIAN TRAINEE TEACHERS’ ADOPTION OF THE INTERNET AS INFORMATION TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Teck-Chai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN as gateways to information for research in academic learning using two cohorts of trainee teachers. The study surveyed 166 trainee teachers undergoing a 5-year Bachelor’s Degree program and compares the statistical differences on gender, programs and years of computer technology experiences. The results revealed that there were significant differences between gender for all the three search engines. Furthermore it also indicated that there was a significant difference between TESL and PISMP group for Yahoo and MSN but not for Google. A significant difference was also observed between years of computer technology experiences and the frequency of usage in the case of MSN. Post hoc test revealed a significant difference in the Internet search between those with more than 7 years of experience with those with less than 2 years experience and those between 2-4 years computing experience. The results provide insight into TESL and PPISMP trainee teachers’ use of the Internet search engines as a tool in information seeking when approaching research for their academic learning activities. Implications on the impact of the Internet to the trainee teachers’ academic learning in approaching research needs were discussed.

  18. The Attitudes of Teachers and Students towards Using Arabic in EFL Classrooms in Saudi Public Schools- A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Al-NOFAIE

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the attitudes of Saudi teachers and students towards employing Arabic as a facilitating tool in English classes, a topic which has gained wide attention recently. The present study was a case study which investigated teachers' and students' attitudes towards this issue in a Saudi intermediate school for females. To reach a clear understanding of this issue, the study focused on one intermediate classroom which had 30 students and three teachers of English in the entire school. Three research tools were used for gathering data: questionnaires, interviews and four observations of one classroom. The results revealed that the attitudes of the teachers and the students about using Arabic were generally positive. The participants preferred using Arabic in certain situations and for specific reasons. Although the attitudes of the teachers and the students received agreements, there were other points on which they disagreed. Recommendations for future studies and solutions were discussed.

  19. The Dark Side of Motivation: Teachers' Perspectives on "Unmotivation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakui, Keiko; Cowie, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Motivation is a well-researched construct; however, few studies have investigated how teachers perceive and make sense of situations in which learners are not motivated to learn. Thirty-two EFL teachers working in Japanese universities were surveyed and interviews with three of these teachers were conducted to reveal their perceptions of student…

  20. Opinions of the Geography Teacher Candidates toward Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyihoglu, Aysegul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the opinions of the teacher candidates about mind mapping technique used in Geography education of undergraduate program. In this study, the qualitative research techniques were used. The study group consists of 55 teacher candidates. The teacher candidates have been asked for their opinions about the process…

  1. Influence of Children's Physical Attractiveness on Teacher Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenealy, Pamela; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Ratings of the physical attractiveness of 11-to-12-year-old children were obtained, and the association between physical attractiveness and teachers' judgements of these children were examined. Teachers revealed a systematic tendency to rate girls higher than boys, and significant sex differences were observed in teachers' ratings of…

  2. Professionalism and Partnership: Panaceas for Teacher Education in Scotland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Aileen; Doherty, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A critical reading of the Donaldson Report on teacher education in Scotland reveals what might be termed a "panacea approach" to addressing perceived current problems in relation to the quality of teacher education. In particular, the essence of the Donaldson Report is that teachers need to embrace "twenty-first century professionalism" through a…

  3. Main Factors of Teachers' Professional Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to reveal the main factors of teachers' professional well being. Theoretically constructed model was tested on large scale data belong to 72.190 teachers working at lower secondary level. Theoretical model included teachers' individual, professional and organizational characteristics. Professional well-being…

  4. Chemistry Teachers' Perceptions on Laboratory Applications: Izmir Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzioglu, Burak; Demirdag, Baris; Ates, Alev; Cobanoglu, Ilker; Altun, Eralp

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to reveal to what extent Turkish chemistry teachers use laboratories effectively and their perceptions on laboratory applications and the factors related to laboratory applications. In this cross-sectional survey, 408 chemistry teachers from the secondary schools in Izmir were given "Teacher Demographic form", "The Scale of…

  5. The Teacher's Planning Pak and Guide to Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Imogene; MacKenzie, Joy

    This book is for both elementary school teachers and students. Suggestions are provided for the teacher on ways to organize time, space, and materials with the emphasis on individualized instruction for the pupils. Materials for the students include activities and small questionnaires structured to reveal to the teacher each child's attitudes,…

  6. The King's Carpet: Drama Play in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Judit; King, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    Trying to develop new perspectives of teaching is never easy, but trying to cultivate ownership and initiative among teacher education students is a still greater aspiration that is infrequently realized. This article addresses each of these highly valued goals for teacher educators as a case study reveals the impact of involving teacher

  7. Deliberate Practice in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronkhorst, Larike H.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Koster, Bob; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Deliberate practice is increasingly recognised as necessary for professional development. This paper sets out to explore in what ways student teachers' learning activities in a teacher education programme can be characterised as deliberate practice. Based on an in-depth exploration of 574 learning activities, our results highlight the…

  8. Motivation Beliefs of Secondary School Teachers in Canada and Singapore: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Chong, Wan Har; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella; Kates, Allison; Hannok, Wanwisa

    2008-01-01

    A mixed methods approach was used to explore secondary teachers' motivation beliefs in Canada and Singapore. Results from Study 1 revealed that socio-economic status (SES) was the strongest predictor of school climate in Canada, and that collective efficacy mediated the effect of SES on school climate in Singapore, but not in Canada. In Study 2,…

  9. The Social Cognitive Model of Job Satisfaction among Teachers: Testing and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Masood A.; Mohaidat, Jihad; Ferrandino, Vincent; El Mourad, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    The study empirically tests an integrative model of work satisfaction (0280, 0140, 0300 and 0255) in a sample of 5,022 teachers in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The study provided more support for the Lent and Brown (2006) model. Results revealed that this model was a strong fit for the data and accounted for 82% of the variance in work…

  10. Writing and the Situated Construction of Teachers' Cognition: Portfolios as Complex Performative Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Íris Susana Pires

    2014-01-01

    With this paper, I aim to contribute to the understanding of the teaching portfolio as a genre. I analyse the linguistic construction and performative nature of the reflective voice in the portfolio of one pre-service teacher. The results reveal her voice to have been constructed upon the convergence of other voices and to perform diverse…

  11. Promoting Preservice Chemistry Teachers' Understanding about the Nature of Science through History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Chung-Chih

    2002-01-01

    Documents the benefits of teaching chemistry through history. The experimental group consisted of seniors enrolled in a teacher preparation program in which they learned how to teach chemistry through the history of science. The results of the analysis of covariance revealed that the experimental group outperformed the control group on an…

  12. Holistic Wellness and Perceived Stress: Predicting Job Satisfaction among Beginning Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.; Harper, Sallie; Ratliff, Lindon; Singleton, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted with 53 beginning teachers, each with less than 3 years of classroom experience, to determine the amount of variance in their job satisfaction that could be accounted for by holistic wellness and perceived stress. The results of a regression analysis revealed that both holistic wellness and perceived stress were…

  13. Personality characteristics and profiles of Greek elementary teachers using the sixteen personality factor questionnaire (16PF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussi-Vergou, Christina J; Angelosopoulou, Argyro; Zafiropoulou, Maria M

    2009-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that a teacher's personality influences the classroom climate, students' behaviors, and their interpersonal relationships. Although the effect of a teacher's personality on students' psychological well-being has long been stressed in many studies, very little is known about the actual personality characteristics of Greek in-service teachers. The purpose of this study was to allocate the characteristics that best describe the personality of Greek elementary school teachers (according to the 16 Cattellian primary factors). Our study belongs in the broader research field aiming at describing and understanding the possible foundations of teachers' behavior. The sample consisted of 138 elementary teachers, who completed a standardized Greek version of the 16PF. Our statistical analysis of one-sample t-test along with an effect size calculation revealed that certain personality characteristics described the Greek elementary teacher and clearly distinguishes them from the normative group of the Greek population. Elementary teachers appear to be quite submissive, cautious, with a tendency to oppose or postpone change. They also scored a low tolerance level against fear and arousal, and high tension levels. Elementary teachers seem to respond to events, ideas, and experiences more with feeling than with thinking and find it difficult to control their feelings, which results in getting upset easily. They also seem to pay little attention to how they may appear to others and generally do what they feel like doing. Elementary teachers also scored low on aspiration level. Possible implications of the results are discussed with reference to students' psychological well-being. PMID:20014644

  14. Teachers' experiences of enjoyment of work as a subtle atmosphere: an empirical lifeworld phenomenological analysis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Anna-Carin, Bredmar.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to show how teachers' experiences of one dimension of enjoyment of work, namely joy as a subtle atmosphere, can be described and understood from a lifeworld perspective. The lifeworld phenomenological approach contributes to the whole research design and provides the con [...] cepts that form the theoretical basis for the analysis. The specific lifeworld concepts used are 'intertwinement', 'natural attitude', 'pre-predicativity', 'intentionality' and 'intersubjectivity'. Using these concepts, the results illuminate and describe the meanings of enjoyment of work, based on what the teachers expressed in interviews. The empirical study consisted of interviews with five teachers working with pupils aged seven to nine years. The results illuminate some vital and fundamental characteristics of teachers' experiences of enjoyment of work and its significance. These characteristics include its basic function and its inherent possibility for opening up the whole classroom situation to the teachers. In this sense, enjoyment of work is similar to standing in a doorway and involves an expectant foreshadowing. The study also found that teachers' experiences of joy are intertwined with their experiences of flow and control. The results found that enjoyment of work was significant in the sense of the confirmation of good work, like a receipt. Finally, the results revealed new concepts and metaphors for a richer understanding of this phenomenon. The research implications of the study illustrate how the lifeworld approach enables a deeper understanding of emotional dimensions in teachers work. The approach provides useful concepts that broaden the understanding of the content, function and meaning of teachers' experiences of enjoyment of work. The paper also points to the need for more research in this area. The results illuminate new and different aspects of teachers' work that may be a valuable resource in this profession.

  15. Who Needs to Fit in? Who Gets to Stand out? Communication Technologies Including Brain-Machine Interfaces Revealed from the Perspectives of Special Education School Teachers Through an Ableism Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor Wolbring; Lucy Diep

    2013-01-01

    Some new and envisioned technologies such as brain machine interfaces (BMI) that are being developed initially for people with disabilities, but whose use can also be expanded to the general public have the potential to change body ability expectations of disabled and non-disabled people beyond the species-typical. The ways in which this dynamic will impact students with disabilities in the domain of special education is explored. Data was drawn from six special education school teachers from...

  16. Relationship among science teacher personality characteristics and degree of teacher classroom implementation after in-service workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechler, Phares Lochiel Coleman

    State departments of public instruction require that teachers periodically update their licenses throughout their teaching careers. Various professional development events such as in-service workshops, university offerings, and special innovative programs provide opportunities for novice and experienced teachers to grow professionally. The "Team Science" workshop was designed from models supported by research that described guidelines for successful workshop strategies. In evaluating the workshop, the question was asked "Why did not all teachers implement the ideas from the workshop in their science classrooms?" This study investigates the possible relationship between teacher personality characteristics and implementation of technology innovations. Team Science was an extensive workshop program planned to develop science teachers' expertise in using computer and video technology to teach in physical science, chemistry, and physics classrooms in rural school in North Carolina. Upon evaluating the four-year effort, it was found that the 23 participants implemented the technological strategies at various levels. At the higher end of the range of technology use, some teachers exhibited complete integration of the computers and interfacing devices into both the laboratory work and the classroom inquiry. At the lower end of the range, some teachers used the technology very little. The resulting question emerged from the data collected: Do specific teacher personality characteristics (independent variables) correlate with the degree of implementation (dependent variable) of the innovative ideas and tools used in the teacher's science classroom after the in-service workshop? To determine if there were any significant personality traits, each teacher was given five personality tests. The tests were Hunt's Conceptual Development Test, the Paragraph Completion Test; James Rest's Defining Issues Test; Simmons Personal Survey, an emotional tendency test; the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; and Riggs and Enochs Self-Efficacy Test. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, multiple regression, and factor analysis to see what variables were predictors of implementation. The regression analysis revealed that subtests from Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Simmons Personal Survey, Hunt's Paragraph Completion Test, and Rest's Defining Issues Test could be used to predict implementation. Factor analysis indicated teachers who implemented the technology were "risk takers" and "flexible planners."

  17. Child-to-Teacher Ratio and Day Care Teacher Sickeness Absenteeism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GØrtz, Mette; Andersson, Elvira

    2014-01-01

    The literature on occupational health points to work pressure as a trigger of sickness absence. However, reliable, objective measures of work pressure are in short supply. This paper uses Danish day care teachers as an ideal case for analysing whether work pressure measured by the child-to-teacher ratio, that is, the number of children per teacher in an institution, affects teacher sickness absenteeism. We control for individual teacher characteristics, workplace characteristics, and family background characteristics of the children in the day care institutions. We perform estimations for two time periods, 2002–2003 and 2005–2006, by using generalized method of moments with lagged levels of the child-to-teacher ratio as instrument. Our estimation results are somewhat mixed. Generally, the results indicate that the child-to-teacher ratio is positively related to short-term sickness absence for nursery care teachers, but not for preschool teacher

  18. A Study on Student Teachers' Misconceptions and Scientifically Acceptable Conceptions About Mass and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, Selahattin

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were considered under three headings. The first was to elicit misconception that science and physics student teachers (pre-service teachers) had about the terms, ``inertial mass'', ``gravitational mass'', ``gravity'', ``gravitational force'' and "weight". The second was to understand how prior learning affected their misconceptions, and whether teachers' misconceptions affected their students' learning. The third was to determine the differences between science and physics student teachers' understanding levels related to mass and gravity, and between their logical thinking ability levels and their attitudes toward physics lessons. A total of 267 science and physics student teachers participated in the study. Data collection instruments included the physics concept test, the logical thinking ability test and physics attitude scale. All instruments were administered to the participants at the end of the 3rd semester of their university years. The physics test consisting of paper and pencil test involving 16 questions was designed, but only four questions were related to mass and gravity; the second test consisted of 10 questions with two stages. The third test however, consisted of 15 likert type items. As a result of the analysis undertaken, it was found that student teachers had serious misconceptions about inertia, gravity, gravitational acceleration, gravitational force and weight concepts. The results also revealed that student teachers generally had positive attitudes toward physics lessons, and their logical thinking level was fairly good.

  19. Teaching Styles of Iranian EFL Teachers: Do Gender, Age, and Experience Make a Difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrak Rahimi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigating Iranian EFL teachers’ teaching styles and the activities they use most frequently in their classes. Additionally, the difference between male and female teachers’ teaching styles and the relationship between teaching styles and teachers’ experience and age were explored. Three hundred EFL teachers were selected by stratified random sampling from six districts of the capital city, Tehran. They filled in a personal information questionnaire and Teaching Activities Preference (TAP questionnaire. The results of the study showed that the participants used a variety of teaching activities in English classes; however, they constituted a special group due to the high percentage of using sensing type activities. Further, it was found that male and female teachers were different in extroverting, sensing, and feeling styles of teaching while female teachers used activities related to these styles more than their male counterparts did. Besides, the obtained results revealed that EFL teachers’ age and experience had a negative relationship with sensing style and a positive relationship with thinking style of teaching.

  20. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability of the nation's preservice agricultural education teachers. Based on the results of this study, preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems, and agricultural teacher education programs require basic and intermediate mathematics as their…

  1. Reshaping Teacher Education through the Professional Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Margery; Forde, Christine; Dickson, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The current policy gaze on teacher quality is resulting in significant shifts in how teacher education is conceptualized, designed and delivered. Traditional approaches to teacher preparation and continuing professional development (CPD) are being challenged, and often displaced, by new models that expedite the process and experience of becoming a…

  2. VIOLENCE AGAINST TEACHERS- RULE OR EXCEPTION?

    OpenAIRE

    Siniša Opi?; Maja Lokmi?; Vesna Bili?

    2013-01-01

    Abstract- The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence of violence against teachers by students. The study included 175 teachers, five primary and five secondary schools. The age of respondents (teachers) ranges from 20 to 65, with average age being 44,33 years. The used  instrument has assessed violence against teachers and has consisted of  data about the characteristics of respondents, frequency and type of violence experienced from students.The results suggest that violence ...

  3. Personal Digital Assistants - teachers prefer the personal

    OpenAIRE

    Wishart, Jocelyn

    2006-01-01

    This paper was presented at the Mlearn 06 conference in Banff October 2006. It presents the results of a small-scale project, funded by the UK Teacher Development Agency, where 13 teachers and 3 trainee teachers in one secondary school science department were given handhelds (Personal Digital Assistants or PDAs) with cameras and internet access for the academic year. The aims were: * to build capacity - enabling trainee teachers to share their mlearning practice; * to enable school based asso...

  4. Cooperation between Science Teachers and ESL Teachers: A Register Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Tammy; Mohan, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Cooperation between English as a second or other language (ESOL) and content-area teachers, often difficult to achieve, is hard to assess linguistically in a revealing way. This article employs register analysis (which is different from, but complementary to, genre analysis) in a Systemic Functional Linguistic perspective to show how an ESOL…

  5. Teachers at Sea with the ARMADA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Two science teachers accompanied an international scientific party of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program on a 6-week expedition to the high Arctic Ocean this summer. Kathy Couchon, a middle school science teacher from Narragansett, RI, was sponsored by the NSF-funded ARMADA Project (www.armadaproject.org), directed by the Office of Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island. Erik Zetterberg, a high school teacher from Sweden, was sponsored by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. The purpose of the expedition was to collect rock and sediment cores in order to reconstruct environmental and climatic conditions in the polar region over the past 60 million years. The $12.5M expedition involved over 200 people from more than 10 countries, three icebreakers, and two helicopters. Cores collected on one vessel were transferred to a laboratory on another, where 20 scientists analyzed microfossils as well as sedimentology, chemistry, and lithology. The teachers participated early in all aspects of the expedition, including coring operations, helicopter flights for ice reconnaissance, laboratory work, and science meetings. Formal education, such as learning how to prepare sediment samples for micropaleontological analysis, was complemented by informal education during one-on-one conversations with scientists over meals, or in social gatherings. The teachers posted reports regularly on websites (e.g., http://tea.rice.edu tea_cuchonfrontpage.html) and participated in a teleconference via Iridium satellite phone. When asked to compare preconceived notions with actual experience, the teachers noted the following: (1) there are many things that scientists don't know (and they are often the first to admit this); (2) the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery does not diminish with age and experience; (3) teamwork among the scientists was greater than expected, and competition among individuals was not observed; and (4) much in the natural world is unknown and opportunities exist to make major discoveries (in other words, science isn't dead). The scientists made the following observations regarding participation by the teachers: (1) they assisted in the laboratory, and got a taste of scientific research; (2) conversations revealed what they know, and how they convey it to students, and thus how scientists may assist in the educational process; (3) the teachers did not hesitate to ask basic questions, a healthy exercise, because it required the scientists to re-examine and re-explain some of their fundamental assumptions; (4) the presence of the teachers encouraged the scientists to describe their results in a manner that is more accessible to a wider audience; and (5) the teachers increased awareness among the scientists by reminding them about their responsibilities to the broader world, beyond their particular subdisciplines. Suggestions for enhancing the experience, for both the teachers and the scientists, will be presented.

  6. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within Two Different Management Regimes: An Assessment-Based Accountability Regime and Regime without External Pressure on Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management…

  7. Evaluation of Teachers’ Instructional Technologies Integration Skills: A Qualitative Need Analysis for New Pedagogical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ad?güzel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at identifying the teachers’ needs of new pedagogical approaches in technology-assisted courses. Data were collected through semi-structured interview form from 12 voluntary teachers from different branches at a technology-supported private school. Findings showed that teachers perceived smart boards and PowerPoint presentations as the fundamentals in classes. Results also indicated that the participants had troubles of integrating technologies at times despite of participating training on the use of instructional technologies. The study also revealed that in technology supported courses excessive concentration on technology hinders dealing with the students, and that the students' individual characteristics were neglected. Finally, the findings of the study indicated that different teaching strategies and approaches were not applied, the authentic materials and models were not used in classes. In the study it is recommended that teachers should be informed about integration of technology and pedagogy.

  8. Teacher-Students’ Interactions in Task-Based vs Form-Focused Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Rahimpour

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Teacher-students’ and students-students’ interactions are of significant importance in foreign language teaching and learning. It is argued that interactions between teachers and students facilitate language development and lead to better language learning. The present study is an attempt to investigate the effect of two teaching approaches: 1. Task-Based Instruction (TBI and 2. Form-Focused Instruction (FFI on the quantity and quality of teacher-students’ interactions reflected in the number of occurrences of turn taking, question type, feedback and errors correction. Two groups of intermediate-level learners were selected as the participants of this study. One group was instructed by Form-Focused Instruction (FFI approach and the other class was instructed by Task-Based Instruction (TBI approach. Results of the statistical analysis of the collected data revealed that FFI approach led to the occurrence of more teacher-students’ interactions than TBI approach. The pedagogical implications are discussed.

  9. Teacher-Team Development in a School-Based Professional Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU PIEN CHENG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents how a team progressed through the five stages of team development as a result of a school-based professional development program using a laboratory class cycle. Six Grade two teachers and their administrator in a primary school in the south eastern United States participated in the study. All the teachers were interviewed at the end of each laboratory class cycle. Their administrator was interviewed after the program ended. A grounded theory approach and constant comparative method were used. The study revealed how the teachers’ participation in the program progressed according to Tuckman and Jenson’s (1997 model of team development in the laboratory class cycle. Establishment of trust among teachers and team support over an extended time were identified as important factors in shaping the team development.

  10. Pedagogical beliefs and attitudes of computer science teachers in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Georgios Fessakis; Tsampika Karakiza

    2011-01-01

    Pedagogical beliefs and attitudes significantly determine the professional skills and practice of teachers. Many professional development programs for teachers aim to the elaboration of the pedagogical knowledge in order to improve teaching quality. This paper presents the study of pedagogical beliefs of computer science teachers in Greece. The research data reveal that computer science teachers usually hold mixed traditional and constructivist theories which are generally irrelevant to eithe...

  11. Development of Teachers as Scientists in Research Experiences for Teachers Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Courtney; Hardin, Emily; Klein-Gardner, Stacy; Benson, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the teachers' development as scientists for participants in three National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Teachers. Participants included secondary science and math teachers with varying levels of education and experience who were immersed in research environments related to engineering and science topics. Teachers' functionality as scientists was assessed in terms of independence, focus, relationships with mentors, structure, and ability to create new concepts. Hierarchies developed within these constructs allowed tracking of changes in functionality throughout the 6-week programs. Themes were further identified in teachers' weekly journal entries and exit interviews through inductive coding. Increases in functionality as scientists were observed for all teachers who completed both the program and exit interview ( n = 27). Seven of the 27 teachers reached high science functionality; however, three of the teachers did not reach high functionality in any of the constructs during the program. No differences were observed in demographics or teaching experience between those who did and did not reach high functionality levels. Inductive coding revealed themes such as teachers' interactions with mentors and connections made between research and teaching, which allowed for descriptions of experiences for teachers at high and low levels of functionality. Teachers at high functionality levels adjusted to open-ended environments, transitioned from a guided experience to freedom, felt useful in the laboratory, and were self-motivated. In contrast, teachers at low functionality levels did not have a true research project, primarily focused on teaching aspects of the program, and did not display a transition of responsibilities.

  12. Enhancing and Evaluating Prospective Teachers’ Techno-pedagogical Knowledge Integration Towards Science Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necati HIRÇA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate educational computer aided teaching materials (CATM which designed by skilled prospective class teachers towards 4 and 5th grade science level according to the principles of an educational software and teaching methods and techniques. Therefore, materials were firstly scored with an educational software assessment scale and findings were presented in the tables after calculated by Microsoft Excel. Secondly, prospective teachers’ using level of teaching methods and techniques, and measurement and assessment methods and techniques were revealed from their CATM's interface. The sample of the study was consisted 29 prospective class teachers. As a result of the study, although prospective teachers designed successive materials, it is understood that they have paid more attention to visual design properties and functionality such as linking between pages, colored backgrounds, interactive buttons, interactive guidance and assistance properties, and multi-media properties excluding principles of editing content criteria. They tried to present science subject by concept mapping, brainstorming, case study and demonstration as teaching methods/techniques with assessment techniques such as multiple-choice test, matching, concept map as assessment respectively. In general, the findings of the study showed that designing and developing CATM allowed prospective teachers to increase their educational technology competencies, self-esteem and confidence. In conclusion, it is revealed that prospective teachers are in need of experiences and environment about how to integrate pedagogy and technology knowledge.

  13. Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Elena K.

    The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

  14. Effects of Study Abroad on Teachers’ Self-perceptions: A Study of Chinese EFL Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Wang

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on an enquiry into a group of 91 Chinese secondary EFL teachers with SA experience in the UK. Drawing on questionnaire data and 20 teachers’ interview narratives, the study examines how SA (study abroad) influenced their self-perceptions on EFL teaching in three aspects, namely, language proficiency, teaching ideology and NES (native English speaking)-NNES (nonnative English speaking) teacher debate. The enquiry revealed that the length of SA was a powerful factor in ...

