WorldWideScience

Sample records for product size distribution

  1. Production, depreciation and the size distribution of firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qi; Chen, Yongwang; Tong, Hui; Di, Zengru

    2008-05-01

    Many empirical researches indicate that firm size distributions in different industries or countries exhibit some similar characters. Among them the fact that many firm size distributions obey power-law especially for the upper end has been mostly discussed. Here we present an agent-based model to describe the evolution of manufacturing firms. Some basic economic behaviors are taken into account, which are production with decreasing marginal returns, preferential allocation of investments, and stochastic depreciation. The model gives a steady size distribution of firms which obey power-law. The effect of parameters on the power exponent is analyzed. The theoretical results are given based on both the Fokker-Planck equation and the Kesten process. They are well consistent with the numerical results.

  2. Optimal Length Transportation Hypothesis to Model Proteasome Product Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Zaikin, Alexey; KURTHS, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses translocation features of the 20S proteasome in order to explain typical proteasome length distributions. We assume that the protein transport depends significantly on the fragment length with some optimal length which is transported most efficiently. By means of a simple one-channel model, we show that this hypothesis can explain both the one- and the three-peak length distributions found in experiments. A possible mechanism of such translocation is provided by so-called...

  3. Measurement of concentration and size distribution of radon decay products in homes using air cleaners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By removing particles, air cleaners can also eliminate radon decay products. However, by removing the particles, the open-quotes unattachedclose quotes fraction of the radon progeny is increased leading to a higher dose per unit exposure. Thus, both the concentration and size distributions of the radon decay products are needed to evaluate air cleaners. Three types of room air cleaners, NO-RAD Radon Removal System, Electronic Air Cleaner and PUREFLOW Air Treatment System were tested in a single family home in Arnprior, Ontario (Canada). Semi-continuous measurements of radon gas concentration and radon decay product activity weighted size distribution were performed in the kitchen/dining room under real living conditions. The effects of air cleaners on both the concentration and size distribution of the radon decay products were measured, and their impact on the dose of radiation given to the lung tissue were examined

  4. Firm size and productivity. Evidence from the electricity distribution industry in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovar, Beatriz [Departmento de Analisis Economico Aplicado y EIT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Javier Ramos-Real, Francisco [Departamento de Analisis Economico, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas y Empresariales, Campus de Guajara, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife, Espana (Spain); De Almeida, Edmar Fagundes [IE-UFRJ (Instituto de Economia-Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro) (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper we apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis through a distance function to investigate the impact of firm size on productivity development in electricity distribution. We use a sample of seventeen Brazilian firms from 1998 to 2005 and decompose productivity into technical efficiency, scale efficiency and technical change. Moreover, a further step is to decompose the technical change measurement into several components. The results indicate that firm size is important for industry's productivity, and therefore a key aspect to consider when making decisions that affect the market structure in the electricity distribution industry. (author)

  5. Firm size and productivity. Evidence from the electricity distribution industry in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis through a distance function to investigate the impact of firm size on productivity development in electricity distribution. We use a sample of seventeen Brazilian firms from 1998 to 2005 and decompose productivity into technical efficiency, scale efficiency and technical change. Moreover, a further step is to decompose the technical change measurement into several components. The results indicate that firm size is important for industry's productivity, and therefore a key aspect to consider when making decisions that affect the market structure in the electricity distribution industry. - Research Highlights: ?We apply Stochastic Frontier Analysis through a distance function to investigate the impact of firm's size on productivity development in electricity distribution using a sample of eighteen Brazilian firms from 1998 to 2005. ?Productivity is decomposed into technical efficiency, scale-efficiency and technical change. ?Firm size is important for the industry's productivity, and therefore a key aspect to consider when making decisions that affect the market structure in the electricity distribution industry.

  6. SILICATE DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION FROM HYPERVELOCITY COLLISIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR DUST PRODUCTION IN DEBRIS DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragments generated by high-velocity collisions between solid planetary bodies are one of the main sources of new interplanetary dust particles. However, only limited ranges of collision velocity, ejecta size, and target materials have been studied in previous laboratory experiments, and the collision condition that enables the production of dust-sized particles remains unclear. We conducted hypervelocity impact experiments on silicate rocks at relative velocities of 9 to 61 km s-1, which is beyond the upper limit of previous laboratory studies. Sub-millimeter-diameter aluminum and gold spheres were accelerated by laser ablation and were shot into dunite and basalt targets. We analyzed the surfaces of aerogel blocks deployed near the targets using an electron probe micro analyzer and counted the number of particles that contained the target material. The size distributions of ejecta ranged from five to tens of microns in diameter. The total cross-sectional area of dust-sized ejecta monotonically increased with the projectile kinetic energy, independent of impact velocity, projectile diameter, and projectile and target material compositions. The slopes of the cumulative ejecta-size distributions ranged from -2 to -5. Most of the slopes were steeper than the -2.5 or -2.7 that is expected for a collisional equilibrium distribution in a collision cascade with mass-independent or mass-dependent catastrophic disruption thresholds, respectively. This suggests that the steep dust size-distribution proposed for the debris disk around HD172555 (an A5V star) could be due to a hypervelocity collision.

  7. Silicate Dust Size Distribution from Hypervelocity Collisions: Implications for Dust Production in Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasawa, S.; Nakamura, A. M.; Kadono, T.; Arakawa, M.; Dohi, K.; Ohno, S.; Seto, Y.; Maeda, M.; Shigemori, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Sakaiya, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sano, T.; Otani, K.; Watari, T.; Sangen, K.; Setoh, M.; Machii, N.; Takeuchi, T.

    2011-06-01

    Fragments generated by high-velocity collisions between solid planetary bodies are one of the main sources of new interplanetary dust particles. However, only limited ranges of collision velocity, ejecta size, and target materials have been studied in previous laboratory experiments, and the collision condition that enables the production of dust-sized particles remains unclear. We conducted hypervelocity impact experiments on silicate rocks at relative velocities of 9 to 61 km s-1, which is beyond the upper limit of previous laboratory studies. Sub-millimeter-diameter aluminum and gold spheres were accelerated by laser ablation and were shot into dunite and basalt targets. We analyzed the surfaces of aerogel blocks deployed near the targets using an electron probe micro analyzer and counted the number of particles that contained the target material. The size distributions of ejecta ranged from five to tens of microns in diameter. The total cross-sectional area of dust-sized ejecta monotonically increased with the projectile kinetic energy, independent of impact velocity, projectile diameter, and projectile and target material compositions. The slopes of the cumulative ejecta-size distributions ranged from -2 to -5. Most of the slopes were steeper than the -2.5 or -2.7 that is expected for a collisional equilibrium distribution in a collision cascade with mass-independent or mass-dependent catastrophic disruption thresholds, respectively. This suggests that the steep dust size-distribution proposed for the debris disk around HD172555 (an A5V star) could be due to a hypervelocity collision.

  8. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 microm) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 micro

  9. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.J. Walqui; T.C. Eisele; S.K. Kawatra

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production.

  10. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHOUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.J. Walqui; T.C. Eisele; S.K. Kawatra

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production.

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHOUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.J. Walqui; T.C. Eisele; S.K. Kawatra

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding and maximizing energy efficiency, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.J. Walqui, T.C. Eisele, S.K. Kawatra

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production.

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.C. Eisele; S.K. Kawatra; H.J. Walqui

    2004-10-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This is being accomplished by mathematical modeling of the grinding circuits to determine how to correct this problem. The approaches taken included (1) Modeling of the circuit to determine process bottlenecks that restrict flowrates in one area while forcing other parts of the circuit to overgrind the material; (2) Modeling of hydrocyclones to determine the mechanisms responsible for retaining fine, high-density particles in the circuit until they are overground, and improving existing models to accurately account for this behavior; and (3) Evaluation of advanced technologies to improve comminution efficiency and produce sharper product size distributions with less overgrinding.

  14. Optimization of Comminution Circuit Throughput and Product Size Distribution by Simulation and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; T. Weldum; D. Larsen; R. Mariani; J. Pletka

    2005-03-31

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This is being accomplished by mathematical modeling of the grinding circuits to determine how to correct this problem. The approaches taken included (1) Modeling of the circuit to determine process bottlenecks that restrict flow rates in one area while forcing other parts of the circuit to overgrind the material; (2) Modeling of hydrocyclones to determine the mechanisms responsible for retaining fine, high-density particles in the circuit until they are overground, and improving existing models to accurately account for this behavior; and (3) Evaluation of advanced technologies to improve comminution efficiency and produce sharper product size distributions with less overgrinding.

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; T. Weldum; D. Larsen; R. Mariani; J. Pletka

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This is being accomplished by mathematical modeling of the grinding circuits to determine how to correct this problem. The approaches taken included (1) Modeling of the circuit to determine process bottlenecks that restrict flowrates in one area while forcing other parts of the circuit to overgrind the material; (2) Modeling of hydrocyclones to determine the mechanisms responsible for retaining fine, high-density particles in the circuit until they are overground, and improving existing models to accurately account for this behavior; and (3) Evaluation of advanced technologies to improve comminution efficiency and produce sharper product size distributions with less overgrinding.

  16. Stratospheric aerosol size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of observational results with ruby laser radar (lambda =6943A) backscattering and data on small ions, we examined typical stratospheric aerosol size distribution so far proposed. Power law size distribution and bimodal size distribution can explain both the laser radar backscattering coefficient and small ion density if we take into account the existence of numerous Aitken particles. Thus we cannot determine aerosol size distribution uniquely at the present stage of the investigations. We will examine here bimodal size distribution in some detail by considering the elementary physical processes. Power law size distribution, we suppose, is produced by in situ sulfuric acid particle nucleation. This size distribution is modified by increased outer particle injection such as a meteor particle or a volcanic eruption. When meteor particles are undergoing sedimentation, eddy diffusion, and growing by attachment of sulfuric acid particles which have a mean radius 5 x 10-3 ?m, assuming the power law size distribution, then meteor particle size distribution is lognormal. Bimodal size distribution is formed by both the lognormal size distribution and the preexisting Aitken size sulfuric acid particles. (auth.)

  17. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; H.J. Walqui

    2002-10-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing he product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. This will save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, and will also reduce the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production. In the seventh quarter of this project, analysis of the plant operation identified sources of overgrinding in the circuit. Overgrinding was primarily caused by two effects: (1) The hydrocyclones used to close the circuit and remove fully-ground particles from the circuit were preferentially returning high-density ore particles to the secondary mills for regrinding even after they were already ground to pass the desired product size, and (2) The primary grinding mills were operating at less than full capacity, suggesting that a shift of grinding load to the primary mills could liberate more material before it reached the secondary mills, allowing more complete liberation with a coarser grind. Circuit modeling is underway to determine how best to modify the circuit to reduce these effects.

  18. Size distribution of radon decay products in the range 0.1-10 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Michael; Rogozina, Marina; Suponkina, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Information about the size distribution of radioactive aerosols in nanometre range is essential for the purposes of air contamination monitoring, dose assessment to respiratory tract and planning of protective measures. The diffusion battery, which allows capturing particles in the size range of 0.1-10 nm, has developed. Interpreting data obtained from diffusion battery is very complex. The method of expectation maximisation by Maher and Laird was chosen for indirect inversion data. The experiments were performed in the box with equivalent equilibrium concentration of radon in the range of 7000-10,000 Bq m(-3). The three modes of size distribution of radon decay products aerosols were obtained: activity median thermodynamic diameter (AMTD) 0.3, 1.5 and 5 nm. These modes can be identified as: AMTD 0.3 nm--atoms of radon progeny (218Po in general); AMTD 1.5 nm--clusters of radon progeny atoms and non-radioactive atoms in the atmosphere; AMTD 5 nm--particles formed by coagulation of previous mode clusters with existing aerosol particles or nucleation of condensation nuclei containing atoms of radon progeny. PMID:24711527

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.J. Walqui; T.C. Eisele; S.K. Kawatra

    2004-07-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This is being accomplished by mathematical modeling of the grinding circuits to determine how to correct this problem. It has been determined that, for mixtures of approximately equal quantities of high-density minerals (such as iron oxides) and low-density minerals (such as quartz), existing hydrocyclone models fail to accurately predict the hydrocyclone behavior. Since the hydrocyclone is the key unit controlling the particle size, an accurate model of these units is required and is being fully developed. Experimental work has demonstrated that the previous models are inaccurate due to incorrect assumptions concerning the change in hydrocyclone cut size as a function of changing particle density.

  20. Optimization of Comminution Circuit Throughput and Product Size Distribution by Simulation and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; T. Weldum; D. Larsen; R. Mariani; J. Pletka

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this project was to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process were used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced could be minimized. The goal was to save energy by reducing the amount of material that was ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that were too fine to be useful. Extensive plant sampling and mathematical modeling of the grinding circuits was carried out to determine how to correct this problem. The approaches taken included (1) Modeling of the circuit to determine process bottlenecks that restrict flowrates in one area while forcing other parts of the circuit to overgrind the material; (2) Modeling of hydrocyclones to determine the mechanisms responsible for retaining fine, high-density particles in the circuit until they are overground, and improving existing models to accurately account for this behavior; and (3) Evaluation of the potential of advanced technologies to improve comminution efficiency and produce sharper product size distributions with less overgrinding. The mathematical models were used to simulate novel circuits for minimizing overgrinding and increasing throughput, and it is estimated that a single plant grinding 15 million tons of ore per year saves up to 82.5 million kWhr/year, or 8.6 x 10{sup 11} BTU/year. Implementation of this technology in the midwestern iron ore industry, which grinds an estimated 150 million tons of ore annually to produce over 50 million tons of iron ore concentrate, would save an estimated 1 x 10{sup 13} BTU/year.

  1. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on rates and size distribution of primary production by Lake Erie phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of natural solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), particularly UVB (297-320 nm), on phytoplankton primary production in Lake Erie was investigated during the spring and summer of 1997. Radiocarbon incorporation and size-selective filtration was used to trace total production and its distribution among particulate and dissolved pools. On average, 1-h exposures produced half the UVB-dependent inhibition of total production realized in 8-h exposures, indicating rapid kinetics of photoinhibition. Cumulative UVB-dependent photoinhibition averaged 36% in 8-h simulated surface exposures. The efficiency of photoinhibition was greater for N-deficient than N-replete communities, but was not related to phytoplankton light history, P limitation, or the dominant genera. The proportion of recently fixed carbon occurring in the dissolved pool after 8-h exposures was significantly greater in higher-UVB treatments, whereas the share in picoplankton (<2 ?m) was significantly lower. Significant UVB-dependent inhibition of total production was limited on average to relatively severe exposures, but the rapid kinetics of inhibition and the apparent effects on the allocation of carbon suggest it may be important to the lake's food web. Differences in optical properties and thermal stratification patterns suggested that the relatively turbid west basin was potentially more susceptible to UVR photoinhibition than the more transparent east or central basins. (author)

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; H.J. Walqui

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. This will save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, and will also reduce the quantity of materials wasted as slimes that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production. In the sixth quarter of this project, work was centered on analyzing the considerable plant data gathered during the first year of the project. Modeling is being carried out of the hydrocyclone portion of the grinding circuit, since this has been identified as the primary source of overgrinding and inefficiency.

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; H.J. Walqui

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this project is to improve the energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. This will save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground to below the target size, and will also reduce the quantity of material wasted as slimes that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production. In the first quarter of this project, work was completed on a basic comminution model that will be used to carry out the subsequent project tasks. This phase of the work was supported by the Electric Power Research Institute, as their cost-share contribution to the project. The model has been implemented as an Excel spreadsheet, which has the advantage of being a very portable format that can be made widely available to the industry once the project is completed.

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this project is to improve the energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. This will save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground to below the target size, and will also reduce the quantity of material wasted as slimes that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production. In the first quarter of this project, work was completed on a basic comminution model that will be used to carry out the subsequent project tasks. This phase of the work was supported by the Electric Power Research Institute, as their cost-share contribution to the project. The model has been implemented as an Excel spreadsheet, which has the advantage of being a very portable format that can be made widely available to the industry once the project is completed

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele, H.J. Walqui

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing he product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. This will save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, and will also reduce the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production. In previous quarters, it was determined that the primary grinding mills were operating at less than full capacity, suggesting that a shift of grinding load to the primary mills could liberate more material before it reached the secondary mills, allowing more complete liberation with a coarser grind. In the eighth quarter, further analysis was carried out to determine the full extent of the benefit that could be obtained by this shift in grinding load. A key part of this analysis was the development of a correlation of the circuit capacity with (a) ore work index, (b) the quantity of primary mill ''pebbles'' that were crushed by a cone crusher in the circuit, and (c) the fraction of the crushed pebbles that were also processed by a high-pressure roll mill.

  6. Assisted spray pyrolysis production and characterisation of ZnO nanoparticles with narrow size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-sized ZnO particles with a narrow size distribution and high crystallinity were prepared from aqueous solutions with high concentrations of Zn2+ containing salts and citric acid in a conventional spray pyrolysis setup. Structure, morphology and size of the produced material were compared to ZnO material produced by simple spray pyrolysis of zinc nitrates in the same experimental setup. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography it has been shown that citric acid-assisted spray pyrolysed material is made up of micron sized secondary particles comprising a shell of lightly agglomerated, monocrystalline primary ZnO nanoparticles with sizes in the 20-30 nm range, separable by a simple ultrasonic treatment step.

  7. Investigation of pore size and energy distributions by statistical physics formalism applied to agriculture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouaini, Fatma; Knani, Salah; Yahia, Manel Ben; Bahloul, Neila; Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb; Kechaou, Nabil

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new investigation that allows determining the pore size distribution (PSD) in a porous medium. This PSD is achieved by using the desorption isotherms of four varieties of olive leaves. This is by the means of statistical physics formalism and Kelvin's law. The results are compared with those obtained with scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on the distribution function of pores has been studied. The influence of each parameter on the PSD is interpreted. A similar function of adsorption energy distribution, AED, is deduced from the PSD.

  8. OPTIMIZATION OF COMMINUTION CIRCUIT THROUGHPUT AND PRODUCT SIZE DISTRIBUTION BY SIMULATION AND CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.J. Walqui; T.C. Eisele; S.K. Kawatra

    2003-04-01

    The goal of this project is to improve energy efficiency of industrial crushing and grinding operations (comminution). Mathematical models of the comminution process are being used to study methods for optimizing the product size distribution, so that the amount of excessively fine material produced can be minimized. The goal is to save energy by reducing the amount of material that is ground below the target size, while simultaneously reducing the quantity of materials wasted as ''slimes'' that are too fine to be useful. This will be accomplished by: (1) modeling alternative circuit arrangements to determine methods for minimizing overgrinding, and (2) determining whether new technologies, such as high-pressure roll crushing, can be used to alter particle breakage behavior to minimize fines production. During this quarter, work was focused on three areas: (1) The mathematical relationship developed for predicting plant throughput was improved, based on ore work index and equipment parameters measured in the plant over an extended period. It was determined that the model would need to fit two distinct regimes of grinding circuit operation, depending on the work index of the feed ore. (2) Plans for a proposed change in the circuit configuration at an iron ore plant are being made, to test predictions based on the work done to date in the project. After determining the desired circuit change, which would require screening a portion of the grinding slurry, samples were sent to an industrial screen manufacturer for pilot plant scale testing. These tests indicated that the screening could be carried out economically, and plans are proceeding to conduct trials of the proposed circuit alteration. (2) The mathematical model used for hydrocyclone simulations was found to be unable to fully predict the ''fish-hook'' behavior that is seen in the plant samples. The model was therefore improved by including empirically-determined terms so that it would be able to account for the observed phenomenon. A more advanced model is currently under development that will take account of measured slurry viscosity, in order to more accurately model the behavior of hydrocyclones with concentrated slurries of very fine particles.

  9. Production of Palm Shell-Based Activated Carbon with More Homogeniouse Pore Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arami-Niya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm shell as a raw material was used for the preparation of activated carbon adsorbents. The precursor was first activated chemically with small proportion of zinc chloride and phosporic acid and then the prepared samples were treated with CO2 flow at 850°C at different activation time. The samples activated chemically with phosphoric acid showed higher surface area and pore volume compared to the samples activated using zinc chloride as chemical agent, at the same duration. In addition, it was shown that extra physical activation will grantees more developed pore structure. In terms of pore size distribution the combined preparation method resulted in a better and more homogenous pore size distribution than the commercial palm shell based activated carbon.

  10. Business size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hulst, R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2001-10-01

    In a recent work, we introduced two models for the dynamics of customers trying to find the business that best corresponds to their expectation for the price of a commodity. In agreement with the empirical data, a power-law distribution for the business sizes was obtained, taking the number of customers of a business as a proxy for its size. Here, we extend one of our previous models in two different ways. First, we introduce a business aggregation rate that is fitness dependent, which allows us to reproduce a spread in empirical data from one country to another. Second, we allow the bankruptcy rate to take a different functional form, to be able to obtain a log-normal distribution with power-law tails for the size of the businesses.

  11. Evaluation of the radiological impact of mineral products as a function of particle size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Faanhof; M. van Staden; I. Kungoane [NECSA, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2008-01-15

    Naturally occurring radioactive material, often referred to as NORM, is found throughout the earth's crust and forms part of the natural radiation background to which all humans are exposed. Normally the radionuclides found in NORM are members of the radioactive decay chains of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th. Human activities like mining and mineral processing and extraction of petroleum products may concentrate the radionuclides in the work environment. Such alteration of the natural environment can increase the radiation exposure of workers and the public. Mineral products like zircon, rutile, ilmenite, monazite, baddeleyite, coal and titanium slag obtained from various mineral deposits in South Africa contain noticeable quantities of TENORM. Dust generated during transport, handling and reprocessing of the material could pose a radiological risk on inhalation of the respirable fraction. An analytical procedure has been developed to quantify this potential risk to workers, which may alleviate intensive workplace and personnel monitoring. 30 refs., 1 fig., 1 app.

  12. Ceria nanoparticles: Size, size distribution, and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Jin, Qiang; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2004-04-01

    Nanocrystalline ceria particles have been prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of cerium nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at room temperature. The smallest size of nanoparticles synthesized is 2 nm. For each batch prepared, a narrow size distribution is found with a standard deviation less than ±15%. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation shows that these particles are single crystals having either an octahedral shape with eight {111} surfaces, or with an additional {200} surface-truncated octahedral shape. In-situ ultraviolet-visible light absorption has been performed to measure the absorption edge and to monitor the growth of nanoparticles. The results from light absorption correlate well with those of the TEM images, providing an in-situ method to measure the particle size during synthesis.

  13. Antioxidant capacity of hydrolyzed animal by-products and relation to amino acid composition and peptide size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Trine; Lametsch, René; Otte, Jeanette

    2015-10-01

    The antioxidative capacity of six different tissue hydrolysates (porcine colon, heart and neck and bovine lung, kidney and pancreas) were tested by three different assays monitoring iron chelation, ABTS radical scavenging and inhibition of lipid oxidation in emulsions, respectively. The hydrolysates were also investigated with respect to amino acid composition and peptide size distribution. The hydrolysates contained peptides ranging from 20 kDa to below 100 Da with a predominance of peptides with low molecular weight (53.8 to 89.0 % below 3 kDa). All hydrolysates exhibited antioxidant activity as assessed with all three methods; inhibition of lipid oxidation ranging from 72 to 88 % (at a final protein concentration of 7 mg/mL), iron chelation capacity from 23 to 63 % (at 1.1 mg/mL), and ABTS radical scavenging from 38 to 50 % (at 10 ?g /mL). The antioxidant activity did not correlate with the proportion of low molecular weight peptides in the hydrolysed tissues, but with the content of specific amino acid residues. The ABTS radical scavenging capacity of the tissues was found to correlate with the content of Trp, Tyr, Met and Arg, whereas the ability to inhibit the oxidation of lineoleic acid correlated with the content of Glu and His. The chosen animal by-products thus represent a natural source of antioxidants with potential for food application. PMID:26396396

  14. Grain size distribution in seeded large grain size UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large grain size fuel is seen as desirable for the reduction of fission gas release. Conventional techniques to obtain a large grained UO2 include the use of dopants, elevated temperatures, oxidising atmospheres (with or without dopants) and greatly increased cycle times. Although each approach may, ultimately, result in a large grain size fuel, manufacturing considerations may outweigh performance benefits. Similarly performance benefits of doped material, in terms of an improved fission gas retention, may also not be realisable. Seeding is a novel technique for obtaining a large grain sized UO2 in which preferential growth of introduced seed crystals results in a large grain microstructure. By selecting the appropriate size and concentration of seeds, a large grain size fuel is obtained using conventional plant and standard processing cycles. Such grain sizes could only be achieved in a similar time in undoped material by sintering at 2000 deg. C. Additionally, as the seed crystals comprise UO2 there can be no implications, for fuel chemistry, of adopting the approach. Grain size distributions are presented on seeded material sintered in production furnaces for one and two conventional cycles. These show that a fully recrystallised microstructure, comprising a large grain size, can be obtained after one process cycle. Where the seed size is larger and the quantity of nuclei is correspondingly reduced, the time to achieve full recrystallisation is longer, necessitating a second pass through the sintering furnace. However the grain size that could potentially be achieved in these circumstances is larger. (author)

  15. Role of base plate rotational speed in controlling spheroid size distribution and minimizing oversize particle formation during spheroid production by rotary processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, C V; Wan, L S; Heng, P W

    2000-09-01

    The occurrence of material adhesion and formation of oversize particles in the product yield during one-pot spheroid production by rotary processing leads to a less predictable process and a decrease in the usable portion of the total product yield obtained from each production run. The use of variable speeds of the rotating frictional base plate during the spheronization run was investigated for achieving optimal spheroid production. When the base plate speed was increased during liquid addition, the greater centrifugal forces generated improved liquid distribution and the mixing of the moist powder mass, resulting in a decrease in the amount of oversize particles formed. When the base plate was maintained at a high speed throughout the run, the amount of oversize particles and mean spheroid size increased, and a greater "between batch" mean spheroid size variability was also observed. The findings showed that, when higher speeds were used, the residence time must be adjusted accordingly to avoid excessive coalescence and growth while maintaining even liquid distribution. A "low-high-low" speed variation during rotary processing may be used to produce spheroids with a narrow size distribution and with a minimal amount of oversize particles in the total product yield. PMID:10914319

  16. Activity size distribution of some natural radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohery, M; Abdallah, A M; Al-Amoudi, Z M; Baz, S S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the results concerning the activity size distribution of the long-lived ((210)Pb) radon decay product aerosols and the thoron decay product aerosols ((212)Pb) and ((7)Be) of the outdoor atmosphere are presented. Also, the mass size distribution of the aerosol particles is determined. The low-pressure Berner cascade impactor Model 20/0.015 was used as a sampling device. The activity size distribution of these radionuclides was determined by one log-normal distribution (accumulation mode) whereas the mass size distribution was by two log-normal distributions (accumulation and coarse mode). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (212)Pb was found to be 305 nm with a geometric standard deviation (?g) of 2.41. The specific air activity concentration of (212)Pb was found to be 0.14 ± 0.012 Bq m(-3). An AMAD of (210)Pb of 610 nm with ?g of 1.8 was determined, whereas that of 550 nm with ?g of 1.97 was determined for (7)Be. The specific air activity concentration of (210)Pb and (7)Be was found to be 0.0016±2.5×10(-4) and 0.00348 ± 4×10(-4) Bq m(-3), respectively. Using a dosimetric model, the total deposition fraction as well as the total equivalent dose has been evaluated considering the observed parameters of the activity size distribution of (212)Pb. At a total deposition fraction of ?21 %, the total equivalent dose was found to be 0.41 µSv. PMID:24106329

  17. MD simulations to evaluate the influence of applied normal stress or deformation on defect production rate and size distribution of clusters in cascade process for pure Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stress influence on the defect production rate and size distribution of defect clusters in cascades was evaluated by molecular dynamics method. Stress was applied by exerting uni-axial, hydrostatic and isometric strain into the cell. For the uni-axial case, strain was varied between -1% and 1%. Defect production rate in cascade increased significantly under uni-axial tensile stress, and even under uni-axial compressive one. The largest increase of defect production rate was observed under isometric strain, and not so much under hydrostatic one. These results indicate that deformation anisotropy is a key factor to increase defect production rate. It was also found that larger defect clusters were formed under the strain condition in which defect production rate is higher.

