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Sample records for quality perinatal care

  1. Mozambican midwives' views on barriers to quality perinatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Karen Odberg; Johansson, Eva; Pelembe, Maria de Fatima M; Dgedge, Clemencia; Christensson, Kyllike

    2006-02-01

    Our purpose in this study was to explore the midwives' perception of factors obstructing or facilitating their ability to provide quality perinatal care at a central labor ward in Maputo. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 16 midwives and were analyzed according to grounded theory technique. Barriers to provision of quality perinatal care were identified as follows: (i) the unsupportive environment, (ii) nonempowering and limited interaction with women in labor, (iii) a sense of professional inadequacy and inferiority, and (iv) nonappliance of best caring practices. A model based on the midwives' reflections on barriers to quality perinatal care and responses to these were developed. Actions aimed at overcoming the barriers were improvising and identifying areas in need of change. Identified evading actions were holding others accountable and yielding to dysfunction and structural control. In order to improve perinatal care, the midwives need to see themselves as change agents and not as victims of external and internal causal relationships over which they have no influence. It is moreover essential that the midwives chose actions aiming at overcoming barriers to quality perinatal care instead of choosing evading actions, which might jeopardize the health of the unborn and newborn infant. We suggest that local as well as national education programs need to correspond with existing reality, even if they provide knowledge that surpasses the present possibilities in practice. Quality of intrapartum and the immediate newborn care requires a supportive environment, however, which in the context of this study presented such serious obstacles that they need to be addressed on the national level. Structural and administrative changes are difficult to target as these depend on national organization of maternal health care (MHC) services and national health expenditures. PMID:16484159

  2. Shanghai needs to improve its perinatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In view of the situation that the perinatal mortality rate of Shanghai keeps dropping, doctor Hua Jiazeng from the Shanghai No. 1 Maternity Hospital told the reporter recently that to further lower down the perinatal mortality rate in Shanghai, the perinatal care should be improved through replacing maternity facilities and equipments, keeping the mother and her baby together in the same ward in hospital, and raising the breastfeeding rate. According to the latest statistics, the maternity mortality rate is now 23.8/100.000 in Shanghai, and the perinatal mortality rate has been 12-13/1000 in the past 10 years. These numbers show that there is still a gap between Shanghai and some developed countries regarding perinatal care. There are 3 reasons behind this: 1) since the early 1980s, Shanghai has been in the birth peak period and each year there are 180,000 babies born on the average, as a result, short of beds and lack of staff, the quality of puerperium monitoring and parturition treatment is impaired; 2) maternity facilities and equipments in quite a few hospitals are obsolete and do not suit the needs of modern maternity care anymore, and many hospitals still put newly-born babies together in a big ward which make babies easy to be infected; and 3) breastfeeding rate is dropping as more families do not choose breastfeeding. Doctor Hua suggests: first, we should make a good use of the 3-level maternal and childcare network covering the whole city, strengthen primary care, and pay particular attention to the women of 1st pregnancy at middle age and the unhealthy pregnant women; 2nd, health and medical sectors should put some funds on improving maternal facilities and equipments, increase maternity staff, and raise the income of maternity workers; lastly, all hospitals should keep the mother and baby in the same ward, and greatest efforts should be made to raise the breastfeeding rate. PMID:12343695

  3. Quality-of-care audits and perinatal mortality in South Africa / ????? ???????? ??????????? ?????? ? ????????????? ?????????? ? ????? ?????? / Contrôle de la qualité des soins et mortalité périnatale en Afrique du Sud / ?????? ???? ??????? ???????? ??????? ???????? ?? ???? ??????? / ?????????????????? / Verificación de la calidad de la asistencia y mortalidad perinatal en Sudáfrica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Emma R, Allanson; Robert C, Pattinson.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Situación El cuidado por debajo del nivel óptimo contribuye a las tasas de mortalidad perinatal. Las verificaciones de la calidad de la asistencia se puede utilizar para identificar y cambiar el cuidado por debajo del nivel óptimo, pero no se sabe si tales verificaciones han reducido la mort [...] alidad perinatal en Sudáfrica. Enfoque Se investigaron las tendencias de mortalidad perinatal en centros de salud que habían completado por lo menos cinco años de verificaciones de la calidad de la asistencia. En un subgrupo de centros que empezaron las verificaciones en 2006, se analizaron los factores modificables que podrían haber contribuido a las muertes perinatales. Marco regional Desde la década de 1990, el programa de identificación del problema perinatal ha realizado verificaciones de la calidad de la asistencia en Sudáfrica para registrar las muertes perinatales, identificar los factores modificables y estimular el cambio. Cambios importantes Cinco años de verificaciones continuas estuvieron disponibles para 163 centros. Las tasas de mortalidad perinatal disminuyeron en 48 centros (28%) y aumentaron en 52 (32%). En el subgrupo de centros que empezó la verificación en 2006, hubo una disminución en la mortalidad perinatal del 30% (16/54), pero un aumento del 35% (19/54). Los centros con una mortalidad perinatal en aumento tenían una mayor probabilidad de identificar los siguientes factores: retraso de los pacientes en la búsqueda de ayuda cuando un niño enfermaba (cociente de posibilidades, CP: 4,67; intervalo de confianza, IC, del 95%: 1,99-10,97); falta de uso de asteroides prenatales (CP: 9,57 (IC del 95%: 2,97-30,81); falta de personal de enfermería (CP: 2,67 (IC del 95%: 1,34-5,33); septicemia neonatal no identificada antes del parto durante el control del feto (CP: 2,92 (IC del 95%: 1,47-5,8) y escasos progresos en el parto con una interpretación incorrecta del partograma (CP: 2,77 (IC del 95%: 1,43-5,34). Lecciones aprendidas Las verificaciones de la calidad de la asistencia no ha mostrado mejoras en la mortalidad perinatal en este estudio. Abstract in english Abstract Problem Suboptimal care contributes to perinatal mortality rates. Quality-of-care audits can be used to identify and change suboptimal care, but it is not known if such audits have reduced perinatal mortality in South Africa. Approach We investigated perinatal mortality trends in health fac [...] ilities that had completed at least five years of quality-of-care audits. In a subset of facilities that began audits from 2006, we analysed modifiable factors that may have contributed to perinatal deaths. Local setting Since the 1990s, the perinatal problem identification programme has performed quality-of-care audits in South Africa to record perinatal deaths, identify modifiable factors and motivate change. Relevant changes Five years of continuous audits were available for 163 facilities. Perinatal mortality rates decreased in 48 facilities (29%) and increased in 52 (32%). Among the subset of facilities that began audits in 2006, there was a decrease in perinatal mortality of 30% (16/54) but an increase in 35% (19/54). Facilities with increasing perinatal mortality were more likely to identify the following contributing factors: patient delay in seeking help when a baby was ill (odds ratio, OR: 4.67; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.99-10.97); lack of use of antenatal steroids (OR: 9.57; 95% CI: 2.97-30.81); lack of nursing personnel (OR: 2.67; 95% CI: 1.34-5.33); fetal distress not detected antepartum when the fetus is monitored (OR: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.47-5.8) and poor progress in labour with incorrect interpretation of the partogram (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.43-5.34). Lessons learnt Quality-of-care audits were not shown to improve perinatal mortality in this study.

  4. Improving perinatal outcome: towards individualized care

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemier, B.M.

    2015-01-01

    Unfortunately not all pregnancies and deliveries take place without complications. Complications during pregnancy or delivery can lead to maternal morbidity and poor perinatal outcomes such as perinatal mortality or (severe) neonatal morbidity. First assessment in antenatal care is to distinguish women who require standard care from those requiring special attention. At the moment, we can make some global risk assessments, but are not able to give a women a risk assessment that is adapted for...

  5. Construction of quality-assured infant feeding process of care data repositories: Construction of the perinatal repository (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de-León-Chocano, Ricardo; Muñoz-Soler, Verónica; Sáez, Carlos; García-de-León-González, Ricardo; García-Gómez, Juan M

    2016-04-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers regarding the construction of data quality (DQ) assured repositories, based on population data from Electronic Health Records (EHR), for the reuse of information on infant feeding from birth until the age of two. This second paper describes the application of the computational process of constructing the first quality-assured repository for the reuse of information on infant feeding in the perinatal period, with the aim of studying relevant questions from the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) and monitoring its deployment in our hospital. The construction of the repository was carried out using 13 semi-automated procedures to assess, recover or discard clinical data. The initial information consisted of perinatal forms from EHR related to 2048 births (Facts of Study, FoS) between 2009 and 2011, with a total of 433,308 observations of 223 variables. DQ was measured before and after the procedures using metrics related to eight quality dimensions: predictive value, correctness, duplication, consistency, completeness, contextualization, temporal-stability, and spatial-stability. Once the predictive variables were selected and DQ was assured, the final repository consisted of 1925 births, 107,529 observations and 73 quality-assured variables. The amount of discarded observations mainly corresponds to observations of non-predictive variables (52.90%) and the impact of the de-duplication process (20.58%) with respect to the total input data. Seven out of thirteen procedures achieved 100% of valid births, observations and variables. Moreover, 89% of births and ~98% of observations were consistent according to the experts׳ criteria. A multidisciplinary approach along with the quantification of DQ has allowed us to construct the first repository about infant feeding in the perinatal period based on EHR population data. PMID:26950399

  6. [Exploring the facets of perinatal care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognat, Éloïse

    2015-04-01

    Perinatal care has long been the sector towards which Éloïse Cognat has wanted to direct her career. From her initial training, she felt drawn to working closely with the patient and the care practices; the nursing profession was an obvious choice for her. Here she tells us of the fulfilling start to her career. PMID:26145423

  7. Perinatal home care: one entrepreneur's experience.

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    Eaton, D G

    1994-10-01

    Nurses have responded to the entrepreneurial movement by entering into various nontraditional roles and starting their own businesses. This article describes the author's experience in establishing a perinatal home-care business. The characteristics of women and nurse entrepreneurs are discussed, as are the components of a business plan and how to manage a business. PMID:7836999

  8. Eclampsia: maternal and perinatal outcomes in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Mor

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Eclampsia is one of the important causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality due to lack of proper antenatal care, low socio-economic status and lack of education. Early attention and intensive management are essential for improving the maternal and fetal outcomes. Unless the social and educational status of women is uplifted and obstetric care is brought to the doorstep, no miracle can be expected. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 653-657

  9. Pregnancy care in two adolescents perinatally infected with HIV.

    OpenAIRE

    Meloni, Alessandra; Tuveri, Milena; Floridia, Marco; Zucca, Francesca; Borghero, Grazia; Gariel, Donatella; Melis, Gian Benedetto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe the main issues encountered in pregnancy care in two perinatally infected adolescents with HIV. Despite the young maternal age, both mothers complied well with visits and treatment during pregnancy and delivered at week 38 through elective caesarean section. Both, however, missed the regular gynaecological and the routine HIV visits scheduled after pregnancy. Both infants following HIV exposure were confirmed HIV negative at the end of tests performed in the fi...

  10. Soap fiction 'reveals truth' of perinatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-27

    An EastEnders storyline that has shown a mother separated from her new baby to be treated for postpartum psychosis mirrors the 'unacceptable' standards of care in the UK, according to a charity. PMID:26967852

  11. Nurses' experiences caring for incarcerated patients in a perinatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zust, Barbara Lois; Busiahn, Lydia; Janisch, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Studies indicate that psychological support of a mother during labor greatly increases the well-being of the mother and the infant. Nurses caring for incarcerated women in birthing centers, provide the only caring support these women have a possibility of receiving. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore nurses' perception of their role in caring for female offenders. The purpose of this article is to present a study that explored nurses' perception of caring for incarcerated women in a perinatal setting. Findings of the study indicated that nurses have difficulty working around the shackles that tied a laboring offender to the bed, and found the guards in the room to be intrusive. Some nurses advocated for the patients; others felt that the women were getting what they deserved. Most nurses struggled with the emotions of the incarcerated mom leaving behind her newborn upon return to prison. PMID:23301566

  12. Identification of peripartum near-miss for perinatal audit

    OpenAIRE

    Kerkhofs, C.; Bruyn, C. de (biograaf); Mesens, T; Theyskens, C; Vanhoestenberghe, M.; Bruneel, E; Van Holsbeke, C; Bonnaerens, A.; Gyselaers, W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Today, perinatal audit focuses basically on cases of perinatal mortality. In most centres in Western Europe, perinatal mortality is low. Identification of metabolic acidosis at birth may increase index cases eligible for evaluation of perinatal care, and this might improve quality of perinatal audit. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of metabolic acidosis at birth in order to estimate its impact on perinatal audit.

  13. Perinatal Obstetric Office Depression Screening and Treatment: Implementation in a Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Tracy; Avalos, Lyndsay A

    2016-05-01

    Perinatal depression affects between 12% and 20% of pregnant and postpartum women and is underdiagnosed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended universal perinatal depression screening. We discuss challenges to instituting universal screening, describe the development and implementation between 2007 and 2014 of Kaiser Permanente Northern California's successful program, and highlight key measures of success. A quality improvement system approach with four steps guided development: 1) identify and use best practices, 2) identify champions and educate clinicians, 3) use data that drive performance, and 4) streamline office workflow. Clinical success was determined by at least 50% improvement in depression care metrics from diagnosis to 120 days afterward. Depression diagnoses, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores, medication dispensation, and treatment for all births in 2014 (N=37,660) were extracted from electronic health records. Ninety-six percent of pregnant and postpartum women were screened at least once. Fourteen percent screened positive for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score of 10 or greater). Approximately 6% of pregnant and postpartum women had severe depression with a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 of 15 or greater and a depression diagnosis, and 80% of these women received treatment. Forty percent of women with a depression diagnosis demonstrated improved symptoms. Kaiser Permanente Northern California's universal perinatal depression screening program can serve as a model for the feasibility and clinical effectiveness of universal depression screening in obstetric care. PMID:27054937

  14. Building Perinatal Case Manager Capacity Using Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Improving breastfeeding rates among Black women is a potential strategy to address disparities in health outcomes that disproportionately impact Black women and children. This quality improvement (QI) initiative aimed to improve perinatal case manager knowledge and self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding among Black, low-income women who use services through Boston Healthy Start Initiative. QI methodology was used to develop and test a two-part strategy for perinatal case managers to promote and support breastfeeding. A positive change was observed in infant feeding knowledge and case manager self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding. Among the 24 mothers participating in this QI initiative, 100% initiated and continued breastfeeding at 1 week postpartum, and 92% were breastfeeding at 2 weeks postpartum. PMID:26937160

  15. [What public health measures could reduce antenatal exposure to tobacco and improve the quality of perinatal care: the gynecologist-obstetrician's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depret-Mosser, S; Mathieu-Nolf, M; Puech, F

    2005-04-01

    The progression of addiction to smoking among young women is particularly alarming. The fatal effects of the nicotine-poisoning on the pregnancy and on the child constitute a serious public health issue. For young women, the period of maternity plays an essential educational role. Contact with medical care during pregnancy offers a special opportunity to establish a sound basis for health. Clinicians must strive to help women become fully aware of the fatal effects of smoking, providing methods and support for abstinence through a global, structured strategy of health care. The "Maternity without tobacco" network was developed to achieve these objectives. Expired CO analysis can be an interesting tool to search for active or passive addiction to smoking, and more generally carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:15980801

  16. Reproductive health and lifestyle factors associated with health-related quality of life among perinatally HIV-infected adolescents in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mbalinda, S. N.; Kiwanuka, N; Kaye, D. K.; Eriksson, L. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background With increased survival of perinatally HIV - infected adolescents due to antiretroviral therapy (ART), the focus of HIV care has shifted to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as a measure of disease progression, effects of ART co-morbidity and prognosis. We assessed factors associated with better HRQoL in perinatally HIV -infected adolescents in Uganda by determining the associations between sexual and reproductive health (SRH) or lifestyle experiences on HRQoL. Methods ...

  17. The Community Perinatal Care Study: Home Visiting and Nursing Support for Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David; Tough, Suzanne; Siever, Jodi

    2006-01-01

    This article describes The Community Perinatal Care Study, a community-based study of pregnancy support that was conducted in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, between 2001 and 2004. The study was conducted to learn how to improve community-based pregnancy care and to improve prenatal care and healthy births, particularly for women with increased…

  18. Marketing and Quality of Life: A Model for Improving Perinatal Health Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, G. E. Alan; Smith, Leah T.; Stamps, Bunnie V.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: A marketing/business model using non-traditional Quality of Life measures was developed to assess perinatal health status on a micro-geographic level. This perinatal health status needs assessment study for Georgia South Central Region was conducted for the years 1994-1999. The model may be applied to any geographic unit in the…

  19. Improvement in perinatal care for extremely premature infants in Denmark from 1994 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselager, Asbjørn Børch; Børch, Klaus; Pryds, Ole Axel

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Major advances in perinatal care over the latest decades have increased the survival rate of extremely premature infants. Centralisation of perinatal care was implemented in Denmark from 1995. This study evaluates the effect of organisational changes of perinatal care on survival and...... morbidity of live-born infants with gestational ages (GA) of 22-28 weeks. METHODS: Three cohort studies were included from 1994-1995, 2003 and 2011. Data from live-born infants were extracted regarding risk factors, survival, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), cystic periventricular leukomalacia (cPVL) and...... intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3-4 (IVH 3-4). RESULTS: A total of 184, 83 and 127 infants were included from the cohorts. Delivery rates at level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) hospitals increased from 69% to 87%. Transfer rates to level 3 NICU almost doubled during the period. Survival rates were...

  20. Association of antenatal care with facility delivery and perinatal survival – a population-based study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervin Jesmin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antenatal Care (ANC during pregnancy can play an important role in the uptake of evidence-based services vital to the health of women and their infants. Studies report positive effects of ANC on use of facility-based delivery and perinatal mortality. However, most existing studies are limited to cross-sectional surveys with long recall periods, and generally do not include population-based samples. Methods This study was conducted within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b in Matlab, Bangladesh. The HDSS area is divided into an icddr,b service area (SA where women and children receive care from icddr,b health facilities, and a government SA where people receive care from government facilities. In 2007, a new Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health (MNCH program was initiated in the icddr,b SA that strengthened the ongoing maternal and child health services including ANC. We estimated the association of ANC with facility delivery and perinatal mortality using prospectively collected data from 2005 to 2009. Using a before-after study design, we also determined the role of ANC services on reduction of perinatal mortality between the periods before (2005 – 2006 and after (2008–2009 implementation of the MNCH program. Results Antenatal care visits were associated with increased facility-based delivery in the icddr,b and government SAs. In the icddr,b SA, the adjusted odds of perinatal mortality was about 2-times higher (odds ratio (OR 1.91; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.50, 2.42 among women who received ≤1 ANC compared to women who received ≥3 ANC visits. No such association was observed in the government SA. Controlling for ANC visits substantially reduced the observed effect of the intervention on perinatal mortality (OR 0.64; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.78 to non-significance (OR 0.81; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.01, when comparing cohorts before and after the MNCH program initiation (Sobel test of mediation P Conclusions ANC visits are associated with increased uptake of facility-based delivery and improved perinatal survival in the icddr,b SA. Further testing of the icddr,b approach to simultaneously improving quality of ANC and facility delivery care is needed in the existing health system in Bangladesh and in other low-income countries to maximize health benefits to mothers and newborns.

  1. Care seeking at time of childbirth, and maternal and perinatal mortality in Matlab, Bangladesh

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    Carine Ronsmans

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the nature of the relationship between the use of skilled attendance around the time of delivery and maternal and perinatal mortality. METHODS: We analysed health and demographic surveillance system data collected between 1987 and 2005 by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B in Matlab, Bangladesh. FINDINGS: The study recorded 59 165 pregnancies, 173 maternal deaths, 1661 stillbirths and 1418 early neonatal deaths in its service area over the study period. During that time, the use of skilled attendance during childbirth increased from 5.2% to 52.6%. More than half (57.8% of the women who died and one-third (33.7% of those who experienced a perinatal death (i.e. a stillbirth or early neonatal death had sought skilled attendance. Maternal mortality was low among women who did not seek skilled care (160 per 100 000 pregnancies and was nearly 32 times higher (adjusted odds ratio, OR: 31.66; 95% confidence interval, CI: 22.03-45.48 among women who came into contact with comprehensive emergency obstetric care. Over time, the strength of the association between skilled obstetric care and maternal mortality declined as more women sought such care. Perinatal death rates were also higher for those who sought skilled care than for those who did not, although the strength of association was much weaker. CONCLUSION: Given the high maternal mortality ratio and perinatal mortality rate among women who sought obstetric care, more work is needed to ensure that women and their neonates receive timely and effective obstetric care. Reductions in perinatal mortality will require strategies such as early detection and management of health problems during pregnancy.

  2. Crossing the quality chasm in neonatal-perinatal medicine.

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    Ellsbury, Dan L

    2010-03-01

    The "Quality Chasm" exists in neonatal intensive care. Despite years of clinical research in neonatology, therapies continue to be underused, overused, or misused. A key concept in crossing the quality chasm is system redesign. The unpredictability of human factors and the dynamic complexity of the neonatal ICU are not amenable to rigid reductionist control and redesign. Change is best accomplished in this complex adaptive system by use of simple rules: (1) general direction pointing, (2) prohibitions, (3) resource or permission providing. These rules create conditions for purposeful self-organizing behavior, allowing widespread natural experimentation, all focused on generating the desired outcome. PMID:20363444

  3. Common perinatal mental disorders in northern Viet Nam: community prevalence and health care use

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    Jane Fisher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish the prevalence of common perinatal mental disorders their determinants, and their association with preventive health care use among women in one rural and one urban province in northern Viet Nam. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of cohorts of pregnant women and mothers of infants recruited systematically in 10 randomly-selected communes. The women participated in psychiatrist-administered structured clinical interviews and separate structured interviews to assess sociodemographic factors, reproductive health, the intimate partner relationship, family violence and the use of preventive and psychiatric health care. Associations between these variables and perinatal mental disorders were explored through univariate analyses and multivariable logistic regression. FINDINGS: Among women eligible for the study (392, 364 (93% were recruited. Of these, 29.9% (95% confidence interval, CI: 25.20-34.70 were diagnosed with a common perinatal mental disorder (CPMD. The frequency of such disorders during pregnancy and in the postpartum period was the same. Their prevalence was higher among women in rural provinces (odds ratio, OR: 2.17; 95% CI: 1.19-3.93; exposed to intimate partner violence (OR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.12-3.96; fearful of other family members (OR: 3.36; 95% CI: 1.05-10.71 or exposed to coincidental life adversity (OR: 4.40; 95% CI: 2.44-7.93. Fewer women with a CPMD used iron supplements than women without a CPMD, but the results were not statistically significant (P = 0.05. None of the women studied had ever received mental health care. CONCLUSION: Perinatal depression and anxiety are prevalent in women in northern Viet Nam. These conditions are predominantly determined by social factors, including rural residence, poverty and exposure to family violence. At present the needs of women with common perinatal mental disorders are unrecognized and not attended to and their participation in essential antenatal preventive care appears to be compromised.

  4. Comparison of Perinatal Outcome of Preterm Births Starting in Primary Care versus Secondary Care in Netherlands: A Retrospective Analysis of Nationwide Collected Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ven, A.J. van de; Schaaf, J. M.; M. A. van Os; C. J. M. de Groot; Haak, M.C.; Pajkrt, E; Mol, B W J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In Netherlands, the obstetric care system is divided into primary and secondary care by risk level of the pregnancy. We assessed the incidence of preterm birth according to level of care and the association between level of care at time of labor onset and delivery and adverse perinatal outcome. Methods. Singleton pregnancies recorded in Netherlands Perinatal Registry between 1999 and 2007, with spontaneous birth between 25+0 and 36+6 weeks, were included. Three groups were compa...

  5. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  6. A regionalized perinatal continuing education programme: successful adaptation to a foreign health care system and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattwinkel, J; Nowacek, G; Cook, L J; Pietrzyk, J; Borkowski, V; Karasinska-Urbanik, O; Molicki, J; Godlewska, Z; Rozanski, B

    1997-05-01

    Much of the decline in perinatal mortality over the past two decades in the United States has been attributed to regionalization of perinatal care. Outreach education from regional medical centres to community hospitals is an essential component of regionalization. The Perinatal Continuing Education Program (PCEP) has been successfully used for outreach education in more than 30 states since 1979. This project tested the efficacy of implementing the PCEP strategy in Poland. PCEP was adapted to Polish conditions, translated, and implemented in four phases. The scheme allowed gradual transfer of ownership to Polish leaders and use of the existing regional structure to disseminate information from regional centres to community hospitals. Evaluation included measures of programme use (participation and completion rates) and acceptance (participant evaluation forms), cognitive knowledge (pre- vs. post-tests), and patient care (chart reviews). Of 2093 doctors, nurses and midwives who began, 1615 (77%) completed the programme, with higher completion by regional centre than community hospital staff. All participant groups responded favourably to the materials and expressed moderate confidence in their mastery of the information and skills. Test scores improved significantly for all phases and for all disciplines, with baseline and final scores consistent with degrees of previous professional education. Large baseline and inter-hospital variations in chart review data restricted analysis of care practices. A comprehensive perinatal education programme can be successfully transferred to a foreign health care system. We believe the following to be particularly important: multidisciplinary instructors and students; a self-instructional format; content aimed at practice rather than theory; and an organized implementation strategy co-ordinated by local personnel. PMID:9231141

  7. Quality of life among Ghanaian adolescents living with perinatally acquired HIV: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enimil, Anthony; Nugent, Nicole; Amoah, Christian; Norman, Betty; Antwi, Sampson; Ocran, Joseph; Kwara, Awewura; Barker, David H

    2016-04-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, increasing numbers of children with perinatally acquired HIV (PAHIV) are living into adolescence. These adolescents face numerous unique challenges such as parent illness/death and years of medication use. Optimizing care for these youth requires an understanding of the factors that contribute to physical health, psychological well-being, social relationships, and quality of life (QOL). This mixed methods study collected quantitative questionnaire data from 40 Ghanaian adolescents with PAHIV (50% female, 12-19 years old) who received care through an adolescent HIV clinic in Kumasi, Ghana. The study also presents results from qualitative interviews conducted with 20 adolescents. Results from quantitative analyses suggested that a significant number of participants were not virally suppressed (67%) and participants reported barriers to treatment adherence, limited social support, concerns about disclosure and HIV-related stigma, limited resources, and lower than expected QOL. Salient themes from the qualitative analyses included limited understanding of how HIV is transmitted, the interplay between food insecurity and treatment adherence and the need for developing safe relationships through which adolescents can discuss their illness without fear of accidental disclosure of their HIV status. PMID:26643735

  8. Utilizing leadership to achieve high reliability in the delivery of perinatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parrotta C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Parrotta,1 William Riley,1 Les Meredith21School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 2Premier Insurance Management Services Inc, Charlotte, NC, USAAbstract: Highly reliable care requires standardization of clinical practices and is a prerequisite for patient safety. However, standardization in complex hospital settings is extremely difficult to attain and health care leaders are challenged to create care delivery processes that ensure patient safety. Moreover, once high reliability is achieved in a hospital unit, it must be maintained to avoid process deterioration. This case study examines an intervention to implement care bundles (a collection of evidence-based practices in four hospitals to achieve standardized care in perinatal units. The results show different patterns in the rate and magnitude of change within the hospitals to achieve high reliability. The study is part of a larger nationwide study of 16 hospitals to improve perinatal safety. Based on the findings, we discuss the role of leadership for implementing and sustaining high reliability to ensure freedom from unintended injury.Keywords: care bundles, evidence-based practice, standardized care, process improvement

  9. Identifying health care quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsaran-Fowdar, Roshnee R

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating health care quality is important for consumers, health care providers, and society. Developing a measure of health care service quality is an important precursor to systems and organizations that value health care quality. SERVQUAL has been proposed as a broad-based measure of service quality that may be applicable to health care settings. Results from a study described in this paper verify SERVQUAL dimensions, but demonstrate additional dimensions that are specific to health care settings. PMID:16318013

  10. Family centered maternity care: its relationship to perinatal regionalization and neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, W H; Swartz, J V

    1976-09-01

    For several months prior to birth a major portion of a family's attention, conversation, thought, and often worry, is directed toward the idea of a new child. This prolonged attention and anticipation contribute to making childbirth an emotionally charged experience. In psychological terms, it is therefore a critical period of peak motivation for learning, and a time to peak susceptibility to reinforcement. Theory, reason, and scientific evidence indicate thng with childbirth and early postpartum experiences, can significantly affect subsequent parental behaviors, the child's central environment influence. Evidence strongly suggests that these parental attitudes and behaviors so crucial to the child's ultimate well-being are learned rather than derived instinctually, and therefore they are malleable and can be taught, directed, and corrected. Through education and reinforcement it is possible to encourage parental behaviors and child interactions which are products of feelings of control, competence, accomplishment, understanding, and caring. Similarly we can recognize and work toward replacing attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that express fear, worry, and insecurity about the child. Over the past 50 years major changes have occurred in the practice of obstetrics and newborn pediatrics. Other major changes will necessarily occur as we move toward perinatal regionalization. Changes instigated solely on physiologic data can have unrecognized collateral effects on the psychological component of the childbirth experience. All concerned health care personnel, especially obstetricians and pediatricians, can insist that the importance of desirable mother-father-child interactions be recognized and that practices fostering them be afforded a high priority. I would like to endorse a comment from a recent article by Richmond concerning the advent of behavioral pediatrics by adding that behavioral obstetrics is also "an idea whose time has arrived". PMID:963936

  11. Perinatal care at the limit of viability between 22 and 26 completed weeks of gestation in Switzerland.

    OpenAIRE

    Berger T.M.; Bernet V.; El Alama S.; Fauchère J.C.; Hösli I.; Irion O.; Kind C.; Latal B.; Nelle M.; Pfister R.E.; Surbek D; Truttmann A.C.; Wisser J.; Zimmermann R.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal care of pregnant women at high risk for preterm delivery and of preterm infants born at the limit of viability (22-26 completed weeks of gestation) requires a multidisciplinary approach by an experienced perinatal team. Limited precision in the determination of both gestational age and foetal weight, as well as biological variability may significantly affect the course of action chosen in individual cases. The decisions that must be taken with the pregnant women and on behalf of the...

  12. Mortalidade perinatal por sífilis congênita: indicador da qualidade da atenção à mulher e à criança Perinatal mortality due to congenital syphilis: a quality-of-care indicator for women's and children's healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Saraceni

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A sífilis permanece como causa importante de mortalidade perinatal no Município do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, onde o presente estudo foi realizado utilizando os dados do Sistema de Informação de Mortalidade e das Fichas de Notificação e Investigação de Óbitos Fetais e Neonatais, obrigatórias para as maternidades municipais. Entre 1996 e 1998, a sífilis congênita foi responsável por 13,1% dos óbitos fetais e 6,5% dos neonatais nas maternidades municipais. Entre 1999 e 2002, os percentuais foram de 16,2% e 7,9%, respectivamente. Para o Município do Rio de Janeiro, de 1999 a 2002, os percentuais foram 5,4% e 2,2%, para óbitos fetais e neonatais. A taxa de mortalidade perinatal por sífilis congênita permanece estável no Município do Rio de Janeiro apesar dos esforços iniciados com as campanhas para eliminação do agravo em 1999 e 2000. Propomos a utilização da taxa de mortalidade perinatal por sífilis congênita como indicador de impacto das ações de controle e eliminação da sífilis congênita e sugerimos a utilização das fichas de notificação e investigação de óbitos fetais e neonatais para a vigilância de outros agravos evitáveis.Syphilis is a persistent cause of perinatal mortality in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where this study was performed using data from the mortality data system and investigational reports for fetal and neonatal deaths, mandatory in municipal maternity hospitals. From 1996 to 1998, 13.1% of fetal deaths and 6.5% of neonatal deaths in municipal maternity hospitals were due to congenital syphilis. From 1999 to 2002, the proportions were 16.2% and 7.9%, respectively. For the city of Rio de Janeiro as a whole from 1999 and 2002, the proportions were 5.4% of fetal deaths and 2.2% of neonatal deaths. The perinatal mortality rate due to congenital syphilis remains stable in Rio de Janeiro, despite efforts initiated with congenital syphilis elimination campaigns in 1999 and 2000. We propose that the perinatal mortality rate due to congenital syphilis be used as an impact indicator for activities to control and eliminate congenital syphilis, based on the investigational reports for fetal and neonatal deaths. Such reports could be extended to the surveillance of other avoidable perinatal disease outcomes.

  13. Evidence for perinatal and child health care guidelines in crisis settings: can Cochrane help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Hayley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important that healthcare provided in crisis settings is based on the best available research evidence. We reviewed guidelines for child and perinatal health care in crisis situations to determine whether they were based on research evidence, whether Cochrane systematic reviews were available in the clinical areas addressed by these guidelines and whether summaries of these reviews were provided in Evidence Aid. Methods Broad internet searches were undertaken to identify relevant guidelines. Guidelines were appraised using AGREE and the clinical areas that were relevant to perinatal or child health were extracted. We searched The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify potentially relevant reviews. For each review we determined how many trials were included, and how many were conducted in resource-limited settings. Results Six guidelines met selection criteria. None of the included guidelines were clearly based on research evidence. 198 Cochrane reviews were potentially relevant to the guidelines. These reviews predominantly addressed nutrient supplementation, breastfeeding, malaria, maternal hypertension, premature labour and prevention of HIV transmission. Most reviews included studies from developing settings. However for large portions of the guidelines, particularly health services delivery, there were no relevant reviews. Only 18 (9.1% reviews have summaries in Evidence Aid. Conclusions We did not identify any evidence-based guidelines for perinatal and child health care in disaster settings. We found many Cochrane reviews that could contribute to the evidence-base supporting future guidelines. However there are important issues to be addressed in terms of the relevance of the available reviews and increasing the number of reviews addressing health care delivery.

  14. Newborn Care Training and Perinatal Mortality in Communities in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Waldemar A.; Goudar, Shivaprasad S.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Chomba, Elwyn; Tshefu, Antoinette; Garces, Ana; Parida, Sailajanandan; Althabe, Fernando; McClure, Elizabeth M.; Derman, Richard J.; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Bose, Carl; Krebs, Nancy F.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Buekens, Pierre; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Hartwell, Tyler D.; Wright, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ninety-eight percent of the 3.7 million neonatal deaths and 3.3 million stillbirths per year occur in developing countries, and evaluation of community-based interventions is needed. Methods Using a train-the-trainer model, local instructors trained birth attendants from rural communities in six countries (Argentina, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guatemala, India, Pakistan, and Zambia) in the World Health Organization Essential Newborn Care course (routine neonatal care, resuscitation, thermoregulation, breastfeeding, kangaroo care, care of the small baby, and common illnesses), and in a modified version of the American Academy of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program (in depth basic resuscitation), except in Argentina. The Essential Newborn Care intervention was assessed with a before and after design (N=57, 643). The Neonatal Resuscitation Program intervention was assessed as a cluster randomized controlled trial (N=62,366). The primary outcome was 7-day neonatal mortality. Results The 7-day follow-up rate was 99.2%. Following Essential Newborn Care training, there was no significant reduction from baseline in all-cause 7-day neonatal (RR 0.99; CI 0.81, 1.22) or perinatal mortality; there was a significant reduction in the stillbirth rate (RR 0.69; CI 0.54, 0.88; p<0.01). Seven-day neonatal mortality, stillbirth, and perinatal mortality were not reduced in clusters randomized to Neonatal Resuscitation Program training as compared with control clusters. Conclusions Seven-day neonatal mortality did not decrease following the introduction of Essential Newborn Care training of community-based birth attendants, although the rate of stillbirths was reduced following this intervention. Subsequent training in the Neonatal Resuscitation Program did not significantly reduce the mortality rates. (clinicaltrials.gov number, NCT00136708). PMID:20164485

  15. Mortalidade perinatal por sífilis congênita: indicador da qualidade da atenção à mulher e à criança Perinatal mortality due to congenital syphilis: a quality-of-care indicator for women's and children's healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria Saraceni; Maria Helena Freitas da Silva Guimarães; Mariza Miranda Theme Filha; Maria do Carmo Leal

    2005-01-01

    A sífilis permanece como causa importante de mortalidade perinatal no Município do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, onde o presente estudo foi realizado utilizando os dados do Sistema de Informação de Mortalidade e das Fichas de Notificação e Investigação de Óbitos Fetais e Neonatais, obrigatórias para as maternidades municipais. Entre 1996 e 1998, a sífilis congênita foi responsável por 13,1% dos óbitos fetais e 6,5% dos neonatais nas maternidades municipais. Entre 1999 e 2002, os percentuais foram d...

  16. Delivery of maternal health care in Indigenous primary care services: baseline data for an ongoing quality improvement initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Kwedza Ru K; Liddle Helen E; O'Donoghue Lynette; Cox Rhonda J; Kennedy Catherine M; Dowden Michelle C; Si Damin; Bailie Ross S; Rumbold Alice R; Thompson Sandra C; Burke Hugh P; Brown Alex DH; Weeramanthri Tarun; Connors Christine M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) populations have disproportionately high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes relative to other Australians. Poorer access to good quality maternal health care is a key driver of this disparity. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of delivery of maternity care and service gaps in primary care services in Australian Indigenous communities. Methods We undertook a cross-sectional baseline audit for a qua...

  17. Promising. Quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleserio, G L

    1998-01-01

    Family planning (FP) and reproductive health (RH) care services need to be of good or better quality in order to attract and retain contraceptive acceptors and users. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) provide a large share of overall family planning services in the Philippines, a country with a high degree of unmet need for family planning. There are an estimated 3-4 million women in the Philippines who need contraception, but are currently not using a method due to a variety of reasons, including side effects, health concerns, inconvenience of method use, and difficult access to and availability of methods. One important element to providing high-quality services is to provide clients with complete information on all available methods and friendly counseling to those who have decided to use a certain method. Improving the quality of care (QOC) is a major objective of the NGO track of the Strengthening the Management and Field Implementation of the Family Planning/Reproductive Health Program. Operating since 1994, the UN Population Fund-assisted program is comprised of the NGO track, the Department of Health track, and the Local Government Unit track. The NGO track aims to improve the QOC in 1317 NGO service outlets. Moreover, the NGO track hopes to strengthen the management and implementation of the FP/RH service program, expand the range of RH services provided, and increase community support and cost-sharing for the FP/RH program. An overview is presented of how the QOC program in the NGO track was implemented during the first 2 years of the 4-year project period. PMID:12294070

  18. MATERNAL AND PERINATAL OUTCOME IN ECLAMPSIA IN A TE RTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND : Eclampsia is a life threatening emergency that con tinues to be a major cause of serious maternal morbidity and is st ill the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. OBJECTIVE: Analysis of all cases of Eclampsia patients to find out the incidence, to evaluate the clinical course, medical & obstetric m anagement, and complications and to study the maternal &perinatal outcome. METHODS : This study was a hospital based prospective observational study. We obtained the data for this study from the case records of all Eclampsia patients who admitted in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal from 01.01.2011 to 31.12.2011 and data were r ecorded on a predesigned proforma. All the obstetrical women with convulsions after 20 wee ks pregnancy or in postpartum period were evaluated. Each case was documented with respec t to age, socioeconomic status, education, occupation, gestational age, time of onse t of Eclampsia, duration and frequency of seizures, mode of delivery, use of drugs (anticonvu lsant and antihypertensive, maternal and perinatal outcome RESULTS: Out of total 203 Eclampsia patients, 144 cases(70.93% were Antepartum Eclampsia, 22 patients (10.84% were intrapa rtum Eclampsia, 35 cases (17.24% were postpartum Eclampsia & 2 cases (0.9% were status Eclampticus.30% Patients did not have oedema,14% had BP<140/90 mm of Hg and 11.4% di d not have proteinuria at the time of admission. There were 21 maternal deaths and morbid ity consisted of pulmonary oedema in 31(33.6% cases, CVA in 17(18.4% cases, renal fail ure in 7(7.6% cases, HELLP syndrome in 6(6.5% cases and aspiration pneumonia in 2(2.2% cas es. Perinatal mortality was 44.3% with majority being related to extreme prematurity. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need of proper antenatal care to prevent Eclampsia and the need for intensive monitoring of women with Eclampsia throughout the hospitalization to improve bo th the maternal & perinatal outcome

  19. Potentially avoidable perinatal deaths in Denmark and Sweden 1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff-Roos, J; Borch-Christensen, H; Larsen, S; Lindberg, B; Wennergren, M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 1950 the perinatal mortality has been significantly higher in Denmark than in Sweden. In 1991 the rate in Denmark was 8.0/1000 deliveries compared to 6.5/1000 in Sweden. An international audit was designed to investigate whether the perinatal death rates in the two countries to...... some extent could reflect differences in the quality of care, indicated by the numbers of perinatal deaths in categories of potentially avoidable deaths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 97% of all perinatal deaths in 1991 in the two countries were analyzed. A new classification focusing on...

  20. Implementing community-based perinatal care: results from a pilot study in rural Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfiqar A Bhutta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This pilot study investigated the feasibility of delivering a package of community-based interventions for improving perinatal care using lady health workers (LHWs and traditional birth attendants (Dais in rural Pakistan. METHODS: The intervention was implemented in four of eight village clusters (315 villages, total population 138 600, while four served as a comparison group. The LHWs in intervention clusters received additional training focused on essential maternal and newborn care, conducted community education group sessions, and were encouraged to link up with local Dais. The intervention was delivered within the regular government LHW programme and was supported by the creation of voluntary community health committees. FINDINGS: In intervention villages, there were significant reductions from baseline in stillbirth (from 65.9 to 43.1 per 1000 births, P < 0.001 and neonatal mortality rates (from 57.3 to 41.3 per 1000 live births, P < 0.001. The proportion of deliveries conducted by skilled attendants at public sector facilities also increased, from 18% at baseline to 30%, while the proportion of home births decreased from 79% to 65%. A household survey indicated a higher frequency of key behaviours (e.g. early and exclusive breastfeeding, delayed bathing and cord care in intervention villages. CONCLUSION: The improved stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates observed indicate that community health workers (i.e. LHWs and Dais can be effective in implementing a community and outreach package that leads to improved home care practices by families, increased care-seeking behaviour and greater utilization of skilled care providers. These preliminary observations require confirmation in an adequately powered trial.

  1. Perspectives on Home Care Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Rosalie A; Kane, Robert L; Illston, Laurel H.; Eustis, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Home care quality assurance (QA) must consider features inherent in home care, including: multiple goals, limited provider control, and unique family roles. Successive panels of stakeholders were asked to rate the importance of selected home care outcomes. Most highly rated outcomes were freedom from exploitation, satisfaction with care, physical safety, affordability, and physical functioning. Panelists preferred outcome indicators to process and structure, and all groups emphasized “enablin...

  2. The utility of clinical care pathways in determining perinatal outcomes for women with one previous caesarean section; a retrospective service evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Karuga Robinson N; Wanyonyi Sikolia Z

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The rising rates of primary caesarean section have resulted in a larger obstetric population with scarred uteri. Subsequent pregnancies in these women are risk-prone and may complicate. Besides ensuring standardised management, care pathways could be used to evaluate for perinatal outcomes in these high risk pregnancies. We aim to demonstrate the use of a care pathway for vaginal birth after caesarean section as a service evaluation tool to determine perinatal outcomes. Me...

  3. The quality of caring relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Abma, Tineke A.; Barth Oeseburg; Guy AM Widdershoven; Marian Verkerk

    2009-01-01

    Tineke A Abma, Barth Oeseburg, Guy AM Widdershoven, Marian VerkerkMedical Humanities/EMGO Institute, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: In health care, relationships between patients or disabled persons and professionals are at least co-constitutive for the quality of care. Many patients complain about the contacts and communication with caregivers and other professionals. From a care-ethical perspective a good patient-professional relationship requires a process of negoti...

  4. Changes in Perinatal Care and Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality for Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Dong; Guang Yue; Jia-lin Yu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Mortality of very low birth weight premature infants is of great public health concern. To better guide local intervention program, it is essential that current and reliable statistics be collected to understand the factors associated with mortality of these infants.Methods: Data of very low birth weight premature infants admitted to a neonatal unit during 2002-2009 was retrospectively collected. Changes in perinatal care between two halves of the study period (2002-2005 and 2006-2...

  5. Maternal perinatal mental illnesses and adverse pregnancy outcomes: population-based studies using data from United Kingdom primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Ban, Lu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Perinatal mental illness, especially depression, is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in high-income countries. In the United Kingdom (UK), mental illness commonly presents to and is treated at primary care level; however there are no up-to-date estimates of the burden of different mental illnesses in women in and around pregnancy. The potential impact of mental illness with or without psychotropic medication on the risk of non-live pregnancy outcomes is uncl...

  6. Quality in Child Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERS Spectrum, 1998

    1998-01-01

    A significant correlation exists between quality child care and outcomes. Quality-related outcomes include cooperative play, sociability, creativity, ability to solve social conflicts, self-control, and language and cognitive development. Legislatures and agencies should strengthen standards; require initial and ongoing staff training; recruit,…

  7. Maternal and perinatal outcome of eclampsia in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasmita Swain

    2016-02-01

    Results: In this study 218 eclampsia cases were studied. The incidence of eclampsia in S.C.B.MCH during study period was 1.39%. Most of the patients were primigravida accounting 83.48% out of which 74.31% were antepartum, 14.22% were intrapartum and 11.47% were postpartum. 44.04% of cases had no ANC and 40.36 irregular ANC. Occurrence of onset of eclampsia at 38 weeks 29.35%. Most of patients were from rural area (97.50% and having low socioeconomic status (83.94% and illiterate. Out of 218 cases 46.33% patients had vaginal delivery, 3.21% patients had vaginal delivery with instrumentation. Conclusions: There is a need of proper antenatal care to prevent eclampsia and the need for intensive monitoring of women with eclampsia throughout hospitalization to improve both the maternal and perinatal outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(2.000: 384-390

  8. ADOPTION OF THE WHO ASSESSMENT TOOL ON THE QUALITY OF HOSPITAL CARE FOR MOTHERS AND NEWBORNS IN ALBANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Mersini, Ehadu; Novi, Silvana; Tushe, Eduard; Gjoni, Maksim; Burazeri, Genc

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the adoption process of the “Quality of hospital care for mothers and newborns babies, assessment tool” (WHO, 2009) was to provide the Albanian health professionals of maternity hospitals with a tool that may help them assess the quality of perinatal care and identify key areas of pregnancy, childbirth and newborn care that need to be improved. Methods: Four maternity hospitals (one university hospital and three regional hospitals) were selected for the assessment using this s...

  9. Measuring quality of maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Katherine J; Draycott, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Health-care organisations are required to monitor and measure the quality of their maternity services, but measuring quality is complex, and no universal consensus exists on how best to measure it. Clinical outcomes and process measures that are important to stakeholders should be measured, ideally in standardised sets for benchmarking. Furthermore, a holistic interpretation of quality should also reflect patient experience, ideally integrated with outcome and process measures, into a balanced suite of quality indicators. Dashboards enable reporting of trends in adverse outcomes to stakeholders, staff and patients, and they facilitate targeted quality improvement initiatives. The value of such dashboards is dependent upon high-quality, routinely collected data, subject to robust statistical analysis. Moving forward, we could and should collect a standard, relevant set of quality indicators, from routinely collected data, and present these in a manner that facilitates ongoing quality improvement, both locally and at regional/national levels. PMID:25913563

  10. The quality of caring relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke A Abma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Tineke A Abma, Barth Oeseburg, Guy AM Widdershoven, Marian VerkerkMedical Humanities/EMGO Institute, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: In health care, relationships between patients or disabled persons and professionals are at least co-constitutive for the quality of care. Many patients complain about the contacts and communication with caregivers and other professionals. From a care-ethical perspective a good patient-professional relationship requires a process of negotiation and shared understanding about mutual normative expectations. Mismatches between these expectations will lead to misunderstandings or conflicts. If caregivers listen to the narratives of identity of patients, and engage in a deliberative dialogue, they will better be able to attune their care to the needs of patients. We will illustrate this with the stories of three women with multiple sclerosis. Their narratives of identity differ from the narratives that caregivers and others use to understand and identify them. Since identities give rise to normative expectations in all three cases there is a conflict between what the women expect of their caregivers and vice-versa. These stories show that the quality of care, defined as doing the right thing, at the right time, in the right way, for the right person, is dependent on the quality of caring relationships.Keywords: ethics of care, dialogue, responsibilities, narratives, relationships

  11. Primary health care quality and diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Rodrigues Gonçalves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the association between primary health care (PHC quality and diabetes mellitus (DM management in adult patients living within the catchment area of PHC services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional, population-based study of adults reporting known diabetes. Quality of PHC was assessed through the Primary Care Assesment Tool (PCATool-Brazil. Statistical analyses were performed with Poisson regression with robust variance. Results: Of the 3,014 adults interviewed, 205 (6.8% reported having diabetes; of these, 64.4% were women and 68.3% were white. Regarding PHC score of the health service attended, people with diabetes that were classified with a high PHC score, presented longer duration of disease (10.9 vs 8.4 anos, p=0.03 and greater frequency of diabetes-related complications (75.3% vs 58.8%, p=0.02. Regarding the proportion of respondents with good glycemic control, no significant difference between groups was found (31.7% vs 38%, p=0.3. In the multivariate analysis, services with a high PHC score presented a better profile of care for the prevention of the main comorbidities – greater blood pressure assessment (PR=1.07; CI95% 1.01-1.14, lipid profile request (PR=1.23; CI95% 1.09-1.39, counseling for physical activity (PR=1.50; CI95% 1.21-1.86, foot examination (PR=2.08; CI95% 1.54-2,81, and counseling for foot care (PR=1.37; CI95% 1.18-1.59. Conclusion: High PHC score services showed better performance in the management of diabetes and care for more complicated patients, but they did not differ significantly from lower PHC score services in terms of patients’ glycemic control.