  15. TEACHER NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  16. The Ideal Psychology Teacher: Qualitative Analysis of Views from Brunei GCE A-Level Students and Trainee Psychology Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Nurul Azureen Omar; Sri Ridhwanah Matarsat; Nur Hafizah Azmin; Veronica Chung Ai Wei; Mohd Mu izzuddin Mohd Nasir; Ummi Kalthum Syahirah Sahari; Masitah Shahrill; Lawrence Mundia

    2014-01-01

    We qualitatively explored the notion of the ideal teacher from the context of pre-university Brunei General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (GCE A-Level) psychology students and trainee psychology teachers. Both previous research and our own analyses on this concept revealed that the so-called ideal teacher was neither a perfect nor a super teacher but rather an effective instructor who was firm, fair, and a good communicator. Psychology students of various ability levels (high achiev...

  17. Mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1979-01-01

    Mathematics Revealed focuses on the principles, processes, operations, and exercises in mathematics.The book first offers information on whole numbers, fractions, and decimals and percents. Discussions focus on measuring length, percent, decimals, numbers as products, addition and subtraction of fractions, mixed numbers and ratios, division of fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The text then examines positive and negative numbers and powers and computation. Topics include division and averages, multiplication, ratios, and measurements, scientific notation and estim

  18. Audio Visual Methods V. A.B.C. Methods in the Teaching of Irish. Report: Results of Research Carried out amongst Teachers of Standards V and VI in National Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Domhnallain, Tomas; O Gliasain, Micheal

    In Ireland Irish is taught as a second language in all primary schools in English-speaking areas. A form of code cognition approach known as the A.B.C. method was in use in all schools for about forty years prior to the introduction of audiovisual methods between 1965-1970. This report gives the results of a survey carried out among teachers who…

  19. A escrita dos professores: textos em formação, professores em formação, formação em formação Teacher's writings: a contribution to teacher's training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Thomé de Andrade

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo apresenta a análise de trabalhos de fim de curso escritos por professoras da rede municipal que freqüentaram um curso de extensão numa universidade pública. Após um semestre de contato com saberes científicos sobre alfabetização e letramento, em simultaneidade com discussões sobre possíveis trajetórias profissionais de formação docente, escreveram sobre suas próprias trajetórias profissionais. Efetuamos uma análise discursiva desses textos. Levantamos certos temas centrais deste discurso dos professores, situando a sua identidade profissional com relação aos saberes profissionais, delimitando certas posições discursivas no campo da formação, umas em relação às outras. Diferenças importantes foram encontradas entre as posições discursivas ocupadas por professores "não-regentes", que atuam como coordenadores e formadores, e as dos professores "regentes". Estes últimos têm clareza quanto a sua impossibilidade de acesso a posições. A análise do discurso, se apresentada às autoras, poderá produzir um efeito formador, tornando-as receptivas a prescrições de práticas pedagógicas produtivas para o trabalho escolar com a linguagem.This paper presents the analysis of texts written by female teachers from public schools at the end of a continuing education course at a public University. These teachers were exposed for a semester to scientific knowledge on teaching to read and write, literacy, and different teacher's training models. They wrote about their own professional trajectories and experiences. A discourse analysis allowed us to relate their professional knowledge to their position in the teachers' training field. Important differences were observed between the speeches of two groups of teachers: Those who work as coordinators or in-service teacher trainers and those who are actually teaching classes to students. In the latter group, papers reveal a clear sense of impossibility of access to certain positions in the literacy field. If presented to the authors, the results of this discourse analysis could be a formative experience, turning teachers more receptive to productive pedagogic practices to teach language in their schools.

  20. Links between teacher assessment and child self - assessment of mental health and behavior among children affected by HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongfei; Li, Xiaoming; Weinstein, Traci L; Chi, Peilian; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2015-07-01

    Teachers are considered to be one of the most important influences in the lives of students. Teachers' assessments of students may be a primary source of information on children's mental and behavioral health; however, this topic has received little attention in research. We examined this issue through linking teachers' ratings of students and mental and behavioral outcomes of children affected by HIV. The hypothesis is that teacher ratings will be predictive of specific child mental and behavioral health outcomes. A quantitative cross-sectional design with self-administered paper-and-pencil instruments was used. The sample included 1221 children (aged 6-18, grades 1-11) affected by HIV including 755 orphans who lost one or both parents to AIDS and 466 vulnerable children living with HIV-infected parents in a central province of China. The corresponding teacher sample included 185 participants. Each child completed an assessment inventory of demographic information and mental and behavioral health measures. Teachers completed a questionnaire about children's school performance. SEM analyses revealed a good model fit according to all fit indices: comparative fit index = 0.93, root mean square error of approximation = 0.07, and standardized root mean square residual = 0.04. Structural equation modeling revealed that problem ratings by teachers were positively associated with child loneliness and behavioral problems, social competence ratings by teachers were negatively related to child depression, and personal growth and social interaction ratings by teachers were negatively related to child loneliness, depression, and trauma. The current study represents a unique contribution to the field in that it recognizes that teachers can be a valuable source of information on children's psychological health. Results from this study have implications for health prevention and intervention for children and families suffering from HIV/AIDS. PMID:25703050

  1. Resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Melanie S.

    This study examined the resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills. Reading instruction in the middle school years should follow the natural cognitive progression that occurs in the adolescent brain from learning to read to reading to learn. Scientific reading is a different type of reading than most middle school students are accustomed to. It is important to understand that students will continue to be expected to read non-fiction critically for success in the 21st century. Effective teachers know this, and they perceive themselves as teachers of reading regardless of the content area in which their expertise lies. This qualitative research study was conducted at a rural middle school with three science teachers who employ before, during, and after literacy strategies when reading the textbook content with their students. The methodologies used in this study were interviews, observations, and document collection. The results of this study revealed the students' reading difficulties perceived by the teacher participants, the literacy strategies used by the teacher participants, the instructional resources the teacher participants used to improve comprehension, and the need for professional development in content area literacy.

  2. Student Teachers’ Ways of Thinking and Ways of Understanding Digestion and the Digestive System in Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiha Odabasi Çimer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the ways in which student teachers understand digestion and the digestive system and, subsequently, their ways of thinking, as reflected in their problem solving approaches and the justification schemes that they used to validate their claims. For this purpose, clinical interviews were conducted with 10 biology student teachers. According to the data, the student teachers possessed different levels of understanding that can be summarized into three categories: (1 naïve, in that their study method was unscientific and memorization-based, (2 fragmented, and (3 unsound. Their ways of thinking were congruent with their ways of understanding, and this was reflected in their explanations, which were constructed ad hoc and focused on simple linear relationships. In line with these ways of thinking, the justification schemes used by the student teachers were mainly external and empirical schemes, which are considered to be unsophisticated or lower-level. This study is the first study that attempts to reveal and classify student teachers’ justification schemes in biology. Earlier studies on student learning processes have been conducted in mathematics. We discovered distinct patterns in the justification schemes used by student teachers, and these patterns were related to the nature of biology as a life science. At the end of the paper, we discuss our results and provide suggestions for teacher education and future research.

  3. What is an `Interesting Curriculum' for Biotechnology Education? Students and Teachers Opposing Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidman, Gillian

    2010-05-01

    Of concern is an international trend of students’ increasing reluctance to choose science courses in both their final years of secondary school and tertiary levels of education. Research into the phenomenon indicates an influencing factor to be the ‘uninteresting curriculum’ (OECD 2006) of school science. This paper presents an exploration of what biotechnology key ideas students and teachers consider to be interesting. A survey was constructed and completed by 500 Australian students and their 35 teachers. Interviews were conducted with a sample of students and teachers. The Chi-square statistics revealed a significant difference between the student and teacher survey responses in four of the six a priori factors. A rank ordering of the key ideas, based on whole group mean scores, indicates only a small overlap in modern biotechnology key ideas of interest to both the students and teachers. The results suggest the key ideas teachers are interested in and incorporate into their curriculum, are not the key ideas students are interested in learning about. This mismatch is particularly prevalent and problematic in situations where curriculum choice is available within a mandated framework or syllabus, which is the case for these teachers and students. The study also found students withdrawing from biology courses in post compulsory settings due to lack of interest and perceived lack of relevance of the course.

  4. Factors Affecting Teachers’ Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamonangan Tambunan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers’ information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers’ information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument used in taking the data, namely questionnaires and observation sheets. Questionnaire was used to obtain data on teacher interpersonal communication, use of information technology tools, teachers’ perceptions toward information technology, and self-improvement of teachers. Observation sheet used to obtain data on teacher competence in the field of information technology Data was analyzed using path analysis through SPSS 12 and LISREL 8:30. The analysis showed teachers’ competence in the field of information technology is influenced by the teacher interpersonal communication, use of information technology tools, teachers’ perceptions toward information technology and self-improvement of teachers either directly or indirectly.

  5. Teacher-Perceived Work Autonomy: The Concept and Its Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Isaac A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a scale to measure teacher sense of work autonomy with evidence for its score replicability. Results of replicability analyses (cross validation and validity generalization) involving 156 Israeli elementary school teachers and 650 Israeli elementary and secondary school teachers suggest four areas of functioning pertinent to teachers'…

  6. Attracting and Retaining Teachers: A Question of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Karin; Alliata, Roberta; Benninghoff, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Attracting and retaining competent teachers is a key concern when it comes to managing the supply and demand for teachers. This article examines the motivation that prompts people to enter or leave the teaching profession with the aim of identifying a decision framework for defining teacher policies. The results are based on the teacher workforce…

  7. Multilingualism in an EFL Practicum: Increasing Student Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, María Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Research in second language teacher education has demonstrated that novice teachers have difficulty in using their pedagogical knowledge, which partly results from a heavy focus on theory offered in teacher training programs (e.g., Bartels, 2005, 2009; Tarone & Allwright, 2005). In order to better equip student teachers with the knowledge…

  8. language teachers

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Le Rosey Institute at Rolle (autumn and spring) and Gstaad (winter) is looking for part-time language teachers of ?Bulgarian, Farsi, Hindi, Korean and Romanian for the start of the autumn term in September 2007. For further details, please contact : www.rosey.ch Please send applications with CVs to job@rosey.ch

  9. Infusing Science, Technology, and Society Into an Elementary Teacher Education Program: The Impact on Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Mary Beth; Peterson, Barbara R.; King, Kenneth Paul

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve science and social studies instruction, preservice teachers developed original science, technology, and society units to teach in elementary and middle school classrooms during their clinical field experience. Data revealed that the preservice teachers fell into categories of being skeptics, open-minded instructors, or…

  10. Teachers´ Understanding of Learning Goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog Skott, Charlotte; Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    The national curriculum for Danish primary and lower secondary schools has recently changed in a goal-oriented direction. The intention is to increase the teachers´ and students´attention to learning outcome, by making learning goals visible. Danish surveys show that teachers did not use the previous curriculum in the intended way in relation to goals (Danmarks Evaluerings Institut, 2012). The surveys also indicate that teachers in general do not articulate learning goals (Skovgaard et al, 2014). Our research investigates how the requirements for goal-orientation influence teachers' practice in mathematics and Danish-as-a-Mother-Tongue in regard to planning, teaching and assessment. Our research is framed by an explorative design. The informants take part in the research- and development project “Digitally Supported Learning Goals”. In addition to observe teaching, we conduct qualitative interviews with 20-30 affiliated teachers before and after the intervention. Each interview is conducted after an observation of a lesson performed by the teacher. For analyzing the interviews, we are inspired by grounded theory (Charmaz 2006). At the congress, preliminary results based on the interviews will be presented. We expect to deepen our understanding of the relations between the various parameters in the teachers' practice in relation to learning goals and goal-oriented teaching. There is conducted research on the effects of goal-oriented teaching on students' learning both internationally and in the Nordic countries (Skaalvik & Skaalvik, 2013; Hattie, 2009). Our study contributes by exploring how goal-oriented teaching influence teachers' practices.

  11. Chance, choice and opportunity: Life history study of two exemplary female elementary science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Kathleen Milligan

    The purpose of this two-year study was to investigate why two female elementary teachers became exemplary science teachers, despite conditions which do not promote such achievement. Each teachers' progress was examined using life history methodology. The study's theoretical grounding included females' academic and attitudinal success in science education. Purposeful sampling of peers, administrators, and college professors produced two research participants. Both teachers participated in interviews, observations, and member checks lasting over one year. Data were analyzed inductively, resulting in two life histories. Comparing the life stories using confluence theory (Feldman, 1986) indicated four major categories for consideration: risk-taking; life-long learning; gender equity; and mentors. Risk-taking is necessary for female elementary teachers because of their often poor educational background. Few female role models support efforts for achievement. Life-long learning, including extensive reading and graduate-level classes, supports female teachers' personal and professional growth. Exposure to new ideas and teacher practices encourages curricular change and refinement in science education. Gender inequity and the male-packaging of science is an issue to be resolved by female elementary teachers. Mentors can provide interaction and feedback to refine science instructional practices. Professors, peers, and mentor teachers support instructional and content knowledge efforts. Recommendations for science education in classroom practices, preservice teacher education and continuing professional development include female-friendly approaches to science instruction. Decreased competitive practices through cooperative learning and gender inclusive language encourages female participation and achievement in classrooms. Hands-on, inquiry-based instruction and verbalization encourages female students' achievement in science education. Preservice teachers must receive adequate conceptual understanding in college science courses. Addressing knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and gender issues inherent in prior science education assists students to be reflective. Practicing teachers should be encouraged to work collaboratively, be reflective, and be aware of gender inequity issues. In-depth professional development efforts are need to support these changes. Administrators must be supportive of the process. Further research can add to and expand this body of knowledge through additional research into male elementary science teachers' life experiences. Research with preservice teachers may reveal similar findings even though their historical time period differs from the two participants in this study.

  12. Impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers on NHS registered conceptions and terminations: final results of cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, D.; Raab, G. M.; Abraham, C.; Scott, S.; Hart, G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers compared with conventional education in terms of conceptions and terminations registered by the NHS. Design Follow-up of cluster randomised trial 4.5 years after intervention. Setting: NHS records of women who had attended 25 secondary schools in east Scotland. Participants: 4196 women (99.5% of those eligible). Intervention: SHARE programme (intervention group) v ...

  13. Impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers on NHS registered conceptions and terminations: final results of cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    HENDERSON, M; Wight, D.; Raab, G M; Abraham, C; Parkes, A.; Scott, S; Hart, G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of a theoretically based sex education programme (SHARE) delivered by teachers compared with conventional education in terms of conceptions and terminations registered by the NHS.Design Follow-up of cluster randomised trial 4.5 years after intervention.Setting NHS records of women who had attended 25 secondary schools in east Scotland.Participants 4196 women (99.5% of those eligible) Intervention SHARE programme (intervention group) v existing sex education (con...

  14. Using critical race theory to analyze science teachers culturally responsive practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tamara; Brand, Brenda R.

    2012-06-01

    Culturally responsive science teaching is using knowledge about the culture and life experiences of students to structure learning that is conducive to their needs. Understanding what teachers need to prepare them to be culturally responsive is a matter of continuous debate. As the focus of multicultural education ventures farther away from its roots, advocating the civil rights of historically oppressed groups, concerns about the gravity of racial inequity on schooling continues. How will this shift in focus influence teachers' capacity to accommodate students' needs resulting from racial inequities in this society, particularly African American students? What knowledge is essential to their effectiveness? This qualitative study examined the instructional practices of two effective middle school science teachers deemed culturally responsive by their administrator on the basis of classroom observations, students' responses and standardized assessment results. Both teachers' classrooms consisted primarily of African American students. Grounded theory was used to analyze the teachers' beliefs and practices in order to identify existing commonalties. Critical race theory was used to identify whether there was any influence of the students' racial identities on the teachers' beliefs and practices. The analysis reveals that the teachers' beliefs and practices were informed by their critical awareness of social constraints imposed upon their African American students' identities. These findings communicate the significance of sociocultural awareness to informing the teachers' instruction, as well as their strategies for managing the varying dynamics occurring in their classrooms. It can be deduced from the findings that an understanding of racial inequities is crucial to the development of sociocultural awareness, and is the foundation for the culturally responsive dispositions and practices of these middle school science teachers.

  15. Exploring Language Teachers’ Evolving Conceptualizations of Language Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry L. LaFond

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines conceptions that pre-service teachers of English bring to the term language variation, a crucial constellation of concepts in linguistics related to understanding the socioculturally variant nature of language. We review responses given to open-ended questions about language variation, focusing on statements made regarding this term at different points of professional development, looking particularly at how initial understanding of language variation evolves as a result of having multiple exposures to this linguistic concept across differing language courses. Survey questions related both to a definition language variation and to an assessment of the importance of this concept for the careers for which these respondents were preparing. Comparative content analyses of responses reveals that many pre-service teachers start their academic careers with differing preconceptions of language variation based on general use of the term. Though these pre-service teachers are sometimes reflective about aspects of variation, their early formulations are quite narrow in scope, often reflecting an incomplete or less sophisticated understanding of the term. Results suggest that, as these pre-service teachers extend their coursework, they also expand and refine their initial understanding of language variation, thereby gaining a discipline-specific and nuanced understanding of the term. Results also show broad appreciation for language variation, and development in the ability to articulate how awareness of variation might assist their teaching.

  16. Conceptualizing In-service Secondary School Science Teachers' Knowledge Base for Climate Change Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Roehrig, G.; Dalbotten, D. M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Nam, Y.; Varma, K.; Wang, J.

    2011-12-01

    The need to deepen teachers' knowledge of the science of climate change is crucial under a global climate change (GCC) scenario. With effective collaboration between researchers, scientists and teachers, conceptual frameworks can be developed for creating climate change content for classroom implementation. Here, we discuss how teachers' conceptualized content knowledge about GCC changes over the course of a professional development program in which they are provided with place-based and culturally congruent content. The NASA-funded Global Climate Change Education (GCCE) project, "CYCLES: Teachers Discovering Climate Change from a Native Perspective", is a 3-year teacher professional development program designed to develop culturally-sensitive approaches for GCCE in Native American communities using traditional knowledge, data and tools. As a part of this program, we assessed the progression in the content knowledge of participating teachers about GCC. Teachers were provided thematic GCC content focused on the elements of the medicine wheel-Earth, Fire, Air, Water, and Life -during a one week summer workshop. Content was organized to emphasize explanations of the natural world as interconnected and cyclical processes and to align with the Climate and Earth Science Literacy Principles and NASA resources. Year 1 workshop content was focused on the theme of "Earth" and teacher knowledge was progressively increased by providing content under the themes of 1) understanding of timescale, 2) understanding of local and global perspectives, 3) understanding of proxy data and 4) ecosystem connectivity. We used a phenomenographical approach for data analysis to qualitatively investigate different ways in which the teachers experienced and conceptualized GCC. We analyzed categories of teachers' climate change knowledge using information generated by tools such as photo elicitation interviews, concept maps and reflective journal perceptions. Preliminary findings from the pre-workshop interviews indicate teachers' different perceptions about timescale, their understanding about data projections using modeling, and their acceptance of the level of uncertainty in the data. Preliminary results from the progressive mapping of the core concepts highlighted 1) a direct correlation between the content provided and the concepts generated. 2) misconceptions generated during the process and 3) connections between various concepts related to the science of global climate change. Analysis of the responses of teachers to the content-based questions revealed a gradual progression in understanding of the science behind GCC. While the initial responses were limited to what causes GCC, later ones were based on local and global implications of GCC and possible adaptive solutions for the same. Our results will provide crucial information about providing conceptual knowledge and addressing misconceptions regarding the science of climate change. The information generated by this study can be used to further develop theme-based structured curricula to enhance teachers' understanding of the phenomenon of GCC.

  17. Teachers’ Thought Processes: The Case of Tunisian Gymnastic University Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Bali

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Teacher’s behaviour is substantially influenced and even determined by teachers’ thought processes. Several studies concerning effectiveness in physical education have analysed various topics such as student engagement, curriculum time allocation, teaching methods, teacher behaviour, and teacher perceptions. However, these investigations have not applied the classroom research findings identified by other researchers. Firstly, this study explains the implied thoughts of the explained Tunisian Gymnastic University Teachers (TGUT to teach gymnastics learning processes by analyzing their thought processes. Secondly, we included the analysis of the connection, interaction and relationship between the three topics reviewed. Thirdly, we identified and analyzed the difference between different Tunisian physical educational teachers’ thoughts and its influence on their didactical practice intervention. Data were collected during 4 months of observations and interviews with six TGUT at the high institute of sport and physical education (ISSEP in Tunisia. They all teach not mixed class in Level1 (first year, BAC + 1. These interviews were semi structured (40 minutes each and gave teachers the opportunity to share their perspectives on broad topics such as education, teaching, and society, and also on more succinct topics such as individual students and situations that had occurred in previous lessons. The data were analyzed using constant comparison. Three topics emerged illustrate how the teachers’ thinking influenced their selecting, ordering, and formulating of curriculum units, their didactic and pedagogical manoeuvring during lessons. This study revealed three major conceptions used by TGUT: 1 Teaching based on pedagogical conceptions (7.20%, 2 Teaching based on sciences (17.42%, and 3 Teaching based on means and practices (75.37%. A number of themes emerged from the analysis of each case, aside to the contextualised responses of individuals. The perception of the TGUT had two consequences: 1 a didactic consequence; the TGUT plan activities that will assist students in developing only physical skills, 2 the legitimacy of the contributory sciences in training programs for student teachers of physical education (PE. Basis on this argument, we might reasonably ask what might be done to address this problem. The issues discussed in this paper will encourage teachers to reflect on their own teaching beliefs and practices and to include them in the process of planning and teaching effectiveness.

  18. Climatic effects on soil trophic networks and the resulting humus profiles in holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) forests in the High Atlas of Morocco as revealed by correspondence analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaka, Nassima; Ponge, Jean-franc?ois

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate methods have been widely used for revealing the structures of communities, and in this paper we explore one particular method, namely correspondence analysis (also called reciprocal averaging), for studying humus profiles by the 'method of small volumes'. The present study was done on humus profiles under holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia), an evergreen Mediterranean species, in the High Atlas of Morocco. Three sites (1500 m, 1700 m, 1900 m altitude) and 2 years (1999 and 2002) were...

  19. Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates

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    Dr. Etem YE??LYURT

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Kele?o?lu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selçuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was conducted on 312 teacher candidates. The data of this study was obtained by “academic selfefficacy scale” which was developed by Jerusalem and Schwazer (1981 and translated into Turkish by Y?lmaz, Gürçay, and Ekici (2007 and its reliability value was determined as .79. However, Cronbach Alfa reliability value of this scale became .76 with the result of the data analysis of the study. SPSS package program was used to analyze the data; and the data analysis, frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation, independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc tests (LSD test were used. When the findings of the research were considered in general, the result showed that the academic self-efficacy perception level of the candidates was at desired level. However, teachers' views about the level of academic self-efficacy perception showed that most of them preferred a lower level option "suits me", instead of "totally suits me" option that was the highest degree of participation of four likert-type scale. This illustrated that their perception about this issue was not at a very high level. When independent variables were taken into account, among the academic perception levels of teacher candidates, a significant difference was detected in terms of working as a teacher or not and academic achievement variables but it revealed no significant difference in terms of gender and type of education program variables.

  20. Head Start Classroom Teachers' and Assistant Teachers' Perceptions of Professional Development Using a Learn Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ilham; Kidd, Julie K.; Burns, M. Susan; Campbell, Trina

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates early childhood education teachers' and assistant teachers' views about a year-long professional development model that focuses on developing intentional teaching. The study shares the results of interviews conducted with the teachers at the end of the implementation of a one-year experimental professional model in Head…

  1. Preschool Teacher Competence Viewed from the Perspective of Students in Early Childhood Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillvist, Anne; Sandberg, Anette; Sheridan, Sonja; Williams, Pia

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines contemporary issues in early childhood teacher education in Sweden. The aim of the study was to explore dimensions of the construct of preschool teachers' competence as reported by 810 students enrolled in early childhood teacher education at 15 Swedish universities. The results showed that students' definitions of…

  2. Fostering Lifelong Learning--Evaluation of a Teacher Education Program for Professional Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterwald, Monika; Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Luftenegger, Marko; Spiel, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Modern economics has placed lifelong learning (LLL) at the center of an intensive ongoing political debate. Evidenced-based interventions are needed, not only in continuing education courses for teachers, but also in schools. This paper introduces evaluation results of TALK, a teacher education program for professional teachers with the objective…

  3. Head Start Mentor Teachers Impact Child Outcomes in Protege Teachers' Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A.; Abbott-Shim, Martha; VandeWiele, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the results of an evaluation of the Individualized Learning Intervention, a mentoring program for early childhood educators. This mentoring program includes 3 components: Mentor Teacher Seminar, Mentor teachers supporting professional development of Protege teachers throughout the school year, and Mentor coordinator meetings…

  4. Predictors of Teacher Candidate Success in Developing a Capstone Project: The Teacher Work Sampling (TWS) Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Paul; Watkins, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    Many university and college teacher education programs have adopted the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) as their capstone assessment demonstrating a teacher candidate's competencies in planning, assessing and reflecting on instructional practice. The TWS summative results submitted by students at a mid-size state university who were in their final…

  5. Georgians Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    What was life like during the Georgian era in Britain? During the period between 1714 and 1830, cities and towns were transformed, conspicuous consumption became the pastime of the emerging middle classes, and gardening and shopping for leisure became commonplace. This digital companion to the British Library's "Georgians Revealed" exhibit brings together some of the key books and newspapers from the period, along with details about guided tours through the physical exhibitions, a Georgian London walking tour, and more. For those unable to view the exhibit in person, this companion site provides brief but detailed narratives on interesting facets of the exhibit, including dancing with the Georgians and celebrity culture. The site is rounded out by an excellent timeline of key events from the time of George I (1714-1727) to George IV (1820-1830) accompanied by vivid illustrations and portraiture.