  18. Market Size, Trade, and Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaviano, Gianmarco; Melitz, Marc

    2008-01-01

    We develop a monopolistically competitive model of trade with firm heterogeneity—in terms of productivity differences—and endogenous differences in the "toughness" of competition across markets—in terms of the number and average productivity of competing firms. We analyse how these features vary across markets of different size that are not perfectly integrated through trade; we then study the effects of different trade liberalization policies. In our model, market size and trade affect the t...

  19. Size distribution of unattached and aerosol-attached short-lived radon decay products: some results of intercomparison measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of radiation protection programmes supported by the CEC, the US-DOE, and the Australian Government, intercomparison measurements were performed in a house with elevated radon concentrations in Northern Bavaria (Germany) in October 1991. Besides the research aspects of aerosol sciences, the purpose of this joint measurement was to compare dose conversion factors calculated from the results obtained by these three laboratories. In low ventilated rooms with moderate aerosol particle concentrations (Z = 4000-8000 cm-3) about 40% of the 218Po activity is associated with clusters, narrow in shape (?g) g) > 1.2, fraction = 10%) of the 'unattached' part of the 218Po distribution with a median diameter of 3-4 nm. The averaged (3 days) derived effective dose conversion factors (HE-DCF) from the 218Po values - measured by the three groups -differ less than 30%. However, the daily averaged values sometimes differ by a factor of 2. In general, it does not appear to make much difference to the derived conversion factors if the ultrafine mode (-3) about 40% of the 218Po activity is associated with clusters, narrow in shape (?g) g) > 1.2, fraction = 10%) of the 'unattached' part of the 218Po distribution with a median diameter of 3-4 nm. The averaged (3 days) derived effective dose conversion factors (HE-DCF) from the 218Po values - measured by the three groups -differ less than 30%. However, the daily averaged values sometimes differ by a factor of 2. In general, it does not appear to make much difference to the derived conversion factors if the ultrafine mode (< 10 nm) is unimodal or bimodal. The median diameters of the aerosol-attached fraction of the short-lived radon decay products ranged between 200 and 350 nm, depending on the different methods used by the three laboratories. However, these fair

  20. Comparative physical-chemical characterization of encapsulated lipid-based isotretinoin products assessed by particle size distribution and thermal behavior analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carla Aiolfi, E-mail: carlaaiolfi@usp.br [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Menaa, Farid [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg 97080 (Germany); Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Menaa, Bouzid, E-mail: bouzid.menaa@gmail.com [Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Quenca-Guillen, Joyce S. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Matos, Jivaldo do Rosario [Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Mercuri, Lucildes Pita [Department of Exact and Earth Sciences, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Diadema, SP 09972-270 (Brazil); Braz, Andre Borges [Department of Engineering of Mines and Oil, Polytechnical School, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Rossetti, Fabia Cristina [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14015-120 (Brazil); Kedor-Hackmann, Erika Rosa Maria; Santoro, Maria Ines Rocha Miritello [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2010-06-10

    Isotretinoin is the drug of choice for the management of severe recalcitrant nodular acne. Nevertheless, some of its physical-chemical properties are still poorly known. Hence, the aim of our study consisted to comparatively evaluate the particle size distribution (PSD) and characterize the thermal behavior of the three encapsulated isotretinoin products in oil suspension (one reference and two generics) commercialized in Brazil. Here, we show that the PSD, estimated by laser diffraction and by polarized light microscopy, differed between the generics and the reference product. However, the thermal behavior of the three products, determined by thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal (DTA) analyses and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), displayed no significant changes and were more thermostable than the isotretinoin standard used as internal control. Thus, our study suggests that PSD analyses in isotretinoin lipid-based formulations should be routinely performed in order to improve their quality and bioavailability.

  1. Comparative physical-chemical characterization of encapsulated lipid-based isotretinoin products assessed by particle size distribution and thermal behavior analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotretinoin is the drug of choice for the management of severe recalcitrant nodular acne. Nevertheless, some of its physical-chemical properties are still poorly known. Hence, the aim of our study consisted to comparatively evaluate the particle size distribution (PSD) and characterize the thermal behavior of the three encapsulated isotretinoin products in oil suspension (one reference and two generics) commercialized in Brazil. Here, we show that the PSD, estimated by laser diffraction and by polarized light microscopy, differed between the generics and the reference product. However, the thermal behavior of the three products, determined by thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal (DTA) analyses and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), displayed no significant changes and were more thermostable than the isotretinoin standard used as internal control. Thus, our study suggests that PSD analyses in isotretinoin lipid-based formulations should be routinely performed in order to improve their quality and bioavailability.

  2. Measurements of size distributions of radon progeny for improved quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major issue in radiation protection is to protect the population from the harmful effects of exposure to radon and radon progeny. Quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products in residential and working environments poses problems, as epidemiologic studies yield information deviating from the results obtained by the indirect method of assessment based on dosimetric respiratory tract models. One important task of the publication here was to characterize the various exposure conditions and to quantify uncertainties that may result from application of the ''dose conversion convention''. A special aerosol spectrometer was therefore designed and built in order to measure the size distributions of the short-lived radon decay products in the range between 0.5 nm and 10 000 nm. The aerosol spectrometer consists of a three-step diffusion battery with wire nets, an 11-step BERNER impactor, and a detector system with twelve large-surface proportional detectors. From the measured size distributions, dose conversion coefficients, E/Peq, were calculated using the PC software RADEP; the RADEP program was developed by BIRCHALL and JAMES and is based on the respiratory tract model of the ICRP. The E/Peq coefficients indicate the effective dose E per unit exposure Peq to radon decay products. (orig./CB)

  3. Aggregate size distributions in hydrophobic flocculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairoj Rattanakawin

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of aggregate (floc size distributions resulting from hydrophobic flocculation has been investigated using a laser light scattering technique. By measuring floc size distributions it is possible to distinguish clearly among floc formation, growth and breakage. Hydrophobic flocculation of hematite suspensions with sodium oleate under a variety of agitating conditions produces uni-modal size distributions. The size distribution of the primary particles is shifted to larger floc sizes when the dispersed suspension is coagulated by pH adjustment. By adding sodium oleate to the pre-coagulated suspension, the distribution progresses further to the larger size. However, prolonged agitation degrades the formed flocs, regressing the distribution to the smaller size. Median floc size derived from the distribution is also used as performance criterion. The median floc size increases rapidly at the initial stage of the flocculation, and decreases with the extended agitation time and intensity. Relatively weak flocs are produced which may be due to the low dosage of sodium oleate used in this flocculation study. It is suggested that further investigation should focus on optimum reagent dosage and non-polar oil addition to strengthen these weak flocs.

  4. Software Package for Aerosol Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    T. A. Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    The “Software Package for Aerosol Size Distribution” is a novel graphical user interface application software used for the study of atmospheric aerosol size distribution from various aerosol models (Continental clean, Continental average, Continental polluted, Urban, Desert, Maritime clean, Maritime polluted, Maritime tropical, Arctic, Antarctic) and/or with different aerosol components (insoluble, water soluble, soot, sea salt (accumulation mode), sea salt (co...

  5. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 ?m in smelters vs. 1.31 ?m in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities.

  6. Aggregate size distributions in sweep flocculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairoj Rattanakawin

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of aggregate size distributions resulting from sweep flocculation has been investigated using laser light scattering technique. By measuring the (volume distributions of floc size, it is possible to distinguish clearly among floc formation, growth and breakage. Sweep flocculation of stable kaolin suspensions with ferric chloride under conditions of the rapid/slow mixing protocol produces uni-modal size distributions. The size distribution is shifted to larger floc size especially during the rapid mixing step. The variation of the distributions is also shown in the plot of cumulative percent finer against floc size. From this plot, the distributions maintain the same S-shape curves over the range of the mixing intensities/times studied. A parallel shift of the curves indicates that self-preserving size distribution occurred in this flocculation. It is suggested that some parameters from mathematical functions derived from the curves could be used to construct a model and predict the flocculating performance. These parameters will be useful for a water treatment process selection, design criteria, and process control strategies. Thus the use of these parameters should be employed in any further study.

  7. Software Package for Aerosol Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Rajesh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The “Software Package for Aerosol Size Distribution” is a novel graphical user interface application software used for the study of atmospheric aerosol size distribution from various aerosol models (Continental clean, Continental average, Continental polluted, Urban, Desert, Maritime clean, Maritime polluted, Maritime tropical, Arctic, Antarctic and/or with different aerosol components (insoluble, water soluble, soot, sea salt (accumulation mode, sea salt (coarse mode, mineral (nucleation mode, mineral (accumulation mode, mineral (coarse mode, mineral (transported, sulfate, as a function of radius. This article discussed about the atmospheric aerosol, aerosol size distribution and the software description. Application case studies to generate the aerosol size distribution for an urban aerosol model and with different components have also been presented in this note.

  8. ANWR progress report number FY83-7: Population size, productivity and distribution of muskoxen in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data on population size and productivity of muskoxen Ovibos moschatus Ln the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge were collected during surveys in April and October...

  9. Unravelling the size distribution of social groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hernando, A; Abad, M; Vesperinas, C

    2009-01-01

    We present an study of size distributions of social groups based on a recent analogy between scale invariant systems and gases and fluids (arXiv:0902.2738v4). We go beyond the non-interacting system proposing a model for interactions based on complex networks that reproduces the main statistical properties found in city-size distributions and electoral results. We found a scale transformation that shows that these distributions can be classified with only one parameter, what we call the \\emph{competitiveness}. We reproduce well established empirical measures, as the six degrees of separation and the maximum number of stable social relationships that one person can address, known as the Dunbar's number. Finally, we show that the scaled city-size distributions of large countries obeys the same universal distribution, which we use to propose a method to estimate the total population of a country.

  10. Elemental Distribution in Depth as Well as Their Fractionation Related to Particle Size, in Phosphogypsum from Phosphoric Acid Production (Huelva, SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we assessed uranium and some toxic elements distribution according to particle sizes in phosphogypsum cores, in order to improve the knowledge behavior of radioactive (238U and 234U) and toxic elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Ag, Zr, Pb, Y, and Sr) Elemental concentration was measured in two phosphogypsum cores, which were separated in three depth intervals. Every sample also was divided in three particle size fractions. Results show that most of elements are not distributed homogeneously in phosphogypsum cores. The differences in distribution of elements suggest that there are fluxes of elements. On the other hand a high fractionation of elements was observed, where most of those were concentrated in fine particles in comparison with coarse and medium particle sizes. The main consequence of that most of these elements are concentrated in the fine fraction (particles <20 ?m), is that make them easily mobilized by leaching and/or erosion. (author)

  11. Submicron aerosols at thirteen diversified sites in China: size distribution, new particle formation and corresponding contribution to cloud condensation nuclei production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J. F.; Hu, M.; Wang, Z. B.; Huang, X. F.; Kumar, P.; Wu, Z. J.; Guo, S.; Yue, D. L.; Shang, D. J.; Zheng, Z.; He, L. Y.

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the particle number size distributions in diversified atmospheric environments is important in order to design mitigation strategies related to submicron particles and their effects on regional air quality, haze and human health. In this study, we conducted 15 different field measurement campaigns between 2007 and 2011 at 13 individual sites in China, including five urban sites, four regional sites, three coastal/background sites and one ship cruise measurement along eastern coastline of China. Size resolved particles were measured in the 15-600 nm size range. The median particle number concentrations (PNCs) were found to vary in the range of 1.1-2.2 × 104 cm-3 at urban sites, 0.8-1.5 × 104 cm-3 at regional sites, 0.4-0.6 × 104 cm-3 at coastal/background sites, and 0.5 × 104 cm-3 during cruise measurement. Peak diameters at each of these sites varied greatly from 24 to 115 nm. Particles in the 15-25 nm (nucleation mode), 25-100 nm (Aitken mode) and 100-600 nm (accumulation mode) range showed different characteristics at each sites, indicating the features of primary emissions and secondary formation in these diversified atmospheric environments. Diurnal variations show a build-up of accumulation mode particles belt at regional sites, suggesting the contribution of regional secondary aerosol pollution. Frequencies of new particle formation (NPF) events were much higher at urban and regional sites than at coastal sites and during cruise measurement. The average growth rates (GRs) of nucleation mode particles were 8.0-10.9 nm h-1 at urban sites, 7.4-13.6 nm h-1 at regional sites and 2.8-7.5 nm h-1 at coastal sites and during cruise measurement. The high gaseous precursors and strong oxidation at urban and regional sites not only favored the formation of particles, but also accelerated the growth rate of the nucleation mode particles. No significant difference in condensation sink (CS) during NPF days were observed among different site types, suggesting that the NPF events in background areas were more influenced by the pollutant transport. In addition, average contributions of NPF events to potential cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% super-saturation in the afternoon of all sampling days were calculated as 11% and 6% at urban sites and regional sites, respectively. On the other hand, NPF events at coastal sites and during cruise measurement had little impact on potential production of CCN. This study provides a large data set of particle size distribution in diversified atmosphere of China, improving our general understanding of emission, secondary formation, new particle formation and corresponding CCN activity of submicron aerosols in Chinese environments.

  12. Submicron aerosols at thirteen diversified sites in China: size distribution, new particle formation and corresponding contribution to cloud condensation nuclei production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Peng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the particle number size distributions in diversified atmospheric environments is important in order to design mitigation strategies related to submicron particles and their effect on regional air quality, haze and human health. In this study, we conducted 15 different field measurement campaigns, each one-month long, between 2007 and 2011 at 13 individual sites in China. These were 5 urban sites, 4 regional sites, 3 coastal/background sites and one ship cruise measurement along eastern coastline of China. Size resolved particles were measured in the 15–600 nm size range. The median particle number concentrations (PNC were found to vary in the range of 1.1–2.2 × 104 cm?3 at urban sites, 0.8–1.5 × 104 cm?3 at regional sites, 0.4–0.6 × 104 cm?3 at coastal/background sites, and 0.5 × 104 cm?3 during cruise measurements. Peak diameters at each of these sites varied greatly from 24 nm to 115 nm. Particles in the 15–25 nm (nucleation mode, 25–100 nm (Aitken mode and 100–600 nm (accumulation mode range showed different characteristics at each of the studied sites, indicating the features of primary emissions and secondary formation in these diversified atmospheric environments. Diurnal variations show a build-up of accumulation mode particles belt at regional sites, suggesting the contribution of regional secondary aerosol pollution. Frequencies of new particle formation (NPF events were much higher at urban and regional sites than at coastal sites and cruise measurement. The average growth rates (GRs of nucleation mode particles were 8.0–10.9 nm h?1 at urban sites, 7.4–13.6 nm h?1 at regional sites and 2.8–7.5 nm h?1 at both coastal and cruise measurement sites. The high gaseous precursors and strong oxidation at urban and regional sites not only favored the formation of particles, but also accelerated the growth rate of the nucleation mode particles. No significant difference in condensation sink (CS during NPF days were observed among different site types, suggesting that the NPF events in background area were more influenced by the pollutant transport. In addition, average contributions of NPF events to potential cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at 0.2% super-saturation in the afternoon of all sampling days were calculated as 11% and 6% at urban sites and regional sites, respectively. On the other hand, NPF events at coastal and cruise measurement sites had little impact on potential production of CCN. This study provides a large dataset of aerosol size distribution in diversified atmosphere of China, improving our general understanding of emission, secondary formation, new particles formation and corresponding CCN activity of submicron aerosols in Chinese environments.

  13. Understanding Animal Group-Size Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Griesser, Michael; Ma, Qi; Webber, Simone; Bowgen, Katharine; Sumpter, David J.T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most striking aspects of animal groups is their remarkable variation in size, both within and between species. While a number of mechanistic models have been proposed to explain this variation, there are few comprehensive datasets against which these models have been tested. In particular, we only vaguely understand how environmental factors and behavioral activities affect group-size distributions. Here we use observations of House sparrows (Passer domesticus) to investigate the f...

  14. Controlling Size and Distribution for Nano-sized Polystyrene Spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Dong Shin; Lee, Hyeong Seok; Yoo, Jung Whan [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ho Gyeom [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Highly monodisperse polystyrene (PS) nanospheres were fabricated by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization in water using styrene, 2,2'-azobis(2-methyl propionamidine) dihydrochloride (AIBA), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The size and distribution of the PS nanospheres were systematically investigated in terms of initiator concentration, stabilizer concentration, reaction temperature, reaction time, and reactant concentration. With increasing AIBA initiator concentration, PS particle sizes are raised proportionally, and can be controlled from 120 to 380 nm. Particle sizes were reduced with increasing PVP concentration. This decrease occurs because a high PVP concentration leads to a large number of primary nuclei in the early stage of polymerization. When the reaction temperature increased, the sizes of the PS particles decrease slightly. The particles grew quickly during the initial reaction stage (1-3 h) and the growth rate became steady-state after 6 h. The PS sizes approximately doubled when the reactant (styrene, PVP, azo-initiator) concentrations were increased by a factor of eight.

  15. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized intercept parameter had an increasing trend with reflectivity. The shape parameter, on the other hand, decreased in a reflectivity range from 10 to 20 dBZ and remained steady at higher reflectivities. Considering the repeatability of the characteristics of the raindrop size distribution, a second impact disdrometer that was located 5.3 km away from the primary site in Wallops Island, Virginia, had similar size spectra in selected tropical cyclones.

  16. Submicron aerosols at thirteen diversified sites in China: size distribution, new particle formation and corresponding contribution to cloud condensation nuclei production

    OpenAIRE

    J. F. Peng; Hu, M.; Wang, Z B; Huang, X. F.; Kumar, P; Z. J. Wu; Yue, D.L.; Guo, S.; D. J. Shang; Zheng, Z; L. Y. He

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the particle number size distributions in diversified atmospheric environments is important in order to design mitigation strategies related to submicron particles and their effect on regional air quality, haze and human health. In this study, we conducted 15 different field measurement campaigns, each one-month long, between 2007 and 2011 at 13 individual sites in China. These were 5 urban sites, 4 regional sites, 3 coastal/background sites and ...

  17. Learning transformed product distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Daskalakis, Constantinos; Diakonikolas, Ilias; Servedio, Rocco A.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of learning an unknown product distribution $X$ over $\\{0,1\\}^n$ using samples $f(X)$ where $f$ is a \\emph{known} transformation function. Each choice of a transformation function $f$ specifies a learning problem in this framework. Information-theoretic arguments show that for every transformation function $f$ the corresponding learning problem can be solved to accuracy $\\eps$, using $\\tilde{O}(n/\\eps^2)$ examples, by a generic algorithm whose runni...

  18. Company size distribution for developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, R.; Angulo-Brown, F.; Tun, Dionisio

    2006-01-01

    We analyze company size distribution for developing countries using the framework proposed by Ramsden and Kiss-Haypál [Physica A 277 (2000) 220]. Although this distribution does not fit developing countries data as good as it does to developed ones, the parameters of the distribution ( ? and ?) for developing countries are remarkably different to those for developed countries. This result supports the hypothesis that parameter ? plays a role analogous to the temperature of the economy, which could be related to the level of economic development, as reported previously by Saslow [Am. J. Phys. 67 (1999) 1239]. Also, this supports the hypothesis that ? is related to the competitive exclusion in economics, as ? tending to zero implies the competition free limit case where company size distribution is predicted to be a power-law, as reported by Takayasu and Okuyama [Fractals 6 (1998) 67]. Finally, we report the goodness of fit for two functions: a finite-size scaling and a log-normal. We found that these functions fit the data better in some cases. However, this is not in itself sufficient evidence that those functions are an appropriate representation of the phenomenon.

  19. City Size Distributions For India and China

    OpenAIRE

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik; Basu, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the size distributions of urban agglomerations for India and China. We have estimated the scaling exponent for the Zipf's law with the Indian census data for the years of 1981-2001 and the Chinese census data for 1990 and 2000. Along with the biased linear fit estimate, the maximum likelihood estimate for the Pareto and Tsallis q-exponential distribution has been computed. For India, the scaling exponent is in the range of [1.88, 2.06] and for China, it is...

  20. Internal particle size distribution of biofuel pellets

    OpenAIRE

    Daugbjerg Jensen, Peter; Temmerman, Michaël; Westborg, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Several methods for disintegration of biofuel pellets were tested and compared for their ability to break up the pellets into the original particles of the raw material. Analyses performed on softwood pellets and straw pellets concluded that wet disintegration in water at ambient temperature is insufficient for a determination of the internal particle size distribution of wood- and straw pellets. When the wet disintegration was performed with water heated to the boiling point and ...

  1. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these craters were predominantly formed by bodies in planetocentric orbits, as maintained by Horedt and Neukum (1984, JGR 89 (B12), 10,405-10,410), or, alternatively, Ganymede and Callisto were rotating non-synchronously at early times (Zahnle et al., 2003). A forth issue is the stability of the shape of crater distributions with time, indicating a stable size distribution of impactors. Our results show that the shape of crater distributions was more or less stable, derived from the record of craters between 2 and 100 km diameters. To examine this topic in more detail, a global coverage of higher resolution imaging data is needed which will be provided by the JANUS camera data aboard ESA's future JUICE mission to Jupiter and Ganymede (Palumbo et al. (2014), LPSC XLV, abstr. No. 2094; Plaut et al. (2014), LPSC XLV, abstr. No. 2717).

  2. City Size Distributions For India and China

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the size distributions of urban agglomerations for India and China. We have estimated the scaling exponent for the Zipf's law with the Indian census data for the years of 1981-2001 and the Chinese census data for 1990 and 2000. Along with the biased linear fit estimate, the maximum likelihood estimate for the Pareto and Tsallis q-exponential distribution has been computed. For India, the scaling exponent is in the range of [1.88, 2.06] and for China, it is in the interval [1.82, 2.29]. The goodness-of-fit tests of the estimated distributions are performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic.

  3. City size distributions for India and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik; Basu, B.

    2009-07-01

    This paper studies the size distributions of urban agglomerations for India and China. We have estimated the scaling exponent for Zipf’s law with the Indian census data for the years of 1981-2001 and the Chinese census data for 1990 and 2000. Along with the biased linear fit estimate, the maximum likelihood estimate for the Pareto and Tsallis q-exponential distribution has been computed. For India, the scaling exponent is in the range of [1.88, 2.06] and for China, it is in the interval [1.82, 2.29]. The goodness-of-fit tests of the estimated distributions are performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic.

  4. PRODUCTION OF UNIFORMLY SIZED SERUM ALBUMIN AND DEXTROSE MICROBUBBLES

    OpenAIRE

    Borrelli, Michael J.; O’Brien, William D; Bernock, Laura J.; Williams, Heather R.; Hamilton, Eric; Wu, Jonah; Oelze, Michael L; Culp, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Uniformly-sized preparations with average microbubble (MB) diameters from 1 µm to 7 µm were produced reliably by sonicating decafluorobutane-saturated solutions of serum albumin and dextrose. Detailed protocols for producing and size-separating the MBs are presented, along with the effects that changing each production parameter (serum albumin concentration, sonication power, sonication time, etc.) had on MB size distribution and acoustic stability. These protocols can be used to produce MBs ...

  5. Particle-size distribution study: PILEDRIVER event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reentry was made by mining into the chimney of broken rock created by a nuclear detonation in granite at a depth of 1500 feet. The chimney was 160 ft in radius and 890 ft high. An injection of radioactive melt was encountered at 300 ft from shot point. Radiochemical analyses determined that the yield of PILEDRIVER nuclear device was 61 ± 10 kt. Two samples of chimney rubble totalling over 5,000 lb were obtained during the postshot exploration. These samples of broken granite underwent screen analysis, a radioactivity-distribution study, and cursory leaching tests. The two samples were separated into 25 different size-fractions. An average of the particle-size data from the two samples showed that 17% of the material is between 20 mesh and I in.; 42% between 1 and 6 in.; and 34% between 6 in. and 3 ft. The distribution of radioactivity varies markedly with the particle size. The minus 100-mesh material comprizes less than 1.5% of the weight but contains almost 20% of the radioactivity. Small-scale batch-leaching tests showed that 25% of the radioactivity could be removed in a few hours by a film-percolation leach with distilled water, and 40% with dilute acid. Brief studies were made of the microfractures in the broken rock and of the radioactivity created by the PILEDRIVER explosion. (author)

  6. Economies of Size in Production Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Economies of size refer to the ability of a farm to lower costs of production by increasing production. Agriculture production displays an L-shaped average cost curve where costs are lower initially but reach a point where no further gains are achieved. Spreading fixed costs, bulk purchases, and marketing power are cited as reasons for economies of size. Labor-reducing technologies may be the primary reason. Most studies do not include the external costs from prophylactic antibiotic use, impa...