  12. [A proposed new interpretation and revised definition of perinatal mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berko, Péter

    2006-02-12

    A proposed new interpretation and revised definition of perinatal mortality. Perinatal mortality rate is a commonly used index, which reflects the quality of obstetrical and neonatological care. Relying on critical remarks considered for his study, the author believes that a novel classification should be developed in order to redefine the term perinatal mortality and pregnancy-related losses. The author points out that intrauterine death during pregnancy cannot be associated with fatal incidents about birth, because the former precedes the latter. While regarding the cases of intrauterine death at late pregnancy as being important specific indicators, the author proposes excluding them from the cases covered by the term perinatal mortality. Furthermore, the author argues that all cases of neonatal death, that is, those at birth and those occurring in the first 28 days of life should be regarded as cases of perinatal mortality. It is reasonable to extend perinatal period this way, because due to a more advanced neonatological care, immature preterm babies may be lost 6 or even 27 days after birth. A novel interpretation of perinatal mortality, not including the cases of intrauterine death at late pregnancy, but including all cases of neonatal mortality makes perinatal mortality rate a more exact qualifier of obstetrical and neonatological care. PMID:16610618

  13. "Can I Ask That?": Perspectives on Perinatal Care After Resettlement Among Karen Refugee Women, Medical Providers, and Community-Based Doulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMancuso, Kate; Goldman, Roberta E; Nothnagle, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    This study characterized the perspectives of Karen refugee women in Buffalo, NY, their medical providers, and Karen interpreters/doulas on perinatal care for Karen women in resettlement. In-depth qualitative interviews with Karen women (14), Karen doulas/interpreters and key informants (8), and medical providers (6) were informed by the social contextual model and focused on women's questions about and opinions of perinatal care in Buffalo and on providers' experiences caring for Karen patients. Karen women expressed gratitude for and understanding of perinatal care in Buffalo, and providers described Karen patients as agreeable but shy. Karen doulas offered an alternative view that exposed women's many questions and concerns, and described how doula training empowered them as patients' advocates. Low self-efficacy, trauma histories, and cultural expectations may contribute to Karen women's seeming agreeability. Doulas/interpreters possess insider knowledge of women's concerns and facilitate communication between patients and the care team. PMID:25724151

  14. Iatrogenic scald injuries in Nigerian babies with perinatal asphyxia: A re-awakening call to strengthen primary health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuti Bankole Peter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Birth asphyxia is a major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Majority of pregnant women in Nigeria still deliver their babies in places where there are no personnel skilled in essential obstetric care and neonatal resuscitation. Consequently newborns are poorly handled at delivery with resultant poor outcome. We report two cases of iatrogenic burns injuries from hot water formentation in an attempt to resuscitate two neonates at peripheral health care facilities in Ilesa, Nigeria. These babies needlessly sustained burns injuries coupled with hypoxic-ischaemic injuries and poor perinatal outcome. These unfortunate cases of "insults upon injuries" underscore the need to strengthen the primary health care system in Nigeria by training and retraining health workers at these facilities. Proper antenatal care, adequate screening of high risk pregnancy for delivery at adequately equipped centres and making efficient referral system available will go a long way in reducing these needless injuries and morbidities.

  15. Horizontal hostility and verbal violence between nurses in the perinatal arena of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Grace; Kelly, Sharilyn; Singh-Carlson, Savitri

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this US study was to determine the frequency of horizontal violence in a perinatal service and its effect on patient outcomes. A 24-question survey instrument was completed online by 63 nurses. The results indicated that labour and delivery wards experience a higher frequency of horizontal violence than other units in the perinatal service. They also showed that the mother and baby unit demonstrates a higher frequency of recipient or victim behaviours. A relationship between horizontal violence and ineffective communication, as well as a relationship between horizontal violence and poor patient outcomes or near misses, was demonstrated. PMID:24479924

  16. Introduction of a qualitative perinatal audit at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Angela N

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal death is a devastating experience for the mother and of concern in clinical practice. Regular perinatal audit may identify suboptimal care related to perinatal deaths and thus appropriate measures for its reduction. The aim of this study was to perform a qualitative perinatal audit of intrapartum and early neonatal deaths and propose means of reducing the perinatal mortality rate (PMR. Methods From 1st August, 2007 to 31st December, 2007 we conducted an audit of perinatal deaths (n = 133 with birth weight 1500 g or more at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH. The audit was done by three obstetricians, two external and one internal auditors. Each auditor independently evaluated the cases narratives. Suboptimal factors were identified in the antepartum, intrapartum and early neonatal period and classified into three levels of delay (community, infrastructure and health care. The contribution of each suboptimal factor to adverse perinatal outcome was identified and the case graded according to possible avoidability. Degree of agreement between auditors was assessed by the kappa coefficient. Results The PMR was 92 per 1000 total births. Suboptimal factors were identified in 80% of audited cases and half of suboptimal factors were found to be the likely cause of adverse perinatal outcome and were preventable. Poor foetal heart monitoring during labour was indirectly associated with over 40% of perinatal death. There was a poor to fair agreement between external and internal auditors. Conclusion There are significant areas of care that need improvement. Poor monitoring during labour was a major cause of avoidable perinatal mortality. This type of audit was a good starting point for quality assurance at MNH. Regular perinatal audits to identify avoidable causes of perinatal deaths with feed back to the staff may be a useful strategy to reduce perinatal mortality.

  17. Retraction statement: Investigating factors associated with nurses' attitudes towards perinatal bereavement care: a study in Shandong and Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The above article from Journal of Clinical Nursing, 'Investigating factors associated with nurses' attitudes towards perinatal bereavement care: a study in Shandong and Hong Kong' by Chan, M. F., Lou, F.-l., Cao, F.-l., Li, P., Liu, L. and Wu, L. H. published online on 6 July 2009 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) and in Volume 18, pp. 2344-2354, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation carried out by the National University of Singapore due to major overlap with a previously published article: Chan MF, Lou F-l, Arthur DG, Cao F-l, Wu LH, Li P, Sagara-Rosemeyer M, Chung LYF & Lui L (2008) Investigating factors associate to nurses' attitudes towards perinatal bereavement care. Journal of Clinical Nursing 17: 509-518. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.02007.x. PMID:26311522

  18. Defining Quality Child Care: Multiple Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrist, Amanda W.; Thompson, Stacy D.; Norris, Deborah J.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple perspectives regarding the definition of quality child care, and how child care quality can be improved, were examined using a focus group methodology. Participants were representatives from stakeholder groups in the child care profession, including child care center owners and directors (3 groups), parents (3 groups), child caregivers (3…

  19. MATERNAL AND PERINATAL OUTCOME IN ECLAMPSIA IN A TE RTIARY CARE CENTRE

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti,; Krishna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND : Eclampsia is a life threatening emergency that con tinues to be a major cause of serious maternal morbidity and is st ill the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. OBJECTIVE: Analysis of all cases of Eclampsia patients to find out the incidence, to evaluate the clinical course, medical & obstetric m anagement, and complications and to study the maternal &perinatal outcome. METHODS : This study was a hospital based prospect...

  20. Maternal and perinatal outcome of eclampsia in a tertiary care centre

    OpenAIRE

    Sasmita Swain; Sujata Singh; Lucy Das; Balaram Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eclampsia is associated with devastating maternal and fetal complications. The main objective was to study the perinatal and maternal outcome and the causative factors for the mortality and morbidity in eclampsia patients admitted to this hospital and to explore the factors contributing to the alarming situation. Methods: 218 eclampsia cases admitted to the labour room in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, SCB Medical College Cuttack, Odisha, India from Jan 2013 to Sep...

  1. Quality assurance in the ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, R D

    1989-01-01

    One of the most utilitarian developments in the field of quality assurance in health care has been the introduction of industrial concepts of quality management. These concepts, coupled with buyer demand for accountability, are bringing new perspectives to health care quality assurance. These perspectives provide a new view of quality assurance as a major responsibility and strategic opportunity for management; a competitive and marketable commodity; and a method of improving safety, effectiveness, and satisfaction with medical care. PMID:10313405

  2. Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-26

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Steve Nesheim discusses perinatal HIV transmission, including the importance of preventing HIV among women, preconception care, and timely HIV testing of the mother. Dr. Nesheim also introduces the revised curriculum Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission intended for faculty of OB/GYN and pediatric residents and nurse midwifery students.  Created: 11/26/2012 by Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 11/26/2012.

  3. [Quality management in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of critical ill patients in the intensive care unit is tantamount to well-designed risk or quality management. Several tools of quality management and quality assurance have been developed in intensive care medicine. In addition to external quality assurance by benchmarking with regard to the intensive care medicine, peer review procedures have been established for external quality assurance in recent years. In the process of peer review of an intensive care unit (ICU), external physicians and nurses visit the ICU, evaluate on-site proceedings, and discuss with the managing team of the ICU possibilities for optimization. Furthermore, internal quality management in the ICU is possible based on the 10 quality indicators of the German Interdisciplinary Society for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI, "Deutschen Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin"). Thereby every ICU has numerous possibilities to improve their quality management system. PMID:24493011

  4. Factors for change in maternal and perinatal audit systems in Dar es Salaam hospitals, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Kisanga Felix; Pembe Andrea B; Urassa David P; Nyamtema Angelo S; van Roosmalen Jos

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective maternal and perinatal audits are associated with improved quality of care and reduction of severe adverse outcome. Although audits at the level of care were formally introduced in Tanzania around 25 years ago, little information is available about their existence, performance, and practical barriers to their implementation. This study assessed the structure, process and impacts of maternal and perinatal death audit systems in clinical practice and presents a det...

  5. Does Audit Improve the Quality of Care?

    OpenAIRE

    Areti Tsaloglidou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality of health care and quality assurance are concepts which have been established for many years. Audit nowadays is adopted as a means of developing high quality care.AIM: This study aims to identify the perspectives of audit in practice and its relationship to quality assessment and assurance, quality improvement, and clinical effectiveness.METHODS: There were used the databases Medline and Cinahl to identify studies related to clinical audit. These databases were searche...

  6. Effective Marketing of Quality Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Bettye M.; Boyd, Harper W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Identifies negative public and professional attitudes that lie beneath the contemporary negative image of quality child care. Argues that concepts and principles of marketing are appropriate for influencing parents to choose high quality services and helping ensure that supplementary care is of sufficient quality to enhance, not inhibit, the…

  7. Estudo da morbidade e da mortalidade perinatal em maternidades: II - mortalidade perinatal segundo peso ao nascer, idade materna, assistência pré-natal e hábito de fumar da mãe A study of perinatal morbidity and mortality in maternity hospitals: II - perinatal mortality according to birth weight, maternal age, prenatal care and maternal smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Laurenti

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Analisa-se a influência de variáveis como peso ao nascer, idade materna, assistência pré-natal e tabagismo materno. Do estudo dos 12.999 nascimentos (vivos e mortos ocorridos em nove maternidades no período de um ano, verificou-se que a mortalidade perinatal é muito maior para os recém-nascidos de baixo peso (665,3 ‰ para peso até 1.500 g, diminuindo à medida que aumenta o peso ao nascer. Também nos casos de mães jovens (menores de 15 anos ou mães com idade superior a 35 anos esse coeficiente foi mais elevado (45,5 ‰ para mães com menos de 15 anos e 47,0 ‰ para mães entre 35 a 39 anos. A faixa imediatamente superior - 40 a 44 anos - apresentou a mais alta mortalidade perinatal: 61,3 ‰ nascidos vivos e nascidos mortos. O número de consultas realizadas no pré-natal tem importância para a diminuição da gestação de alto risco. Mães que fizeram 7 ou mais consultas no pré-natal tiveram a menor mortalidade no período (17,7‰ nascidos vivos e nascidos mortos. Já o hábito materno de fumar influencia a mortalidade quando a quantidade é de mais de 10 cigarros por dia. A mortalidade perinatal dos produtos de mães que fumavam menos de 10 cigarros por dia não diferiu das taxas de mortalidade para as mães não-fumantes.The influence of birth weight, maternal age, prenatal care and smoking during pregnancy are analysed. Of 12,999 births (live and stillbirths ocurring in nine maternity hospitals during one year, the greatest perinatal mortality rate (PM was that of low birth weight babies (665.3 ‰ for those weighing less than 1,500 g. The PM decreases with increasing weight. Young mothers (less than 15 years of age and women aged 35 or more also had higher Perinatal Mortality rates - 45.5 ‰ for the former and 47.0 ‰ for the latter. Prenatal care is important for the decrease of high risk in pregnancy. Mothers who had made 7 or more consultations during pregnancy had the lowest PM (17.7 ‰ live and stillbirths. Smoking during pregnancy has an influence only when women smoke more than 10 cigarettes a day. Perinatal mortality for babies whose mothers smoked less than 10 cigarettes a day is not different from non-smoking women.

  8. Analysing Maternal Employment and Child Care Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Akgündüz, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    The contributions in this thesis revolve around mothers' employment and child care quality. The first topic of interest is how mothers' employment is affected by modern child care services and parental leave entitlements. There is already an extensive literature on the effects of modern social policies such as child care services and parental leave entitlements. A related second topic is how child care quality is produced and influenced by policy measures. Positive findings from the UK and US...

  9. African Primary Care Research: Quality improvement cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Claire van Deventer; Bob Mash

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Improving the quality of clinical care and translating evidence into clinical practice is commonly a focus of primary care research. This article is part of a series on primary care research and outlines an approach to performing a quality improvement cycle as part of a research assignment at a Masters level. The article aims to help researchers design their quality improvement cycle and write their research project proposal.

  10. African primary care research: Quality improvement cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Van Deventer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of clinical care and translating evidence into clinical practice is commonly a focus of primary care research. This article is part of a series on primary care research and outlines an approach to performing a quality improvement cycle as part of a research assignment at a Masters level. The article aims to help researchers design their quality improvement cycle and write their research project proposal.

  11. Leadership and the quality of care

    OpenAIRE

    Firth-Cozens, J.; Mowbray, D.

    2001-01-01

    The importance of good leadership is becoming increasingly apparent within health care. This paper reviews evidence which shows that it has effects, not only on financial management, but on the quality of care provided. Some theories of leadership are discussed, primarily in terms of how different types of leaders might affect quality in different ways, including the effects that they might have on the stress or wellbeing of their staff which, in turn, is related to the quality of care produc...

  12. [Quality assurance concepts in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A; Braun, J P; Riessen, R; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Bingold, T M

    2015-11-01

    Intensive care medicine (ICM) is characterized by a high degree of complexity and requires intense communication and collaboration on interdisciplinary and multiprofessional levels. In order to achieve good quality of care in this environment and to prevent errors, a proactive quality and error management as well as a structured quality assurance system are essential. Since the early 1990s, German intensive care societies have developed concepts for quality management and assurance in ICM. In 2006, intensive care networks were founded in different states to support the implementation of evidence-based knowledge into clinical routine and to improve medical outcome, efficacy, and efficiency in ICM. Current instruments and concepts of quality assurance in German ICM include core intensive care data from the data registry DIVI REVERSI, quality indicators, peer review in intensive care, IQM peer review, and various certification processes. The first version of German ICM quality indicators was published in 2010 by an interdisciplinary and interprofessional expert commission. Key figures, indicators, and national benchmarks are intended to describe the quality of structures, processes, and outcomes in intensive care. Many of the quality assurance tools have proved to be useful in clinical practice, but nationwide implementation still can be improved. PMID:26497132

  13. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield helpful developments. Because “primary care helps prevent illness and death” (3, 4. References 1.Shrivastava SR, Bobhate PS. Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh (2009 – 2010. TAF Prev Med Bull. (2012, 11(3: 307-314 2.Akturk Z, Set T. Quality in Family Practice: Opportunities and Tools Ready for Application. Turkish Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. 2010; 4(1:1-7. 3.Grol R, Baker R, Wensing M. Quality Assurance in General Practice: the State of the Art in Europe Family Practice 1994. Volume 11,Issue 4 p 460-467 4.Starfield B, Leiyu S, Macinko J. Contribution of Primary Care to Health Systems and Health. The Milbank Quarterly. 2005; 83(3:457-502. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000: 217-218

  14. Clinical benchmarking: implications for perinatal nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, K

    1998-06-01

    Health care is a dynamic environment where expectations of quality must be balanced with appropriateness of treatment and cost of care. Managers often have inadequate information on which to base decisions, policy, and practice. Clinical benchmarking is a tool and a process of continuously comparing the practices and performances of one's operations against those of the best in the industry or the focused area of service and then using that information to enhance and improve performance and productivity. The article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of benchmarking as well as the factors influencing the need for such tools in health care and in perinatal nursing. PMID:9782874

  15. Quality of maternal health care at Shoklo Malaria Research Unit in Mae La refugee camp in 2008 : an evaluation using WHO Safe Motherhood Needs Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    HOOGENBOOM, G.

    2010-01-01

    PROBLEM STATEMENT: As part of a quality improvement project a WHO Safe Motherhood Needs Assessment (SMNA) was performed at the SMRU clinic in Mae La refugee camp. OBJECTIVES: To describe availability, use and quality of perinatal care and to identify gaps in the provision of care. METHODS: Facility observations, record reviews, staff interviews and observations of deliveries were conducted using SMNA instruments with locally adapted structured survey forms. FINDINGS: Availability of appropria...

  16. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Iachina, Maria; Palshof, Torben

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry was...... opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  17. Improving quality of tuberculosis care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Madhukar; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Hopewell, Phil

    2014-01-01

    In India, the quality of care that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive varies considerably and is often not in accordance with the national and international standards. In this article, we provide an overview of the third (latest) edition of the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC). These standards are supported by the existing World Health Organization guidelines and policy statements pertaining to TB care and have been endorsed by a number of international organizations. We call upon all health care providers in the country to practice TB care that is consistent with these standards, as well as the upcoming Standards for TB Care in India (STCI). PMID:24640340

  18. The utility of clinical care pathways in determining perinatal outcomes for women with one previous caesarean section; a retrospective service evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuga Robinson N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rising rates of primary caesarean section have resulted in a larger obstetric population with scarred uteri. Subsequent pregnancies in these women are risk-prone and may complicate. Besides ensuring standardised management, care pathways could be used to evaluate for perinatal outcomes in these high risk pregnancies. We aim to demonstrate the use of a care pathway for vaginal birth after caesarean section as a service evaluation tool to determine perinatal outcomes. Methods A retrospective service evaluation by review of delivery case notes and records was undertaken at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya between January 2008 and December 2009 Women with ≥2 previous caesarean sections, previous classical caesarean section, multiple gestation, breech presentation, severe pre-eclampsia, transverse lie, placenta praevia, conditions requiring induction of labour and incomplete records were excluded. Outcome measures included the proportion of eligible women who opted for test of scar (ToS, success rate of vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC; proportion on women opting for elective repeat caesarean section (ERCS and their perinatal outcomes. Results A total of 215 women with one previous caesarean section were followed up using a standard care pathway. The median parity (minimum-maximum was 1.01234. The other demographic characteristics were comparable. Only 44.6% of eligible mothers opted to have a ToS. The success rate for VBAC was 49.4% with the commonest (31.8% reason for failure being protracted active phase of labour. Maternal morbidity was comparable for the failed and successful VBAC group. The incidence of hemorrhage was 2.3% and 4.4% for the successful and failed VBAC groups respectively. The proportion of babies with acidotic arterial PH ( Conclusions Besides ensuring standardised management, care pathways could be objective audit and service evaluation tools for determining perinatal outcomes.

  19. Impact of perinatal oral health care education programme on the knowledge, attitude and practice behavior amongst gynaecologists of Vadodara city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshula Neeraj Deshpande

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gynecologists the Primary Health Care providers, for pregnant mothers bear the unique responsibility to detect and diagnose oral health problems for timely and effective interventions. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of Perinatal Oral Health Care (POHC education program on the knowledge, attitude and practice behavior amongst Gynaecologists of Vadodara City. Settings and Design: An analytical cross sectional study was conducted amongst Gynecologists practicing in Vadodara city, registered under Indian Medical Association (IMA, Baroda, Gujarat. Materials and Methods: A validated questionnaire survey was conducted to establish a baseline level of knowledge, attitude and practice behavior of 46 Gynecologists. After that education and awareness regarding POHC to Gynecologists was provided with the help of flip charts and resource brochures. To determine the impact of recent provision of education and awareness a post-test was conducted. Statistical analysis used: Data was analyzed by paired t-test using the SPSS Version 20. Results: The results after evaluating the data from pretest and posttest showed a mean increase of correct answers in knowledge (from 7.304-9.891; P = 0.00, Attitude (from 3.978-4.108; P = 0.49 and practice behavior (from 4.130-5.521; P = 0.00 in POHC amongst Gynecologists following the education program. Conclusions: It can be concluded that there is a need for provision of education and awareness to the primary health care providers which would help in improving pregnant women and infant?s oral health status along with establishment of dental home.

  20. Kangaroo Mother Care in a Mozambican Perinatal ward : A Clinical Case study

    OpenAIRE

    Söderbäck, Maja; Erlandsson, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) was first introduced in Mozambique in 1984. The aim of this study was to describe Mozambican mothers’ experiences of going through admission, passing from an intensive care ward to a nursery ward with their premature baby, undergoing KMC training before early discharge. A clinical case study was conducted, involving naturalistic observations and a face-to-face interview with 41 mothers participating to complete a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and manifest co...

  1. Perinatal neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelin, Angie C.; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2014-01-01

    Fetal or neonatal brain injury can result in lifelong neurologic disability. The most significant risk factor for perinatal brain injury is prematurity; however, in absolute numbers, full-term infants represent the majority of affected children. Research on strategies to prevent or mitigate the impact of perinatal brain injury (“perinatal neuroprotection”) has established the mitigating roles of magnesium sulfate administration for preterm infants and therapeutic hypothermia for term infants with suspected perinatal brain injury. Banked umbilical cord blood, erythropoietin, and a number of other agents that may improve neuronal repair show promise for improving outcomes following perinatal brain injury in animal models. Other preventative strategies include delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants and progesterone in women with prior preterm birth or short cervix and avoidance of infections. Despite these advances, we have not successfully decreased the rate of preterm birth, nor are we able to predict term infants at risk of hypoxic brain injury in order to intervene prior to the hypoxic event. Further, we lack the ability to modulate the sequelae of neuronal cell insults or the ability to repair brain injury after it has been sustained. As a consequence, despite exciting advances in the field of perinatal neuroprotection, perinatal brain injury still impacts thousands of newborns each year with significant long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:24592318

  2. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  3. Quality of newborn care at birth

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, AJ; Marchant, T.

    2014-01-01

    Quality of care can be measured by seeing if skilled birth attendants use simple approaches to save lives. Skilled birth attendants range from trained community health workers to nurses, doctors and midwives. Findings from three low-income settings show quality of care for the newborn is low even when a skilled birth attendant is at the mother’s side during birth. Source: 2012 Baseline survey data, the IDEAS project, based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Funded by the...

  4. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-01-01

    -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS) at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1). Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA) especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our coun...

  5. Connecting Child Care Quality to Child Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Greg J.; Christina M. Gibson-Davis

    2006-01-01

    Effective early childhood intervention and child care policies should be based on an understanding of the effects of child care quality and type on child well-being. This article describes methods for securing unbiased estimates of these effects from nonexperimental data. It focuses on longitudinal studies like the one developed by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Early Child Care Research Network. This article first describes bias problems that arise in analyses...

  6. Quality management in Irish health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, K; Harrington, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a quantitative research study of quality management in the Irish health-care sector. The study findings suggest that quality management is what hospitals require to become more cost-effective and efficient. The research also shows that the culture of health-care institutions must change to one where employees experience pride in their work and where all are involved and committed to continuous quality improvement. It is recommended that a shift is required from the traditional management structures to a more participative approach. Furthermore, all managers whether from a clinical or an administration background must understand one another's role in the organisation. Finally, for quality to succeed in the health-care sector, strong committed leadership is required to overcome tensions in quality implementation. PMID:10724566

  7. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Isla Pera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Isla PeraDepartment of Public Health Nursing, Mental and Mother and Child Health, University of Barcelona, SpainBackground: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions.Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed.Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system.Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, health care quality, quality of life, qualitative research

  8. Developing evidence-based maternity care in Iran: a quality improvement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current Iranian perinatal statistics indicate that maternity care continues to need improvement. In response, we implemented a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of maternity care at an Iranian Social Security Hospital. Using a before-and-after design our aim was to improve the uptake of selected evidence based practices and more closely attend to identified women's needs and preferences. Methods The major steps of the study were to (1 identify women's needs, values and preferences via interviews, (2 select through a process of professional consensus the top evidence-based clinical recommendations requiring local implementation (3 redesign care based on the selected evidence-based recommendations and women's views, and (4 implement the new care model. We measured the impact of the new care model on maternal satisfaction and caesarean birth rates utilising maternal surveys and medical record audit before and after implementation of the new care model. Results Twenty women's needs and requirements as well as ten evidence-based clinical recommendations were selected as a basis for improving care. Following the introduction of the new model of care, women's satisfaction levels improved significantly on 16 of 20 items (p Conclusion The introduction of a quality improvement care model improved compliance with evidence-based guidelines and was associated with an improvement in women's satisfaction levels and a reduction in rates of caesarean birth.

  9. Does Audit Improve the Quality of Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areti Tsaloglidou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The quality of health care and quality assurance are concepts which have been established for many years. Audit nowadays is adopted as a means of developing high quality care.AIM: This study aims to identify the perspectives of audit in practice and its relationship to quality assessment and assurance, quality improvement, and clinical effectiveness.METHODS: There were used the databases Medline and Cinahl to identify studies related to clinical audit. These databases were searched up to May 2009.DISCUSSION: Audit is used as a tool to assure and assess the quality of patient health care. It is also an educational tool as it creates a lot of opportunities for professionals to think about practice and to learn from the experience of others.CONCLUSIONS: Although that audit is a powerfull and useful tool to improve and evaluate the quality of health care, on the other hand there are many barriers that make its use difficult in everyday practice.

  10. Reviewing the quality of care: Priorities for improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Rapid and substantial change in our health care system has prompted careful analysis of the quality of health care and the effectiveness of the methods used to review and improve quality. Although welcome, those applying this scrutiny must recognize that improvement in the quality of health care will take the concerted and cooperative efforts of health policymakers, health care practitioners, health care organizations, consumers of care, purchasers of care, and those organizations that define...

  11. Changes in Perinatal Care and Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality for Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mortality of very low birth weight premature infants is of great public health concern. To better guide local intervention program, it is essential that current and reliable statistics be collected to understand the factors associated with mortality of these infants.Methods: Data of very low birth weight premature infants admitted to a neonatal unit during 2002-2009 was retrospectively collected. Changes in perinatal care between two halves of the study period (2002-2005 and 2006-2009 were identified. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were found by logistic regression and a predictive score model was established.Findings: A total of 475 cases were enrolled. In-hospital mortality decreased from 29.8% in 2002-2005 to 28.1% in 2006-2009 (P>0.05. More infants born<28 gestational weeks survived to discharge in the latter epoch (38.1% vs 8.3%, P<0.05. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn, pulmonary hemorrhage,birth weight <000 grams, gestational age <33 weeks, feeding before 3 postnatal days and enteral feeding were found predictors of in-hospital mortality by logistic regression. The discriminating ability of the predictivemodel was 82.4% and the cutoff point was -0.56.Conclusion: Survival of very low birth weight premature neonates was not significantly improved in 2006-2009 than 2002-2005. Infants with a score higher than -0.56 were assessed to be at high risk of in-hospital mortality. Multi-center studies of planned follow-up are needed to develop a comprehensive and applicable score system.

  12. Use of Care, Outcomes and Costs of a Culturally-based Perinatal Program for Asian American and Pacific Islander Women in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, Dyanne D.; Korenbrot, Carol C.; De, Anindya K.; Mayberry, Linda J.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE. This study examines whether psychosocial perinatal care services developed through community partnerships and cultural deference with attention to individual women's health issues, had an assocaited impact on use of prenatal care, birth outcomes and perinatal care costs for the three participating Asian Pacific Islander American ethinc groups. METHODS. The use of prenatal care visits and birth outcomes for women in the Malama program were compared to those for women of the same etnic groups in the community prior to the introduction of the program. Data on program participants from 1992 to 1994 were compared to birth certificate data on Hawaiian, Filipino and Japanese women from 1988 to 1991. Costs of providing Malama prenatal services were determined from data provided by cost accounting and encounter data systems for the program. SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT FINDINGS. The use of prenatal care visits and birth outcomes were significantly lower for Malama program participants than for women of the same ethnic groups prior to the introduction of the program. The costs of the prenatal program services were $846 to $920 per woman. The expected savings in medical costs per infant with the improved preterm birth rates were $680 per infant. Thus 75% to 80% of the costs of the services were likely to be saved in lower medical costs of the infants. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS. Programs that use community approaches and caring servies delivered in a cultural context, like the Malama model, have a potential for improving the use of prenatal care and birth outcomes at reasonable costs. RELEVANCE TO ASIAN PACIFIC ISLANDER AMERICAN POPULATIONS. The Malama approach to ascertaining cultural preferences for the content and delivery of care should prove useful in addressing public health goals of improved pregnancy outcomes for diverse groups of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. KEY WORDS. Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, pregnancy, prenatal care, low birthweight, preterm birth, cultural competency, community partnerships, costs, cost effectiveness. PMID:11567478

  13. The emerging EU quality of care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollaard, Hans; van de Bovenkamp, Hester M.; Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    initiatives regarding the quality systems of the Member States and the quality of services, this paper shows how the depth of EU interference has increased from sharing information to standardization and even to the first signs of enforcement. We argue that at this stage, reflection on the feasibility and......Despite the fact that Member States and many citizens of the EU like to keep healthcare a foremost national competence and the EU treaties state that Member States remain primarily responsible for the organization and delivery of health care services, the European Union (EU) has expanded its...... involvement in healthcare policy over the last twenty years. Based on interviews and document and literature analysis we show that the scope of EU involvement has widened from public health and access to care, to quality of care. In this paper we concentrate on the latter. Focusing on the recent EU...

  14. Measuring quality of care for colorectal cancer care: comprehensive feedback driving quality improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Kolfschoten, Nicoline Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Data from clinical audits such as the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit, can be used for valid and meaningful feedback information, which may support improvement of quality of care. First, we showed that the continuous feedback cycle of clinical auditing has an autonomous, positive effect on the quality of surgical care. Second, we describe how data from clinical audits can be used to monitor and improve national practice and performance in colorectal cancer care, especially for high-risk patie...

  15. [The quality of chronic care in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Birgit; Nolte, Ellen; Erler, Antje

    2011-01-01

    Over the last ten years changes in the legal framework of the German health care system have promoted the development of new health service models to improve chronic care. Recent innovations include the nation-wide introduction of disease management programmes (DMPs), integrated care contracts, community nurse programmes, the introduction of General Practitioner (GP)-centred care contracts, and new opportunities to offer interdisciplinary outpatient care in polyclinics. The aim of this article is to describe the recent developments regarding both the implementation of new health care models by statutory health insurance companies and their evaluation. As part of a European project on the development and validation of disease management evaluation methods (DISMEVAL), we carried out a selective literature search to identify relevant models and evaluation studies. However, on the basis of the currently available evaluation and study results it is difficult to judge whether these developments have actually led to an improvement in the quality of chronic care in Germany. Only for DMPs, evaluation is legally mandatory; its methods are inappropriate, though, for studying the effectiveness of DMPs. Further study results on the effectiveness of DMPs mostly focus on the DMP Diabetes mellitus type II and show consistent improvements regarding process parameters such as regular routine examinations, adherence to treatment guidelines, and quality of life. More research will be needed to determine whether DMPs can also help reduce the incidence of secondary disease and mortality in the long term. PMID:22142877

  16. Nursing care quality: a concept analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Virya Koy; Jintana Yunibhand; Yupin Angsuroch

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a clear definition of nursing care quality that contributes to the formulation, application, and measurement of quality nursing outcomes for patients, organisations, and nursing staff. It also indicates the manner in which, by using the definition, empirically based operational definitions can be developed for different operational environments and settings. The study employed a concept analysis methodology to extract terms, attributes, antecedents, and...

  17. Utility of local health registers in measuring perinatal mortality: A case study in rural Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adair Timothy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal mortality is an important indicator of obstetric and newborn care services. Although the vast majority of global perinatal mortality is estimated to occur in developing countries, there is a critical paucity of reliable data at the local level to inform health policy, plan health care services, and monitor their impact. This paper explores the utility of information from village health registers to measure perinatal mortality at the sub district level in a rural area of Indonesia. Methods A retrospective pregnancy cohort for 2007 was constructed by triangulating data from antenatal care, birth, and newborn care registers in a sample of villages in three rural sub districts in Central Java, Indonesia. For each pregnancy, birth outcome and first week survival were traced and recorded from the different registers, as available. Additional local death records were consulted to verify perinatal mortality, or identify deaths not recorded in the health registers. Analyses were performed to assess data quality from registers, and measure perinatal mortality rates. Qualitative research was conducted to explore knowledge and practices of village midwives in register maintenance and reporting of perinatal mortality. Results Field activities were conducted in 23 villages, covering a total of 1759 deliveries that occurred in 2007. Perinatal mortality outcomes were 23 stillbirths and 15 early neonatal deaths, resulting in a perinatal mortality rate of 21.6 per 1000 live births in 2007. Stillbirth rates for the study population were about four times the rates reported in the routine Maternal and Child Health program information system. Inadequate awareness and supervision, and alternate workload were cited by local midwives as factors resulting in inconsistent data reporting. Conclusions Local maternal and child health registers are a useful source of information on perinatal mortality in rural Indonesia. Suitable training, supervision, and quality control, in conjunction with computerisation to strengthen register maintenance can provide routine local area measures of perinatal mortality for health policy, and monitoring of newborn care interventions. Similar efforts are required to strengthen routine health data in all developing countries, to guide planned progress towards reduction in the local, national and international burden from perinatal mortality.

  18. Regionalized perinatal education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattwinkel, John; Cook, Lynn J; Nowacek, George; Bailey, Carey; Crosby, Warren M; Hurt, Hallam; Short, Jerry

    2004-04-01

    Despite changes in the organization and financing of healthcare delivery, and dramatic increases in the number and distribution of perinatal facilities and professionals over the past three decades, there remains a continuing need for effective and efficient regionalized perinatal outreach education programmes. Both the organizers and the participants should be multidisciplinary and include both inpatient and outpatient providers. Content should be restricted to issues relevant to participants' practice, and include topics ranging from preconception to postpartum and early infant care. There are various effective formats, but consideration should be given to reaching as many providers as possible simultaneously within a given facility, minimizing expense and economizing on participants' time. Evaluation strategies range from assessment of immediate outcomes, which generally examine programme process, to ultimate outcomes, which measure changes in patient care and patient health. PMID:16256719

  19. Quality of Care in Old Age Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kart, Cary S.; Manard, Barbara B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper looks at the complexity of the "quality-of-care" issue and discusses five characteristics which investigators have suggested for identifying a good old age institution (OAI): ownership, size of facility, socioeconomic status of facility, social integration, and "professionalism" of staff. (Author)

  20. Quality Reforms in Danish Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Despite relatively generous coverage of the over-65 population, Danish home help services receive regular criticism in the media and public opinion polls. Perhaps as a consequence, reforms of Danish home care policy for senior citizens have placed strong emphasis on quality since the 1990s. This...... increase the overall quality of care by increasing the transparency at the political, administrative and user levels. However, reforms have revolved around conflicting principles of standardisation and the individualisation of care provision and primarily succeeded in increasing the political and ad...... reform strategy represents a shift from the welfare state modernisation program of the 1980s, which built mainly on economic strategies of cost-efficiency and New Public Management (NPM) princi-ples, including contract management and performance management. Recent reforms have instead attempted to...

  1. Changes in depression status in low socioeconomic perinatal subjects in rural India after supervised physical exercise: A randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Gopal Nambi Subash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perinatal depression is a major public health problem, affecting up to a quarter of all pregnant women in rural Asean countries and often leads to psychologic symptoms, lower quality of life, and higher health care costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of supervised physical exercise on depression level of perinatal subjects. Subjects/Intervention: 60 subjects who fulfill the selection criteria were randomly assigned to exercise (Group-1, n=30) and control grou...

  2. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty; Zijlstra, Jan G; Curtis, Jared Randall; Ørding, Helle

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and......%-1%). Test-retest reliability showed a median weighted κ of 0.69 (0.53-0.83). Validation showed significant correlation between total scores and key questions. CONCLUSIONS: The questions were assessed as relevant and understandable, providing high face and content validity. Ceiling effects were comparable to...

  3. Improving the quality of perinatal mental health: a health visitor-led protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Anne; Ilot, Irene; Lekka, Chrysanthi; Oluboyede, Yemi

    2011-02-01

    The mental health of mothers is of significant concern to community practitioners. This paper reports on a case study exploring the success factors of a well established, health visitor-led protocol to identify and treat women with mild to moderate depression. Data were collected through interviews with a purposive sample of 12 community practitioners, a focus group of four health visitors and observation of a multidisciplinary steering group meeting. The protocol was described as an evidence-based tool and safety net that could be used flexibly to support clinical judgments and tailored to individual needs. Success factors included frontline clinician engagement and ownership, continuity of leadership to drive development and maintain momentum, comprehensive and on-going staff training, and strategic support for the protocol as a quality indicator at a time of organisational change. Quality and clinical leadership are continuing policy priorities. The protocol enabled frontline staff to lead a service innovation, providing a standardised multiprofessional approach to women's mental health needs through effective support, advice and treatment that can be measured and quality assured. PMID:21388041

  4. Quality in point-of-care testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James H

    2003-09-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is an increasingly popular means of providing laboratory testing at or near to the site of patient care. POCT provides rapid results and has the potential to improve patient outcome from earlier treatment. However, a faster result is not necessarily an equivalent result to traditional, core laboratory testing. Preanalytic, analytic and postanalytic factors can influence the quality of POCT and lead to misinterpretation. Concerns over the quality of POCT have resulted in a hierarchy of laboratory regulations in the USA and POCT guidelines are appearing in a number of countries worldwide. Quality POCT must control every aspect of the test and testing process that can affect the ultimate result. Laboratory quality regulations are very similar to industrial quality requirements and POCT can be viewed like any manufacturing business where the product being produced is the test result. Use of industrial management techniques, such as failure mode and effects analysis, can be applied to POCT to isolate and reduce the sources of testing error. Data management is fundamental to quality. Analyzing POCT data can show quality trends before they affect the result. Newer POCT devices have computerized data capture and storage functions that can collect the key information at the time the test is performed and later transmit that data to a POCT data manager or hospital information system. Recent standards, such as the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards POCT1-A, provide a connectivity standard to allow different POCT devices to share a common interface and data manager system, reducing the cost of implementing and maintaining POCT. Guaranteeing POCT quality is resource-intensive and as healthcare budgets get tighter and staffing shortages grow, patient outcome must be weighed against available resources to determine optimum testing strategies. Use of the POCT literature can help establish an evidence-based justification to support POCT. PMID:14510177

  5. Quality of care in humanitarian surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kathryn M; Trelles, Miguel; Ford, Nathan P

    2011-06-01

    Humanitarian surgical programs are set up de novo, within days or hours in emergency or disaster settings. In such circumstances, insuring quality of care is extremely challenging. Basic structural inputs such as a safe structure, electricity, clean water, a blood bank, sterilization equipment, a post-anesthesia recovery unit, appropriate medications should be established. Currently, no specific credentials are needed for surgeons to operate in a humanitarian setting; the training of more humanitarian surgeons is desperately needed. Standard perioperative protocols for the humanitarian setting after common procedures such as Cesarean section, burn care, open fractures, and amputations and antibiotic prophylaxis, and post-operative pain management must be developed. Outcome data, especially long-term outcomes, are difficult to collect as patients often do not return for follow-up and may be difficult to trace; standard databases for post-operative infections and mortality rates should be established. Checklists have recently received significant attention as an instrument to support the improvement of surgical quality; knowing which items are most applicable to humanitarian settings remains unknown. In conclusion, the quality of surgical services in humanitarian settings must be regulated. Many other core medical activities of humanitarian organizations such as therapeutic feeding, mass vaccination, and the treatment of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus, are subject to rigorous reporting of quality indicators. There is no reason why surgery should be exempted from quality oversight. The surgical humanitarian community should pull together before the next disaster strikes. PMID:21487849

  6. [Quality of care in adult resuscitation unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Cabrera, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays the quality of care has become a key piece in medical assistance. Apart from doing things correctly we should have an objective knowledge of the opinion of the user That opinion could be known thanks to the analysis of the perceived quality care from the patient. From October to December of 2008 a descriptive, transversal and retrospective research has been developed in a resuscitation unit at a third level hospital of the Community of Madrid. This research has been for all the registrations to the service, through the Servqhos questionnaire. The aims of the research were to evaluate the quality perceived at the resuscitation unit; to know the profile of the patient treated and to identify the possible improvements and problems as well. The patients were anonymous and they presented themselves voluntary 19 of 42 registrations in total answered the questionnaire with a rate of reply of 45%. The average age registered were 57 years old with an average of stay of 11 days. The most prevalent pathologies were neoplasias and polytraumatisms. According to the quality perceived by the unity there has not been any relationship among gender study level, labor activity marital status and previous hospital stay. At the area of information to the patient there have been some deficiencies as well as some discrimination from the attending staff. Noise is valuated negatively by the patients. Further to the professionalism, is valuated positively at all the social classes. The global quality perceived of the unity were very good from the patient. PMID:25551917

  7. Providers Caring for Adolescents with Perinatally-Acquired HIV: Current Practices and Barriers to Communication About Sexual and Reproductive Health

    OpenAIRE

    Albright, Jamie N.; Fair, Cynthia D.

    2014-01-01

    The population of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) present challenges to HIV healthcare providers (HHCPs). Originally not expected to survive childhood, they are now living well into young adulthood. Little is known about the type of sexual and reproductive (SRH) information/services offered to AYA with PHIV by HHCPs. HHCPs (n=67) were recruited using snowball sampling, and completed an online survey. Providers' most frequently endorsed SRH topics discus...

  8. Utilization of free dental health care services provided to the perinatally infected human immunodeficiency virus children in Bangalore: Longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Javaregowda Parvathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of Highly active anti-retroviral therapy have increased the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients and hence it is imperative that all efforts have to be made by Pediatric dentists to provide a better oral health for these children. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of utilization of free dental treatment provided to these perinatally infected HIV positive children who were previously screened as a part of oral health survey. Design: Purposive sampling was used. Inclusion criteria: Perinatally infected HIV children screened for oral health status. Exclusion criteria: Patients not screened during the oral health survey. Materials and Methods: Attendance records of 319 perinatally HIV infected children consisting of 178 males and 141 females attending a specialized pediatric outpatient clinic at Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health were examined to compare treatment compliance rates. Results: The number of patients in the severe category who completed treatment was significantly less compared with mild and advanced categories (P 0.05. Conclusion: The results show that children with HIV have significantly lower compliance. Even though all dental treatment provided to them was free of the cost it still had no impetus to encourage them to go through with the treatment.

  9. Quality of Care in Humanitarian Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Kathryn M.; Trelles, Miguel; Ford, Nathan P

    2011-01-01

    Humanitarian surgical programs are set up de novo, within days or hours in emergency or disaster settings. In such circumstances, insuring quality of care is extremely challenging. Basic structural inputs such as a safe structure, electricity, clean water, a blood bank, sterilization equipment, a post-anesthesia recovery unit, appropriate medications should be established. Currently, no specific credentials are needed for surgeons to operate in a humanitarian setting; the training of more hum...

  10. Techniques change, but quality care does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecko, Lindsey

    2009-01-01

    The technical tools and complexity of cases for young practitioners are not the same as those used by their predecessors, but the aim is the same: quality ethical care at the highest level. The challenges of building the ethical practice today include building trust in a world where patients have access to media depictions of a society of greed, the temptations of over-treatment, and a need for an evidence base to one's practice. PMID:20415128

  11. Peripheral venous catheters : Quality of care assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlqvist, Margary

    2010-01-01

    About half of the patients admitted to hospitals receive intravenous therapy through peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). Unfortunately, the use of PVCs is associated with the risk of complications that may lead to increased morbidity and prolonged hospitalisation. Because of the frequent use of PVCs and the risk of PVC-related complications, there are good reasons to assess quality of care. The overall aim of this study was to attain increased knowledge about PVC documen...

  12. Perinatal Oxygen in the Developing Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Elizabeth R.; Britt, Rodney D; Trinidad, Mari Charisse; Faksh, Arij; Richard J Martin; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), wheezing, and asthma, remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population, particularly in the setting of premature birth. Pulmonary outcomes in these infants are highly influenced by perinatal exposures including prenatal inflammation, postnatal intensive care unit interventions, and environmental agents. Here, there is strong evidence that perinatal supplemental oxygen administration has significant effect...

  13. Perinatal Asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Shajari

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Asphyxia before, during or after delivery is an important cause of perinatal mortality and neurologic morbidity. The fetus and newborn are equipped with a wide range of adaptive mechanisms to survive an Asphyxia episode, and when these fail, injury can occur. The American academy or pediatrics (AAP and the American college of obstetrics and gynecology (AcoG committees on maternal-fetal medicine and fetus and newborn have recently defined certain criteria that must be present: Profound umbilical artery metabolic or mixed academia (PH<700, persistence of an apgar score of 0 to 3 for longer than 5 minutes, neonatal neurologic sequelae (E.g., seizures, coma, hypotonia, and multiorgan system dysfunction (E.g., cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hematologic, pulmonary or renal. In cases in which such evidence is laking, we cannot conclude that perinatal Asphyxia exists. The staging of the encephalopathy is useful for determination of prognosis. Those with mild encephalopathy do well, those with severe encephalopathy have a poor prognosis. The outcome of these with moderate (Stage II hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is less certain, however, these children are at risk for neurologic disability and future academic failure. Overall tests used to evaluate subtle changes that may relate to perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury have been inadequate, future studies should include tests of acquisition of new learning, memory, problem solving, and reasoning.

  14. Influence of structural features on Portuguese toddler child care quality

    OpenAIRE

    Pessanha, Manuela; Aguiar, Cecília; Bairrão, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Whereas child care quality has been extensively studied in the U.S., there is much less information about the quality of child care in other countries.With one of the highest maternal employment rates in Europe, it is important to examine child care in Portugal. Thirty toddler classrooms in child care centers were observed. The purpose of this studywas to determine whether structural features account for overall toddler child care quality. Results showed younger and better-paid teach...

  15. Factors related to main preventable perinatal injuries of public hospital in the Brazilian Federal District.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamella Padilha BRITO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of prenatal care, childbirth and newborn are determinants of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The realization of a adequate prenatal care and skilled birth assistance would reduce the incidence of injuries and perinatal deaths that are largely preventable. Method: Descriptive and exploratory study of quantitative and qualitative nature.  Interview and review of medical records of thirty mothers and newborns were made. The results were chart using the SPSS software, version 20.0, for processing and statistical analysis. We performed thematic analysis of interviews, and tabulated according to their frequencies, identifying the differences and similarities between data. Results: The most frequent perinatal injuries were prematurity (74.2%, Respiratory Distress (71%, Underweight (51.6%, Infection or Sepsis (41.9%, Perinatal Asphyxia (19.4%  and Oligohydramnio (19.4%. These injuries were related to several factors such as inadequate prenatal care, with fewer than six prenatal consultations (70% and late onset (50%, and presence of maternal health problems such as: changes in amniotic fluid (50% and preterm labor (50%. The interviewees added other factors such as failures in the care professional (43%, failures in care and service (33%, difficulty of access (19% and breast self-care failures (16.6%. Conclusion: Stood out in this study the occurrence of perinatal injuries in children of mothers with stable socio-demographic profile and in term newborns as also the percentage of deaths (16.1%. The perinatal injuries and deaths could have been avoided with qualified prenatal care, childbirth and newborn care.

  16. Improving the quality of care for children in health systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Homer, C. J.; Kleinman, L C; Goldman, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the state of the art in quality improvement, review its application to care for children, and define the information that will be needed so that care for children can be further improved. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Health services for children exhibit numerous deficiencies in quality of care. The deficiencies cross all major domains of pediatric care--preventive services, acute care, and chronic care--and provide the opportunity for creative application of improvement strateg...

  17. Quality indicators for international benchmarking of mental health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Richard C; Mattke, Soeren; Somekh, David; Silfverhielm, Helena; Goldner, Elliot; Glover, Gyles; Pirkis, Jane; Mainz, Jan; Chan, Jeffrey A

    To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data.......To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data....

  18. Quality care as ethical care: a poststructural analysis of palliative and supportive district nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagington, Maurice; Walshe, Catherine; Luker, Karen A

    2016-03-01

    Quality of care is a prominent discourse in modern health-care and has previously been conceptualised in terms of ethics. In addition, the role of knowledge has been suggested as being particularly influential with regard to the nurse-patient-carer relationship. However, to date, no analyses have examined how knowledge (as an ethical concept) impinges on quality of care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care and thirteen of their lay carers. Poststructural discourse analysis techniques were utilised to take an ethical perspective on the current way in which quality of care is assessed and produced in health-care. It is argued that if quality of care is to be achieved, patients and carers need to be able to redistribute and redevelop the knowledge of their services in a collaborative way that goes beyond the current ways of working. Theoretical works and extant research are then used to produce tentative suggestions about how this may be achieved. PMID:26189362

  19. Managing Quality in Health Care: Involving Patient Care Information Systems and Healthcare Professionals in Quality Monitoring and Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    De Mul, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    It is no longer possible to ignore the issue of quality in health care. Care institutions strive to provide all patients with effective, efficient, safe, timely, patient-centered care. Increased attention for quality is also found in discussions regarding use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health care processes. In these discussions, ICT is almost always brought into a direct relationship with improving the quality of care, especially ICTs that professionals use direc...

  20. Nursing care quality: a concept analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virya Koy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a clear definition of nursing care quality that contributes to the formulation, application, and measurement of quality nursing outcomes for patients, organisations, and nursing staff. It also indicates the manner in which, by using the definition, empirically based operational definitions can be developed for different operational environments and settings. The study employed a concept analysis methodology to extract terms, attributes, antecedents, and consequences (outcomes from relevant literature databases. The analysis identified nine attributes: nurse competency performance, met nursing care needs, good experiences for patients, good leadership, staff characteristics, preconditions of care, physical environment, progress of nursing process, and cooperation with relatives. Antecedences include nurse-staffing levels, positive practice environment, and nursing turnover. Consequences include patient safety, patient satisfaction, nursing outcomes, nurse satisfaction, and budget management. Because of the breadth and depth of modern nursing practice, further research and development of the concept is required. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1832-1838

  1. Delivery of maternal health care in Indigenous primary care services: baseline data for an ongoing quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwedza Ru K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous populations have disproportionately high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes relative to other Australians. Poorer access to good quality maternal health care is a key driver of this disparity. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of delivery of maternity care and service gaps in primary care services in Australian Indigenous communities. Methods We undertook a cross-sectional baseline audit for a quality improvement intervention. Medical records of 535 women from 34 Indigenous community health centres in five regions (Top End of Northern Territory 13, Central Australia 2, Far West New South Wales 6, Western Australia 9, and North Queensland 4 were audited. The main outcome measures included: adherence to recommended protocols and procedures in the antenatal and postnatal periods including: clinical, laboratory and ultrasound investigations; screening for gestational diabetes and Group B Streptococcus; brief intervention/advice on health-related behaviours and risks; and follow up of identified health problems. Results The proportion of women presenting for their first antenatal visit in the first trimester ranged from 34% to 49% between regions; consequently, documentation of care early in pregnancy was poor. Overall, documentation of routine antenatal investigations and brief interventions/advice regarding health behaviours varied, and generally indicated that these services were underutilised. For example, 46% of known smokers received smoking cessation advice/counselling; 52% of all women received antenatal education and 51% had investigation for gestational diabetes. Overall, there was relatively good documentation of follow up of identified problems related to hypertension or diabetes, with over 70% of identified women being referred to a GP/Obstetrician. Conclusion Participating services had both strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of maternal health care. Increasing access to evidence-based screening and health information (most notably around smoking cessation were consistently identified as opportunities for improvement across services.