  6. A MODEL OF IMPROVING TEACHER’S STRATEGIES IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE TRAINING

    OpenAIRE

    Galina Petrova; Olga Milovanova; Olga Efimova

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on developing the teachers’ skills which are integral to the processes of professional decision–making where teachers are constantly involved. The paper gives an overview of a model of teachers’ development offered by innovative educational processes, activity of the teachers on the organization of foreign student training activity, etc. It describes the results of the authors’ modeling on adapting the presentation reliability development among the business student...

  7. Teachers as Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    In "Teachers as Learners", a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning. Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teaching…

  8. Developing a Framework for Classroom Lesson Delivery to Improve English Teachers’ Performance in the Foundation Year Programme at a Saudi University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed J. Aburizaizah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The current English programme provided to foundation year students at King Abdulaziz University is failing to equip learners with the desired level of English language. This paper assesses the teaching materials and proposes a teaching framework to improve teachers’ lesson delivery. The framework was designed to overcome some of the shortfalls in the mandatory course book series (Headway Plus. The framework adopted Kumaravadivelu’s (2010 principles for lesson delivery: diagnosis, treatment and assessment, and advocates the development of cognitive ability, encourages collaborative learning, problem solving, emphasizes process rather than product, communication skills, and self-inquiry. Fifteen English teachers participated in a pilot study by implementing the new lesson delivery framework over a 14-week course. A peer observation strategy was used to help the teachers reflect on their teaching methods and improve the quality of their teaching. Also, during the last two weeks of the course the head of the English unit and an external observer conducted observations to monitor and assess teachers’ development. The findings of the study revealed the new framework helped teachers improve their lesson delivery and encouraged them to use new teaching techniques such as problem solving and a student-centred approach. However, the results also indicated there was a need for teacher training courses to help teachers understand the principles behind the different teaching methodology. In addition, a cultural factor was found to be influential, as some teachers were reserved about criticizing other teachers’ performance.

  9. Turkish New High School Physics Curriculum: Teachers' Views and Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Balta, Nuri; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the physics teacher’s views about changes made to physics curriculum andin-service training needs about new topics added. To achieve this purpose, a survey is conducted via Internet. Aquestionnaire of 11 Likert-type items was used as a data collection tool. Data supplied by the participants werecleaned and finally views of 100 teachers were taken into account. The analysis of the results demonstrated thatphysics teacher’s attitudes toward the changes ...

  10. TEACHERS NEEDED

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  11. Teachers’ Levels of Use of the 5E Instructional Model in the Implementation of Curriculum Reforms in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareed Mohamed Nawastheen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The 5E instructional model is an innovative approach for constructive classroom instruction. First introduced in competency-based curriculum reforms in Sri Lanka, this is an inquiry-based model that allows students to engage in the self-learning process, in which teachers act as facilitators. The aim of this study was to assess the levels of teachers’ participation (through Levels of Use or LoU in implementing the 5E instructional model in Sri Lanka. The Concerns-Based Adoption Model (CBAM was used to identify teachers’ LoU. Using the qualitative method, 9 out of 305 secondary school Geography teachers from the Kalutara district were selected as respondents in this survey. We used the basic interview protocol adopted from CBAM instruments. Our results revealed that many teachers were either non-users or were at the initial stage of use. The overall results revealed that the use of innovation was unsatisfactory. Thus, these teachers must be engaged in training programs, provided with the necessary materials and resources and must be continuously monitored to help those who want to qualify for a user profile and those who want to move up into the higher user profiles.

  12. A cannabinoid receptor 1 mutation proximal to the DRY motif results in constitutive activity and reveals intramolecular interactions involved in receptor activation

    OpenAIRE

    D’Antona, Aaron M.; Ahn, Kwang H.; Wang, Lei; Mierke, Dale F.; Lucas-Lenard, Jean; Kendall, Debra A

    2006-01-01

    Activation of a G-protein-coupled receptor involves changes in specific microdomain interactions within the transmembrane region of the receptor. Here, we have focused on the role of L207, proximal to the DRY motif of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 in the interconversion of the receptor resting and active states. Ligand binding analysis of the mutant receptor L207A revealed an enhanced affinity for agonists (three- to six-fold) and a diminished affinity for inverse agonists (19- to 35-fold)...

  13. Bully Busters Modified: The Effect of a Brief Universal Intervention on Elementary School Teacher Efficacy, Skills and Knowledge, and Reports of Student Victimization of Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgent, Rebecca A.; Higgins, Kristin K.; Lounsbery, Karyl L.; Behrend, Bonni Nickens; Keller, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of a brief, but intensive modified Bully Busters universal prevention program on measures of teacher efficacy, teacher self-efficacy, teacher skills and knowledge about peer victimization, and teacher-reports of students' peer victimization was conducted with 30 elementary school teachers. Paired-samples "t" tests revealed clinically…

  14. The Revealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    For those interested in insightful and critical analysis of issues regarding religion and its portrayal in the media, it can be difficult to sift and winnow through the myriad of material offered on the web. Jointly sponsored by the New York University Department of Journalism and New York Universityâ??s Center for Religion and Media, The Revealer is a well-thought out review of just such matters, and one that will be of great interest to persons with a penchant for the subject. The review is divided into three playful headings: Today, Timely, and Timeless. As might be expected, the Today section culls media coverage from that particular day. The Timely section offers links to media coverage of particularly germane issues and events, while the Timeless area offers some exclusive commentaries on photography and the occult and the relationship between science and religion. Finally, visitors can zero in on the religion of their choice by looking through the material as organized by faith, such as Hinduism, Paganism, and Christianity.

  15. Development and Autonomy : Conceptualising teachers’ continuing professional development in different national contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Wermke, Wieland

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates teachers’ perceptions of continuing professional development (CPD) in Germany and Sweden with a questionnaire study comprising a total of 711 mainly lower secondary teachers. Three conceptual terms are elaborated and explained. Teachers act in a CPD marketplace that is constituted by several sources of knowledge which offer opportunities for teachers’ development. How teachers act in the marketplace is a key part of their CPD culture. The study reveals similaritie...

  16. Teacher-student interactions and domain-specific motivation: The relationship between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and motivation in middle school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Julie Brockman

    2009-11-01

    This study examined interactions between middle school science students' perceptions of teacher-student interactions and their motivation for learning science. Specifically, in order to better understand factors affecting middle school students' motivation for science, this study investigated the interactions between middle school students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior in their science classroom and their efficacy, task value, mastery orientations, and goal orientation for learning science. This mixed methods study followed a sequential explanatory model (Cresswell & Plano-Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in two phases, with quantitative data in the first phase informing the selection of participants for the qualitative phase that followed. The qualitative phase also helped to clarify and explain results from the quantitative phase. Data mixing occurred between Phase One and Phase Two (participant selection) and at the interpretation level (explanatory) after quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately. Results from Phase One indicated that students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors were predictive of their efficacy for learning science, task value for learning science, mastery orientation, and performance orientation. These results were used to create motivation/perception composites, which were used in order to select students for the qualitative interviews. A total of 24 students with high motivation/high perceptions, low motivation/low perceptions, high motivation/low perceptions, and low motivation/high perceptions were selected in order to represent students whose profiles either supported or refuted the quantitative results. Results from Phase Two revealed themes relating to students' construction of their perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and dimensions of their efficacy and task value for science. Students who reported high motivation and high perceptions of teacher-student interactions during the quantitative phase described the most instances of teacher cooperative behaviors, such as teacher helpfulness and understanding. Conversely, students reporting low motivation and low perceptions of teacher-student interactions described the most instances of teacher oppositional behavior, such as harsh and impatient behaviors. An in-depth description of categories and subcategories is also provided. This study concludes with an interpretive analysis of quantitative and qualitative results considered both separately and together. Implications for middle grades science education are discussed, including recommendations for behavior management, scaffolding students' transition to middle school, making explicit connections to science careers, and providing opportunities for small successes within the science classroom. Implications for science teacher education, limitations of the study, and future research directions are also discussed.

  17. Effects of Study Abroad on Teachers’ Self-perceptions: A Study of Chinese EFL Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on an enquiry into a group of 91 Chinese secondary EFL teachers with SA experience in the UK. Drawing on questionnaire data and 20 teachers’ interview narratives, the study examines how SA (study abroad influenced their self-perceptions on EFL teaching in three aspects, namely, language proficiency, teaching ideology and NES (native English speaking-NNES (nonnative English speaking teacher debate. The enquiry revealed that the length of SA was a powerful factor in determining teachers’ attitudes toward their jobs and their own capacities to perform them successfully. These findings were discussed with suggestions for making SA experience an effective and sustainable path for EFL teachers’ professional development. Based on the findings, implications and suggestions are proposed, which are applicable not only to Chinese EFL teachers but beyond.

  18. Computer Use by School Teachers in Teaching-learning Process

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    Jyoti Bhalla

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Developing countries have a responsibility not merely to provide computers for schools, but also to foster a habit of infusing a variety of ways in which computers can be integrated in teaching-learning amongst the end users of these tools. Earlier researches lacked a systematic study of the manner and the extent of computer-use by teachers. The current study examined a comprehensive investigation of 300 Central School teachers’ use of computers in India. Towards this end, a questionnaire was constructed that listed essential dimensions for teachers’ use of computers: Computer Aided Learning (CAL, Computer Managed Instruction (CMI, and Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI. The findings revealed that teachers often used computers to update subject knowledge and teaching skills, develop lesson plans, prepare additional instructional material, notify relevant information via internet, prepare question banks. They sometimes used computers for showing something in the class, showcasing students’ work on school-website, preparing test papers, simulations, games, students’ assignments. They had either rarely or never used computers for presenting entire lesson, students’ classroom presentations, tutorials, sharing information with parents, publishing homework, giving tests to students – either offline or online, maintaining students’ records, and individualized instructions. The analysis indicated that amongst the three categories of computer use, CAL was the most popular category of computer use whereas CAI was the least popular among teachers. The results help to demystify seeming inconsistency and variation with regard to computer use among teachers. The identification of comprehensive ways of computer use empowers stakeholders with vital information and may assist implementation of appropriate measures to fully infuse computers in teaching-learning process.

  19. Teachers' Concerns About Biotechnology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Sadler, Troy D.; Koroly, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The impacts of biotechnology are found in nearly all sectors of society from health care and food products to environmental issues and energy sources. Despite the significance of biotechnology within the sciences, it has not become a prominent trend in science education. In this study, we seek to more fully identify biology teachers' concerns about biotechnology instruction and their reported practices. Consistent with the Stages of Concern framework as modified by Hord et al., we investigated teachers' awareness, informational, personal, management, consequences, collaboration, and refocusing concerns about biotechnology teaching by employing a qualitative design that allowed for the emergence of teachers' ideas. Twenty high school life science teachers attending a biotechnology institute were interviewed using an interview protocol specifically designed to target various Stages of Concern. Although the Stages of Concern framework guided the development of interview questions in order to target a wide range of concerns, data analysis employed a grounded theory approach wherein patterns emerged from teachers' own words and were constantly compared with each other to generate larger themes. Our results have potential to provide guidance for professional development providers and curriculum developers committed to supporting initial implementation of biotechnology education. Recommendations include supporting teacher development of biotechnology content knowledge; promoting strategies for obtaining, storing and managing biotechnology equipment and materials; providing opportunities for peer teaching as a means of building teacher confidence; and highlighting career opportunities in biotechnology and the intersections of biotechnology and everyday life.

  20. From Rigid Dichotomy to Measured Contingency. Hong Kong Preservice Teachers' Discursive Construction of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study into the discursive construction of teacher identities amongst six preservice English language teachers in Hong Kong. While teacher identity construction has been conceptualized as an evolving process of becoming a teacher, some preservice teachers regard their professional identities as rigid, resulting

  1. The relationship between the critical thinking skills and the academic language proficiency of prospective teachers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M M (Mary), Grosser; Mirna, Nel.

    Full Text Available We report on the relationships that exist between the critical thinking skills and the academic language proficiency ofa group of first-year prospective teachers at a South African university (n = 89). The results revealed the nature of the critical thinking skills as well as the academic language p [...] roficiency of the students. Significant correlations between academic language proficiency and making inferences, as well as between academic language proficiency and critical thinking as a general competency, were noted. The article concludes with recommendations on how to enhance critical thinking and language proficiency in the teacher-training curriculum.

  2. Framing the debate over teacher unions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Smith

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The power of teacher unions in the U.S. has waned since the 2010 mid-term elections.  The convergence of business conservatism and teacher accountability ideologies has led to an intense targeting of public teacher unions as a problem, both economically and educationally.  Using the target audience framework of Schneider and Ingram (1993, I break down the framing used in the present anti-union movement and explore a local example of anti-union legislation in Pennsylvania.  The analysis reveals a socially constructed dichotomy in which victimized children are pitted against greedy teachers.  To stem this wave of anti-unionism, teacher unions must recognize their position as public contenders and rearticulate their message using child-first rhetoric.

  3. Antecedents of teachers’ emotions in the classroom: an intraindividual approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Eva S.; Keller, Melanie M.; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Taxer, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a preexisting, but as yet empirically untested theoretical model, the present study investigated antecedents of teachers’ emotions in the classroom. More specifically, the relationships between students’ motivation and discipline and teachers’ enjoyment and anger were explored, as well as if these relationships are mediated by teachers’ subjective appraisals (goal conduciveness and coping potential). The study employed an intraindividual approach by collecting data through a diary. The sample consisted of 39 teachers who each participated with one of their 9th or 10th grade mathematics classes (N = 758 students). Both teachers and students filled out diaries for 2–3 weeks pertaining to 8.10 lessons on average (N = 316 lessons). Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that students’ motivation and discipline explained 24% of variance in teachers’ enjoyment and 26% of variance in teachers’ anger. In line with theoretical assumptions, after introducing teachers’ subjective appraisals as a mediating mechanism into the model, the explained variance systematically increased to 65 and 61%, for teachers’ enjoyment and anger respectively. The effects of students’ motivation and discipline level on teachers’ emotions were partially mediated by teachers’ appraisals of goal conduciveness and coping potential. The findings imply that since teachers’ emotions depend to a large extent on subjective evaluations of a situation, teachers should be able to directly modify their emotional experiences during a lesson through cognitive reappraisals.

  4. Teacher Test Accountability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Ludlow

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the high stakes of teacher testing, there is no doubt that every teacher test should meet the industry guidelines set forth in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Unfortunately, however, there is no public or private business or governmental agency that serves to certify or in any other formal way declare that any teacher test does, in fact, meet the psychometric recommendations stipulated in the Standards. Consequently, there are no legislated penalties for faulty products (tests nor are there opportunities for test takers simply to raise questions about a test and to have their questions taken seriously by an impartial panel. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems (NES in their 1999 Massachusetts Educator Certification Test (MECT Technical Report, and more specifically, to identify those technical characteristics of the MECT that are inconsistent with the Standards. A second purpose of this article is to call for the establishment of a standing test auditing organization with investigation and sanctioning power. The significance of the present analysis is twofold: a psychometric results for the MECT are similar in nature to psychometric results presented as evidence of test development flaws in an Alabama class-action lawsuit dealing with teacher certification (an NES-designed testing system; and b there was no impartial enforcement agency to whom complaints about the Alabama tests could be brought, other than the court, nor is there any such agency to whom complaints about the Massachusetts tests can be brought. I begin by reviewing NES's role in Allen v. Alabama State Board of Education, 81-697-N. Next I explain the purpose and interpretation of standard item analysis procedures and statistics. Finally, I present results taken directly from the 1999 MECT Technical Report and compare them to procedures, results, and consequences of procedures followed by NES in Alabama.

  5. Investigation of Pre-service Teachers’ Attitudes towards Teaching Profession in a Teaching Formation Certification Program(SDÜ Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin ÖZKAN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards teaching profession were examined using different variables. The results reveals that, pre-service teacher candidates are interested in the teaching profession, enjoyed teaching profession, and have a higher level of commitment to teaching profession. Moreover pre-service teachers’ attitudes toward the professional responsibility and the social reputation of the teaching profession were positive according to the data analyzed. There is significant difference were found in terms of the interest of teaching profession, enjoying the profession, Professional commitment in terms of participants’ age and working in a job. However, there is no significant difference found according to the level of education, their graduation area, and the job sector. There is also significant difference was found in the reputation of teaching profession and professional responsibility in terms of the job sector pre-service teachers’ employed.

  6. Processes of negotiation of meanings on algebraic thinking in a community of practice of pre-service mathematics teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina de Costa Trindade Cyrino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We presented in this paper results of a research which aimed to investigate how the community of practice context of pre-service mathematics teacher education collaborates for learning on algebraic thinking by these future teachers. We analyzed, taking into account the Social Theory of Learning developed by Wenger (1998 as a theoretical frame, processes of negotiation of meanings present in participants' algebraic thinking in the development of tasks in one of the actions of the project "Mathematical Education of Teachers of Mathematics" inside the program "Universidade sem Fronteiras". This analysis allowed us to define some forms of member participation and explicit reification of algebraic thinking, due to some interactions in the processes of negotiation of meanings, which revealed changes in the identity of participants in become teachers of mathematics.

  7. PBS Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) Teachers web site provides access to thousands of lesson plans, teaching activities, videos, and interactive games and simulations for all levels of instruction, Pre-K to 12. These resources are correlated to state, national, and Canadian educational standards and are tied to PBS' on-air and online programming (NOVA, Nature, and others). They are organized by topic (math, science and technology, social studies, and others). Within each topic area the resources are searchable by grade level and subtopic. Other materials include links to blogs on educational topics, news articles and event announcements, a frequently-asked-questions feature, and information on PBS' professional development program, Teacherline.

  8. Rational and Caring Teachers: Reconstructing Teacher Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstine, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Examines means of achieving dispositional educational aims (rationality and caring) by redesigning teacher education programs. Prospective teachers must be prepared to cultivate rational, caring dispositions in themselves to encourage these dispositions in their students. (SM)

  9. An investigation of preschool teachers' recognition of possible child abuse and neglect in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Sevinç Ç?rak; Sönmez, Sibel; Dereobal?, Nilay

    2015-03-01

    Child abuse and neglect have a potentially deleterious impact on children's physical, social, and psychological development. Preschool teachers may play a crucial role in the protection, early detection, and the intervention of child abuse and neglect, as they have the opportunity to establish a close contact with the families and to observe day-to-day changes in pupils' behavior. The main purpose of this study is to investigate preschool teachers' experiences and characteristics in relation to their awareness of possible child abuse and neglect signs. A questionnaire survey was designed and administered to 197 preschool teachers who work for the public preschools in the Izmir province of Turkey. In addition to the questionnaire items, a 34-item Likert-type scale measuring the level of familiarity with possible signs of child abuse and neglect was developed. This scale had an internal consistency of 0.94. The results revealed that 10.65% of preschool teachers had training regarding violence against children and 2.03% of them had training in child abuse and neglect. Overall, 35% of all teachers reported that they had prior experience with pupils who were exposed to child abuse and neglect. Moreover, statistical analyses indicated that being a parent and having training in child abuse and neglect, having experience with maltreated children, and having higher job status were significant factors in preschool teachers' ability to recognize the possible signs of child abuse and neglect. Our results support that teacher training in child abuse and neglect can play an important role in preschool teachers' awareness of the possible signs of child abuse and neglect. PMID:24928252

  10. Teachers' Views of Moral Education Topics - Taiwan and the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huey-Ya; Davidman, Patricia; Petersen, George; Thomas, R. Murray

    1998-01-01

    In a questionnaire survey, 94 teachers in Taiwan and 140 in the United States judged which topics among 20 moral issues would be appropriate subjects of study in grade six of the primary school and in the first year of the university. The issues related to religion, ethnicity, gender, health care, crime, alcohol, tobacco, gambling, guns, government corruption, birth control, caring for the elderly, and television programming. The results revealed great diversity of opinion within each group of respondents. No single topic was approved by all teachers in either group, nor was any topic rejected by all. Among the 234 teachers, no two offered precisely the same configuration of answers over the 20 topics. Nevertheless, some group trends could be identified for individual topics. For example, in both countries the great majority of respondents would teach about industrial pollution, whereas very few would approve of trying to identify the best religion. In the rationales teachers offered in support of their choices, the four reasons that figured most prominently in both countries were that a topic would contribute to the nation's welfare, would help students to make wise decisions, would be interesting for students, and would represent a peaceful way to face social problems.

  11. Physicians as Patient Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Brunton, Stephen A.

    1984-01-01

    Physicians have a central role in educating patients and the public in the elements of personal health maintenance. To be an effective teacher, one must recognize the learning needs of each patient and use methods of information transfer that will result in comprehension and compliance. To bring about a change in life-style, one must also have an understanding of a patient's health beliefs and the determinants of human behavior. Using this information together with behavior modification strat...

  12. Documenting Elementary Teachers' Sustainability of Instructional Practices: A Mixed Method Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Bridget A.

    School reform programs focus on making educational changes; however, research on interventions past the funded implementation phase to determine what was sustained is rarely done (Beery, Senter, Cheadle, Greenwald, Pearson, et al., 2005). This study adds to the research on sustainability by determining what instructional practices, if any, of the Teaching SMARTRTM professional development program that was implemented from 2005--2008 in elementary schools with teachers in grades third through eighth were continued, discontinued, or adapted five years post-implementation (in 2013). Specifically, this study sought to answer the following questions: What do teachers who participated in Teaching SMARTRTM and district administrators share about the sustainability of Teaching SMARTRTM practices in 2013? What teaching strategies do teachers who participated in the program (2005--2008) use in their science classrooms five years postimplementation (2013)? What perceptions about the roles of females in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) do teachers who participated in the program (2005--2008) have five years later (2013)? And, What classroom management techniques do the teachers who participated in the program (2005--2008) use five years post implementation (2013)? A mixed method approach was used to answer these questions. Quantitative teacher survey data from 23 teachers who participated in 2008 and 2013 were analyzed in SAS v. 9.3. Descriptive statistics were reported and paired t-tests were conducted to determine mean differences by survey factors identified from an exploratory factor analysis, principal axis factoring, and parallel analysis conducted with teacher survey baseline data (2005). Individual teacher change scores (2008 and 2013) for identified factors were computed using the Reliable Change Index statistic. Qualitative data consisted of interviews with two district administrators and three teachers who responded to the survey in both years (2008 and 2013). Additionally, a classroom observation was conducted with one of the interviewed teachers in 2013. Qualitative analyses were conducted following the constant comparative method and were facilitated by ATLAS.ti v. 6.2, a qualitative analysis software program. Qualitative findings identified themes at the district level that influenced teachers' use of Teaching SMARTRTM strategies. All the themes were classified as obstacles to sustainability: economic downturn, turnover of teachers and lack of hiring, new reform policies, such as Race to the Top, Student Success Act, Common Core State Standards, and mandated blocks of time for specific content. Results from the survey data showed no statistically significant difference through time in perceived instructional practices except for a perceived decrease in the use of hands-on instructional activities from 2008 to 2013. Analyses conducted at the individual teacher level found change scores were statistically significant for a few teachers, but overall, teachers reported similarly on the teacher survey at both time points. This sustainability study revealed the lack of facilitating factors to support the continuation of reform practices; however, teachers identified strategies to continue to implement some of the reform practices through time in spite of a number of system-wide obstacles. This sustainability study adds to the literature by documenting obstacles to sustainability in this specific context, which overlap with what is known in the literature. Additionally, the strategies teachers identified to overcome some of the obstacles to implement reform practices and the recommendations by district level administrators add to the literature on how stakeholders may support sustainability of reform through time.

  13. Revealing Interactions between Human Resources, Quality of Life and Environmental Changes within Socially-oriented Observations : Results from the IPY PPS Arctic Project in the Russian North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    Socially-oriented Observations (SOO) in the Russian North have been carried out within multidisciplinary IPY PPS Arctic project under the leadership of Norway and supported by the Research Council of Norway as well as Russian Academy of Sciences. The main objective of SOO is to increase knowledge and observation of changes in quality of life conditions (state of natural environment including climate and biota, safe drinking water and foods, well-being, employment, social relations, access to health care and high quality education, etc.) and - to reveal trends in human capital and capacities (health, demography, education, creativity, spiritual-cultural characteristics and diversity, participation in decision making, etc.). SOO have been carried out in industrial cities as well as sparsely populated rural and nature protection areas in observation sites situated in different bioms (from coastal tundra to southern taiga zone) of Murmansk, Arkhangelsk Oblast and Republic of Komi. SOO were conducted according to the international protocol included in PPS Arctic Manual. SOO approaches based both on local people's perceptions and statistics help to identify main issues and targets for life quality, human capital and environment improvement and thus to distinguish leading SOO indicators for further monitoring. SOO have revealed close interaction between human resources, quality of life and environmental changes. Negative changes in human capital (depopulation, increasing unemployment, aging, declining physical and mental health, quality of education, loss of traditional knowledge, marginalization etc.), despite peoples' high creativity and optimism are becoming the major driving force effecting both the quality of life and the state of environment and overall sustainability. Human induced disturbances such as uncontrolled forests cuttings and poaching are increasing. Observed rapid changes in climate and biota (ice and permafrost melting, tundra shrubs getting taller and more numerous, etc.) have become an add factor in accelerating or influencing land use and overall sustainability. In relation to the future sustainability in nature and society it is northern communities, their adaptive capacities and creativity that are decisive. SOO enables to identify and monitor the implementation of local strategies that will stimulate the human capital improvement and act not only as the agent of economic modernization but as an important solutions for better state of environment and society.