  7. Product Distributions for Distributed Optimization. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniawski, Stefan R.; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    With connections to bounded rational game theory, information theory and statistical mechanics, Product Distribution (PD) theory provides a new framework for performing distributed optimization. Furthermore, PD theory extends and formalizes Collective Intelligence, thus connecting distributed optimization to distributed Reinforcement Learning (FU). This paper provides an overview of PD theory and details an algorithm for performing optimization derived from it. The approach is demonstrated on two unconstrained optimization problems, one with discrete variables and one with continuous variables. To highlight the connections between PD theory and distributed FU, the results are compared with those obtained using distributed reinforcement learning inspired optimization approaches. The inter-relationship of the techniques is discussed.

  8. Fisher Information in Flow Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Tune, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The flow size distribution is a useful metric for traffic modeling and management. Its estimation based on sampled data, however, is problematic. Previous work has shown that flow sampling (FS) offers enormous statistical benefits over packet sampling but high resource requirements precludes its use in routers. We present Dual Sampling (DS), a two-parameter family, which, to a large extent, provide FS-like statistical performance by approaching FS continuously, with just packet-sampling-like computational cost. Our work utilizes a Fisher information based approach recently used to evaluate a number of sampling schemes, excluding FS, for TCP flows. We revise and extend the approach to make rigorous and fair comparisons between FS, DS and others. We show how DS significantly outperforms other packet based methods, including Sample and Hold, the closest packet sampling-based competitor to FS. We describe a packet sampling-based implementation of DS and analyze its key computational costs to show that router impl...

  9. Genome Sizes and the Benford Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Friar, James L; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; 10.1371/journal.pone.0036624

    2012-01-01

    Data on the number of Open Reading Frames (ORFs) coded by genomes from the 3 domains of Life show some notable general features including essential differences between the Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, with the number of ORFs growing linearly with total genome size for the former, but only logarithmically for the latter. Assuming that the (protein) coding and non-coding fractions of the genome must have different dynamics and that the non-coding fraction must be controlled by a variety of (unspecified) probability distribution functions, we are able to predict that the number of ORFs for Eukaryotes follows a Benford distribution and has a specific logarithmic form. Using the data for 1000+ genomes available to us in early 2010, we find excellent fits to the data over several orders of magnitude, in the linear regime for the Prokaryote data, and the full non-linear form for the Eukaryote data. In their region of overlap the salient features are statistically congruent, which allows us to: interpret the differenc...

  10. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  11. On stratospheric aerosol size distributions from recent optical radar observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From observational results of ruby laser (lambda=6943 A) radar backscattering and data on small ions, we examined typical stratospheric aerosol size distributions thus far proposed. Power-law size distribution and bimodal size distribution can explain both the lidar backscattering coefficient and density of small ion if we take into account the existence of numerous Aitken particles. Thus we cannot determine aerosol size distribution uniquely at the present stage of the investigations. We examine here bimodal size distribution in some detail by considering the elementary physical processes. The power-law size distribution, we presume, is produced by in situ sulfuric acid particle nucleation. This size distribution is modified by increased outer particle injection such as that from meteors or volcanic eruptions. If meteor particles are undergoing sedimentation, eddy diffusion and growing by attachment of sulfuric acid particles which have mean radius 5 m?, assuming the power-law size distribution, then meteor particle size distribution is log-normal. Bimodal size distribution is produced by both the log-normal size distribution and the pre-existing Aitken-size sulfuric acid particles. (auth.)

  12. On the distribution of source code file sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Herraiz Tabernero, Israel; German, Daniel M.; Hassan, Ahmed E.

    2011-01-01

    Source code size is an estimator of software effort. Size is also often used to calibrate models and equations to estimate the cost of software. The distribution of source code file sizes has been shown in the literature to be a lognormal distribution. In this paper, we measure the size of a large collection of software (the Debian GNU/Linux distribution version 5.0.2), and we find that the statistical distribution of its source code file sizes follows a double Pareto distribution. This means...

  13. Description of the general particle size distribution function by infinite progression on the basis of simple particle size distribution functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroll, J. (Technische Hochschule, Leuna-Merseburg (German Democratic Republic))

    1979-08-01

    Many particle size distributions can be described by expanded gamma or beta distribution functions. The general particle size distribution function can, under certain conditions, be accurately expressed by an infinite progression, increasing in accordance with very simple gamma or beta distribution functions, and it can be expressed approximately by a finite sum of these functions.

  14. Batch sizing with controllable production rates

    OpenAIRE

    Glock, Christoph H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we focus on a production system where a single product is manufactured on a single facility and delivered to the subsequent stage in batch shipments. In contrast to earlier works, we assume that the inventory on the producing stage is depleted at discrete time intervals, and analyse the effect of a variable production rate on the inventory build-up and the total costs of the system. We develop formal models for the case of equal- and unequal-sized batch ship...

  15. Evaluation of droplet size distributions using univariate and multivariate approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauno, M.H.; Larsen, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutically relevant material characteristics are often analyzed based on univariate descriptors instead of utilizing the whole information available in the full distribution. One example is droplet size distribution, which is often described by the median droplet size and the width of the distribution. The current study was aiming to compare univariate and multivariate approach in evaluating droplet size distributions. As a model system, the atomization of a coating solution from a two-fluid nozzle was investigated. The effect of three process parameters (concentration of ethyl cellulose in ethanol, atomizing air pressure, and flow rate of coating solution) on the droplet size and droplet size distribution using a full mixed factorial design was used. The droplet size produced by a two-fluid nozzle was measured by laser diffraction and reported as volume based size distribution. Investigation of loading and score plots from principal component analysis (PCA) revealed additional information on the droplet size distributions and it was possible to identify univariate statistics (volume median droplet size), which were similar, however, originating from varying droplet size distributions. The multivariate data analysis was proven to be an efficient tool for evaluating the full information contained in a distribution. © 2013 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  16. Re-examination of the size distribution of firms

    OpenAIRE

    Kaizoji, Taisei; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yuichi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of the size distribution of firms. To this aim, we use the Bloomberg database comprising multinational firms within the years 1995-2003, and analyze the data of the sales and the total assets of the separate financial statement of the Japanese and the US companies, and make a comparison of the size distributions between the Japanese companies and the US companies. We find that (i) the size distribution of the US firms is approximately lo...

  17. Location and size distribution of entertainment and arts  establishments

    OpenAIRE

    Rütt, Benjamin

    2001-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the location and size distribution of arts and entertainment industries in Sweden as well as the size distribution of Swedish labor market regions. Several sectors of the arts and entertainment industry are investigated empirically by comparing their location and overall capacity to the size of their respective markets and testing their conformity with the rank-size rule. The analyzed establishments are opera houses, football stadiums, concert performances and movie theat...

  18. A first principles derivation of animal group size distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Qi; Johansson, Anders; Sumpter, David J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Several empirical studies have shown that the animal group size distribution of many species can be well fit by power laws with exponential truncation. A striking empirical result due to H-S Niwa is that the exponent in these power laws is one and the truncation is determined by the average group size experienced by an individual. This distribution is known as the logarithmic distribution. In this paper we provide first principles derivations of the logarithmic distribution and other truncate...

  19. Changes of firm size distribution: The case of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Jiang, Zhuhua; Cheong, Chongcheul; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the distribution and inequality of firm sizes is evaluated for the Korean firms listed on the stock markets. Using the amount of sales, total assets, capital, and the number of employees, respectively, as a proxy for firm sizes, we find that the upper tail of the Korean firm size distribution can be described by power-law distributions rather than lognormal distributions. Then, we estimate the Zipf parameters of the firm sizes and assess the changes in the magnitude of the exponents. The results show that the calculated Zipf exponents over time increased prior to the financial crisis, but decreased after the crisis. This pattern implies that the degree of inequality in Korean firm sizes had severely deepened prior to the crisis, but lessened after the crisis. Overall, the distribution of Korean firm sizes changes over time, and Zipf’s law is not universal but does hold as a special case.

  20. On the influence of bimodal size distributions in particle sizing using laser-induced incandescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, J.; Bladh, H.; Bengtsson, P.-E.

    2010-06-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) is a technique for in-situ soot particle size distribution measurements with the limitation that the distribution function has to be assumed (often monodisperse or lognormal) in the signal analysis. Since it is established that size distributions sometimes are bimodal, it is of interest to understand the influence from such distributions on the LII signal, and consequently what information can be extracted from experimental LII signals. The influence of the parameters of the bimodal lognormal distribution on the evaluation using a monodisperse or lognormal distribution was investigated. A range of bimodal distributions were tested and it was found that a unimodal evaluation of a signal from a bimodal distribution is only slightly affected by its small-size mode, meaning that LII can be used to determine the approximate parameters of the large-size mode.

  1. Mathematical model for predicting the particle-size distribution in a batch attrition-grinding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngulyen, T. H.

    1981-10-01

    The modified feed forward one Horst model predicts the particle size distribution in attrition grinding of Blomstrandine ore particles ranging in size from 1.4 to 600 microns. In predicting the particle size distribution (PSD), a material index alpha greater than or equal to 0 which describes the breakage property of the solid was determined. Two comminution coefficients and the size ratio of the respective sizes are needed to determine alpha. The modified model and graphical solution can be used to predict the PSD in other comminution processes. Production of the new surface was directly proportional to the size reduction energy up to 120 Wh. The size reduction energy was calculated from the grinding time and the net shaft torque. At higher levels of input energy, production of new surface decreases. Plots of the new surface produced in sq m versus the size reduction energy (Wh) have two straight line portions with slopes of 1.166 and -0.111.

  2. The Distribution of Bubble Sizes During Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yin; Furlanetto, Steven R; Sutter, P M

    2015-01-01

    A key physical quantity during reionization is the size of HII regions. Previous studies found a characteristic bubble size which increases rapidly during reionization, with apparent agreement between simulations and analytic excursion set theory. Using four different methods, we critically examine this claim. In particular, we introduce the use of the watershed algorithm -- widely used for void finding in galaxy surveys -- which we show to be an unbiased method with the lowest dispersion and best performance on Monte-Carlo realizations of a known bubble size PDF. We find that a friends-of-friends algorithm declares most of the ionized volume to be occupied by a network of volume-filling regions connected by narrow tunnels. For methods tuned to detect those volume-filling regions, previous apparent agreement between simulations and theory is spurious, and due to a failure to correctly account for the window function of measurement schemes. The discrepancy is already obvious from visual inspection. Instead, HI...

  3. The Italian primary school-size distribution and the city-size: a complex nexus

    CERN Document Server

    Belmonte, Alessandro; Buldyrev, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the statistical law according to which Italian primary school-size distributes. We find that the school-size can be approximated by a log-normal distribution, with a fat lower tail that collects a large number of very small schools. The upper tail of the school-size distribution decreases exponentially and the growth rates are distributed with a Laplace PDF. These distributions are similar to those observed for firms and are consistent with a Bose-Einstein preferential attachment process. The body of the distribution features a bimodal shape suggesting some source of heterogeneity in the school organization that we uncover by an in-depth analysis of the relation between schools-size and city-size. We propose a novel cluster methodology and a new spatial interaction approach among schools which outline the variety of policies implemented in Italy. Different regional policies are also discussed shedding lights on the relation between policy and geographical features.

  4. Power-law versus exponential distributions of animal group sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Niwa, Hiro-Sato

    2003-01-01

    There has been some confusion concerning the animal group-size: an exponential distribution was deduced by maximizing the entropy; lognormal distributions were practically used; a power-law decay with exponent {3/2} was proposed in physical analogy to aerosol condensation. Here I show that the animal group-size distribution follows a power-law decay with exponent 1, and is truncated at a cut-off size which is the expected size of the groups an arbitrary individual engages in...

  5. Re-examination of the size distribution of firms

    CERN Document Server

    Kaizoji, T; Iyetomi, H; Kaizoji, Taisei; Ikeda, Yuichi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of the size distribution of firms. To this aim, we use the Bloomberg database comprising firms around the world within the years 1995-2003, and analyze the data of the sales and the total assets of the consolidation base of the Japanese and the US companies, and make a comparison of the size distributions between the Japanese companies and the US companies. We find that (i) the size distribution of the US firms is approximately log-normal, in agreement with Gibrat's observation \\cite{Gibrat}, and in contrast (ii) the size distribution of the Japanese firms is clearly not log-normal, and the upper tail of the size distribution follows the Pareto law. It agree with the predictions of the Simon model \\cite{Simon}.

  6. Distributions of region size and GDP and their relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Hu; Chunxia, Yang; Xueshuai, Zhu; Zhilai, Zheng; Ya, Cao

    2015-07-01

    We first analyze the distribution of metropolitan (city) size, the distribution of metropolitan (city) GDP and the relation of both distributions. It is found that (1) the tails of distributions of size and GDP both obey Pareto Law with the Pareto exponent 1; (2) compared with Pareto exponent in GDP, Pareto exponent in size is bigger. Then an agent model is built to study the underlying formation mechanism of distributions of region size and GDP. Our model presents the mechanism how economic factors flow between regions to reproduce the tail behavior and the difference between the Pareto exponents of size and those of GDP. At last, the simulated results agree with the real empirical well.

  7. Calculating Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes Using Noncentral Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Deborah

    This paper provides a brief review of the concepts of confidence intervals, effect sizes, and central and noncentral distributions. The use of confidence intervals around effect sizes is discussed. A demonstration of the Exploratory Software for Confidence Intervals (G. Cuming and S. Finch, 2001; ESCI) is given to illustrate effect size confidence…

  8. Distributed size estimation of dynamic anonymous networks

    OpenAIRE

    Terelius, Håkan; Varagnolo, Damiano; Johansson, Karl Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the size of dynamic anonymous networks, motivated by network maintenance. The proposed algorithm is based on max-consensus information exchange protocols, and extends a previous algorithm for static anonymous networks. A regularization term is accounting for a-priori assumptions on the smoothness of the estimate, and we specifically consider quadratic regularization terms since they lead to closed-form solutions and intuitive design laws. We derive an exp...

  9. Bimodal Size-distribution of Bainite Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Hase, K; García Mateo, Carlos; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2006-01-01

    There are two well-known phenomena associated with the bainite reaction, which have been exploited in the present work to enhance the mechanical behaviour of steel. Firstly, the bainite plate size decreases as the transformation temperature is reduced. Secondly, it is bad to have large regions of untransformed austenite in the microstructure; this is because they can transform, under the influence of external stress, into corresponding large regions of untempered, brittle martensite. By ad...

  10. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different size range and aspect ratio range, and the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in these different ranges is conducted. Numerical simulation indicates that a fairly reasonable representation of the spheroid particle size distribution can be obtained when the size range and aspect ratio range are suitably chosen.

  11. Application of a laser particle size analyser to estimating paricle size distribution in suspended sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies were undertaken in 1998 on phosphorus concentration in river sediment versus sediment grain size distribution as a part of research on water quality and outflow from small agricultural watershed, carried out by the Department of Hydraulic Structures, Agricultural University of Warsaw. Laser particle size analyser was applied to measure suspended sediment size distribution. Sampling procedure, principles of analysis and the results were described

  12. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlichting, Hilke E. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E., E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations.

  13. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R ? 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R ? 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R ?< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R ? 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations

  14. Extrema propagation : fast distributed estimation of sums and network sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Baquero, Carlos; Almeida, Paulo S??rgio; Menezes, Raquel; Jesus, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation of data values plays an important role on distributed computations, in particular, over peer-to-peer and sensor networks, as it can provide a summary of some global system property and direct the actions of self-adaptive distributed algorithms. Examples include using estimates of the network size to dimension distributed hash tables or estimates of the average system load to direct load balancing. Distributed aggregation using nonidempotent functions, like sums, is not trivial as ...

  15. Estimation of Particle Size Distribution and Aspect Ratio of Non-Spherical Particles From Chord Length Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Agimelen, Okpeafoh S; Vasile, Massimiliano; Nordon, Alison; Haley, Ian; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Information about size and shape of particles produced in various manufacturing processes is very important for process and product development because design of downstream processes as well as final product properties strongly depend on these geometrical particle attributes. However, recovery of particle size and shape information in situ during crystallisation processes has been a major challenge. The focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) provides the chord length distribution (CLD) of a population of particles in a suspension flowing close to the sensor window. Recovery of size and shape information from the CLD requires a model relating particle size and shape to its CLD as well as solving the corresponding inverse problem. This paper presents a comprehensive algorithm which produces estimates of particle size distribution and particle aspect ratio from measured CLD data. While the algorithm searches for a global best solution to the inverse problem without requiring further a priori information on ...

  16. Elemental mass size distribution of the Debrecen urban aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Size distribution is one of the basic properties of atmospheric aerosol. It is closely related to the origin, chemical composition and age of the aerosol particles, and it influences the optical properties, environmental effects and health impact of aerosol. As part of the ongoing aerosol research in the Group of Ion Beam Applications of the Atomki, elemental mass size distribution of urban aerosol were determined using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analytical technique. Aerosol sampling campaigns were carried out with 9-stage PIXE International cascade impactors, which separates the aerosol into 10 size fractions in the 0.05-30 ?m range. Five 48-hours long samplings were done in the garden of the Atomki, in April and in October, 2007. Both campaigns included weekend and working day samplings. Basically two different kinds of particles could be identified according to the size distribution. In the size distribution of Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Ba, Ti, Mn and Co one dominant peak can be found around the 3 m aerodynamic diameter size range, as it is shown on Figure 1. These are the elements of predominantly natural origin. Elements like S, Cl, K, Zn, Pb and Br appears with high frequency in the 0.25-0.5 mm size range as presented in Figure 2. These elements are originated mainly from anthropogenic sources. However sometimes in the size distribution of these elements a 2nd, smaller peak appears at the 2-4 ?m size ranges, indicating different sources. Differences were found between the size distribution of the spring and autumn samples. In the case of elements of soil origin the size distribution was shifted towards smaller diameters during October, and a 2nd peak appeared around 0.5 ?m. A possible explanation to this phenomenon can be the different meteorological conditions. No differences were found between the weekend and working days in the size distribution, however the concentration values were smaller during the weekend than the other days. The elemental mass size distribution provides information about the origin and sources of aerosol particles, and with emphasis on the PM2.5, serves as an input parameter for the determination of lung deposition probabilities by stochastic lung model calculation. This calculation together with short-term time variation enables us to give a more precise health impact of the urban aerosol

  17. Size distribution measurements and chemical analysis of aerosol components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakkanen, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The principal aims of this work were to improve the existing methods for size distribution measurements and to draw conclusions about atmospheric and in-stack aerosol chemistry and physics by utilizing size distributions of various aerosol components measured. A sample dissolution with dilute nitric acid in an ultrasonic bath and subsequent graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis was found to result in low blank values and good recoveries for several elements in atmospheric fine particle size fractions below 2 {mu}m of equivalent aerodynamic particle diameter (EAD). Furthermore, it turned out that a substantial amount of analyses associated with insoluble material could be recovered since suspensions were formed. The size distribution measurements of in-stack combustion aerosols indicated two modal size distributions for most components measured. The existence of the fine particle mode suggests that a substantial fraction of such elements with two modal size distributions may vaporize and nucleate during the combustion process. In southern Norway, size distributions of atmospheric aerosol components usually exhibited one or two fine particle modes and one or two coarse particle modes. Atmospheric relative humidity values higher than 80% resulted in significant increase of the mass median diameters of the droplet mode. Important local and/or regional sources of As, Br, I, K, Mn, Pb, Sb, Si and Zn were found to exist in southern Norway. The existence of these sources was reflected in the corresponding size distributions determined, and was utilized in the development of a source identification method based on size distribution data. On the Finnish south coast, atmospheric coarse particle nitrate was found to be formed mostly through an atmospheric reaction of nitric acid with existing coarse particle sea salt but reactions and/or adsorption of nitric acid with soil derived particles also occurred. Chloride was depleted when acidic species reacted with atmospheric sea salt particles. The chloride loss was found to decrease with increasing particle size suggesting that surface reaction mechanisms were important. Overall, the results obtained in this work describe the present methods used in all steps of accurate size distribution measurements of aerosol components and demonstrate the usefulness and possibilities of size distribution measurements in various scientific studies. (orig.)

  18. Spraco model 1713A nozzle spray drop-size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drop-size distribution model used by Radiation and Environmental Systems for the calculation or iodine removal by the containment spray system has been reviewed. It was found that a true log-normal distribution fits the experimental data better than the upper-limit log-normal distribution currently in use up to the size of the maximum observed drop. Normalizing this distribution to 100 percent at a slightly higher drop size (4000 ?m compared to the observed maximum of 3830 ?m) results in a geometric mean diameter of 280 ?m and a standard deviation of 0.7. This model results in a slightly lower iodine removal rate (exponential time constant is 20.0 hr-1 compared to 22.2 hr-1 based on the experimental distribution, and about 23 hr-1 based on the current Westinghouse model). This model will be adopted as the Westinghouse standard. (U.S.)

  19. Influence of particle size distributions on magnetorheological fluid performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriac, H.; Stoian, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence that size distributions of the magnetic particles might have on the magnetorheological fluid performances. In our study, several size distributions have been tailored first by sieving a micrometric Fe powder in order to obtain narrow distribution powders and then by recomposing the new size distributions (different from Gaussian). We used spherical Fe particles (mesh -325) commercially available. The powder was sieved by means of a sieve shaker using a series of sieves with the following mesh size: 20, 32, 40, 50, 63, 80 micrometers. All magnetic powders were characterized through Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements, particle size analysis and also Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were taken. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids based on the resulted magnetic powders were prepared and studied by means of a rheometer with a magnetorheological module. The MR fluids were measured in magnetic field and in zero magnetic field as well. As we noticed in our previous experiments particles size distribution can also influence the MR fluids performances.

  20. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different s...

  1. Isometric size-scaling of metabolic rate and the size abundance distribution of phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Huete-Ortega, María; Cermeño, Pedro; CALVO-DÍAZ, ALEJANDRA; Marañón, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between phytoplankton cell size and abundance has long been known to follow regular, predictable patterns in near steady-state ecosystems, but its origin has remained elusive. To explore the linkage between the size-scaling of metabolic rate and the size abundance distribution of natural phytoplankton communities, we determined simultaneously phytoplankton carbon fixation rates and cell abundance across a cell volume range of over six orders of magnitude in tropical and subtr...

  2. Density, chemistry, and size distribution of interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Hartung, J. B.; Gault, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Depth/diameter ratios measured for 98 craters in lunar glass targets reveal a broad distribution with a single strong peaking between 0.55 and 0.8. The measured values indicate a mean meteoroid density greater than 1 g/cu cm and probably less than 4 g/cu cm. Microprobe analyses show that typical glass pit liners on silicate targets contain only approximately 0.1% or less of meteoritic material. The size-frequency distribution of meteoroids was analyzed for a fractured glass surface of 60095, and a very steep size distribution of submicron meteoroids is indicated. As in the case of 15205, a dip at approximately 5 micron in the size-frequency distribution is detected.

  3. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  4. Zero emission distributed hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for distributed production facilities has become a critical issue in developing a hydrogen infrastructure. Hydrogen generation using processes that make effective use of what would normally be considered waste streams or process inefficiencies can have more favorable economics than stand-alone technologies. Currently, natural gas is distributed to industrial and residential customers through a network of pipelines. High pressure main lines move gas to the vicinity of consumers where the pressure is reduced for local, low pressure distribution. Often, the practice is to use an isenthalpic expansion which results in a cooling of the gas stream. Some of the natural gas is burned to preheat the fuel so that the temperature after the expansion is near ambient. This results in the destruction of exergy in the high pressure gas stream and produces CO2 in the process. If, instead, a turbo-expander is used to reduce the stream pressure, work can be recovered using a generator and hydrogen can be produced via electrolysis. This method of hydrogen production is free of green-house gas emissions, makes use of existing gas distribution facilities, and uses exergy that would otherwise be destroyed. Pressure reduction using the work producing process (turbo-expander) is accompanied by a large drop in temperature, on the average of 70 K. The local gas distributor requires the gas temperature to be raised again to near 8oC to prevent damage to valve assemblies. The required heating power after expansion can be on the order of megawatts (site dependent.) Supplying the heat can be seen as a cost if energy is taken from the system to reheat the fuel; however, the low temperature stream may also be considered an asset if the cooling power can be used for a local process. This analysis is the second stage of a study to examine the technical and economic feasibility of using pressure let-down sites as hydrogen production facilities. This paper describes a proposed demonstration hydrogen production and fueling station near Victoria, BC. The station would demonstrate the viability of the proposed process to generate hydrogen while increasing the performance of the natural gas distribution system. The station could provide the ability to fuel vehicles as part of the Victoria node of the hydrogen highway project to be implemented for the 2010 Winter Olympic games. (author)

  5. Ionization cluster size distribution for alpha particles: Experiment, modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents data for measured ionization cluster size distributions by alpha particles in tissue equivalent media and comparison with the simulated data for liquid water. The experiments were carried out with a beam of 4.6 MeV alpha particles performed in a setup called the JET Counter. The theoretically derived cluster size distributions for alphas particles were obtained using the K-means algorithm. The simulation was carried out by Monte Carlo track structure calculations using cross sections for liquid water. The first moments of cluster size distributions, derived from K-means algorithm as a function of diameter of cluster centroid, were compared with the corresponding moments derived from the experiments for nitrogen and propane targets. It was found that the ratio of the first moments for water to gas targets correlates well with the corresponding ratio of the mean free paths for primary ionization by alpha particles in the two media. It is shown that the cluster size distributions for alpha particles in water, obtained from K-means algorithm, are in agreement with the corresponding distributions measured experimentally in nitrogen or propane gas targets of nano-meter sizes. (authors)

  6. Can vesicle size distributions predict eruption intensity during volcanic activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. LaRue

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied three-dimensional (3-D vesicle size distributions by X-ray microtomography in scoria collected during the relatively quiescent Phase II of the 2010 eruption at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland. Our goal was to compare the vesicle size distributions (VSDs measured in these samples with those found in Stromboli volcano, Italy. Stromboli was chosen because its VSDs are well-characterized and show a correlation with eruption intensity: typical Strombolian activity produces VSDs with power-law exponents near 1, whereas larger and more energetic Vulcanian-type explosions and Plinian eruptions produce VSDs with power-law exponents near 1.5. The hypothesis to be tested was whether or not the samples studied in this work would contain VSDs similar to normal Strombolian products, display higher power-law exponents, or be described by exponential functions. Before making this comparison we tested the hypothesis that the phreatomagmatic nature of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption might have a significant effect on the VSDs. We performed 1 atm bubble-growth experiments in which the samples were inundated with water and compared them to similar, control, experiments without water inundation. No significant differences between the VSDs of the two sets of experiments were found, and the hypothesis is not supported by the experimental evidence; therefore, VSDs of magmatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions can be directly compared. The Phase II Eyjafjallajökull VSDs are described by power law exponents of ~ 0.8, typical of normal Strombolian eruptions. The comparable VSDs and behavior of Phase II of the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption to Stromboli are interpreted to be a reflection of similar conduit systems in both volcanoes that are being constantly fed by the ascent of deep magma that mixes with resident magma at shallow depths. Such behavior implies that continued activity during Phase II of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption could be expected and would have been predicted, had our VSDs been measured in real time during the eruption. However, the products studied show no peculiar feature that could herald renewed eruption intensity observed in the following Phase III of the eruption.