  2. Quality improvement and accountability in the Danish health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mainz, Jan; Kristensen, Solvejg; Bartels, Paul

    2015-01-01

    , reporting of adverse events, national handling of patient complaints, national accreditation and public disclosure of all data on the quality of care. Over the years, Denmark has worked up a progressive and transparent just culture in quality management; the different actors at the different levels of the......, transparency in health care and accountability. To further develop the Danish governance model, it is important to expand the model to the primary care sector. Furthermore, a national quality health programme 2015-18 recently launched by the government supports a new development in health care focusing upon...... delivering high-quality health care-high quality is defined by results of value to the patients....

  3. Quality of intensive care chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated the image quality of a stimulable phosphorous plate system in intensive care chest radiography. Four radiologists examined 308 chest radiographs (200 conventional, 108 digital) according to the following criteria: visibility of catheters, tubes (artificial objects), bronchi, central and peripheral vessels, diaphragm, trachea, and retrocardial lung parenchyma. Detectability of these structures was classified as good, poor, or impossible to see. In addition, optical density was measured in the region of liver, heart, and lung. Results were evaluated by Student and υ test

  4. New horizon in quality care--Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M C

    1997-01-01

    The current status and directions for changes of issues related to quality care in health services in Asian countries--Malaysia, China, Singapore, Japan and Korea are overviewed. In countries with public sector dominated health care systems such as Malaysia. China and Singapore, governmental leadership in quality care is prominent along with legislative backup. Japan and Korea have private sector dominated health care systems and quality care activities are mainly carried out by non-governmental organisations. Hospital accreditation programs are in the developing stages in most countries, although China and Korea started in 1980. Most Asian countries are at the initial stages in quality care activities and focus has been placed on education and training. Asian countries are not exempted from efforts to enhance quality care activities and a new horizon in quality health care is emerging. PMID:10174544

  5. Identifying Tools and Strategies to Provide Quality Oncology Care

    OpenAIRE

    Ganz, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    This session of the ASCO Quality Symposium provided an opportunity to examine a variety of research and quality improvement strategies aimed at improving the quality of cancer care along the continuum.

  6. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  7. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality. PMID:26950539

  8. Increasing access to quality health care for the poor: Community perceptions on quality care in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Kiguli; Elizabeth Ekirapa-Kiracho; Olico Okui; Aloysius Mutebi; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Julie Kiguli1, Elizabeth Ekirapa-Kiracho1, Olico Okui1, Aloysius Mutebi1, Hayley MacGregor2, George William Pariyo11Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda; 2Institute of Development Studies, Sussex, UKAbstract: This paper examines the community’s perspectives and perceptions on quality of health care delivery in two Uganda districts. The paper addresses community concerns on service quality. It focuses on the poor because they are a vulnerable group and often b...

  9. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with better outcomes in diabetes care. Quality management was measured with newly developed questionnaires about organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, q...

  10. Linkages among reproductive health, maternal health, and perinatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lassi, Zohra S; Blanc, Ann; Donnay, France

    2010-12-01

    Some interventions in women before and during pregnancy may reduce perinatal and neonatal deaths, and recent research has established linkages of reproductive health with maternal, perinatal, and early neonatal health outcomes. In this review, we attempted to analyze the impact of biological, clinical, and epidemiologic aspects of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes through an elucidation of a biological framework for linking reproductive, maternal and newborn health (RHMNH); care strategies and interventions for improved perinatal and neonatal health outcomes; public health implications of these linkages and implementation strategies; and evidence gaps for scaling up such strategies. Approximately 1000 studies (up to June 15, 2010) were reviewed that have addressed an impact of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes. These include systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and stand-alone experimental and observational studies. Evidences were also drawn from recent work undertaken by the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG), the interconnections between maternal and newborn health reviews identified by the Global Alliance for Prevention of Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS), as well as relevant work by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. Our review amply demonstrates that opportunities for assessing outcomes for both mothers and newborns have been poorly realized and documented. Most of the interventions reviewed will require more greater-quality evidence before solid programmatic recommendations can be made. However, on the basis of our review, birth spacing, prevention of indoor air pollution, prevention of intimate partner violence before and during pregnancy, antenatal care during pregnancy, Doppler ultrasound monitoring during pregnancy, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, birth and newborn care preparedness via community-based intervention packages, emergency obstetrical care, elective induction for postterm delivery, Cesarean delivery for breech presentation, and prophylactic corticosteroids in preterm labor reduce perinatal mortality; and early initiation of breastfeeding and birth and newborn care preparedness through community-based intervention packages reduce neonatal mortality. This review demonstrates that RHMNH are inextricably linked, and that, therefore, health policies and programs should link them together. Such potential integration of strategies would not only help improve outcomes for millions of mothers and newborns but would also save scant resources. This would also allow for greater efficiency in training, monitoring, and supervision of health care workers and would also help families and communities to access and use services easily. PMID:21094418

  11. Maternal, Perinatal and Neonatal Mortality in South-East Asia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South East Asia Region (SEAR is one of the most populous world regions and also bears a disproportionate burden of mortality compared to other world regions. The purpose of this article was to analyze the situation of maternal, neonatal and perinatal health in SEAR to inform public health practitioners, program managers and policy makers about the situation in this world region. A secondary review of policy and programmatic documents published by ministries of health in SEAR countries, WHO, other UN agencies and peer reviewed journal articles in the area of maternal, child, neonatal and perinatal health published in the last five years was conducted. This article discusses the current situation of maternal, perinatal and neonatal health in SEAR countries, highlights some of the key challenges and provides recommendations to countries on the way forward for improving perinatal and maternal health. Key issues are discussed under the broad themes of improving maternal and perinatal health information systems, improving quality of care and human resource management. The article concludes that Health Systems Strengthening, Scaling up of Skilled Human Resource, Investing in information systems and improving the quality of maternal and neonatal care services are essential for future progress in countries but these are long term processes which need sustained commitment and ownership at all levels.

  12. Perinatal care at the limit of viability between 22 and 26 completed weeks of gestation in Switzerland. 2011 revision of the Swiss recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas M; Bernet, Vera; El Alama, Susanna; Fauchère, Jean-Claude; Hösli, Irène; Irion, Olivier; Kind, Christian; Latal, Bea; Nelle, Mathias; Pfister, Riccardo E; Surbek, Daniel; Truttmann, Anita C; Wisser, Joseph; Zimmermann, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal care of pregnant women at high risk for preterm delivery and of preterm infants born at the limit of viability (22-26 completed weeks of gestation) requires a multidisciplinary approach by an experienced perinatal team. Limited precision in the determination of both gestational age and foetal weight, as well as biological variability may significantly affect the course of action chosen in individual cases. The decisions that must be taken with the pregnant women and on behalf of the preterm infant in this context are complex and have far-reaching consequences. When counselling pregnant women and their partners, neonatologists and obstetricians should provide them with comprehensive information in a sensitive and supportive way to build a basis of trust. The decisions are developed in a continuing dialogue between all parties involved (physicians, midwives, nursing staff and parents) with the principal aim to find solutions that are in the infant's and pregnant woman's best interest. Knowledge of current gestational age-specific mortality and morbidity rates and how they are modified by prenatally known prognostic factors (estimated foetal weight, sex, exposure or nonexposure to antenatal corticosteroids, single or multiple births) as well as the application of accepted ethical principles form the basis for responsible decision-making. Communication between all parties involved plays a central role. The members of the interdisciplinary working group suggest that the care of preterm infants with a gestational age between 22 0/7 and 23 6/7 weeks should generally be limited to palliative care. Obstetric interventions for foetal indications such as Caesarean section delivery are usually not indicated. In selected cases, for example, after 23 weeks of pregnancy have been completed and several of the above mentioned prenatally known prognostic factors are favourable or well informed parents insist on the initiation of life-sustaining therapies, active obstetric interventions for foetal indications and provisional intensive care of the neonate may be reasonable. In preterm infants with a gestational age between 24 0/7 and 24 6/7 weeks, it can be difficult to determine whether the burden of obstetric interventions and neonatal intensive care is justified given the limited chances of success of such a therapy. In such cases, the individual constellation of prenatally known factors which impact on prognosis can be helpful in the decision making process with the parents. In preterm infants with a gestational age between 25 0/7 and 25 6/7 weeks, foetal surveillance, obstetric interventions for foetal indications and neonatal intensive care measures are generally indicated. However, if several prenatally known prognostic factors are unfavourable and the parents agree, primary non-intervention and neonatal palliative care can be considered. All pregnant women with threatening preterm delivery or premature rupture of membranes at the limit of viability must be transferred to a perinatal centre with a level III neonatal intensive care unit no later than 23 0/7 weeks of gestation, unless emergency delivery is indicated. An experienced neonatology team should be involved in all deliveries that take place after 23 0/7 weeks of gestation to help to decide together with the parents if the initiation of intensive care measures appears to be appropriate or if preference should be given to palliative care (i.e., primary non-intervention). In doubtful situations, it can be reasonable to initiate intensive care and to admit the preterm infant to a neonatal intensive care unit (i.e., provisional intensive care). The infant's clinical evolution and additional discussions with the parents will help to clarify whether the life-sustaining therapies should be continued or withdrawn. Life support is continued as long as there is reasonable hope for survival and the infant's burden of intensive care is acceptable. If, on the other hand, the health care team and the parents have to recognise that in the light of a very poor prognosis the burden of the currently used therapies has become disproportionate, intensive care measures are no longer justified and other aspects of care (e.g., relief of pain and suffering) are the new priorities (i.e., redirection of care). If a decision is made to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining therapies, the health care team should focus on comfort care for the dying infant and support for the parents. PMID:22009720

  13. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    OpenAIRE

    LYNDON, Audrey; Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support n...

  14. Molecular imaging in quality health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quality Health Care results from applying fundamental basic science and preclinical concepts as well as novel technologies to patient care within specific socio-economic frameworks. Cancer mortality has improved recently but outcomes of cancer patients are still unacceptably poor. Molecular Imaging has the potential to improve the outcome of cancer patients in several ways. In the preclinical setting, high resolution molecular imaging devices designed for small animal research have developed into valuable tools for drug evaluation and imaging probe design. These have enabled us to study drug effects in vivo by monitoring longitudinally their effects on tumor cell metabolism or proliferation. The success of Imatinib in treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) has demonstrated that targeted drugs can induce remarkable tumor responses and may even cure cancer patients. Targeted drugs have been used for treating various common solid human tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer. However, diverse signaling pathways are involved in the development and progression of these genetically heterogeneous diseases. Consequently, inhibition of one specific pathway is likely to be efficacious in only in small subsets of patients with specific histological tumor types. It is unlikely that a single 'blockbuster' drug can be effective for all patients with a 'common' tumor. Rather, it will be necessary to develop multiple targeted drugs even for patients that share a single histologically defined tumor type. The inevitable consequence is a decreased revenue/cost ratio for the industry and increasing costs for patients and health care systems. It is therefore of paramount importance to identify drug failure as early as possible in preclinical and clinical trials. Human studies with positron emission tomography (PET) with molecular imaging probes targeting physiological processes such as glycolysis, lipid synthesis, amino acid transport, cell surface receptors, gene expression and others are available for evaluating in animal experimental studies and humans the extent of disease as well as treatment effects in vivo. With the advent of PET/CT anatomic and molecular images can be fused affording assignment of normal or abnormal molecular imaging findings to specific anatomical structures. The major vendors have invested millions of dollars into bringing together the highest quality CT with 'state of the art' PET instrumentation. Similar technology mergers are currently happening for PET and MRI. These technological advances come at a time of increasing health care expenditures worldwide. One must therefore carefully evaluate whether the increasing costs are met by increasing effectiveness of the technology. This needs to be carefully determined within the varying health care systems and frameworks. This presentation will provide cancer statistics, introduce molecular imaging tools and will describe the concept of targeted imaging. Animal experimental studies will be used to demonstrate promising treatment approaches in vivo and how imaging can be used to monitor therapeutic effects. Further, the clinical molecular PET/CT imaging technology will be introduced and its impact on patient management and cost-effectiveness will be reviewed and discussed within the confines of different health care systems. Finally, Initial clinical trials will be presented that use molecular PET rather than anatomical CT imaging for prospectively arriving at patient management decisions. (author)

  15. Increasing access to quality health care for the poor: Community perceptions on quality care in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kiguli

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Julie Kiguli1, Elizabeth Ekirapa-Kiracho1, Olico Okui1, Aloysius Mutebi1, Hayley MacGregor2, George William Pariyo11Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda; 2Institute of Development Studies, Sussex, UKAbstract: This paper examines the community’s perspectives and perceptions on quality of health care delivery in two Uganda districts. The paper addresses community concerns on service quality. It focuses on the poor because they are a vulnerable group and often bear a huge burden of disease. Community views were solicited and obtained using eight focus group discussions, six in-depth and 12 key informant interviews. User perceptions and definitions of the quality of health services depended on a number of variables related to technical competence, accessibility to services, interpersonal relations and presence of adequate drugs, supplies, staff, and facility amenities. Results indicate that service delivery to the poor in the general population is perceived to be of low quality. The factors that were mentioned as affecting the quality of services delivered were inadequate trained health workers, shortage of essential drugs, poor attitude of the health workers, and long distances to health facilities. This paper argues that there should be an improvement in the quality of health services with particular attention being paid to the poor. Despite wide focus on improvement of the existing infrastructure and donor funding, there is still low satisfaction with health services and poor perceived accessibility.Keywords: quality, health care, poor, community, perceptions, utilization

  16. Quality of care for gastrointestinal conditions: a primer for gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelman, Michael D; Dorn, Spencer D; Peterson, Erica; Runge, Thomas; Allen, John I

    2011-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine's publications To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in health-care quality. The quality of care for digestive diseases has not been evaluated comprehensively, although emerging literature suggests that the gap between recommended care and actual practice may be quite substantial. This paper reviews the history of, the rationale behind, and current work related to quality of care and quality improvement in the area of digestive diseases, with particular attention to colonoscopy, inflammatory bowel diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic hepatitis C virus infection, and liver transplantation. PMID:21731014

  17. Can the patient perspective contribute to quality of nutritional care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Mette; Rasmussen, Henrik H; Laursen, Birgitte S

    2011-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2010 Can the patient perspective contribute to quality of nutritional care? Aim: Undernutrition has been seen in hospitalized patients at all times. Nurses have a central position in the nutritional care of the patient. Despite guidelines for nutritional practise and care, 20-...

  18. Measuring the Multifaceted Nature of Infant and Toddler Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Peter L.; Kriener-Althen, Kerry; Marcella, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: The quality of group care infants and toddlers experience relates to their concurrent and later development. Recent quality improvement initiatives point to the need for ecologically valid measures that assess the multifaceted nature of child care quality. In this article, we present the psychometric properties of an infant and…

  19. The AAWC conceptual framework of quality systems for wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Timothy G; Milne, Catherine T; Barr, Jane Ellen; Cordrey, Renee; Dieter, Susan; Harwood, Judith; Sawyer, Allen; Trepanier, Kimberly; Woelfel, Stephanie

    2006-11-01

    When the Association for Advanced Wound Care Quality of Care Task Force members determined there was no unanimously accepted definition of quality as it relates to wound care, they: 1) identified relevant components of quality wound care, and 2) created a framework of quality wound care indicators to enable the creation or assessment of wound care delivery systems. The framework is an innovative conceptual model that serves as a basis for the Association strategies to facilitate high quality wound care for patients/clients across the continuum of care and recognizes the role of the supporting systems necessary to provide wound care services. It uses the Institute of Medicine's Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century to define quality systems for wound care and includes safety and effectiveness coupled with the delivery of timely, efficient, equitable, collaborative, patient-centered care. This framework can be utilized during clinical, managerial, or regulatory review of wound care service delivery. PMID:17146119

  20. Evaluating the Quality of the Child Care in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hujala, Eeva; Fonsen, Elina; Elo, Janniina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of the early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality in Finland. The study is based on the paradigm of inclusionary quality and the assessment is based on the quality evaluation model. The parents and teachers assess the quality to be good. The strength of the quality was the effect…

  1. Postacute rehabilitation quality of care: toward a shared conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Tiago Silva; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-05-01

    There is substantial interest in mechanisms for measuring, reporting, and improving the quality of health care, including postacute care (PAC) and rehabilitation. Unfortunately, current activities generally are either too narrow or too poorly specified to reflect PAC rehabilitation quality of care. In part, this is caused by a lack of a shared conceptual understanding of what construes quality of care in PAC rehabilitation. This article presents the PAC-rehab quality framework: an evidence-based conceptual framework articulating elements specifically pertaining to PAC rehabilitation quality of care. The widely recognized Donabedian structure, process, and outcomes (SPO) model furnished the underlying structure for the PAC-rehab quality framework, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framed the functional outcomes. A comprehensive literature review provided the evidence base to specify elements within the SPO model and ICF-derived framework. A set of macrolevel-outcomes (functional performance, quality of life of patient and caregivers, consumers' experience, place of discharge, health care utilization) were defined for PAC rehabilitation and then related to their (1) immediate and intermediate outcomes, (2) underpinning care processes, (3) supportive team functioning and improvement processes, and (4) underlying care structures. The role of environmental factors and centrality of patients in the framework are explicated as well. Finally, we discuss why outcomes may best measure and reflect the quality of PAC rehabilitation. The PAC-rehab quality framework provides a conceptually sound, evidence-based framework appropriate for quality of care activities across the PAC rehabilitation continuum. PMID:25542676

  2. The Impact of Child Care Subsidy Use on Child Care Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca M. Ryan; Johnson, Anna; Rigby, Elizabeth; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the federal government allotted $7 billion in child care subsidies to low-income families through the state-administered Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), now the government’s largest child care program (US DHHS, 2008). Although subsidies reduce costs for families and facilitate parental employment, it is unclear how they impact the quality of care families purchase. This study investigates the impact of government subsidization on parents’ selection of child care quality using...

  3. Introduction of a qualitative perinatal audit at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Angela N; van Roosmalen Jos; Mogren Ingrid; Kidanto Hussein L; Massawe Siriel N; Nystrom Lennarth; Lindmark Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Perinatal death is a devastating experience for the mother and of concern in clinical practice. Regular perinatal audit may identify suboptimal care related to perinatal deaths and thus appropriate measures for its reduction. The aim of this study was to perform a qualitative perinatal audit of intrapartum and early neonatal deaths and propose means of reducing the perinatal mortality rate (PMR). Methods From 1st August, 2007 to 31st December, 2007 we conducted an audit of...

  4. Is Health Care Ready for Six Sigma Quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Chassin, Mark R

    1998-01-01

    Serious, widespread problems exist in the quality of U.S. health care: too many patients are exposed to the risks of unnecessary services; opportunities to use effective care are missed; and preventable errors lead to injuries. Advanced practitioners of industrial quality management, like Motorola and General Electric, have committed themselves to reducing the frequency of defects in their business processes to fewer than 3.4 per million, a strategy known as Six Sigma Quality. In health care,...

  5. HCFA's health care quality improvement program: the medical informatics challenge.

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, J B; Hayes, R P; Pates, R D; Elward, K S; Ballard, D J

    1996-01-01

    The peer-review organizations (PROs) were created by Congress in 1984 to monitor the cost and quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. In order to do this, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) contracted with the PROs through a series of contracts referred to as "Scopes of Work." Under the Fourth Scope of Work, the HCFA initiated the Health Care Quality Improvement Program (HCQIP) in 1990, as an application of the principles of continuous quality improvement. Since then,...

  6. The Impact of Child Care Subsidy Use on Child Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Anna; Rigby, Elizabeth; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the federal government allotted $7 billion in child care subsidies to low-income families through the state-administered Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), now the government’s largest child care program (US DHHS, 2008). Although subsidies reduce costs for families and facilitate parental employment, it is unclear how they impact the quality of care families purchase. This study investigates the impact of government subsidization on parents’ selection of child care quality using multivariate regression and propensity score matching approaches to account for differential selection into subsidy receipt and care arrangements. Data were drawn from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (CCS-FFCWS), conducted in 2002 and 2003 in 14 of the 20 FFCWS cities when focal children were 3 years old (N = 456). Our results indicate that families who used subsidies chose higher quality care than comparable mothers who did not use subsidies, but only because subsidy recipients were more likely to use center-based care. Subgroup analyses revealed that families using subsidies purchased higher-quality home-based care but lower-quality center-based care than comparable non-recipients. Findings suggest that child care subsidies may serve as more than a work support for low-income families by enhancing the quality of nonmaternal care children experience but that this effect is largely attributable to recipients’ using formal child care arrangements (versus kith and kin care) more often than non-recipients. PMID:21874092

  7. Current issues in perinatal epidemiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Berendes, H W

    1987-01-01

    The main national data sources for perinatal epidemiology are birth and death certificates, yet routinely linked birth and death certificate data are still not available in the U.S. Completeness and quality of the reporting of perinatal events should be considered in examining trends over time and between jurisdictions. The U.S. has experienced a marked decline in its infant mortality rate, but only a very modest decline in the rate of low birth weight. Research must focus more on studies of ...

  8. How health policy influences quality of care in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lisa A; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2009-08-01

    The primary focus of child health policy for the last twenty years has been on improving health care coverage and access. More recently, the focus has shifted to include not only coverage, but also the quality of the care received. This article describes some "voltage drops" in health care that impede delivery of high quality health care. The growing emphasis on quality is reflected in provisions of the new Child Health Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) legislation. In addition to providing funding for health coverage for over four million more children, it also includes the most significant federal investment in pediatric quality to date. PMID:19660643

  9. Providers caring for adolescents with perinatally-acquired HIV: Current practices and barriers to communication about sexual and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Jamie N; Fair, Cynthia D

    2014-11-01

    The population of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) present challenges to HIV healthcare providers (HHCPs). Originally not expected to survive childhood, they are now living well into young adulthood. Little is known about the type of sexual and reproductive (SRH) information/services offered to AYA with PHIV by HHCPs. HHCPs (n=67) were recruited using snowball sampling, and completed an online survey. Providers' most frequently endorsed SRH topics discussed with both male and female patients included condom use (77.3%), STD prevention (73.1%), and screening (62.1%). Providers' reports indicated that females received significantly more education about SRH topics overall. The most frequently noted barriers to SRH communication included more pressing health concerns (53.0%), parent/guardian not receptive (43.9%), and lack of time during appointment (43.9%). Provider-reported SRH conversations with HHCPs were highly focused on horizontal transmission and pregnancy prevention. Salient social aspects of SRH promotion for AYAs with PHIV (e.g., managing disclosure and romantic relationships) were less commonly discussed, though such conversations may serve to reduce secondary transmission and enhance the overall well-being of AYA with PHIV. Findings indicated that further work must be done to identify strategies to address unmet SRH needs of the aging population of AYA with PHIV. PMID:25290765

  10. Quality indicators for primary care mental health services

    OpenAIRE

    Shield, T.; Campbell, S.; Rogers, A.; Worrall, A; Chew-Graham, C; Gask, L

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To identify a generic set of face valid quality indicators for primary care mental health services which reflect a multi-stakeholder perspective and can be used for facilitating quality improvement.

  11. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A. M. M.; Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse-sensitive indicators and nurses’ satisfaction with the quality of care are two commonly used ways to measure quality of nursing care. However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive screening indicators and nurse-perceived quality of care. Methods To calculate a composite performance score for each of six Dutch non-university teaching hospitals, the percentage scores of the public...

  12. The perinatal loss and parental reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamile Kukulu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the causes of prenatal losses, pregnancy termination and reflection of this situation for the parents were investigated. Despite great attention in improving perinatal care, perinatal loss (fetal loss and newborn death continues to occur. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, the perinatal period extends from the 20th gestational week through 1 month after birth. However, researchers who study perinatal loss use a broader definition that includes early (during the first 12 weeks following conception as well as late fetal loss (>20 weeks’ gestation. Of all known pregnancies, an estimated ratio of 12% to 20% ends in an early fetal loss. The most recent available data have revealed that the rates translate to about 1.03 million annual fetal losses and, for 2004, 18.602 newborn deaths. According to the results of 2008, infant mortality rate decreased very rapidly in Turkey. Of the many parents who suffer a perinatal loss, at least 80% become pregnant again, an event that occurs within 18 months. Therefore, it is important for nurses and health care professionals to understand the impact of a perinatal loss on a subsequent pregnancy. The purpose of this article is to perform an investigation on parental, primarily maternal, responses to pregnancy subsequent to perinatal loss, and to describe nursing implications for parents during the subsequent pregnancy.

  13. Adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcome in adolescent mothers associated with first birth: a hospital-based case-control study in a tertiary care hospital in North-East India

    OpenAIRE

    Medhi R; Das B; Das A; Ahmed M; Bawri S; Rai S

    2016-01-01

    Robin Medhi, Banani Das, Arpana Das, Mansur Ahmed, Sonika Bawri, Suditi Rai Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Silchar, Assam, India Purpose: To analyze the adverse obstetrical and perinatal outcome of adolescent mothers associated with first birth. Patients and methods: This prospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital of North-East India between January 2014 and December 2014. All adolescent primigravidae com...

  14. The meaning of quality of care in home care settings: older lesbian and bisexual women's perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorovich, Alisa

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that the experience of being a lesbian or bisexual woman influences women's interactions with health care providers, and their perception of the quality of care. Limited research to date, however, has examined how ageing and sexuality mediates women's experiences of quality, when accessing health care in the community. To fill a gap in the literature, this study investigated older lesbian and bisexual women's perspectives on the meaning of quality of care in the context of receiving home care services. This was a qualitative single case study. Sixteen participants, aged 55-72 from Ontario, Canada, participated in semi-structured interviews between 2011 and 2012. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. The interview data were analysed using iterative thematic analysis and guided by a feminist ethic of care perspective. Participants described quality of care in ways that were in line with a feminist ethic of care; that is, they wanted care providers to be responsive and attentive to their needs, to involve them in the caring process and to demonstrate respect and caring. Participants also indicated that providers' comfort with, and knowledge of, sexual diversity was important for enabling quality of care. These findings deepen our understanding of how to support quality of care for this population through changes to provider education and training, and health policy. PMID:25919504

  15. Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Essén

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women.

  16. Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essén Birgitta

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women.

  17. Molecular imaging in quality health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quality health care results from translating fundamental bench discoveries and making them available to patients. During the past decade, 'molecular imaging' has emerged both as a new tool/technology and as a research and clinical discipline. Molecular imaging is an interdisciplinary approach involving biologists, physicists, physicians, mathematicians, conventional chemists, radiochemists and other specialists who have joined forces for better understanding and visualizing of both normal physiological processes and the molecular processes preceding the morphological manifestations of disease in vivo. Molecular imaging has been defined as 'non-invasive, quantitative, and repetitive imaging of targeted macromolecules and biological processes in living organisms' or as 'the visual representation, characterization, and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and sub-cellular levels within intact living organisms'. Weissleder defined molecular imaging in the most simple terms as 'studying diseases non-invasively at the molecular level'. Regardless of these semantic differences molecular imaging can contribute significantly to the preclinical and clinical drug and disease evaluation process. It is interesting to note, that despite major advances in imaging technology, cancer mortality has remained largely unchanged over the last three decades. Imaging has thus far enabled us to look through a magnifying glass at disease processes but has failed to dramatically influence disease outcomes. Emerging data suggest that molecular PET imaging is about to change this situation. High resolution molecular imaging devices designed for small animal research have developed into valuable tools for drug evaluation and imaging probe design. These include microPET, microCT, microMRI and optical imaging devices. These have enabled us to study drug effects in vivo by monitoring longitudinally their effects on tumour cell metabolism or proliferation. The only currently available molecular imaging tool for human studies is positron emission tomography (PET). Many different molecular imaging probes targeting physiological processes such as glycolysis, lipid synthesis, amino acid transport, cell surface receptors, gene expression and others are available for evaluating in animal experimental studies and humans the extent of disease as well as treatment effects in vivo. With the advent of PET/CT anatomic and molecular images can be fused affording assignment of normal or abnormal molecular imaging findings to specific anatomical structures. The major vendors have invested millions of dollars into bringing together the highest quality CT with state-of-the-art PET instrumentation. As a result more than 1000 PET/CT scanners have been installed worldwide over the last four years. These technological advances come at a time of increasing health care expenditures worldwide. One must therefore carefully evaluate whether the increasing costs are met by increasing effectiveness of the technology. As an additional problem, health care systems vary substantially between countries and cultures and cost-effectiveness analyses need to be tailored towards specific health care environments. A paradigm shift from morphological to molecular imaging is occurring on every level of preclinical and clinical research and in clinical practice. Animal tumour models are being used for serial non-invasive monitoring of preclinical drug effects in vivo using molecular imaging technology. This molecular imaging application reduces the numbers of animals required for preclinical studies and might allow for some predictions of drug effectiveness in humans. Molecular imaging should be used in phase I, II and III trials to identify drug success and failure early. Applications of molecular imaging to patient stratification will define appropriate patient populations for smaller, more rapid clinical trials. Recent studies in lung cancer, lymphoma, esophageal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumour have clearly indicated that FDG PET/CT imaging can be used to appropriately change the management of cancer patients. Clinical molecular imaging, currently restricted primarily to PET, is therefore already considered the gold standard for monitoring effects of many conventional cancer treatments and will now be used to monitor the effects of 'targeted' treatments in all phases of clinical trials. This presentation will introduce molecular imaging tools including instrumentation and imaging probes and will describe the concept of targeted imaging. Animal experimental studies will be used to demonstrate promising treatment approaches in vivo and how imaging can be used to monitor therapeutic effects. Further, clinical molecular PET/CT imaging assays will be introduced and its impact on patient stratification and management as well as its cost effectiveness will be reviewed and discussed within the confines of different health care systems. Finally, initial clinical trials that use molecular PET rather than anatomical CT imaging for prospectively arriving at patient management decisions will be presented. (author)

  18. Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in Health Care: Impact on Perceived Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Alba, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. Objectives To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across ra...

  19. Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in Health Care: Impact on Perceived Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Dara H.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Alba, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across racial/ethnic groups....

  20. LONG-TERM CARE OF DEPENDENT ELDERLY AND QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Macková Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the issue of long-term care of dependent elderly and quality of life of their carers. Elderly care has an impact on the quality of life of family members. The research was carried out through a questionnaire and interview. The quality of life was measured using the WHOQOL instrument. The research aimed to identify the current levels of family members’ quality of life and the factors influencing the quality of life thereof. The research findings showed a lower quality o...

  1. Marketing quality and value to the managed care market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmirski, G

    1998-11-01

    Quantifying quality and marketing care delivery have been long-term challenges in the health care market. Insurers, employers, other purchasers of care, and providers face a constant challenge in positioning their organizations in a proactive, competitive niche. Tools that measure patient's self-reported perception of health care needs and expectations have increased the ability to quantify quality of care delivery. When integrated with case management and disease management strategies, outcomes reporting and variance analysis tracking can be packaged to position a provider in a competitive niche. PMID:10338715

  2. Theory and practice for measuring health care quality

    OpenAIRE

    Berwick, Donald M; Knapp, Marian Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    As competition, cost control, and new modes of delivery emerge in health care, there is a need to reexamine both the traditional definitions of health care quality and the methods by which it is measured. Industries other than health care have much to teach regarding the methods for obtaining, analyzing, and displaying data; techniques for problem identification, problem solving, and reassessment; and ideas about organizational factors that produce a high quality product or service. The Quali...

  3. Is the nursing process part of quality care?

    OpenAIRE

    ABAUNZA DE GONZÁLEZ, MYRIAM

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to answer the question: Is the nursing process part of quality care? In order to back the answer, it starts by mentioning several authors that have performed studies on the use of scientific methods, problem solving methods and the attention to care -innursing method and its relationship to the quality of service and the nursing care, while at the same time it introduces related experiences associated with NIPE research projects and related Groups with Dx, ...

  4. Quality improvement and accountability in the Danish health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainz, Jan; Kristensen, Solvejg; Bartels, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Denmark has unique opportunities for quality measurement and benchmarking since Denmark has well-developed health registries and unique patient identifier that allow all registries to include patient-level data and combine data into sophisticated quality performance monitoring. Over decades, Denmark has developed and implemented national quality and patient safety initiatives in the healthcare system in terms of national clinical guidelines, performance and outcome measurement integrated in clinical databases for important diseases and clinical conditions, measurement of patient experiences, reporting of adverse events, national handling of patient complaints, national accreditation and public disclosure of all data on the quality of care. Over the years, Denmark has worked up a progressive and transparent just culture in quality management; the different actors at the different levels of the healthcare system are mutually attentive and responsive in a coordinated effort for quality of the healthcare services. At national, regional, local and hospital level, it is mandatory to participate in the quality initiatives and to use data and results for quality management, quality improvement, transparency in health care and accountability. To further develop the Danish governance model, it is important to expand the model to the primary care sector. Furthermore, a national quality health programme 2015-18 recently launched by the government supports a new development in health care focusing upon delivering high-quality health care-high quality is defined by results of value to the patients. PMID:26443814

  5. Health-care quality promotion through infection prevention: beyond 2000.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerberding, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Health-care value purchasing, complex health-care systems, and information technology are the three most important change drivers influencing the interrelated themes of the 4th decennial conference: accountability, quality promotion through infection prevention across the health-care delivery system, and medical informatics. Among the change drivers influencing themes of future conferences may be a societal mandate for health promotion and health-care access for all.

  6. Barriers to appropriate care for mothers and infants during the perinatal period in rural Afghanistan: a qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbrander, William; Natiq, Kayhan; Shahim, Shafiqullah; Hamid, Najibullah; Skena, Naomi Brill

    2014-01-01

    This study, conducted in five rural districts in Afghanistan, used qualitative methods to explore traditional practices of women, families and communities related to maternal and newborn care, and sociocultural and health system issues that create access barriers. The traditional practices discussed include delayed bathing of mothers and delayed breastfeeding of infants, seclusion of women after childbirth, restricted maternal diet, and use of traditional home remedies and self-medication instead of care in health facilities to treat maternal and newborn conditions. This study also looked at community support structures, transportation and care-seeking behaviour for maternal and newborn problems which create access barriers. Sociocultural barriers to better maternal-newborn health include shame about utilisation of maternal and neonatal services, women's inability to seek care without being accompanied by a male relative, and care-seeking from mullahs for serious health concerns. This study also found a high level of post-partum depression. Targeted and more effective behaviour-change communication programmes are needed. This study presents a set of behaviour-change messages to reduce maternal and newborn mortality associated with births occurring at home in rural communities. This study recommends using religious leaders, trained health workers, family health action groups and radio to disseminate these messages. PMID:24003851

  7. HIV Ambulatory Care Quality of Care Performance Results: Beginning 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset represents self‐reported performance data by HIV ambulatory care programs. All HIV ambulatory programs throughout New York State with a significant HIV...

  8. Methodological Research Priorities in Palliative Care and Hospice Quality Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Sydney Morss; Herr, Keela; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Kamal, Arif H; Walling, Anne M; Ersek, Mary; Norton, Sally A

    2016-02-01

    Quality measurement is a critical tool for improving palliative care and hospice, but significant research is needed to improve the application of quality indicators. We defined methodological priorities for advancing the science of quality measurement in this field based on discussions of the Technical Advisory Panel of the Measuring What Matters consensus project of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association and a subsequent strategy meeting to better clarify research challenges, priorities, and quality measurement implementation strategies. In this article, we describe three key priorities: 1) defining the denominator(s) (or the population of interest) for palliative care quality indicators, 2) developing methods to measure quality from different data sources, and 3) conducting research to advance the development of patient/family-reported indicators. We then apply these concepts to the key quality domain of advance care planning and address relevance to implementation of indicators in improving care. Developing the science of quality measurement in these key areas of palliative care and hospice will facilitate improved quality measurement across all populations with serious illness and care for patients and families. PMID:26596877

  9. Women's and care providers' perspectives of quality prenatal care: a qualitative descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sword Wendy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much attention has been given to the adequacy of prenatal care use in promoting healthy outcomes for women and their infants. Adequacy of use takes into account the timing of initiation of prenatal care and the number of visits. However, there is emerging evidence that the quality of prenatal care may be more important than adequacy of use. The purpose of our study was to explore women's and care providers' perspectives of quality prenatal care to inform the development of items for a new instrument, the Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire. We report on the derivation of themes resulting from this first step of questionnaire development. Methods A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 pregnant women and 40 prenatal care providers recruited from five urban centres across Canada. Data were analyzed using inductive open and then pattern coding. The final step of analysis used a deductive approach to assign the emergent themes to broader categories reflective of the study's conceptual framework. Results The three main categories informed by Donabedian's model of quality health care were structure of care, clinical care processes, and interpersonal care processes. Structure of care themes included access, physical setting, and staff and care provider characteristics. Themes under clinical care processes were health promotion and illness prevention, screening and assessment, information sharing, continuity of care, non-medicalization of pregnancy, and women-centredness. Interpersonal care processes themes were respectful attitude, emotional support, approachable interaction style, and taking time. A recurrent theme woven throughout the data reflected the importance of a meaningful relationship between a woman and her prenatal care provider that was characterized by trust. Conclusions While certain aspects of structure of care were identified as being key dimensions of quality prenatal care, clinical and interpersonal care processes emerged as being most essential to quality care. These processes are important as they have a role in mitigating adverse outcomes, promoting involvement of women in their own care, and keeping women engaged in care. The findings suggest key considerations for the planning, delivery, and evaluation of prenatal care. Most notably, care should be woman-centred and embrace shared decision making as an essential element.

  10. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    . The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a...... feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed...... among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe....

  11. Cancer Quality Alliance: Blueprint for a better cancer care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Christopher; Stovall, Ellen; Ganz, Patricia A; Desch, Christopher; Hewitt, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The Cancer Quality Alliance (CQA), a national alliance advocating for improvements in the quality of cancer care in America, presents a set of 5 case studies that depict a vision of quality cancer care and a "Blueprint" for actions to realize this vision. The CQA Blueprint case studies feature patients with soft tissue sarcoma, breast cancer, rectal cancer, and Hodgkin disease and focus on key phases in the cancer care trajectory: detection, diagnosis, treatment, post-treatment/survivorship, and end of life. Each case study begins with a patient summary, follows with a worst- and a best-case scenario, and concludes with a discussion section identifying "what went right" in the best case and "what went wrong" in the worst case. Steps to be taken by key stakeholders, for example, health care providers, insurers/payers, policy makers, and patients and families, are then outlined. By juxtaposing a worst- and best-case scenario, the cancer care case studies elucidate the origins of complex health care problems and clarify the actions needed to overcome them. The CQA will make the case studies available for use as teaching tools to give health care providers and patients themselves descriptions of how the health care system should work to achieve the ultimate benefit for an individual living with, through, and beyond a diagnosis of cancer. The CQA adopted the definition of quality health care of the Institute of Medicine, and the analysis of care provided in the discussion section of each case study is framed using 6 quality improvement aims identified in the Institute of Medicine's report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. Health care quality may be judged according to its safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. PMID:18768677

  12. Reducing perinatal HIV transmission in developing countries through antenatal and delivery care, and breastfeeding: supporting infant survival by supporting women's survival.

    OpenAIRE

    Berer, M.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a joint UNAIDS/UNICEF/WHO working group announced an initiative to pilot test an intervention to reduce perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), based on new guidelines on HIV and infant feeding. This intervention for developing countries includes short-course perinatal zidovudine (AZT) treatment and advice to HIV-positive women not to breastfeed their infants, where this can be done safely. The present paper raises questions about the extent of the public health...

  13. Interest of pregnant women in the use of SMS (short message service text messages for the improvement of perinatal and postnatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormick Gabriela

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile health (mHealth is emerging as a useful tool to improve healthcare access especially in the developing world, where limited access to health services is linked to poor antenatal care, and maternal and perinatal mortality. The objective of this study is to 1 understand pregnant women’s access and usage of cell phones and 2 survey the health information needs and interests in a population attending public hospitals and health centers of two cities in Argentina. This information is not available and it is the basis to develop a strategy for improving maternal care via cell phones. Methods Questionnaires were verbally administered to pregnant women who were attending an antenatal care visit in community health centers and public hospitals in Rosario, Santa Fe and Mercedes, Corrientes. Participants were 18?years of age or older and had previously given birth. The data obtained was qualitative and analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results A total of 147 pregnant women meeting inclusion criteria (Rosario: 63; Mercedes: 84 were approached and verbally consented to participate. The average age was 29.5?years, most lived in urban areas (89% with a mean travel time of 43.4 minutes required to get to the health center and 57.3 minutes to get the hospital. Ninety-six percent of women (n?=?140 responded that they would like to receive text messages and cell phone calls with information regarding prenatal care, although the topics and period of time to receive information varied greatly. Conclusions Considering the vast majority of the interviewed women had access to and were interested in receiving text messages and calls with educational information regarding pregnancy and infant health, pregnant women in Argentina could benefit from such an mHealth program. The low access to Internet suggests it is not an option for this population; however, this cannot be assumed as representative of the country’s situation. To retain active participation, other forms of health communication, such as a 2-way text message systems or toll-free numbers, could be considered in the future. Cost of use and implementing these options should be studied.

  14. Assessing Quality in Mental Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Ian Shaw

    1997-01-01

    Quality assessment in mental health services is undergoing change in the United Kingdom following the introduction of market reforms. Traditionally, service quality was monitored by professional practitioners with reference to user satisfaction. This became formalized, and the two main forms of quality assurance currently used are outlined. However, the government is concerned that this may be inadequate for the monitoring of quality standards, specified in contracts between service purchaser...

  15. Improving the quality of head and neck cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Randal S

    2007-12-01

    The 2001 report by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) titled Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century highlighted the gap that exists between what we know to be effective, beneficial care and the care that is often delivered to an individual patient.(1) In the report, the IOM stated, "Between the health care we have and the care we could have lies not just a gap, but a chasm."(1)((p1)) The report, signifying a national initiative to improve the quality of care in the United States, articulated the following 6 aims for a new health care system: (1) to increase the safety of health care by avoiding injuries to patients through care intended to help them; (2) to provide effective services based on scientific knowledge and to avoid services of no proven benefit; (3) to deliver individualized treatment respectful of and responsive to the patient's preferences, needs, and values; (4) to deliver timely care by reducing wait times and harmful delays; (5) to increase efficiency by not wasting equipment, supplies, ideas, and energy; and (6) to deliver care that is equitable and does not vary by personal characteristics, patient sex, ethnicity, geography, and social economic status. The IOM also recognized a need to optimize quality cancer care in the United States. PMID:18086958

  16. Validade, confiabilidade e evitabilidade da causa básica dos óbitos neonatais ocorridos em unidade de cuidados intensivos da Rede Norte-Nordeste de Saúde Perinatal Validez, confiabilidad y evitabilidad de la causa básica de óbitos neonatales ocurridos en una unidad de cuidados intensivos de la Red Norte-Nordeste de Salud Perinatal Validity and reliability of data and avoidability of the underlying cause of neonatal deaths in the intensive care unit of the North-Northeast Perinatal Care Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Marlúcia Lopes Moreira de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Analisar a validade e confiabilidade da causa básica e a evitabilidade dos óbitos neonatais ocorridos em unidade de cuidados intensivos da Rede Norte-Nordeste de Saúde Perinatal (RENOSPE. A amostra foi de 53 óbitos neonatais contidos no banco de dados da RENOSPE e ocorridos em maternidade de Teresina, Piauí, Brasil. A validade foi feita comparando-se as causas da Rede com as obtidas dos prontuários, sendo calculado kappa, sensibilidade e valor preditivo positivo (VPP. Na análise da evitabilidade, foi utilizada a Lista Brasileira de Causas de Mortes Evitáveis. Quando comparadas as causas de óbitos entre RENOSPE e prontuários, o kappa foi de 47,6% para causas maternas e 73,9% para malformações congênitas, sensibilidade de 95% e 83,3%, e VPP de 88,9% e 85,7%, respectivamente. O percentual de óbitos evitáveis na RENOSPE foi elevado, sendo por adequada atenção à mulher na gestação em 72% dos casos. As causas classificadas como malformações congênitas foram válidas, e os óbitos evitáveis apontam para necessidade do controle da gravidez.Analizar la validez y confiabilidad de la causa básica de los óbitos neonatales y su evitabilidad, ocurridos en una unidad de cuidados intensivos de la Red Norte-Nordeste de Salud Perinatal (RENOSPE. La muestra fue de 53 óbitos neonatales, incluidos en el banco de datos de la RENOSPE y ocurridos en la maternidad de Teresina, Piauí, Brasil. La validez fue realizada comparándose las causas de la red, con las obtenidas de los historiales médicos, calculándose kappa, sensibilidad y valor predictivo positivo (VPP. En el análisis de la evitabilidad, se utilizó la lista brasileña de causas de muertes evitables. Resultados: cuando se comparan las causas de óbitos entre RENOSPE y los historiales, el kappa fue de un 47,6% con respecto a causas maternas y un 73,9% para malformaciones congénitas, sensibilidad de un 95% y un 83,3%, y VPP de un 88,9% y un 85,7%, respectivamente. El porcentaje de óbitos evitables en la RENOSPE fue elevado, considerándose adecuada la atención a la mujer en la gestación en un 72% de los casos. Conclusión: las causas clasificadas como malformaciones congénitas fueron válidas, y los óbitos evitables indican una necesidad de control del embarazo.The aim of this study was to analyze the validity and reliability of data and the avoidability of neonatal deaths in the intensive care unit in the North-Northeast Perinatal Care Network (RENOSPE. The sample included 53 neonatal deaths recorded in the RENOSPE database that occurred in a maternity hospital in Teresina, Piauí State, Brazil. Validity was assessed by comparing causes recorded in the database with those from patient charts and calculating kappa index, sensitivity, and positive predictive value (PPV. Analysis of avoidability used the Brazilian List of Avoidable Deaths. When causes of death recorded in the RENOSPE database were compared with patient charts, kappa was 47.6% for maternal causes and 73.9% for congenital malformations, sensitivity was 95% and 83.3%, and PPV was 88.9% and 85.7%, respectively. The percentage of avoidable deaths in the RENOSPE database was high, attributable to lack of adequate prenatal care in 72% of cases. In conclusion, causes classified as congenital malformations were valid, and the high rate of avoidable deaths points to the need for improved prenatal care.

  17. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havig Anders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78. Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is complex. Increasing staffing levels or the ratio of registered nurses alone is not likely sufficient for increasing quality of care.

  18. Child-Care Subsidies: Do They Impact the Quality of Care Children Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anna D.; Ryan, Rebecca M.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government's largest investments in early care and education, but little is known about whether it increases low-income children's access to higher quality child care. This study used newly available nationally representative data on 4-year-old children (N = 750) to investigate whether…

  19. MRI of perinatal brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Allsop, Joanna [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Perinatal Imaging, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Martinez Biarge, Miriam [La Paz University Hospital, Dept of Neonatology, Madrid (Spain); Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Neonatal Medicine, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Dept of Paediatrics, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    MRI is invaluable in assessing the neonatal brain following suspected perinatal injury. Good quality imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults or older children. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and should be available to aid interpretation of the imaging findings. Perinatal lesions, the pattern of which can predict neurodevelopmental outcome, are at their most obvious on conventional imaging between 1 and 2 weeks from birth. Very early imaging during the first week may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates but brain abnormalities may still be subtle using conventional sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is very useful for the early identification of ischaemic tissue in the neonatal brain but may underestimate the final extent of injury, particularly basal ganglia and thalamic lesions. MR imaging is an excellent predictor of outcome following perinatal brain injury and can therefore be used as a biomarker in interventional trials designed to reduce injury and improve neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  20. Internet Use and Access Among Pregnant Women via Computer and Mobile Phone: Implications for Delivery of Perinatal Care

    OpenAIRE

    Peragallo Urrutia, Rachel; Berger, Alexander A; Ivins, Amber A; Beckham, A Jenna; Thorp Jr, John M; Nicholson, Wanda K

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of Internet-based behavioral programs may be an efficient, flexible method to enhance prenatal care and improve pregnancy outcomes. There are few data about access to, and use of, the Internet via computers and mobile phones among pregnant women. Objective We describe pregnant women’s access to, and use of, computers, mobile phones, and computer technologies (eg, Internet, blogs, chat rooms) in a southern United States population. We describe the willingness of pregnant wom...

  1. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    OpenAIRE

    de Bruin, Simone R.; van Oostrom, Sandra H.; Drewes, Hanneke W.; de Jong - van Til, Janneke T; Baan, Caroline A; Struijs, Jeroen N

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achieveme...

  2. Racial/Ethnic Discrimination in Health Care: Impact on Perceived Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; De Alba, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Background Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. Objectives To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across racial/ethnic groups. Research Design A cross-sectional analysis of a population-based sample of California adults responding to the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between perceived discrimination and perceived quality of health care after adjusting for patient characteristics and reports of access to care. Main Results A total of 36,831 respondents were included. African Americans (68.7%) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (64.5%) were less likely than non-Hispanic whites (72.8%) and Hispanics (74.9%) to rate their health care quality highly. African Americans (13.1%) and Hispanics (13.4%) were the most likely to report discrimination, followed by Asian/Pacific Islanders (7.3%) and non-Hispanic whites (2.6%). Racial/ethnic discrimination in health care was negatively associated with ratings of health care quality within each racial/ethnic group, even after adjusting for sociodemographic variables and other indicators of access and satisfaction. Feeling discriminated against fully accounted for the difference in low ratings of quality care between African Americans and whites, but not for other racial/ethnic minorities. Conclusions Patient perceptions of discrimination may play an important, yet variable role in ratings of health care quality across racial/ethnic minority groups. Health care institutions should consider how to address this patient concern as a part of routine quality improvement. PMID:20146022

  3. Quality in the provision of headache care. 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Michele; Jenkinson, Crispin; Perera, Suraj; Loder, Elizabeth; Jensen, Rigmor; Katsarava, Zaza; Gil Gouveia, Raquel; Broner, Susan; Steiner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define "quality" of headache care, and develop indicators that are applicable in different settings and cultures and to all types of headache. No definition of quality of headache care has been formulated. Two sets of quality indicators, proposed in the US and UK...... findings we proposed a large number of putative quality indicators, and refined these and reduced their number in consultations with larger international groups of stakeholder representatives. We formulated a definition of quality from the quality indicators. Five main themes were identified: (1) headache...... services; (2) health professionals; (3) patients; (4) financial resources; (5) political agenda and legislation. An initial list of 160 putative quality indicators in 14 domains was reduced to 30 indicators in 9 domains. These gave rise to the following multidimensional definition of quality of headache...