  14. Ensinar ciências na perspectiva da sustentabilidade: barreiras e dificuldades reveladas por professores de biologia em formação / Teaching science in the perspective of sustainability: barriers and difficulties revealed by biology teachers in training

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Magnólia Fernandes Florêncio de, Araújo; Maria Arminda, Pedrosa.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A presente investigação parte de uma visão global sobre as dificuldades relativas ao ensino de biologia na perspectiva do desenvolvimento sustentável e da formação de professores dessa área para atuarem no ensino básico. Tem como objetivo identificar os temas relacionados ao ambiente e ao desenvolvi [...] mento sustentável que são considerados difíceis de serem ensinados, caracterizando os motivos dessas dificuldades. A pesquisa se desenvolveu numa abordagem qualitativa e quantitativa. De forma geral, identificou-se que os participantes da pesquisa indicam dificuldades em incluir questões sobre desenvolvimento sustentável em suas futuras aulas e que a ausência da abordagem multidisciplinar ou interdisciplinar corresponde a uma razão importante para as dificuldades em ensinar na perspectiva da sustentabilidade, uma vez que isso possibilitaria aos alunos fazer uma análise do ambiente do ponto de vista das dimensões sociais e econômicas, além de poderem avaliar os aspectos éticos a elas relacionados. Abstract in english This research is part of an overview of the difficulties related to biology education in the perspective of sustainable development and teacher training in this area to work in basic education. It aims to identify the issues related to environment and sustainable development which are considered har [...] d to be taught, characterizing the reasons for such difficulties. The research has been developed in a qualitative and quantitative approach. Overall, we found that the survey participants indicate problems to include matters on sustainable development in their future classes and that the absence of a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary approach represents an important reason for the difficulties in teaching from the perspective of sustainability, since this would enable students to analyze the environment from the point of view of social and economic dimensions, in addition to assessing the ethical aspects related to them.

  15. Results, Results, Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Dale

    2000-01-01

    Given the amount of time, energy, and money devoted to provincial achievement exams in Canada, it is disturbing that Alberta students and teachers feel so pressured and that the exams do not accurately reflect what students know. Research shows that intelligence has an (untested) emotional component. (MLH)

  16. The Atlas-3D project - IX. The merger origin of a fast and a slow rotating Early-Type Galaxy revealed with deep optical imaging: first results

    CERN Document Server

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Serra, Paolo; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Ferriere, Etienne; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovic, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    The mass assembly of galaxies leaves imprints in their outskirts, such as shells and tidal tails. The frequency and properties of such fine structures depend on the main acting mechanisms - secular evolution, minor or major mergers - and on the age of the last substantial accretion event. We use this to constrain the mass assembly history of two apparently relaxed nearby Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) selected from the Atlas-3D sample, NGC 680 and NGC 5557. Our ultra deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope reach 29 mag/arcsec^2 in the g-band. They reveal very low-surface brightness (LSB) filamentary structures around these ellipticals. Among them, a gigantic 160 kpc long tail East of NGC 5557 hosts gas-rich star-forming objects. NGC 680 exhibits two major diffuse plumes apparently connected to extended HI tails, as well as a series of arcs and shells. Comparing the outer stellar and gaseous morphology of the two ellipticals with that predicted from models of colliding galax...

  17. Revealing the Biodiversity in Chironomidae (Diptera): Results From an Emergence Trap Study of a Ravine Spring-run in Northern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B. A.; Rasmussen, A. K.; Pescador, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    Research for this project was conducted as part of a larger scale investigation of the aquatic insect fauna of a Florida spring-run ravine system that focused especially on stonefly and caddisfly taxa. The present research focused largely on documenting chironomid midge species diversity, emergence phenology, and overall composition by utilizing repeated emergence trap sampling at a single site within a first order, forested ravine stream in the Florida panhandle area. The approximate two year survey revealed a rich and distinctive chironomid fauna, with a variety of feeding types and microhabitat specific taxa. Many of the study species were considered to be common and widespread; however, several species and two genera were new records for the state. Several undescribed species were also noted. Emergence occurred in all months but with greatest densities generally recorded from December through March of the second year. The single location examined to date on this ravine stream ranks near the upper range of chironomid species richness reported on a world-wide basis for first order lotic systems. Other aspects of composition and apparent community patterns, was well as the importance and significance of first order stream biodiversity, are examined and discussed.

  18. The Mathematical Tale of Two Teachers: A Longitudinal Study Relating Mathematics Instructional Practices to Level of Intellectual Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, JoAnn; Meier, Sherry L.; Lubinski, Cheryl A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article the development of two teachers as they make the transition from pre-service teachers to experienced teachers is examined. While these teachers participated in the same mathematics methods course and similar collaborative environments in their practicum experiences, their mathematics classroom instructional practices revealed stark…

  19. Connected and Culturally Embedded Beliefs: Chinese and US Teachers Talk about How Their Students Best Learn Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Christopher A.; Perry, Michelle; Sims, Linda M.; Miller, Kevin F.; Fang, Ge

    2008-01-01

    This study compares US and Chinese elementary mathematics teachers' beliefs about how students learn mathematics. Interviews with teachers in each country revealed that Chinese and US teachers have distinct ways of thinking about how mathematics should be taught and how students learn. Many Chinese teachers talked about developing students'…

  20. An Interpretive Inquiry of the Case Law of Teacher Evaluation in the Southern Regional Education Board States: Forecasting Pressing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder-Wilkerson, Kathy S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze case law related to teacher evaluation between 1980 and 2008 in the SREB states to determine the problems associated with teacher evaluation and if these problems were documented in the literature. Content analysis of teacher dismissal cases revealed many types of teacher evaluation problems. The two most…

  1. State Teacher Evaluation and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Gregory J.; David, Kristine A.; Rodgers, Deborah; German, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Current accountability trends suggest an increasing role in state mandates regarding teacher evaluation. With various evaluation models and components serving as the basis for quality teaching, teacher education programs need to recognize the role teacher evaluation plays and incorporate aspects where appropriate. This article makes that case and…

  2. English as a foreign language—teachers’ perspectives on implementing online instruction in the Iranian EFL context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dashtestani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to explore Iranian English as a foreign language (EFL teachers’ perceptions on the implementation of online EFL instruction. A mixed-methods design, including semi-structured interviews and questionnaires, was employed for the specific purposes of this study. A total of 242 EFL teachers participated in the questionnaire phase of the study. In addition, 46 EFL teachers participated in the interview phase of the study. The teachers worked at a number of universities, schools and language-teaching institutions in Iran. Results suggest that although the Iranian EFL teachers adopted moderately positive attitudes towards the implementation of online instruction, the majority of them preferred blended instruction to online instruction. At the same time, the study revealed that the implementation of online EFL instruction in Iran is challenging due to a number of perceived impediments and obstacles. The most considerable perceived challenges to the implementation of online EFL instruction comprise lack of online facilities and resources, lack of interaction in online instruction, cultural resistances to online instruction and teachers’ limited knowledge of online instruction. The findings of this study provided crucial insights into teachers’ perspectives on a number of measures that can be adopted to facilitate the integration of online instruction in the EFL context of Iran. The findings would provide valuable insights for educational authorities and course designers to integrate online instruction into the EFL curriculum.

  3. TXESS Revolution: Utilizing TERC's EarthLabs Cryosphere Module to Support Professional Development of Texas Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, M.; Ellins, K. K.; Polito, E. J.; Castillo Comer, C. A.; Stocks, E.; Manganella, K.; Ledley, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    TERC’s EarthLabs project provides rigorous and engaging Earth and environmental science labs. Four existing modules illustrate sequences for learning science concepts through data analysis activities and hands-on experiments. A fifth module, developed with NSF, comprises a series of linked inquiry based activities focused on the cryosphere to help students understand concepts around change over time on multiple and embedded time scales. Teachers recruited from the NSF-OEDG-sponsored Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution teacher professional development program conducted a pedagogical review of the Cryosphere EarthLabs module and provided feedback on how well the materials matched high school needs in Texas and were aligned with state and national standards. Five TXESS Revolution teachers field tested the materials in their classrooms and then trained other TXESS Revolution teachers on their implementation during spring and summer 2010. Here we report on the results of PD delivery during the summer 2010 TXESS Revolution summer institute as determined by (1) a set of evaluation instruments that included a pre-post concept map activity to assess changes in workshop teachers’ understanding of the concepts presented, a pre-post test content knowledge test, and a pre-post survey of teachers’ comfort in teaching the Texas Earth and Space Science standards addressed by the module; (2) teacher reflections; and (3) focus group responses. The findings reveal that the teachers liked the module activities and felt they could use them to teach Environmental and Earth Science. They appreciated that the sequence of activities contributed to a deeper understanding and observed that the variety of methods used to present the information accommodates different learning styles. Information about the cryosphere was new to all the teachers. The content knowledge tests reveal that although teachers made appreciable gains, their understanding of cryosphere, how it changes over time, and it’s role in Earth’s climate system remains weak. Our results clearly reflect the challenges of addressing the complexity of climate science and critical need for climate literacy education.

  4. Mathematics teachers' beliefs and curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, Boris; Herrington, Anthony

    2003-05-01

    This paper discusses the role of mathematics teachers' beliefs and their impact on curriculum reform. It is argued that teachers' beliefs about the teaching and learning mathematics are critical in determining the pace of curriculum reform. Educational change is a complex process in which teachers hold strong beliefs about the quality and the process of innovation. Curriculum implementation may only occur through sufferance as many teachers are suspicious of reform in mathematics education given its equivocal success over the past decades. It is not surprising then that many teachers, when they come to enact the curriculum in their classes, rely more on their own beliefs than on current trends in pedagogy. These beliefs, conservative as they might be, have their own rationality in the practical and daily nature of the teaching profession, and in the compelling influence of educational systems from which these teachers are paradoxically the social product. The literature indicates that many of these teachers hold behaviourist beliefs, a fact that has strong implications for the success of constructivist-oriented curriculum reform. In general, studies of teachers' pedagogical beliefs reveal the extreme complexity of bringing about educational change, and largely explains the failure of many past reform endeavours.

  5. The Changing Role Of The Innovative Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoel, Ricardo; Geraedts, Hay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a research about the changing role and competences of teachers and the willingness of the teachers to change. The researchers developed and conducted a survey at Fontys University of Applied Sciences department engineering to find out how teachers teach and how they would want to teach. The conclusion drawn from this research results in five subjects of attention: 1 To investigate new teaching competences 2 To investigate new teaching strategies 3 To develop coll...

  6. Enrich Practicum to Cultivate Effective Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Evan Ortlieb

    2013-01-01

    To advance systems of teacher education, curriculums must be enhanced with relevant activities aligned with practicum experiences to enhance the value of their education. Acting as a bridge to connect knowledge learned at the university and practical teacher applications in schools throughout the community, a research project involving several constructive activities was embedded within four literacy courses during the last two years of teacher candidates’ undergraduate education. Results ...

  7. Instrument of Primary School Teacher Competency

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulghani M. Alnoor; Ma Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The study aimed to investigating the Primary School Teacher Competency (PSTC) and design an PSTC instrument to reflect state standard and use this instrument to compare and evaluate primary school teacher competency. Approach: For this reason, the researcher formulated the following question. What are the necessary teaching competencies of Primary School Teachers (PSTC)? To find answer to the above mentioned questions. Results: The study used the descriptive research approa...

  8. What inspires South African student teachers for their future profession?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Charl, Wolhuter; Hannes, van der Walt; Ferdinand, Potgieter; Louisa, Meyer; Thapelo, Mamiala.

    Full Text Available The need for an inspired professional teacher corps to haul South African school education out of its current low level of quality was the driving force behind this project. Its aim was to determine what counted as sources of inspiration for student teachers and hence for future teachers. Based on a [...] conceptual-theoretical study, a questionnaire that could probe student teachers' sources of inspiration was completed by a sample of student teachers (n = 1,683). A factor analysis of their responses revealed the following as their sources of inspiration, from most to least important: (extended) family, religion, the teacher education institution, teaching practice, friends, and personal life. A comparison with similar research elsewhere revealed that, in this sample of respondents, considerations, such as education being the only accessible profession or being forced to enter the teaching profession because of economic circumstances, did not figure at all.

  9. Teacher Candidates’ Strategies for Coping with Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahtiyar Eraslan Çapan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore how teacher candidates cope with stress according to their gender, age, and major. The data for the study was collected via a personal information form and the Multidimensional Intimate Coping Questionnaire (MICQ with the participation of 307 university students, 183 female (59.6 % and 124 male (40.4. To analyze the data, for the gender and age variables an independent samples t-test, and for the major variable, a one-way ANOVA test was utilized. The results revealed that there was a significant difference in the gender variable in the subscales of ‚Negative and Passive Coping?, ‚Seeking External Support? and ‚Belief in Religion? subscale for the female students. The difference was significant for the male students in the subscale of ‚Use of Alcohol and Drugs?. Also, according to the age variable, the difference was again significant for the participants between the ages of 23 and 31 in the subscale of ‚Positive and Active Coping? and ‚Supporting Oneself?. Moreover, there was a significant difference major variable in the subscales of ‚Denial/Mental Disengagement? for special education students, and ‚Belief in Religion ? subscale for students in science departments. As a result of the study, teacher candidates should be aware of the existing and potential stress sources and problems, and also the problems they will face in their profession. In addition, they should be equipped with the necessary skills to be able to cope with those factors effectively.

  10. A Study of Environmental Awareness of Student Teachers and Teachers in Relation of Their Emotional Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at finding out the relationship between environmental awareness and emotional intelligence of student teachers and teachers. The sample of the study consisted of 200 student teachers (100 male and 100 female and also of 100 teachers (50 male and 50 female. The sample was taken from 15 self-financed B.Ed. colleges of Ghaziabad District of CCS University, Meerut (UP. Environmental awareness measure scale by Dr. P. K. Jha and emotional intelligence inventory by Dr. S. K. Mangal and Mrs. Shubhra Mangal was used for assessing the environmental awareness and emotional intelligence of student teachers and teachers. Data was analyzed by using mean, SD, t-test and by Pearson Product Moment Correlation Technique. The results showed that there was no significant difference between male and female student teachers and teachers regarding environmental awareness and emotional intelligence. The results also showed that the environmental awareness of male and female student teachers was also found to be slightly positively but not significantly correlated with emotional intelligence. The environmental awareness of male teachers was found to be moderately, positively and significantly correlated with emotional intelligence. On the other hand the environmental awareness of female teachers was found to be slightly positively but not significantly correlated with emotional intelligence.

  11. Factors affecting secondary science teachers' appraisal and adoption of technology-rich project-based learning environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehmann, April Lynn

    We are learning much about how to design project-based curriculum that leverages technology, but we know less about the everyday needs of teachers and the implicit and explicit factors that influence their curriculum adoption decisions. Given that teachers are the gatekeepers of their classrooms, it is essential that designers and reformers understand the criteria teachers use to support their judgments regarding the appraisal and adoption of innovative curricula if they wish to see widespread use of their designs. Toward this end, this dissertation examines the perceptions of teachers as they appraise and consider the adoption of one innovative, technology-rich, project-based curriculum. Thirty secondary science teachers in Indiana were recruited. This study took place in two phases. During the first phase, data consisted of teachers' comments in the form of "think aloud's" and observations as teachers interacted with an Internet-based science program: Web-Based Inquiry Science Environment. Through an examination of these data, six implicit factors were identified: Trust, Identity, Self-Efficacy, Process Goals, Situational Constraints, and Contextual Idiosyncrasies. Examination of the content related to these categories suggests that curricular adoption is not simply an academic process but is also a personal one. Also, trust between the teacher and both the change facilitator and the innovation plays an influential role. Data collected during the second phase included item analysis of factors that emerged during semi structured interviews and rated by the teachers in terms of their importance in influencing their adoption of the WISE-water quality program. Teacher identified factors were collapsed into 26 explicit factors and analyzed using cluster analysis, resulting in five clusters of teacher profiles: Logistically Focused, Subject-Matter Focused, Scaffolded Optimists, Accountability Focused, and Pedagogically Savvy. This study reveals that factors affecting teachers' decision-making processes extend beyond those of which they are consciously aware. Additionally, there is no one set of factors important to all teachers. Instead, different groups of teachers have different concerns and therefore different needs. A central contribution of this study is the identification of cross-cutting concerns. Additionally, this study provides practical implications for both designers and change agents interested in facilitating technology-infused curricular innovations.

  12. Teacher Education in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Teacher education programmes within Canada are markedly different in structure and duration across the provinces, which affects programme delivery for teacher candidates and their opportunities for clinical practice. This paper provides a brief overview of Canadian pre-service teacher education, a summary of new teacher induction and mentoring…

  13. Effect of Gender on Teachers’ Organizational Culture Perception: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Ipek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the strength of the effect of gender, if there is any, on the perceptions of teachers on organizational culture in a meta-analysis. 27 studies consisting of Master’s theses and PhD dissertations were chosen from the National Thesis/Dissertation Database provided by Turkish Council of Higher Education. The sample consists of 9563 teachers. Of these, 5402 are female and 4161 are male. The variables of school type, publication type, and publication year, the region in which the research was carried on, settlement, positions and teaching levels of the teachers, type of schools, data collection instrument, and researcher’s gender were taken as moderator variables in the study. As a result of the study, a low level but statistically significant effect size was found in favor of female teachers according to fixed effect model (d=0.021 and random effect model (d=0.010. The moderator analysis revealed that, the publication type (p=0.003, positions of the teachers (being teacher or manager (p=0.017, the region and the settlement in which the research was conducted (p=0.034; p=0.022 and researcher’s gender (p=0.006 were determined as moderator variables with the average effect size. On the other hand, school type (public or private (p=0.223, school level (p=0.552, teaching fields of the teachers (p=0.786, data collection instrument (p=0.672 were not determined as moderator variables with the average effect size. In terms of the gender variable, the study findings indicate that there is an increasing tendency in the effect sizes in favor of female teachers.

  14. Emotional intelligence (EQ levels of the senior students in secondary education system in Turkey based on teacher’s perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Titrek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available As in all sciences, interpersonal interactions develop new approaches. One of them is emotional intelligence (EQ, “observing and understanding capacity own and other’s emotion, definition of different type of emotion; and knowledge that you learned using to know other’s emotion and understanding. The purpose of this study is to determine EQ competence acquisition levels of senior students in secondary education system according to teacher perceptions. A survey method was used as the main research approach. Participants were 262 teachers who were selected from seven secondary schools in Adapazari that were selected randomly. Research questions were tested with ANOVA that includes Observed Power and Partial Eta analysis and t-test that includes Cohen d analysis. Results revealed that students, who have higher academic achievements, have the highest level in EQ traits as well. Science and Anatolian Secondary Schools’ students have higher EQ levels as cognitive skills.

  15. Towards Development of OER Derived Custom-Built Open Textbooks: A Baseline Survey of University Teachers at the University of the South Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Prasad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Textbook prices have soared over the years, with several studies revealing many university students are finding it difficult to afford textbooks. Fortunately, two innovations – open educational resources (OER and open textbooks – hold the potential to increase textbook affordability. Experts, though, have stated the obvious: that students can save money through open textbooks only if teachers are willing to develop and use them. Considering both the high price of textbooks and the benefits offered by OER and open textbooks, the aim of this study was to assess the University of the South Pacific (USP teachers’ willingness towards development of custom-built OER derived open textbooks for their courses with a focus on providing a foundation for strategies to promote open textbook development at USP. This paper reports the findings of an online survey of 39 USP teachers. The results show that 17 teachers were willing to develop OER derived custom-built open textbooks for their courses. Besides this, there are findings relating to six important areas: teachers’ motivation to develop open textbooks; the frequency of more than one prescribed textbook per course; teachers’ awareness of the costs of the prescribed textbooks; the average cost of prescribed textbooks in a course; teachers’ awareness and utilization of OER and open textbooks; and teachers’ perceived barriers to using OER and types of challenges they encounter while using OER. These findings have been discussed in relation to research studies on OER and open textbooks.

  16. Teaching Reaction Stoichiometry: Exploring and Acknowledging Nigerian Chemistry Teachers Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoade Ejiwale Okanlawon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a growing interest in studies of students’ problem-solving strategies and difficulties, and misconceptionsregarding stoichiometry, little is known about the way teachers understand and teach reaction stoichiometry. This articlepresents a case study of pedagogical content knowledge put into actions by chemistry teachers when teaching the topic ofstoichiometry to second year senior secondary school students. Fourteen chemistry teachers with teaching experience rangingfrom 5 to 20 years were involved in this study. Research data were obtained from classroom observations and videotapedrecordings of classroom practice. Analyses of the teachers’ teaching activities revealed their skillfulness, resourcefulness, andweaknesses in terms of pedagogical content knowledge displayed when teaching stoichiometry. The results of this exploratorystudy offer insight into the knowledge systems that need to be expanded, enriched, and elaborated for teaching stoichiometry.To better understand the findings of this study, the results obtained were presented under two separate sections: (1 resultsconcerning introducing reaction stoichiometry to students and (2 results concerning leading students to identify limitingreagents. Implications for instruction and teachers’ professional development are offered.

  17. Pedagogical and conflict situations of teacher of physical training

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    Pechko O.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the essence of pedagogical and conflict situations between teacher and student. Considered ways of solving and preventing pedagogical and conflict situations in school. Principal reasons of conflict situations are selected, situations of activity, conduct and relations. The receptions of influence of teacher of physical culture are separated on personality of schoolchildren. It is well-proven that the profession of teacher of physical culture supposes possibility of conflict situations.

  18. THE KING’S CARPET: DRAMA PLAY IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Judit Kerekes; King, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    Trying to develop new perspectives of teaching is never easy, but trying to cultivate ownership and initiative among teacher education students is a still greater aspiration that is infrequently realized. This article addresses each of these highly valued goals for teacher educators as a case study reveals the impact of involving teacher candidates in interdisciplinary focused, constructivist and reflective models and planning for teaching, and then student teaching, which reaffirms this appr...

  19. Teachers' use of questioning in supporting learners doing science investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Umesh Ramnarain

    2011-01-01

    I examine how teachers employ a questioning strategy in supporting Grade 9 learners doing science investigations in South African schools. A particular focus of this study was how teachers use questioning in contributing towards the autonomy of these learners. The research adopted a qualitative approach which involved the collection of data by means of classroom observations and interviews with five teachers at schools resourced for practical work. The analysis of transcript data revealed tha...

  20. FACTORS AFFECTING TEACHERS’ USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Mojgan Afshari; Kamariah Abu Bakar; Wong Su Luan; Bahaman Abu Samah; Foo Say Fooi

    2009-01-01

    Research studies in the past decade have shown that computer technology is an effective means for widening educational opportunities, but most teachers neither use technology as an instructional delivery system nor integrate technology into their curriculum. Studies reveal a number of factors influencing teachers’ decisions to use ICT in the classroom: non-manipulative and manipulative school and teacher factors. These factors are interrelated. The success of the implementation of ICT is no...

  1. Teacher efficacy scale for classroom diversity (TESCD): a validation study

    OpenAIRE

    Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to validate the Teacher Efficacy Scale for Classroom Diversity (TESCD). This scale was developed to measure preservice teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs in their capability to teach students from diverse backgrounds. Four hundred and seventeen (N=417) preservice teachers participated in the study. Data analyses revealed that overall the TESCD has a good construct and concurrent validity and reliability. Recommendations are made for using ...

  2. Teacher’s Interaction Styles during Sociodramatic Play that Promote Reading and Writing among Preschoolers

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    Excelsa C. Tongson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to help understand a teacher’s facilitation of reading and writing during sociodramatic play among Filipino preschoolers. It describes how Filipino preschool teachers demonstrate redirecting and extending style interactions as they participate during sociodramatic play. It also identifies the ways by which the teacher provided print-rich environments in the dramatic play area to promote early reading and writing among Filipino children with ages ranging from four years old to f ive years old and 11 months. Five female teachers from four schools in Quezon City that adopt the play curriculum based on a set of criteria were studied. Each teacher was interviewed regarding play, her role, and how she prepares the dramatic play area. She was observed for 10 consecutive school days. The teachers’ interaction styles were classified as either extending or redirecting. Four of the f ive teachers demonstrated at varying degrees both extending and redirecting styles as they participated in the children’s sociodramatic play. The interaction style of the teacher revealed her ability to perform within the context of the play and the ways she assisted children in performing reading and writing activities. The considerable increase in the frequency of children’s literacy activities during sociodramatic play could be attributed to the combination of extending style interaction and the integration of literacy materials in the dramatic play area.