  7. Size Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod Size through Probabilistic Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body size of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of size evolution in these marine organisms. The body size of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod size. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned sizes based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod size to compare with the observed data. New sizes were chosen via a normal distribution, and the neutral model selected new sizes differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the distribution on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod size down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of size decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant size. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of size evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining size evolution in ostracods.

  8. The Size Frequency Distribution of Small Main-Belt Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Brian J.; Trilling, David E.; Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Hulsebus, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid size distribution informs us about the formation and composition of the Solar System. We build on our previous work in which we harvest serendipitously observed data of the Taurus region and measure the brightness and size distributions of Main-belt asteroids. This is accomplished with the highly sensitive MIPS 24 micron channel. We expect to catalog 104 asteroids, giving us a statistically significant data set. Results from this investigation will allow us to characterize the total population of small, Main-belt asteroids. Here we will present new results on the completeness of our study; on the presence of size distribution variations with inclination and radial distance in the belt; and early result on other archival fields.

  9. Estimating Clique Composition and Size Distributions from Sampled Network Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gjoka, Minas; Butts, Carter T

    2013-01-01

    Cliques are defined as complete graphs or subgraphs; they are the strongest form of cohesive subgroup, and are of interest in both social science and engineering contexts. In this paper we show how to efficiently estimate the distribution of clique sizes from a probability sample of nodes obtained from a graph (e.g., by independence or link-trace sampling). We introduce two types of unbiased estimators, one of which exploits labeling of sampled nodes neighbors and one of which does not require this information. We compare the estimators on a variety of real-world graphs and provide suggestions for their use. We generalize our estimators to cases in which cliques are distinguished not only by size but also by node attributes, allowing us to estimate clique composition by size. Finally, we apply our methodology to a sample of Facebook users to estimate the clique size distribution by gender over the social graph.

  10. Novel magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic polydivinylbenzene (PDVB)/magnetite micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution were prepared by entrapping Fe(CO)5 within the pores of uniform porous PDVB particles, followed by the thermal decomposition of the encapsulated Fe(CO)5 at 300 deg. C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. Magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution have been prepared by the thermal decomposition of the PDVB/magnetite magnetic microspheres at 1100 deg. C under inert atmosphere. The graphitic coating protects the elemental iron particles from oxidation and thereby preserves their very high magnetic moment for at least a year. Characterization of these unique magnetic carbon graphitic particles was also performed. - Highlights: ? Magnetic PDVB/iron-oxide composite particles of narrow size distribution have been synthesized and characterized. ? Magnetic C/Fe composite particles of narrow size distribution have been synthesized and characterized. ? Magnetic onion-like fullerenes structures have been observed in these different particles.

  11. New finite-size correction for local alignment score distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Park Yonil; Sheetlin Sergey; Ma Ning; Madden Thomas L; Spouge John L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Local alignment programs often calculate the probability that a match occurred by chance. The calculation of this probability may require a “finite-size” correction to the lengths of the sequences, as an alignment that starts near the end of either sequence may run out of sequence before achieving a significant score. Findings We present an improved finite-size correction that considers the distribution of sequence lengths rather than simply the corresponding means. This a...

  12. On the size distribution of Atlantic tropical cyclones

    OpenAIRE

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew; Chavas, Daniel Robert; Dean, L.

    2009-01-01

    The size of a tropical cyclone is known to vary considerably across storms, though little is understood about the environmental and internal factors that modulate it. Making use of newly available extended tropical cyclone records that include information about storm structure, we examine the size distribution of Atlantic tropical cyclones, using as a metric the radius of vanishing storm winds normalized by the theoretical upper bound given by the ratio of the potential intensity to the Corio...

  13. Determining Magnetic Nanoparticle Size Distributions from Thermomagnetic Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    DiPietro, R. S.; Johnson, H G; Bennett, S. P.; Nummy, T. J.; Lewis, L. H.; Heiman, D

    2010-01-01

    Thermomagnetic measurements are used to obtain the size distribution and anisotropy of magnetic nanoparticles. An analytical transformation method is described which utilizes temperature-dependent zero-field cooling (ZFC) magnetization data to provide a quantitative measurement of the average diameter and relative abundance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Applying this method to self-assembled MnAs nanoparticles in MnAs-GaAs composite films reveals a log-normal size dist...

  14. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on Micromechanical Properties of thin Nanoparticulate Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Nina; Schilde, Carsten; Kwade, Arno

    In this study the production of thin nanoparticulate coatings on solid stainless-steel substrates using dip-coating was investigated. Defined particle sizes and particle size distributions of Al2O3-nanoparticles were adjusted by stirred media milling using various operating parameters. Using nanoindentation the influence of particle size and width of the particle size distribution on the mechanical properties was investigated. In particular the establishment of nanoindentation routines for particulate thin films in contrast to hard coatings is discussed. Nanoindentation appears to be an efficient method for analysing mechanical properties of said thin coatings. It will be shown, that the influence of the substrate can be neglected for small indent depth while the coating's surface roughness influences the employed routine of the nanoindentation. The effect of the median particle size and the width of the particle size distribution on the coating structure and the micromechanical coating properties will be discussed. As a result, the maximum indentation force decreases with decreasing particle size but rises again once the nanoparticles reach very small sizes. A change in the width of the particle size distribution influences the micromechanical properties and coating structure as well.

  15. Size distributions of member asteroids in seven Hirayama families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distributions of asteroids in the seven Hirayama families are studied for newly assigned member asteroids in the diameter range of about 10 to 100 km. The size distributions for the different families are expressed by the power-law functions with distinctly different power-law indices. The power-law indices for families with small mean orbital inclinations are about 2.5 to 3.0. On the other hand, the power-law indices for families with large mean orbital inclinations are significantly smaller than 2.5. This indicates that the smaller asteroids were removed preferentially from these families after their formation. It is thought that the smaller asteroids left behind the families were dispersed into the main belt. It is consistent with the fact that the power-law index for the size distribution of asteroids with diameters smaller than 25 km in the main belt is larger than the power-law indices for the size distributions of asteroids in the families. This segregation due to the asteroid size can be caused by a drag force caused by the ambient matter deposited on the invariable place of the solar system during the early evolutionary stage. (author)

  16. Estimation of Nanoparticle Size Distributions by Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Rune; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the nanoparticle size distribution is important for the interpretation of experimental results in many studies of nanoparticle properties. An automated method is needed for accurate and robust estimation of particle size distribution from nanoparticle images with thousands of particles. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique based on a deformable ellipse model that can perform this task. Results of using this technique are shown for both nearly spherical particles and more irregularly shaped particles. The technique proves to be a very useful tool for nanoparticle research.

  17. Size-Dependency of Income Distributions and Its Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the size-dependency of income distributions, i.e. the income distribution curves change with the population of a country systematically. By using the generalized Lotka-Volterra model to fit the empirical income data in the United States during 1996-2007, we found an important parameter $\\lambda$ can scale with a $\\beta$ power of the size (population) of U.S. in that year. We pointed out that the size-dependency of the income distributions, which is a very important property but seldom addressed by previous studies, has two non-trivial implications: (1) the allometric growth pattern, i.e. the power law relationship between population and GDP in different years, which can be mathematically derived from the size-dependent income distributions and also supported by the empirical data; (2) the connection with the anomalous scaling for the probability density function in critical phenomena since the re-scaled form of the income distributions has the exactly same mathematical expression for the...

  18. The evolution and distribution of species body size

    OpenAIRE

    Clauset, Aaron; Erwin, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of species body size within taxonomic groups exhibits a heavy right-tail extending over many orders of magnitude, where most species are significantly larger than the smallest species. We provide a simple model of cladogenetic diffusion over evolutionary time that omits explicit mechanisms for inter-specific competition and other microevolutionary processes yet fully explains the shape of this distribution. We estimate the model's parameters from fossil data...

  19. The degree distribution of fixed act-size collaboration networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qinggui Zhao; Xiangxing Kong; Zhenting Hou

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate a special evolving model of collaboration net-works, where the act-size is fixed. Based on the first-passage probability of Markov chain theory, this paper provides a rigorous proof for the existence of a limiting degree distribution of this model and proves that the degree distribution obeys the power-law form with the exponent adjustable between 2 and 3.

  20. Application of Gnostic Theory to Analysis of Particle Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Zden?k; Ždímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Ji?í

    Vol. 56. Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2002 - (Korhonen, H.), s. 164-168 ISBN 952-5027-34-1. [Czech-Finnish Aerosol Symposium. Prague (CZ), 23.05.2002-26.05.2002] Grant ostatní: EVK2(XE) CT/1999/00052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : SMPS * particle size distribution * modal analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. A Merging Algorithm for Aerosol Size Distribution from Multiple Instruments.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondrá?ek, Jakub; Ždímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Ji?í; Lazaridis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 199, 1-4 (2009), s. 219-233. ISSN 0049-6979 Grant ostatní: MTKD(XE) CT-2004-513849 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosols * merging particle size distribution * multilognormal model Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.676, year: 2009

  2. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Durán

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009, we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  3. Growing axons analysis by using Granulometric Size Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the field of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of growing neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric size distribution in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, size and spatial orientation of growing axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric size distribution results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of growing axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the growing direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.

  4. Growing axons analysis by using Granulometric Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mariela A.; Ballarin, Virginia L.; Rapacioli, Melina; Celín, A. R.; Sánchez, V.; Flores, V.

    2011-09-01

    Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the field of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of growing neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric size distribution in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, size and spatial orientation of growing axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric size distribution results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of growing axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the growing direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.

  5. A model of size distribution of customer groups and businesses

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, D; Hui, P M; Zheng, Dafang

    2001-01-01

    We present a generalization of the dynamical model of information transmission and herd behavior proposed by Egu\\'{\\i}luz and Zimmermann. A characteristic size of group of agents $s_{0}$ is introduced. The fragmentation and coagulation rates of groups of agents are assumed to depend on the size of the group. We present results of numerical simulations and mean field analysis. It is found that the size distribution of groups of agents $n_{s}$ exhibits two distinct scaling behavior depending on $s \\leq s_{0}$ or $s > s_{0}$. For $s \\leq s_{0}$, $n_{s} \\sim s^{-(5/2 + \\delta)}$, while for $s > s_{0}$, $n_{s} \\sim s^{-(5/2 -\\delta)}$, where $\\delta$ is a model parameter representing the sensitivity of the fragmentation and coagulation rates to the size of the group. Our model thus gives a tunable exponent for the size distribution together with two scaling regimes separated by a characteristic size $s_{0}$. Suitably interpreted, our model can be used to represent the formation of groups of customers for certain p...

  6. Thresholded Power Law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2015-01-01

    Power law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold $x_0$; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background $x_b$; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in simplest terms with a "thresholded power law" distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), $N(x) dx \\propto (x+x_0)^{-a} dx$, where $x_0 > 0$ is positive for a threshold effect, while $x_0 < 0$ is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential-growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold $x_0$. We app...

  7. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes. PMID:25725854

  8. INITIAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies that focus specifically on this issue are rare. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we theoretically predict the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that the typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is ?4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs (?2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5 × 108 M ?, several times larger than previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view that the Milky Way GCs were born compact on the sub-pc scale, and rather implies that (1) the initial GCs were generally larger than the typical size of the present-day GCs, (2) the initially large GCs mostly shrank and/or disrupted as a result of the galactic tides, and (3) the initially small GCs expanded by two-body relaxation, and later shrank by the galactic tides.

  9. Modelling of Recent Changes In The Urban Particle Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, J.; Heyder, J.; Kreyling, W. G.; Heinrich, J.; Wichmann, H. E.

    Measurements of the particle size distribution in the environment of the East German city of Erfurt over the last decade showed a constant or slight increase in the number of particles smaller than 0.1 µm (ultrafine particles) and a decrease in the number of larger particles (fine particles) confirmed by a 3-4 fold decrease in PM2 . This effect .5 may be attributed to a possible increase in ultrafine particle emission, a decrease in fine particle emission and consequently by less scavenging of ultrafine by fine parti- cles. Numerical protocols were developed to examine this conjecture supporting their validity. The measurement protocol, the implications of the increase in ultrafine par- ticles along with a decrease in micron size particles, and the development of a nu- merical code (mathematical model?) to examine this phenomenon are discussed. The codes were developed to simulate coagulation with broad distributions. The simula- tions quantitatively examine the effect of the reduction of micron sized particles on ul- trafine particle persistence. They indicate the necessity of a continual source of micron sized particles, since sedimentation would eliminate such particles without continual renewal. The code is described in detail, with particular attention paid to the effect of the coagulation kernel used in the particle balance equations. These simulations sug- gest that it is important to use coagulation kernels appropriate for the transition regime. Otherwise the collision of similarly sized ultrafine particles are underestimated. Sev- eral protocols accounting for different continual source terms are studied.

  10. Grain size distribution and compaction properties of concrete waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low level radioactive concrete waste will be produced in future by breaking up the nuclear facilities, and the waste will be disposed in shallow depth of ground. In order to prepare for those situation, it is needed to clarify the gradation and compaction properties of concrete waste. In this study, full-scale concrete structure specimens were broken up, and a series of grain size analysis and compaction tests on concrete waste were performed. From the test results, close correlations between dry density, void ratio or porosity of the compacted concrete waste and its grain size distribution were found. (author)

  11. Critical sizes and flux distributions in the shut down pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important part of the experiments carried out on the reactor G1 during a period of shut-down has consisted in determinations of critical sizes, and measurements of flux distribution by irradiations of detectors. This report deals with the following points: 1- Critical sizes of the flat pile, the long pile and the uranium-thorium pile. 2- Flux charts of the same piles, and study of an exponential experiment. 3- Determination of the slit effect. 4- Calculation of the anisotropy of the lattice. 5- Description of the experimental apparatus of the irradiation measurements. (author)

  12. Probabilistic Optimal Allocation and Sizing of Distributed Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosseinzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal allocation of Distributed Generation (DG in distribution system is one of the important parts of DG research studies so as to maximize its benefits. For this purpose, a probabilistic approach is proposed in this study to consider time varying load demands as uncertain parameters of distribution system. It is assumed that each load point consists of three categories of voltage dependent loads: residential, industrial and commercial. The proposed algorithm is based on a probabilistic load flow solved by Point Estimate Method (PEM. The objective function is considered as a combination of active power loss, reactive power loss and voltage profiles indices. To solve the optimization problem, an Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO technique is adopted and the optimal location and size of different types of DG are obtained. Examining on a test distribution system, the performance of the proposed approach is assessed and illustrated.

  13. Studies on the Toxicity and Distribution of Indium Compounds According to Particle Size in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Cheol Hong; Han, Jeong-Hee; Cho, Hae-Won; Kang, Mingu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The use of indium compounds, especially those of small size, for the production of semiconductors, liquid-crystal panels, etc., has increased recently. However, the role of particle size or the chemical composition of indium compounds in their toxicity and distribution in the body has not been sufficiently investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of particle size and the chemical composition of indium compounds on their toxicity and distribution. M...

  14. Magnetic heating effect of nanoparticles with different sizes and size distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, R.; Dutz, S. [Department of Nano Biophotonics, Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Neeb, A.; Cato, A.C.B. [Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Zeisberger, M., E-mail: zeisberger@ipht-jena.de [Department of Spectroscopy and Imaging, Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    We present a comparative study of dynamic and quasistatic magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles. The samples are prepared by different wet chemical precipitation methods resulting in different sizes and size distributions. The structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The heating effect in an ac field in the range 0-30 kA/m at 210 kHz was measured calorimetrically. In addition, a vibrating sample magnetometer was used for hysteresis and remanence curve measurements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of 4 different types of magnetic nanoparticles with mean sizes from 10-20 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Basic characterization by X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of sizes and size distributions from X-ray and TEM data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calorimetric measurements of the specific heating power in an ac field of 210 kHz and field amplitudes up to 30 kA/m.

  15. Seasonal changes of trophic transfer efficiencies in a plankton food web derived from biomass size distributions and network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaedke, Ursula; Straile, Dietmar

    1994-01-01

    The trophic transfer efficiencies in the planktonic food web of large, deep, and mesoeutrophic Lake Constance were derived independently from biomass size distributions and from mass-balanced carbon flow diagrams based on comprehensive data for biomass, production, and food web structure. The main emphasis was on the transfer of primary production to herbivores since this process dominates the flow of matter within the food web. Biomass size distributions offer an ecosystem approach which rel...

  16. Development of sample size allocation program using hypergeometric distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this research is the development of sample allocation program using hypergeometric distribution with objected-oriented method. When IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) performs inspection, it simply applies a standard binomial distribution which describes sampling with replacement instead of a hypergeometric distribution which describes sampling without replacement in sample allocation to up to three verification methods. The objective of the IAEA inspection is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material, therefore game theory is applied to its sampling plan. It is necessary to use hypergeometric distribution directly or approximate distribution to secure statistical accuracy. Improved binomial approximation developed by Mr. J. L. Jaech and correctly applied binomial approximation are more closer to hypergeometric distribution in sample size calculation than the simply applied binomial approximation of the IAEA. Object-oriented programs of 1. sample approximate-allocation with correctly applied standard binomial approximation, 2. sample approximate-allocation with improved binomial approximation, and 3. sample approximate-allocation with hypergeometric distribution were developed with Visual C++ and corresponding programs were developed with EXCEL(using Visual Basic for Application). 8 tabs., 15 refs. (Author)

  17. Development of sample size allocation program using hypergeometric distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Tae; Kwack, Eun Ho; Park, Wan Soo; Min, Kyung Soo; Park, Chan Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is the development of sample allocation program using hypergeometric distribution with objected-oriented method. When IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) performs inspection, it simply applies a standard binomial distribution which describes sampling with replacement instead of a hypergeometric distribution which describes sampling without replacement in sample allocation to up to three verification methods. The objective of the IAEA inspection is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material, therefore game theory is applied to its sampling plan. It is necessary to use hypergeometric distribution directly or approximate distribution to secure statistical accuracy. Improved binomial approximation developed by Mr. J. L. Jaech and correctly applied binomial approximation are more closer to hypergeometric distribution in sample size calculation than the simply applied binomial approximation of the IAEA. Object-oriented programs of 1. sample approximate-allocation with correctly applied standard binomial approximation, 2. sample approximate-allocation with improved binomial approximation, and 3. sample approximate-allocation with hypergeometric distribution were developed with Visual C{sup ++} and corresponding programs were developed with EXCEL(using Visual Basic for Application). 8 tabs., 15 refs. (Author).

  18. Pore Size Distribution of Carbon with Different Probe Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Chaiyot Tangsathitkulchai; Supunnee Junpirom; Sorod Charoensuk; Warangkhana Somrup; Worapot Intomya; Atichat Wongkoblap

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation (GCMC) method is used to study the adsorption of different probe molecules on activated carbon, while the experimental tests are performed by using a Gravimetric Analyzer. In addition the simulation results together with the measured isotherm data are used for the determination of micropore size distribution. Nitrogen at 77 K and carbon dioxide at 273 and 300 K are proposed as molecular probes. The simulation results obtained for various...

  19. Nonlinear observer of crystal-size distribution during batch crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Bakir, Toufik; Othman, Sami; Fevotte, Gilles; Hammouri, Hassan

    2006-01-01

    A high-gain observer was designed to estimate the crystal-size distribution (CSD) in batch crystallization processes. The observer is based on the discretization of population balance equations describing the evolution of the CSD using finite difference method. Due to process impurities and other batch-to-batch variations, the kinetic parameters involved in the dynamic model of the crystallization, relating primary and secondary nucleation in particular, are subject to significant variations....

  20. Size distribution of airborne particles in animal houses

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, T.L.H.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Cambra-López, M.; Huynh, T.T.T.; H.K. Parmentier; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    The concentration and size distribution of airborne particles were measured inside and outside typical animal houses such as broilers, broiler breeders (both floor housing with litter); layers (floor housing system and aviary housing system); turkeys (floor housing with litter), pigs: fattening pigs (traditional houses, low emission houses with dry feed, and low emission houses with wet feed), piglets, sows (individual and group housing); cattle (cubicle house), and mink (cages). Using an aer...

  1. The animal species–body size distribution of Marion Island

    OpenAIRE

    Gaston, Kevin J; Chown, Steven L.; Mercer, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    Body size is one of the most significant features of animals. Not only is it correlated with many life history and ecological traits, but it also may influence the abundance of species within, and their membership of, assemblages. Understanding of the latter processes is frequently based on a comparison of model outcomes with the frequency of species of different body mass within natural assemblages. Consequently, the form of these frequency distributions has been ...

  2. Study of mathematical model of sodium aerosol size distribution parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the analysis of liquid metal fast breeder reactor accidents, the effect of sodium aerosol cannot be neglected. Generation and characterization of sodium aerosols contribute significantly to safety studies of fast reactors and it is important to carry out study on the mathematical model of sodium aerosol size distribution. Here, we started with the elementary definition of these parameters of the model, and deduced the primary conclusion, which coincided with the experiment results very well. (authors)

  3. Analysis of Time Evolution of Particle Size Distribution.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Zden?k; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Ždímal, Vladimír; Eleftheriadis, K.; Lazaridis, M.; Smolík, Ji?í

    Prague : Orgit, 2009 - (Smolík, J.; O'Dowd, C.), S.116-119 ISBN 978-80-02-12161-2. [International Conference Nucleation and Atmospheric Aerosols /18./. Prague (CZ), 10.08.2009-14.08.2009] Grant ostatní: MF CZ(NO) 0049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : tropospheric aerosol * particle size distribution * time series filtration and interpolation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://www.icnaa.cz/

  4. New finite-size correction for local alignment score distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Yonil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local alignment programs often calculate the probability that a match occurred by chance. The calculation of this probability may require a “finite-size” correction to the lengths of the sequences, as an alignment that starts near the end of either sequence may run out of sequence before achieving a significant score. Findings We present an improved finite-size correction that considers the distribution of sequence lengths rather than simply the corresponding means. This approach improves sensitivity and avoids substituting an ad hoc length for short sequences that can underestimate the significance of a match. We use a test set derived from ASTRAL to show improved ROC scores, especially for shorter sequences. Conclusions The new finite-size correction improves the calculation of probabilities for a local alignment. It is now used in the BLAST+ package and at the NCBI BLAST web site (http://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

  5. Controlling semiconductor nanoparticle size distributions with tailored ultrashort pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser generation of size-controlled semiconductor nanoparticle formation under gas phase conditions is investigated. It is shown that the size distribution can be changed if picosecond pulse sequences of tailored ultra short laser pulses (<200 fs) are employed. By delivering the laser energy in small packages, a temporal energy flux control at the target surface is achieved, which results in the control of the thermodynamic pathway the material takes. The concept is tested with silicon and germanium, both materials with a predictable response to double pulse sequences, which allows deduction of the materials' response to complicated pulse sequences. An automatic, adaptive learning algorithm was employed to demonstrate a future strategy that enables the definition of more complex optimization targets such as particle size on materials less predictable than semiconductors

  6. Initial Size Distribution of the Galactic Globular Cluster System

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Jihye; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Kim, Juhan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies are rare that focus specifically on this issue. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we predict theoretically the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is ~4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs (~2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5x10^8 M_sun$, several times larger than the previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view t...

  7. Pore Size Distribution of Carbon with Different Probe Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiyot Tangsathitkulchai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation (GCMC method is used to study the adsorption of different probe molecules on activated carbon, while the experimental tests are performed by using a Gravimetric Analyzer. In addition the simulation results together with the measured isotherm data are used for the determination of micropore size distribution. Nitrogen at 77 K and carbon dioxide at 273 and 300 K are proposed as molecular probes. The simulation results obtained for various pore sizes represent the structure of molecular probe packing in the individual pores at different pressures. The reconstructed adsorption isotherm obtained by using these results and a postulated pore size distribution (PSD function is used to determine the PSD of activated carbon which provides the best match between the simulation isotherm and the experimental isotherm. The PSD obtained using the GCMC agrees very well with the Density Functional Theory (DFT method. The PSD for carbon dioxide differs from that for nitrogen due to the molecular structure and size. The advantage of GCMC is that it can provide not only adsorption isotherm but also the snapshot that presents the mechanism inside the pore.

  8. Time Evolution of the Mutual Fund Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the process of mutual fund growth both empirically and theoretically. The size of large mutual funds has a heavy tailed distribution that has been conjectured to be a power law; we investigate the data more carefully and show that it is better described by a log normal. To explain this we develop a stochastic growth model based on multiplicative growth, creation and annihilation. Under the simplifying assumption that these processes do not depend on fund size we obtain a time-dependent analytic solution of the model. The distribution evolves from a log normal into a power law only over long time scales, suggesting that log-normality comes about because the industry is still young and in a transient state due to its rapid growth in recent years. We make the model more realistic by taking into account size dependent effects, in particular the decay in the rates of diffusion and drift with increasing fund size. The resulting model is in good quantitative agreement with the data. Surprisingly, it a...

  9. Controls on phytoplankton cell size distributions in contrasting physical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. R.; Daines, S. J.; Lenton, T. M.

    2012-04-01

    A key challenge for marine ecosystem and biogeochemical models is to capture the multiple ecological and evolutionary processes driving the adaptation of diverse communities to changed environmental conditions over different spatial and temporal scales. These range from short-term acclimation in individuals, to population-level selection, immigration and ecological succession on intermediate scales, to shifts in the global biogeochemical cycling of key elements. As part of the "EVE" project, we have been working toward improving the representation of ecological and evolutionary processes in models, with a focus on understanding the role of marine ecosystems in the past, present, and future Earth system. Our approach is to develop a mechanistic understanding of trade-offs between different functional traits through the explicit representation of resource investment in sub-cellular components controlled by a synthetic genome. Trait expression (including size, metabolic strategies on a continuum from autotrophy to heterotrophy, and predation strategies) and adaptation to the environment are then emergent properties of the model, following from natural selection operating in the model environment. Here we show results relating to controls on phytoplankton cell size - a key phytoplankton trait which is inextricably linked to the structuring and functioning of marine ecosystems. Coupled to the MIT OGCM, we use the model to derive dynamic optimal size-class distributions at representative oligotrophic and high-latitude time series sites, which are then compared with in situ data. Particular attention is given to the relative importance of top-down vs bottom-up drivers for phytoplankton cell size, and their influence on global patterns in phytoplankton cell size, as well as changes in the cell size distribution during phytoplankton bloom periods.