  4. Quality in the provision of headache care. 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Michele; Jenkinson, Crispin; Perera, Suraj; Loder, Elizabeth; Jensen, Rigmor; Katsarava, Zaza; Gil Gouveia, Raquel; Broner, Susan; Steiner, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to define "quality" of headache care, and develop indicators that are applicable in different settings and cultures and to all types of headache. No definition of quality of headache care has been formulated. Two sets of quality indicators, proposed in the US and U......." Quality in headache care is multidimensional and resides in nine essential domains that are of equal importance. The indicators are currently being tested for feasibility of use in clinical settings.......The objective of this study was to define "quality" of headache care, and develop indicators that are applicable in different settings and cultures and to all types of headache. No definition of quality of headache care has been formulated. Two sets of quality indicators, proposed in the US and UK......, are limited to their localities and/or specific to migraine and their development received no input from people with headache. We first undertook a literature review. Then we conducted a series of focus-group consultations with key stakeholders (doctors, nurses and patients) in headache care. From the...

  5. Parental Involvement in Pediatric Hospital Care-Implications for Clinical Practice and Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Ygge, Britt Marie

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding about parents’ perceptions of quality of care and their own involvement in pediatric hospital care. Parental involvement in the care of hospitalized children has gained increased attention in recent years. The aim of this thesis was to study parental involvement in pediatric hospital care and investigate its association to the work conditions of pediatric hospital staff. The first study validated a parent questionnaire that me...

  6. The quality-value proposition in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feazell, G Landon; Marren, John P

    2003-01-01

    Powerful forces are converging in US health care to finally cause recognition of the inherently logical relationship between quality and money. The forces, or marketplace "drivers," which are converging to compel recognition of the relationship between cost and quality are: (1) the increasing costs of care; (2) the recurrence of another medical malpractice crisis; and (3) the recognition inside and outside of health care that quality is inconsistent and unacceptable. It is apparent that hospital administrators, financial officers, board members, and medical staff leadership do not routinely do two things: (1) relate quality to finance; and (2) appreciate the intra-hospital structural problems that impede quality attainment. This article discusses these factors and offers a positive method for re-structuring quality efforts and focusing the hospital and its medical staff on quality. The simple but compelling thesis of the authors is that health care must immediately engage in the transformation to making quality of medical care the fundamental business strategy of the organization. PMID:14977035

  7. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Quality of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscella, Kevin; Sanders, Mechelle R

    2016-03-18

    The annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports document widespread and persistent racial and ethnic disparities. These disparities result from complex interactions between patient factors related to social disadvantage, clinicians, and organizational and health care system factors. Separate and unequal systems of health care between states, between health care systems, and between clinicians constrain the resources that are available to meet the needs of disadvantaged groups, contribute to unequal outcomes, and reinforce implicit bias. Recent data suggest slow progress in many areas but have documented a few notable successes in eliminating these disparities. To eliminate these disparities, continued progress will require a collective national will to ensure health care equity through expanded health insurance coverage, support for primary care, and public accountability based on progress toward defined, time-limited objectives using evidence-based, sufficiently resourced, multilevel quality improvement strategies that engage patients, clinicians, health care organizations, and communities. PMID:26789384

  8. Measuring and improving quality of care in surgical oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Wouters, Michael Wilhelmus Jacobus Maria

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that quality of care in surgical oncology varies by provider and is partly based on differences in procedural volume and other attributes of hospitals. Especially for low-volume high-risk surgical procedures concentration of services in hospitals with better outcomes (outcome-based referral) can lead to dramatic improvement in short- as well as long-term outcomes. Casemix- and reliability adjustments are essential in the evaluation of quality of care. In addit...

  9. Coaching to Quality: Increasing Quality in Early Care and Education Programmes through Community-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jaesook Lee; Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to increase the quality in early care and education through targeted coaching. A collaborative including several community agencies and a university developed a framework of support for early care and education providers, using coaching as its foundational basis, called Coaching to Quality (CTQ). This paper provides a…

  10. The ReACH Collaborative--improving quality home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Patricia Simino; Pace, Karen B; Lauder, Bonnie; Solomon, Debra A

    2007-08-01

    Research on quality of care has shown that vigorous leadership, clear goals, and compatible incentive systems are critical factors in influencing successful change (Institute of Medicine, 2001). Quality improvement is a complex process, and clinical quality improvement applications are more likely to be effective in organizations that are ready for change and have strong leaders, who are committed to creating and reinforcing a work environment that supports quality goals (Shortell, 1998). Key leadership roles include providing clear and sustained direction, articulating a coherent set of values and incentives to guide group and individual activities, aligning and integrating improvement efforts into organizational priorities, obtaining or freeing up resources to implement improvement activities, and creating a culture of "continuous improvement" that encourages and rewards the pursuit and achievement of shared quality aims (Institute of Medicine, 2001, 70-71). In summary, home health care is a significant and growing sector of the health care system that provides care to millions of vulnerable patients. There seems little doubt that home health agencies want to focus on quality of care issues and provide optimal care to home-based patients. Furthermore, there is a growing awareness of the value for adapting innovative, effective models for improving the culture of home care practice. This awareness stems from the notion that some agencies see quality improvement activities as a way for them to distinguish themselves not only to regulators and customers, but also to meet the cultural and transformational needs to remain viable in a constantly evolving and competitive health care industry. PMID:17966307

  11. Shared Care Contributions to Self-Care and Quality of Life in Chronic Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebern, Margaret; Brown, Roger; Flatley-Brennan, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Shared care is an interpersonal interaction system composed of communication, decision making, and reciprocity; it is used by patients and family caregivers (care dyads) to exchange social support. This study's purpose was to describe the contributions of shared care to outcomes for individuals with cardiac disease. A secondary data analysis was used to answer the following questions. What is the association between elements of shared care and patient outcomes? Do dyad perceptions of shared care differentially contribute to patient outcomes? Participants in this study were 93 individuals with a cardiac disease and 93 family caregivers. Composite index structured equation modeling was the analytic tool. Caregiver communication and reciprocity were related to patient mental quality of life. Patient communication and reciprocity were related to their own mental and physical quality of life and self-care confidence. Findings from this study contribute a better understanding of how care dyads are integral to patient outcomes. PMID:26864996

  12. Helping You Choose Quality Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Certified Organizations Newsletters Publicity Kit State Recognition Quality Improvement Tools Standards Standards Information About Our Standards Comment on a Standard Field Reviews National Patient Safety Goals Prepublication Standards R3 Reports Standards Interpretation Universal ...

  13. Perinatal Practices & Traditions Among Asian Indian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    As the population in the United States grows more diverse, nurses caring for childbearing women must be aware of the many cultural traditions and customs unique to their patients. This knowledge and insight supports women and their families with the appropriate care, information, and resources. A supportive relationship builds trust, offers guidance, and allows for the new family to integrate information from nurses and other healthcare providers with the practice of certain perinatal cultural traditions. The Asian Indian culture is rich in tradition, specifically during the perinatal period. To support the cultural beliefs and practices of Asian Indian women during this time, nurses need to be aware of and consider multiple factors. Many women are navigating the new role of motherhood while making sense of and incorporating important cultural rituals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of perinatal cultural practices and traditions specific to the Asian Indian culture that perinatal nurses may observe in the clinical setting. Cultural traditions and practices specific to the pregnancy and postpartum period are described together with symbolism and implications for nursing practice. It is important to note that information regarding perinatal customs is provided in an effort to promote culturally sensitive nursing care and may not pertain to all Asian Indian women living in the United States. PMID:26909722

  14. Evaluation of perinatal and neonatal risk factors of children with cerebral palsy referred from health-care centers in north and east of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of nonprogressive motor impairment syndromes with potentially different risk factors and causal pathways which is caused by damage in the very young brain. The etiology of CP is mostly unknown and the prevalence has not decreased in comparison to past decades, although many advances have occurred in obstetric and neonatal care. In fact, it seems that the prevalence might have even increased in term infants. The aim of this study was the evaluation of cerebral palsy risk factors in Iran to compare them with other countries."n"nMethods: In this case-control study, all one to six years old children who were referred to a rehabilitation center from Shahid Beheshti child-health-care centers during the years 2007-2008, with documented cerebral palsy for evaluation of perinatal and neonatal risk factors were enrolled in the study, with matched controls. "n"nResults: 112 in the case and 113 in the control group were studied. The main factors associated with CP, were: preterm delivery, neonatal and postnatal seizures, Apgar score of zero to three at twentieth minute after birth, low birth weight, and multiple gestations. The majority of infants with CP were born at term and only 37.8% before 37 weeks."n"nConclusions: Preterm birth, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and low birth weight were the independent predictors of CP in this population.

  15. Cost Functions, Efficiency, and Quality in Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, H. Naci

    1997-01-01

    Data collected in visits to 50 for-profit and 50 nonprofit day care centers showed no quality differences and little efficiency difference between the two sectors. Cost of increasing quality from mediocre to good was 12-16 cents per child-hour. (SK)

  16. Alternative perspectives of quality of prenatal care in Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Camarena O

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this article describes the process and results of a research on the quality of prenatal care from the perspective of pregnant women who use the principal subsystems of the Mexican healthcare system in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico. Methodology: the ?eld of cognitive anthropology was adopted using techniques that reveal the organization of concepts of quality in prenatal care based on pregnant women’s knowledge and experience, in terms of where they decided to seek care. Results: aspects of care quality assumed as satis?ers that are important to women when they seek prenatal care in different healthcare institutions are presented. These women prefer to obtain full information from their healthcare providers about how to take care of themselves during their pregnancy, and, additionally, they also wish to be treated in a kind way showing respect and interest in their emotions and feelings on the part of the physicians. They also criticize the condition of the hospitals and the lack of medicines that were supposed to be provided. The methods that were utilized are considered to contribute to the improvement of quality in prenatal service and, furthermore, to optimizing the continuity of care for pregnant women.

  17. Quality of care delivered to hospitalized inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalized patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are at high risk for morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization costs. While the literature on trends in hospitalization rates for this disease is conflicting, there does appear to be significant variation in the delivery of care to this complex group, which may be a marker of suboptimal quality of care. There is a need for improvement in identifying patients at risk for hospitalization in an effort to reduce admissions. Moreover, appropriate screening for a number of hospital acquired complications such as venous thromboembolism and Clostridium difficile infection is suboptimal. This review discusses areas of inpatient care for IBD patients that are in need of improvement and outlines a number of potential quality improvement initiatives such as pay-for-performance models, quality improvement frameworks, and healthcare information technology.

  18. Quality of Health Care Activity in Educational Institutions: Conceptual Aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Tretyakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with one of the priority tasks of Russian educational system – developing the health responsibility. The recent health deterioration trend among children and adolescents calls for the complex health care measures, equally affecting the learning outcomes. The authors argue that there is a need for proper definition and specification of the key term of health care quality. However, the analysis of the available scientific and documentary recourses demonstrates the absence of such unified definition. The authors describe the existing approaches to defining the health care quality, and examine structural components of the health care activity, their interrelations and interdependence. In authors’ opinion, the synthesis of the available research materials provides the basis for further studies in the theory and practice of quality management activities regarding the health protection of children, adolescents and young adults in educational institutions. 

  19. Leadership and quality of working life in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H L; Hood, J N; Piland, N F

    1994-01-01

    Home health care has undergone startling changes in the past decade and, in the process, become a strategically important ingredient of health care delivery. However, the question remains whether home health care organizations can deliver the benefits anticipated for integrated care delivery systems. The answer to this question depends to a great extent on whether home health care organizations build vibrant, visionary leadership capable of transforming organizations and motivating staff to deliver high quality and low cost services. This paper examines a case study of transformational leadership as it relates to the quality of working life for nurses, homemakers, and staff. The findings indicate that leader behaviour is strongly associated with homemakers', and to a lesser extent staff members', job satisfaction, job involvement, and propensity to remain with the organization. These job attitudes have been shown to be related to higher job performance. The implications for leadership in home health agencies are discussed. PMID:10134028

  20. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A...

  1. [Diabetes, psychosocial distress and quality of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatati, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes is on the rise world wide; according to the latest report from the International Diabetes Federation, the number of people affected by the disease will increase by 55% from 382 in 2013 to almost 600 million in 2033. Individuals living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for depression and anxiety. Diabetes impacts on physical, emotional, social and financial aspects of life across cultures and countries, yet gaps in care exist around psychosocial and self-management education and support. The DAWN2 study provides a first multinational, multidisciplinary systematic framework for the comparison of unmet needs of people with diabetes and those who care for them in four continents. it is necessary to develop a system of patient-centered care, in which the empowerment of the person is the main instrument, and at the same time target on which to focus. Transforming study results into actions at the national level will represent one of the main activities of the DAWN2 initiative. In Italy, to do so, it is not enough write new documents but new resources are required. PMID:25282349

  2. [Maternal and perinatal health status in the State of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A C; de Siqueira, A A; Bafile, P N

    1989-02-01

    The assistance offered during pregnancy and labour as also to the newborn child, and its relationship to maternal and perinatal mortality in the State of S. Paulo in 1984, is analysed on the basis of official available data. With respect to prenatal care the number of visits per woman was considered to be "sufficient" though of doubtful quality. The proportion of cesarean sections was very high (46.2%). Maternal mortality was found to be 4.86 deaths per 10,000 live births, but despite its being high, this figure is certainly too low and the correct figure is probably twice as high. The principal cause of maternal deaths is toxemia in pregnancy, followed by hemorrhage and abortion. Most of these deaths could have been avoided with care during pregnancy and labour. The rate of perinatal mortality was found to be 29.2 deaths per thousand births in 1984. This figure is also very high. The analysis of the causes of death for this period showed that the disorders which arose during the perinatal period were responsible for 90 per cent of the total number of deaths. The main causes of death in this group were the intra-uterine hypoxias and anoxias, asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome and massive aspiration syndrome. These data bring to light the poor quality of the care offered to this group. The authors trust that the new policy of the Decentralized and Unified System of Health will take the quality of care as much as the integration of services into consideration with a view to overcoming the precarious maternal and perinatal health situation in S. Paulo. PMID:2814311

  3. Crossing the quality chasm: lessons from health care quality improvement efforts in England

    OpenAIRE

    Madhok, Rajan

    2002-01-01

    The second report from the US Institute of Medicine Crossing the Quality Chasm, highlighted the deficiencies in health care quality in the USA, analyzed the contributory factors, and proposed 13 recommendations for improvements. Clearly, the challenges are enormous. Can anything be learned from the experiences of other countries? This article describes the author's experiences of health care quality improvement efforts in the National Health Service in England and their implications for the U...

  4. LSCS audit in a tertiary care center in Mumbai: to study indications and risk factors in LSCS and it's effect on early peri-natal morbidity and mortality rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree Dayanand Katke

    2014-08-01

    Methods: The Cama and Albless hospital is a tertiary care center located in South Mumbai, which cares for over 3000 deliveries per year. In the present retrospective analytical study, all cases of caesarean delivery from August 2013 to January 2014 were analyzed regarding the indication, associated risks factors, and all NICU admissions were studied. The decision to perform a caesarean section in each of these patients was made by a consultant on duty in consultation with the unit head telephonically. The primary objective of the study was to do LSCS audit with the secondary objective to analyse relationship of early peri-natal morbidity with indication of LSCS and risk factors associated. Results: In the present study we found that the overall incidence of LSCS is 25.7%, incidence of primary LSCS is 23.1 %, incidence of LSCS in Referred cases is 61.7 %. So overall high incidence of LSCS is justified as our's is a tertiary care referral unit. 3.5% of total LSCS cases were elderly gravidas and teenage pregnancies each. In our study, 11.8% and 3.5% patients were less than 37 weeks and 34 weeks respectively. However 30.6 % of NICU admissions were due to low birth weight. So IUGR in near term patients is an important morbid factor. Previous LSCS was the leading indication in 35.2% of cases followed by foetal distress in 14.9% of cases and Previous 2 LSCS 10.5%. Two important relative indications we found were Previous 1 LSCS and PIH contributing for nearly half of the total cases. Average duration of surgery was 86 minutes in our study and average stay in hospital was 9 days. In our study early perinatal mortality was 1.6% and morbidity in the form of NICU admissions was 20.8%. Most common cause for NICU admission was LBW followed by Respiratory distress. After comparing high risks factors and indications with NICU admissions we found highest morbidity in neonates who underwent LSCS for fetal distress, multiple pregnancy and premature rupture of membranes. Conclusions: Individualization of the indication and careful evaluation can help us limiting early peri-natal morbidity and mortality. Obstetric audits in the institution, following standardized guidelines and practice of evidenced-based medicine will help us a lot in reducing the peri-natal morbidity and mortality. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 963-968

  5. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Improvements on Colorectal Cancer Quality of Care Indicators during a 3-Year Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malafa, Mokenge; Fulp, William; Fletcher, Michelle; Smith, Jesusa Corazon R; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of cancer care has become a national priority; however, there are few ongoing efforts to assist medical oncology practices in identifying areas for improvement. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care is a consortium of 11 medical oncology practices that evaluates the quality of cancer care across Florida. Within this practice-based system of self-assessment, we determined adherence to colorectal cancer quality of care indicators (QCIs) in 2006, disseminated results to each practice and reassessed adherence in 2009. The current report focuses on evaluating the direction and magnitude of change in adherence to QCIs for colorectal cancer patients between the 2 assessments. STUDY DESIGN Medical records were reviewed for all colorectal cancer patients seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 489) and 2009 (n = 511) at 10 participating practices. Thirty-five indicators were evaluated individually and changes in QCI adherence over time and by site were examined. RESULTS Significant improvements were noted from 2006 to 2009, with large gains in surgical/pathological QCIs (eg, documenting rectal radial margin status, lymphovascular invasion, and the review of ?12 lymph nodes) and medical oncology QCIs (documenting planned treatment regimen and providing recommended neoadjuvant regimens). Documentation of perineural invasion and radial margins significantly improved; however, adherence remained low (47% and 71%, respectively). There was significant variability in adherence for some QCIs across institutions at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care practices conducted self-directed quality-improvement efforts during a 3-year interval and overall adherence to QCIs improved. However, adherence remained low for several indicators, suggesting that organized improvement efforts might be needed for QCIs that remained consistently low over time. Findings demonstrate how efforts such as the Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care are useful for evaluating and improving the quality of cancer care at a regional level. PMID:24275073

  6. Antenatal care strengthening for improved quality of care in Jimma, Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted; Negussie, Dereje; GebreMariam, Abebe; Tilahun, Abebech; Friis, Henrik; Rasch, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    effect of intervention on various outcomes was significantly modified by maternal education. CONCLUSION: The quality of care can be improved in some important aspects with limited resources. Moreover, the study provides strategic perspectives on how to facilitate improved quality of ANC....... included in the evaluation. Improved content of care (physical examinations, laboratory testing, tetanus toxoid (TT)-immunization, health education, conduct of health professionals, and waiting time) were defined as proximal project outcomes and increased quality of care (better identification of health...... months. The effect of the intervention was assessed by comparing the change in quality of care from before to after the intervention period at intervention sites, relative to control sites, using logistic mixed effect regression. RESULTS: The continued attention to the ANC provision during implementation...

  7. Research into care quality criteria for long-term care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Liang; Chang, Hong-Jer; Liu, An-Chi; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to determine the criteria that reflect the quality of care provided by long-term care institutions. Research was conducted using a two-step procedure that first utilized the SERVQUAL model with Fuzzy Delphi Method to establish the proper criteria by which service quality could be measured. A total of 200 questionnaires were mailed to expert respondents, of which 89 were returned and 77 deemed valid for use in this study. We then applied the Multi-Criteria Decision Making Process to determine the degree of importance of each criterion to long-term care institution service quality planning work. Secondly, 200 questionnaires were distributed and 74 valid responses were returned. Based on the 5 SERVQUAL model constructs, this study found 17 of the 28 criteria, to be pertinent to nursing care quality, with those in the Responsiveness and Empathy domains being the ones most critical. PMID:18080970

  8. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part II: Three Early Reports on Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-09-01

    The 1990 Institute of Medicine report Medicare: A Strategy for Quality Assurance offered a definition of quality in health care and recommendations on how to achieve it. The forces for change would include different activities by the federal government, informed consumers, professionalism, and private initiatives. Eight years later, the National Roundtable report Statement on Quality of Care indicated that there were major problems of underuse, overuse, and misuse of health care services. In the same year, the President's Advisory Commission report Quality First: Better Health Care for All Americans discussed major problems with health care and proposed many initiatives to correct them, and also recommended a Bill of Rights and Responsibilities for the patients. PMID:26244402

  9. Does Child Care Quality Mediate Associations Between Type of Care and Development?

    OpenAIRE

    Abner, Kristin S.; Gordon, Rachel A; Kaestner, Robert; Korenman, Sanders

    2013-01-01

    Studies document that, on average, children cared for in centers, as compared to homes, have higher cognitive test scores but worse socioemotional and health outcomes. The authors assessed whether the quality of care received explains these associations. They considered multiple domains of child development—cognitive, socioemotional, and health—and examined whether mediation is greater when quality measures are better aligned with outcome domains. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study ...

  10. Health, Quality of Care and Quality of Life: A Case of Frail Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between health, quality of care of geriatric case management and quality of life for the purpose of furthering the understanding of the relationship between quality of life and geriatric case management. Using survey data from a group of frail older adults, this study assesses the relative merit of two…

  11. The association between chronic care management and the quality of thrombosis care

    OpenAIRE

    Drewes, H.W.; Baan, C.A.; Westert, G.P.; Meijboom, B.R.; M. Lambooij

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), used to prevent thrombosis, is associated with substantial avoidable hospitalization. Aim Identify the associations between chronic care management and the quality of OAT as suggested by the chronic care model (CCM) of Wagner. Methods Regression analysis with data of 61 thrombosis clinics and inductive analysis with 63 interviews with health care professionals of 23 thrombosis clinics. Results Results show substantial differences between regi...

  12. Defining quality of care indicators for neonatal intensive care units independent of maternal risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelem, I; Taeusch, H W

    1990-05-01

    Observed and birthweight-specific neonatal mortality rates have been used for assessing quality of neonatal care, but these are crude and affected by risk characteristics of the population served. Even when neonatal mortality rate is corrected for four risk factors, race, sex, birthweight, and multiple births, (California Data Research Facility, Santa Barbara, CA) it is possible that the corrected neonatal mortality rate is not comparable among institutions because of population differences not corrected for, eg, prenatal care. To analyze whether our high neonatal mortality rate is primarily dependent on population risk or quality of neonatal care, we used contemporaneous data collection by senior physicians and a microcomputer database system to construct indices of quality of care that are based on diagnoses graded according to disease severity. For the 1987/1988 academic year, we found: neonatal intensive care unit nosocomial infection rate, 20%; severe intraventricular hemorrhage per 100 very low birthweight infants (1500 g), 20%; bronchopulmonary dysplasia per 100 cases of severe respiratory distress syndrome, 27%; necrotizing enterocolitis per 100 neonatal intensive care unit discharges, 5%; air leak per 100 cases of severe respiratory distress syndrome, 21%; and neonatal mortality rate per very low birthweight delivery rate, 0.4. We propose that microcomputer, hospital-based analyses will improve comparisons of neonatal intensive care unit quality of care if appropriate indices can be sufficiently well-defined and shared. PMID:2352285

  13. Health care and the quality of life: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C A

    1989-10-01

    The increasing requirement for evaluation of health care, either for purposes of quality assurance or deciding resource distribution issues, has brought into question a number of ideas concerning the aims of the health care enterprise. This article suggests that the ultimate aim is to improve the quality of life, and examines the feasibility of adopting this as an evaluation criterion. Difficulties concerning the concept and definition of the quality of life are outlined, and a plea made for the adoption of the broadest possible therapeutic aims. Social indicators and subjective evaluations are considered in turn as measures of the quality of life, and their inadequacies and strengths exposed. Relationships between the measures are discussed, and their uses outlined. It is finally suggested that nurses should participate in the formulation of quality of life concepts and evaluations which reflect the values which underpin their own practice. PMID:2681314

  14. Review of Medicare, Medicaid, and Commercial Quality of Care Measures: Considerations for Assessing Accountable Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessell, Eric; Pegany, Vishaal; Keolanui, Beth; Fulton, Brent D; Scheffler, Richard M; Shortell, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have proliferated under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). If ACOs are to improve health care quality and lower costs, quality measures will be increasingly important in determining if provider consolidations associated with the development of ACOs are achieving their intended purpose. This article assesses quality measurement across public and private sectors. We reviewed available quality measures for a subset of programs in six organizations and assessed the number and domain of measures (structure, process, outcomes, and patient experience). Two-thirds of all quality measures were categorized as process measures. Outcome measures made up nearly 20 percent of measures. Patient experience and structure measures made up approximately 8 percent and 7 percent, respectively. We propose further improvements to quality measurement initiatives. For example, programs that reward providers should consider reward size and distribution within the organization. Quality improvement initiatives should consider what encourages provider buy-in and participation and the effects on populations with disproportionate health care needs. As the focus of quality initiatives may change from year to year, measures should be periodically revisited to ensure continued improvement and sustainability. Finally, we suggest quality measures that regulators could use prior to ACO formation or in the year or two following formation. PMID:26124294

  15. Incorporating health care quality into health antitrust law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Helen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antitrust authorities treat price as a proxy for hospital quality since health care quality is difficult to observe. As the ability to measure quality improved, more research became necessary to investigate the relationship between hospital market power and patient outcomes. This paper examines the impact of hospital competition on the quality of care as measured by the risk-adjusted mortality rates with the hospital as the unit of analysis. The study separately examines the effect of competition on non-profit hospitals. Methods We use California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD data from 1997 through 2002. Empirical model is a cross-sectional study of 373 hospitals. Regression analysis is used to estimate the relationship between Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG risk-adjusted mortality rates and hospital competition. Results Regression results show lower risk-adjusted mortality rates in the presence of a more competitive environment. This result holds for all alternative hospital market definitions. Non-profit hospitals do not have better patient outcomes than investor-owned hospitals. However, they tend to provide better quality in less competitive environments. CABG volume did not have a significant effect on patient outcomes. Conclusion Quality should be incorporated into the antitrust analysis. When mergers lead to higher prices and lower quality, thus lower social welfare, the antitrust challenge of hospital mergers is warranted. The impact of lower hospital competition on quality of care delivered by non-profit hospitals is ambiguous.

  16. Length of Hospital Stay and Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, José; Abelha, Vasco; Vicente, Henrique; Neves, João; Machado, José

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between Length Of hospital Stay (LOS) and Quality-of-Care (QofC) is demanding and difficult to assess. Indeed, a multifaceted intertwining network of countless services and LOS factors is available, which may range from organizational culture to hospital physicians availability, without discarding the possibility of lifting the foot on intermediate care services, to the customs and cultures of the people. On health policy terms, LOS remains a measurable index of efficiency, a...

  17. Health Literacy and Communication Quality in Health Care Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Wynia, Matthew K; Osborn, Chandra Y.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between limited health literacy and poor health may be due to poor communication quality within health care delivery organizations. We explored the relationship between health literacy status and receiving patient-centered communication in clinics and hospitals serving communication-vulnerable patient populations. Thirteen health care organizations nationwide distributed a survey to 5,929 patients. All patients completed seven items assessing patient-centered communication. O...

  18. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure. PMID:22095668

  19. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance. PMID:23429226

  20. Safe high quality health care: investing in tomorrow's leaders

    OpenAIRE

    DONALDSON, L.

    2001-01-01

    The agenda for health care in developed countries in the 21st century will be dominated by a vision of quality which seeks to address the deep seated problems of the past. The ability to deliver safe, effective, high quality care within organisations with the right cultures, the best systems, and the most highly skilled and motivated work forces will be the key to meeting this challenge. This is an issue which should be a priority for education and training bodies. The need for health service...

  1. Quality in occupational health care: management's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, E W

    1994-04-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a continual improvement process that requires common sense, education and training, and the ability to communicate and work as part of a team. TQM can improve all aspects of a business, including health, safety, and environmental functions. Physicians and nonphysician managers can use TQM to identify and respond to customer needs and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of programs. Examples of TQM to improve medical programs have included (1) an Audit Program that assesses medical programs and provides specific measurements ("metrics") of medical programs, and (2) a team that developed an Alternative Return-to-Work Program, which now assists in early rehabilitation of injured employees. In addition to expecting its physicians to be knowledgeable, fair, and objective, management expects them to use and understand TQM principles. PMID:8014711

  2. Internal marketing: creating quality employee experiences in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie; Oetjen, Dawn; Rotarius, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    To cope with the recent challenges within the health care industry, health care managers need to engage in the internal marketing of their various services. Internal marketing has been used as an effective management tool to increase employees' motivation, satisfaction, and productivity (J Mark Commun. 2010;16(5):325-344). Health care managers should understand that an intense focus on internal marketing factors will lead to a quality experience for employees that will ultimately have a positive effect on the patient experiences. PMID:21808171

  3. Quality in the provision of headache care. 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Michele; Perera, Suraj; Loder, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Gil Gouveia, Raquel; Jensen, Rigmor; Katsarava, Zaza; Steiner, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    emphasize processes of care rather than structure or outcomes, and are not widely applicable to different levels and locations of headache care. Furthermore, they do not fully incorporate accepted evidence regarding optimal methods of care. There is a clear need for consensus-based indicators that fully...... had they been developed, what aspects of headache care did they relate to and how and with what utility were they being used? A systematic review of the medical literature was performed. A total of 32 articles met criteria for inclusion. We identified 55 existing headache quality indicators of which...... reflect patients' and public-health priorities. Ideally, these will be valid across cultures and health-care settings....

  4. Perinatal considerations in the hospital disaster management process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Susan; Danna, Denise; Giarratano, Gloria; Prepas, Robbie; Johnson, Cheri Barker

    2010-01-01

    Nurses play a vital role in providing care to mothers and infants during a disaster, yet few are fully prepared for the challenges they will encounter under extreme conditions. The ability to provide the best possible care for families begins with understanding the perinatal issues in relation to each phase of the disaster management process. This article reviews the hospital and perinatal nursing role in the mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery phases of disaster management. PMID:20629934

  5. Factors Associated with Poor Sleep Quality in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jeong-Mi; Lee, Jung Ah; Jang, Jung-Woo; Kim, Young Sik; Sunwoo, Sung

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep disorder is a common problem in adults and affects physical and mental health. We investigated factors associated with poor sleep quality in Korean primary care. Methods A total of 129 couples (129 husbands and 129 wives) aged 30 to 79 years were included in this study from March, 2009 to February, 2010. The subjects were surveyed using a specific questionnaire. Sleep disorder was defined by a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index global score greater than 5 (poor sleepers). The sub...

  6. Perinatal Mortality Trends in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Berhan, Yifru; Berhan, Asres

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the magnitude of perinatal mortality in Ethiopia was among the highest in Sub Saharan Africa, there was no systematic review done to assess the trend and causes of perinatal death. The objective of this review was to assess the trend of perinatal mortality rate (PMR) and the causes attributed to perinatal deaths. Methods Studies included in this systematic review were sixteen hospital and community based perinatal mortality studies, which were conducted between 1974 and 20...

  7. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design: Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting: Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants: In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes: The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed ...

  8. Comparing public and private hospital care service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, D; O'Callaghan, M

    1998-01-01

    The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian's framework to compare and contrast Malta's public and private hospital care service quality. Through the identification of 16 service quality indicators and the use of a Likert-type scale, two questionnaires were developed. The first questionnaire measured patient pre-admission expectations for public and private hospital service quality (in respect of one another). It also determined the weighted importance given to the different service quality indicators. The second questionnaire measured patient perceptions of provided service quality. Results showed that private hospitals are expected to offer a higher quality service, particularly in the "hotel services", but it was the public sector that was exceeding its patients' expectations by the wider margin. A number of implications for public and private hospital management and policy makers were identified. PMID:10185325

  9. Mortalidade perinatal e evitabilidade: revisão da literatura Perinatal mortality and evitability: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Lansky

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, realizou-se uma revisão da literatura sobre mortalidade perinatal com maior enfoque na evitabilidade desses óbitos. Foram pesquisadas, sobretudo, publicações da década de 90 nas bases Medline e Lilacs (América Latina e Caribe. Discutiram-se as dificuldades para a realização de estudos nesta área, ainda em número restrito no Brasil, em decorrência do grande subregistro de óbitos fetais e da má qualidade da informação nas declarações de óbitos. Foram apresentadas as principais propostas de classificação dos óbitos perinatais baseadas em enfoque de evitabilidade, com destaque para a classificação de Wigglesworth. Nesta abordagem, os óbitos perinatais foram relacionados a momentos específicos da assistência, sendo evidenciadas as possibilidades de sua prevenção. Recomenda-se o enfoque de evitabilidade para a abordagem da mortalidade perinatal no Brasil, dado que as taxas são ainda elevadas, a maioria dos óbitos é considerada evitável e poderia ser prevenida com a melhoria da assistência pré-natal, ao parto e ao recém-nascido, não apenas quanto à sua resolubilidade clínica, mas também à organização da assistência em sistemas hierarquizados e regionalizados, assegurando o acesso da gestante e do recém-nascido em tempo oportuno a serviços de qualidade.This is a literature review onperinatal mortality focusing its evitability. A Medline and Lilacs (Latin-America and Caribbean search was conducted for the 90s. There are few research studies on this subject in Brazil due to the great number of underreported fetal deaths and the low quality information provided in death certificates. Different proposals for perinatal death classification are presented. Most are based on grouping the underlying causes of deaths in a functional system in order to facilitate the analysis. In the Wigglesworth classification system, one of the most recommended methods, deaths are related to the different stages of care for pregnant women and children, evidencing the possibilities of their prevention. The evitability approach of perinatal deaths in Brazil is highly recommended, as mortality rates are still very high and most of the deaths are considered avoidable. Premature deaths could be avoided improving the quality of health care. Besides improving the medical assistance, the organization of health care regarding pre-natal, birth and neonatal care must also be better developed to ensure access to qualified assistance.

  10. Perinatal outreach education. A continuation strategy for a basic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattwinkel, J; Nowacek, G A; Cook, L J; Hurt, H; Short, J G

    1984-07-01

    The Perinatal Continuing Education Program consists of a nine-month intervention with community hospital nurses, physicians, and support personnel. Components include a hospital self-inventory of resources, coordination by community hospital staff, a skills workshop, and self-instructional books. This article outlines a follow-up strategy to the basic program and describes changes in community hospital knowledge and care practices that occur between programs. The follow-up program presented includes a modified coordinators' workshop, identification of updated self-instructional materials for careful study by past participants, and a self-survey of "recommended routines" intended to facilitate change in hospital policies. Otherwise, except for the deletion of the resources inventory, the follow-up program is similar to the basic program. Testing of participants and detailed review of 1435 hospital charts at sequential time periods revealed a decline in mean knowledge scores between programs, higher scores by new participants before follow-up when compared to pre-basic program, a plateau of patient care quality between programs, and a further improvement in patient care quality after the follow-up program. We conclude that a follow-up program is best accepted after three years but that timing is not critical. Evaluation measures suggest that new knowledge and care practices become institutionalized as a result of this program and that altered care practices are not simply a result of improved performance by individuals. PMID:6518071

  11. Perinatal outcomes among migrant mothers in the United Kingdom: Is it a matter of biology, behaviour, policy, social determinants or access to health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthussery, Shuby

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines trends in perinatal outcomes among migrant mothers in the UK, and it explores potential contributors to disparities focusing on pregnancy, birth and the first year of life. Trends in perinatal outcomes indicate that ethnic minority grouping, regardless of migrant status, is a significant risk factor for unfavourable outcomes. It is unclear whether migrant status per se adds to this risk as within-group comparisons between UK-born and foreign-born women show variable findings. The role of biological and behavioural factors in producing excess unfavourable outcomes among ethnic minority mothers, although indicated, is yet to be fully understood. UK policies have salient aspects that address ethnic inequalities, but their wide focus obscures provisions for migrant mothers. Direct associations between socio-economic factors, ethnicity and adverse infant outcomes are evident. Evidence is consistent about differential access to and utilisation of health services among ethnic minority mothers, in particular recently arrived migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. PMID:26527304

  12. The quality of COPD care in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Rasmussen, Finn Vejlø; Borgeskov, Hanne; Dollerup, Jens; Jensen, Michael Skov; Roslind, Klaus; Nielsen, Lill Moll

    2007-01-01

    We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in a large sample of general practices in Denmark. We focussed on whether participation by general practitioners (GPs) in an educational programme could enhance the use of spirometry in the diagnosis and staging of the disease and improve adherence...

  13. TQ What?: Applying Total Quality Management to Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Dorothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM), developed by W. Edward Deming and Joseph Juran in 1940s, and its applications for child care centers. Discusses how TQM focuses on customer satisfaction, measuring performance, benchmarking, employee empowerment, and continuous training. Includes a list of suggested readings on TQM. (MDM)

  14. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  15. Quality of Institutional Care and Early Childhood Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paula Salgado; Fearon, R. M. Pasco; Belsky, Jay; Fachada, Inês; Soares, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Institutional rearing adversely affects children's development, but the extent to which specific characteristics of the institutional context and the quality of care provided contribute to problematic development remains unclear. In this study, 72 preschoolers institutionalised for at least 6 months were evaluated by their caregiver using the…

  16. MORTALIDAD PERINATAL DE LA POBLACIÓN AFILIADA A UNA EPS DE PASTO. DEPARTAMENTO DE NARIÑO. 2007. MORTALIDADE PERINATAL DA POVOACÃO AFILIADA A UMA EPS DE PASTO. ESTADO DE NARINHO. 2007. PERINATAL MORTALITY OF A POPULATION OF HEALTH CARE AFFILIATES IN THE CITY OF PASTO, DEPARTMENT OF NARIÑO, 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Isabel Delgado Bravo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: identificar los factores que se relacionan con mortalidad perinatal de la población afiliada a una EPS del departamento de Nariño durante 2007. Materiales y Métodos: la investigación fue de tipo cuantitativo, descriptivo, retrospectivo-evaluativo, dado que los datos corresponden a la revisión documental realizada a las historias clínicas de las gestantes con eventos de mortalidad en el año 2007. Se tomó el 100% de los casos de mortalidad perinatal, lo cual representó el total de la población. Se estudiaron las variables socio-demográficas; se realizó análisis de casos (manejo de protocolo de atención, diligenciamiento de ficha de notificación, cumplimiento de las normas técnicas y guías de atención. Se estudiaron 34 eventos, de los cuales 61,8% murieron en el ante-parto, 20,6% en el intra-parto y 17,6% en la pre-alta. Se diseñó una ficha de verificación, se aplicó a los eventos, los datos se consolidaron en el sistema estadístico de información EPIINFO versión 2000, y se realizó el cruce de variables existentes. Una vez identificados los hallazgos en cuanto a las causas de riesgo, se aplicó el chi2 y determinando el valor de P, se levantó la línea de base con el fin de priorizar planes o proyectos enfocados a la reducción del indicador de mortalidad perinatal para la EPS. Resultados: de la población total las madres con edades comprendidas entre 23 y 26 años de edad, registran el mayor número de casos, procedentes el 56% de cabecera municipal quienes tenían un grado de escolaridad de primaria completa, el 23% con cónyuge, el 26% presentaban antecedentes de multiparidad; durante el embarazo asistieron a cuatro controles realizados por médico general en el primer nivel de atención, de ellas el 67% no utilizaban método de planificación familiar. Con relación a los riesgos que tenían las madres se encontraron 3 casos con hipertensión crónica; infecciones urinarias 3 casos; tabaquismo, alcoholismo y alteraciones sicológicas, así como retardo en el crecimiento intrauterino fue reportado un caso; los cuales fueron clasificados como embarazo de alto riesgo; 6 embarazos no se clasificaron, los cuales sí tenían aspectos relevantes a tener en cuenta. El estudio demostró la omisión al momento de escribir o consignar aspectos en la historia clínica. En el proceso de parto y puerperio se identificaron las semanas de gestación entre las 28 y 40 semanas, de las cuales el 71% tuvo parto vaginal; 26,57% cesárea, de las cuales la mitad fueron atendidas por médico obstetra y el restante por médico general; el 11% no registra datos y el 5% corresponde a otros. El nivel de atención fue el nivel 1 en un 70%. Entre las causas más frecuentes de complicaciones en el momento del parto están la retención de restos placentarios, partos pretermino, sufrimiento fetal, shock hipovolémico, hemorragias de tercer trimestre. Con respecto a la notificación obligatoria de casos de mortalidad perinatal reportados al Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica (Sivigila, en ninguno de los eventos se realizó investigación de campo; igualmente no hubo comités de análisis de las muertes perinatales. La ficha perinatal se lleva en un 100%, pero al hacer el análisis de la confrontación de los datos con la historia clínica no concuerdan, posiblemente debido a que lo diligencian diferentes profesionales de la salud.Objetivo: identificar os fatores que se relacionam com mortalidade perinatal de a povoação afiliada a uma EPS do Estado de Narinho durante 2007. Materiais e Métodos: A pesquisa foi de tipo quantitativo, descritivo, retrospetivo- avaliativo, os dados que correspondem à revisão documental realizada às historias clinicas das gestantes com eventos de mortalidade no ano 2007. Tomou-se o 100% dos casos de mortalidade perinatal, o qual representou o total da povoação. Estudaram se a variável sócia- demográficas; se realizou analise de casos (manejo de protocolo de atenção diligencia mento de fichas de notificação, comprimento das normas técnicas e guias de a

  17. Quality and safety in health care, part V: introduction to crossing the quality chasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century focused on quality issues generally in health care, not only on mistakes. It made numerous recommendations for improving health care, including 6 aims and 10 rules to guide policy makers. This was intended to help redesign health care. However, the authors of the report did not attempt to provide all the answers because they realized that innovation was important and that they could not foresee all the sociopolitical forces and technological and research breakthroughs in the future. PMID:26402122

  18. Comparative Quality Indicators for Hospital Choice: Do General Practitioners Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrua, Marie; Sicotte, Claude; Lalloué, Benoît; Minvielle, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Context The strategy of publicly reporting quality indicators is being widely promoted through public policies as a way to make health care delivery more efficient. Objective To assess general practitioners’ (GPs) use of the comparative hospital quality indicators made available by public services and the media, as well as GPs’ perceptions of their qualities and usefulness. Method A telephone survey of a random sample representing all self-employed GPs in private practice in France. Results A large majority (84.1%–88.5%) of respondents (n = 503; response rate of 56%) reported that they never used public comparative indicators, available in the mass media or on government and non-government Internet sites, to influence their patients’ hospital choices. The vast majority of GPs rely mostly on traditional sources of information when choosing a hospital. At the same time, this study highlights favourable opinions shared by a large proportion of GPs regarding several aspects of hospital quality indicators, such as their good qualities and usefulness for other purposes. In sum, the results show that GPs make very limited use of hospital quality indicators based on a consumer choice paradigm but, at the same time, see them as useful in ways corresponding more to the usual professional paradigms, including as a means to improve quality of care. PMID:26840429

  19. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates Dos; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; Costa, Fernanda Marques da; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-12-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Results Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Conclusion Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself. PMID:26313440

  20. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  1. Reliability of medical audit in quality assessment of medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho Luiz Antonio Bastos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical audit of hospital records has been a major component of quality of care assessment, although physician judgment is known to have low reliability. We estimated interrater agreement of quality assessment in a sample of patients with cardiac conditions admitted to an American teaching hospital. Physician-reviewers used structured review methods designed to improve quality assessment based on judgment. Chance-corrected agreement for the items considered more relevant to process and outcome of care ranged from low to moderate (0.2 to 0.6, depending on the review item and the principal diagnoses and procedures the patients underwent. Results from several studies seem to converge on this point. Comparisons among different settings should be made with caution, given the sensitivity of agreement measurements to prevalence rates. Reliability of review methods in their current stage could be improved by combining the assessment of two or more reviewers, and by emphasizing outcome-oriented events.

  2. QUALITY ASSESSEMENT OF ANTE-NATAL CARE USING THE METHOD OF LOT QUALITY ASSURANCE SAMPLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Salarilak

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the coverage rate, timeliness and quality of ante-natal care in rural areas under the coverage of Health Houses in West Azerbaijan province, 30 Health Houses (HH were randomly selected out of 731 HH in the province. In each HH, using the method of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS 28 women having recently born babies was selected. Data were collected using check-list for facilities, and questionnaires and forms to be completed from the files by interview. The study showed that the method of LQAS is quite effective for evaluation of this service at HH level. The weighted total coverage of ante-natal care was 46.2%. Quality of care was acceptable for 53.9% of mothers. The weighted average of time lines of care was 49.8%. Availability of facilities in delivery of this service was 100%, showing there was no short coming in this respect.

  3. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part VI: More on Crossing the Quality Chasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Crossing the Quality Chasm. A New Health System for the 21st Century report (Chasm report) was that 6 major aims for US health care were set forth. In addition, the report indicated that health care in the United States care should be redesigned in accordance with 10 enumerated rules. There were other recommendations as well, to try to bridge the huge gap between the health care many people in the United States receive and what they should receive. PMID:26447385

  4. Utility of local health registers in measuring perinatal mortality: A case study in rural Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Adair Timothy; Mazurki Setiawaty; Michener Keryl; Suswardany Dwi; Burke Leona; Elmiyati Catur; Rao Chalapati

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Perinatal mortality is an important indicator of obstetric and newborn care services. Although the vast majority of global perinatal mortality is estimated to occur in developing countries, there is a critical paucity of reliable data at the local level to inform health policy, plan health care services, and monitor their impact. This paper explores the utility of information from village health registers to measure perinatal mortality at the sub district level in a rural ...

  5. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and conditions, provide appropriate wound treatment, increase satisfaction, reduce pain, increase mobility, reduce and eliminate aggravating factors, and achieve a satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome. Many scientific researches and knowledge about the pathophysiological processes of wound formation and healing are currently available. Modern achievements can accelerate independence, reduce pain and encourage faster wound healing, thus it is important to continuously develop awareness, knowledge and experience, along with the treatment to achieve, maintain and enhance the quality of health care and patient safety. PMID:25326985

  6. Satisfaction of patients from provided quality of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifigenia Kotsagiorgi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the interest of health professionals has turned more and more towards to satisfaction of patients by the provided care of health. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the satisfaction of patients by the the provided care of health. The method ?f this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature, mainly in the pubmed data base which referred to the satisfaction of patients by the provided care of health. Results: According to the literature, satisfaction of patients’ needs consists a complex issue. As implementation of patients’ needs is defined the level of satisfaction of patients’ expectations related to personal experience and to the meet of internal needs. The results of recent studies indicate that the expectation of patients and the health professionals should coincide having as ultimate goal the reassurance of co-operation. It is widely accepted that the meet of needs is related to better clinical outcome since satisfied patients are more likely to accept medical treatment, to have active participation in their care and maintain trust of services of health care. Furthermore, assessment of satisfaction of patients’ needs contributes to the improvement of health care services and to better management of cost for health. Finally, it is widely accepted that the meet of needs consists a credible index of quality of care. Conclusions: Though the satisfaction of patients’ needs is a subjective issue, however, it should consist an integral part of the treatment.

  7. Maternal perinatal mental health and offspring academic achievement at age 16:the mediating role of childhood executive function

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Rebecca M.; Bornstein, Marc H.; Cordero, Miguel; Scerif, Gaia; Mahedy, Liam; Evans, Jonathan; Abioye, Abu; Stein, Alan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elucidating risk pathways for under-achieving at school can inform strategies to reduce the number of adolescents leaving school without passing grades in core subjects. Maternal depression can compromise the quality of parental care and is associated with multiple negative child outcomes. However, only a few small studies have investigated the association between perinatal maternal depression and poor academic achievement in adolescence. The pathways to explain the risks are also...

  8. Differences in Child Care Quality in Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Erin J.; Frestedt, Becki; Grace, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This study examines rural differences in one important indicator of quality for licensed child care settings--the number of children per adult. It also investigates the relationships between cost of child care, child care subsidy receipt, and child care quality for both rural and non-rural areas. We used representative child care survey data…

  9. Quality-based financial incentives in health care: can we improve quality by paying for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Douglas A; Perry, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This article asks whether financial incentives can improve the quality of health care. A conceptual framework drawn from microeconomics, agency theory, behavioral economics, and cognitive psychology motivates a set of propositions about incentive effects on clinical quality. These propositions are evaluated through a synthesis of extant peer-reviewed empirical evidence. Comprehensive financial incentives--balancing rewards and penalties; blending structure, process, and outcome measures; emphasizing continuous, absolute performance standards; tailoring the size of incremental rewards to increasing marginal costs of quality improvement; and assuring certainty, frequency, and sustainability of incentive payoffs--offer the prospect of significantly enhancing quality beyond the modest impacts of prevailing pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. Such organizational innovations as the primary care medical home and accountable health care organizations are expected to catalyze more powerful quality incentive models: risk- and quality-adjusted capitation, episode of care payments, and enhanced fee-for-service payments for quality dimensions (e.g., prevention) most amenable to piece-rate delivery. PMID:19296779

  10. MORTALIDAD PERINATAL DE LA POBLACIÓN AFILIADA A UNA EPS DE PASTO. DEPARTAMENTO DE NARIÑO. 2007. / PERINATAL MORTALITY OF A POPULATION OF HEALTH CARE AFFILIATES IN THE CITY OF PASTO, DEPARTMENT OF NARIÑO, 2007. / MORTALIDADE PERINATAL DA POVOACÃO AFILIADA A UMA EPS DE PASTO. ESTADO DE NARINHO. 2007.