  3. Formas de enseñanza y evaluación utilizadas por los docentes de Odontología: resultados y su clasificación psicopedagógica / Forms of teaching and assessment used by teachers in dental sciences: results and psycho-pedagogical classification

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Olivia, Espinosa-Vázquez; Adrián, Martínez-González; Frida, Díaz-Barriga Arceo.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se presenta un estudio de la manera de enseñar y evaluar de los profesores que imparten el Plan de Estudios de Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología (FO), UNAM, vigente desde 1992. Objetivo: Identificar las principales formas de enseñanza y evaluación utilizadas por los docen [...] tes de la FO, y clasificarlas psicopedagógicamente. Método: Estudio observacional, transversal, exploratorio tipo encuesta con escala Likert. Los datos se analizaron con SPSS (Alfa de Cronbach=0.880) a través de estadística descriptiva y con un análisis factorial exploratorio. Resultados: De una muestra de 484 profesores (45.6% mujeres, 54.4% hombres), se determinó que las principales formas de enseñanza utilizadas son: los profesores realizan preguntas sobre temas vistos previamente y la exposición de temas por parte del profesor; las que menos: el dictado y la exposición por parte de los estudiantes. Respecto a las estrategias de enseñanza-aprendizaje utilizan principalmente: demostraciones, ilustraciones y análisis de casos. Las formas de evaluación de la teoría más utilizadas son: participación en clase, exámenes de opción múltiple y listas de control; y en la práctica: exámenes de opción múltiple, número de trabajos y listas de control. Discusión: De las formas de enseñanza y evaluación que los profesores utilizan, algunas son más eficaces ya que fomentan la solución de problemas, y promueven una fuerte motivación en el estudiante. Conclusiones: Los profesores utilizan pocas formas de enseñanza y evaluación con diferente enfoque; prevalece la enseñanza centrada en el profesor y el uso excesivo de formas de evaluación relacionadas con el área cognoscitiva, el cumplimiento de tratamientos y el saber teórico de los procedimientos. Se sugiere crear conciencia y enriquecer las prácticas educativas habituales con capacitación continua y actualización constante, respecto a las formas de evaluación fundamentadas en la construcción del conocimiento y en el desarrollo de habilidades y actitudes profesionales. Abstract in english Introduction: We report a study of the way of teaching and assessment is performed by the professors at the School of Dentistry (Facultad de Odontología, FO), of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The curriculum of dental surgeon has been in use since 1992. The object of the study [...] is to identify the main forms of teaching and assessments used by teachers at the School of Dentistry (FO), and classify them both psychologically and pedagogically. Method: An observational, cross-type exploratory survey with a Likert scale. Data were analyzed with SPSS (Cronbach's Alpha=0.880) through descriptive statistics and an exploratory factor analysis. Results: From a sample of 484 teachers (45.6% female, 54.4% male), it was determined that the main ways of teaching were: teachers prepare questions on topics previously seen, and give a seminar on the day's topic. Few give: dictation or have presentation by students. Regarding teaching strategies the most used are: demonstrations, illustrations and case analysis. The forms of assessment most often used are: class participation, multiple-choice tests and checklists; and in practice: multiple choice exams, number of assignments and checklists. Discussion: Among all forms of teaching and assessment that teachers use, some are more effective if they encourage problem solving, and promote a strong motivation in the student. Conclusions: Teachers use a few ways of teaching and evaluation with a different approach; prevailing teacher-centered teaching and excessive use of evaluation forms related to the cognitive area, fulfillment of treatments and theoretical knowledge of procedures. It is suggested to create awareness and enrich the regular educational practices with continuous training and updating regarding the evaluation forms grounded in knowledge construction and the development of skills and professional attitudes.

  4. Language teachers and teaching

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    Ben Said, Selim

    2013-01-01

    This volume gathers contributions from a range of global experts in teacher education to address the topic of language teacher education. It shows how teacher education involves the agency of teachers, which forms part of their identity, and which they take on when integrating into the teaching community of practice. In addition, the volume explores the teachers' situated practice dynamic negotiation of classroom situations, socialization into the professional teaching culture, and ""on the ground experimentation"" with pedagogical skills/techniques.

  5. Comparing Views of Primary School Mathematics Teachers and Prospective Mathematics Teachers about Instructional Technologies

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    Adnan Baki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology is rapidly improving in both hardware and software side. As one of the contemporary needs people should acquire certain knowledge, skills, attitudes and habits to understand this technology, to adapt to it and to make use of its benefits. In addition, as in all domains of life, change and improvement is also unavoidable for educational field. As known, change and improvement in education depends on lots of factors. One of the most important factors is teacher. In order to disseminate educational reforms, teachers themselves should accept the innovation first (Hardy, 1998, Baki, 2002; Oral, 2004. There has been variety of studies investigating teacher and prospective teachers? competences, attitudes and opinions (Paprzychi, Vikovic & Pierson, 1994; Hardy, 1998; Kocasaraç, 2003; Lin, Hsiech and Pierson, 2004; Eliküçük, 2006; Ye?ilyurt, 2006; Fendi, 2007; Teo, 2008; Arslan, Kutluca & Özp?nar, 2009. As the common result of these studies indicate that teachers? interest towards using instructional technology have increased. Accordingly, most of the teachers began to think that using instructional technologies becomes inevitable for teachers. By reviewing the related literature, no studies have been come across comparing the opinions of teachers and teacher candidates about instructional technologies. In this study, it was aimed to investigate and compare the views of mathematics teachers with prospective mathematics teachers about ICT. It was considered that collecting opinions of teachers and teachers candidates about the instructional technologies, comparing and contrasting them will contribute to the field. To follow this research inquiry, a descriptive approach type; case study research design was applied. The reason for choosing such design is that the case study method permits studying one aspect of the problem in detail and in a short time (Yin, 2003; Çepni, 2007. The study was conducted with the total sample of 12. 3 of them were mathematics teachers chosen from 3 different schools of different social stratification among primary schools in Artvin city center in the spring term of 2008-2009 educational year, another 3 of them were mathematics teachers from 3 different schools of different social stratification among primary schools in Trabzon city. Prospective mathematics teachers at their last year were randomly chosen from the elementary mathematics teacher training program of Fatih Faculty of Education in Karadeniz Technical University.The chosen 6 teachers and 6 candidate teachers were interviewed with 9-item semi-structured interviews in duration of 25 to 40 minutes. The opinions of the teachers and candidate teachers were compared and interpreted in a multidimensional point of view by the researchers. Concerning the research inquiries, the obtained data were classified under the titles as; definition of the instructional technology concept, instructional technologies used by the participants, benefits of this usage, competences related to usage of these technologies, suggestions for using these technologies. Based on the data these results were drawn; while the teachers take the instructional technologies concept as technological tool specifically, the candidate teachers, on the other hand, perceive the concept from a broader point of view. The teachers are more acquainted with mainstream technological products like computer and internet however the candidate teachers are also aware of books, magazines and concrete materials. Complying with some previous studies (Baki, 2000; Ye?ilyurt, 2006; Lin, Hsiech and Pierson, 2004; Ayvac? et al., 2007, both teachers and candidate teachers agree on that using instructional technologies matters in a positive way. However, since the teachers are actively in-service, they mentioned on application problems, on the contrary the candidate teachers are unaware of the prospective problems. The reason of this situation may be the problems faced during the application but could not be envisaged in the theoretical pre-service education. T

  6. The Development of Teacher and Teacher-Librarian Collaboration Scale and the Examination Structures of Collaboration Models

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    Hai-Hon Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to construct the Collaboration Scale for primary and secondary school teacher and teacher-librarian of Taiwan. Teachers and teacher-librarians were selected from five municipals in the south of Taiwan. Fifty-nine teacher-librarians, 76 teachers and 2 principals from 60 primary and secondary schools participated in this study for the testing of scale quality. Results indicated as follows: 1. The Collaboration Scale consisted of 22 items, divided into three factors, which were integrated instruction, teacher-librarian as resource, and traditional role of teacher-librarian. 2. The Collaboration Scale had reasonable coefficient of internal consistency reliability and content validity. 3. Exploratory factor analysis showed that The Collaboration Scale had acceptable construct validity. Three factors explained variance 60.23%and had high correlations of the Collaboration Scale separately. The second purpose was to examine the facets of teacher and teacher-librarians collaboration. Results indicated that teacher and teacher-librarians had low-end collaboration, most of the cooperation existed in teacher-librarians provided materials or resources for the teachers; high-end collaboration, integrated instruction appear to be less prevalent among participants in this study.

  7. Factors that motivate Turkish EFL teachers

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    Erkaya, Odiléa Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers’ motivation has been an extensive topic of discussion among researchers for over two decades. What has been missing in the discussion, though, is the perspective of those who teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL, especially those who work in Turkey. Therefore, the purpose of this case study was to investigate factors that motivated Turkish EFL teachers working at a Preparatory English Program of a university in Turkey and ways to enhance their motivation. Eight teachers took part in the study. To collect data, unstructured interviews were used. Then, codes were written and themes on teachers’ motivation and demotivation, and ways to motivate teachers emerged. The results can be understood by looking at expectancy theory, more specifically on the focus of the theory: intrinsic (personal and extrinsic (environmental motives. The analysis of what the teachers believed to be their source of motivation and demotivation helped the researcher to propose ways to enhance their motivation.

  8. Teachers' professional development: Awareness of literacy practices

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Berit, Lundgren; Eileen, Scheckle; Denise, Zinn.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article draws upon our experiences of participating in a Literacy Hub in South Africa. The aim is to describe and analyse how dialogue among Grade Eight teachers in a Literacy Hub around literacy teaching practices might lead to professional development and deepen teachers' understanding of lit [...] eracy practices and teaching. Interviews and observations with eight teachers were conducted to understand their literacy practices. The result indicates that sustainable development is a process that takes time. Furthermore, the study shows that the teachers relate to students' context and own experiences as a means of introducing a topic. While some teachers try to give the students access to cognitively demanding tasks, most tasks and events in the classrooms are cognitively undemanding and context-embedded. The importance of offering teachers examples of varied literacy practices and of making classroom literacy practice visible is noted.

  9. A RESEARCH ON RESILIENCY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS TEACHERS THAT WORK IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION SCHOOLS ( EXAMPLE OF HATAY PROVINCE

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    Yunus YILDIRIM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to analyze whether resiliency of physical education and sports teachers that work in primary and secondary schools vary in terms of some variables. Population of the study comprises of a total of 253 physical education and sports teachers (63 female, 190 male teachers out of 485 physical education and sports teachers that work in primary and secondary schools (Province, District and Village of Hatay Provincial Directorate of National Education have participated in the research. In order to determine resiliency of the participants, personal information form developed by the researchers and “Scale Of Resiliency” developed by Gürgan (2006a have been used. Resiliency levels of teachers have been compared in terms of their genders, marital status, place of work (province, district, village, professional service period and types of schools, in which they work (primary, secondary education. SPSS 16.0 statistics package software has been used for calculation and evaluation of the obtained data. The data has been summarized in percentages (% and frequency tables. Test of normality for the data has been performed through One–Sample Kolmogorov–Simirnov test and it is assumed that the data shows normal distribution. Therefore, the data has been analyzed from parametric tests through independent sample-t test and One Way ANOVA. In this study, error level has been accepted as 0.05.It is observed that there is no a statistically significant difference between female teachers and male teachers when resiliency scores of the teachers are compared in terms of their genders. The research results reveal that elementary education teachers’ scores on positive outlook subtest of “Scale Of Resiliency” is significantly higher in comparison to secondary education teachers. On the other hand, it is suggested that there is no statistically significant difference between teachers that marital status and professional service period when their resiliency scores are compared.

  10. Teachers’ professional development needs in data handling and probability

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Wessels; Hercules Nieuwoudt

    2011-01-01

    Poor Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) results and widespread disappointing mathematics results in South Africa necessitate research-based and more efficient professional development for in-service mathematics teachers. This article reports on the profiling of mathematics teachers’ statistical knowledge, beliefs and confidence in order to inform the development of in-service teacher education programmes in statistics for Grade 8 and Grade 9 teachers. Ninety mathe...

  11. From Awareness to Cultural Agency: EFL Colombian Student Teachers’ Travelling Abroad Experiences

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    John Jairo Viafara González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombian English as a foreign language student teachers’ opportunities to grow as educators through international sojourns do not usually subsume the traditional study and residence abroad goal. This was the case for our participants who engaged mainly in working abroad with study being ancillary. Fifty student teachers from two public universities reported how their international sojourn bolstered their intercultural learning. Three different programs, disconnected from participants’ academic institutions, became vehicles for their experiences abroad. Surveys and interviews reveal that participants’ origin, selected programs, and contextual circumstances influenced their intercultural learning. As a result, intercultural development gravitated towards awareness of intercultural patterns, critical reading of culture, and pre-service teachers’ repositioning to build cultural agency. Implications suggest the need to connect traveling abroad programs to undergraduate curricula.

  12. Developing Pedagogical Practices to Enhance Confidence and Competence in Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Dawn

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this self-study research was to deepen my understanding of pedagogy for teacher education and the factors that enhanced and hindered my confidence and competence as a teacher educator. I recorded my impressions and descriptions of events, discussions, and interpretations as a result of studying my practice in an electronic journal. Student teachers' responses to questionnaires, peer evaluation guidelines, and interviews provided alternative views about the efficacy of my pedagogy. Data collection and analysis was a hermeneutic and recursive process revealing emergent themes. One theme was that a focus on science content knowledge gave a false sense of confidence and overshadowed our ability to engage in meaningful conversations about learning to teach—a practice challenged through self-study research.

  13. PRACTICE-BASED EDUCATION VOCFTIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS, AS A FORM OF READINESS OF TEACHERS TO STADY AT HOME CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

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    ????? ??????? ??????????

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health in system of additional professional education are considered.  The concept "readiness of the teacher for training at home children with limited opportunities of health" is defined.  The advanced training course program "Training at home children with limited opportunities of health" as means of formation of this type of readiness is submitted.Research objective is justification and skilled and experimental check of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.As a result of research special educational needs of children with limited opportunities of the health, defining specifics of activity of the teachers training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed; structural components of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health are revealed and scientifically proved; the model of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed; scientific and methodical ensuring process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health is developed.Scope of results: the educational and methodical complex developed by the author (the program, monitors, educational and methodical grants can be used by the faculty of pedagogical highest and average special institutions for development of special courses; the faculty of system of additional professional education of teachers for the purpose of development of curricula and educational programs, didactic and methodical materials for the organization of process of formation of readiness of the teacher to training at home children with limited opportunities of health.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-4-21

  14. A Descriptive Study of Teacher’s Oral Feedback In an ESL Young Learner Classroom in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Elis Homsini Maolida

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the teacher?s oral positive and corrective feedback in a classroom interaction in ESL young learner context in Indonesia. The study was conducted in a primary one class of a newly-established international school where English was used as the medium of instruction not only in English class but also in almost all subjects. It was revealed that the teacher employed more positive feedback than corrective feedback in the interaction, and in employing positive feedback the tea...

  15. Correct or Incorrect Language: A Case of Iranian EFL Teachers

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    Giti Mousapour Negari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on teacher attitudes toward language and cultural differences has revealed that teachers form negative stereotypes of students with non-standard dialects (Münstermann, 1989. They consider dialect differences as deficiency in language learning, or sloppy pronunciation. Teacher’s attitude toward the students is important in that it creates the classroom atmosphere and affects the way language is taught to the students. The immediate goal of the present study is to investigate EFL teachers’ attitude toward dialect differences in Iran. It further investigates the roles that the variables like teachers’ gender, teachers’ years of teaching experience, school location and the students’ ethnic background play in forming the teachers’ attitude toward dialect variations. To this end, forty Iranian EFL teachers were randomly selected from nine different public high schools. To collect data, modified version of Hoover et al. (1996 Questionnaire was administered. The data were analyzed using simple frequency and percentages. The findings revealed that %71 of the teachers were sensitive toward varieties in dialect and considered them as forms of language and only %14 viewed them as language learning deficiency. The study has some implications for language teaching and material development.

  16. Assessing teachers' positive psychological functioning at work: Development and validation of the Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Tyler L; Long, Anna C J; Cook, Clayton R

    2015-06-01

    This study reports on the initial development and validation of the Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (TSWQ) with 2 samples of educators-a general sample of 185 elementary and middle school teachers, and a target sample of 21 elementary school teachers experiencing classroom management challenges. The TSWQ is an 8-item self-report instrument for assessing teachers' subjective wellbeing, which is operationalized via subscales measuring school connectedness and teaching efficacy. The conceptualization and development processes underlying the TSWQ are described, and results from a series of preliminary psychometric and exploratory analyses are reported to establish initial construct validity. Findings indicated that the TSWQ was characterized by 2 conceptually sound latent factors, that both subscales and the composite scale demonstrated strong internal consistency, and that all scales demonstrated convergent validity with self-reported school supports and divergent validity with self-reported stress and emotional burnout. Furthermore, results indicated that TSWQ scores did not differ according to teachers' school level (i.e., elementary vs. middle), but that they did differ according to unique school environment (e.g., 1 middle school vs. another middle school) and teacher stressors (i.e., general teachers vs. teachers experiencing classroom management challenges). Results also indicated that, for teachers experiencing classroom challenges, the TSWQ had strong short-term predictive validity for psychological distress, accounting for approximately half of the variance in teacher stress and emotional burnout. Implications for theory, research, and the practice of school psychology are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25642703

  17. Principals and Teachers Assess Professional Development in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Judith C.; Burke, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    Recent surveys of teachers and principals regarding their perceptions of professional development needs and preferred modes of delivery for inservice teacher education revealed similarities and discrepancies between the two groups. The findings indicated that joint development of inservice programs would be beneficial. (Author/WD)

  18. Critical Reflectivity and the Development of New Culturally Relevant Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Tonia R.; Truscott, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Three case studies present how preservice teachers use reflections while learning to teach. Interviews and document analysis reveal that critical reflections evidence greater understanding of culturally relevant pedagogy and offer a platform for critical consciousness. Using critical reflectivity to develop teachers' understandings of…

  19. School Culture: Teachers' Beliefs, Behaviors, and Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongboontri, Chantarath; Keawkhong, Natheeporn

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research project documents the school culture of Hope University's Language Institute and reveals the reciprocal relationship between the school culture and the instructional practices of the English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers in this particular institute. Altogether, 62 EFL teachers agreed to complete a…

  20. Critically Re-Conceptualising Early Career Teacher Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce; Down, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how and why we adopted a socially critical orientation to early career teacher resilience. In re-conceptualising early career teacher resilience, we expose the normative components of resilience by revealing the implicit values, beliefs and assumptions that underpin most traditional conceptions of resilience. We argue…

  1. Geography Teachers' Metaphors Concerning the Concept of "Geography"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to reveal geography teachers' perception on the concept of "Geography", by means of the metaphors they use. The study was participated by 116 geography teachers working in several high-schools in Istanbul City center within the 2012-2013 academic year. Answers to the following questions were…

  2. Classroom Leadership and Creativity: A Study of Social Studies and Islamic Education Teachers in Jordan

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    Samih Al-Karasneh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the leadership practices and creativity traits as perceived by social studies and Islamic education teachers in Jordan. A sample of 289 social studies and Islamic education teachers were selected randomly. Data were collected using quantitative research method. Leadership practices were measured using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI-Self developed by Kouzes and Posner (2003 with self-developed items on the Islamic component by the researchers, and creativity traits were measured using the Creativity Self-Perception Questionnaire (CSPQ developed by Goertz (1993. The validity and the reliability of two instruments are already developed and assessed. The data have been statistically analyzed (by using the SPSS. Findings of the study revealed that teachers perceived themselves positively in all dimensions studied. They were also found to be creative, as they perceived themselves to possess all the creativity traits. The study also showed that there was a significant correlation between the results of the ten leadership dimensions together and the eight creativity traits of teachers were positively significant. The results showed that there were no significant differences according to the dependent variables (gender, major of specialization, educational experience, and stage of schools on most of the independent variables (eight creativity traits and ten leadership dimensions. The study also offered some recommendations to enhance the status of educational leadership, creativity of social studies and Islamic education teachers.

  3. Teachers’ Perceptions of Sex Education of Primary School Children

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    H Taghdissi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Sex education of children, a complex issue in any culture, has always been a controversial subject. Schools can play a vital role in imparting sex education to children, particularly in more conservative communities. The objective of this study was to find out primary school teachers beliefs, attitudes, values, and understandings regarding sex education of school pupils. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study we employed a community-based approach to design the project. Purposeful, voluntary and maximum variation sampling was used to recruit 22 teachers from selected schools in Western Tehran (21 female and 1 male teacher. Information was collected in 4 focus-group discussion sessions. Grounded theory and thematic analysis were used.Results: Findings revealed three major themes: 1 organizational role, 2 institution construction, and 3 individual characteristics. These themes were described by subthemes as follows: 1. for organizational role: organizational culture and policies; 2. for institution construction: family and educational institutions; 3. for individual characteristics: biology, gender, instincts, curiosity, knowledge, and behaviors.Conclusion: From the participants point of views, the school and the family are two important institutions in children sex education. However, teachers are not sufficiently competent in sex behavior education. Inappropriate policies, resource limitations, and the family cultural structure are obstacles in sex education of children in schools. The participants believe the following are priorities in childrens sex education: changing cultural attitudes in organizations and institutions, such as cultural diffusion; sound training approaches in sex-related topics; providing sufficient resources; improving knowledge and skills of teachers in the area of sex education of pupils; and effective interaction between families and school authorities.

  4. Writing and the situated construction of teachers??? cognition : portfolios as complex performative spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Iris Susana Pires

    2014-01-01

    With this paper, I aim to contribute to the understanding of the teaching portfolio as a genre. I analyse the linguistic construction and performative nature of the reflective voice in the portfolio of one pre-service teacher. The results reveal her voice to have been constructed upon the convergence of other voices and to perform diverse reflective actions. The portfolio is conceptualised as a complex performative space that is used to construct a complex thought about practice and, accordin...

  5. The relationship between the critical thinking skills and the academic language proficiency of prospective teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Grosser, M. M.; Mirna Nel

    2013-01-01

    We report on the relationships that exist between the critical thinking skills and the academic language proficiency ofa group of first-year prospective teachers at a South African university (n = 89). The results revealed the nature of the critical thinking skills as well as the academic language proficiency of the students. Significant correlations between academic language proficiency and making inferences, as well as between academic language proficiency and critical thinking as a general...

  6. Preservice Teachers' Emotion-Related Regulation and Cognition: Associations with Teachers' Responses to Children's Emotions in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The present research examines preservice teachers' (N = 24) self-reported emotion-related regulation and cognition as predictors of their observed responses to young children's positive and negative emotional displays. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that teachers reporting greater reappraisal strategies in…

  7. Making the transition to middle schooling: A case study of experienced science teachers coping with change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Donna Dorough

    The increasing popularity of the middle school movement necessitates a need for more interpretive research in middle level education. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore science teachers' perceptions of the transition to a new middle school and the meanings they attached to this new experience. The participants were three eighth grade science teachers, each with 20 plus years of teaching experience. The primary data for analysis was a series of five interviews with each participant. Data collection also included weekly participant observation of team meetings. Findings revealed that the science teachers all had positive feelings attached to the ability to keep track of students' academic progress and behavior problems as a result of teaming. The changes associated with the first year were very stressful for all three, primarily the loss of the traditional junior high departmentalized structure. The two participants who transferred directly from the junior high school were very skeptical of any benefits from an interdisciplinary curriculum, the appropriateness of the middle school philosophy for eighth grade students, and the move to heterogeneously grouped science classes. In contrast, the former junior high teacher who had spent the past ten years teaching sixth grade at the elementary school had positive beliefs about the potential benefits of an interdisciplinary curriculum and heterogeneous grouping. Teacher stress associated with a change in the school setting and the science teachers' constraints to actualizing a meaningful middle schooling experience are illuminated. Teachers' lack of ownership in the reform decision making process, loss of time with their science teacher peers, diminished compliments from high school counterparts, and need for more empirical evidence supporting proposed changes all served as barriers to embracing the reform initiatives. The participants found taking a very slow approach to be their most useful means of coping with the stress of these changes. The discussion includes meta-assertions and recommendations concerning the leadership and planning process for movement to a middle school philosophy, the most appropriate building structure for meeting needs of science teachers, teachers as curriculum makers, and the nature of middle level professional development for experienced science teachers.

  8. A case study of secondary teachers facilitating a historical problem-based learning instructional unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecore, John L.

    Current curriculum trends promote inquiry-based student-centered strategies as a way to foster critical thinking and learning. Problem-based learning (PBL), a type of inquiry focusing on an issue or "problem," is an instructional approach taught on the basis that science reform efforts increase scientific literacy. PBL is a constructivist approach to learning real life problems where understanding is a function of content, context, experiences, and learner goals; historical PBL situates the lesson in a historical context and provides opportunities for teaching NOS concepts. While much research exists on the benefits of historical PBL to student learning in general, more research is warranted on how teachers implement PBL in the secondary science curriculum. The purpose of this study was to examine the classroom-learning environment of four science teachers implementing a historical PBL instructional unit to identify the teachers' understandings, successes and obstacles. By identifying teachers' possible achievements and barriers with implementing a constructivist philosophy when executing historical PBL, educators and curriculum designers may improve alignment of the learning environment to constructivist principles. A qualitative interpretive case study guided this research study. The four participants of this study were purposefully and conveniently selected from biology teachers with at least three years of teaching experience, degrees in education, State Licensure, and completion of a PBL workshop. Data collection consisted of pre and post questionnaires, structured interviews, a card sort activity in which participants categorized instructional outcomes, and participant observations. Results indicated that the four teachers assimilated reform-based constructivist practices to fit within their preexisting routines and highlighted the importance of incorporating teachers' current systems into reform-based teacher instruction. While participating teachers addressed a few NOS tenets, emphasizing the full range of possible NOS objectives included in historical PBL is warranted. This study also revealed the importance of creating a collaborative classroom culture and building positive student-teacher relationships when implementing PBL instruction. The four teachers agreed that the historical PBL instructional unit provided a context for learning state standards, and they positively viewed their experiences teaching the lesson. Thus findings from this study suggest that teaching science in a historical context using PBL can be effective.