  10. Grain-size Distributions from Deconvolved Broadband Magnetic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, K.

    2014-12-01

    A magnetic susceptibility meter with several-decade frequency band has recently made it possible to obtain superparamagnetic grain-size distributions only by room-temperature measurement. A rigorous deconvolution scheme of frequency dependence of susceptibility is already available. I have made some corrections on the deconvolution scheme and present its applications to broadband susceptibility data on loess and volcanic rocks. Deconvolution of frequency dependence of susceptibility was originally developed by Shchervakov and Fabian [2005]. Suppose an ensemble of grains distributed for two independent variables of volume (grain-size) and energy barrier. Applying alternating magnetic field with varying frequency results in differentiating grains by energy barrier - not directly by volume. Since the response function for frequency is known, deconvolution of frequency dependence of susceptibility provide a rigorous solution for the second moment of volume on the volume-energy barrier distribution. Based on a common assumption of a linear relation between volume and energy barrier, we can obtain analytical volume or grain-size distributions of superparamagnetic grains. A ZH broadband susceptibility meter comprises of two separated devices for lower (SM-100, 65 - 16kHz) and higher (SM-105, 16k - 512kHz) frequency ranges. At every frequency susceptibility calibration was conducted using three kinds of paramagnetic rare earth oxides [Fukuma and Torii, 2011]. Almost all samples exhibited seemingly linear dependences of in-phase susceptibility on logarithmic frequency. This indicates that the measured data do not suffer serious noise, and that the second moment of volume is relatively constant against energy barrier. Nonetheless, third-order polynomial fittings revealed slight deflections from the quasi-linear susceptibility - logarithmic frequency relations. Deconvolving the polynomials showed that such slight defections come from peaks or troughs in varying second moment of volume against energy barrier. Assuming a linear relation between volume and energy barrier, peaks or troughs around 1 x 10^{-24} m^{3} were found for the derived volume distributions. Long-tailed volume distributions from Chinese loess samples suggest the broad grain-size distribution.

  11. Development of laboratory and process sensors to monitor particle size distribution of industrial slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendse, H.P.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we present a novel measurement technique for monitoring particle size distributions of industrial colloidal slurries based on ultrasonic spectroscopy and mathematical deconvolution. An on-line sensor prototype has been developed and tested extensively in laboratory and production settings using mineral pigment slurries. Evaluation to date shows that the sensor is capable of providing particle size distributions, without any assumptions regarding their functional form, over diameters ranging from 0.1 to 100 micrometers in slurries with particle concentrations of 10 to 50 volume percents. The newly developed on-line sensor allows one to obtain particle size distributions of commonly encountered inorganic pigment slurries under industrial processing conditions without dilution.

  12. Morphology, size distribution and elemental composition of several dental debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shigeaki; Iwadera, Nobuki; Esaki, Mitsue; Aoyama, Ken-Ichi; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Morita, Manabu; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated morphologies, size distributions and elemental compositions of dental debris formed by cutting/grinding teeth or dental alloys. The average size of debris formed by cutting/grinding dental alloy was around 100 ?m and that of teeth was 20 ?m. The debris formed by grinding with diamond or carborundum point had isotropic irregular shape, while the debris formed by cutting with carbide bar had characteristic lathe-cut shape. The elemental analysis indicated that the debris formed by grinding dental alloy with carborundum point consisted of not only the particles of the alloy but also the particles of Si compounds with the size of around 10 ?m. The particles of Si compounds would be formed by abrasion of the grinding instrument (carborundum, SiC). Similarly, the debris formed by grinding with diamond point also contained submicro-sized particles consisting of C compounds. The results indicate that the morphology and composition of dental debris are varied depending on the combination between the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials and that the dental debris consist of both the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials in some combination. In addition, some of the debris of tooth had the size less than 2 ?m, which has a potential to induce inflammation. Though the inflammation can be expected at low level, it is required to investigate the details in future.

  13. INITIAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Kyungki 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk-Jin [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juhan, E-mail: jhshin@ap4.khu.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 87 Hoegiro Dondaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-10

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies that focus specifically on this issue are rare. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we theoretically predict the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that the typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is {approx}4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs ({approx}2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }, several times larger than previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view that the Milky Way GCs were born compact on the sub-pc scale, and rather implies that (1) the initial GCs were generally larger than the typical size of the present-day GCs, (2) the initially large GCs mostly shrank and/or disrupted as a result of the galactic tides, and (3) the initially small GCs expanded by two-body relaxation, and later shrank by the galactic tides.

  14. Universal functional form of 1-minute raindrop size distribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall remains one of the poorly quantified phenomena of the hydrological cycle, despite its fundamental role. No universal laws describing the rainfall behavior are available in literature. This is probably due to the continuous description of rainfall, which is a discrete phenomenon, made by drops. From the statistical point of view, the rainfall variability at particle size scale, is described by the drop size distribution (DSD). With this term, it is generally indicated as the concentration of raindrops per unit volume and diameter, as the probability density function of drop diameter at the ground, according to the specific problem of interest. Raindrops represent the water exchange, under liquid form, between atmosphere and earth surface, and the number of drops and their size have impacts in a wide range of hydrologic, meteorologic, and ecologic phenomena. DSD is used, for example, to measure the multiwavelength rain attenuation for terrestrial and satellite systems, it is an important input for the evaluation of the below cloud scavenging coefficient of the aerosol by precipitation, and is of primary importance to make estimates of rainfall rate through radars. In literature, many distributions have been used to this aim (Gamma and Lognormal above all), without statistical supports and with site-specific studies. Here, we present an extensive investigation of raindrop size distribution based on 18 datasets, consisting in 1-minute disdrometer data, sampled using Joss-Waldvogel or Thies instrument in different locations on Earth's surface. The aim is to understand if an universal functional form of 1-minute drop diameter variability exists. The study consists of three main steps: analysis of the high order moments, selection of the model through the AIC index and test of the model with the use of goodness-of-fit tests.

  15. Grain-size distribution of volcaniclastic rocks 2: Characterizing grain size and hydraulic sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Martin; McPhie, Jocelyn; Allen, Sharon R.; Proussevitch, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantification of the grain size distribution of sediments allows interpretation of processes of transport and deposition. Jutzeler et al. (2012) developed a technique to determine grain size distribution of consolidated clastic rocks using functional stereology, allowing direct comparison between unconsolidated sediments and rocks. Here, we develop this technique to characterize hydraulic sorting and infer transport and deposition processes. We compare computed grain size and sorting of volcaniclastic rocks with field-based characteristics of volcaniclastic facies for which transport and depositional mechanisms have been inferred. We studied pumice-rich, subaqueous facies of volcaniclastic rocks from the Oligocene Ohanapecosh Formation (Ancestral Cascades, Washington, USA), Pliocene Dogashima Formation (Izu Peninsula, Honshu, Japan), Miocene Manukau Subgroup (Northland, New Zealand) and the Quaternary Sierra La Primavera caldera (Jalisco State, Mexico). These sequences differ in bed thickness, grading and abundance of matrix. We propose to evaluate grain size and sorting of volcaniclastic deposits by values of their modes, matrix proportion (populations of pumice and dense clasts are hydraulically sorted with each other, considering various types of transport underwater. Evaluation of this ratio for our samples shows that most studied volcaniclastic facies are deposited by settling from density currents, and that basal dense clast breccias are emplaced by shear rolling. These hydraulic sorting ratios can be applied to any type of clastic rocks, and indifferently on consolidated and unconsolidated samples.

  16. Educational production and optimal class size

    CERN Document Server

    Foregger, T H

    2004-01-01

    Lazear (2001) (Quarterly Journal of Economics, v. 116, p. 777-803) provided a model of a private school with a particular profit function. Using an alternative, related profit function I show that an optimal solution has nearly equal class sizes. I also offer a conjecture about the roots of a certain family of polynomials, which if true, allows one to conclude that if students become less disruptive or teacher cost increases, then the optimal solution for a profit maximizing school is generally, but not always, to use fewer classes. I also show that if the school has s>1 types of students, then the optimal solution will have at most s-1 mixed classes and its bipartite graph is a forest.

  17. Cloud droplet size distributions in low-level stratiform clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, N.L.; Verlinde, J.; Clothiaux, E.E.

    2000-01-15

    A database of stratus cloud droplet size distribution parameters, derived from in situ data reported in the existing literature, was created, facilitating intercomparison among datasets and quantifying typical values and their variability. From the datasets, which were divided into marine and continental groups, several parameters are presented, including the total number concentration, effective diameter, mean diameter, standard deviation of the droplet diameters about the mean diameter, and liquid water content, as well as the parameters of modified gamma and lognormal distributions. In light of these results, the appropriateness of common assumptions used in remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions is discussed. For example, vertical profiles of mean diameter, effective diameter, and liquid water content agreed qualitatively with expectations based on the current paradigm of cloud formation. Whereas parcel theory predicts that the standard deviation about the mean diameter should decrease with height, the results illustrated that the standard deviation generally increases with height. A feature common to all marine clouds was their approximately constant total number concentration profiles; however, the total number concentration profiles of continental clouds were highly variable. Without cloud condensation nuclei spectra, classification of clouds into marine and continental groups is based on indirect methods. After reclassification of four sets of measurements in the database, there was a fairly clear dichotomy between marine and continental clouds, but a great deal of variability within each classification. The relevant applications of this study lie in radiative transfer and climate issues, rather than in cloud formation and dynamics. Techniques that invert remotely sensed measurements into cloud droplet size distributions frequently rely on a priori assumptions, such as constant number concentration profiles and constant spectral width. The results of this paper provide a basis for evaluating the sensitivity of these techniques. In particular, there were large enough differences in observed droplet spectral widths to significantly affect remotely sensed determinations of cloud microphysics.

  18. Building predictive models of soil particle-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to build predictive models (PMs of soil particle-size distribution (psd in a region with complex geology and a young and unstable land-surface? The main objective of this study was to answer this question. A set of 339 soil samples from a small slope catchment in Southern Brazil was used to build PMs of psd in the surface soil layer. Multiple linear regression models were constructed using terrain attributes (elevation, slope, catchment area, convergence index, and topographic wetness index. The PMs explained more than half of the data variance. This performance is similar to (or even better than that of the conventional soil mapping approach. For some size fractions, the PM performance can reach 70 %. Largest uncertainties were observed in geologically more complex areas. Therefore, significant improvements in the predictions can only be achieved if accurate geological data is made available. Meanwhile, PMs built on terrain attributes are efficient in predicting the particle-size distribution (psd of soils in regions of complex geology.

  19. Measurements of ultrafine particle size distribution near Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fenjuan; Costabileb, Francesca; Li, Hong; Fang, Dong; Alligrini, Ivo

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the particle number concentration and size distribution of ultrafine particles (UFPs) near the city of Rome. Measurements were made using Scanning Mobility particle Sizer System (SMPS), at Montelibretti station in October and November, 2007. The major focus of this study was the evaluation of aerosol size distribution from 4 to 70 nm using scanning mobility particle size with a high resolution Nano Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA). Cluster analysis and factor analysis were used to analyze the correlation of different diameter particle fractions with related gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. The results obtained showed that over the measurements period the daily average particle total number concentration was 19,000 cm - 3 . There was a weekly cycle which makes it evident that the values on workdays were higher than the values on the weekends by a factor of around 1.3. The cluster analysis and factor analysis conducted with an hourly data set suggest that the N 30-50 (number concentration of particles with diameter between 30 and 50 nm) and the N 50-70 closely correlated to NOx and relative humidity, while the N 4-10, N 10-30 and N 4-70 consort with solar radiation, temperature and wind speed.

  20. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  1. Grain size effects on He bubbles distribution and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gao, X.; Gao, N. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Z.G., E-mail: zhgwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Cui, M.H.; Wei, K.F.; Yao, C.F.; Sun, J.R.; Li, B.S.; Zhu, Y.B.; Pang, L.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Y.F. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xie, E.Q. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • SMAT treated T91 and conventional T91 were implanted by 200 keV He{sup 2+} to 1 × 10{sup 21} He m{sup ?2} at room temperature and annealed at 450 °C for 3.5 h. • He bubbles in nanometer-size-grained T91 are smaller in as-implanted case. • The bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were hard to detect and those along the nanograin boundaries coalesced and filled with the grain boundaries after annealing. • Brownian motion and coalescence and Ostwald ripening process might lead to bubbles morphology presented in the nanometer-size-grained T91 after annealing. - Abstract: Grain boundary and grain size effects on He bubble distribution and evolution were investigated by He implantation into nanometer-size-grained T91 obtained by Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) and the conventional coarse-grained T91. It was found that bubbles in the nanometer-size-grained T91 were smaller than those in the conventional coarse-grained T91 in as-implanted case, and bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were undetectable while those at nanograin boundaries (GBs) coalesced and filled in GBs after heat treatment. These results suggested that the grain size of structural material should be larger than the mean free path of bubble’s Brownian motion and/or denuded zone around GBs in order to prevent bubbles accumulation at GBs, and multiple instead of one type of defects should be introduced into structural materials to effectively reduce the susceptibility of materials to He embrittlement and improve the irradiation tolerance of structural materials.

  2. Grain size effects on He bubbles distribution and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SMAT treated T91 and conventional T91 were implanted by 200 keV He2+ to 1 × 1021 He m?2 at room temperature and annealed at 450 °C for 3.5 h. • He bubbles in nanometer-size-grained T91 are smaller in as-implanted case. • The bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were hard to detect and those along the nanograin boundaries coalesced and filled with the grain boundaries after annealing. • Brownian motion and coalescence and Ostwald ripening process might lead to bubbles morphology presented in the nanometer-size-grained T91 after annealing. - Abstract: Grain boundary and grain size effects on He bubble distribution and evolution were investigated by He implantation into nanometer-size-grained T91 obtained by Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) and the conventional coarse-grained T91. It was found that bubbles in the nanometer-size-grained T91 were smaller than those in the conventional coarse-grained T91 in as-implanted case, and bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were undetectable while those at nanograin boundaries (GBs) coalesced and filled in GBs after heat treatment. These results suggested that the grain size of structural material should be larger than the mean free path of bubble’s Brownian motion and/or denuded zone around GBs in order to prevent bubbles accumulation at GBs, and multiple instead of one type of defects should be introduced into structural materials to effectively reduce the susceptibility of materials to He embrittlement and improve the irradiation tolerance of structural materials

  3. Better Size Estimation for Sparse Matrix Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amossen, Rasmus Resen; Campagna, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of doing fast and reliable estimation of the number of non-zero entries in a sparse Boolean matrix product. Let n denote the total number of non-zero entries in the input matrices. We show how to compute a 1 ± ? approximation (with small probability of error) in expected time O(n) for any ? > 4*(n^(-1/4)). The previously best estimation algorithm, due to Cohen (JCSS 1997), uses time O(n/?^2). We also present a variant using O(sort(n)) I/Os in expectation in the cache-oblivious model. We also describe how sampling can be used to maintain (independent) sketches of matrices that allow estimation to be performed in time o(n) if z is sufficiently large. This gives a simpler alternative to the sketching technique of Ganguly et al. (PODS 2005), and matches a space lower bound shown in that paper.

  4. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  5. Colony size-frequency distribution of pocilloporid juvenile corals along a natural environmental gradient in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Lozano-Cortés, Diego F.

    2015-10-29

    Coral colony size-frequency distributions can be used to assess population responses to local environmental conditions and disturbances. In this study, we surveyed juvenile pocilloporids, herbivorous fish densities, and algal cover in the central and southern Saudi Arabian Red Sea. We sampled nine reefs with different disturbance histories along a north–south natural gradient of physicochemical conditions (higher salinity and wider temperature fluctuations in the north, and higher turbidity and productivity in the south). Since coral populations with negatively skewed size-frequency distributions have been associated with unfavorable environmental conditions, we expected to find more negative distributions in the southern Red Sea, where corals are potentially experiencing suboptimal conditions. Although juvenile coral and parrotfish densities differed significantly between the two regions, mean colony size and size-frequency distributions did not. Results suggest that pocilloporid colony size-frequency distribution may not be an accurate indicator of differences in biological or oceanographic conditions in the Red Sea.

  6. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA is of extremely low volatility.

  7. Empirical Reference Distributions for Networks of Different Size

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anna; Browning, Christopher R

    2015-01-01

    Network analysis has become an increasingly prevalent research tool across a vast range of scientific fields. Here, we focus on the particular issue of comparing network statistics, i.e. graph-level measures of network structural features, across multiple networks that differ in size. Although "normalized" versions of some network statistics exist, we demonstrate via simulation why direct comparison of raw and normalized statistics is often inappropriate. We examine a recent suggestion to normalize network statistics relative to Erdos-Renyi random graphs and demonstrate via simulation how this is an improvement over direct comparison, but still sometimes problematic. We propose a new adjustment method based on a reference distribution constructed as a mixture model of random graphs which reflect the dependence structure exhibited in the observed networks. We show that using simple Bernoulli models as mixture components in this reference distribution can provide adjusted network statistics that are relatively ...

  8. Fluctuating fitness shapes the clone size distribution of immune repertoires

    CERN Document Server

    Desponds, Jonathan; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system relies on the diversity of receptors expressed on the surface of B and T-cells to protect the organism from a vast amount of pathogenic threats. The proliferation and degradation dynamics of different cell types (B cells, T cells, naive, memory) is governed by a variety of antigenic and environmental signals, yet the observed clone sizes follow a universal power law distribution. Guided by this reproducibility we propose effective models of somatic evolution where cell fate depends on an effective fitness. This fitness is determined by growth factors acting either on clones of cells with the same receptor responding to specific antigens, or directly on single cells with no regards for clones. We identify fluctuations in the fitness acting specifically on clones as the essential ingredient leading to the observed distributions. Combining our models with experiments we characterize the scale of fluctuations in antigenic environments and we provide tools to identify the relevant growth...

  9. Dynamic lot sizing with product returns and remanufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Teunter, Ruud; Bayindir, Pelin; van den Heuvel, Wilco

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We address the dynamic lot sizing problem for systems with product returns. The demand and return amounts are deterministic over the finite planning horizon. Demands can be satisfied by manufactured new items, but also by remanufactured returned items. The objective is to determine those lot sizes for manufacturing and remanufacturing that minimize the total cost composed of holding cost for returns and (re)manufactured products and set-up costs. Two different set-up co...

  10. Top pair production distributions at the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi Yuji

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available At the Tevatron, the top quark is mainly produced in pairs through the strong interaction and decays before forming hadrons. Thus the kinematical distributions at top pair production possess rich information on the tt¯$tar t$ production vertex including polarizations of top and anti-top quarks. In this article, recent measurements on top quark pair production distributions at Tevatron (CDF and DO are presented.

  11. Microfluidic production of porous carbon spheres with tunable size and pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Han; Xu, Hongbao; Lu, Tianyi; Li, Jiang; Chen, Haosheng; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-01-01

    Porous carbon particles have been widely used in many areas including energy storage. Production of carbon microspheres in an efficient, controlled, and low-cost manner, however, is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic approach to generate porous carbon particles using inexpensive precursors and show that the size of the particle and pores can be tuned by adjusting the deionized (DI) water content in droplets and preheating temperature. The developed strategy offers an effective approach to control the production of porous carbon spheres with a well-defined diameter, narrow size distribution and pore size. PMID:26397924

  12. Image Analysis of Pellet Size for a Control System in Industrial Feed Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2011-01-01

    When producing aquaculture fish feed pellets, the size of the output product is of immense importance. As the production method cannot produce pellets of constant and uniform size using constant machine settings, there is a demand for size control. Fish fed with feed pellets of improper size are prone to not grow as expected, which is undesirable to the aquaculture industry. In this paper an image analysis method is proposed for automatic size-monitoring of pellets. This is called granulometry and the method used here is based on the mathematical morphological opening operation. In the proposed method, no image object segmentation is needed. The results show that it is possible to extract a general size distribution from an image of piled disordered pellets representing both length and diameter of the pellets in combination as an area.

  13. Image analysis of pellet size for a control system in industrial feed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Frosch, Stina

    2011-01-01

    When producing aquaculture fish feed pellets, the size of the output product is of immense importance. As the production method cannot produce pellets of constant and uniform size using constant machine settings, there is a demand for size control. Fish fed with feed pellets of improper size are prone to not grow as expected, which is undesirable to the aquaculture industry. In this paper an image analysis method is proposed for automatic size-monitoring of pellets. This is called granulometry and the method used here is based on the mathematical morphological opening operation. In the proposed method, no image object segmentation is needed. The results show that it is possible to extract a general size distribution from an image of piled disordered pellets representing both length and diameter of the pellets in combination as an area. PMID:22031836

  14. Distributed Project Management for New Product Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred E. Thal; Jr, Adedeji Badiru; Rupy Sawhney

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an integrative distributed project management approach for product development. The core of the integrative model is the Triple C model of project management, which presents a systematic structure for Communication, Cooperation, and Coordination across product development functions. The achievement of lower product development cycles requires strategic implementation of project management techniques. The level of communication, cooperation, and coordination required for ef...

  15. Size Distribution of Main-Belt Asteroids with High Inclination

    CERN Document Server

    Terai, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the size distribution of high-inclination main-belt asteroids (MBAs) to explore asteroid collisional evolution under hypervelocity collisions of around 10 km/s. We performed a wide-field survey for high-inclination sub-km MBAs using the 8.2-m Subaru Telescope with the Subaru Prime Focus Camera (Suprime-Cam). Suprime-Cam archival data were also used. A total of 616 MBA candidates were detected in an area of 9.0 deg^2 with a limiting magnitude of 24.0 mag in the SDSS r filter. Most of candidate diameters were estimated to be smaller than 1 km. We found a scarcity of sub-km MBAs with high inclination. Cumulative size distributions (CSDs) were constructed using Subaru data and published asteroid catalogs. The power-law indexes of the CSDs were 2.17 +/- 0.02 for low-inclination ( 15 deg) MBAs in the 0.7-50 km diameter range. The high-inclination MBAs had a shallower CSD. We also found that the CSD of S-like MBAs had a small slope with high inclination, whereas the slope did not vary with inclinatio...

  16. Size of RJVs and Degree of Cooperation in Product Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bourreau, Marc; Dogan, Pinar; Manant, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we provide a model of Research Joint Venture (RJV), and study the incentives of competing firms to cooperate in product development. Firms that participate in the RJV decide on the product components for joint development, i.e., they decide on how much to cooperate. We consider three cases: (i) an RJV with an exogenous size and an endogenous scope, (ii) an RJV with an endogenous size and an exogenous scope, and (iii) an RJV with an endogenous size and scope. Using numerical simu...

  17. The Spectral Energy Distribution of HH30 IRS: Constraining The Circumstellar Dust Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Wood,Kenneth; Wolff, Michael J.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Whitney, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    We present spectral energy distribution (SED) models for the edge-on classical T Tauri star HH30 IRS that indicate dust grains have grown to larger than 50 microns within its circumstellar disk. The disk geometry and inclination are known from previous modeling of multiwavelength Hubble Space Telescope images and we use the SED to constrain the dust size distribution. Model spectra are shown for different circumstellar dust models: a standard ISM mixture and larger grain mod...

  18. High-Resolution UV Holography Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Morris Kaufman; Capelle, Gene; Grover, Mike; Sorenson, Dan; Pazuchanics, Pete

    2010-01-01

    A high-resolution UV holography relay lens, shown in Figure 1, has been developed for measuring particle size distributions down to 0.5 ?m in a 12-mm-diameter by 5-mm-thick volume. This work has been selected by an independent judging panel and editors of R&D Magazine as a recipient of a 2009 R&D 100 Award. This award recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products introduced during the past year.

  19. Modelling the evolution of 210Pb and 210Po size distributions in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of radon (222Rn and 220Rn) decay products in the atmosphere is important for estimating air ionization, assessing the inhalation doses to humans and for understanding atmospheric transport processes. The decay products 218Po, 214Pb (T1/2 < 1 hour), 212Pb (T1/2 ? 10.6 hrs) are short lived and 210Po (T1/2 ? 13 days), 210Pb (T1/2 ? 22 years) are long lived. Within a short time after their formation, the decay product atom combine with air constituents to form molecular clusters which then get attached to existing aerosol particles. The activity size distributions of the short-lived components in the atmosphere show two major modes, namely fine and coarse modes. The long-lived components predominantly occur in the coarse mode. Several studies have been carried out on the decay product activity distributions to estimate their atmospheric residence times. An important aspect that has received little attention is the upward size evolution of the decay products due to the persistent coagulation of the coarse mode particles. The present study aims at the development of first principle model for progeny attachment dynamics to a coagulating aerosol, which will provide insight in understanding the evolution of activity size distribution. A theoretical model is formulated by considering the processes such a constant formation of background aerosols, attachment of progeny atoms to the aerosol, coagulation, physical decay, and deposition. A set of integro-differential equations for attached and unattached fractions are formulated and are solved by a comprehensive numerical approach. Comparative studies of the activity size distributions, the degree of mixing of radioactivity within particles are carried out for short-lived and long lived species. The results are in agreement with the observations which show that the mode of the activity size distribution strongly depends on the effective life time of the progeny species in the atmosphere. The size dependence of activity per particle also show interesting behaviour with respect to the life times of the species. (author)

  20. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Particle-size distribution in soils of West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumov, E. V.

    2010-03-01

    The particle-size distribution in soils sampled near Russian polar stations in West Antarctica has been studied. It is shown that the soils of the Subantarctic zone (the Bellingshausen Station on King George Island) are characterized by a higher content of silt and clay in the fine earth fraction and by a higher content of the fine earth fraction in comparison with the soils of the proper Antarctic tundra barrens near the Lenin-gradskaya Station and the Antarctic cold desert near the Russkaya Station. In the latter soils, the content of rock fragments is higher than that in the soils of the Antarctic tundra barrens. In the soils of the tundra barrens, a considerable accumulation of fine earth may take place in large cavities (hollows) on the stony bedrock surface. Desert pavements are formed in both types of Antarctic landscapes.