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Adriana Isabel, Delgado Bravo; Janeth Verónica, López Maya; Fanny Carmenza, Meneses Paredes.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: identificar os fatores que se relacionam com mortalidade perinatal de a povoação afiliada a uma EPS do Estado de Narinho durante 2007. Materiais e Métodos: A pesquisa foi de tipo quantitativo, descritivo, retrospetivo- avaliativo, os dados que correspondem à revisão documental realizada às [...] historias clinicas das gestantes com eventos de mortalidade no ano 2007. Tomou-se o 100% dos casos de mortalidade perinatal, o qual representou o total da povoação. Estudaram se a variável sócia- demográficas; se realizou analise de casos (manejo de protocolo de atenção diligencia mento de fichas de notificação, comprimento das normas técnicas e guias de atenção). Estudaram se 34 eventos, dos quais 61,8% morreram no ante- parto, 20,6% no intra-parto e 17,6% na pré- alta. Desenhou-se uma ficha de verificação, se aplicaram aos eventos, os dados se consolidaram no sistema estadístico de informação EPIINFO versão 2000, e realizou se o Cruzamento de variáveis existentes. Uma vez identificados os descobrimentos em quanto ás causas de risco, aplicou se o chi2 e determinando o valor de P, se levantou a línea de base com o fim de priorizar planos ou projetos enfocados à redução do indicador de mortalidade perinatal para a EPS. Resultados: da povoação total as mães com idades compreendidas entre 23 e 26 anos de idade, registram o maior números de casos, procedentes o 56% de cabeceira municipal quens tinham um grau de escolaridade de primaria completa, o 23% com conjugue, o 26% apresentavam antecedentes de multi- paridade; durante o embaraço assistiram a quatro controles realizados por médico general no primeiro nível de atenção, delas o 67% não utilizavam método de planificação familiar. Com relação aos riscos que tinham as mães encontraram se 3 casos com hipertensão crônica; infecções urinarias 3 casos; tabaquismo, alcoolismo e alterações psicológicas, assim como retardo no crescimento intra-uterino foi reportado um caso; os quais foram classificados como embaraço de alto risco; 6 embaraços não se classificaram, os quais se tinham aspectos relevantes a ter em conta. A pesquisa demonstrou a omissão ao momento de escrever ou consignar aspectos na historia clinica. Em o proceso de parto e puerpério se identificaram as semanas de gestação entre as 28 e 40 semanas, das quais o 71% teve parto vaginal; 26,57% cesárea, das quais a metade foi atendida por medico obstetra e o restante por medico general; o 11% não registra dados e o 5% corresponde a outros. O nível de atenção foi o nível 1 num 70%. Entre as causas mais freqüentes de complicações no momento do parto estão a retenção de restos placentários, partos predetermino, sofrimento fetal, shock hipovolêmico, hemorragias de terceiro trimestre. Com respeito à notificação obrigatória de casos de mortalidade perinatal, foram reportados ao Sistema de Vigilância Epidemiologia (Sivigila), em nenhum dos eventos se realizou pesquisa de campo; igualmente não teve comitês de analise das mortes perinatales. A ficha se leva em um 100%, mas ao fazer o analise de a confrontação dos dados com historia clinica não concordam possivelmente devido a que o diligenciam diferentes profissionais da saúde. Abstract in spanish Objetivo: identificar los factores que se relacionan con mortalidad perinatal de la población afiliada a una EPS del departamento de Nariño durante 2007. Materiales y Métodos: la investigación fue de tipo cuantitativo, descriptivo, retrospectivo-evaluativo, dado que los datos corresponden a la revis [...] ión documental realizada a las historias clínicas de las gestantes con eventos de mortalidad en el año 2007. Se tomó el 100% de los casos de mortalidad perinatal, lo cual representó el total de la población. Se estudiaron las variables socio-demográficas; se realizó análisis de casos (manejo de protocolo de atención, diligenciamiento de ficha de notificación, cumplimiento de las normas técnicas y guías de atención). Se estudiaron 34 eventos, de los cuales 61,8% mu

  11. Factors During Pregnancy, Delivery and Birth Affecting Global Quality of Life of the Adult Child at Long-term Follow-up. Results from the Prospective Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Trine Flensborg-Madsen; Niels Jørgen Andersen; Joav Merrick

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a prospective cohort study, where we explore associations between pregnancy, delivery and the global quality of life (QOL) of the adult child 31-33 years later. The data is from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959-61 using two sets of questionnaires send to 7,222 persons: one filled out by physicians during pregnancy and delivery, while the follow-up questionnaire was completed by the adult children 31-33 years later. The main outcome measures were objective factors...

  12. Acute Myocardial Infarction Quality of Care: The Strong Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lyle G.; Butt, Amir; Conroy, Britt; Devereux, Richard B.; Galloway, James M.; Jolly, Stacey; Lee, Elisa T.; Silverman, Angela; Yeh, Jeun-Liang; Welty, Thomas K.; Kedan, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the quality of care provided patients with acute myocardial infarction and compare with similar national and regional data. Design Case series. Setting The Strong Heart Study has extensive population-based data related to cardiovascular events among American Indians living in three rural regions of the United States. Participants Acute myocardial infarction cases (72) occurring between 1/1/2001 and 12/31/2006 were identified from a cohort of 4549 participants. Outcome measures The proportion of cases that were provided standard quality of care therapy, as defined by the Healthcare Financing Administration and other national organizations. Results The provision of quality services, such as administration of aspirin on admission and at discharge, reperfusion therapy within 24 hours, prescription of beta blocker medication at discharge, and smoking cessation counseling were found to be 94%, 91%, 92%, 86% and 71%, respectively. The unadjusted, 30 day mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion Despite considerable challenges posed by geographic isolation and small facilities, process measures of the quality of acute myocardial infarction care for participants in this American Indian cohort were comparable to that reported for Medicare beneficiaries nationally and within the resident states of this cohort. PMID:21942161

  13. Lessons learned in the development of process quality indicators for cancer care in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Higashi Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In Japan, attention has increasingly focused on ensuring the quality of care, particularly in the area of cancer care. The 2006 Basic Cancer Control Act reinforced efforts to ensure the quality of cancer care in a number of sectors, including the role of government in ensuring quality. We initiated a government-funded research project to develop quality indicators to measure the quality of care for five major cancers (breast, lung, stomach, colorectal, and liver cancer) in Japan, and...

  14. Licensure Portability: Assuring Access to Quality Care in Physical Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lane

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The concurrent circumstances of an increasingly mobile workforce, disparities in access to healthcare, and the ability to deliver care through technology (e.g., telehealth present the need and the opportunity to practice across state borders. Over the past four years, the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy (FSBPT has explored professional licensure models that will allow cross border practice. This paper reviews FSBPT's exploratory process and describes some of the advantages of an interstate compact. It concludes that if agreement among state licensing boards can be achieved, a compact could serve as a viable means to increase patient access to quality physical therapy care. 

  15. What doctors think about the impact of managed care tools on quality of care, costs, autonomy, and relations with patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bovier Patrick A; Agoritsas Thomas; Deom Marie; Perneger Thomas V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background How doctors perceive managed care tools and incentives is not well known. We assessed doctors' opinions about the expected impact of eight managed care tools on quality of care, control of health care costs, professional autonomy and relations with patients. Methods Mail survey of doctors (N = 1546) in Geneva, Switzerland. Respondents were asked to rate the impact of 8 managed care tools on 4 aspects of care on a 5-level scale (1 very negative, 2 rather negative, 3 neutral...

  16. Implementing a quality improvement programme in palliative care in care homes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higginson Irene J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of older people reach the end of life in care homes. The aim of this study is to explore the perceived benefits of, and barriers to, implementation of the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes (GSFCH, a quality improvement programme in palliative care. Methods Nine care homes involved in the GSFCH took part. We conducted semi-structured interviews with nine care home managers, eight nurses, nine care assistants, eleven residents and seven of their family members. We used the Framework approach to qualitative analysis. The analysis was deductive based on the key tasks of the GSFCH, the 7Cs: communication, coordination, control of symptoms, continuity, continued learning, carer support, and care of the dying. This enabled us to consider benefits of, and barriers to, individual components of the programme, as well as of the programme as a whole. Results Perceived benefits of the GSFCH included: improved symptom control and team communication; finding helpful external support and expertise; increasing staff confidence; fostering residents' choice; and boosting the reputation of the home. Perceived barriers included: increased paperwork; lack of knowledge and understanding of end of life care; costs; and gaining the cooperation of GPs. Many of the tools and tasks in the GSFCH focus on improving communication. Participants described effective communication within the homes, and with external providers such as general practitioners and specialists in palliative care. However, many had experienced problems with general practitioners. Although staff described the benefits of supportive care registers, coding predicted stage of illness and advance care planning, which included improved communication, some felt the need for more experience of using these, and there were concerns about discussing death. Conclusions Most of the barriers described by participants are relevant to other interventions to improve end of life care in care homes. There is a need to investigate the impact of quality improvement programmes in care homes, such as the GSFCH, on a wider range of outcomes for residents and their families, and to monitor the sustainability of any resulting improvements. It is also important to explore the impact of the different components of these complex interventions.

  17. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators. PMID:23378059

  18. The Ups and Downs of Child Care: Variations in Child Care Quality and Exposure across the Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Kathryn; Habasevich-Brooks, Tara

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable policy interest in understanding the role of child care in children's development. Yet little research has examined whether individual children experience changes in child care quality across their early years, and less has included children's varying levels of exposure to care in analyses of child care trajectories. Using…

  19. Self-reported quality care for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerås, N; Jordan, K P; Clausen, B; Cordeiro, C; Dziedzic, K; Edwards, J; Grønhaug, G; Higginbottom, A; Lund, H; Pacheco, G; Pais, S; Hagen, K B

    2015-01-01

    % (IQR 28%, 64%; range 0-100%) for the total sample with relatively similar medians across three of four countries. Achievement rates on individual QIs showed a large variation ranging from 11% (referral to services for losing weight) to 67% (information about the importance of exercise) with significant...... differences in achievement rates between the countries. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated a potential for improvement in OA care in all four countries, but for somewhat different aspects of OA care. By exploring these differences and comparing healthcare services, ideas may be generated on how the quality......OBJECTIVES: To assess and compare patient perceived quality of osteoarthritis (OA) management in primary healthcare in Denmark, Norway, Portugal and the UK. METHODS: Participants consulting with clinical signs and symptoms of knee OA were identified in 30 general practices and invited to complete a...

  20. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part VII: Lower Costs and Higher Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine report entitled The Health Care Imperative: Lowering Costs and Improving Outcomes discussed numerous ways to decrease costs in the health care system without decreasing quality. The use of evidence-based medicine, eliminating wasteful spending such as needlessly high administrative costs, having more preventive services, having a better reimbursement system that emphasized quality, developing a less fragmented and more efficient medical delivery system, having more transparency for patients on the outcomes of different providers, having greater health care literacy for patients, and eliminating fraud were some of the recommendations. The total savings from eliminating unnecessary health care costs was estimated to be over 3 quarters of a trillion dollars each year. PMID:26545019

  1. Óbitos perinatais evitáveis e ambiente externo ao sistema de assistência: estudo de caso em município da Região Metropolitana do Rio de Janeiro Avoidable perinatal deaths and the environment outside the health care system: a case study in a city in Greater Metropolitan Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. G. Rosa

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo visa compreender a contribuição de fatores do ambiente externo ao sistema de assistência na ocorrência de óbitos perinatais em maternidades, que em 1994, compunham a rede de atendimento obstétrico em um município da região metropolitana do Rio de Janeiro. Dividiram-se os elementos em quatro grupos de variáveis, para entender a relação entre falhas no atendimento e deficiências no ambiente externo e institucionalizado: repasse de recursos para custeio, fatores geográficos e temporais, características organizacionais e administrativas e ação/participação de grupos de interesse. Entrevistas semi-estruturadas foram realizadas. Os resultados indicaram as seguintes falhas: repasses de recursos para custeio insuficientes para manter cuidados de qualidade, sobretudo nos casos das maternidades privadas; nenhuma regionalização ou hierarquização formal ou informal dos cuidados obstétricos no município; desconhecimento das normas do Ministério da Saúde nas maternidades estudadas e as adotadas em três das quatro maternidades não faziam referência nem aos procedimentos para a admissão, nem ao seguimento do trabalho de parto, nem ao seguimento fetal e o nível de participação não era o efetivamente implementado.This paper focuses on the role of environmental factors external to the health care system in the occurrence of perinatal deaths in maternity hospitals belonging to the local health system in a city in Greater Metropolitan Rio de Janeiro in 1994. Elements from the political and administrative context that contribute to an understanding of the relationship between failures in health care and structural deficiencies in these maternity hospitals were divided into four groups of variables: distribution of resources, spatial and temporal factors, organizational and managerial features, and action by interest groups. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. The study concluded that poor performance in four groups of variables may have contributed to perinatal mortality: distribution of resources was insufficient to provide quality in health care, especially in private maternity hospitals; there was no formal or informal regional or hierarchical organization of obstetric care in the city; Ministry of Health guidelines were ignored in all four maternity hospitals, while in three of the hospitals there were no admissions procedures and delivery and fetal follow-up listed in their own rules; and the level of actual participation was low.

  2. Quality of care: how good is good enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chassin Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Israel has made impressive progress in improving performance on key measures of the quality of health care in the community in recent years. These achievements are all the more notable given Israel's modest overall spending on health care and because they have accrued to virtually the entire population of the country. Health care systems in most developed nations around the world find themselves in a similar position today with respect to health care quality. Despite significantly increased improvement efforts over the past decade, routine safety processes, such as hand hygiene and medication administration, fail routinely at rates of 30% to 50%. People with chronic diseases experience preventable episodes of acute illness that require hospitalization due to medication mix-ups and other failures of outpatient management. Patients continue to be harmed by preventable adverse events, such as surgery on the wrong part of the body and fires in operating theaters. Health care around the world is not nearly as safe as other industries, such as commercial aviation, that have mastered highly effective ways to manage serious hazards. Health care organizations will have to undertake three interrelated changes to get substantially closer to the superlative safety records of other industries: leadership commitment to zero major quality failures, widespread implementation of highly effective process improvement methods, and the adoption of all facets of a culture of safety. Each of these changes represents a major challenge to the way today's health care organizations plan and carry out their daily work. The Israeli health system is in an enviable position to implement these changes. Universal health insurance coverage, the enrolment of the entire population in a small number of health plans, and the widespread use of electronic health records provide advantages available to few other countries. Achieving and sustaining levels of safety comparable to, say, commercial aviation will be a long journey for health care--one we should begin promptly. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/1/1/3/

  3. Quality assessment of child care services in primary health care settings of Central Karnataka (Davangere District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious disease and malnutrition are common in children. Primary health care came into being to decrease the morbidity. Quality assessment is neither clinical research nor technology assessment. It is primarily an administrative device used to monitor performance to determine whether it continues to remain within acceptable bounds. Aims and Objectives: To assess the quality of service in the delivery of child health care in a primary health care setting. To evaluate client satisfaction. To assess utilization of facilities by the community. Materials and Methods: Study Type: Cross-sectional community-based study. Quality assessment was done by taking 30-50%, of the service provider. Client satisfaction was determined with 1 Immunization and child examination-90 clients each. Utilization of services was assessed among 478 households. Statistical Analysis: Proportions, Likert′s scale to grade the services and Chi-square. Results: Immunization service: Identification of needed vaccine, preparation and care was average. Vaccination technique, documentation, EPI education, maintenance of cold chain and supplies were excellent. Client satisfaction was good. Growth monitoring: It was excellent except for mother′s education andoutreach educational session . Acute respiratory tract infection care: History, physical examination, ARI education were poor. Classification, treatment and referral were excellent. Client satisfaction was good. Diarrheal disease care: History taking was excellent. But examination, classification, treatment, ORT education were poor. Conclusion: Mothers education was not stressed by service providers. Service providers′ knowledge do not go with the quality of service rendered. Physical examination of the child was not good. Except for immunization other services were average.

  4. Effects of an Integrated Care System on quality of care and satisfaction for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Caprice; Madden, Vanessa; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    To assess the effects of an Integrated Care System (ICS) on parent-reported quality of care and satisfaction for Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). In 2006 Florida reformed its Medicaid program in Broward and Duval counties. Children's Medical Services Network (CMSN) chose to participate in the reform and developed an ICS for CSHCN. The ICS ushered in several changes such as more prior approval requirements and closing of the provider network. Telephone surveys were conducted with CMSN parents whose children reside in the reform counties and parents whose children reside outside of the reform counties in 2006 and 2007 (n = 1,727). Results from multivariate quasi-experimental models show that one component of parent-report quality of care, customer service, increased. Following implementation of the ICS, customer service increased by 0.22 points. After implementation of the ICS, parent-reported quality and satisfaction were generally unaffected. Although significant increases were not seen in the majority of the quality and satisfaction domains, it is nonetheless encouraging that parents did not report negative experiences with the ICS. It is important to present these interim findings so that progress can be monitored and decision-makers can begin to consider if the program should be expanded statewide. PMID:21509433

  5. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. PMID:19760542

  6. [Quality of life in the focus of quality audits in long-term care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold-Majumdar, A; Behrens, J

    2012-12-01

    Quality of life - an important outcome factor of long-term care - development and psychometric testing of an audit instrument, the Quality of Life Index, (QoL index"), to assess the consideration for individual quality of life aspects during the care process in long-term care settings is evaluated ?-? even for clients with limited communication skills.A stratified random sample of n=209 residents was drawn out of the population of N=1 128 residents of 8 nursing homes and their individual QoL-aspects were assessed with SEIQoL-DW or in difficult communication situations with "LQ-Index-Informationssammlung". The LQ-Index's new items were validated via a parallel testing with the reference instrument SEIQoL-DW, the split half-reliability, the interrater reliability (Kappa) and a structured expert review according to the cognitive interview technique.All 209 participants were assessed via LQ-Index. The SEIQoL-Interview was completed and estimated valid by 18 (8.61%) residents. The psychometric testing results and the expert review indicate high feasibility, good reliability, validity and objectivity of the instrument "LQ-Index".As a result of this study a feasible and valid instrument is now available to assess the consideration for individual quality of life aspects during the care process in long-term care settings - even for clients with limited communication skills. PMID:22322335

  7. Mortalidade perinatal em São Paulo, Brasil Perinatal mortality in S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Laurenti

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi analisada a mortalidade perinatal em São Paulo num período de dois anos. Partiu o estudo da totalidade dos atestados de nascidos mortos e de uma amostra de óbitos de menores de sete dias, para a qual a metodologia foi a de entrevistas domiciliares e junto aos médicos e hospitais que tenham prestado assistência às crianças falecidas. O coeficiente de mortalidade perinatal encontrado foi igual a 42,04 por mil nascidos vivos. Esse valor apresenta-se bastante elevado quando comparado ao de áreas desenvolvidas. Foi verificado que ele poderia ser diminuído com a simples redução dos coeficientes específicos por algumas causas evitáveis a nível de pré-natal (sífilis congênita, doenças próprias ou associadas à gravidez, do parto (distócias, traumatismos obstétricos e anóxia, ou da atenção ao recém-nascido (causas infecciosas, do aparelho respiratório, hemorragias e certas anóxias. O coeficiente de mortalidade perinatal segundo a idade da mãe mostrou que o risco varia com a idade, apresentando-se maior nas mulheres de 40 a 49 anos.Perinatal mortality in S. Paulo, over a period of two years, was analysed. The study took in all death certificates of the stillborn and a sample of children under a week of age. For the latter the methodology used was by interviewing phisicians and hospitals that cared for the deceased. The perinatal mortality rate was 42,05 per thousand live births. This value is really high when compared with those of developed areas. Nevertheless it can be reduced once the specific rates for some of the avoidable diseases be reduced by proper pre-natal care (congenital syphilis, illness pertaining to or associated with pregnancy. This can also be done by improving care at delivery (Distocias, obstetrical traumatism and anoxia and towards the newlyborn (infeccious diseases, respiratory diseases, haemorrages and anoxia. The perinatal mortality rate varies with the age of the mother, the risk being largest in women between 40 and 49 years of age.

  8. Mortalidade perinatal em São Paulo, Brasil / Perinatal mortality in S. Paulo, Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ruy, Laurenti; Maria Helena, Silveira; Arnaldo A. F., Siqueira.

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi analisada a mortalidade perinatal em São Paulo num período de dois anos. Partiu o estudo da totalidade dos atestados de nascidos mortos e de uma amostra de óbitos de menores de sete dias, para a qual a metodologia foi a de entrevistas domiciliares e junto aos médicos e hospitais que tenham prest [...] ado assistência às crianças falecidas. O coeficiente de mortalidade perinatal encontrado foi igual a 42,04 por mil nascidos vivos. Esse valor apresenta-se bastante elevado quando comparado ao de áreas desenvolvidas. Foi verificado que ele poderia ser diminuído com a simples redução dos coeficientes específicos por algumas causas evitáveis a nível de pré-natal (sífilis congênita, doenças próprias ou associadas à gravidez), do parto (distócias, traumatismos obstétricos e anóxia), ou da atenção ao recém-nascido (causas infecciosas, do aparelho respiratório, hemorragias e certas anóxias). O coeficiente de mortalidade perinatal segundo a idade da mãe mostrou que o risco varia com a idade, apresentando-se maior nas mulheres de 40 a 49 anos. Abstract in english Perinatal mortality in S. Paulo, over a period of two years, was analysed. The study took in all death certificates of the stillborn and a sample of children under a week of age. For the latter the methodology used was by interviewing phisicians and hospitals that cared for the deceased. The perinat [...] al mortality rate was 42,05 per thousand live births. This value is really high when compared with those of developed areas. Nevertheless it can be reduced once the specific rates for some of the avoidable diseases be reduced by proper pre-natal care (congenital syphilis, illness pertaining to or associated with pregnancy). This can also be done by improving care at delivery (Distocias, obstetrical traumatism and anoxia) and towards the newlyborn (infeccious diseases, respiratory diseases, haemorrages and anoxia). The perinatal mortality rate varies with the age of the mother, the risk being largest in women between 40 and 49 years of age.

  9. Prioritizing WHO normative work on maternal and perinatal health: a multicountry survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coltart Cordelia EM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO develops evidence-based guidelines for setting global standards and providing technical support to its Member States and the international community, as a whole. There is a clear need to ensure that WHO guidance is relevant, rigorous and up-to date. A key activity is to ascertain the guidance needs of the countries. This study provides an international comparison of priority guidance needs for maternal and perinatal health. It incorporates data from those who inform policy and implementation strategies at a national level, in addition to targeting those who use and most need the guidance at grassroot level. Methods An online multi-country survey was used to identify WHO guidance priorities for the next five years in the field of maternal and perinatal health. WHO regional and country offices were requested to respond the survey and obtain responses from Ministries of Health around the world. In addition, the survey was disseminated through other networks and relevant electronic forums. Results A total of 393 responses were received, including 56 from Ministries of Health and 54 from WHO/UN country offices. 75% of responses were from developing countries and 25% from developed countries. Guidance on strategies focusing on 'quality of care' issues to reduce all-cause maternal/perinatal mortality was considered the most important domain to target, which includes for instance guidance to improve access, dissemination, implementation of effective practices and health professionals' education. Conclusions This study provides a panorama of international priority guidance needs for maternal and perinatal health. Although clinical guidance remains a priority, there are other areas related to health systems guidance, which seem to be even more important. Overall, the domain ranked highest in terms of greatest need for guidance was around quality of care, which included questions related to educational needs, access to and implementation of guidance.

  10. The implementation of unit-based perinatal mortality audit in perinatal cooperation units in the northern region of the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Diem Mariet Th

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal (mortality audit can be considered to be a way to improve the careprocess for all pregnant women and their newborns by creating an opportunity to learn from unwanted events in the care process. In unit-based perinatal audit, the caregivers involved in cases that result in mortality are usually part of the audit group. This makes such an audit a delicate matter. Methods The purpose of this study was to implement unit-based perinatal mortality audit in all 15 perinatal cooperation units in the northern region of the Netherlands between September 2007 and March 2010. These units consist of hospital-based and independent community-based perinatal caregivers. The implementation strategy encompassed an information plan, an organization plan, and a training plan. The main outcomes are the number of participating perinatal cooperation units at the end of the project, the identified substandard factors (SSF, the actions to improve care, and the opinions of the participants. Results The perinatal mortality audit was implemented in all 15 perinatal cooperation units. 677 different caregivers analyzed 112 cases of perinatal mortality and identified 163 substandard factors. In 31% of cases the guidelines were not followed and in 23% care was not according to normal practice. In 28% of cases, the documentation was not in order, while in 13% of cases the communication between caregivers was insufficient. 442 actions to improve care were reported for ‘external cooperation’ (15%, ‘internal cooperation’ (17%, ‘practice organization’ (26%, ‘training and education’ (10%, and ‘medical performance’ (27%. Valued aspects of the audit meetings were: the multidisciplinary character (13%, the collective and non-judgmental search for substandard factors (21%, the perception of safety (13%, the motivation to reflect on one’s own professional performance (5%, and the inherent postgraduate education (10%. Conclusion Following our implementation strategy, the perinatal mortality audit has been successfully implemented in all 15 perinatal cooperation units. An important feature was our emphasis on the delicate character of the caregivers evaluating the care they provided. However, the actual implementation of the proposed actions for improving care is still a point of concern.

  11. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  12. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Aldana, J.; Piechulek, H.; al-Sabir, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min) was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint) consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec), with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client's emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture. PMID:11436472

  13. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldana Jorge Mendoza

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec, with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client?s emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture.

  14. Quality of maternal care: A comparison of preterm infants in Kangaroo mother care and full- term infants in regular care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Alicia Carbonell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the potential impact of an intervention program (Kangaroo Mother Care, KMC on maternal sensitivity in a sample of high-risk adolescent mothers. Two mother-infant groups were compared: adolescent mothers with their preterm baby in kangaroo care and adolescent mothers with their full-term baby in regular care. Naturalistic observations at the home environment were conducted to assess maternal quality of care. No significant differences were found between both groups of dyads. Results are in line with the notion that KMC seems to play a protective role for adolescent mothers and their premature babies, given the additional risk factor of prematurity when compared to the full term group. These preliminary findings are stimulating and support further inquiry into the effects of KMC on maternal sensitivity particularly in high-risk populations.

  15. Overall quality of diabetes care in a defined geographic region: different sides of the same story

    OpenAIRE

    Van Bruggen, R; Gorter, K.; Stolk, R.; Zuithoff, P.; Verhoeven, R.; Rutten, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background In diabetes care, knowledge about what is achievable in primary and secondary care is important. There is a need for an objective method to assess the quality of care in different settings. A quality-of-care summary score has been developed based on process and outcome measures. An adapted version of this score was used to evaluate diabetes management in different settings. Aim To evaluate the quality of diabetes management in primary and secondary care in a defined geographic regi...

  16. Improving quality and reducing inequities: a challenge in achieving best care

    OpenAIRE

    Mayberry, Robert M.; Nicewander, David A.; Qin, Huanying; Ballard, David J

    2006-01-01

    The health care quality chasm is better described as a gulf for certain segments of the population, such as racial and ethnic minority groups, given the gap between actual care received and ideal or best care quality. The landmark Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century challenges all health care organizations to pursue six major aims of health care improvement: safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and patient-centere...

  17. Improving quality of care through improved audit and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hysong Sylvia J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has led the industry in measuring facility performance as a critical element in improving quality of care, investing substantial resources to develop and maintain valid and cost-effective measures. The External Peer Review Program (EPRP of the VA is the official data source for monitoring facility performance, used to prioritize the quality areas needing most attention. Facility performance measurement has significantly improved preventive and chronic care, as well as overall quality; however, much variability still exists in levels of performance across measures and facilities. Audit and feedback (A&F, an important component of effective performance measurement, can help reduce this variability and improve overall performance. Previous research suggests that VA Medical Centers (VAMCs with high EPRP performance scores tend to use EPRP data as a feedback source. However, the manner in which EPRP data are used as a feedback source by individual providers as well as service line, facility, and network leadership is not well understood. An in-depth understanding of mental models, strategies, and specific feedback process characteristics adopted by high-performing facilities is thus urgently needed. This research compares how leaders of high, low, and moderately performing VAMCs use clinical performance data from the EPRP as a feedback tool to maintain and improve quality of care. Methods We will conduct a qualitative, grounded theory analysis of up to 64 interviews using a novel method of sampling primary care, facility, and Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN leadership at high-, moderate-, and low-performing facilities. We will analyze interviews for evidence of cross-facility differences in perceptions of performance data usefulness and strategies for disseminating performance data evaluating performance, with particular attention to timeliness, individualization, and punitiveness of feedback delivery. Discussion Most research examining feedback to improve provider and facility performance lacks a detailed understanding of the elements of effective feedback. This research will highlight the elements most commonly used at high-performing facilities and identify additional features of their successful feedback strategies not previously identified. Armed with this information, practices can implement more effective A&F interventions to improve quality of care.

  18. Diagnostic image quality of mammograms in German outpatient medical care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A total of 79 115 mammograms from statutory health insurance (SHI) physicians within German outpatient care were evaluated with respect to the diagnostic image quality. Materials and Methods: Mammograms were randomly selected between 2006 and 2008 by the regional Associations of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians and submitted to regional boards of experts for external evaluation. The mammogram quality was evaluated using a 3-point scale (adequate, borderline, failure) and documented using a nationally standardized protocol. Results: 87.6 % of the mammograms were classified as adequate, 11.0 % as borderline and 1.4 % as failure. Mediolateral oblique mammograms (mlo) had worse ratings than craniocaudal mammograms (cc). Main reasons for classifying the mammograms as borderline or failure were 'inframammary fold not adequately visualized' (mlo), 'pectoral muscle not in the correct angle or not to the level with the nipple' (mlo), 'the nipple not in profile' (mlo, cc) and 'breast not completely or not adequately visualized' (cc). Conclusion: The results show a good overall quality of mammograms in German outpatient medical care. Failures can be associated predominantly with incorrect positioning of the breast. More precisely defined quality criteria using objective measures are recommended, especially for craniocaudal mammograms (cc). (orig.)

  19. Monitoring quality in Israeli primary care: The primary care physicians' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissanholtz-Gannot Rachel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2000, Israel has had a national program for ongoing monitoring of the quality of the primary care services provided by the country's four competing non-profit health plans. Previous research has demonstrated that quality of care has improved substantially since the program's inception and that the program enjoys wide support among health plan managers. However, prior to this study there were anecdotal and journalistic reports of opposition to the program among primary care physicians engaged in direct service delivery; these raised serious questions about the extent of support among physicians nationally. Goals To assess how Israeli primary care physicians experience and rate health plan efforts to track and improve the quality of care. Method The study population consisted of primary care physicians employed by the health plans who have responsibility for the quality of care of a panel of adult patients. The study team randomly sampled 250 primary-care physicians from each of the four health plans. Of the 1,000 physicians sampled, 884 met the study criteria. Every physician could choose whether to participate in the survey by mail, e-mail, or telephone. The anonymous questionnaire was completed by 605 physicians – 69% of those eligible. The data were weighted to reflect differences in sampling and response rates across health plans. Main findings The vast majority of respondents (87% felt that the monitoring of quality was important and two-thirds (66% felt that the feedback and subsequent remedial interventions improved medical care to a great extent. Almost three-quarters (71% supported continuation of the program in an unqualified manner. The physicians with the most positive attitudes to the program were over age 44, independent contract physicians, and either board-certified in internal medicine or without any board-certification (i.e., residents or general practitioners. At the same time, support for the program was widespread even among physicians who are young, board-certified in family medicine, and salaried. Many physicians also reported that various problems had emerged to a great or very great extent: a heavier workload (65%, over-competitiveness (60%, excessive managerial pressure (48%, and distraction from other clinical issues (35%. In addition, there was some criticism of the quality of the measures themselves. Respondents also identified approaches to addressing these problems. Conclusions The findings provide perspective on the anecdotal reports of physician opposition to the monitoring program; they may well accurately reflect the views of the small number of physicians directly involved, but they do not reflect the views of primary care physicians as a whole, who are generally quite supportive of the program. At the same time, the study confirms the existence of several perceived problems. Some of these problems, such as excess managerial pressure, can probably best be addressed by the health plans themselves; while others, such as the need to refine the quality indicators, are probably best addressed at the national level. Cooperation between primary care physicians and health plan managers, which has been an essential component of the program's success thus far, can also play an important role in addressing the problems identified.

  20. Quality of Health Care in the United States: Implications for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Brendan M.; Palmer, Lena; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine’s publications To Error is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in U.S. health care quality. Emerging studies continue to reveal deficits in the quality of adult and pediatric care, including subspecialty care. In recent years, key stakeholders in the health care system including providers, purchasers, and the public have been applying various quality improvement methods to address these concerns. Lessons learned from these efforts ...

  1. Challenges in validating quality of care data in a schizophrenia registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte Gjørup; Gradus, Jaimie L; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Mainz, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Improvement of quality of care for psychiatric patients is a key objective of health care systems worldwide. Consequently, there is an increasing interest in documenting quality of care; however, little is known about the validity of the available data on psychiatric care....

  2. Electronic Medical Records and Diabetes Quality of Care: Results From a Sample of Family Medicine Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Crosson, Jesse C.; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A.; Hahn, Karissa A.; Dicicco-Bloom, Barbara; Shaw, Eric; Orzano, A. John; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Care of patients with diabetes requires management of complex clinical information, which may be improved by the use of an electronic medical record (EMR); however, the actual relationship between EMR usage and diabetes care quality in primary care settings is not well understood. We assessed the relationship between EMR usage and diabetes care quality in a sample of family medicine practices.

  3. Providers, Children, and Families Experience the Impact of High Quality Care Giving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsalia, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC), a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting quality child care, believes that family child care accreditation is the true measure of high-quality family based care. In this article, the author presents the steps made by the NAFCC to accreditation. NAFCC Accreditation is a formal system…

  4. Care and Quality of Life in the Dying Phase: The contribution of the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Veerbeek, Laetitia

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis concerns the professional care and the quality of life for dying patients and their relatives in the hospital, the nursing home and the primary care setting. The effect of introducing the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP) on the content of care and the quality of life of the dying patient was studied. The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP) provides care goals to ensure that dying patients and their family receive the best possible comfo...

  5. The short-term effects of an integrated care model for the frail elderly on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care

    OpenAIRE

    Looman, Wilhelmina Mijntje; Fabbricotti, Isabelle Natalina; Huijsman, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores the short-term value of integrated care for the frail elderly by evaluating the effects of the Walcheren Integrated Care Model on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care after three months.Intervention: Frailty was preventively detected in elderly living at home with the Groningen Frailty Indicator. Geriatric nurse practitioners and secondary care geriatric nursing specialists were assigned as case managers and co-ordinated the care agr...

  6. The short-term effects of an integrated care model for the frail elderly on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care

    OpenAIRE

    Looman, Wilhelmina Mijntje; Fabbricotti, Isabelle Natalina; Huijsman, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study explores the short-term value of integrated care for the frail elderly by evaluating the effects of the Walcheren Integrated Care Model on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care after three months. Intervention Frailty was preventively detected in elderly living at home with the Groningen Frailty Indicator. Geriatric nurse practitioners and secondary care geriatric nursing specialists were assigned as case managers and co-ordinated the care agre...

  7. Collaborative quality improvement in the cardiac intensive care unit: development of the Paediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaies, Michael; Cooper, David S; Tabbutt, Sarah; Schwartz, Steven M; Ghanayem, Nancy; Chanani, Nikhil K; Costello, John M; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Laussen, Peter C; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Donohue, Janet E; Willis, Gina M; Gaynor, J William; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Ohye, Richard G; Charpie, John R; Pasquali, Sara K; Scheurer, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Despite many advances in recent years for patients with critical paediatric and congenital cardiac disease, significant variation in outcomes remains across hospitals. Collaborative quality improvement has enhanced the quality and value of health care across specialties, partly by determining the reasons for variation and targeting strategies to reduce it. Developing an infrastructure for collaborative quality improvement in paediatric cardiac critical care holds promise for developing benchmarks of quality, to reduce preventable mortality and morbidity, optimise the long-term health of patients with critical congenital cardiovascular disease, and reduce unnecessary resource utilisation in the cardiac intensive care unit environment. The Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium (PC4) has been modelled after successful collaborative quality improvement initiatives, and is positioned to provide the data platform necessary to realise these objectives. We describe the development of PC4 including the philosophical, organisational, and infrastructural components that will facilitate collaborative quality improvement in paediatric cardiac critical care. PMID:25167212

  8. Patent Ductus Arteriosus: Perinatal Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nizarali, Z; Marques, T; Costa, C; Barroso, R.; Cunha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) is the most common heart disease among the newborn population. Besides prematurity, other factors are believed to play a significant role in this condition. Aims: Identification of perinatal risk factors associated with PDA in premature or Very Low Birth Weight Infants (VLBW). Material and methods: Transversal study including all infants admitted to a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, from January 2005 to December 2009 and includ...

  9. [Quality concept in health care. Methodology for its measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera Guitart, J

    2003-12-01

    It is increasingly necessary that the neurologists achieve basic knowledgement in clinical management and medical care quality. We will review the concepts of medical care quality (MCQ). Of the definitions checked, we want to emphasize the following aspects. a) application of current scientific knowledge; b) interpersonal relationship; c) environment where the assistance is dispensed; d) results in health; e) cost of assistance; f) risks for the patient and g) patient satisfaction. For the analysis of the MCQ we could distinguish several components: scientific-technical component, efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, accessibility, continuity, equity, appropriateness, and satisfaction of the patient and of the professional. One of the main objectives to measure the MCQ is to improve the assistance itself. For its measurement we can employ diverse methods depending on our objective: to improve the process, to do Benchmarking, to know the satisfaction of the patients or to guarantee the quality of the medical attention. The most used tools for this measurement are: establishment of criteria-indicator-standard for quality, elaboration of satisfaction questionnaires, interviews to key informant, analysis of complaints and claims of patients and professionals, and clinical audits. The role of the neurologist in the achievement of a high quality neurological attention if fundamental. Therefore, it is necessary some specific formation on: scientific and technical matter, communicative abilities, teamworking, management and organisation of tasks and pharmaco-economic evaluation, and a cultural change that involves every professional on the co-responsibility of the continuous improvement of the processes and of the results of his work, advancing gradually towards the excellence of medical assistance. PMID:15206329

  10. Quality of diabetes care in Dutch care groups: no differences between diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone R de Bruin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between presence and nature of co-morbidity and quality of care for diabetes patients enrolled in diabetes disease management programmes provided by care groups.Methods: We performed an observational study within eight Dutch diabetes care groups. Data from patient record systems of care groups and patient questionnaires were used to determine quality of care. Quality of care was measured as provision of the recommended diabetes care, patients’ achievement of recommended clinical outcomes and patients’ perception of coordination and integration of care.Results: 527 diabetes patients without and 1187 diabetes patients with co-morbidity were included. Of the co-morbid patients, 7.8% had concordant co-morbid conditions only, 63.8% had discordant co-morbid diseases only and 28.4% had both types of conditions. Hardly any differences were observed between patients with and without co-morbidity in terms of provided care, achievement of clinical outcomes and perceived coordination and integration of care.Conclusions: Our study implies that care groups are able to provide similar quality of diabetes care for diabetes patients with and without co-morbidity. Considering the expected developments regarding additional disease management programmes in care groups, it is of importance to monitor quality of care, including patient experiences, for all chronic diseases. It will then become clear whether accountable provider-led organisations such as care groups are able to ensure quality of care for the increasing number of patients with multiple chronic conditions.

  11. [Nurses deliver quality care in the community nurses deliver quality care in the community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chu; Lin, Chouh-Jiaun

    2009-08-01

    In Taiwan, responsibility for administering healthcare services is being gradually moved out of hospitals and into the community. As such, nurses are increasingly required to address new problems and meet the specific healthcare needs of important subgroups such as Taiwan's growing elderly population and young adult immigrants. Because policies have lagged behind such developments, nurses are expected to provide leadership in addressing these new challenges. Their status within the medical system, however, continues to reflect earlier, more 'traditional' stereotypes and gives inadequate credit for current responsibilities, which include providing long term healthcare and public health nursing, in addition to homecare responsibilities. In the face of these challenges, Taiwan community nurses have continued to develop new ways to provide care and demonstrated innovation, commitment and flexibility in their roles. If nurses are to continue to take a leading role in developing community healthcare services, they require professional recognition as well as appropriate policy support from regulatory and local government authorities. PMID:19634095

  12. [The "Zurich Quality Model of Nursing Care", based on the "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM): a new perspective in measuring quality in nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Büchi, Silvia; Rettke, Horst; Horvath, Eva; Marfurt-Russenberger, Katrin; Schwendimann, René

    2008-10-01

    Ensuring and maintaining a high level of quality in nursing care becomes more and more important as economic pressure is increasing and personnel is being reduced. The nursing executives of four large Swiss hospitals therefore commissioned a group of nursing scientists and nursing experts with the task of developing a trendsetting model to represent, assess, and interpret the quality of nursing care. The "Quality of Health Outcome Model" (QHOM) served as a basis for development. More than 60 nurses from acute care hospitals and specialized clinics assessed a first draft of the model in hearings and by means of questionnaires. The model integrated earlier attempts at quality screening regarding structures, processes and results, complementing these three elements with a fourth: the patients, whose characteristics influence the results of nursing care remarkably. Thus, the former one-dimensional, linear viewpoint was resolved into a dynamic representation of all four elements, illustrating a specific concept of nursing care. Through the multi-dimensionality of the model the complexity of the nursing process is better represented. The model's core consists of eight exemplary indicators of quality, each of which is relevant to nursing and for each of which criteria and assessment tools have been formulated. The model is seen as a basis and reference for the quality development and first opportunities for clinical application have been succesfully employed. The project can serve as a paradigm of networking amongst hospitals and cooperation between nursing scientists and experts, and of the critical significance of such collaboration to the advancement of nursing quality. PMID:18850535

  13. Mortes perinatais e avaliação da assistência ao parto em maternidades do Sistema Único de Saúde em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil, 1999 Perinatal deaths and childbirth healthcare evaluation in maternity hospitals of the Brazilian Unified Health System in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Lansky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho analisa a associação entre a morte perinatal e o processo de assistência hospitalar ao parto, considerando-se que grande parte das mortes perinatais pode ser prevenível pela atenção qualificada de saúde e que a avaliação da qualidade da assistência perinatal ao parto é necessária para a redução da morbi-mortalidade perinatal. Realizou-se estudo caso-controle de base populacional dos óbitos perinatais (n = 118 e nascimentos (n = 492, ocorridos em maternidades do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Sexo masculino, prematuridade, doenças na gravidez, baixo peso ao nascer, doenças do recém-nascido, não realização de pré-natal, não utilização de partograma e menos de uma avaliação fetal por hora durante o trabalho de parto apresentaram associação estatisticamente significativa com o óbito perinatal. No modelo de regressão logística múltipla, não utilização do partograma durante o trabalho de parto e tipo de maternidade apresentaram-se como fatores de risco independentes para a morte perinatal. O estudo indica que é deficiente a qualidade da assistência hospitalar ao parto e que aspectos da estrutura dos serviços e do processo de assistência relacionam-se com a mortalidade perinatal por causas evitáveis.This paper analyzes the association between perinatal mortality and factors related to hospital care during labor, considering that healthcare assessment is needed in order to reduce perinatal mortality. A population-based case-control study was conducted with 118 perinatal deaths (cases and 492 births (controls that took place in maternity hospitals of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Male sex, prematurity, diseases during pregnancy, low birth weight, newborn diseases, lack of prenatal care, lack of partograph use during labor, and less than one fetus assessment per hour during labor were significantly associated with perinatal deaths. In the multiple regression analysis, lack of partograph use during labor and type of hospital were associated with perinatal deaths. These results indicate inadequate quality of care in maternity hospitals and show that health services structure and health care process are related to perinatal mortality due to preventable causes.

  14. PERINATAL LEUKODYSTROPHY CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Mihut

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the authors want to present a case of a premature newborn who presented an extremely rare disease for medical practice. Low prevalence of the perinatal leukodystrophy, the difficulty of the clinical diagnosis and the echography resemblance with other diseases of the periventricular white matter is the subjects of this presentation.

  15. Caregivers in older peoples' care: perception of quality of care, working conditions, competence and personal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    From, Ingrid; Nordström, Gun; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Johansson, Inger

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to describe and compare nursing assistants', enrolled nurses' and registered nurses' perceptions of quality of care, working conditions, competence and personal health in older peoples' care. Altogether 70 nursing assistants, 163 enrolled nurses and 198 registered nurses completed a questionnaire comprising Quality from the Patient's Perspective modified for caregivers, Creative Climate Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, items on education and competence and Health Index. The caregivers reported higher perceived reality of quality of care in medical-technical competence and physical-technical conditions than in identity-oriented approach and socio-cultural atmosphere. In subjective importance, the highest rating was assessed in one of the physical-technical items. The organisational climate was for three of the dimensions rather close/reached the value for a creative climate, for seven dimensions close to a stagnant climate. In perceived stress of conscience, there were low values. Nursing assistants had lower values than enrolled nurses and registered nurses. The caregivers reported highest values regarding previous education making them feel safe at work and lowest value on the item about education increasing the ability for a scientific attitude. Registered nurses could use knowledge in practice and to a higher degree than nursing assistants/enrolled nurses reported a need to gain knowledge, but the latter more often received education during working hours. The health index among caregivers was high, but registered nurses scored lower on emotional well-being than nursing assistants/enrolled nurses. The caregivers' different perceptions of quality of care and work climate need further attention. Although stress of conscience was low, it is important to acknowledge what affected the caregivers work in a negative way. Attention should be paid to the greater need for competence development among registered nurses during working hours. PMID:23088213

  16. Improving the quality of emergency medicine care by developing a quality requirement framework: a study from The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Ikkersheim, David E; van de Pas, Harm

    2012-01-01

    Background In The Netherlands, mainly inexperienced physicians work in the ED on all shifts, including the evening and night shifts, when no direct supervision is available. In 2004 a report of the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate revealed that quality of care at Emergency Departments (EDs) was highly variable. Based on this report and international studies showing significant potential for quality improvement, stakeholders felt the need to improve the quality of EM care. Based on the literatur...

  17. Improving Quality of Care in Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, Steffen Jais; Møller, Morten H; Larsson, Heidi; Johnsen, Søren P; Madsen, Anders H; Bendix, Jørgen; Adamsen, Sven; Jensen, Anders G; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik; Nielsen, Ann-Sophie; Kallehave, Finn; Oxholm, Dorthe; Skarbye, Mona; Jølving, Line R; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.; Thomsen, RW; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:The treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) is complex, and mortality remains high. We present results from a nationwide initiative to monitor and improve the quality of care (QOC) in PUB.METHODS:All Danish hospitals treating PUB patients between 2004 and 2011 prospectively registered......, of which one-quarter were in-hospital bleeders. Preadmission use of anticoagulants, multiple coexisting diseases, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists scores increased between 2004 and 2011. Considerable improvements were observed for most QOC indicators over time. Endoscopic treatment was...... disease.Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 4 June 2013; doi:10.1038/ajg.2013.162....

  18. Quality of Dental Care and Social Disparities in Health

    OpenAIRE

    Mabriez JC; Chanut C; Herter G; Minguet-Fabbri J; Orgebin JY; Borgès Da Silva Ge

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To compare the quality of oro-dental preparation before prosthesis in patients affiliated with the general health care fund ( régime général ) and those covered by the universal health coverage program (CMU) including complementary insurance (CMUC). Method: The study sample was comprised by requests for prior approval collected between February 15, 2001 and May 18, 2001 in eight administrative regions participating in the study. Accordingly, 3 116 patients covered by the CMUC and 3 310...

  19. Quality of health care in the United States: implications for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Brendan M; Palmer, Lena; Kappelman, Michael D

    2009-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine's publications To Error is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in US health care quality. Emerging studies continue to reveal deficits in the quality of adult and pediatric care, including subspecialty care. In recent years, key stakeholders in the health care system including providers, purchasers, and the public have been applying various quality improvement methods to address these concerns. Lessons learned from these efforts in other pediatric conditions, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, neonatal intensive care, and liver transplantation may be applicable to the care of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).This review is intended to be a primer on the quality of care movement in the United States, with a focus on pediatric IBD. In this article, we review the history, rationale, and methods of quality measurement and improvement, and we discuss the unique challenges in adapting these general strategies to pediatric IBD care. PMID:19633570

  20. cura, care, C A R E, Care: Dimensions and Qualities of Care (re)forming an Ecology of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coxon, Ian Robert; Bremner, Craig; Jensen, Jesper; LaCava, Laura

    it serves to inform is to begin a process of concretizing the otherwise lost but vitally important concept we call Care. In writing this paper we will attempt to adopt a 'position' through an extensive but not complete review of existing and past thinking in order to "find a line and then to hang a...... abstraction of the acknowledged complexity of such a holistic notion such as Care. Its role is to simplify Care, as we formulate it, to a point where its complexity can begin to be understood in ways that might be practically useful. After all, Care derives much of its meaning through the actions taken in its...

  1. Pediatric recertification and quality of care: the role of the American Board of Pediatrics in improving children's health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Paul V

    2007-11-01

    American health care is in the middle of a second revolution in quality as profound as the Flexner revolution occurring almost 100 years ago. Although systems issues are the basis for most of the concern, physician quality and professional development are also pertinent. Specialty board certification and maintenance of certification are key drivers of professional development and improvement of care. PMID:17950317

  2. Intensive-care unit lungs - possibilities to improve the quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray lung diagnosis in an intensive-care unit makes special demands on technique, imaging and on the physician's experience. The quality of image interpretation and evaluation is considerably improved by superimposing the technical data on the X-ray image and by using an antiscatter grid cassette. Proper evaluation of the parameters important for diagnosis is improved by registration of the data on the X-ray film; taking a maximum possible score of 100 as reference value, quality of evaluation is improved from 66.5 points to 71.8 points by data registration on the film itself, whereas the simultaneous use of an antiscatter grid cassette improves the score still further, namely, to 84.3 points. The importance of the clinical condition of the patient, and of the type of breathing chosen, for assessing the chest X-ray, is emphasized. (orig.)

  3. Carefree in child care ?: child wellbeing, caregiving quality, and intervention programs in center-based child care

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Claudia Denise

    2014-01-01

    The use of center child care in Western countries has increased over the last three decades and is nowadays the most frequently used type of non-parental care for children aged zero to four (OECD, 2013). The aim of the current dissertation is to shed more light on indicators of child care quality in center child care and to answer the question whether narrow-focused caregiver interventions are effective in improving child care quality. The reported meta-analysis shows that narrow-focus interv...

  4. Quality Registers in Professional Health Care Educations; Knowledge Gaps and Proposed Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordin Annika M. M.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The use of quality registers has increased rapidly in Sweden and they are identified as beneficial for health care competitiveness. A quality register is a structured gathering of patient information, to improve health care. However, the introduction of quality registers in health care organisations presupposes that employees know how to use them in quality improvement. Disconnections, or knowledge gaps, concerning quality registers hamper the possibilities to take advantage of them. Taking departure in professional health care educations, the purpose with the paper is to identify and explore knowledge gaps concerning quality registers. A second purpose is to propose actions to bridge the gaps.