  9. Differences in Elementary School Achievement between Girls and Boys: Does the Teacher Gender Play a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burusic, Josip; Babarovic, Toni; Seric, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Elementary schools in many countries record an unequal representation of male and female teachers with female teachers in huge majority. At the same time, numerous studies reveal that girls generally outmatch boys in the majority of school subjects. Consequently, possible effects of teacher-pupil gender interaction are becoming an important topic…

  10. Is American Teacher Education Fully up to the Common Core Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    This narrative considers how well equipped today's teacher education students and faculty are to meet the demands of the new Common Core State Standards. Data from the Teacher Education Accreditation Council's national evaluation of teacher education programs gives a mixed picture that, while mostly encouraging, also reveals that some…

  11. Localism and Teacher Labor Markets: How Geography and Decision Making May Contribute to Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Mimi; Cannata, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    A wide body of evidence indicates that there is a large inequality in the distribution of teachers across schools. Relatedly, recent research has revealed a number of important dimensions of teacher labor markets in the United States. We review the literature in two of these areas: the geography of teacher labor markets and the decision-making…

  12. Which Teachers Choose a Defined Contribution Pension Plan? Evidence from the Florida Retirement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2002, public school teachers in Florida have been permitted to choose between a defined benefit (DB) and a defined contribution (DC) retirement plan. We exploit this unique policy environment to study new teachers' revealed preferences over pension plan structures. Roughly 30 percent of teachers hired between 2003 and 2008 selected the DC…

  13. The Awful Truth: A Microhistory of Teacher Stress at Westwood High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munt, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    This paper is drawn from a recent microhistory of teacher stress, a genealogical inquiry that reveals the debilitating effects of a 'game of truth' called 'economic rationalism' on South Australian teachers during the last two decades of the twentieth century. It explores the everyday stresses of teaching through extracts from the teachers' oral…

  14. Sources and Manifestations of Occupational Stress as Reported by Full-Time Special Education Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimian, Michael J.; Santoro, Theresa M.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of scores of 365 special education teachers on the Teacher Stress Inventory Survey revealed that many exhibited frequent and strong indications of job related stress. Emotional as well as behavioral and physiological manifestations were ranked. Stress came from any sources and affected teachers to varying degrees. (CL)

  15. Turkish Primary School Teachers' Perceptions of School Culture Regarding ICT Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezci, Erdogan

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed at identifying Turkish primary school teachers' perceptions of school culture regarding ICT integration in education. In addition, the current study was designed to investigate factors that might influence their perceptions. The participants were 1540 primary school teachers. The findings revealed that the teachers'…

  16. Reflecting to Conform? Exploring Irish Student Teachers' Discourses in Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Oliver; McCormack, Orla

    2014-01-01

    A new model of reflective practice for student teachers on school placement was implemented into a teacher education program. The model aimed to encourage critical reflection that challenged hegemonic assumptions and power relations. In contrast to this, the analysis of the student teachers' reflections revealed a desire to fit in and…

  17. Writing Like a Scientist: Exploring Elementary Teachers' Understandings and Practices of Writing in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Nicole J.; Dotger, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the connections between elementary teachers' conceptions of how scientists use writing and how the teachers used writing during science lessons. Data collected included lesson observations, interviews, handouts to students, and curriculum resources. The findings revealed that teachers in this study thought…

  18. Globalization and Its Challenges for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Odell, Sandra J.

    2008-01-01

    There are serious implications of the global economy for teacher education. In this paper, the authors identify some of the influences of the global economy on education and teacher education, point out responses to these, and discuss some of the resultant challenges from the vantage point of the United States.

  19. Preschool Teachers' Exposure to Classroom Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Leonid

    2006-01-01

    This research examined exposure to classroom noise of 25 full-time teaching staff in 14 preschool settings located across Western Sydney. The results indicated that one teacher exceeded the maximum permissible level of daily noise exposure for employees under the health and safety legislation. Three staff approached this level and 92% of teachers

  20. Professional Socialization of Teachers of Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmid, Charles A.

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses the training of college sociology teachers. Included are a literature review on the teaching of sociology, results of a survey on college inservice teacher education in sociology, and reviews of research on college teaching. How the theory and substantive work of sociology contributes to learning to teach sociology is…

  1. Measuring Characteristics of Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soine, Karen M.; Lumpe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to create and psychometrically test an instrument which measured teachers' perceptions of characteristics of professional development. The sample consisted of elementary teachers from five school districts in Washington State participating in a district improvement initiative. Results of exploratory factor…

  2. Elementary School Teachers and Teaching with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Filiz

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify the relationship between elementary school teachers' ICT engagement with their attitudes towards technology. To this end, one hundred elementary school students were asked to fill out questionnaires related to their ICT knowledge, usage, and attitude towards technology. The results show that teachers' ICT…

  3. Applying Knowledge Management in Teacher Evaluation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essandoh, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Teacher evaluations are underused in public schools, resulting in the loss of knowledge critical to professional development. Knowledge management (KM) theory offers approaches that can lead to improvements in the effectiveness of evaluations and teacher performance. This multiple case study of 9 campuses in an exemplary school district…

  4. Teachers' Beliefs about Neuroscience and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambo, Debby; Zambo, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Information from neuroscience is readily available to educators, yet instructors of educational psychology and related fields have not investigated teachers' beliefs regarding this information. The purpose of this survey study was to uncover the beliefs 62 teachers held about neuroscience and education. Results indicate there were three types of…

  5. Teacher Burnout in Black and White

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses teacher burnout which scholars define as a condition caused by depersonalization, exhaustion, and a diminished sense of accomplishment. A psychological model of how stress leads to burnout describes it as a syndrome resulting from teachers' inability to protect themselves against threats to their self esteem and well-being.…

  6. Teacher's Mind Resources: Teacher's Transforming Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proposing a teacher-based approach to educational reform, the Teacher's Mind Resources site is built around a recently published study of education, entitled Teaching in Mind: How Teacher Thinking Shapes Education. While largely promotional, the site offers a great deal of perspective into the current analysis of reformist trends and initiatives to stand on its own as a valuable source of insight and inspiration to educators at every level. Philosophically, the site's author is convinced that popular efforts to apply "universal" educational standards are meaningless - if they fail to take into account what each teacher brings to the class as an individual. Thus, it focuses on the teacher's mind as a unique tool destined to interpret every mandated standard differently and uniquely. Offering forums, media, and recently published research in the area, the Teacher's Mind site looks both to inform and engage all users.

  7. Teacher Perceptions of Gender-Based Differences among Elementary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy Darrin Wood

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine teacher perceptions of gender-based differences among elementary school teachers. In this mixed-methods study, the researcher utilized an online survey to collect data. Quantitative analysis revealed no statistically significant differences; however, qualitative analysis showed that there were more negative responses to survey statements pertaining to males. More than half of the participants perceived differences between female and male elementary tea...

  8. Prospective Teacher Concerns: A Comparative Study of Departments of English Language Teaching and Language and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mustafa naci kayao?lu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Language teachers in Turkey do not take a standard pre-service education as graduates of English Language Teaching (ELT, linguistics, and translation departments all end up with language teaching profession and this, in turn, results in different teaching needs and concerns. The researchers argue that these different concerns may be one of the underlying causes of chronic language education problems in Turkey, in that Turkish Ministry of National Education does not take into consideration the comparative picture of practicing teachers and composes curricula, teaching materials, and compulsory one-shot professional development activities that all reflect “one size fits all” ideology. Therefore, determining the needs and concerns of pre-service language teachers is of vital importance. The current study has arisen from Griffith’s (2012 call for more larger-scale studies on teacher concerns across different contexts via triangulation. The researchers aim at not only investigating teacher concerns but also painting a much detailed comparative picture between ELT and linguistics department prospective teachers. The researchers target convenience sampling, in the full knowledge that this group will not represent the whole population. However, this type of non-probability sampling can serve well when it is easy to gather much informative data. Building on the recent work of Griffiths (2012, the researchers have modified and extended the existing measurement tool of Griffiths (2012 to investigate the issue much deeper and compensate the caveats. They adapted her instrument and asked the participants to add their thoughts as well as deciding their concern level. The results are mainly in line with the referred study in terms of the rating and frequency. The study reveals that there are some differences between the concerns of ELT department students and language and literature department students. While prospective teachers studying at the ELTdepartment were found to be highly concerned about technology, their counterparts studying at the langauge and literature department were not interested in the issue. The study also reveals that despite EIL’s large space in the literature (Cogo, 2012; Sowden, 2012, it was not found as a major concern for the prospective teachers. Methodology was also the least rated concern for the prospective teachers at both departments on the contrary to the well-accepted literature.

  9. Prospective Teacher Concerns: A Comparative Study of Departments of English Language Teaching and Language and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mustafa naci kayao?lu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Language teachers in Turkey do not take a standard pre-service education as graduates of English Language Teaching (ELT, linguistics, and translation departments all end up with language teaching profession and this, in turn, results in different teaching needs and concerns. The researchers argue that these different concerns may be one of the underlying causes of chronic language education problems in Turkey, in that Turkish Ministry of National Education does not take into consideration the comparative picture of practicing teachers and composes curricula, teaching materials, and compulsory one-shot professional development activities that all reflect “one size fits all” ideology. Therefore, determining the needs and concerns of pre-service language teachers is of vital importance. The current study has arisen from Griffith’s (2012 call for more larger-scale studies on teacher concerns across different contexts via triangulation. The researchers aim at not only investigating teacher concerns but also painting a much detailed comparative picture between ELT and linguistics department prospective teachers. The researchers target convenience sampling, in the full knowledge that this group will not represent the whole population. However, this type of non-probability sampling can serve well when it is easy to gather much informative data. Building on the recent work of Griffiths (2012, the researchers have modified and extended the existing measurement tool of Griffiths (2012 to investigate the issue much deeper and compensate the caveats. They adapted her instrument and asked the participants to add their thoughts as well as deciding their concern level. The results are mainly in line with the referred study in terms of the rating and frequency. The study reveals that there are some differences between the concerns of ELT department students and language and literature department students. While prospective teachers studying at the ELTdepartment were found to be highly concerned about technology, their counterparts studying at the langauge and literature department were not interested in the issue. The study also reveals that despite EIL’s large space in the literature (Cogo, 2012; Sowden, 2012, it was not found as a major concern for the prospective teachers. Methodology was also the least rated concern for the prospective teachers at both departments on the contrary to the well-accepted literature.

  10. The Effect of Gender, Seniority and Subject Matter on the Perceptions of Organizational Justice of Teachers: A Meta-Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkurt, Yahya; Yilmaz, Kursad; Karaman, Gizem

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the results of a meta-analysis conducted with the theses and research studies published in Turkey from 2005 to 2012 regarding organizational justice. The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of gender, seniority and subject matter on the perceptions of organizational justice of teachers. Specific criteria were used…

  11. Korean Early Childhood Educators' Multi-Dimensional Teacher Self-Efficacy and ECE Center Climate and Depression Severity in Teachers as Contributing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Ha; Kim, Yang Eun

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated profiles of South Korean early childhood educators' teacher self-efficacy and contributing factors to teacher self-efficacy. The contributing factors were examined with a focus on early childhood education (ECE) center climate and depression severity in teachers as well as teacher and classroom characteristics. The results

  12. STEM Career Changers' Transformation into Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Catherine; Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Paska, Lawrence M.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines the transformation (professional growth) of career-changing women scientists who decided to become teachers. Drawing upon Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory, we tracked their transformation for 3 years. Our findings revealed multiple identities, disorientation, a perceived sense of meaninglessness, loss and eventual regain in confidence, gain in pedagogical knowledge and skill, and changed perceptions of the social roles of science teachers and scientists. Driven by personal choice or need (financial, intellectual), such transformations were achieved through active pursuit of meaning in one's work, critical assessment of assumptions, planning, and trying on the unfamiliar role of a science teacher. It is argued that such transition entails complex changes in thinking about science teaching and identifying oneself as a science teacher.

  13. PBS TeacherSource

    Science.gov (United States)

    PBS has gathered together Kids Resources, links to art-related activities for kids from throughout the PBS site, including Sesame Street Coloring Books and Theodore Tugboat Interactive Stories. The Arts Classroom link takes users to the Arts section of TeacherSource, a collection of Online Teacher's Guides prepared by the Teacher Resource Service at PBS. The teacher's guides are arranged by area: Arts, Science and Math, Social Studies, and Preschool. Areas may contain links to relevant PBS programs, educational resources for students, or curriculum ideas for teachers. PBS TeacherSource also includes information about off-air taping rights of PBS programs for educators.

  14. K-12 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay

    2013-06-01

    For many school subjects, teachers enlist in professional development activities to fulfill certification requirements to update themselves on recent developments in their field. For astronomy, in addition to certification, many teachers need to acquire basic knowledge and skills since their background is often deficient. Thus, a main goal of professional development workshops is to enhance the knowledge base of the participants. But their needs go beyond what can be acquired in a book or lecture. In response to guidelines of the National Science Education Standards (1996), the participants should actively investigate phenomena and interpret results, be introduced to resources that expand their knowledge, build on their current understanding, and incorporate reflection on the process and outcomes of understanding science through inquiry. Examples of how these elements are incorporated into workshops that emphasize activities and teacher-to-teacher interaction over lecture are offered in this presentation. Setting realistic goals for workshops of different lengths (from one day to one month) and evaluating the results are also components of teacher professional development.

  15. Teacher Involvement in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kevin O.

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers in the field of teacher education have proposed the formation of partnerships between teachers and teacher educators, without explicitly stating what additional roles teachers might play in the teacher preparation process. This article describes how some pre-service teacher education programmes have increased the involvement of…

  16. Florida Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Mathematics Ability and Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mathematics ability and efficacy of Florida preservice agricultural education teachers. Results indicated that the preservice teachers were not proficient in solving agricultural mathematics problems. On the other hand, the preservice teachers were efficacious in personal teaching efficacy and personal…

  17. Developing Teachers' Subject Didactic Competence through Problem Posing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticha, Marie; Hospesova, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Problem posing (not only in lesson planning but also directly in teaching whenever needed) is one of the attributes of a teacher's subject didactic competence. In this paper, problem posing in teacher education is understood as an educational and a diagnostic tool. The results of the study were gained in pre-service primary school teacher

  18. The Induction and Needs of Beginning Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Corinne; van der Klink, Marcel; Swennen, Anja; Yaffe, Elka

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of an exploratory research study into induction practices of novice teacher educators in six different countries. The study was a project carried out by members of the Association of Teacher Educators Europe (ATEE) Research and Development Centre Professional Development of Teacher Educators. Induction is seen as…

  19. Mathematics Teachers' Approaches to Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Pekka

    1996-01-01

    A six-year case study was conducted on the impact of, and teachers' role in, the use of computers and the Mathcad program in mathematics instruction at a technical college. Results for 2 teachers and 51 of their students showed definite stages in the teachers' use of the computer technology. (SLD)

  20. Exploring Teachers' Use of Technology in Classrooms of Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Mayra C.; Cowan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results of an investigation that documents teachers' perceptions of the contribution of technology use in classrooms of bilingual learners. Study questions asked how teachers perceive teacher-made digital movies impact learning, and what situational factors delimit technology infusion. Data gathered in focus groups and…

  1. Teacher Self-Efficacy: A Classroom-Organization Conceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Isaac A.; Kass, Efrat

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed and interviewed Israeli elementary and secondary teachers to provide support for an expanded conceptual model of teacher self-efficacy, the Classroom and School Context model. This re-conceptualization considers teacher tasks and relationships in both the classroom and school organization context. Results found a good fit between the…

  2. Teacher Immediacy Scales: Testing for Validity across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Oetzel, John G.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wilcox, Richard G.; Takai, Jiro

    2007-01-01

    Cross-cultural validity of teacher immediacy scales is a constant concern in instructional communication research. The present study examines the validity of two existing teacher immediacy scales: the Revised Nonverbal Immediacy Measure (RNIM) and the Chinese Teacher Immediacy Scale (CTIS) in U.S., Chinese, German, and Japanese cultures. Results

  3. Towards a Complicated Conversation: Teacher Education and the Curriculum Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, research in teacher education has played a practical role deriving its questions directly either from "the doing" of teacher education and/or having sought to directly improve "the doing" of teacher education. As a result, a tendency towards moral, intellectual and institutional parochialism has confined both the promise and purpose…

  4. Impact of Satisfaction and Commitment on Teachers' Organizational Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesen, Harun; Basim, Nejat H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of job satisfaction and organizational commitment on teachers' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in a structural equation model. The study was employed to a group of teachers and their supervisors. The results indicated that job satisfaction and commitment to the school had an impact on OCBs of the teachers

  5. Teachers' Perceptions, Beliefs and Concerns about Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Sigal; Heiman, Tali; Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Schools and teachers nowadays face new difficulties and challenges as a result of the fast growth of cyberbullying. The aim of the study is to examine the perceptions, beliefs and concerns about cyberbullying, as well as the needs, of a professionally diverse group of teachers. Three-hundred and twenty-eight teachers (88.4% female, 11.6% male)…

  6. Teachers' Opinions about the Use of Body Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Effective communication occurs with non-verbal and verbal tools. In this study the body language as non-verbal communication tool is taken to be examined, and teachers' opinions about the use and importance of body language in education are surveyed. Eight open-ended questions are asked to 100 teachers. As a result, it is shown that teachers

  7. Effects of Teacher Rewards on Recognition and Job Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    Implications of Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory for teacher reward programs were tested by comparing changes in teachers' (N=38) job-enrichment opportunities and recognition after the teachers had chosen one of two rewards (travel to professional training conferences or cash). Results were consistent with the motivation-hygiene theory. (IAH)

  8. Chapter 2: Adoption of Instructional Innovation across Teachers' Career Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Michael W.; Lund, Jacalyn; Gurvitch, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Teachers are regularly exposed to a number of new and innovative technologies, ideas, philosophies, systems, and experiences from the time they enter teacher education to the time they leave the profession. A predictable result of this increased exposure is that teachers are regularly faced with decisions about whether to incorporate one or more…

  9. Teacher Education as Identity Construction: Insights from Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a qualitative study that explored the experiences of one group of pre-service English language teachers in Hong Kong as they undertook an action research project as part of their undergraduate teacher training programme. Grounded in a theory of teacher identity construction as both practice and discourse, the…

  10. The Impact of Women Teachers on Girls' Education. Advocacy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The recruitment of women teachers can have a positive impact on girls' enrollments in school. This advocacy brief promotes the recruitment of women teachers which is currently held back as a result of gender disparities. The publication explains how recruitment of women teachers could relate to girls' education, stating some current issues facing…

  11. “Whole Teacher” Crisis: Examining Pre-service Student Teachers’ Perceptions of Professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsun Shin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The changing nature of teacher professionalism presents an important challenge to teachereducation programs. Teacher professionalism can be broadly defined as the set of teachers’professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions. However, with the increased accountabilityand standards movement, professionalism in education often overemphasizes accountabilityby prioritizing knowledge and skills over dispositions. The move in the field toward‘professionalization’ has generally resulted in systematic reform and professionaldevelopment rather than promoted ‘professionalism.’ This paper explored pre-serviceundergraduate students’ perceptions of teacher professionalism at a major university in NewJersey. The results indicated that the students focused more on ‘performance’ and‘external/outward aspects’ and less on recognizing the complexity and dynamics of theteaching and learning process. The study argues that teacher education programs must beredesigned so that pre-service students have the opportunity to discuss and develop properdispositions, reflect upon their perceptions, and enhance teacher professionalism.

  12. A change in perspective – Teacher education as an open system

    OpenAIRE

    Ko?nig, Christoph; Mulder, Regina H.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher education is the environment for the learning and instruction of prospective teachers. Its structure, components, and contents shape the development of relevant competences which enable prospective teachers to be effective in the classroom. But its relevance is questioned because respective research, characterised by inconclusive results, does not offer explanations about the reasons why certain teacher education programmes are more effective than others in the development of relevant...

  13. Mathematics Special Content Competencies of Elementary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Gülteke; Ekber Tomul; Fikret Korur

    2013-01-01

    According to the results of national and international level examinations, the achievement of students in Turkey in mathematics is low. Elementary school teachers play a significant role in the education of students. Elementary school teachers differ from other teachers in that they are responsible for teaching more than one subject. In determining the competencies and performance indicators of elementary school teachers, the Ministry of National Education has paid regard to the common ground...

  14. STUDENTS’ OPPINION ABOUT PROFESSIONAL ETHICS RELATION OF THE TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Stojanovska

    2013-01-01

    Professional teacher’s ethics is a collection of moral codes of their professional work. It is significant that the teaching profession respects certain designated professional-ethical codes of conduct between the teachers and the students, with their colleagues and other people they professionally cooperate with.     This study is focused on analysis of the professional ethical relation of teachers towards students, seen from student’s point of view. These are the results of student?...

  15. Pre-Service EFL Teachers’ Attitudes towards ‘Language Acquisition Courses’

    OpenAIRE

    Nalan K?z?ltan

    2011-01-01

    This study discusses the attitudes of pre-service English language teachers towards „Language Acquisition Courses? in English Language Teacher Education Programs. The data have been collected through a developed questionnaire of 20 questions given to 324 students in the department of Pre-service English Language Teacher Education at Ondokuz May?s University. SPSS has been used for the evaluation of the data. The results indicate that the pre-service teachers of English believe in the imp...

  16. Relationship between High School Principals' Humor Styles and Teacher Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ça?atay K?l?nç; Ergün Recepo?lu; Serkan Ko?ar

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the relationship between high school teachers' perceptions of teacher leadership and school principals' humor styles. A total of 252 teachers employed in 12 high schools located in the city centre of Ankara, Turkey participated in the study. “The Humor Behavior Scale” developed by Cemalo?lu, Recepo?lu, ?ahin, Da?ç? and Köktürk (2013) and “The Teacher Leadership Scale” developed by Beycio?lu and Aslan (2010) were used to gather data. Results of th...

  17. Factors influencing trust of teachers among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnianingsih, Sri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, Ki Hajar Dewantoro is one of the most respected scholars in education philosophy. He stated the importance of trust earned by teachers in guiding students in their learning activities. The teacher, as the leader in the class, needs to develop mutual trust between students and teachers. Trust to teachers is strongly required by students as a foundation in developing and expanding their relationship and also social network. It is also the fundamental element in their desire to pursue higher education, for it is only through a sense of trust that student will embrace an empowering sense of freedom and pursuit the knowledge. The exercise of this freedom requires a risk on behalf of students based on the trust of their teachers and the learning experience that they provide. If students trust their teachers, they will be more able to focus on the task at hand and to work and learn more effectively. A total number of 291 senior high school students in Yogyakarta (males=147, females=144 completed an open-ended questionnaire developed for this study that asks how much they trust their teachers and the reason why they trust their teachers. The data was analyzed using indigenous psychological approach of analyzing the content of open-ended responses, categorization of the responses and cross-tabulating with demographic/background information. Results indicated that 63% of participants stated that they trusted their teachers. The main reason for trusting their teachers are as follows: they are perceived as being similar to their parents, teachers’ ability in transferring knowledge, the relationship with teacher, and their abilities of guiding students. The study concluded that trust of senior high school students was established because of views that teachers are parents that have competence in delivering knowledge and are formally established as teachers. Therefore a teacher’s behavior that similarly represents a parent’s behavior at home will produce a child’s trust and this will become the foundation for the students to learn better.

  18. "Four Years on, I'm Ready to Teach": Teacher Education and the Construction of Teacher Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a qualitative study that aimed to explore how one group of preservice English language teachers in Hong Kong constructed their identities as teachers. Using in-depth interviews to gain a rich understanding of participants' teacher identity formation in practice and discourse, the paper examines the…

  19. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support meetings, classroom coaching/Big Lab co-teaching, summer institutes, and off-campus conferences and seminars. Results indicated that the effectiveness of the six venues was closely tied to the level of collaborative planning that took place between the Alexander Science Center School and the associated California Science Center. Examination of teachers' and stakeholders opinions reflect that after a year-and-a-half of operations, the school's professional development program is perceived as disjointed and ineffective, but that the foundation of a sound program has been established.

  20. Leadership that promotes teacher empowerment among urban middle school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Skipper, Joni

    In this study, the focus was on determining leadership strategies that promote teacher empowerment among urban middle school science teachers. The purpose of the paper was to determine if leadership strategies are related to teacher empowerment. The emphasis was on various forms of leadership and the empowerment of teachers in context in restructuring the democratic structure. An effective leadership in science education entails empowering others, especially science teachers. In this regard, no published studies had examined this perspective on empowering teachers and school leadership. Therefore, this study determined if a relationship exists between leadership strategy actions and teacher empowerment. The significance of the study is to determine a relationship between leadership strategies and teacher empowerment as a positive approach toward developing successful schools. Empowerment is essential for implementing serious improvements. Empowering others in schools must form a major component of an effective principal's agenda. It is becoming clearer in research literature that complex changes in education sometimes require active initiation. For this study, a quantitative methodology was used. Primary data enabled the research questions to be answered. The reliability and validity of the research were ensured. The results of this study showed that 40% of the administrators establish program policies with teachers, and 53% of teachers make decisions about new programs in schools. Furthermore, the findings, their implications, and recommendations are discussed.

  1. Teacher Training and Pre-service Primary Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive science teaching efficacy beliefs may be useful for teacher training universities, so that they can adapt their curriculum to accommodate these factors. Participants included 292 pre-service primary teachers, a cross-sectional sample from two different universities in the Netherlands across the four different years of study in the training program. Based upon our results, we conclude that the science teaching self-efficacy of pre-service teachers, in particular, improved during years 1 and 2, and not during years 3 and 4. Higher levels of self-rated subject-matter knowledge and science teaching experience in primary schools both contributed to higher levels of personal self-efficacy for science teaching. Differences at the university level in courses taken during the first year between science content courses and science methods courses also influenced the pre-service teachers' development of science teaching self-efficacy. After their first year, the pre-service teachers from the university with science content courses had significantly higher self-efficacy than pre-service teachers from the university that offered science methods courses. After the second year of teacher training, however, this difference in self-efficacy was no longer present.