  2. Optimization of bridging agents size distribution for drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, Alex; Andrade, Alex Rodrigues de; Pires Junior, Idvard Jose; Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: awaldmann@petrobras.com.br; andradear.gorceix@petrobras.com.br; idvard.gorceix@petrobras.com.br; aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br

    2008-07-01

    The conventional drilling technique is based on positive hydrostatic pressure against well walls to prevent inflows of native fluids into the well. Such inflows can cause security problems for the team well and to probe. As the differential pressure of the well to reservoir is always positive, the filtrate of the fluid tends to invade the reservoir rock. Minimize the invasion of drilling fluid is a relevant theme in the oil wells drilling operations. In the design of drilling fluid, a common practice in the industry is the addition of bridging agents in the composition of the fluid to form a cake of low permeability at well walls and hence restrict the invasive process. The choice of drilling fluid requires the optimization of the concentration, shape and size distribution of particles. The ability of the fluid to prevent the invasion is usually evaluated in laboratory tests through filtration in porous media consolidated. This paper presents a description of the methods available in the literature for optimization of the formulation of bridging agents to drill-in fluids, predicting the pore throat from data psychotherapy, and a sensitivity analysis of the main operational parameters. The analysis is based on experimental results of the impact of the size distribution and concentration of bridging agents in the filtration process of drill-in fluids through porous media submitted to various different differential of pressure. The final objective is to develop a software for use of PETROBRAS, which may relate different types and concentrations of bridging agents with the properties of the reservoir to minimize the invasion. (author)

  3. The use of the mercury porosimeter for the evaluation of micropore size distribution in potato extrudates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Sokołowska

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Several samples of potato flour ex-trudates were obtained by simple and screw extruder. The effects of process variables (moisture, temperature were related to the following extrudates features: expansion, density, and shearing stress. The microstructure of the extruded products was examined by mercury porosimeter. Total porosity and changes of the average pore radius were stated in relation to physical properties of the extrudates. Total porosity decreased when the expansion of the products increased. Feed moisture was the principal determinante of physical strength, and affected changes in the number, size and distribution of the pores.

  4. Flow distribution in adjacent subchannels of unequal size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an experimental and analytic investigation of the single phase flow distribution in subchannel geometries. It was intended as an investigation of fundamental transport mechanisms and therefore concentrated on simple geometries with two interconnected subchannels. The experimental phase consisted of detailed measuremnts of the fluid velocity in a geometry representing two communicating subchannels of different sizes. These measurements were made at three axial locations along the test section. The size of one of the subchannels was varied to give subchannel area ratios of 1.0, 0.68, 0.50 and 0.32. Two Reynolds numbers (108000 and 180000) were investigated. Axial pressure gradient data for all of these cases was also taken. The analytic phase concentrated on applying a three dimensional finite difference fluid flow code to subchannel geomtries. The code was applied to the cases studied in the experiment as well as other investigator's results. It used the two equation K-? turbulence model. The performance of this model was assessed. Unique features of the subchannel flows were identified and discussed. Conclusions regarding the transport mechanisms involved and the ability of a multidimensional code to predict the flow fields reliably were presented

  5. Concentrations and size distributions on Antarctic stratospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle Measuring Systems laser particle spectrometer (ASAS-X and FSSP) probes were used to measure aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions during 11 out of 12 ER-2 flights between Punta Arenas (53 degree S) and Antarctica (up to 72 degree S) from August 17 to September 22, 1987. The time resolution was 10 s, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 2 km. The data were divided into two size classes (0.05-0.25 and 0.53-5.5 ?m radius) to separate the small particle from the coarse particle populations. Results show that the small particle concentrations are typical for a background aerosol during volcanic quiescence. This concentration is generally constant along a flight track; in only one instance did the authors measure a depletion of small particles during a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) encounter, suggesting a nucleation of type I PSC particles on background aerosols. Temporary increases of the coarse particle concentrations indicated the presence of tenuous polar stratospheric clouds that were encountered most frequently at the southernmost portion of a flight track and when the aircraft descended to lower altitudes. During particle events, particle modes were found at 0.6 ?m radius, corresponding to type I PSCs, and occasionally, a second mode at 2.0 ?m radius, corresponding to type II PSCs

  6. Size- and type-specific exposure assessment of an asbestos products factory in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtice, Midori N; Berman, D Wayne; Yano, Eiji; Kohyama, Norihiko; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    This study describes fibre size and type-specific airborne asbestos exposures in an asbestos product factory. Forty-four membrane filter samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy to determine the size distribution of asbestos fibres, by workshop. Fibre frequencies of bivariate (length by width) categories were calculated and differences between workshops were tested by analysis of variance. Data were recorded for 13?435 chrysotile and 1075 tremolite fibres. The proportions between size metrics traditionally measured and potentially biologically important size metrics were found to vary in this study from proportions reported in other cohort studies. One, common size distribution was generated for each asbestos type over the entire factory because statistically significant differences in frequency between workshops were not detected. This study provides new information on asbestos fibre size and type distributions in an asbestos factory. The extent to which biologically relevant fibre size indices were captured or overlooked between studies can potentially reconcile currently unexplained differences in asbestos-related disease (ARD) risk between cohorts. The fibre distributions presented here, when combined with similar data from other sites, will contribute to the development of quantitative models for predicting risk and our understanding of the effects of fibre characteristics in the development of ARD. PMID:26242170

  7. Parametrization of drop size distribution with rain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochou, Abe Delfin; Nzeukou, Armand; Sauvageot, Henri

    2007-03-01

    Because the rain rate R is easier to observe than the drop size distribution (DSD), it is useful to express the DSD as a function of R only, i.e. N( D,R). Disdrometer data from four sites in West Africa are used to compare observed DSDs with fitting to a lognormal function in which the three parameters Xi, with i = 1, 2, 3, are expressed as functions of R only. Observed DSDs are found well represented by such N( D,R) function. Writing the N( D,R) moments for a calculation of useful physical quantities, such as water content M, rain rate, or radar reflectivity factor Z, raises constraints of self consistency of the various equations. Modifying the analytical form of DSD in order to take into account the constraint of self-consistency is not found to increase significantly the quality of the DSD fitting with respect to the direct use of Xi( R) in the distribution, ignoring the lack of self-consistency. Then Z- R relations obtained by direct regression of observed data are compared with the relations derived analytically from N( D,R) and the expressions Xi( R) observed in each site. The two groups of relations compare very well.

  8. Size distribution of circumstellar disks in the Trapezium cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, S. M.; Alves, J.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we present results on the size distribution of circumstellar disks in the Trapezium cluster as measured from HST/WFPC2 data. Direct diameter measurements of a sample of 135 bright proplyds and 14 silhouettes disks suggest that there is a single population of disks well characterized by a power-law distribution with an exponent of -1.9 ± 0.3 between disk diameters 100-400 AU. For the stellar mass sampled (from late G to late M stars) we find no obvious correlation between disk diameter and stellar mass. We also find that there is no obvious correlation between disk diameter and the projected distance to the ionizing Trapezium OB stars. We estimate that about 40% of the disks in the Trapezium have radius larger than 50 AU. We suggest that the origin of the Solar system's (Kuiper belt) outer edge is likely to be due to the star formation environment and disk destruction processes (photoevaporation, collisions) present in the stellar cluster on which the Sun was probably formed. Finally, we identified a previously unknown proplyd and named it 266-557, following convention.

  9. Innovation flow through social networks: Productivity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Matteo, T D; Gallegati, M

    2004-01-01

    A detailed empirical analysis of the productivity of non financial firms across several countries and years shows that productivity follows a non-Gaussian distribution with power law tails. We demonstrate that these empirical findings can be interpreted as consequence of a mechanism of exchanges in a social network where firms improve their productivity by direct innovation or/and by imitation of other firm's technological and organizational solutions. The type of network-connectivity determines how fast and how efficiently information can diffuse and how quickly innovation will permeate or behaviors will be imitated. From a model for innovation flow through a complex network we obtain that the expectation values of the productivity level are proportional to the connectivity of the network of links between firms. The comparison with the empirical distributions reveals that such a network must be of a scale-free type with a power-law degree distribution in the large connectivity range.

  10. Ceramic Membrane Fabrication from Industrial Waste: Effect of Particle Size Distribution on the Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Norliza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial waste from sanitary company is chosen in this study as a precursor to fabricate ceramic membrane. It has been reported that enormous rejects being generated every year by this company. A preliminary characterization of this industrial waste shows the presence of quartz mineral, which is one of the main and suitable elements for the formation of ceramic products. Extrusion method was applied in fabricating tubular type ceramic membrane. In this present study, the effect of three different particle size distribution of the powder waste on the porosity is presented. The characterization of the porosity was performed in order to gain the insights in preparing ceramic membrane with good permeability. Results show that almost 40% porosity is able to be obtained using higher particle size distribution. However, further improvements in working conditions should be optimized in order to have a ceramic membrane with good physical properties.

  11. Size-fractionated characterization and quantification of nanoparticle release rates from a consumer spray product containing engineered nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Lorenz, Christiane; Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Gehrig, Robert; Goetz, Natalie V.; Scheringer, Martin; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    This study describes methods developed for reliable quantification of size- and element-specific release of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) from consumer spray products. A modified glove box setup was designed to allow controlled spray experiments in a particle-minimized environment. Time dependence of the particle size distribution in a size range of 10-500 nm and ENP release rates were studied using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). In parallel, the aerosol was transferred to a size...

  12. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, T. S.; Milutinovi?, S.; Marinov, I.; Cabré, A.

    2015-05-01

    Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C) biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth System models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing algorithms to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD). Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size - picophytoplankton (0.5-2 ?m in diameter), nanophytoplankton (2-20 ?m) and microphytoplankton (20-50 ?m). The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e. oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have large biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield on average ~0.2-0.3 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms, and several state-of-the-art Earth System models. However, the range of phytoplankton C biomass spatial variability globally is larger than estimated by any other models considered here, because the PSD-based algorithm is not a priori empirically constrained and introduces improvement over the assumptions of the other approaches. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm. Uncertainty budget analyses indicate that absolute carbon concentration uncertainties are driven by the PSD parameter No which determines particle number concentration to first order, while uncertainties in PFTs' fractional contributions to total C biomass are mostly due to the allometric coefficients.

  13. Carbon-based phytoplankton size classes retrieved via ocean color estimates of the particle size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Kostadinov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their important roles in biogeochemical cycles, phytoplankton functional types (PFTs have been the aim of an increasing number of ocean color algorithms. Yet, none of the existing methods are based on phytoplankton carbon (C biomass, which is a fundamental biogeochemical and ecological variable and the "unit of accounting" in Earth System models. We present a novel bio-optical algorithm to retrieve size-partitioned phytoplankton carbon from ocean color satellite data. The algorithm is based on existing algorithms to estimate particle volume from a power-law particle size distribution (PSD. Volume is converted to carbon concentrations using a compilation of allometric relationships. We quantify absolute and fractional biomass in three PFTs based on size – picophytoplankton (0.5–2 ?m in diameter, nanophytoplankton (2–20 ?m and microphytoplankton (20–50 ?m. The mean spatial distributions of total phytoplankton C biomass and individual PFTs, derived from global SeaWiFS monthly ocean color data, are consistent with current understanding of oceanic ecosystems, i.e. oligotrophic regions are characterized by low biomass and dominance of picoplankton, whereas eutrophic regions have large biomass to which nanoplankton and microplankton contribute relatively larger fractions. Global spatially integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass standing stock estimates using our PSD-based approach yield on average ~0.2–0.3 Gt of C, consistent with analogous estimates from two other ocean color algorithms, and several state-of-the-art Earth System models. However, the range of phytoplankton C biomass spatial variability globally is larger than estimated by any other models considered here, because the PSD-based algorithm is not a priori empirically constrained and introduces improvement over the assumptions of the other approaches. Satisfactory in situ closure observed between PSD and POC measurements lends support to the theoretical basis of the PSD-based algorithm. Uncertainty budget analyses indicate that absolute carbon concentration uncertainties are driven by the PSD parameter No which determines particle number concentration to first order, while uncertainties in PFTs' fractional contributions to total C biomass are mostly due to the allometric coefficients.

  14. Consideration on the derivation of functions for the particle size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroll, J.

    1981-09-01

    A method for theoretical determination of particle size distribution is given. It considers the particle comminution as a random process and uses the formal logical laws of the theory of probability. The particle size distribution functions theoretically derived from specific comminution conditions make evident the relation between the technical comminution parameters and particle size distributions parameters. The knowledge of the comminution conditions makes it possible, as a rule, to assign the correct type of function to a given particle size distribution, and consequently, to extrapolate the particle size distribution.

  15. Efficient dot product over word-size finite fields

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, J G

    2004-01-01

    We want to achieve efficiency for the exact computation of the dot product of two vectors over word-size finite fields. We therefore compare the practical behaviors of a wide range of implementation techniques using different representations. The techniques used include oating point representations, discrete logarithms, tabulations, Montgomery reduction, delayed modulus.

  16. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  17. Determination of Size Distributions in Nanocrystalline Powders by TEM, XRD and SAXS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Pedersen, Jørgen Houe; Jørgensen, Jens Erik; Skov Pedersen, Jan; Joensen, Karsten Dan; Brummerstedt Iversen, Steen; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2006-01-01

    Crystallite size distributions and particle size distributions were determined by TEM, XRD, and SAXS for three commercially available TiO2 samples and one homemade. The theoretical Guinier Model was fitted to the experimental data and compared to analytical expressions. Modeling of the XRD spectra showed a difference between the analytical size dependent expressions and the theoretical Guinier Model. Primay particle size distributions were extracted from SAXS measurements by the hard sphere mode...

  18. Progresses in the production of large-size THGEM boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The THicK GEM (THGEM) electron multipliers are derived from the GEM design, by scaling the geometrical parameters and changing the production technology. Small-size (a few cm2) detectors exhibit superb performance, while larger ones exhibit gain response and uniformity limitations. We have studied with a systematic approach several aspects concerning the material (type and thickness of the fibreglass plates) and the production procedure, in particular the cleaning and polishing stages. The net result is the production of large THGEM multipliers reproducing the performance of the small ones. We report in detail about the studies and the results

  19. Progresses in the production of large-size THGEM boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M.; Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Novakova, K.; Novy, J.; Panzieri, D.; Pereira, F. A.; Santos, C. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schopferer, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-03-01

    The THicK GEM (THGEM) electron multipliers are derived from the GEM design, by scaling the geometrical parameters and changing the production technology. Small-size (a few cm2) detectors exhibit superb performance, while larger ones exhibit gain response and uniformity limitations. We have studied with a systematic approach several aspects concerning the material (type and thickness of the fibreglass plates) and the production procedure, in particular the cleaning and polishing stages. The net result is the production of large THGEM multipliers reproducing the performance of the small ones. We report in detail about the studies and the results.

  20. Activity size distribution of the short-lived and long-lived radionuclides in outdoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a number of radioactive isotopes of different elements in the atmosphere near ground level. Most of them are decay products from the 238U- and 232Th-chains with the highest activity concentration of the short-lived 222Rn-(radon)(1-100 Bq/m3) and 220Rn-(thoron) (0.01-1 Bq/m3) decay products. The long-lived radon decay products (210Pb/210Po) have concentrations between 1-5x10-4 Bq/m3. In contrast to these nuclides the amount of the activity concentration of 7Be (1-7x10-3 Bq/m3)is produced by interaction of the cosmic rays with atmospheric gases. Most of these airborne radionuclides are adsorbed on the surface of aerosol particles and form radioactive aerosol. Therefore the behaviour of the airborne radionuclides is determined by the behaviour of the aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Besides the generation rate the activity concentration of the radionuclides in air is influenced by their transport in the atmosphere and by the radioactive decay. In addition, for the longer-lived radionuclides (half-live >1 d) the removal processes (dry deposition, wet deposition) from the atmosphere have an influence on the activity concentration and the coagulation process will significantly change the activity size distribution of the original radioactive aerosol. The activity size distribution of the radioactive aerosol is the dominant parameter for the behaviour of the radionuclides in the environment. The removal processes from the atmosphere, the deposition rate on ground and vegetation and the deposition probability in the lung during inhalation depend on the particle size. In this paper the measurement results of the activity size distribution of the short-lived (218Po, 214Po) and the long-lived (210Pb, 210Po) radon and thoron (212Pb, 212Po) decay products and 7Be are summarised, obtained from measurements over a longer period in outdoor air during the last years. Especially, the aim was to find out the differences between the size distributions of these radionuclides. Therefore it was important to use measurement techniques, which made it possible, to register simultaneously almost all of these radionuclides during one measurement run over a longer time period

  1. Particle size distribution models, their characteristics and fitting capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Hossein; Rastgo, Mostafa; Mansouri Zadeh, Moharram; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-10-01

    Many attempts have been made to characterize particle size distribution (PSD) curves using different mathematical models, which are primarily used as a basis for estimating soil hydraulic properties. The principle step in using soil PSD to predict soil hydraulic properties is determining an accurate and continuous curve for PSD. So far, the characteristics of the PSD models, their fitting accuracy, and the effects of their parameters on the shape and position of PSD curves have not been investigated. In this study all developed PSD models, their characteristics, behavior of their parameters, and their fitting capability to the UNSODA database soil samples were investigated. Results showed that beerkan estimation of soil transfer (BEST), two and three parameter Weibull, Rosin and Rammler (1 and 2), unimodal and bimodal Fredlund, and van Genuchten models were flexible over the entire range of soil PSD. Correspondingly, the BEST, two and three parameter Weibull, Rosin and Rammler (1 and 2), hyperbolic and offset renormalized log-normal models possessed a high fitting capability over the entire range of PSD. The few parameters of the BEST, Rosin and Rammler (1 and 2), and two parameter Weibull models provides ease of use in soil physics and mechanics research. Thus, they are seemingly fit with acceptable accuracy in predicting the PSD curve. Although the fractal models have physical and mathematical basis, they do not have the adequate flexibility to contribute a description of the PSD curve. Different aspects of the PSD models should be considered in selecting a model to describe a soil PSD.

  2. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Asmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February–March of 1.72–2.38 ?g m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 ?g m-3 and in September–October of 0.36–0.57 ?g m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  3. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2015-07-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 ?g m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 ?g m-3 and in September-October of 0.36-0.57 ?g m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  4. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Ammonium Sulphate Dried in a Rotary Dryer

    OpenAIRE

    Susianto Susianto; Ali Altway; Kuswandi Kuswandi; Margono Margono

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study theoretically, by mathematical model development, the effect of particle size distribution on the performance of rotary dryer to dry ammonium sulphate fertilizer assuming plug flow with axial dispersion pattern (PFDA model) for solid particle flow. The mathematical model development was carried out by combining the drying processes model with particle size distribution model. Particle size distribution models used are Rosin-Rommler model and Gamma distribution...

  5. The anomalies of the properties of nanomaterials related to the distribution of the grain sizes

    CERN Document Server

    Glinchuk, M D

    2004-01-01

    We have performed the calculations of the size effect in the temperature dependence of BaTiO3 nanograin ceramics specific heat and dielectric permittivity. We took into account the distribution of the grain sizes, that exists in any real nanomaterial. This distribution lead to the distribution of the temperatures of the size driven transition from ferroelectric to paraelectric phase because of relation between the temperature and the sizes. We calculated the transition temperature distribution function on the basis of the sizes distribution function. This function allowed to calculate the temperature dependence of any physical quantity in a nanomaterial. As an examples we calculated specific heat and dielectric permittivity in nanograin ferroelectric ceramics. The results demonstrate the strong influence of the size distribution on the observed properties and especially on extracted from experiment values of critical size and temperature. We carried out the comparison of the theory with the measured specific ...

  6. Effects of grain size distribution on coercivity and permeability of ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grain size dependence of coercivity and permeability (GSDCP) theory is extended to include grain size distribution in ferromagnets. It is found that the experimental data do not agree with the GSDCP theory on the transition location of different grain size ranges (The GSDCP theory has three different grain size ranges for different magnetization processes.). Correspondingly, including the grain size distribution the GSDCP theory fits the experimental data very well. These results prove that the grain size distribution indeed affects the magnetic properties of nanocrystalline ferromagnets

  7. Raindrop Size Distribution and Radar Parameters at Cape Verde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzeukou, Armand; Sauvageot, Henri; Delfin Ochou, Abe; Mouhamed Fadel Kebe, Cheikh

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation measurement using passive or active microwaves from space- or ground-based radar involves hypotheses about the raindrop size distribution (DSD). A universal knowledge of DSD characteristics is needed. A 4-yr dataset collected with a disdrometer at Dakar, Senegal, on the Atlantic coast of West Africa is used to analyze the DSD at the end of the continental trajectory of Sahelian squall lines. The DSDs are stratified in eight rain-rate classes and are fitted to analytical distributions. The shape of the averaged DSDs is found to be very similar from one year to the next. From rain rates R higher than about 20 mm h-1, the slope of the DSDs tends toward a constant value. The coefficients of the Z R relation, between the radar reflectivity factor Z and R, are different for convective and stratiform parts of the squall lines. However, because the Z R relations for convective rain intersect the relation for stratiform rain for high rates, it is suggested that using a single Z R relation enables correct representation of the whole Z and R range of variation in West Africa. The coefficients of this single Z R are close to that of the stratiform relation and to that observed in other West African areas. The conditional probability density function of rain rate, P(R), is of lognormal shape and also is very stable year after year. The coefficient of variation of R is found to be constant and close to 2.24, the value observed at many other sites. From P(R), the linear coefficient S(?) of the relation that links the area-averaged rain rate to the fractional area where the rain rate is higher than the threshold ? is computed and is found to be very stable for the values of ? close to mR, the mean climatic value of R (around 5 6 mm h-1). Because most of the sub-Saharan West African sites have a similar mR, comparison shows that S(?) is homogeneous over this area. This result suggests that S(?) can be used with confidence for average rainfall estimation over a climatically homogeneous region.

  8. Simulation of 2D Fields of Raindrop Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, A.; Schleiss, M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2008-12-01

    The raindrop size distribution (DSD hereafter) is of primary importance for quantitative applications of weather radar measurements. The radar reflectivity~Z (directly measured by radar) is related to the power backscattered by the ensemble of hydrometeors within the radar sampling volume. However, the rain rate~R (the flux of water to the surface) is the variable of interest for many applications (hydrology, weather forecasting, air traffic for example). Usually, radar reflectivity is converted into rain rate using a power law such as Z=aRb. The coefficients a and b of the Z-R relationship depend on the DSD. The variability of the DSD in space and time has to be taken into account to improve radar rain rate estimates. Therefore, the ability to generate a large number of 2D fields of DSD which are statistically homogeneous provides a very useful simulation framework that nicely complements experimental approaches based on DSD data, in order to investigate radar beam propagation through rain as well as radar retrieval techniques. The proposed approach is based on geostatistics for structural analysis and stochastic simulation. First, the DSD is assumed to follow a gamma distribution. Hence a 2D field of DSDs can be adequately described as a 2D field of a multivariate random function consisting of the three DSD parameters. Such fields are simulated by combining a Gaussian anamorphosis and a multivariate Gaussian random field simulation algorithm. Using the (cross-)variogram models fitted on data guaranties that the spatial structure of the simulated fields is consistent with the observed one. To assess its validity, the proposed method is applied to data collected during intense Mediterranean rainfall. As only time series are available, Taylor's hypothesis is assumed to convert time series in 1D range profile. Moreover, DSD fields are assumed to be isotropic so that the 1D structure can be used to simulate 2D fields. A large number of 2D fields of DSD parameters are generated and the corresponding reflectivity fields are derived. They are in good agreement in terms of mean, standard deviation and variogram with reflectivity fields measured by an operational radar during the same event. This shows the promising potential of the proposed DSD-field simulation approach.

  9. The grain-size distribution of pyroclasts: Primary fragmentation, conduit sorting or abrasion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, U.; Schauroth, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions expel a mixture of pyroclasts and lithics. Pyroclasts, fragments of the juvenile magma, record the state of the magma at fragmentation in terms of porosity and crystallinity. The grain size distribution of pyroclasts is generally considered to be a direct consequence of the conditions at magma fragmentation that is mainly driven by gas overpressure in bubbles, high shear rates, contact with external water or a combination of these factors. Stress exerted by any of these processes will lead to brittle fragmentation by overcoming the magma's relaxation timescale. As a consequence, most pyroclasts exhibit angular shapes. Upon magma fragmentation, the gas pyroclast mixture is accelerated upwards and eventually ejected from the vent. The total grain size distribution deposited is a function of fragmentation conditions and transport related sorting. Porous pyroclasts are very susceptible to abrasion by particle-particle or particle-conduit wall interaction. Accordingly, pyroclastic fall deposits with angular clasts should proof a low particle abrasion upon contact to other surfaces. In an attempt to constrain the degree of particle interaction during conduit flow, monomodal batches of washed pyroclasts have been accelerated upwards by rapid decompression and subsequently investigated for their grain size distribution. In our set-up, we used a vertical cylindrical tube without surface roughness as conduit. We varied grain size (0.125-0.25; 0.5-1; 1-2 mm), porosity (0; 10; 30 %), gas-particle ratio (10 and 40%), conduit length (10 and 28 cm) and conduit diameter (2.5 and 6 cm). All ejected particles were collected after settling at the base of a 3.3 m high tank and sieved at one sieve size below starting size (half-?). Grain size reduction showed a positive correlation with starting grain size, porosity and overpressure at the vent. Although milling in a volcanic conduit may take place, porous pyroclasts are very likely to be a primary product of magma fragmentation at or close to the fragmentation level. Given the high abrasiveness of pumice, hemispherical clasts should be observed if clast break-up followed efficient clast abrasion. As a consequence, finer grained pyroclastic fall deposits do not necessarily proof efficient secondary fragmentation in the conduit but may rather reveal the influence of conduit length on 'What size of pyroclasts can be erupted'?

  10. Fractal bird nest distribution produces scale-free colony sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Jovani, Roger; Tella, José Luis

    2007-01-01

    The spatial distribution of organisms often differs across scales. For instance, colonial bird populations could be described, from large to small scale, as scattered clumps of otherwise regularly distributed breeding pairs. We analysed the distribution of nests of a large colonial population of white storks (Ciconia ciconia) and found a fractal pattern in each of the 4 study years. Moreover, we found that the often- observed, long-tailed frequency distribution of ...