  5. Eclampsia: Repercusión materna y perinatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Rivas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la incidencia de eclampsia y su repercusión materna y perinatal en el Departamento de Obstetricia y Ginecología. Departamento Clínico Integral de la Costa. Universidad de Carabobo. Hospital “Dr. Adolfo Prince Lara” Puerto Cabello. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo, longitudinal y analítico de 40 casos con diagnóstico de eclampsia en 31 532 nacimientos en un período de 10 años: 1998 - 2007. Resultados: La incidencia fue de 0,13 %, 1 caso por cada 788 nacimientos. Predominó el grupo etario de 10 - 19 años (52,5 %, concubinas 60 %, grado de instrucción primaria (60 %. Prevaleció el antecedente familiar de hipertensión en la madre (25 %, el antecedente personal de preeclampsia en embarazo anterior (12,5 %. Los principales signos y síntomas fueron: hiperreflexia (65 %, cefalea (50 %, escotomas y amaurosis (20 %. La primera convulsión se presentó ante-parto (75 %. Sin control de embarazo (55.%. Destacaron las I gestas (72,5 %, edad de embarazo 37-41 semanas (50 %, tipo de parto: cesárea (85.%. En los resultados perinatales prevaleció: neonatos deprimidos (52,5 %, peso neonatal entre 2.500-3.499 g (50 %, con morbilidad de 30,55 %, la mayoría debido a síndrome de dificultad respiratoria. La mortalidad fetal fue de 9,09 % y la mortalidad neonatal 9,09 %. Morbilidad materna fue de 53,84 %, asociada: síndrome Hellp (23,07 %, insuficiencia renal aguda (7,69 %, desprendimiento prematuro de placenta (7,69 %; hubo una muerte materna (2,5 %. Conclusión: Es importante que todas las mujeres embarazadas reciban atención médica continua y oportuna, lo cual permite el diagnóstico y tratamiento temprano de afecciones como la pre-eclampsia y eclampsia, esta última es una de las mayores emergencias obstétricas; esta revisión revela una vez más que contribuye decididamente a la morbi-mortalidad materna y perinatal. Implica una asistencia precoz e intensiva para disminuir sus repercusiones.Objective: To determine the incidence of eclampsia and maternal and perinatal impact en el Departamento de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, Hospital “Dr. Adolfo Prince Lara”, Departamento Clínico Integral de la Costa, Universidad de Carabobo. Puerto Cabello. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective, longitudinal and analytical diagnosis of 40 cases in 31 532 births eclampsia over a period of 10 years from 1998 to 2007. Results: The incidence was 0.13 %, 1 case per 788 births. The predominant age group of 10 - 19 years (52.5 %, concubines 60 %, primary education level (60 %. The prevailing family history of hypertension in the mother (25 %, personal history of preeclampsia in previous pregnancy (12.5 %. The main signs and symptoms were hyperreflexia (65 %, headache (50 %, scotoma and amaurosis (20 %. The first seizure came before delivery (75 %. Without birth control (55 %. First gravity (72.5 %, gestational age 37-41 weeks (50 %, type of delivery: cesarean section (85 %. Prevailed in perinatal outcomes: depressed neonates (52.5 %, birth weight between 2 500-3 499 g (50 %, with morbidity of 30.55 %, mostly due to respiratory distress syndrome. Fetal mortality was 9.09 % and 9.09 % neonatal mortality. Maternal morbidity was 53.84 %, associated: HELLP syndrome (23.07 %, acute renal failure (7.69 %, abruption (7.69 % there was one maternal death (2.5 % . Conclusion: It is important that all pregnant women receive ongoing and timely medical care, allowing early diagnosis and treatment of conditions such as pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, the latter is a major obstetric emergencies, this review reveals once again that contributes decisively to the morbidity and maternal and perinatal mortality. It involves an early and intensive support to reduce their impact.

  6. Comparative analysis of quality assurance in health care delivery and higher medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Busari, Jamiu O.

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in higher medical education involves the development, sustenance, improvement, and evaluation of the standard of training of medical professionals. In health care delivery, QA focuses on guaranteeing and maintaining a high standard of the service provided in different health care systems. When the service delivered by the care provider is in accordance with what the recipients of health care expect, then quality in health care is considered to be present. There are seve...

  7. The short-term effects of an integrated care model for the frail elderly on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care

    OpenAIRE

    Looman, Willemijn; Fabbricotti, Isabelle; Huijsman, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Purpose: This study explores the short-term value of integrated care for the frail elderly by evaluating the effects of the Walcheren Integrated Care Model on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care after three months. Intervention: Frailty was preventively detected in elderly living at home with the Groningen Frailty Indicator. Geriatric nurse practitioners and secondary care geriatric nursing specialists were assigned as case managers...

  8. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Michael E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC practices. Methods This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30 were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Results Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Conclusions Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were willing to participate in and consent to, the collection and linkage of information from multiple sources that would be required for such assessments.

  9. Provider communication on perinatal depression: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Sherry L; Ko, Jean Y; Burley, Kim; Gupta, Seema

    2016-02-01

    Women's lack of knowledge on symptoms of perinatal depression and treatment resources is a barrier to receiving care. We sought to estimate the prevalence and predictors of discussing depression with a prenatal care provider. We used the 2011 population-based data from 24 sites participating in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 32,827 women with recent live births) to examine associations between maternal characteristics and report that a prenatal care provider discussed with her what to do if feeling depressed during or after pregnancy. Overall, 71.9 % of women reported discussing perinatal depression with their prenatal care provider (range 60.7 % in New York City to 85.6 % in Maine). Women were more likely to report a discussion on perinatal depression with their provider if they they were 18-29years of age than over 35 years of age compared to older (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 18 to 19 y = 1.08, 20 to 24 y = 1.10, 25 to 29 y = 1.09), unmarried (aPR = 1.07) compared to married, had 12 years, and had no previous live births (aPR = 1.03) compared to ≥1 live births. Research is needed on effective ways to educate women about perinatal depression and whether increased knowledge on perinatal depression results in higher rates of treatment and shorter duration of symptoms. PMID:25578631

  10. Human Care Theory and Influences on the Life Quality Index of Cancer Patients in Household Life

    OpenAIRE

    Yali Sun; Ling Gao; Ying Dong; Ling Gong

    2013-01-01

    To investigatetheinfluences of the application of human care theory on the life quality and happiness of cancer patients after they receiveda community nursing care which was implemented by the human care theory. The quality life and the happiness index of 93 patients with cancer living in the six communities in Jillin were assessed, the assessment of the life quality was based on a life quality scale (SF-36) and that of the happiness index was based on Memorial Univers...

  11. Impact of a continuous education program on the quality of assistance offered by intensive care physiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Walkyria Araújo Macedo; Rossetti, Heloisa Baccaro; Araújo, Abigail; Spósito Júnior, José Jonas; Salomão, Hellen; Mattos, Simone Siqueira; Rabelo, Melina Vieira; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of quality indicators and adverse events registering in the quality assessment of intensive care physiotherapy and to evaluate the impact of implementing protocolized care and professional training in the quality improvement process. Methods A prospective before-after study was designed to assess 15 indicators of the quality of care. Baseline compliance and adverse events were collected before and after the implementation of treatment protocols and staff trainin...

  12. Lessons learned in the development of process quality indicators for cancer care in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higashi Takahiro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Japan, attention has increasingly focused on ensuring the quality of care, particularly in the area of cancer care. The 2006 Basic Cancer Control Act reinforced efforts to ensure the quality of cancer care in a number of sectors, including the role of government in ensuring quality. We initiated a government-funded research project to develop quality indicators to measure the quality of care for five major cancers (breast, lung, stomach, colorectal, and liver cancer in Japan, and palliative care for cancers in general. While we successfully developed a total of 206 quality indicators, a number of issues have been raised regarding the concepts and methodologies used to measure quality. Examples include the choice between measuring the process of care versus the outcome of care; the degree to which the process-outcome link should be confirmed in real-world measurement; handling of exceptional cases; interpretation of measurement results between quality of care versus quality of documentation; creation of summary scores; and the optimal number of quality indicators for measurement considering the trade-off between the measurement validity versus resource limitations. These and other issues must be carefully considered when attempting to measure quality of care, and although many appear to have no correct answer, continuation of the project requires that a decision nevertheless be made. Future activities in this project, which is still ongoing, should focus on the further exploration of these problems.

  13. Quality of Type II Diabetes Care in Primary Health Care Centers in Kuwait: Employment of a Diabetes Quality Indicator Set (DQIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Badawi, Dalia; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil; Mourad, Yara; Behbehani, Kazem

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the major public health challenges, affecting more than 347 million adults worldwide. The impact of diabetes necessitates assessing the quality of care received by people with diabetes, especially in countries with a significant diabetes burden such as Kuwait. This paper aimed at piloting an approach for measuring Type II diabetes care performance through the use of a diabetes quality indicator set (DQIS) in primary health care. The DQIS for Kuwait was adapted from...

  14. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  15. Patients' experiences with continuum of care across hospitals. A multilevel analysis of Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Berendsen, Annette J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Communication between professionals is essential because it contributes to an optimal continuum of care. Whether patients experience adequate continuum of care is uncertain. To address this, a questionnaire was developed to elucidate this care process from a patients' perspective. In this study, the instrument's ability to measure differences in "Consumer Quality Index Continuum of Care" scores between hospitals was investigated. Methods: The questionnaire was mailed to a random sa...

  16. Primary Health Care Consumers’ Perception of Quality of Care and Its Determinants in North-Central Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwole Adeyemi Babatunde; Emmanuel Aiyenigba; Olugbenga Ademola Awoyemi; Tanimola Makanjuola Akande; Omotosho Ibrahim Musa; Adekunle Ganiyu Salaudeen; Olubukola Oluwakemi Babatunde; Oladele Ademola Atoyebi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The importance of incorporating the perspective of the patient when evaluating and designing health care programs is now widely recognized. The objective of this study was to assess consumers’ perception of quality of care and its determinants among Primary Health Care Consumers in Ilorin, Nigeria.Methodology: It was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out among consumers of Primary Health Care in Ilorin South Local Government Area of Kwara State. Sample size of 250 was de...

  17. Quality of Life and Quality of Care for patients with Gout

    OpenAIRE

    SINGH, JASVINDER A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic gouty arthritis lead to significant pain, activity limitation and disability and impact patient’s health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Many effective therapies are available for treatment of gouty arthritis, yet medication errors in treatment of gout are common. One of the main goals of therapy is to lower serum uric acid, which in turn leads to a reduction in frequency of gout flares. Evidence suggests that the quality of care provided to patients with gout may impact th...

  18. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part I: Five Pioneers in Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Five pioneers had a huge impact on the quality movement in health care in the United States. Ernest Codman contributed in many ways, including his focus on outcome analysis. Avidis Donabedian is known for his focus on the 3 domains of structure, process, and outcome in health care. Walter Shewhart is known especially for the control chart and early work on what W. Edwards Deming made into the PDSA cycle. Deming is also known for other contributions, including his 14 points of management, correcting system problems rather than blaming the workers, and his System of Profound Knowledge. Juran is known for the Pareto principle and his emphasis on customer satisfaction and addressing the human, not just statistical side, of quality improvement. PMID:26147460

  19. Perceptions of Local Health Care Quality in 7 Rural Communities with Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Thomas S.; Marcin, James P.; Daschbach, Martha M.; Cole, Stacey L.

    2005-01-01

    Rural health services are difficult to maintain because of low patient volumes, limited numbers of providers, and unfavorable economies of scale. Rural patients may perceive poor quality in local health care, directly impacting the sustainability of local health care services. This study examines perceptions of local health care quality in 7…

  20. Improving the Quality of Nursing Home Care and Medical-Record Accuracy with Direct Observational Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, John F.; Osterweil, Dan; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2005-01-01

    Nursing home medical-record documentation of daily-care occurrence may be inaccurate, and information is not documented about important quality-of-life domains. The inadequacy of medical record data creates a barrier to improving care quality, because it supports an illusion of care consistent with regulations, which reduces the motivation and…

  1. Complicaciones maternas y mortalidad perinatal en el Síndrome de Hellp: Registro multicéntrtico en unidades de cuidados intensivos del área Buenos Aires Maternal morbidity and perinatal mortality in HELLP syndrome. Multicentric studies in intensive care units in Buenos Aires area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Malvino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron en forma retrospectiva las características clínicas, complicaciones, gravedad, y sobrevivencia materna y fetal, en un grupo de gestantes con síndrome HELLP ( Hemolysis , Elevated Liver enzyme levels, Low Platelet count que requirieron admisión en cuatro unidades de cuidados intensivos del área metropolitana Buenos Aires, Argentina. Durante el período comprendido entre marzo de 1997 y marzo de 2003 se evaluaron 62 pacientes en la segunda mitad del embarazo o el puerperio inmediato que cumplían criterios diagnósticos de hipertensión inducida por el embarazo, asociado a plaquetopenia 70 UI/l, láctico deshidrogenasa >600 UI/l, bilirrubina total >1.2 mg / dl , y/o frotis de sangre periférica con signos de hemólisis. La edad promedio fue 28 ± 8 años; número de gestas promedio 2.7 ± 2.3; edad gestacional media 33 ± 4 semanas. Según el grado de plaquetopenia, 23 casos pertenecieron a la clase 1, 29 a la clase 2 y el resto a la clase 3 de la clasificación de Martin . Hubo 16 formas eclámpticas. El recuento plaquetario promedio fue 67 604 ± 31 535/ mm3 ; TGO 271 ± 297 UI/l; TGP 209 ± 178 UI/l; LDH 1 444 ± 1 295 UI/l; creatininemia 1.1 ± 0.8 mg / dl. Cuarenta y una pacientes cursaron con diverso grado de deterioro del filtrado glomerular, con requerimiento de tratamiento hemodialítico y plasmaféresis en un caso. Se presentó insuficiencia respiratoria vinculada a síndrome de distrés respiratorio del adulto en cuatro enfermas. Todas las puérperas sobrevivieron y se comprobaron cuatro muertes perinatales. En la población estudiada, se observó baja prevalencia de complicaciones graves, óptima sobrevivencia materna y baja mortalidad perinatal.We analized the clinical characteristics, complications, severity, and maternal and fetal survival of patients suffering from HELLP syndrome ( Hemolysis , Elevated Liver enzymes level, Low Platelet count requiring admission to the intensive care unit in four hospitals from Buenos Aires area, Argentina. Data was revised in the charts from March 1997 to March 2003 and 62 patients were included in the study. During the second half of pregnancy or immediate puerperal period, diagnostic criteria were defined on the basis of preeclampsia and the following laboratory abnormalities: platelet count nadir 70 UI/l, and serum lactic dehydrogenase >600 UI/l, total bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and/or periferical blood smear with hemolysis. The mean maternal age was 28 ± 8 years; parity 2.7 ± 2.3; gestational age 33 ± 4 weeks. According to platelet count, 23 cases were identified to class 1, 29 to class 2 and the rest to Martin's class 3. There were 16 eclamptic patients. The platelet count was 67 604 ± 31 535/mm3; alanine aminotransferase 271 ± 297 UI/l; aspartate aminotransferase 209 ± 178 UI/l; serum lactic dehydrogenase 1 444 ± 1 295 UI/l; serum creatininine levels 1.1 ± 0.8 mg/dl. Forty-one patients had diverse degree of renal function damage, renal dialysis and plasmapheresis was required in one female. Respiratory failure due to pulmonary edema was observed in four patients. All obstetric patients survived. There were four perinatal deaths. In our population sample, low rate of life-threatening maternal complications and low perinatal mortality were observed.

  2. Duration of incarceration and perinatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, L; Hines, S; Shibley, K A; Landon, M B

    1991-10-01

    The number of incarcerated women is increasing, thus pregnancy in prison is no longer uncommon. We reviewed the perinatal outcome of 53 women with short-term incarceration (fewer than 90 days) and of 53 women who experienced long-term incarceration (more than 120 days). Poor prenatal care, history of drug abuse, hepatitis, and poor nutrition were more common among the short-incarceration group. Of infants born to short-incarceration women, 32 (60%) were normal, four (7%) stillborn, eight (15%) premature, six (11%) small for gestational age, and four (7%) septic. Women in the long-incarceration group delivered 48 normal infants (91%), whereas two were offspring of diabetic mothers and three were premature. Birth weight for infants born to smokers in the short-incarceration group was significantly lower than that of infants born to smokers in the long-incarceration group. Women who suffer short incarcerations experience high perinatal mortality and morbidity. In contrast, those incarcerated longer appear to benefit from better prenatal care, improved nutrition, and a structured environment, and thus a more favorable perinatal outcome. PMID:1923168

  3. Measuring quality of diabetes care by linking health care system administrative databases with laboratory data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klomp Helena

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic complications of diabetes can be reduced through optimal glycemic and lipid control as evaluated through measurement of glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. We aimed to produce measures of quality of diabetes care in Saskatchewan and to identify sub-groups at particular risk of developing complications. Findings Prevalent adult cases of diabetes in 2005/06 were identified from administrative databases and linked with A1C and LDL-C tests measured in centralized laboratories. A1C results were performed in 33,927 of 50,713 (66.9% diabetes cases identified in Saskatchewan, and LDL-C results were performed in 12,031 of 24,207 (49.7% cases identified within the province's two largest health regions. The target A1C of Conclusions Linkage of laboratory with administrative data is an effective method of assessing quality of diabetes care on a population basis and to identify sub-groups requiring particular attention. We found that less than 50% of Saskatchewan people with diabetes achieved optimal glycemic and lipid control. Disparities were most evident among First Nations people and young women. The indicators described can be used to provide standardized information that would support quality improvement initiatives.

  4. Improving the quality of eye care with tele-ophthalmology: shared-care glaucoma screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mul, Marleen; de Bont, Antoinette A; Reus, Nicolaas J; Lemij, Hans G; Berg, Marc

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a shared-care tele-ophthalmology service initiated by the Rotterdam Eye Hospital and 10 optometrists working in retail optician stores. The optometrists screened their clients with a nerve fibre analyser and the resulting images were then further assessed by trained technicians at the hospital. We analysed data from 1729 patients and measured several indicators of the quality of the work as well as its efficiency and effectiveness. The quality of the images was at least satisfactory in most cases (89%), and the agreement between the optometrists and the hospital about normal or suspect test results was high (81%). Only 27% of the patients were called for additional testing at the hospital department and 11% consulted an ophthalmologist. Eighty new cases of glaucoma were detected. The combination of task redesign and telemedicine accounted for the success of the screening service. Task redesign was needed to transfer screening from the hospital to primary care in a safe and responsible way. Telemedicine was crucial for assuring quality, facilitating information exchange and for coordination. PMID:15603630

  5. Developing a Total Quality Management Model for Health Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Mosadegh Rad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total quality management (TQM is a managerial practice to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, flexibility, and competitiveness of a business as a whole. However, in practice, these TQM benefits are not easy to achieve. Despite its theoretical promise and the enthusiastic response to TQM, recent evidence suggests that attempts to implement it are often unsuccessful. Many of these TQM programmes have been cancelled, or are in the process of being cancelled, as a result of the negative impact on profits. Therefore, there is a pressing need for a clinical approach to establishing TQM. Method: The aim of this article is therefore: “To identify the strengths and weakness of TQM, the logical steps towards TQM, and to develop a model so that health care organizations aiming at using TQM to achieve excellence can follow through easily”. Based on the research questions proposed in this study, the research strategies of a literature review, a questionnaire survey, semi-structured interviews, and a participatory action research were adopted in this study. For determining the success and barriers of TQM in health care organizations, a questionnaire survey has done in 90 health acre organizations in Isfahan Province, which implement TQM. The results of this survey were used for introducing a new model of TQM. This model will be developed via a semi-structured interview with at minimum 10 health care and quality managers. Then, through a participatory action research, this model will be implemented in 3 sites. At this time, the questionnaire survey has done and the model is introduced. Therefore, developing the model and its implementation will be done later. Results: In this survey, the mean score of TQM success was 3.48±0.68 (medium from 5 credits. Implementation of TQM was very low, low, medium, high and very high successful respectively in 3.6, 10.9, 21.8, 56.4 and 7.3 percent of health care organizations. TQM had the most effect on process management and focus on employees and the less effect on focus on material resources, customers, and suppliers. The mean score of TQM implementation problems was 3.01±0.83 (medium on a 5 scale. TQM Barriers in health care organizations were strategic problems, performance appraisal problems, human resource problems, structural problems, process problems respectively. Based on these results a Model with 10 enablers and 3 results’ indicators is introduced. Enablers are factors that enable organization to reach excellent and results are the out comes of organization, which can be achieved through implementation of enablers. This model will be developed through semi structure interviews and implemented in 3 health care organizations for determining the efficacy and efficiency ( this two phases has not done. Discussion: Total quality management is a good strategy for improving the productivity of organizations. However, if some important principles are not considered in TQM models before its implementation, the overall strategy of a TQM initiative may fail.

  6. Hospital competition, resource allocation and quality of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwanziger Jack

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of approaches have been used to contain escalating hospital costs. One approach is intensifying price competition. The increase in price based competition, which changes the incentives hospitals face, coupled with the fact that consumers can more easily evaluate the quality of hotel services compared with the quality of clinical care, may lead hospitals to allocate more resources into hotel rather than clinical services. Methods To test this hypothesis we studied hospitals in California in 1982 and 1989, comparing resource allocations prior to and following selective contracting, a period during which the focus of competition changed from quality to price. We estimated the relationship between clinical outcomes, measured as risk-adjusted-mortality rates, and resources. Results In 1989, higher competition was associated with lower clinical expenditures levels compared with 1982. The trend was stronger for non-profit hospitals. Lower clinical resource use was associated with worse risk adjusted mortality outcomes. Conclusions This study raises concerns that cost reductions may be associated with increased mortality.

  7. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Ammentorp, Jette

    2012-01-01

    offering professionals training in communicating with patients and colleagues. The outcome was measured by assessing patients' experience of quality of care. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and analysed using a linear regression model. Approval was obtained from the Danish Data Protection......Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:? Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided as...... insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:? To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:? The study was designed as an intervention study...

  8. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Ammentorp, Jette

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided as...... insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  9. Fighting violence against health workers: a way to improve quality of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignon, Maxime; Verheye, Jean-Charles; Manaouil, Cécile; Ammirati, Christine; Turban-Castel, Emmanuelle; Ganry, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Violence against health care workers impairs the quality of care. In one university medical center in France, 46% of the health care workers were physically assaulted at some point in the previous 12 months and 79% were verbally insulted. This article describes a participatory approach that was used to ensure health care workers take an active role in designing and implementing anti-violence measures. In each unit, a working group of health care professionals and managers developed an action plan for reducing violence-generating practices. This proactive approach is a powerful tool for motivating health care professionals to improve quality of care. PMID:24971816

  10. Quality of care in reproductive health programmes: monitoring and evaluation of quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwast, B E

    1998-12-01

    As 200 million women become pregnant every year, at least 30 million will develop life-threatening complications requiring emergency treatment at any level of society where they live. But it is a basic human right that pregnancy be made safe for all women as complications are mostly unpredictable. This requires reproductive health programmes which are responsive to women's and their families' needs and expectations on the one hand and enhancement of community participation, high quality obstetric services, and both provider collaboration and satisfaction on the other. Monitoring and evaluation of these facets need to be an integral part of any safe motherhood programme, not only to assess progress, but also to use this information for subsequent planning and implementation cycles of national programmes. Lessons learned from ten years' implementation of Safe Motherhood programmes indicate that process and outcome indicators are more feasible for short-term evaluation purposes than impact indicators, such as maternal mortality reduction. The former are described in this paper with relevant country examples. This is the third, and last, article in a series on quality of care in reproductive health programmes. The first (Kwast 1998a) contains an overview of concepts, assessments, barriers and improvements of quality of care. The second (Kwast 1998b) addresses education issues for quality improvement. PMID:10076314

  11. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Brazil evaluated by PCR and association with perinatal aspects Infecção congênita pelo citomegalovírus em unidade neonatal de alto risco de um hospital universitário no Brasil: prevalência avaliada pela PCR e associação com alguns aspectos perinatais

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Vítor V. SANTOS; Maria Margarida R. SOUZA; Sérgio Henrique L. GONÇALVES; Ana Cristina S. COTTA; MELO Lorenza A. O.; Gláucia M. Q. ANDRADE; BRASILEIRO-FILHO Geraldo

    2000-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common congenital infection, affecting 0.4% to 2.3% newborns. Most of them are asymptomatic at birth, but later 10% develop handicaps, mainly neurological disturbances. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CMV shed in urine of newborns from a neonatal intensive care unit using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and correlate positive cases to some perinatal aspects. Urine samples obtained at first week of life were processed according to a PC...

  12. Calidad de los datos utilizados para el cálculo de indicadores de salud reproductiva y perinatal en población autóctona e inmigrante Quality of data used to calculate reproductive and perinatal health indicators in native and migrant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Río

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Evaluar la calidad de los datos sobre nacimientos recogidos en el Movimiento Natural de la Población (MNP y en los registros de metabolopatías para el cálculo de indicadores de salud reproductiva y perinatal. Métodos: Comparación entre registros acerca de 1 número total de nacimientos de madre residente en Cataluña y Comunitat Valenciana registrados durante 2005-2006, 2 grado de cumplimentación de los datos sobre origen geográfico de la madre, y 3 grado de cumplimentación de la edad materna, peso al nacer y edad gestacional según el origen de la madre. Resultados: Los registros de metabolopatías recogen de forma exhaustiva los nacimientos registrados en el MNP. El grado de cumplimentación de los datos sobre el origen y la edad materna fue algo menor en los registros de metabolopatías, aunque la proporción de nacimientos según el origen de la madre fue muy similar a la del MNP, así como la media de edad materna según el origen. El grado de cumplimentación de los datos sobre peso al nacer y edad gestacional según el origen materno fue muy inferior en el MNP, especialmente entre los nacimientos de madre inmigrante registrados en Cataluña. Conclusiones: Nuestros resultados sugieren una limitación en la calidad de los datos sobre edad gestacional y peso al nacer del MNP, sobre todo de cara al cálculo y la comparación de indicadores de prematuridad y bajo peso al nacer en población autóctona e inmigrante. A la vez, apoyan la utilidad de los registros de metabolopatías como fuente para el cálculo diferencial de tales indicadores.Objective: To assess the quality of data on births in the Natural Population Movement (NPM and congenital metabolic disorders registers with regard to calculation of reproductive and perinatal health indicators. Methods: The following comparisons between registers were made: (1 the total number of births to mothers living in Catalonia and Valencia from 2005 to 2006, (2 the percentage of missing data on the mother's geographical origin, (3 the percentage of missing data on the mother's age and the infant's birthweight and gestational age according to maternal origin. Results: The congenital metabolic disorders registers exhaustively collected the total number of births gathered in the NPM. The percentages of missing data on material origin and age were higher in the congenital metabolic disorders registers, although the proportion of births by maternal origin and the mean maternal age in each ethnic group was fairly similar to that in the NPM. The percentages of missing data on birthweight and gestational age were much higher in the NPM data than in the congenital metabolic disorders registers, especially among births registered in Catalonia and births to foreign mothers. Conclusions: Our results suggest some limitations in the quality of the data on gestational age and birthweight provided by NPM data, especially for comparisons of preterm and low birthweight indicators in the Spanish-born and immigrant populations. Moreover, the results point to the quality of the congenital metabolic disorders registers as a source to compare reproductive and perinatal health indicators.

  13. The ABC's of Quality Child Care: Parent Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Human Services, Oklahoma City. Office of Child Care.

    This booklet for Oklahoma parents provides guidelines for selecting a child care setting that best suits the child, the family, and the work situation. It delineates 13 steps in choosing a child care arrangement and lists child care options such as centers, family day care homes, and in-home care arrangements. The role of state licensing is…

  14. [The availability and quality of the ambulatory polyclinic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, N K; Sokolov, V A; Sokolova, I A; Doiutova, M V

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the results of the study of complex of medical demographic and social economic indicators of Nizhny Novgorod oblast during 1989-2010. The results are as follows. The policlinics' net reduced by 2.25 times, including by 10.6 times in rural area and by 12.6 times of ambulatories of community hospitals. The indicators of physicians' supply of oblast population decreased too especially in urban area. The annual number of visits to physicians per capita decreased by 1.36 times. The number of calls of out-patients to physicians of emergency medical care increased by 1.5 times. The morbidity with temporarily disability and primary registration as a disabled person decreased by 1.45 times, including able-bodied citizen by 1.54 times. In Nizhny Novgorod oblast, the rate of decrease of indicators of primary disability during 2006-2009 overpassed the corresponding federal indicators by 1.45 times. The population mortality increased by 1.43 times. The accessibility and quality of ambulatory polyclinic care significantly impacts on the levels of mortality and social security of population and can be used as an indicator of social risks in the region. PMID:23808035

  15. Quality of care in the management of major obstetric haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, S N

    2012-02-01

    Substandard care is reported to occur in a large number of cases of major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH). A prospective audit was carried out by a multidisciplinary team at our hospital over a one year period to assess the quality of care (QOC) delivered to women experiencing MOH. MOH was defined according to criteria outlined in the Scottish Audit of Maternal Morbidity (SAMM). 31 cases were identified yielding an incidence of 3.5\\/1000 deliveries. The predominant causes were uterine atony 11 (35.4%), retained products of conception 6 (19.3%) and placenta praevia\\/accreta 6 (19.3%). Excellent initial resuscitation and monitoring was noted with a high level of senior staff input. Indicators of QOC compared favourably with the SAMM. Areas for improvement were identified. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of detailed prospective data collection in MOH in a busy Dublin obstetric unit with a view to developing a national audit. Standardization of definitions allows for international comparisons.

  16. A comprehensive model of cooperation between caregivers related to quality of care.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, W.J.; Vermeij, D.J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The system and delivery of health care tend to suffer from fragmentation, resulting in discontinuous and costly care. Local cooperation between caregivers is essential to achieve appropriate, timely, continuous and efficient care. The article develops a general comprehensive patient-centered model of quality of care related to local cooperation between caregivers. The model can be used in quality improvement and research. The proposed model: Within the framework of Donabedian's tr...

  17. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    OpenAIRE

    McSherry R; Pearce P

    2016-01-01

    Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translat...

  18. Improving quality and reducing inequities: a challenge in achieving best care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Robert M; Nicewander, David A; Qin, Huanying; Ballard, David J

    2008-01-01

    The health care quality chasm is better described as a gulf for certain segments of the population, such as racial and ethnic minority groups, given the gap between actual care received and ideal or best care quality. The landmark Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century challenges all health care organizations to pursue six major aims of health care improvement: safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and patient-centeredness. "Equity" aims to ensure that quality care is available to all and that the quality of care provided does not differ by race, ethnicity, or other personal characteristics unrelated to a patient's reason for seeking care. Baylor Health Care System is in the unique position of being able to examine the current state of equity in a typical health care delivery system and to lead the way in health equity research. Its organizational vision, "culture of quality," and involved leadership bode well for achieving equitable best care. However, inequities in access, use, and outcomes of health care must be scrutinized; the moral, ethical, and economic issues they raise and the critical injustice they create must be remedied if this goal is to be achieved. Eliminating any observed inequities in health care must be synergistically integrated with quality improvement. Quality performance indicators currently collected and evaluated indicate that Baylor Health Care System often performs better than the national average. However, there are significant variations in care by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status that indicate the many remaining challenges in achieving "best care" for all. PMID:19181022

  19. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    OpenAIRE

    Marianne Storm; Inger Margrete Dyrholm Siemsen; Kristin Alstveit Laugaland; Dagrunn NÃ¥den Dyrstad; Karina Aase

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures.Methodology: Included in the study were e...

  20. Putting people with Parkinson's in control: exploring the impact of quality social care

    OpenAIRE

    Mcdonnell, Ann; Kennedy, Fiona; Wood, Brendan; Ramawswamy, Bhanu; Whitfield, Malcolm; Tod, Angela

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Parkinson’s is a progressive and incurable condition. Cost-effective social care services are a priority in the future delivery of adult social care. This study aimed to explore how the provision of quality social care interventions impacts on quality of life, health and wellbeing and future care costs for people with Parkinson’s and their carers. METHODS The study was conducted in three stages and adopted case study, individual interview and focus group methods. ...

  1. Quality management and quality assurance in haemophilia care: a model at the Bonn haemophilia centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackmann, H-H; Effenberger, W; Schwaab, R; Hess, L; Hanfland, P; Oldenburg, J

    2002-05-01

    The severe clotting defects associated with the diagnosis of severe haemophilia A and B require a quality management and quality assurance system designed to avoid both bleeding sequelae (such as damaged joints) through early on-demand or prophylactic treatment in a home-care setting, and side-effects such as infectious diseases (hepatitis A-G and human immunodeficiency virus), allergic reactions, haemolysis and if possible inhibitor formation, by using highly purified, virus-inactivated or recombinant products in which the factor VIII and IX proteins are as natural as possible. As the intravenous injection of the required clotting factor is entrusted to the patients in home treatment, the haemophilia centre has to check treatment protocols and, when necessary, joint and muscle status. In addition, it is imperative to ensure the safety of the product, and checks must be carried out to make sure that batch numbers are recalled as soon as possible if side-effects are observed. These are the reasons for several Acts of Parliament in Germany requiring special treatments and regular checks (the Disabled Act, recommendations by the German Medical Council, the Transfusion Act). Thus, at the haemophilia centre in Bonn we have established a special quality management and quality assurance system taking into account the great number of patients (> 800), the often considerable distance between the centre and the patient, and the aforementioned regulations and laws. Quality management involves dealing with daily practicalities such as 24-h availability of a physician, medical technologist and nurse, careful instruction of patient and family in home care, genetic counselling, regular laboratory tests (especially recovery time, half-life, inhibitors and gene defects, clinical chemistry and serology) and clinical investigations (especially joint and muscle status). It also includes co-operation with family doctors and different departments at our university hospital (e.g. orthopaedic, microbiology), daily conferences with staff, information for nursery schools, schools, training institutions and/or the workplace in case of emergency, and cooperation with German haemophilia foundations. For quality assurance, several self-controlling systems are in place, such as distribution of concentrate, laboratory data, treatment protocols, joint and muscle status and bleeding tendencies. All these and more are double-checked and interactive, controlling data and activities with the help of EDP. Exceptional staff motivation and patient compliance are important for this quality system. PMID:12010413

  2. The role of culture in quality improvement in the intensive care unit: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Lam Soh; Kim Geok Soh; Patricia M Davidson

    2012-01-01

    Improving the quality of patient care and patient outcomes is a major concern internationally.  In a developing health care system, implementing quality improvement is challenging due not only to resource and workforce issues but also cultural factors.  Using the method of a focussed literature review, this paper discusses the importance of assessing a societal view of culture, social mores and customs, and power relationships in quality improvement activities using the intensive care unit as...

  3. Factors predicting team climate, and its relationship with quality of care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eccles Martin P; Goh Teik T; Steen Nick

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality of care in general practice may be affected by the team climate perceived by its health and non-health professionals. Better team working is thought to lead to higher effectiveness and quality of care. However, there is limited evidence available on what affects team functioning and its relationship with quality of care in general practice. This study aimed to explore individual and practice factors that were associated with team climate, and to explore the relatio...

  4. End-user perspectives on e-commerce and health care web site quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rouge, Cynthia; De Leo, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    We explore and compare the importance of various quality dimensions for health care and e-commerce web sites. The results show that the importance of various quality attributes for all except four of ten quality dimensions studied differ between health care and e-commerce web sites. These results can help health care managers to improve and/or to guide the design of their web sites. PMID:18998907

  5. Nurse Burnout and Quality of Care: Cross-National Investigation in Six Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Clarke, Sean P.; Finlayson, Mary; Aiken, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    We explored the relationship between nurse burnout and ratings of quality of care in 53,846 nurses from six countries. In this secondary analysis, we used data from the International Hospital Outcomes Study; data were collected from1998 to 2005. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and a single-item reflecting nurse-rated quality of care were used inmultiple logistic regression modeling to investigate the association between nurse burnout and nurse-rated quality of care. Across countries, higher lev...

  6. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care - a feasibility study with caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenau, Katharin; Kaltenbach, Elisa; Mkinga, Getrude; Hecker, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy of the training immediately before, directly after, and 3 months following the training workshop. The results showed high demand, good feasibility, high motivation, and acceptance of caregivers. They reported improvements in caregiver-child relationships, as well as in the children's behavior. Study 2 assessed exposure to maltreatment and the mental health of 28 orphans living in one institution in which all caregivers had been trained. The children were interviewed 20 months before, 1 month before, and 3 months after the training. Children reported a decrease in physical maltreatment and assessments showed a decrease in mental health problems. Our approach seems feasible under challenging circumstances and provides first hints for its efficacy. These promising findings call for further studies testing the efficacy and sustainability of this maltreatment prevention approach. PMID:26236248

  7. The Effect of Changing Patterns of Obstetric Care in Scotland (1980–2004) on Rates of Preterm Birth and Its Neonatal Consequences: Perinatal Database Study

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, J.E.; Morris, C.; Chalmers, J

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Most pregnancies last about 40 weeks but increasing numbers of babies are being born preterm, before they reach 37 weeks of gestation (gestation is the period during which a baby develops in its mother). Nowadays in the US, for example, more than half a million babies arrive earlier than expected every year (1 in 8 babies). Although improvements in the care of newborn babies (neonatal care) mean that preterm babies are more likely to survive than in the past, prete...

  8. How to reduce perinatal mortality? The contribution of Portuguese reform of perinatal healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Hercília Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the World Health Organization indicated Portugal as an example to follow in reducing perinatal, neonatal and infant mortalities. The success achieved over the last five decades is a source of pride for the perinatology professionals today. Of paramount importance was the program “Child and Maternal Hospital Healthcare Referral Network”, to start in 1990 and to be fulfilled in a decade. The key point made in the document was the classification of hospitals in health care levels with d...

  9. [Quality evaluation of primary care service performance. What are the problems with the recent Hungarian primary care indicators?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolozsvári, László Róbert; Rurik, Imre

    2016-02-28

    The Hungarian primary care quality indicator system has been introduced in 2009, and has been continuously developed since then. The system offers extra financing for family physicians who are achieving the expected levels of indicators. There are currently 16 indicators for adult and mixed practices and 8 indicators are used in paediatric care. Authors analysed the influencing factors of the indicators other than those related to the performance of family physicians. Expectations and compliance of patients, quality of outpatient (ambulatory) care services, insufficient flow of information, inadequate primary care softwares which need to be updated could be considered as the most important factors. The level of financial motivations should also be significantly increased besides changes in the reporting system. It is recommended, that decision makers in health policy and financing have to declare clearly their expectations, and professional bodies should find the proper solution. These indicators could contribute properly to the improvement of the quality of primary care services in Hungary. PMID:26895800

  10. The patient as the pivot point for quality in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengnick-Hall, C A

    1995-01-01

    Health care enterprises make comprehensive and durable changes in people. This human-centered purpose defines the fundamental nature of quality in health care settings. Traditional perspectives of quality and familiar views of customer satisfaction are inadequate to manage the complex relationships between the health care delivery firm and its patients. Patients play four roles in health care systems that must be reflected when defining and measuring quality in these settings: patient as supplier, patient as product, patient as participant, and patient as recipient. This article presents a conceptual model of quality that incorporates these diverse patient roles. The strategic and managerial implications of the model are also discussed. PMID:10140872

  11. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. Toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. (author)

  12. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment: toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also. PMID:18952706

  13. Situação de saúde materna e perinatal no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil Maternal and perinatal health position in the State of S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina d'Andretta Tanaka

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available Pelos dados oficiais disponíveis, para o Estado de São Paulo (Brasil analisou-se a assistência oferecida na gestação, no parto e ao recém-nascido e suas relações com a mortalidade materna e perinatal. Com referência ao pré-natal, houve indícios de quantidade de consultas por gestação, numericamente suficiente, porém de qualidade discutível. Quanto ao parto observou-se uma alta percentagem de cesarianas (46,2%. A mortalidade materna foi de 4,86 por dez mil n.v., valor este subestimado. A primeira causa de óbitos maternos foram as toxemias, seguidas das hemorragias e do aborto, causas estas evitáveis em sua maioria, com uma boa qualidade de assistência pré-natal e ao parto. Quanto aos óbitos do período perinatal, o coeficiente foi de 29,2 por mil nascimentos em 1984, valor este também elevado. A análise das causas de óbitos mostrou que as afecções de origem perinatal ocorreram em cerca de 90% dos óbitos, tendo como principais causas as hipóxias intra-uterinas, asfixias, síndromes de angústia respiratória e aspiração maciça. Esses dados revelam a má qualidade de assistência recebida por este grupo. Sugere-se que a nova política de Sistema Unificado e Descentralizado de Saúde deveria levar em conta tanto a qualidade de assistência como a integração dos serviços para poder-se fazer frente à situação precária de saúde materna e perinatal do Estado.The assistance offered during pregnancy and labour as also to the newborn child, and its relationship to maternal and perinatal mortality in the State of S. Paulo in 1984, is analysed on the basis of official available data. With respect to prenatal care the number of visits per woman was considered to be "sufficient" though of doubtful quality. The proportion of cesarean sections was very high (46.2%. Maternal mortality was found to be 4.86 deaths per 10,000 live births, but despite its being high, this figure is certainly too low and the correct figure is probably twice as high. The principal cause of maternal deaths is toxemia in pregnancy, followed by hemorrhage and abortion. Most of these deaths could have been avoided with care during pregnancy and labour. The rate of perinatal mortality was found to be 29.2 deaths per thousand births in 1984. This figure is also very high. The analysis of the causes of death for this period showed that the disorders which arose during the perinatal period were responsible for 90 per cent of the total number of deaths. The main causes of death in this group were the intra-uterine hypoxias and anoxias, asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome and massive aspiration syndrome. These data bring to light the poor quality of the care offered to this group. The authors trust that the new policy of the Decentralized and Unified System of Health will take the quality of care as much as the integration of services into consideration with a view to overcoming the precarious maternal and perinatal health situation in S. Paulo.

  14. Gaps in continuity of care: patients’ perceptions of the quality of care during labor ward handover in Mulago hospital, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, Dan K.; Nakimuli, Annettee; Kakaire, Othman; Osinde, Michael O.; Mbalinda, Scovia N; Kakande, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Background Client satisfaction is a common outcome measure for quality of care and goal for quality improvement in healthcare. We assessed women’s perceptions of the structure, process and outcome of intrapartum care in Mulago hospital, specifically, labor ward duty shift handovers. Methods Data was collected through 40 in-depth interviews conducted on two occasions: during the time of hospitalization and within 4–6 months after childbirth. Participants were women who delivered at the hospita...

  15. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 1. Deficits in the quality of care due to understaffing and undertraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    Caught between the inability or unwillingness of nursing home corporations and owners to redistribute revenue and the reluctance of federal and state agencies to increase payments to nursing homes, the nation's most vulnerable older adults are not receiving the care they deserve. Widespread recognition of substandard care and quality of life of older adults in nursing homes has existed for decades. In addition, there is substantial evidence that poor quality of care is related to inadequate numbers and training of nursing staff. Still, policy makers and nursing home owners have failed to take needed action. In the first article of this two-part series, major deficits in the care of older adult nursing home residents are reviewed, and research documenting the relationship between nursing home staffing and the quality of care and life of residents is summarized. PMID:20078025

  16. Quality of Care is Similar for Safety-Net and Non-Safety-Net Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Newsroom Research Activities April 2013, No. 392 Quality of care is similar for safety-net and ... Data Users’ Workshop Research Briefs Patient Safety and Quality Safety-net hospitals are institutions typically located in ...

  17. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Darko Gvozdanovi_; Miroslav Kon_ar; Vinko Kojund_i_; Hrvoje Jezid_i_

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on...

  18. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor-induced perinatal complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    There are a growing number of concerns about the utilization of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in late pregnancy and the onset of perinatal complications. This review aimed to analyze and summarize the studies evaluating the risk of perinatal complications (such as low birth weight, preterm delivery, withdrawal or toxic phenomena, and other detrimental events/poor neonatal outcomes) related to maternal SRI use in late pregnancy. A computerized search of MEDLINE (1966-January 2007) and PsycINFO (1974-January 2007) databases was performed. Articles describing perinatal complications after late in utero exposure to SRIs were selected and also reviewed for additional references. Fifty studies met the inclusion criteria. Exposure to SRIs late in pregnancy is clearly associated with an increased risk of infants developing a constellation of symptoms, including CNS and respiratory effects, often requiring close infant observation and supportive or specific treatment in intensive care units. Such symptoms are not always due to toxic or withdrawal reactions. Indeed, some evidence suggests that SRIs may interfere with the physiology of the respiratory system and parasympathetic activity in neonates. Of the most methodologically relevant studies reviewed, 50% have been published in the last 3 years. Hence, it is possible that further concerning data will become available in the future. For these reasons, the opportunity of tapering and discontinuing SRIs in late pregnancy should be taken into consideration, although to date the evidence to support such a clinical decision is preliminary. PMID:17407365

  19. Patients' own assessments of quality of primary care compared with objective records based measures of technical quality of care: cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Mala; Clarke, Aileen; Sanderson, Colin; Hammersley, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relation between older patients' assessments of the quality of their primary care and measures of good clinical practice on the basis of data from administrative and clinical records.

  20. Quality of care in inflammatory bowel disease: a review and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelman, Michael D; Palmer, Lena; Boyle, Brendan M; Rubin, David T

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's publications To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm publicized the widespread deficits in U.S. health care quality. Emerging studies continue to reveal deficits in the quality of adult and pediatric care, including subspecialty care. The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis require diligent, long-term management and attention to their impact on intestinal and extraintestinal organ systems. Although the quality of IBD care has not been prospectively or comprehensively evaluated in the United States, several small studies have demonstrated significant variation in care. As variation may indicate underuse, overuse, or misuse of medical services, such variation suggests a clear need for translating evidence-based practices into the actual practice and follow-up provided for patients. This article reviews the history, rationale, and methods of quality measurement and improvement and identifies the unique challenges in adapting these general strategies to the care of the inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:19572335

  1. Informatics Resources to Support Health Care Quality Improvement in the Veterans Health Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Hynes, Denise M.; Perrin, Ruth A.; Rappaport, Steven; Stevens, Joanne M; Demakis, John G.

    2004-01-01

    Information systems are increasingly important for measuring and improving health care quality. A number of integrated health care delivery systems use advanced information systems and integrated decision support to carry out quality assurance activities, but none as large as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The VHA's Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) is a large-scale, multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative designed to ensure excellence in all areas where VHA ...

  2. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-...

  3. Good-quality social care for people with Parkinson’s disease: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Fiona; Stocks, Amanda-Jayne; McDonnell, Ann; Ramaswamy, Bhanu; Wood, Brendan; Whitfield, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study examines the meaning of good-quality social care for people with Parkinson's disease and their carers. It identifies, from their perspective, the impact of good-quality social care on health and well-being. Design Qualitative case study methodology, interview and framework analysis techniques were used. Setting: community locations in the north and midlands of England. Participants Data were collected from 43 participants including individual interviews with people with Parkinson's disease (n=4), formal and informal social care providers (n=13), 2 focus groups, 1 with people with Parkinson's disease and their carers (n=17), and 1 with professionals (n=8), plus a telephone interview with a former commissioner. Findings Good-quality social care, delivered in a timely fashion, was reported to have a positive impact on health. Furthermore, there is an indication that good-quality social care can prevent untoward events, such as infections, symptom deterioration and deterioration in mental health. The concept of the ‘Impact Gap’ developed from the findings, illustrates how the costs of care may be reduced by delivering good-quality social care. Control, choice and maintaining independence emerged as indicators of good-quality social care, irrespective of clinical condition. Participants identified characteristics indicative of good-quality social care specific to Parkinson's disease, including understanding Parkinson's disease, appropriate administration of medication, timing of care and reassessment. ‘Parkinson's aware’ social care was seen to generate psychological, physical and social benefits that were inter-related. Conclusions The findings indicate how maximising quality in social care delivery for people with Parkinson's disease can impact on health and well-being. Long-term or short-term benefits may result in prevented events and reductions in health and social care resource. Health professionals can be instrumental in early detection of and signposting to social care. PMID:26883233

  4. A cross-national comparison of the quality of clinical care using vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, John W; Liu, Anli

    2007-09-01

    In studies comparing clinical practice to evidence-based standards, researchers have found that quality of care is inconsistently provided to different segments of the population in both developing and developed countries. To test the hypothesis that quality of care varies widely within different countries, we conducted a prospectively designed evaluation of quality for three common clinical conditions: diarrhoea, tuberculosis and prenatal care. Five countries participated in the study: China, the Philippines, Mexico, El Salvador and India. Within each country, physicians were randomly selected from tertiary care hospitals, district level hospitals, and public and private outpatient clinics. A total of 488 previously validated case vignettes were administered to 300 participating physicians. Vignettes were scored according to evidence and expert based quality criteria. We used a random effects model to estimate the associations between quality scores by case, physician characteristics, study site, and country. We found that average quality of care was low (61.0%), but there exists a wide variation in overall quality (30-93%). While there was little difference in average quality scores between countries (60.2 to 62.6%), variation within countries was broad. The wide variation was consistent across facility type, medical condition and domain of care. We also found that younger, female, tertiary care and specialist physicians performed better than their counterparts. We conclude that some physicians provide exceptional care even in the setting of limited resources. Furthermore, poor quality can be addressed by health policy planners by directing remediation toward the lowest performers. PMID:17660225

  5. Can psychiatry cross the quality chasm? Improving the quality of health care for mental and substance use conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Harold Alan; Page, Ann E K; Druss, Benjamin; Appelbaum, Paul S; Gottlieb, Gary; England, Mary Jane

    2007-05-01

    In 2001, a seminal Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, put forth a comprehensive strategy for improving the quality of U.S. health care. This strategy attained considerable traction within the overall U.S. health care system and subsequent attention in the mental health community as well. A new Institute of Medicine report, Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance Use Conditions, examines the quality chasm strategy in light of the distinctive features of mental and substance use health care, including concerns about patient decision-making abilities and coercion into care, a less developed quality measurement and improvement infrastructure, lagging use of information technology and participation in the development of the National Health Information Infrastructure, greater separations in care delivery accompanied by more restrictions on sharing clinical information, a larger number of provider types licensed to diagnose and treat, more solo practice, and a differently structured marketplace. This article summarizes the Institute of Medicine's analysis of these issues and recommendations for improving mental and substance use health care and discusses the implications for psychiatric practice and related advocacy efforts of psychiatrists, psychiatric organizations, and other leaders in mental and substance use health care. PMID:17475728

  6. Quality of Type II Diabetes Care in Primary Health Care Centers in Kuwait: Employment of a Diabetes Quality Indicator Set (DQIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Dalia; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil; Mourad, Yara; Behbehani, Kazem

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the major public health challenges, affecting more than 347 million adults worldwide. The impact of diabetes necessitates assessing the quality of care received by people with diabetes, especially in countries with a significant diabetes burden such as Kuwait. This paper aimed at piloting an approach for measuring Type II diabetes care performance through the use of a diabetes quality indicator set (DQIS) in primary health care. The DQIS for Kuwait was adapted from that developed by the National Diabetes Quality Improvement Alliance and the International Diabetes Federation. Five key care domains/measures were employed: (1) Blood glucose level measurement, (2) Cholesterol level measurement, (3) Blood pressure measurement, (4) Kidney function testing and (5) Smoking status check. The sample included the four major primary health care centers with the highest case load in Kuwait City, 4,241 patients in 2012 and 3,211 in 2010. Findings revealed the applicability and utility of employing performance indicators for diabetes care in Kuwait. Furthermore, findings revealed that many of the primary health care centers have achieved noteworthy improvement in diabetes care between 2010 and 2012, with the exception of smoking status check. The DQIS can help policymakers identify performance gaps and investigate key system roadblocks related to diabetes care in Kuwait. PMID:26176691

  7. Multimorbidity and Quality of Preventive Care in Swiss University Primary Care Cohorts

    OpenAIRE

    Streit, Sven; da Costa, Bruno R; Bauer, Douglas C.; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Weiler, Stefan; Zimmerli, Lukas; Frey, Peter; Cornuz, Jacques; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Battegay, Edouard; Kerr, Eve; Aujesky, Drahomir; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings.