  2. Chinese Teachers’ Professional Identity and Beliefs about the Teacher-Student Relationships in an Intercultural Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Li; Du, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative study of immigrant Chinese teachers’ professional identity and beliefs about the teacher-student relationship in an intercultural context. Theoretically, this study takes its departure from a sociocultural perspective on understanding professional identity. The empirical analysis in the study drew mainly upon ethnographic interviews with a group of Chinese language teachers in Denmark concerning their life experiences, perceptions, and beliefs. The results of this study suggest that teachers’ beliefs about their roles as teachers and about student-teacher relationships are shaped by both their prior experiences and backgrounds and the current social and cultural contexts in which they are situated. Changes of context (e.g., from China to Denmark) often lead to a transformation of their professional identity and beliefs. Being a teacher in an intercultural context often exposes them to the confrontation of diverse challenges and dilemmas. On one hand, teachers in this study generally experienced a transformation from being a moral role model, subject expert, authority and parental role to being a learning facilitator and culture worker. On the other hand, they developed diverse individualized coping strategies to handle student-teacher interactions and other aspects of teachers’ professional identity.

  3. The decline of teacher autonomy: Tears or cheers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1987-09-01

    In the United States teacher autonomy has been declining for at least a decade. This decline can be attributed in large part to three factors. First, uniform staff development programmes based on research on effective teaching have become widespread. Second, classroom observations have become an integral part of imposed teacher evaluations. Third, school principals have been called on to assume the role of `instructional leader'. While some may perceive the decline of teacher autonomy negatively, at least two benefits of this decline have been identified. First, a `common language' by which teachers can discuss the problems and potential of instruction and teaching among themselves and with school administrators is developing. Second, the likelihood that teachers will achieve a truly professional status is enhanced. Many educators write as if the natural result of a decline in teacher autonomy is standardization; that is, the cloning of teachers. This article negates such pessimism. Teacher autonomy, like many educational variables, exists along a continuum. As a consequence, a midpoint on the autonomy continuum — a balance between uniqueness and standardization, between license and responsibility — is the desirable state of affairs. Finally, autonomy should be earned by teachers, not simply given to them. In this regard, greater concern should be given to teachers' preparation for, and induction into, their roles as school teachers. Similarly, increases in autonomy should mirror increases in teacher status; status defined in terms of teacher experience, expertise, and excellence.

  4. Help Teachers Help Themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald E.; Murphy, John

    1987-01-01

    Peer coaching, teacher input, and focus on teaching improvement are important ingredients in an inservice teacher training program in a Palos Hills, Illinois, school district. Program goals and guidelines for training sessions and peer coaching teams are detailed. (CJH)

  5. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.

  6. ChemTeacher: Electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Electron page includes resources for teaching students about electrons.

  7. ChemTeacher: Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Combustion page includes resources for teaching students about the chemistry behind combustion.

  8. ChemTeacher: Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Isotopes page includes resources for teaching students about the structure and uses of isotopes.

  9. ChemTeacher: Neutron

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Neutron page includes resources for teaching students about neutrons.

  10. ChemTeacher: Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Fusion page includes resources for teaching students about the discovery and applications of fusion.

  11. PRACTICAL VALUE OF UNDERSTANDING THE MINDSET OF SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noora Abdul Kader

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mind set of students and teachers seeks much more importance in the present scenario. The present study is intended to find the type of mindset of secondary school students in learning English language on the select areas and also made an attempt to find out the effect of fixed mindset of students on the attitude of students towards English language. Understanding the mind set of secondary school English teachers regarding the performance and attitude of students in learning English language on select areas revealed the result that most of the teachers are having fixed mind set and there is an urgent necessity to change the situation. A sample of 100 secondary school students and 20 secondary school English teachers were selected randomly from the state of Kerala. Majority of students are having fixed mindset in select areas and they believe that it is talent which is worthwhile and their effort won’t do anything in learning English language. A shift in this situation is the need of the hour. For that the teachers should change their mindset and motivate the learners to assure themselves that their intelligence is not static.

  12. Metphor Status About The Concept of ‘Geograpy’ of Prospective Social Science, Science and Classroom Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ça?r? ÖZTÜRK

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to reveal the perceptions of prospective elemantary Social Science, Science and Classroom Teachers who will educate the students at elemantary school, by the help of metaphors about geography. Total of 357 senior students from Ahi Evran University College of Education, Social ScienceTeachers? Department (Men – 62/Women –69 Science Teachers? Department ( Men – 62, Women- 53 and Clarsroom Teachers? Department (Men – 57 , Women – 54 , joined this study. Datas of the research are based on that students completed the sentence: “Geography is as.................because ....................”. Datas which are gained , are commented in terms of content analysis technique . The results of this research show that 33% (per cent of students thougt the concept of “geography” as source of life, 23,2% of students thought it as the area of life , 8.1% of students thought it as leading and to find directions and 7.5% of students thought that geography shelters the different branches in. So it is found that 56% of the prospective teachers relate geography with life.

  13. Speech content analysis of male and female L2 teachers in Iranian EFL context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attaran, Atena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the speech content of male and female teachers in the context of Iranian EFL classes. Previous studies on speech content are mainly conducted on European cultures and there is a niche considering investigations of gender differences in Iranian EFL context with regard to speech content. To this end, 74 EFL classes were observed to figure out the quality of speech content in different genders among teachers. After observing the classes and recording teachers’ voices, their speech was transcribed. The content of the transcribed texts was counted based on the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC principles. The data were analyzed according to Newman, Groom, Handelman, and Pennebaker’ (2008 word-count model. Four categories were investigated to find out the gender differences among male and female teachers. The categories are linguistic dimensions, prepositions, psychological processes, and pronouns. The results revealed significant differences among male and female teachers considering various categories of speech content. The Chi-square formula was utilized to investigate the frequencies.

  14. Factor Analysis of Competency of Computer Teacher at Vocational Certificate Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangutai Moto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The research objectives were to analysis the factor and construct the questionnaire on competency of computer teacher at vocational certificate level of educational institute under Office of Vocational Education Commission (OVEC. The descriptive research and structural relationship model were used for the study. Sample groups comprised of 1 90 experts and 2 200 educational institutes under OVEC. Research instruments were questionnaires on competency of computer teacher at vocational certificate level for: 1 experts and 2 educational institutes. Data analysis were conducted with: 1 Exploratory factor analysis by using SPSS for Windows for data from experts, 2 The second order confirmatory factor analysis with LISREL 8.72 program and Cronbach’s ? formula for data from educational institutes. Research results revealed that competency of computer teacher at vocational certificate level composed of 12 components from 62 variables covered 3 domains of knowledge, skill, and affection. Those 12 components were general knowledge about education, knowledge about curriculum, knowledge about teaching, knowledge about e-Learning and e-Media, knowledge about IT support, knowledge about computer use, teaching skill, skill about e-Learning and e-Media, skill about IT support, skill for using computer, supportive affection to be a teacher and affection in IT. The questionnaire on competency of computer teacher had good quality with good construct validity and high reliability in 2 dimensions of intent and actual competencies.

  15. A Case Study of College Teacher's Politeness Strategy in EFL Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Peng; Fang Xie; Lingling Cai

    2014-01-01

    In the process of teaching and learning activity, teachers’ language plays a very important role in EFL classroom, such as teachers’ academic instructions, motivating the class and evaluating students. No exaggeration to say that teachers’ language is indispensable to effective communication in class. Adopting Brown and Levinson’s politeness strategies through class observation, the researcher aims to reveal how the teacher applies politeness strategies to his teaching...

  16. The Interplay between EFL High School Teachers' Beliefs and Their Instructional Practices Regarding Reading Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Mahin SALIMI; Fatemeh KHONAMRI

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has revealed the influential role of teachers’ beliefs in determining their professional behavior; that is, the ways they plan their lessons, the kinds of decision they make, and the methods they apply in their classrooms. The present study aimed, first, to investigate the construct of teachers’ belief systems about reading strategies among EFL high school teachers, then to explore the degree of discrepancies or consistencies between teachers’ beliefs about reading str...

  17. Exploring the Relationship between Teachers' Social Intelligence and Classroom Discipline Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Soleiman Yahyazadeh Jeloudar; Aida Suraya Md Yunus

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the social intelligence level of teachers employed in government secondary schools in Malaysia based on selected demographic variables such as age, and how they relate to the classroom discipline strategies used. The sample of the study comprises 203 teachers. The study also revealed that there were significant differences between teachers’ age groups and their social intelligence. Further a significant relationship was noted between teachers’ social...

  18. Identidade docente: as várias faces da constituição do ser professor. Teacher identity: The various facets of the constitution of being a teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iza, Dijnane Fernanda Vedovatto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é resultado da produção conjunta de um grupo de pesquisadores dos programas de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Motricidade e em Educação, alocados na Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP, Campus Rio Claro, Brasil, que tem como foco de estudos a formação de professores. Esse esforço coletivo teve como propósito apresentar os resultados das pesquisas de cada um dos autores deste artigo, tendo como objetivo explorar a identidade docente. Trata-se de uma pesquisa qualitativa, do tipo exploratória, que utilizou como fonte de dados as investigações de Trabalho de Conclusão de Curso, Mestrado e Doutorado, possibilitando a reflexão sobre a identidade docente a partir de múltiplos olhares, buscando reconhecer elementos que contribuem tanto nos momentos de formação, quanto nos momentos do exercício docente. Foram identificados três eixos de análise: Experiência e Saber da Experiência; Profissionalidade Docente, e Formação inicial e continuada. A partir destes eixos, percebeu-se o desenvolvimento pessoal do professor como elemento central. Pontua-se ainda que a identidade docente é dinâmica e tem relação direta com o contexto social no qual se está inserido. Assim, as pesquisas analisadas perpassam diferentes contextos, podendo revelar elementos significativos à formação inicial e continuada de educadores, além de oferecer contribuições para a compreensão da educação brasileira a partir de perspectivas investigativas complementares. This article is the result of a joint production by a group of researchers from the Graduate Programs in Motricity Sciences and Education allocated at the State University of Sao Paulo - UNESP, Rio Claro campus, Brazil, which focuses on teacher education studies. The purpose of this collective effort was to present the results of the researches conducted by each of the coauthors in order to explore teacher identity. It is an exploratory qualitative research which used investigations of Course Monographic Papers, Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertations as sources of data, enabling reflection on teacher identity from multiple perspectives, aiming to recognize elements that contribute either for teacher education or practice. Three analysis axes have been identified: experience and knowledge from experience, teacher professionalism, and teacher initial and continuing education. Based on these axes, we noticed the personal development of teachers as a central element. We also observed that teacher identity is dynamic and directly related to the social context in which the teacher is inserted. Thus the analyzed studies pervade different contexts, and may reveal significant elements for both initial and continuing training for educators, besides offering contributions to the understanding of Brazilian education from complementary investigative perspectives.

  19. Gender, Policy and Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Christine

    2007-01-01

    An examination of gender discourses within New Labour education policy on the preparation of students for a career in teaching in the UK reveals a contradictory yet, at the same time, complementary position. In the guidelines outlining the Standards that a prospective teacher has to achieve, the ways in which gender informs pupils' educational…

  20. Teacher Page - Deutsch Klasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau Barlow

    2009-11-02

    On this site you will find the resource needed to teach a German Level I Course. There are links below for lesson plans and a link to the student page. This page is an introductory page for the teacher. Below are four links that will provide teachers with additional resources to use in their classrooms. Teacher Page - Lesson Plans Teacher Page - Resources Student Page - Deutsch Klasse Student WebQuests ...

  1. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

    OpenAIRE

    Kayarkanni, Dr S.

    2012-01-01

    Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusin...

  2. Investigation of Science Teacher Candidates’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Science Teaching with Respect to Some Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma A?GÜL YALÇIN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available “The purpose of this study was to investigate science-teacher candidates’ science teaching self-efficacy beliefs according to grade level and gender. A survey approach was used in the study. The sample consisted of 192 first and fourth grade pre-service science teachers enrolled in the department of Science Teacher Training in the Education Faculty at Bayburt University. Data was collected using a likert type test, “science teaching self-efficacy belief scale” with 23 items, adapted to Turkish by the researcher, and originally developed by Enochs-Riggs (1990. The coefficient of Cronbach alpha for the Turkish version of the test was found to be 0.81. Variance analysis (two-way ANOVA was performed on the collected data to reveal whether there are significant differences in science teacher candidates’ self-efficacy beliefs of science teaching according to grade level and gender. The results of the analysis showed that science-teacher candidates’ self-efficacy beliefs of science teaching are considerably high. In addition, the same findings indicated that there were statistically significant differences in science-teacher candidates’ self-efficacy beliefs of science teaching with respect to both grade level and gender, in favors of female.

  3. The Perspectives of Teacher Trainees’ Regarding the Concept of “Child” by Means of Metaphors (A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O?uzhan KILDAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to reveal the changes related to the “child” concept of the teacher trainees through metaphors in their first and forth years based on behaviourism and constructivism. 104 teacher trainees studying at the faculty of education of a state university between 2007 and 2011 participated in the study. As a data collection tool, teacher trainees were given a paper on which “a child is like…; because…” was written. This paper was accepted as a written document. Qualitative and quantitative techniques were carried out in order to analyse the data. The metaphors gathered through the papers were analysed according to qualitative analysis principles. Kruskal-Wallis H Test was performed in order to find out whether the relation between the departments of the teacher trainees and the philosophical foundations of the metaphors they devised was significant. As a result of data analysis, it was observed that there was not an important change in the philosophical foundations of the metaphors devised by the teacher trainees regarding the concept of “child”. In addition, there was not a significant difference between the departments of teacher trainees and the philosophical foundations of the metaphors they devised in their final year.

  4. Teachers discovering nuclear science for the 90's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High school and junior high school teachers from across the country have rediscovered nuclear science through summer participation as teacher research associates at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As a result of their new knowledge and awareness of the broad range of applications of nuclear science with obvious positive benefit to society, these teachers are putting nuclear chemistry and physics back into their curriculum. Through direct research participation teachers become a primary resource for students. The Department of Energy is now supporting over 150 teacher research associates in its TRAC program in all areas of science. The eight week teacher research associate appointments provide an in-depth experience for the teacher, and an opportunity for teachers and scientists to become engaged in new curriculum and materials development

  5. English Teacher Education as Literacy Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayher, John S.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's keynote address from the 2011 CEE Summer Conference at Fordham University in which he challenges educators to rethink what they do and how they do it. He talks about English teacher education as literacy teacher education. He tries to sketch a picture of the status quo and its limits, and an alternative picture…

  6. A program for teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program developed by the Spanish Atomic Forum aimed at high school teachers' training to nuclear science information in schools and universities, is presented. The rationale of its development and its implementation is discussed: among various observations, it was found out that seminars where teachers from science and teachers from other disciplines were mixed, are of a better efficiency towards nuclear energy acceptance

  7. Qualities of Effective Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronge, James H.

    This book synthesizes research to identify specific teacher behaviors that contribute to student achievement, focusing on what teachers can control (preparation, personality, and practices). Part 1 examines teacher effectiveness. Chapter 1 investigates prerequisites of effective teaching, particularly the influence of background and professional…

  8. Rethinking Reflection: Teachers' Critiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Becky M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study conducted with a teacher focus group asked to read and discuss their responses to selected published teacher narratives of reflective practice. The teachers challenged features of practitioner reflection presented in several of the reading selections as not representative of how they experienced…

  9. Assessment of Teacher Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Feyyat

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to contribute to the achievement of educational goals by determining teachers' levels of motivation. With this aim in mind, the opinions of 386 teachers employed in primary schools in Tokat province were sought. According to the findings of the study, the teachers stated that their needs were not fulfilled according to…

  10. Assessment Mathematics Teacher's Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoor, A. G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aimed to identifying the professional efficiencies for the intermediate schools mathematics teachers and tries to know at what level the math teachers experience those competencies. The researcher used a descriptive research approach, the study data collected from specialist educators and teacher's experts and previous studies to…

  11. Finding Exemplary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Eamonn

    2010-01-01

    Teacher quality is the most crucial component in promoting student learning. For all the controversy about No Child Left Behind, one underlying emphasis of the federal law that is irrefutable is the importance placed on teacher quality. Therefore, a school organization committed to excellence must recruit and select outstanding teachers. The Obama…

  12. Urban Mathematics Teacher Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Mathematics teachers are both more difficult to attract and more difficult to retain than social sciences teachers. This fact is not unique to the United States; it is reported as being a problem in Europe as well (Howson, 2002). In the United States, however, the problem is particularly preoccupying. Because of the chronic teacher shortages and…

  13. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  14. Mentoring New Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Judie A.; Wagstaff, Imelda

    1999-01-01

    Describes an approach to mentoring new teachers in California's Conejo Valley Unified School District that addresses five phases of new teacher development, explaining that, although it is not as structured nor comprehensive an approach as the California Formative Assessment and Support System for Teachers (CFASST), it has clearly demonstrated…

  15. Science teacher's discourse about reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research we start from the assumption that teachers act as mediators of reading practices in school and problematise their practices, meanings and representations of reading. We have investigated meanings constructed by a group of teachers of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, working at a federal technical school. Having French discourse analysis as our theoretical-methodological framework, we considered that meanings, concepts and conceptions of reading are built historically through discourses, which produce meanings that determine ideological practices. Our results show that, for that group of teachers, there were no opportunities during either initial training or on-going education for reflecting upon the role of reading in science teaching and learning. Moreover, there seems to be an association between the type of discourse and modes of reading, so that unique meanings are attributed to scientific texts and their reading are linked to search and assimilation of information.

  16. Characteristics of Public, Private, and Bureau of Indian Education Elementary and Secondary School Teachers in the United States: Results From the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey. First Look. NCES 2009-324

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Jared

    2009-01-01

    This report presents selected findings from the school teacher data files of the 2007-08 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). SASS is a nationally representative sample survey of public, private, and Bureau of Indian Education-funded (BIE) K-12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The public school…

  17. Troops-to-Teachers: Program Brings More Men and Minorities to the Teaching Workforce, but Education Could Improve Management to Enhance Results. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-06-265

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    2006-01-01

    With the 2002 enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA), GAO was mandated to review the Troops-to-Teachers program, which provides financial assistance and counseling to help military personnel obtain their teacher licenses, especially in priority subject areas, such as math and science, and find employment in high-need districts and…

  18. When students become teachers: training period, research and teaching practice in the formation of indigenous teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Humberto Alves Corrêa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main traineeship theme in the Indigenous Teachers Training Course at the Federal University of Amazonas is one of the most important challenges in the college training of indigenous teachers. Since indigenous university students are already teachers in their villages, current investigation endeavors to answer the following questions: What kind of activities will characterize this training and which will compose the teachers' formation? How may research and teaching practice be articulated so that efforts and results may contribute towards teacher training and indigenous schools? Current research focuses on the experience of the Mura Class which is in its final year and finishing its traineeship. Traineeship has been a space-time opportunity for reflection and activities on the school and on the teaching practice to highlight teachers' training, qualify their professional insertions and, consequently, the work of the indigenous school.

  19. Learning to use student ideas in elementary science teaching: The influence of mentor teachers in preservice teachers' developing meanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Elsa Nunes

    This study explores the influence of mentor teachers in the meanings and practices that two elementary preservice teachers adopted about eliciting and using student ideas, while learning to teach science in the university science methods course and in the field placement classroom. Prior research on teacher development has shown that the high-leverage practice of eliciting and using student ideas can support preservice teachers in thinking about common problems of practice. I used four core problems of practice to examine the meanings and practices that preservice teachers adopted in eliciting and using student ideas as they planned, enacted and reflected on methods course assignments in the field placement classroom. Using sociocultural and situative perspectives on learning, I identified two factors that influenced the sense that preservice teachers constructed and the practices that they adopted about eliciting and using student ideas. These factors were mentor teacher's perspectives on learning and goals for student learning. I also examined three mechanisms by which mentor teacher's perspectives and goals influenced preservice teacher meanings and practices about eliciting and using student ideas in instruction, including mentor teacher's classroom practice, the nature and foci of mentor teacher and preservice teacher conversations and mentor teacher's use of preservice teachers' ideas in their conversations about instruction. The results suggest that preservice teachers come to make sense of and use student ideas in their instruction in ways that closely align with those of their mentors. They also indicate that preservice teachers' integration of experiences from different learning-to-teach contexts in making sense of student ideas may be related to the degree of alignment between mentor teachers' perspectives and goals and the perspectives and goals of the science methods course.

  20. Teachers' Job Characteristics and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabe, Clermont; Burns, Mildred

    1994-01-01

    To test the Job Characteristics Model of Motivation, 247 Quebec teachers completed the Job Diagnostic Survey. Results demonstrated the utility of the model and the instrument for the teaching profession. Psychological states influenced the relationship between job characteristics and motivation/satisfaction outcomes. (SK)

  1. Retraining Institute in Teacher Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, H.B.; Jennings, R.

    1992-07-31

    This endeavor was comprised of three companion projects. They are interdependent components which together provide a significant enhancement to the existing programs in the School of Education at Norfolk state University.The primary focus of the project was in instructing regular and special education undergraduate students and teachers. As a result of this endeavor, instruction in science and engineering majors was enhanced.

  2. Preservice teachers' objectives and their experience of practical work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivalainen, V.; Asikainen, M. A.; Hirvonen, P. E.

    2013-06-01

    This study explores third-year preservice physics teachers’ (n=32) views concerning the objectives of practical work at school and university. Content analysis of their essays about practical work revealed not only the objectives of the practical work undertaken but also how they had experienced teaching as school and university students. The objectives most commonly referred to were related to the connections between theory and practice, motivation, understanding phenomena, learning how to observe, and learning how to report. In contrast, some objectives were recognized only rarely, which is an important issue for discussion as a future challenge. Preservice teachers’ positive experiences of practical work resulted from the successful implementation of practical work. According to our findings, practical work can in many cases be regarded as successful, especially when the participants understand the objectives of the teaching. In contrast, negative experiences reflected failures or difficulties in implementation. We conclude by suggesting that preservice teachers should be offered opportunities to reflect on their previous experiences and to see and experience in practice the advantages of practical work.

  3. Teaching Teachers in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Moldwin, M.; Rabella-Soares, M.; Reiff, P.; Sumners, C.; Yizengaw, E.

    2008-05-01

    Africa needs to develop a space physics research structure, and a key goal of the United Nations-sponsored International Heliophysical Year (IHY) is to provide support to those efforts. One key focus of IHY is the deployment of networks of small instruments to encourage development of space science research and educational infrastructures in developing nations. In addition to new scientific discoveries and advancing space science research in Africa by establishing scientific collaborations between scientists in developed and developing nations, an IHY objective is to increase the number of space scientists and increase the scientific awareness about the importance of the space science In order to develop space science research infrastructure, space science educational infrastructure also needs to be developed to support the long-term operation and use of the science instrumentation. Developing nations need to develop the necessary training and encouragement of students to enter and excel in scientific fields. In response to these needs, the authors, working under the auspices of the AGU Space Physics and Aeronomy Education and Public Outreach (SPA EPO) Committee, organized a Geophysics Information for Teachers (GIFT) workshop for Ethiopian high school physics educators on 10 November 2007 in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia. The workshop, held in conjunction with the IHY-Africa Space Weather Science and Education Workshop, gathered together 62 high school physics teachers from around the country for a one-day professional development program that focused on fundamental physics concepts relevant to space weather. Our presentation will describe the workshop, the challenges of launching such a program, and present results from the assessment surveys taken by teachers at the end of the workshop.

  4. Adaptation and Validation of the Teacher Emotional Labour Strategy Scale in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongbiao

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the adaptation and validation of the Teacher Emotional Labour Strategy Scale (TELSS) as tested on samples of 633 Beijing teachers and 648 Chongqing teachers in Chinese mainland. Results show that the 13-item TELSS adapted for this study had good internal consistency on three subscales which measure three types of teacher

  5. A Survey of Bahamian and Jamaican Teachers' Level of Motivation and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, David K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation among teachers in the Bahamas and Jamaica. A total of 168 Bahamian (n = 75) and Jamaican (n = 93) teachers completed the Teacher Motivation and Job Satisfaction Survey. Overall results indicate that teachers in the Bahamas reported higher levels…

  6. English Language Teacher Educators' Pedagogical Knowledge Base: The Macro and Micro Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Shahab; Akbari, Ramin; Samar, Reza Ghafar; Kiany, Gholam Reza

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the major categories of English language teacher educators' pedagogical knowledge base. To this end, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 5 teachers, teacher educators, and university professors (15 participants in total). The results of data analysis indicated that teacher educators'…

  7. Effects of Student Teaching on the Classroom Management Beliefs and Skills of Music Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Manny

    1982-01-01

    Does the music student teaching experience affect student teachers' classroom management beliefs and skills, and as a result of student teaching, do the classroom management beliefs and skills of music student teachers and their cooperating teachers become more congruent? Research indicates that student teaching does not affect student teacher

  8. Perspective Consciousness and Cultural Relevancy: Partnership Considerations for the Re-Conceptualization of Music Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Suzanne L.