  11. Extracting magnetic cluster size and its distributions in advanced perpendicular recording media with shrinking grain size using small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Virat; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Takano, Ken; Terris, Bruce D.; Hellwig, Olav [San Jose Research Center, HGST a Western Digital company, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd., San Jose, California 95135 (United States); Wang, Tianhan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94035 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Wu, Benny; Graves, Catherine [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94035 (United States); Dürr, Hermann A.; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Jo [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    We analyze the magnetic cluster size (MCS) and magnetic cluster size distribution (MCSD) in a variety of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media designs using resonant small angle x-ray scattering at the Co L{sub 3} absorption edge. The different PMR media flavors considered here vary in grain size between 7.5 and 9.5?nm as well as in lateral inter-granular exchange strength, which is controlled via the segregant amount. While for high inter-granular exchange, the MCS increases rapidly for grain sizes below 8.5?nm, we show that for increased amount of segregant with less exchange the MCS remains relatively small, even for grain sizes of 7.5 and 8?nm. However, the MCSD still increases sharply when shrinking grains from 8 to 7.5?nm. We show evidence that recording performance such as signal-to-noise-ratio on the spin stand correlates well with the product of magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution.

  12. Extracting magnetic cluster size and its distributions in advanced perpendicular recording media with shrinking grain size using small angle x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the magnetic cluster size (MCS) and magnetic cluster size distribution (MCSD) in a variety of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media designs using resonant small angle x-ray scattering at the Co L3 absorption edge. The different PMR media flavors considered here vary in grain size between 7.5 and 9.5?nm as well as in lateral inter-granular exchange strength, which is controlled via the segregant amount. While for high inter-granular exchange, the MCS increases rapidly for grain sizes below 8.5?nm, we show that for increased amount of segregant with less exchange the MCS remains relatively small, even for grain sizes of 7.5 and 8?nm. However, the MCSD still increases sharply when shrinking grains from 8 to 7.5?nm. We show evidence that recording performance such as signal-to-noise-ratio on the spin stand correlates well with the product of magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution

  13. On the concentration and size distribution of sub-micron aerosol in the Galápagos Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorribas, M.; Gómez Martín, J. C.; Hay, T. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Cuevas, C. A.; Agama Reyes, M. V.; Paredes Mora, F.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the CHARLEX campaign in the Galápagos Islands, a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer was deployed on San Cristobal Island in July-August 2011 to carry out size-resolved measurements of the concentration of submicron aerosols. To our knowledge these are the first measurements of aerosol concentrations in this unique environment. The particles with marine origin displayed a tri-modal number size distribution with peak diameters of 0.016 ?m, 0.050 ?m and 0.174 ?m and a cloud-processed intermodal minimum at 0.093 ?m. The mean total aerosol number concentration for the marine contribution was 470 ± 160 cm-3. A low particle concentration of 70 ± 50 cm-3 for the nucleation size range was measured, but no evidence of new particle production in the atmospheric marine boundary layer (MBL) was observed. The concentration of the Aitken size mode was found to be related to aerosol entrainment from the free troposphere off the coast of Chile followed by transport within the MBL to the Galápagos Islands. Cloud processing may activate the particles in the Aitken size range, growing through 'in-cloud' sulphate production and increasing the particle concentration in the accumulation size range. The 0.093 ?m cloud processed minima suggests that the critical supersaturation at which the particle is activated to a cloud droplet is in the 0.14-0.21% range. The daytime marine particle background concentration was influenced by human activity around the sampling site, as well as by new particle formation triggered by biogenic emissions from the vegetation cover of the island's semiarid lowlands. Effective CCN formation may play a role in the formation and properties of the stratus clouds, which permanently cover the top of the windward side of the islands and establish one of their characteristic climatic bands.

  14. Some regularity of the grain size distribution in nuclear fuel with controllable structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known, the fission gas release from ceramic nuclear fuel depends from average size of grains. To increase grain size they use additives which activate sintering of pellets. However, grain size distribution influences on fission gas release also. Fuel with different structures, but with the same average size of grains has different fission gas release. Other structure elements, which influence operational behavior of fuel, are pores and inclusions. Earlier, in Kyoto, questions of distribution of grain size for fuel with 'natural' structure were discussed. Some regularity of grain size distribution of fuel with controllable structure and high average size of grains are considered in the report. Influence of inclusions and pores on an error of the automated definition of parameters of structure is shown. The criterion, which describe of behavior of fuel with specific grain size distribution, is offered

  15. Measurement of aggregate size distribution by inversion of angular light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Ren

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to propose a new method for determining the size distribution of submicronic particles by inversion of the measured angular scattering of light. This method relies on the determination of a function Rg*. by angular scattering. The variation of this function informs us about the polydispersity of the aggregates size. We show that, by supposing the nature of the size distributions (lognormal, it is possible to determine the governing parameters of these distributions.

  16. Measurement of aggregate size distribution by inversion of angular light scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, K. F.; Coppalle, A.; Yon, J.; Caumont-Prim, C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new method for determining the size distribution of submicronic particles by inversion of the measured angular scattering of light. This method relies on the determination of a function Rg*. by angular scattering. The variation of this function informs us about the polydispersity of the aggregates size. We show that, by supposing the nature of the size distributions (lognormal), it is possible to determine the governing parameters of these distributions.

  17. Simplified representation of atmospheric aerosol size distributions using absolute principal component analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, T. W.; M. Mozurkewich

    2006-01-01

    Principal component analysis provides a fast and robust method to reduce the data dimensionality of an aerosol size distribution data set. Here we describe a methodology for applying principal component analysis to aerosol size distribution measurements. We illustrate the method by applying it to data obtained during five field studies. Most variations in the sub-micrometer aerosol size distribution over periods of weeks can be described using 5 components. Using 6 to 8 components preserves v...

  18. Radioactivity size distributions of ambient aerosols in Helsinki, Finland during May 1986 after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient aerosol size distributions oof 131I, 103Ru, 132Te and 137Cs radionuclides were measured in Helsinki, Finland during May 7 - 14, 1986. Radioactivity size distributions were unimodal. Geometric mean diameter of 131I was in the size range 0.33 - 0.57 ?m a.e.d.. Other isotopes had geometric mean diameters in the size range 0.65 - 0.93 ?m a.e.d.. (author)

  19. Integration of in situ Imaging and Chord Length Distribution Measurements for Estimation of Particle Size and Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Agimelen, Okpeafoh S; McGinty, John; Tachtatzis, Christos; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Haley, Ian; Sefcik, Jan; Mulholland, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient processing of particulate products across various manufacturing steps requires that particles possess desired attributes such as size and shape. Controlling the particle production process to obtain required attributes will be greatly facilitated using robust algorithms providing the size and shape information of the particles from in situ measurements. However, obtaining particle size and shape information in situ during manufacturing has been a big challenge. This is because the problem of estimating particle size and shape (aspect ratio) from signals provided by in-line measuring tools is often ill posed, and therefore it calls for appropriate constraints to be imposed on the problem. One way to constrain uncertainty in estimation of particle size and shape from in-line measurements is to combine data from different measurements such as chord length distribution (CLD) and imaging. This paper presents two different methods for combining imaging and CLD data obtained with in-line tools in order to ...

  20. Drop Size Distribution - Based Separation of Stratiform and Convective Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurai, Merhala; Gatlin, Patrick; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    For applications in hydrology and meteorology, it is often desirable to separate regions of stratiform and convective rain from meteorological radar observations, both from ground-based polarimetric radars and from space-based dual frequency radars. In a previous study by Bringi et al. (2009), dual frequency profiler and dual polarization radar (C-POL) observations in Darwin, Australia, had shown that stratiform and convective rain could be separated in the log10(Nw) versus Do domain, where Do is the mean volume diameter and Nw is the scaling parameter which is proportional to the ratio of water content to the mass weighted mean diameter. Note, Nw and Do are two of the main drop size distribution (DSD) parameters. In a later study, Thurai et al (2010) confirmed that both the dual-frequency profiler based stratiform-convective rain separation and the C-POL radar based separation were consistent with each other. In this paper, we test this separation method using DSD measurements from a ground based 2D video disdrometer (2DVD), along with simultaneous observations from a collocated, vertically-pointing, X-band profiling radar (XPR). The measurements were made in Huntsville, Alabama. One-minute DSDs from 2DVD are used as input to an appropriate gamma fitting procedure to determine Nw and Do. The fitted parameters - after averaging over 3-minutes - are plotted against each other and compared with a predefined separation line. An index is used to determine how far the points lie from the separation line (as described in Thurai et al. 2010). Negative index values indicate stratiform rain and positive index indicate convective rain, and, moreover, points which lie somewhat close to the separation line are considered 'mixed' or 'transition' type precipitation. The XPR observations are used to evaluate/test the 2DVD data-based classification. A 'bright-band' detection algorithm was used to classify each vertical reflectivity profile as either stratiform or convective, depending on whether or not a clearly-defined melting layer is present at an expected height, and if present, maximum reflectivity within the melting layer as well as the corresponding height are determined. We will present results of quantitative comparisons between the XPR observations-based classifications and the simultaneous 2DVD data-based classifications. Time series comparisons will be presented for thirteen events in Huntsville.

  1. Production and Distribution of NASA MODIS Remote Sensing Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on-board NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites make key measurements for understanding the Earth's terrestrial ecosystems. Global time-series of terrestrial geophysical parameters have been produced from MODIS/Terra for over 7 years and for MODIS/Aqua for more than 4 1/2 years. These well calibrated instruments, a team of scientists and a large data production, archive and distribution systems have allowed for the development of a new suite of high quality product variables at spatial resolutions as fine as 250m in support of global change research and natural resource applications. This talk describes the MODIS Science team's products, with a focus on the terrestrial (land) products, the data processing approach and the process for monitoring and improving the product quality. The original MODIS science team was formed in 1989. The team's primary role is the development and implementation of the geophysical algorithms. In addition, the team provided feedback on the design and pre-launch testing of the instrument and helped guide the development of the data processing system. The key challenges the science team dealt with before launch were the development of algorithms for a new instrument and provide guidance of the large and complex multi-discipline processing system. Land, Ocean and Atmosphere discipline teams drove the processing system requirements, particularly in the area of the processing loads and volumes needed to daily produce geophysical maps of the Earth at resolutions as fine as 250 m. The processing system had to handle a large number of data products, large data volumes and processing loads, and complex processing requirements. Prior to MODIS, daily global maps from heritage instruments, such as Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were not produced at resolutions finer than 5 km. The processing solution evolved into a combination of processing the lower level (Level 1) products and the higher level discipline specific Land and Atmosphere products in the MODIS Science Investigator Lead Processing System (SIPS), the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS), and archive and distribution of the Land products to the user community by two of NASA s EOS Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs). Recently, a part of MODAPS, the Level 1 and Atmosphere Archive and Distribution System (LAADS), took over the role of archiving and distributing the Level 1 and Atmosphere products to the user community.

  2. Radioisotope production and distribution in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high quality of radioactive products and services, provided by the Commercial Products Unit of Australian Atomic Energy Agency for industrial and medical applications are discussed. The production program has changed from research driven to being market driven. The Commission in fact not only manufactures radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals but also acts as a Centralized Dispensing Service for over sea products. The advantages associated with centralize distribution are discussed. The delivery arrangements and the existed problems are explained. With the unique experience, assistance and advice are provided for many years now to Nuclear Energy Unit at PUSPATI via staff training programs and many visits by the Commission staff to assist in the commissioning of the facilities in which enables PUSPATI to provide Malaysia and surrounding neighbour countries (on a smaller scale) with the similar type of service that the Commission does within Australia. (A.J.)

  3. Size distributions of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, C.; Maeda, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Tomiyama, A.; Ito, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Size of micro-bubbles is widely distributed in the range of one to several hundreds micrometers and depends on generation methods, flow conditions and elapsed times after the bubble generation. Although a size distribution of micro-bubbles should be taken into account to improve accuracy in numerical simulations of flows with micro-bubbles, a variety of the size distribution makes it difficult to introduce the size distribution in the simulations. On the other hand, several models such as the Rosin-Rammler equation and the Nukiyama-Tanazawa equation have been proposed to represent the size distribution of particles or droplets. Applicability of these models to the size distribution of micro-bubbles has not been examined yet. In this study, we therefore measure size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by a pressurized dissolution method by using a phase Doppler anemometry (PDA), and investigate the applicability of the available models to the size distributions of micro-bubbles. Experimental apparatus consists of a pressurized tank in which air is dissolved in liquid under high pressure condition, a decompression nozzle in which micro-bubbles are generated due to pressure reduction, a rectangular duct and an upper tank. Experiments are conducted for several liquid volumetric fluxes in the decompression nozzle. Measurements are carried out at the downstream region of the decompression nozzle and in the upper tank. The experimental results indicate that (1) the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation well represents the size distribution of micro-bubbles generated by the pressurized dissolution method, whereas the Rosin-Rammler equation fails in the representation, (2) the bubble size distribution of micro-bubbles can be evaluated by using the Nukiyama-Tanasawa equation without individual bubble diameters, when mean bubble diameter and skewness of the bubble distribution are given, and (3) an evaluation method of visibility based on the bubble size distribution and bubble number density is proposed, and the evaluated visibility agrees well with the visibility measured in the upper tank.

  4. A Year-round Observation of Size Distribution of Aerosol Particles at the Cape Ochiishi, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.; Mukai, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    New particle formation by nucleation of gas-phase compounds emitted from marine biogenic sources is very important for climate change. To clarify the mechanism of the formation, size distributions of submicron aerosols have been measured at the Cape Ochiishi, facing the North Western Pacific Ocean where primary productivity is high. A test observation was done from 22nd May to 18th June 2008 and a year-round observation has been performed from 16th October 2009 to 7th September 2010. The size distribution from 10 nm to 487 nm in diameter was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI 3034). Sample air was dried to lower than 40%. Transport of sulfate, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) was estimated with Chemical weather FORecasting System (CFORS), developed by Prof. Uno, Kyushu University, Japan. Existence of inversion layer was estimated with temperature profile measured at surface, 10m, 30m, and 50m in altitude. The burst of the particles smaller than 20nm in diameter continuing longer than 3 hrs was observed ten times until 3rd November 2009. Two were observed in early summer and the other was in autumn. Banana shape was faintly observed five times. Transport of sulfate, OC, and BC was observed 3, 8, 9 times, respectively. Source of air mass was estimated with these elements, weather map, and wind direction. Five air masses were estimated to continental. Clearly nucleation related to marine sources was not observed. The size distribution of burst evens of maritime and continental air mass showed the shift of mode to larger diameter. Strong inversion of temperature was observed once. The value of size distribution did not show high. Minimum value of size distribution was observed in the strong rain on 27th October. Acknowledgments This study was partly supported by the Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research on Priority Areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (18067005). The observation was performed at the monitoring station of the National Institute for Environmental Studies.

  5. Multimodal size distributions of ?' precipitates during continuous cooling of UDIMET 720 Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technological properties of many nickel-based superalloys originate in the morphology and distribution of Ni3(Al, Ti) particles (?' precipitates). Starting from the solution-annealed condition, the distribution and the morphology of ?' precipitates are investigated experimentally during continuous cooling of the nickel-base superalloy UDIMET 720 Li. Characterization of the precipitates is carried out by scanning electron microscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy investigations. Depending on cooling rate, monomodal, bimodal and even trimodal size distributions are observed. The experimental observations of the size distributions are confirmed by numerical simulations of the ?' precipitation kinetics. The theoretical background for occurrence of multimodal size distributions during continuous cooling is discussed.

  6. Influence of flow rate on aerosol particle size distributions from pressurized and breath-actuated inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K J; Chan, H K; Brown, K F

    1998-01-01

    Particle size distribution of delivered aerosols and the total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler are important determinants of pulmonary deposition and response to inhalation therapy. Inhalation flow rate may vary between patients and from dose to dose. The Andersen Sampler (AS) cascade impactor operated at flow rates of 30 and 55 L/min and the Marple-Miller Impactor (MMI) operated at flow rates of 30, 55, and 80 L/min were used in this study to investigate the influence of airflow rate on the particle size distributions of inhalation products. Total mass of drug delivered from the inhaler, fine particle mass, fine particle fraction, percentage of nonrespirable particles, and amount of formulation retained within the inhaler were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry for several commercial bronchodilator products purchased in the marketplace, including a pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), breath-actuated pressurized inhaler (BAMDI), and three dry powder inhalers (DPIs), two containing salbutamol sulphate and the other containing terbutaline sulphate. Varying the flow rate through the cascade impactor produced no significant change in performance of the pressurized inhalers. Increasing the flow rate produced a greater mass of drug delivered and an increase in respirable particle mass and fraction from all DPIs tested. PMID:10346666

  7. The limit distribution of the maximum increment of a random walk with regularly varying jump size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikosch, Thomas Valentin; Rackauskas, Alfredas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the asymptotic distribution of the maximum increment of a random walk with a regularly varying jump size distribution. This problem is motivated by a long-standing problem on change point detection for epidemic alternatives. It turns out that the limit distribution of the maximum increment of the random walk is one of the classical extreme value distributions, the Fréchet distribution. We prove the results in the general framework of point processes and for jump sizes taking values in a separable Banach space

  8. The limit distribution of the maximum increment of a random walk with regularly varying jump size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Mikosch, Thomas; 10.3150/10-BEJ255

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the asymptotic distribution of the maximum increment of a random walk with a regularly varying jump size distribution. This problem is motivated by a long-standing problem on change point detection for epidemic alternatives. It turns out that the limit distribution of the maximum increment of the random walk is one of the classical extreme value distributions, the Fr\\'{e}chet distribution. We prove the results in the general framework of point processes and for jump sizes taking values in a separable Banach space.

  9. Determination of grain-size distribution from ultrasonic attenuation: Transformation and inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoletti, D.; Anderson, A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Although researchers often describe a particular medium with only a single grain size or an average grain size, distributions of grain sizes can have significant effects on the physical characteristics of the material. Ultrasonic attenuation due to energy scattered at the grain boundaries depends on the ultrasonic wavelength, the grain size, and certain material properties such as elastic constants. This paper examines the relationship between the wavelength dependency of ultrasonic attenuation and grain-size distributions. A transformation is developed which solves a general class of Fredholm equations of the first kind. The equation relating attenuation to grain-size distributions belongs to this class of equations. The transformation allows attenuation to be calculated by discrete convolution, and provides a method for estimating the grain-size distribution directly from attenuation measurements. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  10. On bimodal size distribution of spin clusters in the one dimensional Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanytskyi, A I

    2015-01-01

    The size distribution of geometrical spin clusters is exactly found for the one dimensional Ising model of finite extent. For the values of lattice constant $\\beta$ above some "critical value" $\\beta_c$ the found size distribution demonstrates the non-monotonic behavior with the peak corresponding to the size of largest available cluster. In other words, at high values of lattice constant there are two ways to fill the lattice: either to form a single largest cluster or to create many clusters of small sizes. This feature closely resembles the well-know bimodal size distribution of clusters which is usually interpreted as a robust signal of the first order liquid-gas phase transition in finite systems. It is remarkable that the bimodal size distribution of spin clusters appears in the one dimensional Ising model of finite size, i.e. in the model which in thermodynamic limit has no phase transition at all.

  11. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M

    2015-01-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann's cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann's rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution. PMID:26197998

  12. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-01-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann’s cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann’s rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution. PMID:26197998

  13. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-07-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann’s cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann’s rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution.

  14. The impact of fuel particle size distribution on neutron transport in stochastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study of the particle size distribution impact on neutron transport in three-dimensional stochastic media. An eigenvalue problem is simulated in a cylindrical container consisting of fissile fuel particles with five different size distributions: constant, uniform, power, exponential and Gaussian. We construct 15 cases by altering the fissile particle volume packing fraction and its optical thickness, but keeping the mean chord length of the spherical fuel particle the same at different size distributions. The tallied effective multiplication factor (keff) and flux distribution along axial and radial directions are compared between different size distributions. At low packing fraction and low optical thickness, the size distribution has a significant impact on radiation transport in stochastic media, which can cause as high as ?270 pcm difference in keff value and ?2.6% relative error difference in peak flux. As the packing fraction and optical thickness increase, the impact gradually dissipates. (authors)

  15. A generalized statistical model for the size distribution of wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, F.; Gallegati, M.; Kaniadakis, G.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent paper in this journal (Clementi et al 2009 J. Stat. Mech. P02037), we proposed a new, physically motivated, distribution function for modeling individual incomes, having its roots in the framework of the ?-generalized statistical mechanics. The performance of the ?-generalized distribution was checked against real data on personal income for the United States in 2003. In this paper we extend our previous model so as to be able to account for the distribution of wealth. Probabilistic functions and inequality measures of this generalized model for wealth distribution are obtained in closed form. In order to check the validity of the proposed model, we analyze the US household wealth distributions from 1984 to 2009 and conclude an excellent agreement with the data that is superior to any other model already known in the literature.

  16. A generalized statistical model for the size distribution of wealth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recent paper in this journal (Clementi et al 2009 J. Stat. Mech. P02037), we proposed a new, physically motivated, distribution function for modeling individual incomes, having its roots in the framework of the ?-generalized statistical mechanics. The performance of the ?-generalized distribution was checked against real data on personal income for the United States in 2003. In this paper we extend our previous model so as to be able to account for the distribution of wealth. Probabilistic functions and inequality measures of this generalized model for wealth distribution are obtained in closed form. In order to check the validity of the proposed model, we analyze the US household wealth distributions from 1984 to 2009 and conclude an excellent agreement with the data that is superior to any other model already known in the literature. (paper)

  17. A generalized statistical model for the size distribution of wealth

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, F; Kaniadakis, G

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper in this journal [J. Stat. Mech. (2009) P02037] we proposed a new, physically motivated, distribution function for modeling individual incomes having its roots in the framework of the k-generalized statistical mechanics. The performance of the k-generalized distribution was checked against real data on personal income for the United States in 2003. In this paper we extend our previous model so as to be able to account for the distribution of wealth. Probabilistic functions and inequality measures of this generalized model for wealth distribution are obtained in closed form. In order to check the validity of the proposed model, we analyze the U.S. household wealth distributions from 1984 to 2009 and conclude an excellent agreement with the data that is superior to any other model already known in the literature.

  18. Batch sizing with controllable production rates in a multi-stage production system

    OpenAIRE

    Glock, Christoph H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In a recent paper, Glock [2010. Batch sizing with controllable production rates. International Journal of Production Research 20: 5925-5942] studied the impact of a variable production rate on the inventory build-up and the total costs in a two-stage production system. In this paper, we extend Glock’s (2010) model to a multi-stage production system where the production rate at each producing stage may be varied within given limits. We compare our model to the classical cas...

  19. Particle size distribution study of 153Sm aerosols during its processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    153Sm is one of the most important therapeutic nuclides (? : 806.822 ± 0.736 keV, T1/2 : 46.3 hours) used for targeted therapy applications especially in solid tumors and for the relief of pain in bone cancer. The isotope is being regularly produced at Radiopharmaceuticals Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Study to establish the particle size of 153Sm aerosols and hence estimation of ALI was carried out. Particle size spectrum during processing was continuously taken by Anderson ACFM Non-viable Ambient particle sizing sampler from the processing plant, i.e. a shielded enclosure. The AMAD values of 153Sm aerosol and corresponding Dose Conversion Factor (Sv/Bq) has been estimated. Based on the particle size arrived at from the experiment a more realistic estimate of the dose for occupational workers can be calculated. The human respiratory tract is an aerodynamic classifying system for airborne particles. The sampling device is used as a substitute for the respiratory tract as a dust collector. This instrument reproduces the dust collecting characteristic of the human respiratory systems with a reasonable degree of accuracy so that the lung penetration by air borne particles can be predicted from the sampling data. The stage-wise distribution of the collected material indicates the extent to which the sample would have penetrated the respiratory system. Hence, a study was carried out to determine particle size distribution of 153Sm aerosols during chemical processing by using eight stages Andersen Cascade sampler. The air activity release inside the production plant during the 153Sm processing was determined in three different operations. Particles size separation was achieved by Anderson eight-stage cascade impactor through the filter media loaded at each stage. The cumulative percent less than the stated size were plotted on log probability paper against Effective Cut off diameter (ECD). From this the AMADs of 153Sm aerosol on three different operations was found to be ? 3 ?m. Dose Conversion Factor (DCF) of 153Sm aerosols for these particle sizes are evaluated using LUDEP 2.0. (author)

  20. Size-fractionated production and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen-Leerbeck, Helle; Bronk, Deborah A.; Markager, Stiig

    2015-01-01

    Production and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter was quantified on a time scale of two days from size fractions ranging from bacteria to zooplankton in the York River, Virginia. The goal was to find the main contributor to DOM. Batch incubation experiments were labeled with N15-ammonium and C13-bicarbonate, and degradation kinetics of dissolved organic matter was measured over 14 days. Chlorophyll a increased to a maximum of 14 ± 0.6 ?g L-1 during the incubation. Inorganic nitrogen was...

  1. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Borchard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular release (ER by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady state conditions in phosphorus controlled chemostats (N : P = 29, growth rate of ? = 0.2 d?1. 14C incubations were accomplished to determine primary production (PP, comprised by particulate (PO14C and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C, and the concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO, and of high molecular weight (>1 kDa, HMW dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO as major components of ER. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (14C and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady state growth, corresponding to ?4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size (10 kDa was significantly different with higher Mol% of arabinose. Mol% of acidic sugars increased and Mol% glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  2. A model study of the size and composition distribution of aerosols in an aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, A.A. [SRC `ECOLEN`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A two-dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model which includes water and sulphate aerosol formation represented by moments of the size and composition distribution function is used to calculate the effect of radial turbulent jet mixing on the aerosol size distribution and mean modal composition. (author) 6 refs.