  8. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  9. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC)/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre. PMID:26034468

  10. Cesariana e resultados neonatais em hospitais privados no Brasil: estudo comparativo de dois diferentes modelos de atenção perinatal / Caesarean section and neonatal outcomes in private hospitals in Brazil: comparative study of two different perinatal models of care / Cesárea y resultados neonatales de hospitales privados en Brasil: un estudio comparativo de dos diferentes modelos de prestación de servicios perinatales

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jacqueline Alves, Torres; Rosa Maria Soares Madeira, Domingues; Jane, Sandall; Zulmira, Hartz; Silvana Granado Nogueira da, Gama; Mariza Miranda Theme, Filha; Arthur Orlando Correa, Schilithz; Maria do Carmo, Leal.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetiva-se comparar a prevalência de cesariana e desfechos neonatais de dois modelos de atenção ao parto em hospitais privados brasileiros, utilizando-se dados do estudo Nascer no Brasil, coorte de base hospitalar realizada nos anos 2011/2012. Foram analisadas 1.664 puérperas e seus conceptos, aten [...] didos em 13 hospitais localizados na Região Sudeste, divididos em “típico” – modelo de atenção padrão, e “atípico” – Hospital Amigo da Criança com equipes de plantão e trabalho colaborativo entre enfermeiras obstétricas e médicos na atenção ao parto. A classificação de Robson foi adotada para a comparação das prevalências de cesariana, que foram menores no hospital atípico (47,8% vs. 90,8%, p Abstract in spanish El objetivo de este estudio es comparar la tasa de cesárea y los resultados neonatales de dos modelos de atención al parto en hospitales privados en Brasil. Se utilizaron datos de la encuesta Nacer en Brasil, una cohorte de base hospitalaria durante los años 2011/2012. Se analizaron a 1.664 madres y [...] a sus recién nacidos en 13 hospitales de la región sureste, divididos en "típico" -modelo de atención estándar- y "atípico" -Hospital Amigo del Niño-, con atención al parto por equipos de turno integrados por médicos y parteras. Se adoptó la clasificación de Robson con el fin comparar las tasas de cesárea, que fueron inferiores en el hospital atípico (47,8% vs. 90,8%, p Abstract in english This study aims at comparing caesarean section rates and neonatal outcomes of two perinatal models of care provided in private hospitals in Brazil. Birth in Brazil data, a national hospital-based cohort conducted in the years 2011/2012 was used. We analysed 1,664 postpartum women and their offspring [...] attended at 13 hospitals located in the South-east region of Brazil, divided into a "typical” – standard care model and "atypical" – Baby-Friendly hospital with collaborative practices between nurse-midwives and obstetricians on duty to attend deliveries in an alternative labour ward. The Robson’s classification system was used to compare caesarean sections, which was lower in the atypical hospital (47.8% vs. 90.8%, p

  11. Age and gender as predictors of allied health quality stroke care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luker JA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Luker1, Julie Bernhardt2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers11International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and Stroke Division, Florey Neurosciences Institutes Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Improvement in acute stroke care requires the identification of variables which may influence care quality. The nature and impact of demographic and stroke-related variables on care quality provided by allied health (AH professionals is unknown.Aims: Our research explores the association of age and gender on an index of acute stroke care quality provided by AH professionals.Methods: A retrospective clinical audit of 300 acute stroke patients extracted data on AH care, patients' age and gender. AH care quality was determined by the summed compliance with 20 predetermined process indicators. Our analysis explored relationships between this index of quality, age, and gender. Age was considered in different ways (as a continuous variable, and in different categories. It was correlated with care quality, using gender-specific linear and logistic regression models. Gender was then considered as a confounder in an overall model.Results: No significant association was found for any treatment of age and the index of AH care quality. There were no differences in gender-specific models, and gender did not significantly adjust the age association with care quality.Conclusion: Age and gender were not predictors of the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients by AH professionals.Keywords: acute stroke, allied health, quality of care, age, gender

  12. Assessing the knowledge of perinatal mental illness among student midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Louise

    2015-11-01

    The experience of perinatal mental illness (mental illness occurring around the time of pregnancy) currently affect 1 in 10 women and can have adverse effects on the mother and her child (Massie and Szajnberg, 2002; O'Connor et al., 2002). The care and effective management of women experiencing perinatal mental illness is therefore an important issue for health care staff, managers, psychiatrists, commissioners and campaigners. Midwives play a significant part in caring for women throughout their pregnancies, during labour and up to the first month after birth. Midwives are in a unique position to assess a woman's well-being and to offer appropriate support. However, previous research has revealed that midwives often have poor understanding and knowledge of perinatal mental health issues and require improved training (Ross-Davie et al, 2006; McCann and Clark, 2010). This research project aims to systematically assess student midwives awareness of perinatal mental illness. The findings of this study will inform curriculum development for graduate and post-graduate midwifery students therefore improving the care and support women with mental illness receive from antenatal services. The findings from this study will also be used for the formation of an educational web-based programme for student and qualified midwives. PMID:25300675

  13. eHealth, care and quality of life

    CERN Document Server

    Capello, Fabio; Manca, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The debate over eHealth is alive as never before. Supporters suggest that it will result in dramatic innovations in healthcare, including a giant leap towards patient-centered care, new opportunities to improve effectiveness, and enhanced wellness and quality of life. In addition, the growing market value of investments in health IT suggests that eHealth can offer at least a partial cure for the current economic stagnation. Detractors counter these arguments by claiming that eHealth has already failed: the UK Department of Health has shut down the NHS National Program for IT, Google has discontinued its Health flagship, and doubts have arisen over privacy safeguards for both patients and medical professionals. This book briefly explains why caregivers, professionals, technicians, patients, politicians, and others should all consider themselves stakeholders in eHealth. It offers myth-busting responses to some ill-considered arguments from both sides of the trench, in the process allowing a fresh look at eHeal...

  14. Relationship Between Patients' Perceptions of Care Quality and Health Care Errors in 11 Countries: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Ana L; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C; MacKinnon, Neil J; Warholak, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Patients may be the most reliable reporters of some aspects of the health care process; their perspectives should be considered when pursuing changes to improve patient safety. The authors evaluated the association between patients' perceived health care quality and self-reported medical, medication, and laboratory errors in a multinational sample. The analysis was conducted using the 2010 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey, a multinational consumer survey conducted in 11 countries. Quality of care was measured by a multifaceted construct developed using Rasch techniques. After adjusting for potentially important confounding variables, an increase in respondents' perceptions of care coordination decreased the odds of self-reporting medical errors, medication errors, and laboratory errors (P integrated care. PMID:26783863

  15. 78 FR 69418 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans, Quality Rating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... Quality for Exchanges: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-27/pdf/2012-28473.pdf . Importance: the... performance information to encourage the delivery of higher-quality health care services, expand access to... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Patient Protection and Affordable Care...

  16. Child Care Quality and Children's Cortisol in Basque Country and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Harriet J.; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Larrea, Inaki; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Barandiaran, Alexander; Linting, Marielle

    2010-01-01

    A cross-country comparison of children's cortisol levels at child care was performed in relation to their cortisol levels at home and the quality and quantity of child care they received. Participants were toddlers visiting child care centers in Spanish Basque Country (N = 60) and the Netherlands (N = 25) with substantial variation in structural…

  17. Determinants of Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes: Implications for Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony; Porter, Boaz

    2008-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design of 400 primary care patients with diabetes, the authors evaluated demographics, health status, subjective health and mental health, health behaviors, health beliefs, knowledge of diabetes treatment, satisfaction with medical care, and quality of medical care as potential predictors of QoL and QoL in the hypothetical…

  18. Intensive Care Unit Utilization and Interhospital Transfers As Potential Indicators of Rural Hospital Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ward, Marcia; Miller, Thomas; Ohsfeldt, Robert; Jaana, Mirou; Lei, Yang; Tracy, Roger; Schneider, John

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining meaningful information from statistically valid and reliable measures of the quality of care for disease-specific care provided in small rural hospitals is limited by small numbers of cases and different definitive care capacities. An alternative approach may be to aggregate and analyze patient services that reflect more generalized care…

  19. Two Measures of the Quality of Group Care for Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Emanuel Kuno; Stahnke, Marita; Butz, Petra; Stahl, Walter; Wessels, Holger

    1996-01-01

    Uses two sets of quality measures of group care to assess their predictive power for measures of the development of children in German group day care. Reports finding that measures of adult-child, child-child, and adult-adult interactions predict development levels when measured by long-term participant observation in a natural day care…

  20. Creating a Patient-Centered Health Care Delivery System: A Systematic Review of Health Care Quality From the Patient Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Khaled; Nolan, Margaret B; Rajjo, Tamim; Shah, Nilay D; Prokop, Larry J; Varkey, Prathibha; Murad, Mohammad H

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience is one of key domains of value-based purchasing that can serve as a measure of quality and be used to improve the delivery of health services. The aims of this study are to explore patient perceptions of quality of health care and to understand how perceptions may differ by settings and condition. A systematic review of multiple databases was conducted for studies targeting patient perceptions of quality of care. Two reviewers screened and extracted data independently. Data synthesis was performed following a meta-narrative approach. A total of 36 studies were included that identified 10 quality dimensions perceived by patients: communication, access, shared decision making, provider knowledge and skills, physical environment, patient education, electronic medical record, pain control, discharge process, and preventive services. These dimensions can be used in planning and evaluating health care delivery. Future research should evaluate the effect of interventions targeting patient experience on patient outcomes. PMID:25082873

  1. Quality of stroke care at an Irish Regional General Hospital and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Robust international data support the effectiveness of stroke unit (SU) care. Despite this, most stroke care in Ireland are provided outside of this setting. Limited data currently exist on the quality of care provided. AIM: The aim of this study is to examine the quality of care for patients with stroke in two care settings-Regional General Hospital (RGH) and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit (SRU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the stroke records of consecutive patients admitted to the SRU between May-November 2002 and April-November 2004 was performed applying the UK National Sentinel Audit of Stroke (NSAS) tool. RESULTS: The results of the study reveal that while SRU processes of care was 74% compliant with standards; compliance with stroke service organisational standards was only 15 and 43% in the RGH and SRU, respectively. CONCLUSION: The quality of stroke care in our area is deficient. Comprehensive reorganisation of stroke services is imperative.

  2. Timing of high-quality child care and cognitive, language, and preacademic development

    OpenAIRE

    Li, W.; Farkas, G.; Duncan, GJ; Burchinal, MR; Vandell, DL

    2013-01-01

    The effects of high- versus low-quality child care during 2 developmental periods (infant-toddlerhood and preschool) were examined using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care. Propensity score matching was used to account for differences in families who used different combinations of child care quality during the 2 developmental periods. Findings indicated that cognitive, language, and preacademic skills prior to school entry were hig...

  3. Timing of High-Quality Child Care and Cognitive, Language, and Preacademic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weilin; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2012-01-01

    The effects of high- versus low-quality child care during 2 developmental periods (infant–toddlerhood and preschool) were examined using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care. Propensity score matching was used to account for differences in families who used different combinations of child care quality during the 2 developmental periods. Findings indicated that cognitive, language, and preacademic skills prior to school entry were hig...

  4. The relationship of bedside nurses' emotional intelligence with quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kelly L; Iseler, Jackeline I

    2014-01-01

    Emotional intelligence, a predictor of productivity and success, may impact behaviors responsible for quality of care. This study examined if emotional intelligence of units' bedside nurses is related to the quality of care delivered to the patients. In this study, emotional intelligence was found to be correlated to the number of Clostridium difficile infections, MRSA infections, patient falls with injury, and pressure ulcer screenings (P < .001) in the inpatient acute care setting. PMID:24356579

  5. Baseline assessment of adult and adolescent primary care delivery in Rwanda: an opportunity for quality improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Vasan, Ashwin; Anatole, Manzi; Mezzacappa, Catherine; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L.; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Nkikabahizi, Fulgence; Hagenimana, Marc; Ndayisaba, Aphrodis; Cyamatare, Felix R; Nzeyimana, Bonaventure; Drobac, Peter; Gupta, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Background: As resource-limited health systems evolve to address complex diseases, attention must be returned to basic primary care delivery. Limited data exists detailing the quality of general adult and adolescent primary care delivered at front-line facilities in these regions. Here we describe the baseline quality of care for adults and adolescents in rural Rwanda. Methods: Patients aged 13 and older presenting to eight rural health center outpatient departments in one district in southea...

  6. La calidad del cuidado infantil: Un resumen para padres (Child Care Quality: An Overview for Parents). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Peggy; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Many parents want to know how important the quality of care is to children's social, emotional, and academic development. This Digest synthesizes some major recent research on child care quality. First, the Digest explains what features contribute to quality of care. The Digest also explains the differences between studies of how quality is…

  7. Internal quality control in point-of-care testing: where's the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Helen; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-03-01

    ISO 22870 standards require protocols for performance of internal quality control for all point-of-care testing devices and training of users in its theory and practice. However, the unique setting of point-of-care testing (i.e. processes conducted by non-scientific users) means that laboratory internal quality control programmes do not easily translate to point-of-care testing. In addition, while the evidence base for internal quality control within the laboratory has been increasing, the equivalent literature surrounding point-of-care testing is very limited. This has led to wide variation in what is considered acceptable practice for internal quality control at the point of care. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that internal quality control is an area of deficiency in point-of-care testing. Internal quality control protocols used at point-of-care testing should be defined based on risk management. The protocol will therefore be dependent on analyser complexity and availability of inbuilt system checks, the risk associated with release of an incorrect patient result as well as frequency of use. The emphasis should be on designing an effective internal quality control protocol as opposed to the inherent tendency of introducing high-frequency quality control. Typically a simple pass or fail criterion is used for internal quality control in point-of-care testing based on whether internal quality control results fall within assigned ranges. While simply taught, such criteria can require broad internal quality control ranges to decrease the probability of false rejection (also reducing the probability of error detection). Customized internal quality control ranges, two-tier acceptance systems and assay-specific internal quality control can be used to improve error detection rates. PMID:26486440

  8. Quality of life and persisting symptoms in intensive care unit survivors: implications for care after discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorsett Joanna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed the quality of life of ICU survivors using SF-36 at 4 months after ICU discharge and investigated any correlation of PCS and MCS with age, illness severity and hospital or ICU length of stay. We examined the relationship between these variables, persisting physical and psychological symptoms and the perceived benefit of individual patients of follow-up. Findings For one year, adult patients admitted for multiple organ or advanced respiratory support for greater than 48 hours to a 16-bedded teaching hospital general intensive care unit were identified. Those surviving to discharge were sent a questionnaire at 4 months following ICU discharge assessing quality of life and persisting symptoms. Demographic, length of stay and illness severity data were recorded. Higher or lower scores were divided at the median value. A two-tailed Students t-test assuming equal variances was used for normally-distributed data and Mann-Whitney tests for non-parametric data. 87 of 175 questionnaires were returned (50%, but only 65 had sufficient data giving a final response rate of 37%. Elderly patients had increased MCS as compared with younger patients. The PCS was inversely related to hospital LOS. There was a significant correlation between the presence of psychological and physical symptoms and desire for follow-up. Conclusion Younger age and prolonged hospital stay are associated with lower mental or physical quality of life and may be targets for rehabilitation. Patients with persisting symptoms at 4 months view follow-up as beneficial and a simple screening questionnaire may identify those likely to attend outpatient services.

  9. Low perinatal autopsy rate in Malaysia: time for a change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Geok Chin; Hayati, Abdul Rahman; Khong, Teck Yee

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine the perinatal autopsy rate in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia and to quantify the value of the perinatal autopsy. All stillbirths, miscarriages, therapeutic abortions, and neonatal deaths between January 1, 2004, and August 31, 2009, were identified from the archives. The autopsy findings were compared with the clinical diagnoses. The autopsy reports were also reviewed to determine if it would be possible to improve the quality of the autopsies. There were 807 perinatal deaths, of which 36 (4.5%) included an autopsy. There were ethnic differences in the rate of autopsy, with the lowest rate among the Malays. The autopsy provided the diagnosis, changed the clinical diagnosis, or revealed additional findings in 58.3% of cases. Ancillary testing, such as microbiology, chromosomal analysis, and biochemistry, could improve the quality of the autopsy. This study provides further data on the perinatal autopsy rate from an emerging and developing country. It reaffirms the value of the perinatal autopsy. Attempts must be made to improve on the low autopsy rate while recognizing that the performance of autopsies can be enhanced through the use of ancillary testing. PMID:20367214

  10. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    OpenAIRE

    Odusola, Aina O; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; van Weert, Henk; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care.Objective: We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria.Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured individual inter...

  11. Comparative analysis of quality assurance in health care delivery and higher medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari JO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jamiu O BusariDepartment of Educational Development and Research, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The NetherlandsAbstract: Quality assurance (QA in higher medical education involves the development, sustenance, improvement, and evaluation of the standard of training of medical professionals. In health care delivery, QA focuses on guaranteeing and maintaining a high standard of the service provided in different health care systems. When the service delivered by the care provider is in accordance with what the recipients of health care expect, then quality in health care is considered to be present. There are several factors in higher medical education and health care that are responsible for the emergence of QA. These include externally imposed obligations requiring demonstration of public accountability and responsibility from educational institutions, as well as the need for activity-specific information by policy makers as an aid for important decision-making within educational institutions. In health care delivery on the other hand, the emergence of QA is linked to the need for containing rising health care costs in the face of limited resources and to guaranteeing high quality patient care in a changing health care environment where the power relationship between doctors and patients is shifting towards patients. Although medical education can be regarded as a distinct entity in the health care industry, it still remains an inherent part of the health care delivery system. As a result, different strategies aimed at guaranteeing and assuring high standards of health care and education in many countries tend to overlap. This paper reflects on whether quality assurance in health care delivery and medical education should be seen as separate entities.Keywords: quality assurance, health care, higher medical education

  12. Resident behaviors and characteristics as determinants of quality of residential care: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, D; Duker, P; Salemink, W; Franken-Wijnhoven, J

    1998-01-01

    The effects of resident behaviors and resident characteristics on the quantity and quality of care they receive from direct-care staff was examined. Four hundred and fifty-two residents with severe and profound mental retardation and 416 direct care staff members were involved. Naturalistic observations were conducted on direct-care staff behavior, that is, staff-resident initiatives, staff affection, staff communicative behavior, on resident behaviors (i.e., maladaptive, stereotypic, and adaptive behavior, position, attending, and communicative behavior), and on resident characteristics (i.e., gender, age, ambulancy, sensory handicaps, and seizure disorder). By importance, residents' ambulancy/motoric skills, their communicative behavior, and attending behavior accounted for the greatest differences in the quality and quantity of the care they receive from direct-care staff. Given that certain resident characteristics can be ameliorated through training, residents themselves may control, to a certain extent, the care they receive from direct-care staff in residential facilities. PMID:9653802

  13. Does palliative care improve quality? A survey of bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Laura P; Meier, Diane E; Morrison, R Sean

    2008-07-01

    Palliative care is the interdisciplinary specialty that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of care for patients with serious illness and their families. Although palliative care programs are becoming increasingly prevalent in U.S. hospitals, the impact of hospital palliative care consultation programs on the quality of care received by family members is not well understood. We conducted prospective quantitative telephonic interviews of family members of patients who died at Mount Sinai Medical Center between April and December 2005 using the validated "After-Death Bereaved Family Member Interview," to assess quality of medical care at the end of life. Multivariable techniques were used to compare family satisfaction of palliative care patients vs. usual care patients controlling for age, race (white vs. nonwhite), diagnosis (cancer vs. noncancer), socioeconomic status (Medicaid vs. non-Medicaid), and functional status (number of dependent activities of daily living). One hundred ninety eligible subjects were contacted and successful interviews were completed with 149 (78.4%) family members (54 palliative care and 95 usual care patients). Palliative care showed benefit, with 65% of palliative care patients' family members reporting that their emotional or spiritual needs were met, as compared to 35% of usual care patients' family members (P=0.004). Sixty-seven percent of palliative care patients' family members reported confidence in one or more self-efficacy domains, as compared to 44% of usual care patients' family members (P=0.03). Our study shows that palliative care consultation is associated with improved satisfaction, with attention to family and enhanced self-efficacy. Palliative care offers a unique approach by integrating the needs of the family into the care of the patient. PMID:18411019

  14. Impact of managed care on quality of healthcare: theory and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangialose, C B; Cary, S J; Hoffman, L H; Ballard, D J

    1997-08-01

    Each strategy for managing healthcare risk has important and unique implications for the patient-provider relationship and for quality of care. Not only are different incentive structures created by different risk-sharing arrangements, but these incentives differ from those in a fee-for-service environment. With fee-for-service and traditional indemnity insurance, physicians have incentives to provide healthcare services of marginal value to the patient; under managed care, physicians have fewer incentives to provide marginally beneficial services. However, the impact of financial arrangements on quality of care remains ambiguous, because it depends on the strategic behavior of physicians with regard to their informational advantage over their patients. Using the framework of an agency theory model, we surveyed the current scientific literature to assess the impact of managed care on quality of care. We considered three different dimensions of quality of care: patient satisfaction, clinical process and outcomes of care measures, and resource utilization. Although we found no systematic differences in patient satisfaction and clinical process and outcomes between managed care and fee-for-service plans, resource utilization appears to be decreased under managed care arrangements. Given the strengths and weaknesses of fee-for-service and managed care, it is unlikely that either will displace the other as the exclusive mechanism for arranging health insurance contracts. Policy makers may be able to take advantage of the strengths of both fee-for-service and managed care financial arrangements. PMID:10170299

  15. Child Care Resource and Referral Programs and Parents' Search for Quality Child Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuqua, Robert W.; Schieck, Roberta

    1989-01-01

    Examines the consumer behaviors of 107 parents currently using family day care to assess the relationship between child care selection and the use of a child care resource and referral program (CCR&R). Parents who used a CCR&R functioned differently as consumers of child care than parents who had not used a CCR&R. (RJC)

  16. Nursing Staff Competence, Psychosocial Work Environment and Quality of Elderly Care: Impact of an Educational Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Hasson, Henna

    2006-01-01

    Insufficient competence among nursing staff is a major concern in elderly care worldwide as the healthcare needs of the elderly become increasingly complex. In previous research, insufficient competence has been associated with work dissatisfaction and stress among elderly care nurses, and with lower quality of care. This thesis describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an educational intervention for nursing staff in elderly care. In a prospective, controlled study, evaluat...

  17. Venous leg ulcer patient priorities and quality of care: results of a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica Linda; Mainz, Jan; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Karlsmark, Tonny; Gottrup, Finn

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive patient evaluation of quality of care encompasses assessment and patient-rated prioritization of the various provisions of care. One hundred consecutive venous leg ulcer patients treated in a multidisciplinary wound healing center were invited to participate in a cross...... leg ulcer care, as provided in a multidisciplinary wound healing center, was assessed as satisfactory by patients, but areas for improvement - notably, cooperation between healthcare sectors and continuity of care - were observed....

  18. UK quality statements on end of life care in dementia: a systematic review of research evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Candy, B.; Elliott, M; Moore, K.; Vickerstaff, V.; L Sampson, E.; Jones, L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Globally, the number of people who die with dementia is increasing. The importance of a palliative approach in the care of people with dementia is recognised and there are national polices to enhance current care. In the UK implementation of these polices is promoted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Dementia Quality Standards (QS). Since publication of the QS new care interventions have been developed. AIM: To explore critically the current internati...

  19. Improving quality of reproductive health care in Senegal through formative supervision: results from four districts

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira Philippe; Suh Siri; Ly Moussa

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In Senegal, traditional supervision often focuses more on collection of service statistics than on evaluation of service quality. This approach yields limited information on quality of care and does little to improve providers' competence. In response to this challenge, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has implemented a program of formative supervision. This multifaceted, problem-solving approach collects data on quality of care, improves technical competence, and enga...

  20. Hospital implementation of health information technology and quality of care: are they related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restuccia Joseph D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, there has been considerable effort to promote the use of health information technology (HIT in order to improve health care quality. However, relatively little is known about the extent to which HIT implementation is associated with hospital patient care quality. We undertook this study to determine the association of various HITs with: hospital quality improvement (QI practices and strategies; adherence to process of care measures; risk-adjusted inpatient mortality; patient satisfaction; and assessment of patient care quality by hospital quality managers and front-line clinicians. Methods We conducted surveys of quality managers and front-line clinicians (physicians and nurses in 470 short-term, general hospitals to obtain data on hospitals’ extent of HIT implementation, QI practices and strategies, assessments of quality performance, commitment to quality, and sufficiency of resources for QI. Of the 470 hospitals, 401 submitted complete data necessary for analysis. We also developed measures of hospital performance from several publicly data available sources: Hospital Compare adherence to process of care measures; Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR file; and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems HCAHPS® survey. We used Poisson regression analysis to examine the association between HIT implementation and QI practices and strategies, and general linear models to examine the relationship between HIT implementation and hospital performance measures. Results Controlling for potential confounders, we found that hospitals with high levels of HIT implementation engaged in a statistically significant greater number of QI practices and strategies, and had significantly better performance on mortality rates, patient satisfaction measures, and assessments of patient care quality by hospital quality managers; there was weaker evidence of higher assessments of patient care quality by front-line clinicians. Conclusions Hospital implementation of HIT was positively associated with activities intended to improve patient care quality and with higher performance on four of six performance measures.

  1. Monitoring and evaluating the quality of cancer care in Japan using administrative claims data

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamoto, Momoko; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Higashi, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    The importance of measuring the quality of cancer care has been well recognized in many developed countries, but has never been successfully implemented on a national level in Japan. We sought to establish a wide‐scale quality monitoring and evaluation program for cancer by measuring 13 process‐of‐care quality indicators (QI) using a registry‐linked claims database. We measured two QI on pre‐treatment testing, nine on adherence to clinical guidelines on therapeutic treatments, and two on supp...

  2. Comparing quality of care for sexually transmitted diseases in specialized and general clinics.

    OpenAIRE

    ASCH, STEVEN M.; Sa'adah, Marjorie G.; Lopez, Rajni; Kokkinis, Alicia; Richwald, Gary A.; Rhew, David C

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare quality of care for patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in specialized vs. general clinics. METHODS: The authors conducted a retrospective chart review evaluating compliance with a set of STD-related process of care quality indicators for adult patients seen in six Los Angeles County clinics (two STD specialized clinics and four general medical clinics). RESULTS: Thirty-two quality indicators were selected using a modified D...

  3. Assessment of users’ expectations, perceived quality and satisfaction with primary care in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Raftopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore users’ expectations, their perceived quality and their satisfaction with primary care services an anonymous questionnaire has been administered to a sample of 212 users.Background: Patient satisfaction with quality of primary care is a dominant concept in quality assurance and quality improvement programs.Methods: It has been used the Expectations-Perceived Quality-Satisfaction with Primary Care Services Scale (E-PQ-SPCSS that was developed and validated in this study. Data were analysed using SPSS, version 18.Results: The overall satisfaction with the primary care services was 97.2%, with the medical care provided was 95.3% and with nursing care was 92.5%. Nursing care was provided to 126 (59.4% users. These users were more satisfied (p<0.0001 with global nursing care provided (4.52±0.70 than those who were not provided a nursing care intervention (3.53±1.73. Age correlated with global satisfaction with primary care (r=0.315, p<0.001 with medical (r=0.194, p<0.001 and nursing care (r=0.183, p<0.001 as well as with expectations totalscore (r=0.295, p<0.001, perceived quality of care total score (r=0.366, p<0.001 and satisfaction with care total score (r=0.207, p=0.002. Based on Cattell’s visual scree plot, four factors accounting for 64.34% of the item covariance were extracted and rotated through factor analysis (nurse’s technical and interpersonal competence, physician’s interpersonal competence, physician’s technical competence and structure characteristics.Conclusions: The psychometric properties of the E-PQ-SPCSS were good enough indicating that the scales are reliable and adequate for group comparisons.

  4. Enhancing the quality of care in the intensive care unit: a systems engineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropello, Steven P; Ravitz, Alan D; Romig, Mark; Pronovost, Peter J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview of systems engineering and describes common core principles found in systems engineering methodologies. The Patient Care Program Acute Care Initiative collaboration between the Armstrong Institute of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, which will use systems engineering to reduce patient harm in the intensive care unit, is introduced. Specific examples of applying a systems engineering approach to the Patient Care Program Acute Care Initiative are presented. PMID:23182531

  5. Classification of Perinatal Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in classification, causes, treatment and outcome of perinatal ischemic stroke are reviewed by researchers at Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary; and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

  6. The role of Medicaid in promoting access to high-quality, high-value maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Anne Rossier; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2010-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of health care improvement and reform is ensuring that individuals, particularly those who are vulnerable and low income, have access to care. Just as challenging is the imperative to ensure that the care accessed is of the highest quality possible. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, identified the primary goal of any high-quality heath care system: The ability to furnish the right care, in the right setting, at the right time. This aim must also be the primary goal of Medicaid in regard to providing access to high-quality care for women throughout the reproductive cycle. Nationwide, Medicaid is a large purchaser of maternity care; in 2006, the program paid for 43% of all births and maternity costs represented 29% of all hospital charges to Medicaid. Under current federal law, state Medicaid agencies have to fulfill several obligations related to assessing, ensuring, and improving the quality of care, particularly for enrollees who receive services through managed care arrangements. The main purpose of this article is to analyze and describe the role of Medicaid in facilitating access to care for pregnant women and ensuring high-quality maternity care that is affordable. It first summarizes the federal Medicaid requirements regarding eligibility, coverage of benefits, financing, and service delivery, with a special emphasis on existing quality provisions. Then, it discusses current issues and recommends several Medicaid reforms, particularly in the area of quality assessment and improvement. All reforms, including Medicaid reforms, should seek to support the IOM-identified aims. Much of the emphasis in Medicaid policy development has been focused on access to care and great need for reform remains in the area of quality assurance and improvement, and disparity reduction because the program can play a significant role in this regard as well. More broadly, health care reform may provide an opportunity to revisit key issues around access to and quality of maternity care, including the benefit package, the content of services covered in the package, the frequency with which these services should be furnished, and the development of meaningful measures to capture whether women of childbearing age, including pregnant women, regardless of insurance status, indeed receive efficient, timely, effective, safe, accessible, and woman-centered maternity care. PMID:20123184

  7. Medicare: a strategy for quality assurance, I: A recapitulation of the study and a definition of quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, K N; Harris-Wehling, J

    1991-01-01

    The first of a series of articles on the Institute of Medicine study on a quality review and assurance program for Medicare, this article reviews the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the IOM study committee and discusses the quality-of-care definition, which became a focal point for the report. A QA system should achieve a balance among important dimensions of "quality of care;" several such dimensions were identified. Turning the definition into practical measurement and intervention approaches and implementing a QA strategy based on it remain significant challenges. PMID:1900934

  8. Integrating the Institute of Medicine's six quality aims into pediatric critical care: relevance and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim, Anthony D; Pollack, Murray M

    2005-05-01

    The Institute of Medicine's report Crossing the Quality Chasm recommends "six aims for improvement." The aims are safety, effectiveness, equity, timeliness, patient-centeredness, and efficiency. This review focuses on the quality of care information relevant to the Institute of Medicine's six aims to assess their relevance, potential impact, and affect on pediatric critical care practice. It is concluded that if the care for pediatric intensive care patients is to be fundamentally improved, an understanding of the current care environment, the existing evidence base, the opportunities for improvement, and the documentation of the improvements needs to be realized. The Institute of Medicine's six aims provide a useful framework to advance the quality of care in this pediatric subspecialty and perhaps others. PMID:15857522

  9. Quality: A Global Issue? An International Review of Quality in Early Childhood Care and Education 1990–2004

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The core function of the Centre for Early Childhood Development and Education (CECDE) is to produce a National Framework for Quality (NFQ) for Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) in Ireland. This comprises three distinct elements of defining, assessing and supporting quality provision in Ireland. To this end, a number of research projects have been conducted as pillars to support the NFQ, including: >Talking About Quality, a national consultation with stakeholders (CECDE,...

  10. Quality of Child Care Using the Environment Rating Scales: A Meta-Analysis of International Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Harriet J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Cárcamo, Rodrigo A.; Harrison, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study provides a systematic examination of child care quality around the globe, using the Environment Rating Scales (ERS). Additional goals of this study are to examine associations between ERS process quality and structural features (group size, caregiver-child ratio) that underpin quality and between ERS and more proximal aspects of…

  11. Care-seeking and quality of care for outpatient sick children in rural Hebei, China: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanfeng; van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Chen, Li; Car, Josip; Li, Ye; Wang, Wei; Robert W Scherpbier

    2013-01-01

    Aim To assess the quality of outpatient pediatric care provided by township and village doctors, prevalence of common childhood diseases, care-seeking behavior, and coverage of key interventions in Zhao County in China. Methods We conducted two cross-sectional surveys: 1) maternal, newborn, and child health household survey including1601 caregivers of children younger than two years; 2) health facility survey on case management of 348 sick children younger than five ye...

  12. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina O. Odusola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective: We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11 and health insurance managers (n=4. Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results: Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions: By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA.

  13. The Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) quality improvement program: an overview for medical directors and primary care clinicians in long term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouslander, Joseph G; Bonner, Alice; Herndon, Laurie; Shutes, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) is a publicly available quality improvement program that focuses on improving the identification, evaluation, and management of acute changes in condition of nursing home residents. Effective implementation has been associated with substantial reductions in hospitalization of nursing home residents. Familiarity with and support of program implementation by medical directors and primary care clinicians in the nursing home setting are essential to effectiveness and sustainability of the program over time. In addition to helping nursing homes prevent unnecessary hospitalizations and their related complications and costs, and thereby continuing to be or becoming attractive partners for hospitals, health care systems, managed care plans, and accountable care organizations, effective INTERACT implementation will assist nursing homes in meeting the new requirement for a robust quality assurance performance improvement program, which is being rolled out by the federal government over the next year. PMID:24513226

  14. Informatics Resources to Support Health Care Quality Improvement in the Veterans Health Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Denise M.; Perrin, Ruth A.; Rappaport, Steven; Stevens, Joanne M.; Demakis, John G.

    2004-01-01

    Information systems are increasingly important for measuring and improving health care quality. A number of integrated health care delivery systems use advanced information systems and integrated decision support to carry out quality assurance activities, but none as large as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The VHA's Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) is a large-scale, multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative designed to ensure excellence in all areas where VHA provides health care services, including inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. In this paper, we describe the role of information systems in the VHA QUERI process, highlight the major information systems critical to this quality improvement process, and discuss issues associated with the use of these systems. PMID:15187063

  15. Communicating for Quality in School Age Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmel, Jennifer; Grieshaber, Susan

    2014-01-01

    School Age Care (SAC) services have existed in Australia for over 100 years but they have tended to take a back seat when compared with provision for school-aged children and those under school age using early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. Many SAC services are housed in shared premises and many children attending preparatory or…

  16. What is quality improvement and why should child neurologists care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Alan; Nichol, Sarena Michell; Allred, Elizabeth N; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the 6 domains of care identified by the Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Chasm, with examples and questions that are especially relevant to physicians caring for children who have neurologic disorders and their families. PMID:21997846

  17. Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Feature: Palliative Care Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… Past Issues / Spring 2014 ... you as comfortable as possible and improve your quality of life. You don't have to be in hospice ...

  18. Perceived quality of health care services among people with osteoarthritis – results from a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grønhaug G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gudmund Grønhaug,1 Jon Hagfors,2 Ingebjørg Borch,2 Nina Østerås,1 Kåre Birger Hagen11National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, 2Norwegian Rheumatism Association, Oslo, NorwayObjective: To assess the perceived quality of care received by people with osteoarthritis (OA in Norway and explore factors associated with the quality of care.Methods: A national survey in which members of the Norwegian Rheumatism Association with OA registered as their main diagnosis completed a questionnaire. The perceived quality of care was reported on a 17-item OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator questionnaire, covering both pharmacological and non-pharmacological aspects of OA care. In addition, the four-page questionnaire covered areas related to demographic characteristics, the location and impact of the OA, and utilization and satisfaction with health care services. The quality of care is calculated as pass rates, where the numerator represents the number of indicators passed and the denominator represents the number of eligible persons.Results: In total, 1,247 participants (response rate 57% completed the questionnaire. Mean age was 68 years (standard deviation 32 and 1,142 (92% were women. Respondents reported OA in hand only (12.4%, hip only (7.3%, knee only (10.4%, in two locations (42% or all three locations (27%. The overall OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator pass rate was 47% (95% confidence interval [CI] 46%–48%, and it was higher for pharmacological aspects (53% [51%–54%] than for non-pharmacological aspects of care (44% [43%–46%]. The pass rate for the individual quality indicators ranged from 8% for “referral for weight reduction” to 81% for “receiving advice about exercises”. Satisfaction with care was strongly associated with perceived quality. The pass rate for those who were “very satisfied” was 33% (25%–40% higher than those who were “very unsatisfied” with care.Conclusion: While the OA patient seems to be rather satisfied with the perceived OA care, there is still room for improvement in the quality of care. Although the quality of care in the present study is somewhat higher than in other studies, less than 50% of the recommended care has been provided.Keywords: quality indicator, physiotherapy, general practitioner, pass rate

  19. Comparison of Healthcare Quality Outcomes Between Accountable Care Organizations and Physician Group Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhchain; Khosla, Sandeep; Sethi, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) were created under the Affordable Care Act to deliver better quality of care at reduced cost compare with the traditional fee-for-service model. But their effectiveness in achieving healthcare quality metrics is unclear. We analyzed ACO and physician group practice (PGP) performance rates for the single coronary artery disease measure and four diabetes mellitus measures now publicly reported on the Medicare Physician Compare Web site for program year 2012. There was no statistically significant difference in reported quality measures between ACOs and PGPs. Our study shows that PGPs can achieve outcomes at par with ACOs. PMID:26223106

  20. Quality of Care for Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Managed Care Medicaid Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Bussing, Regina; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Ettner, Susan; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether clinical severity is greater among children receiving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care in primary care compared with those in specialty mental health clinics, and to examine how care processes and clinical outcomes vary by sector across three 6-month time intervals. Method: This was a longitudinal…

  1. Measuring quality in maternal-newborn care: developing a clinical dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Ann E; Dunn, Sandra I; Fell, Deshayne B; Harrold, Joann; Walker, Mark C; Kelly, Sherrie; Smith, Graeme N

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy, birth, and the early newborn period are times of high use of health care services. As well as opportunities for providing quality care, there are potential missed opportunities for health promotion, safety issues, and increased costs for the individual and the system when quality is not well defined or measured. There has been a need to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure quality care within the provincial maternal-newborn system. We also wanted to provide automated audit and feedback about these KPIs to support quality improvement initiatives in a large Canadian province with approximately 140 000 births per year. We therefore worked to develop a maternal-newborn dashboard to increase awareness about selected KPIs and to inform and support hospitals and care providers about areas for quality improvement. We mapped maternal-newborn data elements to a quality domain framework, sought feedback via survey for the relevance and feasibility of change, and examined current data and the literature to assist in setting provincial benchmarks. Six clinical performance indicators of maternal-newborn quality care were identified and evidence-informed benchmarks were set. A maternal-newborn dashboard with "drill down" capacity for detailed analysis to enhance audit and feedback is now available for implementation. While audit and feedback does not guarantee individuals or institutions will make practice changes and move towards quality improvement, it is an important first step. Practice change and quality improvement will not occur without an awareness of the issues. PMID:23343794

  2. Crossing the quality chasm: creating the ideal patient care experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Kathleen S

    2007-01-01

    To create a health system that better meets patients' needs requires a fundamental redesign of our care delivery system and a new framework. Without a payment mechanism to reflect the value of care provided other than the face-to-face visit, adoption of advanced medical home principles will be challenging. The hand-off of the patient between providers and settings of care is a critical time for the patient and its effectiveness impacts patient care outcomes. The appropriate utilization of hospital and other health system resources is crucial, especially as hospitals, emergency departments, and other health care venues increasingly face capacity constraints and throughput challenges. It becomes the responsibility of the multidisciplinary team of providers to ensure that patients being discharged have an identified personal physician or team who will provide a medical home, and that the handoff to this medical home is thorough and well coordinated. An ideal patient care experience is one in which all systems and processes are geared to meet the needs of the patient: a safety-oriented system that provides standardized, evidence-based care supported by technology, but that recognizes and responds to individual needs. PMID:18080626

  3. Does quality of care for hypertension in primary care vary with postcode area deprivation? An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammouche Salah

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypertension is a common major risk factor for stroke and coronary heart disease. Little is known about how achievement of financially incentivised and non-incentivised indicators of quality of care varies with deprivation, or about the effect of financial incentives on health inequalities in hypertension. General practices in the UK have received financial incentives for high quality care since 2004. This study set out to assess the variations in achievement of incentivised and non-incentivised quality indicators for hypertension by patient area deprivation, before and after the introduction of financial incentives. Methods Achievement of 14 quality indicators for hypertension in 304 patient participants in 18 general practices in Norfolk, England was assessed one year before (2003 and one year after (2005 the introduction of financial incentives. Four indicators were incentivised and 10 were non-incentivised. Each participant's postcode was linked to an index of multiple deprivation score. Results The range of achievement of incentivised quality indicators was 65-94% in the least deprived third of participants, and 77-94% in the most deprived third in 2003 and 2005 combined. For non-incentivised indicators, the range was 7-85% in the least deprived and 24-93% in the most deprived third. Achievement of incentivised quality indicators in 2003 and 2005 combined did not vary significantly by area deprivation. Achievement of three of 10 non-incentivised indicators was higher in participants from more deprived postcode areas: providing lifestyle advice (odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.79, assessment of peripheral vascular disease (1.54, 1.02-2.35 and electrocardiography (1.38, 1.04-1.82. Conclusions Participants from more deprived areas received at least the same, and sometimes better, quality of care than those from less deprived areas. Quality of care for hypertension in general practice may not follow the inequitable distribution seen with some other conditions.

  4. Quality and Cost of Diabetes Mellitus Care in Community Health Centers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patrick; Shin, Peter; Beeson, Tishra; Burke, Laura S.; Wood, Susan F.; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine variations in the quality and cost of care provided to patients with diabetes mellitus by Community Health Centers (CHCs) compared to other primary care settings. Research Design and Methods We used data from the 2005–2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (N = 2,108). We used two dependent variables: quality of care and ambulatory care expenditures. Our primary independent variable was whether the respondent received care in a Community Health Centers (CHCs) or not. We estimated logistic regression models to determine the probability of quality of care, and used generalized linear models with log link and gamma distribution to predict expenditures for CHC users compared to non-users of CHCs, conditional on patients with positive expenditures. Results Results showed that variations of quality between CHC users and non-CHC users were not statistically significant. Patients with diabetes mellitus who used CHCs saved payers and individuals approximately $1,656 in ambulatory care costs compared to non-users of CHCs. Conclusions These findings suggest an opportunity for policymakers to control costs for diabetes mellitus patients without having a negative impact on quality of care. PMID:26636324

  5. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support

  6. Impacts of pay for performance on the quality of primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available T Allen, T Mason, W WhittakerManchester Centre for Health Economics, University of Manchester, Manchester, United KingdomAbstract: Increasingly, financial incentives are being used in health care as a result of increasing demand for health care coupled with fiscal pressures. Financial incentive schemes are one approach by which the system may incentivize providers of health care to improve productivity and/or adapt to better quality provision. Pay for performance (P4P is an example of a financial incentive which seeks to link providers' payments to some measure of performance. This paper provides a discussion of the theoretical underpinnings of P4P, gives an overview of the health P4P evidence base, and provide a detailed case study of a particularly large scheme from the English National Health Service. Lessons are then drawn from the evidence base. Overall, we find that the evidence for the effectiveness of P4P for improving quality of care in primary care is mixed. This is to some extent due to the fact that the P4P schemes used in primary care are also mixed. There are many different schemes that incentivize different aspects of care in different ways and in different settings, making evaluation problematic. The Quality and Outcomes Framework in the United Kingdom is the largest example of P4P in primary care. Evidence suggests incentivized quality initially improved following the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework, but this was short-lived. If P4P in primary care is to have a long-term future, the question about scheme effectiveness (perhaps incorporating the identification and assessment of potential risk factors needs to be answered robustly. This would require that new schemes be designed from the onset to support their evaluation: control and treatment groups, coupled with before and after data.Keywords: pay for performance, primary care, financial incentives, quality of health care

  7. Quality improvement in pre-hospital critical care: increased value through research and publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital critical care is considered to be a complex intervention with a weak evidence base. In quality improvement literature, the value equation has been used to depict the inevitable relationship between resources expenditure and quality. Increased value of pre-hospital critical care involves moving a system from quality assurance to quality improvement. Agreed quality indicators can be integrated in existing quality improvement and complex intervention methodology. A QI system for pre-hospital critical care includes leadership involvement, multi-disciplinary buy-in, data collection infrastructure and long-term commitment. Further, integrating process control with governance systems allows evidence-based change of practice and publishing of results. PMID:24887186

  8. Blueprint for action: steps toward a high-quality, high-value maternity care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angood, Peter B; Armstrong, Elizabeth Mitchell; Ashton, Diane; Burstin, Helen; Corry, Maureen P; Delbanco, Suzanne F; Fildes, Barbara; Fox, Daniel M; Gluck, Paul A; Gullo, Sue Leavitt; Howes, Joanne; Jolivet, R Rima; Laube, Douglas W; Lynne, Donna; Main, Elliott; Markus, Anne Rossier; Mayberry, Linda; Mitchell, Lynn V; Ness, Debra L; Nuzum, Rachel; Quinlan, Jeffrey D; Sakala, Carol; Salganicoff, Alina

    2010-01-01

    Childbirth Connection hosted a 90th Anniversary national policy symposium, Transforming Maternity Care: A High Value Proposition, on April 3, 2009, in Washington, DC. Over 100 leaders from across the range of stakeholder perspectives were actively engaged in the symposium work to improve the quality and value of U.S. maternity care through broad system improvement. A multi-disciplinary symposium steering committee guided the strategy from its inception and contributed to every phase of the project. The "Blueprint for Action: Steps Toward a High Quality, High Value Maternity Care System", issued by the Transforming Maternity Care Symposium Steering Committee, answers the fundamental question, "Who needs to do what, to, for, and with whom to improve the quality of maternity care over the next five years?" Five stakeholder workgroups collaborated to propose actionable strategies in 11 critical focus areas for moving expeditiously toward the realization of the long term "2020 Vision for a High Quality, High Value Maternity Care System", also published in this issue. Following the symposium these workgroup reports and recommendations were synthesized into the current blueprint. For each critical focus area, the "Blueprint for Action" presents a brief problem statement, a set of system goals for improvement in that area, and major recommendations with proposed action steps to achieve them. This process created a clear sightline to action that if enacted could improve the structure, process, experiences of care, and outcomes of the maternity care system in ways that when anchored in the culture can indeed transform maternity care. PMID:20123180

  9. Supporting employees' work-family needs improves health care quality: Longitudinal evidence from long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Kelly, Erin L; Bacic, Janine; DePasquale, Nicole; Hurtado, David; Kossek, Ellen; Sembajwe, Grace

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed qualitative and quantitative data from U.S.-based employees in 30 long-term care facilities. Analysis of semi-structured interviews from 154 managers informed quantitative analyses. Quantitative data include 1214 employees' scoring of their supervisors and their organizations on family supportiveness (individual scores and aggregated to facility level), and three outcomes: (1), care quality indicators assessed at facility level (n = 30) and collected monthly for six months after employees' data collection; (2), employees' dichotomous survey response on having additional off-site jobs; and (3), proportion of employees with additional jobs at each facility. Thematic analyses revealed that managers operate within the constraints of an industry that simultaneously: (a) employs low-wage employees with multiple work-family challenges, and (b) has firmly institutionalized goals of prioritizing quality of care and minimizing labor costs. Managers universally described providing work-family support and prioritizing care quality as antithetical to each other. Concerns surfaced that family-supportiveness encouraged employees to work additional jobs off-site, compromising care quality. Multivariable linear regression analysis of facility-level data revealed that higher family-supportive supervision was associated with significant decreases in residents' incidence of all pressure ulcers (-2.62%) and other injuries (-9.79%). Higher family-supportive organizational climate was associated with significant decreases in all falls (-17.94%) and falls with injuries (-7.57%). Managers' concerns about additional jobs were not entirely unwarranted: multivariable logistic regression of employee-level data revealed that among employees with children, having family-supportive supervision was associated with significantly higher likelihood of additional off-site jobs (RR 1.46, 95%CI 1.08-1.99), but family-supportive organizational climate was associated with lower likelihood (RR 0.76, 95%CI 0.59-0.99). However, proportion of workers with additional off-site jobs did not significantly predict care quality at facility levels. Although managers perceived providing work-family support and ensuring high care quality as conflicting goals, results suggest that family-supportiveness is associated with better care quality. PMID:27082022

  10. Continuous quality improvement in acute health care: creating a holistic and integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, N

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the range of quality activity in a National Health Service hospital trust, using a staff questionnaire survey, self-assessment against the Baldrige Quality Award criteria, and the application of the SERVQUAL approach to service quality assessment. Reviews the acute health care quality programme literature. Finds that there are needs for greater integration of quality effort, to engage with patients in a more meaningful manner, and to achieve greater commitment and involvement from clinicians and managers. Identifies lack of time and resources as a major barrier to greater application of quality programmes. Explores ways of developing a more holistic and integrated programme of quality improvement. Describes the creation and implementation of a model for continuous improvement in health care quality. PMID:10166023

  11. The short-term effects of an integrated care model for the frail elderly on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina Mijntje Looman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study explores the short-term value of integrated care for the frail elderly by evaluating the effects of the Walcheren Integrated Care Model on health, quality of life, health care use and satisfaction with care after three months.Intervention: Frailty was preventively detected in elderly living at home with the Groningen Frailty Indicator. Geriatric nurse practitioners and secondary care geriatric nursing specialists were assigned as case managers and co-ordinated the care agreed upon in a multidisciplinary meeting. The general practitioner practice functions as a single entry point and supervises the co-ordination of care. The intervention encompasses task reassignment between nurses and doctors and consultations between primary, secondary and tertiary care providers. The entire process was supported by multidisciplinary protocols and web-based patient files.Methods: The design of this study was quasi-experimental. In this study, 205 frail elderly patients of three general practitioner practices that implemented the integrated care model were compared with 212 frail elderly patients of five general practitioner practices that provided usual care. The outcomes were assessed using questionnaires. Baseline measures were compared with a three-month follow-up by chi-square tests, t-tests and regression analysis.Results and conclusion: In the short term, the integrated care model had a significant effect on the attachment aspect of quality of life. The frail elderly patients were better able to obtain the love and friendship they desire. The use of care did not differ despite the preventive element and the need for assessments followed up with case management in the integrated care model. In the short term, there were no significant changes in health. As frailty is a progressive state, it is assumed that three months are too short to influence changes in health with integrated care models. A more longitudinal approach is required to study the value of integrated care on changes in health and the preservation of the positive effects on quality of life and health care use.