    2011-01-01

    Strong school-university partnerships yield effective music teachers. However, music teacher preparation curriculum has undergone little reform over the years, resulting in a homogeneous P-12 curriculum. Encouraging preservice music teachers to consider cultural and pedagogical differences holds promise for changing music teacher preparation and…

  9. Teachers´Constructions of Multilingual Students Competence Levels in LIteracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Abstract Based on a theoretical understanding of standardised literacy testing as a social practice (Hamilton, 2001; 2012) this paper explores and discusses teachers´ perceptions of and practices around National standardised literacy testing in a Danish primary class with multilingual students. In the first part of the presentation it is analysed how the literacy tests used in the classroom construct a representation of a literacy level, and how this construction relates to central issues in the international academic discourse about standardised literacy testing of multilingual students. In the second part of the presentation it is explored how these standardised testing instruments and the result of the tests are embedded in teachers´ practices and in their perceptions of multilingual students´ literacy levels. The analysis is based on a six year longitudinal study in one primary school class in Denmark. Besides the standardised tests used in the classrooms the data consists of interviews with teachers,of observations of testing practices, and of school-home conferences. The analysis reveals that the validity of the standardised literacy tests is questioned in relation to multilingual students, and that the teachers embed the tests and their results in a broader competence framework in which a testing based construction and an everyday based construction of competence are operating side by side. These findings give reason to question and discuss equality oriented educational programmes and strategies for multilingual students in which literacy testing plays a central role, and to discuss ethical issues around the production and use of literacy tests in educational contexts characterised by linguistic diversity.

  10. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR.S.KAYARKANNI

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusing on effective classroom management will enhance a teacher's skills and performance in the classroom.

  11. Student teachers’ levels of understanding and model of understanding about Newton's laws of motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin DEVECIOGLU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the level of student teachers’ understandings of Newton’s laws of motion and relating these levels to identify student teachers’ models of understanding. An achievement test composed of two parts comprising 12 open ended questions was constructed and given to 45 pre-service classroom teachers. The first part of the test included 3 open-ended questions for each law asking students to explain a case, determine the physics law related to the case and write a case suitable for the related law. The second part was composed of three questions about defining Newton’s laws of motion.The data analysis was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, the analysis of understanding level showed that pre-service teachers were relatively successful at explaining a case about Newton’s law of motion. However, their achievement in defining these laws was low. In the second stage, the analysis of the understanding model revealed that students developed different understanding models such as Optimum Model (OM, Uncreative Model (UM, Theoretical Model (TM, Practical Model (PM, Memorizing Model (MM and Inappropriate Model (IM. As a result of the data analysis it was determined that only a few students had a scientific understanding model.The results showed that the student teachers’ have significant weaknesses in understanding the terms of fundamental knowledge of Newton’s Laws of Motion. This may stem from the lack of student teachers to relate scientific knowledge with real life phenomena and experiences. Another result of this study is that defining the level of understanding and model of understanding students can help educators to prepare and implement teaching activities more effectively to promote students’ thinking, discussing and interpreting skills.

  12. Content of teachers' stereotypes about adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?eri? Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Discourse on 'problematic behavior' of the young in adolescence period is often present in lay, media, professional and scientific public. In this research, we performed empirical testing of the psychological concept of 'storm and stress', which is manifested by stereotypes about adolescents as rebels. The goal was to establish whether teachers hold stereotypes about younger adolescents as a social group and what the content of the stereotype is. Research participants were 193 teachers teaching the seventh grade in ten Belgrade primary schools. Factor analysis method established the presence of several factors, which reflect the psychological content and meaning of teachers' stereotypes about younger adolescents. The results of our research point out: (a that stereotypes of teachers about younger adolescents stand in partial correspondence with the content of a widely distributed concept of 'storm and stress'; (b that this concept is mostly loaded with a negative perception of pupils on the part of teachers and (c that teachers less often perceive pupils through the prism of some positive qualities. That is, teachers think that these positive qualities are not 'typical' qualities of adolescents if they are observed as a group. Interviewed teachers hold stereotypes about younger adolescents, but intensity and valence of stereotypes vary depending on the nature of obtained factors.

  13. Institutional Leadership, Teacher’s Competence on Curricular Trends and Student’s Performance in Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camfel V. Balaud-Tabboga

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study primarily aimed to determine whether there is a significant combined influence of institutional leadership in science education, and teachers' competence on curricular trends on students' performance in science education in private secondary schools in Region XI. Employing a descriptive-correlation design, this investigation was conducted in Region XI (Davao Region or Southern Mindanao with 233 purposively selected Science Teachers from private secondary high schools. A 20-item-researcher made Questionnaire was administered to them. The statistical tools used in the interpretation of data and the testing of the null hypothesis were the weighted mean, arithmetic mean, standard deviation, and linear regression. Results show that the level of institutional leadership in science education among the high schools in Region XI is high as quantified by a mean value of 4.43. There is a high level of teacher's competence on various curricular trends, which is quantified by an overall mean value of 4.31. It was also noted that the students' performance in science is low as denoted by an overall mean of 24.20 out of the perfect score of 60. Out of the 10 divisions whose records were shared by the Dep Ed Region XI, only 2 have average ratings (G - 33.40, and I - 33.05. Statistical analysis shows that none of the two independent variables was able to establish a significant predictive influence on students' performance in science. There is also no combined predictive influence as revealed by an r2 of 21.0% with a p-value of 0.439 which is greater than 0.05.

  14. Building professional identity as computer science teachers: Supporting high school computer science teachers through reflection and community building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lijun

    Computing education requires qualified computing teachers. The reality is that too few high schools in the U.S. have computing/computer science teachers with formal computer science (CS) training, and many schools do not have CS teacher at all. Moreover, teacher retention rate is often low. Beginning teacher attrition rate is particularly high in secondary education. Therefore, in addition to the need for preparing new CS teachers, we also need to support those teachers we have recruited and trained to become better teachers and continue to teach CS. Teacher education literature, especially teacher identity theory, suggests that a strong sense of teacher identity is a major indicator or feature of committed, qualified teachers. However, under the current educational system in the U.S., it could be challenging to establish teacher identity for high school (HS) CS teachers, e.g., due to a lack of teacher certification for CS. This thesis work centers upon understanding the sense of identity HS CS teachers hold and exploring ways of supporting their identity development through a professional development program: the Disciplinary Commons for Computing Educators (DCCE). DCCE has a major focus on promoting reflection on teaching practice and community building. With scaffolded activities such as course portfolio creation, peer review and peer observation among a group of HS CS teachers, it offers opportunities for CS teachers to explicitly reflect on and narrate their teaching, which is a central process of identity building through their participation within the community. In this thesis research, I explore the development of CS teacher identity through professional development programs. I first conducted an interview study with local HS CS teachers to understand their sense of identity and factors influencing their identity formation. I designed and enacted the professional program (DCCE) and conducted case studies with DCCE participants to understand how their participation in DCCE supported their identity development as a CS teacher. Overall, I found that these CS teachers held different teacher identities with varied features related to their motivation and commitment in teaching CS. I identified four concrete factors that contributed to these teachers' sense of professional identity as a CS teacher. I addressed some of these issues for CS teachers' identity development (especially the issue of lacking community) through offering professional development opportunities with a major focus on teacher reflection and community building. Results from this work indicate a potential model of supporting CS identity development, mapping the characteristics of the professional development program with particular facets of CS teacher identity. This work offers further understanding of the unique challenges that current CS teachers are facing in their CS teaching, as well as the challenges of preparing and supporting CS teachers. My findings also suggest guidelines for teacher education and professional development program design and implementation for building committed, qualified CS teachers in ways that promote the development of CS teacher identity.

  15. PRF Cross-Cultural Psychological Study of Lithuanian Students, Teachers, and Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illovsky, Michael E.; Gintiliene, Grazina; Bulotaite, Laima; Rickman, Jacqueline; Belekiene, Marijona; Janowitz, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The Personality Research Form (PRF) was used to study the psychological traits of Lithuanian college of education students, teachers, and special education teachers. A sample of American college students was also used for comparison. Chi-square results indicated no statistical differences among the groups. Interpretations of the lack of…

  16. Examining Teachers' Beliefs about ICT in Education: Implications of a Teacher Preparation Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Komis, Vassilis

    2007-01-01

    The survey presented in this article examines current teachers' beliefs and attitudes towards information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. A total of 1165 primary and secondary education teachers participated in the study, immediately after following a training programme on basic ICT skills. The authors' results showed that the…

  17. Teacher Attraction: Are Magnet School Teachers More Professionalized than Traditional Schoolteachers in Urban Secondary Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lorraine

    2002-01-01

    Used a national-level data set to investigate four elements of teacher professionalization in both magnet and traditional urban secondary schools and examine the impact of school organization on teacher professionalization. Results indicated that the magnet school context is noteworthy in the areas of autonomy, classroom control, influence on…

  18. Teach the Teacher! Building ROV's to Teach Polar Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholow, S.; Warburton, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) a non-profit corporation consisting of institutions organized and operated for educational, professional, or scientific purposes, received funding from Lockheed Martin to design and host a workshop for teachers. Middle School teachers participated in a three-day Polar Workshop designed to enlighten teachers regarding marine polar science and exploration through the use of remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs. The Polar Workshop was offered as part of a teacher professional development activity that took at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. The workshop provided training for teachers alongside polar scientists and teacher mentors. The overall purpose of the workshop was to teach teachers about marine polar science and technology that could be used with students in classrooms. Teachers were teamed with a polar scientist and with a teacher mentor for the three-day project. Results from the evaluation of the Polar Workshop indicate this workshop was an excellent opportunity for the teachers who participated as well as for the scientists. In this presentation, we will share the evaluation data, best practices of the workshop model, and how teacher mentors, scientists, and graduate students can help teach teachers successfully.

  19. Programa de Formação Continuada para Docentes da Educação Superior: um estudo avaliativo a partir dos resultados de uma tese / Continuing Education Program for Higher Education Teachers: an evaluative study based on thesis results

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sueli Petry da, Luz; Newton César, Balzan.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar considerações avaliativas sobre os resultados de uma tese de doutorado intitulada "Programa de Formação Continuada para Docentes do Ensino Superior: um estudo de caso",desenvolvida na Universidade do Vale do Itajaí - UNIVALI, Itajaí, Santa Catarina, e apresentada [...] na Faculdade de Educação, da Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, em Campinas, Estado de São Paulo, em novembro de 2007. A metodologia utilizada na pesquisa foi um estudo de caso, por meio de narrativa. O plano de desenvolvimento do artigo está dividido em quatro partes. A primeira contextualiza a instituição e o referido Programa em sua primeira edição. A segunda apresenta a metodologia e a análise dos dados da pesquisa. A terceira parte aborda os resultados do estudo de caso. A quarta parte avalia os resultados alcançados. Ao final, efetuam- se considerações que sinalizam para a importância da continuidade de estudos, em favor do estado da arte sobre formação continuada para docentes do ensino superior, que objetive caracterizar a identidade e profissionalidade docente, em nível nacional, principalmente a partir dos saberes e fazeres desses programas. Abstract in english This article offers some evaluative considerations of the results of a doctorate thesis entitled "Programa de FormaçãoContinuada para Docentes do Ensino Superior: um estudo de caso" (Continuing Education Program for Higher Education Teachers: A case study), carried out at the Universidade do Vale do [...] Itajaí (University of Vale do Itajaí) - UNIVALI, in Itajaí, Santa Catarina, and presented at the School of Education of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, in Campinas, State of São Paulo, in November 2007. The methodology used in the research was a case study, by means of a narrative. The article is divided into four sections. The first section outlines the context of the institution that developed the Program and the Program itself in its first edition. The second presents the research methodology used and the data analysis. The third addresses the results of the case study, and the fourth section evaluates the results obtained. At the end, some considerations are made that point to the importance of further studies on the state- of- the- art in the area of continuing education for higher education teachers, seeking to characterize the identity of the teaching professional, at the national level, particularly based on the knowledge and activities of these programs.

  20. Characteristics of an Effective English Language Teacher as Perceived by Iranian Teachers and Learners of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Babai Shishavan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to characterize qualities of an effective English language teacher (EELT as perceived by Iranian English language teachers and learners. For this purpose, a tailor-made questionnaire was administered to 59 English language teachers and 215 learners of English at universities, high schools and language institutes in Iran. The results indicated significant differences between teachers’ and learners’ views on some characteristics of EELTs. Teachers seemed to agree more strongly than students that an EELT should assign homework and integrate group activities into the classroom. Other areas of significant difference in opinions included preparing the lesson well, using lesson plans and assessing what students have learned reasonably. Students, on the contrary, agreed more than teachers that teaching English in Persian (first language of the learners was one of the prominent characteristics of an EELT. The qualitative analysis indicated that teachers perceived the features like mastery of the target language, good knowledge of pedagogy and the use of particular techniques and methods as well as a good personality to make an EELT, whereas, learners gave more weight to characteristics relating to a teacher’s personality and the way he behaves toward his students.

  1. The Teacher Quality Index: A Protocol for Teacher Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronge, James H.; Hindman, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    Turn your teacher hiring process into a research-based protocol that is more apt to select teachers who will increase student achievement. Using the teacher quality indicators from the ASCD best-selling book "Qualities of Effective Teachers, 2nd Edition," the authors take the guesswork out of teacher hiring with a systematic structure and steps…

  2. Strengthening Teacher Education Program: Keys to Develop through Teacher Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tecnam Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Teacher performance assessment is a part of a global trend based on teacher education program. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the American Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA) program, to identify some of the features in creating a system for pre-service teachers in developing countries, and to suggest an ideal TPA model for strengthening the teacher education program.

  3. Dissident Teacher Education: A Heterologic Paradigm for Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    As challenges are handed down from state and federal governments to demonstrate utility and efficiency within teacher education programs, it is important to stop and consider the role of teacher education within schooling. Perhaps we should prepare new teachers by asking, "How should we prepare new teachers?" By framing teacher education within a…

  4. Teachers’ reasoning in a repeated sampling context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Wessels

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of variability and uncertainty are regarded as cornerstones in statistics. Proportional reasoning plays an important connecting role in reasoning about variability and therefore teachers need to develop students’ statistical reasoning skills about variability, including intuitions for the outcomes of repeated sampling situations. Many teachers however lack the necessary knowledge and skills themselves and need to be exposed to hands-on activities to develop their reasoning skills about variability in a sampling environment. The research reported in this article aimed to determine and develop teachers’ understanding of variability in a repeated sampling context. The research forms part of a larger project that profiled Grade 8–12 teachers’ statistical content and pedagogical content knowledge. As part of this larger research project 14 high school teachers from eight culturally diverse urban schools attended a series of professional development workshops in statistics and completed a number of tasks to determine and develop their understanding of variability in a repeated sampling context. The Candy Bowl Task was used to probe teachers’ notions of variability in such a context. Teachers’ reasoning mainly revealed different types of thinking based on absolute frequencies, relative frequencies and on expectations of proportion and spread. Only one response showed distributional reasoning involving reasoning about centres as well as the variation around the centres. The conclusion was that a greater emphasis on variability and repeated sampling is necessary in statistics education in South African schools. To this end teachers should be supported to develop their own and learners’ statistical reasoning skills in order to help prepare them adequately for citizenship in a knowledge-driven society.

  5. The Impact of a Professional Development Programme on Primary Teachers' Classroom Practice and Pupils' Attitudes to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Greg

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship, if any, between teacher participation in a targeted professional development programme and changes in participants' instructional practice and their pupils' attitudes to learning primary science. The programme took place over a 2-year period in 15 small rural schools in the West of Ireland. Data sources include teacher and pupil questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and informal classroom observations. The findings reveal that as a result of their involvement in the programme, (a) teachers' instructional practice in science lessons became more inquiry-based and they were engaging their pupils in substantially more hands-on activities in science lessons and (b) pupils developed more positive attitudes towards learning science. The findings from this study add to what is known about delivering effective professional development.

  6. Teaching Science to Students with Learning Disabilities: Subverting the Myths of Labeling Through Teachers' Caring and Enthusiasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Isenbarger, Lynn

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and analyse the role of a teacher's caring and enthusiasm in an inclusive science classroom. Using stories, interviews, and action research, it is revealed that this teacher's approach focuses on two major ideas: (a) Combining activity-oriented science curriculum with the building of caring relationships in her classroom; and (b) Developing enthusiasm for science and fulfilling students' personal purposes. A case study of one student labeled as learning disabled is analysed and provides evidence of his remarkable growth in terms of his academic and behavioral performance over a period of two years. Based on the results of this study a number of ways of subverting labeling are suggested and two qualitative hypotheses for further research in this area are proposed. The main suggestion of this study is that thinking behind labels in the context of an inclusive science classroom needs to be revised in light of the role of teacher caring.

  7. A STUDY OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN RELATION TO LEVEL OF ASPIRATION OF B.ED STUDENT TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawed Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and level of aspiration in terms of subject background of B.Ed student teachers. The sample size was 600, among them 300 are boys and 300 are girls. The tool used for this study is 'Emotional Intelligence Scale' developed by Ankool Hyde, Sanjyot Pethe and Upinder Dhar. The result revealed the Positive correlation between EI with level of aspiration. The science student teachers shows positive correlation between EI and level of aspiration. Whereas there is no positive correlation was found between EI and level of aspiration in respect of arts and social science of B.Ed student teachers respectively

  8. A Study of Developing Professional Ethics Principles Scale for Teachers Working in the Pre-School Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?afak ÖZTÜRK AYNAL

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the development of a professional ethics principles scale for teachers working in the pre-school education domain, in addition to testing the reliability and validity of this questionnaire. To this end, pre-school teachers' opinions were collected. Following the analysis of these viewpoints and the previous literature, items of the trial form were written. The draft form which comprised these items were applied to 245 pre-school teachers. In order to document the validity of the scale, a factor analysis was conducted. The analysis results revealed that the scale has a four factorial structure. The Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of the scale, which is an indicator of its reliability, was found to be 0.95. The reliability coefficients for the subcomponents varied between 0.90 and 0.94.

  9. The relationship between wellbeing indicators and teacher psychological stress in Eastern Cape public schools in South Africa

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Malik L.M., Vazi; Robert A.C., Ruiter; Bart, van den Borne; Glynnis, Martin; Kitty, Dumont; Priscilla S., Reddy.

    Full Text Available ORIENTATION: Positive psychological and subjective wellbeing indicators have proven to be protective against certain physical illnesses but have been rarely assessed in teacher stress. RESEARCH PURPOSE: The main objective of this study was to assess the relationship between indicators of wellbeing a [...] nd stress and to further assess the relative importance of these wellbeing indicators in explaining stress variance in a large sample of Eastern Cape primary and high school teachers in South Africa. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: The majority of teacher stress studies focus on the misfit between the individual's resources and the environmental demands. There is a scarcity of studies reporting on protective factors in teaching and we know little about their possible role as possible protective factors against stress. This is important in developing stress prevention strategies. RESEARCH DESIGN, APPROACH AND METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was used targeting public school teachers in the Eastern Cape. The sample size was 562 randomly selected teachers from both public primary and high schools. MAIN FINDINGS: The results revealed that stress is prevalent amongst teachers. Subjective and psychological wellbeing factors added significantly to the explained stress variance. Also, both negative affect and role problems had significant positive correlations with stress, whilst psychological wellbeing had a strong inverse relationship with stress. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The results implied that interventions focusing on improving psychological wellbeing and reduction of negative affect can contribute to stress prevention. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: The results contributed towards a better understanding of the relative importance of wellbeing constructs as protective factors against teacher stress.

  10. The relationship between wellbeing indicators and teacher psychological stress in Eastern Cape public schools in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik L.M. Vazi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Positive psychological and subjective wellbeing indicators have proven to be protective against certain physical illnesses but have been rarely assessed in teacher stress.Research purpose: The main objective of this study was to assess the relationship between indicators of wellbeing and stress and to further assess the relative importance of these wellbeing indicators in explaining stress variance in a large sample of Eastern Cape primary and high school teachers in South Africa.Motivation for the study: The majority of teacher stress studies focus on the misfit between the individual’s resources and the environmental demands. There is a scarcity of studies reporting on protective factors in teaching and we know little about their possible role as possible protective factors against stress. This is important in developing stress prevention strategies.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey was used targeting public school teachers in the Eastern Cape. The sample size was 562 randomly selected teachers from both public primary and high schools.Main findings: The results revealed that stress is prevalent amongst teachers. Subjective and psychological wellbeing factors added significantly to the explained stress variance. Also, both negative affect and role problems had significant positive correlations with stress, whilst psychological wellbeing had a strong inverse relationship with stress.Practical/managerial implications: The results implied that interventions focusing on improving psychological wellbeing and reduction of negative affect can contribute to stress prevention.Contribution/value-add: The results contributed towards a better understanding of the relative importance of wellbeing constructs as protective factors against teacher stress.

  11. Reaching the teachers

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The fourth edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme welcomed 38 teachers to the Laboratory this July. For three weeks the teachers were immersed in the life of CERN, giving them a unique experience to take back to their classrooms.   Participants and organisers of the HST 2001 programme. The pupils of the teachers who attended the High School Teachers (HST) programme at CERN will notice a difference when they meet their teachers at the beginning of next term. They'll see a new-found enthusiasm in their eyes, and this will be thanks to the three weeks they spent at the Laboratory attending the summer students' lectures and working with other teachers from around the world. 'This experience fires you up again!,' explains Wim Peeters, a Belgian teacher at CERN for the second time. For many teachers of physics, university is a long time ago. Physics research has moved on, and there are many new things to learn. That's why CERN has the HST, so that teachers can mix with university students in ...

  12. Teacher Knowledge: A Complex Tapestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoniou, Misty

    2015-01-01

    Teachers need to know a great deal, in many areas and in multiple ways. Teacher knowledge is a complex tapestry, and teachers must successfully weave the multiple threads. In this article, I present a conceptualisation of teacher knowledge that provides a framework for describing the complexity of teacher knowledge. The framework describes three…

  13. Current Issues in Teacher Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Wis?niewska, Danuta

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a review of a selection of the literature in the field of English foreign language teaching related to teacher autonomy. The focus is on the core themes recurring in the literature, which comprise: rationale for teacher autonomy, definitions of the concept, descriptions of an autonomous teacher, recognition of the constraints on autonomy and suggestions for teacher education promoting teacher autonomy.

  14. Changing Attitudes toward Teacher Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Donald

    The identification, encouragement, and recruitment of teachers is a professional responsibility that must be faced today. The field of industrial arts holds no external attractors; the job of teacher recruitment rests on the shoulders of teachers, supervisors, and teacher educators. Teachers have attitudes that fail to support any process that…

  15. Elementary School Teachers' Manipulative Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Florez, Lida J.; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from 503 inservice elementary teachers, this study investigated the relationship between teachers' background characteristics, teachers' beliefs about manipulatives, and the frequency with which teachers use manipulatives as part of their mathematics instruction. Findings from the study show that teachers' grade level and beliefs about…

  16. The nurturing of creativity in the History classroom through teaching methods: the views of teachers and learners

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Byron, Bunt.

    Full Text Available Nurturing creative thinking abilities in all learning areas and subjects is one of the cornerstones and ideals of Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) in South Africa. This article reports on the results obtained with a pilot study that set out to determine the extent to which creativity is presently nurt [...] ured in the History classroom. A qualitative study by means of semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with learners (n = 4) and teachers (n = 2) of History at a secondary school was conducted to determine learner and teacher perceptions related to the nurturing of creativity through the instructional practices of teachers applied during teaching and learning. The results revealed that the nurturing of creativity has not yet become reality in the History classroom. It was disconcerting to note that direct instruction dominates the teaching and learning of History and that very little opportunity for practical experience and interaction during teaching and learning exists. The article concludes with recommendations to teachers on how to purposefully enhance creativity during the teaching of History. This pilot study was conducted as partial fulfillment of the requirements for a BEd Honours degree, and to set the scene for a more extended study on creative thinking in History with larger groups of learners and teachers.

  17. Influence of Financial Literacy of Teachers on Financial Education Teaching in Elementary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu-Tong Deng; Li-Chiu Chi; Nai-Yung Teng; Tseng-Chung Tang; Chun-Lin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Would teachers’ own lack of financial literacy inhibit their teaching financial education in the classroom? Using unique data from a sample of elementary school teachers in Taiwan, this paper examines the impact of teachers’ personal financial literacy on the effectiveness of their financial education teaching. Our results substantiated that there is a positive correlation between teachers’ financial literacy and financial education teaching. Furthermore, elementary school teachers unde...

  18. Investigating the effectiveness of a dynamic integrated approach to teacher professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotis Antoniou; Leonidas Kyriakides; Bert Creemers

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues that research on teacher professional development could be integrated with validated theoretical models of educational effectiveness research (EER). A dynamic integrated approach (DIA) to teacher professional development is proposed. The methods and results of a study comparing the impact of the DIA and the Holistic - Reflective Approach (HA) to teacher professional development are presented. Teaching skills and teacher perceptions of teaching of 130 teachers and the achiev...

  19. A Case Study of English Teacher Development in Hebei Normal University of Science and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Xuerong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: English teacher training is a very important part of teacher development in a university. This article reports a case study of English teacher development in Hebei Normal University of Science and Technology. A training program was given to improve the professional level of the young English Teachers. The result shows the school-based training improved teachers’ professional competence and received a good training effect. Several effective training patterns are proposed to enhance...

  20. Human Rights Education Standards for Teachers and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Todd

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a set of human rights education standards for classroom teachers and, by implication, outcomes for teacher preparation programs. The discussion includes a brief description of human rights education and concludes with recommendations for teacher preparation programs.