  12. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  13. A timely referral to palliative care team improves quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Saraswathi Devi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the trajectory of disease progress and treatment plan, patients and the family members are confronted with challenging situations like unsurmountable physical distress, inadequate coping patterns,unanswered spiritual issues in the background of serious threat to very existence of life leads to a debilitating Quality of life.The Palliative Care team approach addresses all the issues and also sees the patient to go through the protocols of Palliative care management as well as Oncological treatment plan. Further, this fecilitates a smooth transition from the hospital to home and hospice care. Various studies conducted globally revealed that patients received palliative care intervention along with oncological treatments had higher scores of Quality of life compared to patients received onlyoncology care alone.This article discusses the various factors contributing to late referrals to palliative care team and also care giver?s views pertaining to need for early referral. Timely referral to palliative care minimises the patient?s and care giver?s distress,ensures modest Quality of life and appropriate measures at the end of life care.

  14. Service Quality of Delivered Care from the Perception of Women with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar S Tabrizi; Samira Askari; Zahra Fardiazar; Hossein Koshavar; Kamal Gholipour

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 – (Importance × Performance) based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women‟s...

  15. Quality care at the end of life in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sepulveda, Cecilia; Habiyambere, Vincent; Amandua, Jacinto; Borok, Margaret; Kikule, Ekie; Mudanga, Barbara; Ngoma, Twalib; Solomon, Bogale

    2003-01-01

    Each year about 0.5% of the total population in Botswana, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe die from HIV/AIDS or cancer. The members of a WHO project to improve palliative care in these countries discuss their work. The greatest needs of terminally ill patients were for adequate pain relief, accessible and affordable drugs, and financial support to counter the loss of income of both patient and family caregiver. Special emphasis should be given to home based palliative care provi...

  16. Measuring quality of care in nursing home - what matters?

    OpenAIRE

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2011-01-01

    Residential care in nursing homes continues to be necessary for those individuals who are no longer able to live safely and comfortably at home. The demographic change with increasing number of persons over 65 years in the next 20 years also means that the percentage of those who will require care in a nursing home some time before the end of their lives will increase. Therefore, anticipating this pressure to expand nursing home availability, it is critical that these services are developed f...

  17. Framework for assessing quality of care for inflammatory bowel disease in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rejler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To create and apply a framework for quality assessment and improvement in care for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients. METHODS A framework for quality assessment and improvement was created for IBD based on two generally acknowledged quality models. The model of Donabedian (Df offers a logistical and productive perspective and the Clinical Value Compass (CVC model adds a management and service perspective. The framework creates a pedagogical tool to understand the balance between the dimensions of clinical care (CVC and the components of clinical outcome (Df. The merged models create a framework of the care process dimensions as a whole, reflecting important parts of the IBD care delivery system in a local setting. Clinical and organizational quality measures were adopted from clinical experience and the literature and were integrated into the framework. Data were collected at the yearly check-up for 481 IBD patients during 2008. The application of the quality assessment framework was tested and evaluated in a local clinical IBD care setting in Jönköping County, Sweden. RESULTS: The main outcome was the presentation of how locally-selected clinical quality measures, integrated into two complementary models to develop a framework, could be instrumental in assessing the quality of care delivered to patients with IBD. The selected quality measures of the framework noted less anemia in the population than previously reported, provided information about hospitalization rates and the few surgical procedures reported, and noted good access to the clinic. CONCLUSION: The applied local quality framework was feasible and useful for assessing the quality of care delivered to IBD patients in a local setting.

  18. Patient Safety in Critical Care Unit: Development of a Nursing Quality Indicator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Camila S P; Barbosa, Sayonara F F

    2015-01-01

    This is a methodological study and technological production that aims to describe the development of a computerized system of nursing care quality indicators for the Intensive Care Unit. The study population consisted of a systems analyst and fifteen critical care nurses. For the development of the system we adopted some of the best practices of the Unified Process methodology using the Unified Modeling Language and the programming language Java Enterprise Edition 7. The system consists of an access menu with the following functions: Home (presents general information), New Record (records the indicator), Record (record search), Census (add information and indicators of the patient), Report (generates report of the indicators) and Annex (accesses the Braden Scale). This information system allows for measurement of the quality of nursing care and to evaluate patient safety in intensive care unit by monitoring quality indicators in nursing. PMID:26262049

  19. Implementation and quality monitoring of e-communication across health care sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Anne; Qvist, Peter

    general practice and hospitals. An important factor for patient-perceived quality of care is the cooperation between the health care sectors that provides services for the patient. In 2009 the Region of Southern Denmark launched a collaboration agreement called Sam:Bo between general practice, hospitals......Background: There has been an increased focus on how to improve the quality of care for patients that receives services from more than one sector in the health care system. Continuity in and coordination of patient pathways in the health care system are included in accreditation standards both for...... and municipalities. The Sam:Bo agreement comprises guidelines for clinical pathways that involves more than one of the participating stakeholders and specified quality standards for the content and timeliness of information exchange across sectors. Part of the Sam:Bo agreement is the implementation of...

  20. Perinatal programming prevention measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larguía, A Miguel; González, María Aurelia; Dinerstein, Néstor Alejandro; Soto Conti, Constanza

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, there has been outstanding scientific progress related to perinatal programming and its epigenetic effects in health, and we can anticipate this trend will continue in the near future. We need to make use and apply these achievements to human neurodevelopment via prevention interventions. Based on the concept of the interaction between genome and ambiome, this chapter proposes low-cost easy-implementation preventive strategies for maternal and infant health institutions.Breastfeeding and human milk administration are the first preventive measures, as has been reviewed in the policy statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Another strategy is the Safe and Family-Centered Maternity Hospitals initiative that promotes and empowers the inclusion of the families and the respect for their rights, especially during pregnancy and birth. (This change of paradigm was approved and is recommended by both United Nations Children's Fund, UNICEF, and Pan American Health Organization, PAHO.) Then, there is also an important emphasis given to the sacred hour-which highlights the impact of bonding, attachment, and breastfeeding during the first hour of life-the pain prevention and treatment in newborns, the control of the "new morbidity" represented by late preterm infants, and finally, the importance of avoiding intrauterine and extrauterine growth restriction. (However, there are not yet clear recommendations about nutritional interventions in order to diminish the potential metabolic syndrome consequence in the adult.). PMID:25287552

  1. National benchmarking between the Nordic countries on the quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mainz, Jan; Hjulsager, Morten; Eriksen, Mette Thorup; Burgaard, Jytte

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the Nordic Indicator Project that aims at describing and analysing the quality of care for important diseases in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). The Council of Ministers decided to appoint a working group for quality mapping with...... rates for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and lung cancer etc., it is difficult to yield data that are representative to the international nations as a whole. It seems that modern health care systems are not able do document their quality. At national and international level we need to invest in...... quality measurement systems and in international collaboration....

  2. What determines patients' satisfaction with their mental health care and quality of life?

    OpenAIRE

    Blenkiron, P.; Hammill, C

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated whether patients' satisfaction with their mental health care and quality of life is related to their age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis, and duration of mental disorder.

  3. What doctors think about the impact of managed care tools on quality of care, costs, autonomy, and relations with patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovier Patrick A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How doctors perceive managed care tools and incentives is not well known. We assessed doctors' opinions about the expected impact of eight managed care tools on quality of care, control of health care costs, professional autonomy and relations with patients. Methods Mail survey of doctors (N = 1546 in Geneva, Switzerland. Respondents were asked to rate the impact of 8 managed care tools on 4 aspects of care on a 5-level scale (1 very negative, 2 rather negative, 3 neutral, 4 rather positive, 5 very positive. For each tool, we obtained a mean score from the 4 separate impacts. Results Doctors had predominantly negative opinions of the impact of managed care tools: use of guidelines (mean score 3.18, gate-keeping (2.76, managed care networks (2.77, second opinion requirement (2.65, pay for performance (1.90, pay by salary (2.24, selective contracting (1.56, and pre-approval of expensive treatments (1.77. Estimated impacts on cost control were positive or neutral for most tools, but impacts on professional autonomy were predominantly negative. Primary care doctors held more positive opinions than doctors in other specialties, and psychiatrists were in general the most critical. Older doctors had more negative opinions, as well as those in private practice. Conclusions Doctors perceived most managed care tools to have a positive impact on the control of health care costs but a negative impact on medical practice. Tools that are controlled by the profession were better accepted than those that are imposed by payers.

  4. Our Day-Care Centers Respect Children: Quality Criteria for Day-Care = Criterios para um Atendimento em Creches que Respeite os Direitos Fundamentais das Criancas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maria Malta; Rosemberg, Fulvia

    Prepared as part of an effort to attain minimum quality standards for Brazilian day care centers, this document focuses on day-to-day provision of day care services for children from birth to 6 years old as well as broader day care administrative concerns. The first version of this document was prepared as part of a training project for day care…

  5. Good-quality social care for people with Parkinson’s disease: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Tod, Angela Mary; Kennedy, Fiona; Stocks, Amanda-Jayne; McDonnell, Ann; Ramaswamy, Bhanu; Wood, Brendan; Whitfield, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study examines the meaning of good-quality social care for people with Parkinson's disease and their carers. It identifies, from their perspective, the impact of good-quality social care on health and well-being. Design Qualitative case study methodology, interview and framework analysis techniques were used. Setting: community locations in the north and midlands of England. Participants Data were collected from 43 participants including individual interviews with people with P...

  6. Higher Quality of Care and Patient Safety Associated With Better NICU Work Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Eileen T; Hallowell, Sunny G; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Hatfield, Linda A; Del Guidice, Mary; Boxer, Bruce Alan; Ellis, Lauren N; Verica, Lindsey; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) work environment, quality of care, safety, and patient outcomes. A secondary analysis was conducted of responses of 1247 NICU staff nurses in 171 hospitals to a large nurse survey. Better work environments were associated with lower odds of nurses reporting poor quality, safety, and outcomes. Improving the work environment may be a promising strategy to achieve safer settings for at-risk newborns. PMID:26262450

  7. Setting up a health care quality management system in a multidisciplinary clinical research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Laktionova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issues of setting up a quality management system in a multidisciplinary specialized clinical research center. It describes the experience with information technologies used in a prophylactic facility to set up effective out- and inpatient health care control. Measures to optimize work under present-day conditions to upgrade the quality of health care are given using the federal health facility as an example.

  8. Quality of pharmaceutical care at the pharmacy counter: patients’ experiences versus video observation

    OpenAIRE

    Koster ES; Blom L; Overbeeke, van, J.J.; Philbert D; Vervloet M; Koopman L; Van Dijk L

    2016-01-01

    Ellen S Koster,1 Lyda Blom,1 Marloes R Overbeeke,1 Daphne Philbert,1 Marcia Vervloet,2 Laura Koopman,2,3 Liset van Dijk2 1Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, the Netherlands; 2Netherlands Institute of Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3National Health Care Institute, Diemen, the Netherlands Introduction: Consumer Quality Index questionnaires are used to assess quality of care from patients’ experiences.Objective: To...

  9. Selected aspects of palliative care and quality of life at the terminal stage of neoplastic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Farbicka, Paulina; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Neoplastic diseases are among the most common causes of death. The quality of life in neoplastic disease depends on the type of neoplasm, level of progression, location, treatment possibilities and prognosis. Cancer reduces the quality of life at the advanced stage of disease. At this time patients feel pain and suffering. Palliative care is used in the terminal phase of neoplastic disease. It includes overall care of an incurable patient and her/his family. The main objective of palliative c...

  10. Good-quality social care for people with Parkinson’s disease : a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Tod, A.M.; Kennedy, F; Stocks, A.J.; Ramaswamy, B; Mcdonnell, A.; Wood, B.; Whitfield, M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The study examines the meaning of good-quality social care for people with Parkinson’s disease and their carers. It identifies, from their perspective, the impact of good-quality social care on health and well-being. Design: Qualitative case study methodology, interview and framework analysis techniques were used. Setting: community locations in the north and midlands of England. Participants: Data were collected from 43 participants including individ...

  11. Localized intestinal perforations as a potential complication of brain hypothermic therapy for perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Naoto; Maiguma, Atsuko; Obinata, Kaoru; Okazaki, Tadaharu; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Brain hypothermic therapy (BHT) is becoming a frequently used standard of care for perinatal asphyxia. Although cardiovascular side effects, coagulation disorders, renal impairment, electrolyte abnormalities, impaired liver function, opportunistic infections, and skin lesions are well-known adverse effects of BHT in newborns, little information is available on the clinical features of intestinal perforation-related BHT. We herein report a case of therapeutic brain cooling for perinatal asphyxia complicated by localized intestinal perforation. In practice, the neonatologist should be aware that intestinal perforation in an infant with perinatal asphyxia is possible, particularly following BHT. PMID:26445344

  12. Effect of an Educational Toolkit on Quality of Care: A Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Baiju R.; Bhattacharyya, Onil; Yu, Catherine H.Y.; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Parsons, Janet A; Straus, Sharon E.; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2014-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Clinical practice guidelines help health care providers deliver the best care to patients by combining all the evidence on disease management into specific recommendations for care. However, the implementation of evidence-based guidelines is often far from perfect. Take the example of diabetes. This common chronic disease, which is characterized by high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood, impairs the quality of life of patients and shortens life expectancy by i...

  13. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenthal, Daniel M.; Orav, E. John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Ashish K. Jha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design: Observational study. Setting: Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants: 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metri...

  14. Adult Obesity and Office-based Quality of Care in the U.S

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jun; Xiao, Lan; Randall S. Stafford

    2009-01-01

    Nationally representative data are limited on the quality of care for obese patients in U.S. ambulatory care settings. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2005 and 2006 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, which for the first time, collected patient weights and heights during a representative sample of visits to U.S. private physician practices. We examined obesity screening, diagnosis and counseling during adult visits and associations with patient and provider characteristics...

  15. An audit of the quality of inpatient care for adults with learning disability in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehan, Rory; Gandesha, Aarti; Hassiotis, Angela; Gallagher, Pamela; Burnell, Matthew; Jones, Glyn; Kerr, Michael; Hall, Ian; Chaplin, Robert; Crawford, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To audit patient hospital records to evaluate the performance of acute general and mental health services in delivering inpatient care to people with learning disability and explore the influence of organisational factors on the quality of care they deliver. Setting Nine acute general hospital Trusts and six mental health services. Participants Adults with learning disability who received inpatient hospital care between May 2013 and April 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measure...

  16. Connecting Child Care Quality to Child Outcomes: Drawing Policy Lessons from Nonexperimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J.; Gibson-Davis, Christina M.

    2006-01-01

    Effective early childhood intervention and child care policies should be based on an understanding of the effects of child care quality and type on child well-being. This article describes methods for securing unbiased estimates of these effects from nonexperimental data. It focuses on longitudinal studies like the one developed by the National…

  17. Quality of Care for Chronic Diseases in a British Cohort of Long-Term Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Nada F; Mant, David; Rose, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Previous research has shown that long-term cancer survivors with other chronic diseases may receive poorer care for those diseases compared with the general population. We sought to establish the quality of care for chronic diseases among cancer survivors in the United Kingdom.

  18. Involving patients in care decisions improves satisfaction: an outcomes-based quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Ellen W

    2004-05-01

    A home care agency used quality improvement processes to improve patient satisfaction survey ratings. The focus was on involving patients in decisions about their care. A multidisciplinary team developed creative strategies to increase staff awareness and enhance customer service skills, which had dramatic results. PMID:15131417

  19. Next of kin's conceptions of the quality of care in the psychiatric setting: a phenomenographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Agneta; Larsson, Bodil Wilde; Ahlström, Gerd

    2007-10-01

    The next of kin play a decisive role in the care provided for patients. This and their unique experience of psychiatric care make it important to include them when defining quality of care. The aim of the present study was to describe how next of kin perceive the concept of quality of care in the case of psychiatric care. Twelve next of kin were included in a qualitative interview study and a phenomenographic approach was used for the analysis of the interviews. The next of kin described quality of care mainly from their own perspective but also to a large extent from the patient's perspective as well. Five descriptive categories resulted: dignity, security, participation, recovery, and health-promoting surroundings. Good relations and communication between staff, patients, and next of kin emerged as the central factors regarding the quality of psychiatric care. The next of kin asked for information about psychiatric illnesses and wanted to cooperate in the care. They avoid telling others about their family member's psychiatric illness because of a feeling of shame and guilt. Staff education regarding such feelings and stigmatization could be useful in furthering the understanding of the next of kin's distress and developing interventions to alleviate it. Clinical practice can be improved by guidelines and instruments developed on the basis of this study. PMID:17845550

  20. Language Differences as a Barrier to Quality and Safety in Health Care: The Joint Commission Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Schyve, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Effective communication with patients is critical to the safety and quality of care. Barriers to this communication include differences in language, cultural differences, and low health literacy. Evidence-based practices that reduce these barriers must be integrated into, rather than just added to, health care work processes.

  1. Information-Seeking in Family Day Care: Access, Quality and Personal Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, L.; Davis, E.; Cook, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Sims, M.; Herrman, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family day-care (FDC) educators work autonomously to provide care and education for children of mixed ages, backgrounds and abilities. To meet the demands and opportunities of their work and regulatory requirements, educators need access to context-relevant and high quality information. No previous research has examined how and where these workers…

  2. Antenatal umbilical cord parameters and perinatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athira Narayanan

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: No association between antenatal umbilical cord characteristics and perinatal outcome was found in pregnancies at high risk for poor perinatal outcome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(4.000: 1211-1215

  3. Quality of life of the nursing caregiver and its relationship with care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Fernando Alves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify aspects that affect the quality of life of nursing caregivers and their relationship with care in an Intensive Care Unit for Adults (A-ICU. Methods: This was a descriptive study with qualitative approach, taking as subjects 21 professionals who constitute the nursing staff of the A-ICU of a school hospital in Maringá-PR. Unstructured interview was used as a strategy to collect data, conducted between May and June 2009. Data analysis was based on the method of content analysis. The categories identified were: overlooking improvement in quality of life related to the resources in an A-ICU; the quality of life influencing the form of care; interpersonal relationships into the health team reflecting on the quality of life and care. Results: The analysis of caregivers’ speech and the results of the observation showed that there is correlation between the aspects they consider influential in their quality of life and the way of caring for patients in an A-ICU. Conclusion: The findings indicate that, among the influential aspects, the stressful factors overlap the enhancing ones. From this perspective, dealing with caregiver’s suffering might be the starting point for the improvement in quality of care in an A-ICU

  4. Quality of life of the nursing caregiver and its relationship with care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Fernando Alves

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify aspects that affect the quality of life of nursing caregivers and their relationship with care in an Intensive Care Unit for Adults (A-ICU. Methods: This was a descriptive study with qualitative approach, taking as subjects 21 professionals who constitute the nursing staff of the A-ICU of a school hospital in Maringá-PR. Unstructured interview was used as a strategy to collect data, conducted between May and June 2009. Data analysis was based on the method of content analysis. The categories identified were: overlooking improvement in quality of life related to the resources in an A-ICU; the quality of life influencing the form of care; interpersonal relationships into the health team reflecting on the quality of life and care. Results: The analysis of caregivers’ speech and the results of the observation showed that there is correlation between the aspects they consider influential in their quality of life and the way of caring for patients in an A-ICU. Conclusion: The findings indicate that, among the influential aspects, the stressful factors overlap the enhancing ones. From this perspective, dealing with caregiver’s suffering might be the starting point for the improvement in quality of care in an A-ICU.

  5. Evaluación de la mortalidad perinatal en mujeres autóctonas e inmigrantes: influencia de la exhaustividad y la calidad de los registros Perinatal mortality assessment in native and immigrant women: influence of exhaustiveness and quality of the registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Río Sánchez

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Realizar un análisis comparativo de la exhaustividad de los datos sobre mortalidad perinatal en la Comunitat Valenciana recogidos en el Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE y en el Registro de Mortalidad Perinatal (RMPCV. Posteriormente, calcular y comparar la tasa de mortalidad perinatal (TMP y sus componentes en gestantes autóctonas e inmigrantes, tomando como referencia los casos notificados a ambos registros durante 2005 y 2006. Métodos: Se definieron los distintos tipos de mortalidad de acuerdo con los criterios establecidos por la OMS. La magnitud de la infradeclaración se analizó calculando las frecuencias y porcentajes de muertes infradeclaradas para el período 2005-2006. Se calcularon y compararon las diversas tasas entre mujeres autóctonas e inmigrantes de los cuatro grupos mayoritarios a partir de ambos registros, así como los intervalos de confianza del 95% para dichas tasas. Resultados: En el INE existe un importante subregistro de muertes fetales y neonatales. Además, constan neonatos fallecidos de madre extranjera con nacionalidad española asignada. Ambos factores distorsionan la proporción de muertes fetales y neonatales en inmigrantes, y provocan una infraestimación de la TMP y sus componentes en estos colectivos, pues las obtenidas a partir del RMPCV son muy superiores en las mujeres inmigrantes, en particular en las de Europa del Este y las subsaharianas, en comparación con las autóctonas. Conclusiones: En definitiva, nuestros resultados indican que ambos registros son complementarios, pero el RMPCV presenta una mayor exhaustividad y fiabilidad para el cálculo de tasas. Además, sugieren la necesidad de monitorizar la evolución de la TMP en la población inmigrante en España.Objective: To analyze the exhaustiveness and reliability of the data on perinatal mortality in two Spanish registries, namely, the National Statistics Institute and the Perinatal Mortality Registry of the Valencian Community and to calculate and compare the perinatal mortality rate (PMR and its components in native and immigrant women, based on the cases reported to both registries in 2005 and 2006. Methods: Perinatal mortality and its components were defined according to the World Health Organization's criteria. The magnitude of underreporting was calculated by taking into account the frequencies and percentages of deaths not declared for 2005-2006. Rates and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated and compared between native and immigrant women using data from both registries. Results: Fetal and neonatal deaths were substantially underreported in the National Statistics Institute compared with the Perinatal Mortality Registry of the Valencian Community. Moreover, in the National Statistics Institute, some neonatal deaths among the offspring of immigrant women were misclassified as being of Spanish nationality. These two factors distorted the proportion of fetal and neonatal deaths in immigrant women, giving rise to an underestimation of the PMR and its components, since the rates obtained from the Perinatal Mortality Registry of the Valencian Community were higher in immigrant than in Spanish women, particularly among east-European and sub-Saharan women. Conclusions: Our results indicate that both registries are complementary. However, the Perinatal Mortality Registry of the Valencian Community was found to be more exhaustive and to have greater reliability. Our results also suggest the importance of monitoring trends in PMR in the immigrant population in Spain.

  6. Traveling abroad for medical care: U.S. medical tourists' expectations and perceptions of service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiry, Michael; Vequist, David G

    2011-01-01

    The SERVQUAL scale has been widely used to measure service quality in the health care industry. This research is the first study that used SERVQUAL to assess U.S. medical tourists' expectations and perceptions of the service quality of health care facilities located outside the United States. Based on a sample of U.S. consumers, who had traveled abroad for medical care, the results indicated that there were significant differences between U.S. medical tourists' perceived level of service provided and their expectations of the service that should be provided for four of the five dimensions of service quality. Reliability had the largest service quality gap followed by assurance, tangibles, and empathy. Responsiveness was the only dimension without a significantly different gap score. The study establishes a foundation for future research on service quality in the rapidly growing medical tourism industry. PMID:21815742

  7. QUARITE (quality of care, risk management and technology in obstetrics: a cluster-randomized trial of a multifaceted intervention to improve emergency obstetric care in Senegal and Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaye Alioune

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal and perinatal mortality are major problems for which progress in sub-Saharan Africa has been inadequate, even though childbirth services are available, even in the poorest countries. Reducing them is the aim of two of the main Millennium Development Goals. Many initiatives have been undertaken to remedy this situation, such as the Advances in Labour and Risk Management (ALARM International Program, whose purpose is to improve the quality of obstetric services in low-income countries. However, few interventions have been evaluated, in this context, using rigorous methods for analyzing effectiveness in terms of health outcomes. The objective of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the ALARM International Program (AIP in reducing maternal mortality in referral hospitals in Senegal and Mali. Secondary goals include evaluation of the relationships between effectiveness and resource availability, service organization, medical practices, and satisfaction among health personnel. Methods/Design This is an international, multi-centre, controlled cluster-randomized trial of a complex intervention. The intervention is based on the concept of evidence-based practice and on a combination of two approaches aimed at improving the performance of health personnel: 1 Educational outreach visits; and 2 the implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews. The unit of intervention is the public health facility equipped with a functional operating room. On the basis of consent provided by hospital authorities, 46 centres out of 49 eligible were selected in Mali and Senegal. Using randomization stratified by country and by level of care, 23 centres will be allocated to the intervention group and 23 to the control group. The intervention will last two years. It will be preceded by a pre-intervention one-year period for baseline data collection. A continuous clinical data collection system has been set up in all participating centres. This, along with the inventory of resources and the satisfaction surveys administered to the health personnel, will allow us to measure results before, during, and after the intervention. The overall rate of maternal mortality measured in hospitals during the post-intervention period (Year 4 is the primary outcome. The evaluation will also include cost-effectiveness. Trial Registration The QUARITE trial is registered on the Current Controlled Trials website under the number ISRCTN46950658 http://www.controlled-trials.com/.

  8. Quality of Care for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction. Cienfuegos 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda María Delgado Acosta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: assessment is a tool to improve quality of patient care. Objective: to assess the quality of care for patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to the Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos in June 2011. Methods: a research was conducted in health systems and services in which the following variables were analyzed: structures (human and material resources, processes (compliance with care protocols and results (impact on mortality. A formulary was applied to 22 patients; an observation guide was used to assess the existence of the human and material resources required for providing hospital care. Data were processed using SPSS 15,0 and they were expressed in absolute values and percentages. Results: concerning structure, there were enough essential material resources for providing medical care; problems with nursing staffing in the Cardiology Service were found. In pre-hospital care, difficulties were related to delayed presentation to consultation, aspirin prescriptions and non-performance of thrombolysis. In post-hospital care, most problems were in rehabilitation and modification of associated risk factors. In the hospital, there were difficulties in conducting ergometer tests at discharge and referring patients for rehabilitation in the health area. Conclusions: there are difficulties in quality of patient care that become more evident in primary health care.

  9. Structured chronic primary care and health-related quality of life in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schers Henk

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structured care is proposed as a lever for improving care for patients with chronic conditions. The purpose of this study was to explore the associations of structured care characteristics, derived from the Chronic Care Model, with health-related quality of life (HRQOL and optimal clinical management in chronic heart failure (CHF patients in primary care, as well as the association between optimal management and HRQOL. Methods Cross-sectional observational study using multi-level random-coefficient analyses of a representative sample of 357 patients diagnosed with CHF from 42 primary care practices in the Netherlands. We combined individual medical record data with patient and physician questionnaires. Results There was large variation in the levels and presence of structured care elements. A 91% of physicians indicated that next appointments for CHF patients were made immediately after visits, while 11% indicated that reminders on CHF management were periodically received in their practice. Few associations were found between the organizational characteristics and optimal treatment or HRQOL. Optimal pharmacological treatment related to better quality of life (β = -11.5, P P = .04. Conclusion HRQOL and treatment quality in CHF patients were not consistently associated with characteristics of structured care in primary care practices.

  10. A conceptual model for assessing quality of care for patients boarding in the emergency department: structure-process-outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan W; Singer, Sara J; Sun, Benjamin C; Camargo, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Many believe that the "boarding" of emergency department (ED) patients awaiting inpatient beds compromises quality of care. To better study the quality of care of boarded patients, one should identify and understand the mechanisms accounting for any potential differences in care. This paper presents a conceptual boarding "structure-process-outcome" model to help assess quality of care provided to boarded patients and to aid in recognizing potential solutions to improve that quality, if it is deficient. The goal of the conceptual model is to create a practical framework on which a research and policy agenda can be based to measure and improve quality of care for boarded patients. PMID:21496148

  11. The effectiveness of an aged care specific leadership and management program on workforce, work environment, and care quality outcomes: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Chenoweth, Lynn; Cunich, Michelle; Kendig, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Background A plethora of observational evidence exists concerning the impact of management and leadership on workforce, work environment, and care quality. Yet, no randomised controlled trial has been conducted to test the effectiveness of leadership and management interventions in aged care. An innovative aged care clinical leadership program (Clinical Leadership in Aged Care − CLiAC) was developed to improve managers’ leadership capacities to support the delivery of quality care in Australi...

  12. Psychometric properties of instruments to measure the quality of end-of-life care and dying for long-term care residents with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    van Soest-Poortvliet, Mirjam C.; Van der Steen, Jenny T; ZIMMERMAN, SHERYL; Cohen, Lauren W; Klapwijk, Maartje. S.; Bezemer, Mirjam; Wilco P. Achterberg; Knol, Dirk L; Ribbe, Miel W; Vet, Henrica C.W. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Quality of care for long-term care (LTC) residents with dementia at the end-of-life is often evaluated using standardized instruments that were not developed for or thoroughly tested in this population. Given the importance of using appropriate instruments to evaluate the quality of care (QOC) and quality of dying (QOD) in LTC, we compared the validity and reliability of ten available instruments commonly used for these purposes. Methods We performed prospective observations and retro...

  13. Long-term effects of perinatal glucocorticoid treatment on the heart

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, W.B. de

    2006-01-01

    Long-term effects of perinatal glucocorticoid treatment on the heart Chronic lung disease in the extremely preterm baby is still a major complication in neonatal intensive care medicine. Perinatal (ante- and neonatal) glucocorticoids are widely used to prevent severe infant respiratory syndrome and to reduce chronic lung disease. The aim of this thesis was to describe the histopathological, functional and hemodynamic impact of antenatal and neonatal glucocorticoid treatment on the developing ...

  14. Towards reduction of maternal and perinatal mortality in rural Burkina Faso : communities are not empty vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Hounton, Sennen; Byass, Peter; Brahima, Bassane

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing maternal and perinatal mortality in sub Saharan Africa remains challenging and requires effective and context specific interventions. OBJECTIVE: The aims of this paper were to demonstrate the impact of the community mobilisation of the Skilled Care Initiative (SCI) in reducing maternal and perinatal mortality and to describe the concept and implementation in order to guide replication and scaling up. DESIGNS: A quasi experimental design was used to assess the extent to wh...

  15. Towards reduction of maternal and perinatal mortality in rural Burkina Faso: communities are not empty vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Hounton, Sennen H.; Byass, Peter; Brahima, Bassane

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reducing maternal and perinatal mortality in sub Saharan Africa remains challenging and requires effective and context specific interventions. Objective: The aims of this paper were to demonstrate the impact of the community mobilisation of the Skilled Care Initiative (SCI) in reducing maternal and perinatal mortality and to describe the concept and implementation in order to guide replication and scaling up. Designs: A quasi experimental design was used to assess the extent to wh...

  16. How do physicians perceive quality of life? Ethical questioning in neonatology

    OpenAIRE

    Einaudi, Marie-Ange; Gire, Catherine; Auquier, Pascal; Le Coz, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background: The outcome of very preterm infants is marked by the development of complications that can have an impact on the quality of life of the children and their families. The concept of quality of life and its evaluation in the long term raise semantic and ethical problems for French physicians in perinatal care. Our reflection aims to gain a better understanding of the representations surrounding quality of life in neonatal medicine.Discussion: If French physicians hesitate to face thi...

  17. Anxiety, Depression, and Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Brenes, Gretchen A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Anxiety and depressive disorders have a significant and negative impact on quality of life. However, less is known about the effects of anxiety and depressive symptoms on quality of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of anxiety and depressive symptoms on emotional and physical functioning, the effects of anxiety symptoms on functioning independent of depressive symptoms, and the effects of depressive symptoms on functioning independent of anxiety symptoms.

  18. Assessing Quality across Health Care Subsystems in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, Andrea; Pagán, José A.; Wong, Rebeca

    2009-01-01

    Recent healthcare reform efforts in Mexico have focused on the need to improve the efficiency and equity of a fragmented healthcare system. In light of these reform initiatives, there is a need to assess whether healthcare subsystems are effective at providing high-quality healthcare to all Mexicans. Nationally representative household survey data from the 2006 Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (National Health and Nutrition Survey) were used to assess perceived healthcare quality across...

  19. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care: critical components in the delivery of high-quality oncology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Raj, Vishwa S; Fu, Jack B; Wisotzky, Eric M; Smith, Sean Robinson; Kirch, Rebecca A

    2015-12-01

    Palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are important collaborative referral sources for each other who can work together to improve the lives of cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by improving both quality of care and quality of life. Cancer rehabilitation and palliative care involve the delivery of important but underutilized medical services to oncology patients by interdisciplinary teams. These subspecialties are similar in many respects, including their focus on improving cancer-related symptoms or cancer treatment-related side effects, improving health-related quality of life, lessening caregiver burden, and valuing patient-centered care and shared decision-making. They also aim to improve healthcare efficiencies and minimize costs by means such as reducing hospital lengths of stay and unanticipated readmissions. Although their goals are often aligned, different specialized skills and approaches are used in the delivery of care. For example, while each specialty prioritizes goal-concordant care through identification of patient and family preferences and values, palliative care teams typically focus extensively on using patient and family communication to determine their goals of care, while also tending to comfort issues such as symptom management and spiritual concerns. Rehabilitation clinicians may tend to focus more specifically on functional issues such as identifying and treating deficits in physical, psychological, or cognitive impairments and any resulting disability and negative impact on quality of life. Additionally, although palliative care and rehabilitation practitioners are trained to diagnose and treat medically complex patients, rehabilitation clinicians also treat many patients with a single impairment and a low symptom burden. In these cases, the goal is often cure of the underlying neurologic or musculoskeletal condition. This report defines and describes cancer rehabilitation and palliative care, delineates their respective roles in comprehensive oncology care, and highlights how these services can contribute complementary components of essential quality care. An understanding of how cancer rehabilitation and palliative care are aligned in goal setting, but distinct in approach may help facilitate earlier integration of both into the oncology care continuum-supporting efforts to improve physical, psychological, cognitive, functional, and quality of life outcomes in patients and survivors. PMID:26314705

  20. Essential criteria for quality OPD services as perceived by patients in a tertiary care hospital in Faridabad City

    OpenAIRE

    Pooja Goyal; Deepak Kumar; Shivam Dixit; Suyesh Srivastav; Abhishek Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a health care system, patient's perception about quality is of utmost importance to understand the relationship between quality of care and utilization of health services. It is also treated as an outcome of health care delivery. The current study was planned to improve the quality of services rendered at tertiary care facilities by utilizing the clients' perception regarding the services. Methods: The present study was a hospital based, cross sectional type of descriptive ...

  1. Respite Care, Marital Quality, and Stress in Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Amber; Dyches, Tina Taylor; Harper, James; Roper, Susanne Olsen; South, Mikle

    2013-01-01

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at risk for having higher stress and lower marital quality than other parents. Survey data regarding respite care, marital quality, and daily hassles and uplifts were obtained from 101 mother-father dyads who were together raising at least one child with ASD (total # of children = 118).…

  2. Child Care Quality and Cognitive Development: Trajectories Leading to Better Preacademic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Sylvana M.; Mongeau, Chantal; Japel, Christa; Xu, Qian; Seguin, Jean R.; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    The associations between trajectories of child care quality from ages 2 to 4 years and children's cognitive performance at 4 years ("n" = 250) were tested. Distinct quality trajectories were identified: low and high ascending Teaching and Interactions trajectory; low and high Provision for Learning trajectory. Membership in the high ascending…

  3. Quality of Life, Values, and Teamwork in Geriatric Care: Do We Communicate What We Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Philip G.

    1995-01-01

    Outlines a framework for organizing discussions of quality of life for elderly persons with disabilities, reviews relevant empirical research, and develops a framework for understanding the different interpretations of quality of life as it is used in communication among health care providers, elderly patients, and their families. New models of…

  4. The Quality of Early Childhood Educators: Children's Interaction in Greek Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentzou, Konstantina; Sakellariou, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Though quality in early childhood education and care has attracted last decades enormous research interest there is still not a unanimous agreement about its definition. Yet, almost all definitions attempted include interaction, group size, adult:child ratio and early childhood educators' level of education, as important indices of quality.…

  5. Identifying resident care areas for a quality improvement intervention in long-term care: a collaborative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cranley Lisa A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, healthcare aides (also referred to as nurse aides, personal support workers, nursing assistants are unregulated personnel who provide 70-80% of direct care to residents living in nursing homes. Although they are an integral part of the care team their contributions to the resident care planning process are not always acknowledged in the organization. The purpose of the Safer Care for Older Persons [in residential] Environments (SCOPE project was to evaluate the feasibility of engaging front line staff (primarily healthcare aides to use quality improvement methods to integrate best practices into resident care. This paper describes the process used by teams participating in the SCOPE project to select clinical improvement areas. Methods The study employed a collaborative approach to identify clinical areas and through consensus, teams selected one of three areas. To select the clinical areas we recruited two nursing homes not involved in the SCOPE project and sampled healthcare providers and decision-makers within them. A vote counting method was used to determine the top five ranked clinical areas for improvement. Results Responses received from stakeholder groups included gerontology experts, decision-makers, registered nurses, managers, and healthcare aides. The top ranked areas from highest to lowest were pain/discomfort management, behaviour management, depression, skin integrity, and assistance with eating. Conclusions Involving staff in selecting areas that they perceive as needing improvement may facilitate staff engagement in the quality improvement process.

  6. Quality of Life of Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Conservative Care without Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    With the evidence that dialysis may not necessarily be beneficial for older adults with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), there is a growing interest in promoting conservative care without dialysis as a viable treatment option for these individuals. This review summarizes the current empirical evidence of symptom experiences and quality of life of patients receiving conservative care. Data suggest that conservative care may yield symptom experiences and quality of life that are compatible with those of patients on dialysis. However, these data are exclusively from studies conducted outside of the United States in which there were often no comparison groups or study designs that could provide high quality evidence. There is an urgent need for further research and developing a conservative care model suitable for CKD populations in the U.S. PMID:26860542

  7. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyeshmerni, Daniel; Froehlich, James B; Lewin, Jack; Eagle, Kim A

    2014-07-01

    Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:25120917

  8. Reforming Cardiovascular Care in the United States towards High-Quality Care at Lower Cost with Examples from Model Programs in the State of Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alyeshmerni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite its status as a world leader in treatment innovation and medical education, a quality chasm exists in American health care. Care fragmentation and poor coordination contribute to expensive care with highly variable quality in the United States. The rising costs of health care since 1990 have had a huge impact on individuals, families, businesses, the federal and state governments, and the national budget deficit. The passage of the Affordable Care Act represents a large shift in how health care is financed and delivered in the United States. The objective of this review is to describe some of the economic and social forces driving health care reform, provide an overview of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA, and review model cardiovascular quality improvement programs underway in the state of Michigan. As health care reorganization occurs at the federal level, local and regional efforts can serve as models to accelerate improvement toward achieving better population health and better care at lower cost. Model programs in Michigan have achieved this goal in cardiovascular care through the systematic application of evidence-based care, the utilization of regional quality improvement collaboratives, community-based childhood wellness promotion, and medical device-based competitive bidding strategies. These efforts are examples of the direction cardiovascular care delivery will need to move in this era of the Affordable Care Act.

  9. Assessing decision quality in patient-centred care requires a preference-sensitive measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer Kaltoft, Mette; Cunich, Michelle; Salkeld, Glenn; Dowie, Jack

    2014-01-01

    A theory-based instrument for measuring the quality of decisions made using any form of decision technology, including both decision-aided and unaided clinical consultations is required to enable person- and patient-centred care and to respond positively to individual heterogeneity in the value...... aspects of decision making. Current instruments using the term 'decision quality' have adopted a decision- and thus condition-specific approach. We argue that patient-centred care requires decision quality to be regarded as both preference-sensitive across multiple relevant criteria and generic across all...... conditions and decisions. MyDecisionQuality is grounded in prescriptive multi criteria decision analysis and employs a simple expected value algorithm to calculate a score for the quality of a decision that combines, in the clinical case, the patient's individual preferences for eight quality criteria...

  10. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wood

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi.Methods: This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy.Results: A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0% were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff’s knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients.Conclusion: Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training.

  11. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures.Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers.Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment.Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  12. Diffusion of information technology supporting the Institute of Medicine's quality chasm care aims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Darrell; Menachemi, Nir; Brooks, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the degree to which healthcare information technology (HIT) supporting the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) six care aims is utilized in the hospital setting and explores organizational factors associated with HIT use. Guided by the IOM's Crossing the quality chasm report and associated literature, 27 applications and/or capabilities are classified according to one or more of the six care aims. A structured survey of Florida hospitals identified the use of HIT. Results suggest that, on average, hospitals have not yet embraced HIT to support the IOM's care aims and that associated organizational factors vary according to care aim. PMID:16416889

  13. Paths to partnership: Veterans Health Administration's Journey in pilot testing breast cancer care quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Lori Hoffman

    2014-01-01

    Prioritizing personalized, proactive, patient-driven health care is among the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) transformational initiatives. As one of the largest integrated healthcare systems, the VHA sets standards for performance measures and outcomes achieved in quality of care. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a hallmark in oncology nursing care. EBP can be linked to positive outcomes and improving quality that can be influenced directly by nursing interventions. VHA oncology nurses had the opportunity to partner with the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS), ONS Foundation, and the Joint Commission in the multiyear development of a comprehensive approach to quality cancer care. Building on a platform of existing measures and refining measurement sets culminated in testing evidence-based, nursing-sensitive quality measures for reliability through the ONS Foundation-supported Breast Cancer Care (BCC) Quality Measures Set. The BCC Measures afforded the VHA to have its many sites collectively assess documentation of the symptoms of patients with breast cancer, the use of colony-stimulating factors, and education about neutropenia precautions provided. Parallel paths of the groups, seeking evidence-based measures, led to the perfect partnership in the VHA's journey in pilot testing the BCC Measures in veterans with breast cancer. This generated further quality assessments and continuous improvement projects for spread and sustainability throughout the VHA. PMID:25252994

  14. What are the effective ways to translate clinical leadership into health care quality improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McSherry R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert McSherry,1 Paddy Pearce2 1School of Health and Social Care, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, 2PKP Consulting, Yarm, United Kingdom Abstract: The presence and/or absence of effective leaders in health care can have a stark consequence on the quality and outcomes of care. The delivery of safe, quality, compassionate health care is dependent on having effective clinical leaders at the frontline. In light of the Kirkup and Francis reports, this article explores some ways of translating clinical leadership into health care quality improvement. This is achieved by exploring what is clinical leadership and why and how this is important to health care quality improvement, clinical leadership, and a duty of candor, along with the importance clinical leadership plays in the provision of quality care improvement and outcomes. Clinical leaders are not predefined roles but emerge from the complex clinical setting by gaining an acquired expertise and from how they then internalize this to develop and facilitate sound relationships within a team. Clinical leaders are effective in facilitating innovation and change through improvement. This is achieved by recognizing, influencing, and empowering individuals through effective communication in order to share and learn from and with each other in practice. The challenge for health care organizations in regard to creating organizational cultures where a duty of candor exists is not to reinvent the wheel by turning something that is simple into something complex, which can become confusing to health care workers, patients, and the public. By focusing on the clinical leader's role and responsibilities we would argue they play a crucial and pivotal role in influencing, facilitating, supporting, and monitoring that this duty of candor happens in practice. This may be possible by highlighting where and how the duty of candor can be aligned within existing clinical governance frameworks. Keywords: governance, candor, safety, outcomes 

  15. Using a big conversation to improve care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Maggie

    The Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) compiled a report on the day, in which it noted: "The overriding result was one of inspiration through being heard, having honest, genuine and open dialogue and positively engaging with like-minded people. The event gave many the confidence to try to take things forward and influence others, and there was a sense of the event being an opportunity that gave hope for the future." The next step is to set up a "nursing cabinet"--a stakeholder board that will oversee work to improve "care through the patients' eyes". This will involve health professionals, academics, voluntary organisations and patient groups. Box 1 outlines key actions taken as a result of the event. The report on the day's findings is available on the trust website. PMID:22667075

  16. Patient Satisfaction and Perceived Quality of Care Among Older Adults According to Activity Limitation Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Hillary R.; de Vries McClintock, Heather F.; Hennessy, Sean; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Streim, Joel E.; Xie, Dawei; Pezzin, Liliana E.; Kwong, Pui L.; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether patient satisfaction and perceived quality of medical care was related to stages of activity limitations among older adults. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) for calendar years 2001-2011. PARTICIPANTS A population-based sample (n= 42,584) of persons 65 years of age and older living in the community. INTERVENTIONS Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) MCBS questions were categorized under 5 patient satisfaction and perceived quality dimensions: care coordination and quality, access barriers, technical skills of primary care physicians, interpersonal skills of primary care physicians, and quality of information provided by primary care physicians. Persons were classified into a stage of activity limitation (0-IV) derived from self-reported difficulty levels performing activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). RESULTS Compared to older beneficiaries with no limitations at ADL Stage 0, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) for Stage I (mild) to Stage III (severe) for satisfaction with care coordination and quality ranged from OR = 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80-0.92) to OR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70-0.89). Compared to ADL Stage 0, satisfaction with access barriers ranged from OR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.76-0.87) at Stage I (mild) to a minimum of OR = 0.67 (95% CI: 0.59-0.76) at Stage III (severe). Similarly, compared to older beneficiaries at ADL Stage 0, perceived quality of the technical skills of their primary care physician ranged from OR = 0.87 (95% CI: 0.82-0.94) at Stage I (mild) to a minimum of OR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72-0.91) at Stage III (severe). CONCLUSIONS Medicare beneficiaries at higher stages of activity limitation although not necessarily the highest stage of activity limitation reported less satisfaction with medical care. PMID:26119464

  17. Servant leadership: enhancing quality of care and staff satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Mark W; Saunders, Nena S

    2008-09-01

    Servant leadership encompasses a powerful skill set that is particularly effective in implementing a team approach to the delivery of nursing practice. This model encourages the professional growth of nurses and simultaneously promotes the improved delivery of healthcare services through a combination of interdisciplinary teamwork, shared decision making, and ethical behavior. The authors describe the case application of servant leadership principles in a Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Intensive Care Unit located in a large urban center. PMID:18791423

  18. 'New parenting', psychotherapy, prenatal and perinatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Terence

    2007-01-01

    The health of future generations, both physical and psychological, depends upon good parental and early environment, free particularly from malnutrition, toxins and undue stress. Education about these negative influences is urgent, especially to encourage childbearing women in a healthy diet and lifestyle. The detrimental effects of cigarette smoking in pregnancy have been known since the 1970s, yet in Germany, for example, 60% of all children are conceived, carried, born into a household where at least one adult smokes. Even if the father desists from smoking at home, the nicotine in his body tissues is transmitted to anyone near him, for example his wife when they sleep near each other. More than one glass of beer, wine or spirits per week during the pregnancy can be detected at birth. Alcohol in early in the pregnancy--just when many mothers are unaware they are pregnant--an produce significant physical malformation, especially in the face. Prenatal exposure to alcohol has signilfcant effects on the intelligence and behaviour of the child. Many of these children are very restless. Even slight amounts of poisoning during the pregnancy are related to the development of a negative self-image and the compensatory behaviour of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder in later life. The Prenatal Deprivation and Poisoning Syndromes have not only been related to heart disease and eating disorders in the area of general health but also in the area of psychological health to the Borderline Personality Disorder. Undue stress of any kind during the pregnancy leads to problems for the developing child. PMID:18309768

  19. The influence of adverse events on the quality of nursing care and patients’ safety

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Mika; Grażyna Nowak-Starz; Ireneusz Kotela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : High quality of medical services is essential to proper healthcare functioning and to achieve aims. High quality of nursing care should have the same characteristics as the whole healthcare system. Although current healthcare systems focus on best quality medical services, the number of adverse events is increasing. It sometimes happens that a patient suffers injuries not due to his/her illness, but because of poorly organised healthcare. Aim of the research : To assess t...

  20. Private Health Care and Drug Quality in Germany – A Game-Theoretical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tristan Nguyen; Karsten Rohlf

    2012-01-01

    Quality of medical treatment is a major goal of Germany's statutory health insurance system. According to our game theoretical approach, existing price-discrimination between statutory and private health insurance leads to a higher quality of innovative drugs. Hence, a move into the direction of a single payer health care (so-called citizens’ insurance) should result in a reduction of innovative drugs' quality. Moreover, and in the case of citizens insurance's implementation, innovative drugs...