  3. Variations in Tropospheric Submicron Particle Size Distributions Across the European Continent 2008–2009.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beddows, D.C.S.; Dall’Osto, M.; Harrison, R.M.; Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Laj, P.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Sellegri, K.; Birmili, W.; Bukowiecki, N.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Zíková, Nad?žda; Putaud, J.-P.; Marinoni, A.; Tunved, P.; Hansson, H.-C.; Feibig, M.; Kivekäs, N.; Swietlicki, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Ulevicius, V.; Aalto, P.P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Kalivitis, N.; Kalapov, I.; Kiss, G.; de Leeuw, G.; Henzing, B.; O'Dowd, C.; Jennings, S.G.; Flentje, H.; Meinhardt, F.; Ries, L.; Denier van der Gon19, H.A.C.; Visschedijk, A.J.H.; Swietlicki, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 14, ?. 8 (2014), s. 4327-4348. ISSN 1680-7316 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 36833; European Commission(XE) 26140 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : particle size distribution * clusters * aerosol size distribution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.053, year: 2014

  4. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2015-02-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady-state conditions in phosphorus-controlled chemostats (N:P = 29, growth rate of ? = 0.2 d-1) at present-day and high-CO2 concentrations. 14C incubations were performed to determine primary production (PP), comprised of particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C). Concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO) and high-molecular-weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) were determined by ion chromatography. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (10 kDa was significantly different, with a higher mol% of arabinose. The mol% of acidic sugars increased and that of glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  5. On the impact of grain size distribution on the plastic behaviour of polycrystalline metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental studies have reported improved combinations of strength and uniform elongation in ultrafine-grained polycrystals with bi-modal grain size distributions. Despite these results, the extent to which the grain size distribution affects macroscopic tensile response, particularly at large strains, is unclear. This issue is examined here for polycrystals with varying grain sizes and grain size distributions using a grain size dependent constitutive model within the viscoplastic self-consistent formalism. The evolution of the macroscopic and grain-level stresses and strains has been monitored as a function of the width and mean of the grain size distribution. As an example of highly heterogeneous structures, the stress–strain response of a number of bi-modal microstructures have been examined and compared with their uni-modal counterparts

  6. DOES SIZE MATTER? THE UNDERLYING INTRINSIC SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF RADIO SOURCES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR UNIFICATION BY ORIENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unification by orientation is a ubiquitous concept in the study of active galactic nuclei. A gold standard of the orientation paradigm is the hypothesis that radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars are intrinsically the same, but are observed over different ranges of viewing angles. Historically, strong support for this model was provided by the projected sizes of radio structure in luminous radio galaxies, which were found to be significantly larger than those of quasars, as predicted due to simple geometric projection. Recently, this test of the simplest prediction of orientation-based models has been revisited with larger samples that cover wider ranges of fundamental properties—and no clear difference in projected sizes of radio structure is found. Cast solely in terms of viewing angle effects, these results provide convincing evidence that unification of these objects solely through orientation fails. However, it is possible that conflicting results regarding the role orientation plays in our view of radio sources simply result from insufficient sampling of their intrinsic size distribution. We test this possibility using Monte Carlo simulations constrained by real sample sizes and properties. We develop models for the real intrinsic size distribution of radio sources, simulate observations by randomly sampling intrinsic sizes and viewing angles, and analyze how likely each sample is to support or dispute unification by orientation. We find that, while it is possible to reconcile conflicting results purely within a simple, orientation-based framework, it is very unlikely. We analyze the effects that sample size, relative numbers of radio galaxies and quasars, the critical angle that separates the two subclasses, and the shape of the intrinsic size distribution have on this type of test

  7. Dust Grain Size Distributions and Extinction in the Milky Way, LMC, and SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Weingartner, J C; Weingartner, Joseph C.

    2001-01-01

    We construct size distributions for carbonaceous and silicate grain populations in different regions of the Milky Way, LMC, and SMC. The size distributions include sufficient very small carbonaceous grains (including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules) to account for the observed infrared and microwave emission from the diffuse interstellar medium. Our distributions reproduce the observed extinction of starlight, which varies depending upon the interstellar environment through which the light travels. As shown by Cardelli, Clayton & Mathis in 1989, these variations can be roughly parameterized by the ratio of visual extinction to reddening, R_V. We adopt a fairly simple functional form for the size distribution, characterized by several parameters. We tabulate these parameters for various combinations of values for R_V and b_C, the C abundance in very small grains. We also find size distributions for the line of sight to HD 210121, and for sightlines in the LMC and SMC. For several size distributio...

  8. The Influence of Ball Charge and Media Size Distribution in Grinding Plant

    OpenAIRE

    COSTEA Claudiu Raul; SILAGHI Helga; KOVENDI Zoltan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of theperformances of an mill grinding circuits. This studyrelieve fineness of cement for certain condition, suchare: ball size distribution, charge of grinding media,weight for all balls from the same category. Becausethe size of media has to match the size of materialbeing ground, it is necessary an analysis of these.Finally, some simulation results are shown.

  9. Particle Size Distributions During Laboratory-Scale Biomass Burns and Prescribed Burns Using Fast Response Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H.; Hosseini, E.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Princevac, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    2010-12-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion in an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies varies not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels and compare with that from prescribed burns. The combustion laboratory at the USDA Forest Service’s Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement ~30 % of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 µm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in MCE vs geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values. Prescribed burns were carried out at wildland managed by military bases. Evolution of particle distribution in and out of the plume will be compared with particle distribution from lab scale burning.

  10. Measurements of Particle Size Distribution Based on Mie Scattering Theory and Markov Chain Inversion Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zi Ye; Xiaoping Jiang; Zhenchong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Measuring particle size distribution through calculating light scattering intensity is a typical inverse problem. This paper builds an inverse mathematical model based on Mie scattering, deduces the inversion formulas for particle size, and calculates the relative coefficients through programming with built-in functions in MATLAB. In order to improve the accuracy and noise immunity of particle size distribution measurement, the development of stochastic inversion algorithm: an inverse problem...

  11. Production and evaluation of size reduced grades of microcrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, S R; Deasy, P B

    2001-02-01

    Size reduction of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH-101) powder by ball milling was poorly effective, particularly in the presence of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), which tended to form a protective foam. Ultrasonic homogenisation of an aqueous suspension more readily produced ultra-fine MCC, even in the presence of the surfactant and two other de-aggregating agents, and factorial experimentation was used to optimise the process. The product was recovered by spray-drying and readily redispersed in water without re-aggregation. Two new grades of ultra-fine MCC, prepared by an optimised treatment with or without 1% SLS, were characterised by a range of techniques in comparison to the starting coarser grade, Avicel PH-101. Mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the less porous and smaller particle size of the new grades, where deposition of SLS as a coating was evident. Surface area determination confirmed that the size-reduced grades had larger specific surface areas, particularly the SLS treated material. Low temperature DSC and X-ray diffraction studies suggested that the new ultra-fine grades were more amorphous. Collectively the results indicate that the new grades should have unique functionality, possibly of benefit in pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:11165090

  12. Size-fractionated production and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen-Leerbeck, Helle; Bronk, Deborah A.

    Production and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter was quantified on a time scale of two days from size fractions ranging from bacteria to zooplankton in the York River, Virginia. The goal was to find the main contributor to DOM. Batch incubation experiments were labeled with N15-ammonium and C13-bicarbonate, and degradation kinetics of dissolved organic matter was measured over 14 days. Chlorophyll a increased to a maximum of 14 ± 0.6 ?g L-1 during the incubation. Inorganic nitrogen was taken up producing a maximum of 10 ± 0.3 ?mol particulate nitrogen L-1. The increase in biomass was mainly in the phytoplankton size fraction, which on average contributed 62 % of total particulate nitrogen and 61 % of total particulate carbon. Up to 5 ± 0.4 ?mol dissolved organic nitrogen L-1 and 33 ± 6.2 ?mol dissolved organic carbon L-1 was produced during the incubation. Bioavailability of phytoplankton produced dissolved organic carbon was 12 ± 1 % and higher than in the presence of bacteria, microzooplankton, orcopepods (7 ± 3 %). The pattern for bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen was less clear and ranged from 4 – 7 %. This study revealed that phytoplankton was the main contributor to the production of dissolved organic matter.

  13. Dust size distributions in coagulation/fragmentation equilibrium: Numerical solutions and analytical fits

    CERN Document Server

    Birnstiel, T; Dullemond, C P

    2010-01-01

    Context. Grains in circumstellar disks are believed to grow by mutual collisions and subsequent sticking due to surface forces. Results of many fields of research involving circumstellar disks, such as radiative transfer calculations, disk chemistry, magneto-hydrodynamic simulations largely depend on the unknown grain size distribution. Aims. As detailed calculations of grain growth and fragmentation are both numerically challenging and computationally expensive, we aim to find simple recipes and analytical solutions for the grain size distribution in circumstellar disks for a scenario in which grain growth is limited by fragmentation and radial drift can be neglected. Methods. We generalize previous analytical work on self-similar steady-state grain distributions. Numerical simulations are carried out to identify under which conditions the grain size distributions can be understood in terms of a combination of power-law distributions. A physically motivated fitting formula for grain size distributions is der...

  14. Light scattering by size-shape distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles of a size comparable to a wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    1993-01-01

    Rigorously light scattering by size-shape distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles are calculated by the T-matrix method, as extended to randomly oriented scatterers. The computational scheme is described along with a newly developed convergence procedure that makes it possible to substantially reduce computer time and storage requirements. The elements of the Stokes scattering matrix for a power-law size distribution of randomly oriented moderately aspherical spheroids are shown to be much smoother than and differ substantially from those of equivalent monodisperse spheroids; averaging over orientations does not eliminate the necessity of averaging over particle sizes. The angular-scattering behavior of the ensembles of nonspherical particles is found to be significantly different from that of the equivalent polydisperse spheres.

  15. Distributed Monte Carlo production for D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The D0 collaboration uses a variety of resources on four continents to pursue a strategy of flexibility and automation in the generation of simulation data. This strategy provides a resilient and opportunistic system which ensures an adequate and timely supply of simulation data to support D0's physics analyses. A mixture of facilities, dedicated and opportunistic, specialized and generic, large and small, grid job enabled and not, are used to provide a production system that has adapted to newly developing technologies. This strategy has increased the event production rate by a factor of seven and the data production rate by a factor of ten in the last three years despite diminishing manpower. Common to all production facilities is the SAM (Sequential Access to Metadata) data-grid. Job submission to the grid uses SAMGrid middleware which may forward jobs to the OSG, the WLCG, or native SAMGrid sites. The distributed computing and data handling system used by D0 will be described and the results of MC production since the deployment of grid technologies will be presented.

  16. Size distribution of particle systems analyzed with organic photodetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sentis, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    As part of a consortium between academic and industry, this PhD work investigates the interest and capabilities of organic photo-sensors (OPS) for the optical characterization of suspensions and two-phase flows. The principle of new optical particle sizing instruments is proposed to characterize particle systems confined in a cylinder glass (standard configuration for Process Analytical Technologies). To evaluate and optimize the performance of these systems, a Monte-Carlo model has been specifically developed. This model accounts for the numerous parameters of the system: laser beam profile, mirrors, lenses, sample cell, particle medium properties (concentration, mean & standard deviation, refractive indices), OPS shape and positions, etc. Light scattering by particles is treated either by using Lorenz-Mie theory, Debye, or a hybrid model (that takes into account the geometrical and physical contributions). For diluted media (single scattering), particle size analysis is based on the inversion of scatter...

  17. Density, Size and Distribution of Stomata in Different Monocotyledons

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Zarinkamar

    2006-01-01

    The present study focuses on the stomatal characters of 54 species from 6 families of monocotyledons, the majority of which are grasses. The stomatal density, guard cell lengths on the adaxial and abaxial leaf epidermis and the stomatal type in each family are described and the relationship between stomatal density and guard cell size is reviewed. These plants are collected from one of the Irano-Turany protected area. However, studying of stomata characters, particularly herbaceous plants gro...

  18. Empirical Reference Distributions for Networks of Different Size

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Anna; Calder, Catherine A.; Browning, Christopher R

    2015-01-01

    Network analysis has become an increasingly prevalent research tool across a vast range of scientific fields. Here, we focus on the particular issue of comparing network statistics, i.e. graph-level measures of network structural features, across multiple networks that differ in size. Although "normalized" versions of some network statistics exist, we demonstrate via simulation why direct comparison of raw and normalized statistics is often inappropriate. We examine a recent...

  19. Linking size and age at sexual maturation to body growth, productivity and recruitment of Atlantic cod stocks spanning the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, Fritz; Trippel, E.A.; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    2013-01-01

    Sexual maturation patterns of 22 North Atlantic stocks of cod (Gadus morhua) were examined and related to geographical distribution area, ambient water temperature, growth and surplus production. Four patterns were identified, i.e. sexual maturation early in life at small size, early in life at large size, late in life at small size and lastly, late in life at large size. These maturation patterns were geographically clustered and associated with differences in growth and surplus production. Sto...

  20. Quantitative analysis of crystal/grain sizes and their distributions in 2D and 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We review methods to estimate the average crystal (grain) size and the crystal (grain) size distribution in solid rocks. Average grain sizes often provide the base for stress estimates or rheological calculations requiring the quantification of grain sizes in a rock’s microstructure. The primary data for grain size data are either 1D (i.e. line intercept methods), 2D (area analysis) or 3D (e.g., computed tomography, serial sectioning). These data have been used for different data treatments over the years, whereas several studies assume a certain probability function (e.g., logarithm, square root) to calculate statistical parameters as the mean, median, mode or the skewness of a crystal size distribution. The finally calculated average grain sizes have to be compatible between the different grain size estimation approaches in order to be properly applied, for example, in paleo-piezometers or grain size sensitive flow laws. Such compatibility is tested for different data treatments using one- and two-dimensional measurements. We propose an empirical conversion matrix for different datasets. These conversion factors provide the option to make different datasets compatible with each other, although the primary calculations were obtained in different ways. In order to present an average grain size, we propose to use the area-weighted and volume-weighted mean in the case of unimodal grain size distributions, respectively, for 2D and 3D measurements. The shape of the crystal size distribution is important for studies of nucleation and growth of minerals. The shape of the crystal size distribution of garnet populations is compared between different 2D and 3D measurements, which are serial sectioning and computed tomography. The comparison of different direct measured 3D data; stereological data and direct presented 2D data show the problems of the quality of the smallest grain sizes and the overestimation of small grain sizes in stereological tools, depending on the type of CSD.

  1. Distributed energy production offers many advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this interview with Daniel Dillier, President of the Board of the IWK company, the aims of the Swiss electricity business to build new nuclear power stations and the Swiss Government's proposals for the building of gas-steam combined cycle power plants are discussed. Dillier, in contrast, favours the construction of distributed combined heat and power (CHP) units. Dillier voices his opinions on this subject and stresses the advantages of distributed systems that combine the production of heat and electrical power. These systems can use renewable resources and provide a higher degree of system reliability and availability. A further topic discussed is that of carbon dioxide emissions, which Dillier notes as being 40 percent less than for conventional systems. The potential for the use of decentralised CHP units in Switzerland is examined

  2. Methodology for determining rom size distribution / Metodologia para determinação de curva granulométrica de rom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Christiane Ribeiro da, Silva; Vládia C. G. de, Souza; Jair C., Koppe.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A metodologia para determinar a curva granulométrica de ROM foi desenvolvida em uma mina de ferro localizada no Brasil. O tamanho dos blocos maiores foi determinado a partir de fotografias, por meio das quais foi definida uma escala para analisar as dimensões dos blocos (comprimento e área). Isso fo [...] i implementado de acordo com um protocolo de amostragem específico, que envolve etapas de divisão e de homogeneização in situ de uma considerável quantidade de minério (cerca de 259 toneladas). Durante o processo de amostragem, os blocos maiores foram segregados, para mensuração, por análise de imagens, enquanto que os de menor tamanho foram peneirados. A metodologia foi desenvolvida para avaliar, inicialmente, o desempenho de um britador giratório, alimentado por basculamento direto, a partir de caminhões. Condições operacionais desse tipo de equipamento, tais como configurações das aberturas de posição aberta (APA) e de posição fechada (APF), podem ser ajustadas previamente, permitindo, assim, a obtenção de diferentes distribuições de tamanho de produto. A variabilidade de tamanho dos fragmentos afeta diretamente os estágios seguintes de britagem, podendo causar um aumento significativo na carga circulante do circuito. Isto leva a uma diminuição da produtividade e recuperação nas etapas posteriores. Os resultados de granulometria de ROM mostraram erros de reprodutibilidade e viés desprezíveis para o protocolo de amostragem desenvolvido, aplicado em itabirito friável. Abstract in english A methodology to determine the size distribution curve of the ROM was developed in a Brazilian iron ore mine. The size of the larger fragments was determined taking photographs and setting the scale of the images to analyze their dimensions (length of their edges and areas). This was implemented acc [...] ording to a specific protocol of sampling that involves split and homogenization stages in situ of a considerable quantity of ore (about 259 metric tonnes). During the sampling process, larger fragments were separated and smaller size material was screened. The methodology was developed initially in order to preview the performance of a primary gyratory crusher that is fed directly from trucks. Operational conditions of the equipment such as closed and open-side settings could be adjusted previously, obtaining different product size distributions. Variability of size of the fragments affects subsequent stages of crushing and can increase circulating load in the circuit. This leads to a decrease of productivity or recovery of the ore dressing. The results showed insignificant errors of accuracy and reproducibility of the sampling protocol when applied to friable itabirite rocks.

  3. Impact of grain size distributions on the dust enrichment in high-redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Tzu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In high-redshift ($z>5$) quasars, a large amount of dust ($\\textstyle\\sim 10^{8} \\mathrm{M}_{\\sun}$) has been observed. In order to explain the large dust content, we focus on a possibility that grain growth by the accretion of heavy elements is the dominant dust source. We adopt a chemical evolution model applicable to nearby galaxies but utilize parameters adequate to high-$z$ quasars. It is assumed that metals and dust are predominantly ejected by Type II supernovae (SNe). We have found that grain growth strongly depends on the grain size distribution. If we simply use the size distribution of grains ejected from SNe, grain growth is inefficient because of the lack of small grains (i.e.\\ small surface-to-volume ratio of the dust grains). However, if we take small grain production by interstellar shattering into consideration, grain growth is efficient enough to account for the rich dust abundance in high-$z$ quasars. Our results not only confirm that grain growth is necessary to explain the large amount of...

  4. Verification of CR-39 Technique for Attached Radon Progeny Size Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A new type cascade impactor has been developed to determine the activity size distribution of radon and thoron progeny in a living environment more efficiently. The modified impactor consists of 4 stages for the collection of aerosol samples. The aerosol cut points in the impactor are set for 10, 2.5, 1 and 0.5 ? m at a flow rate of 4 L.min-1. Five CR-39 chips were used as alpha detectors for each stage. In order to separate ? particles emitted from radon and thoron progeny, CR-39 detectors are covered with aluminum-vaporized Mylar films. Thickness of films is properly adjusted to allow ? particles emitted from radon and thoron progeny to reach the CR-39 detectors. In addition, a 400-mesh metal wire screen was mounted as diffusion collector at the air inlet of the impactor to remove the unattached fraction of radon and thoron decay products. Validation of the technique was performed with the commercial devices. The results confirmed that the developed technique can provide us significant information to estimate the activity size distribution of attached radon and thoron progeny for dose assessment

  5. DOMAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF Y-TZP NANO-PARTICLES USING XRD AND HRTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Florence Boulc'h; Marie-Claude Schouler; Patricia Donnadieu; Jean-Marc Chaix; Elisabeth Djurado

    2011-01-01

    Yttria doped nanocrystalline zirconia powder was prepared by spray-pyrolysis technique. Powder crystallized into tetragonal form, as dense and compositionally homogeneous polycrystalline spheres. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used in order to characterize the mean size and the size distribution of crystalline domains. An average size of 6 nm was calculated by Scherrer formula from X-Ray diffraction pattern. The domain size, dete...

  6. Particle Size Distribution Measurements of Manganese-Doped ZnS Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Dieckmann, Yvonne; Cölfen, Helmut; Hofmann, Heinrich; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2009-01-01

    We performed particle size and particle size distribution measurements for L-cysteine-stabilized ZnS/Mn nanoparticles in the size region below 10 nm. For this we applied transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF-FFF) measurements, and we calculated particle sizes with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and the shift of the band gap absorption in the UV-vis spectrum. T...

  7. Aerosol Size Distribution Estimation And Associated Uncertainty For Measurement With a SMPS

    OpenAIRE

    Coquelin, Loic; Fischer, Nicolas; Motzkus, C.; Macé, T.; Gensdarmes, François; Lebrusquet, Laurent; Fleury, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) is a high resolution nanoparticle sizing system that has long been hailed as the researcher's choice for airborne nanoparticle size characterization for nano applications including nanotechnology research and development. SMPS is widely used as the standard method to measure airborne particle size distributions below 1 m. It is composed of two devices: a Di erential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) selects particle sizes thanks to their electrical mobility and a...

  8. Methods for determining particle size distribution and growth rates between 1 and 3 nm using the Particle Size Magnifier

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Kontkanen, Jenni; Kangasluoma, Juha; Franchin, Alessandro; Wimmer, Daniela; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sipilä, Mikko; Mikkilä, Jyri; Vanhanen, Joonas; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-01-01

    The most important parameters describing the atmospheric new particle formation process are the particle formation and growth rates. These together determine the amount of cloud condensation nuclei attributed to secondary particle formation. Due to difficulties in detecting small neutral particles, it has previously not been possible to derive these directly from measurements in the size range below about 3 nm. The Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier has been used at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, southern Finland, and during nucleation experiments in the CLOUD chamber at CERN for measuring particles as small as about 1 nm in mobility diameter. We developed several methods to determine the particle size distribution and growth rates in the size range of 1–3 nm from these data sets. Here we introduce the appearance-time method for calculating initial growth rates. The validity of the method was tested by simulations with the Ion-UHMA aerosol dynamic model.

  9. Continuation of Direct Products of Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    A. Petermann

    2000-01-01

    If, in some problems, one has to deal with the ``product'' of distributions $\\rm f_i$ (also called generalized functions) $\\rm\\bar T = \\Pi^m_{i=1} f_i$, this product has a priori no definite meaning as a functional $(\\rm \\bar T, \\phi) $ for $\\rm\\phi \\in S$. But if $\\rm x^{\\kappa +1} \\Pi^m_{i=1} f_i$ exists, whatever the associativity is between some powers $\\rm r_i$ of $\\rm x$ ($\\rm r_i \\in \\Bbb N, \\sum_i r_i\\leq \\kappa +1, r_i \\geq 0$) and the various $\\rm f_i$, then a cont...

  10. On wildfire complexity, simple models and environmental templates for fire size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, M. M.; Bradstock, R.; Gill, M.; Sadler, R.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation fires affect some 370 Mha annually. At global and continental scales, fire activity follows predictable spatiotemporal patterns driven by gradients and seasonal fluctuations of primary productivity and evaporative demand that set constraints for fuel accumulation rates and fuel dryness, two key ingredients of fire. At regional scales, fires are also known to affect some landscapes more than others and within landscapes to occur preferentially in some sectors (e.g. wind-swept ridges) and rarely in others (e.g. wet gullies). Another common observation is that small fires occur relatively frequent yet collectively burn far less country than relatively infrequent large fires. These patterns of fire activity are well known to management agencies and consistent with their (informal) models of how the basic drivers and constraints of fire (i.e. fuels, ignitions, weather) vary in time and space across the landscape. The statistical behaviour of these landscape fire patterns has excited the (academic) research community by showing some consistency with that of complex dynamical systems poised at a phase transition. The common finding that the frequency-size distributions of actual fires follow power laws that resemble those produced by simple cellular models from statistical mechanics has been interpreted as evidence that flammable landscapes operate as self-organising systems with scale invariant fire size distributions emerging 'spontaneously' from simple rules of contagious fire spread and a strong feedback between fires and fuel patterns. In this paper we argue that the resemblance of simulated and actual fire size distributions is an example of equifinality, that is fires in model landscapes and actual landscapes may show similar statistical behaviour but this is reached by qualitatively different pathways or controlling mechanisms. We support this claim with two key findings regarding simulated fire spread mechanisms and fire-fuel feedbacks. Firstly, we demonstrate that the power law behaviour of fire size distributions in the widely used Drossel and Schwabl (1992) Forest Fire Model (FFM) is strictly conditional on simulating fire spread as a cell-to-cell contagion over a fixed distance; the invariant scaling of fire sizes breaks down under the slightest variation in that distance, suggesting that pattern formation in the FFM is irreconcilable with the reality of disparate rates and modes of fire spread observed in the field. Secondly, we review field evidence showing that fuel age effects on the probability of fire spread, a key assumption in simulation models like the FFM, do not generally apply across flammable environments. Finally, we explore alternative explanations for the formation of scale invariant fire sizes in real landscapes. Using observations from southern Australian forest regions we demonstrate that the spatiotemporal patterns of fuel dryness and magnitudes of fire driving weather events set strong environmental templates for regional fire size distributions.

  11. Density, Size and Distribution of Stomata in Different Monocotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zarinkamar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the stomatal characters of 54 species from 6 families of monocotyledons, the majority of which are grasses. The stomatal density, guard cell lengths on the adaxial and abaxial leaf epidermis and the stomatal type in each family are described and the relationship between stomatal density and guard cell size is reviewed. These plants are collected from one of the Irano-Turany protected area. However, studying of stomata characters, particularly herbaceous plants growing in less contaminated zone such as protected areas, could improve basic knowledge on main characters of monocotyledons.

  12. Electrostatic Barrier Against Dust Growth in Protoplanetary Disks. I. Classifying the Evolution of Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2010-01-01

    Collisional growth of submicron-sized dust grains into macroscopic aggregates is the first step of planet formation in protoplanetary disks. These aggregates are considered to carry nonzero negative charges in the weakly ionized gas disks, but its effect on their collisional growth has not been fully understood so far. In this paper, we investigate how the charging of dust aggregates affects the evolution of their size distribution properly taking into account the charging mechanism in a weakly ionized gas. To clarify the role of the size distribution, we divide our analysis into two steps. First, we analyze the collisional growth of charged aggregates assuming a monodisperse (i.e., narrow) size distribution. We show that the monodisperse growth stalls due to the electrostatic repulsion when a certain condition is met, as is already expected in the previous work. Second, we numerically simulate dust coagulation using Smoluchowski's method to see how the outcome changes when the size distribution is allowed to...

  13. Earthquake Size Distribution: Power-Law with Exponent Beta = 1/2 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2009-01-01

    We propose that the widely observed and universal Gutenberg-Richter relation is a mathematical consequence of the critical branching nature of earthquake process in a brittle fracture environment. These arguments, though preliminary, are confirmed by recent investigations of the seismic moment distribution in global earthquake catalogs and by the results on the distribution in crystals of dislocation avalanche sizes. We consider possible systematic and random errors in determining earthquake size, especially its seismic moment. These effects increase the estimate of the parameter beta of the power-law distribution of earthquake sizes. In particular we find that the decrease in relative moment uncertainties with earthquake size causes inflation in the beta-value by about 1-3%. Moreover, earthquake clustering greatly influences the beta-parameter. If clusters (aftershock sequences) are taken as the entity to be studied, then the exponent value for their size distribution would decrease by 5-10%. The complexity ...

  14. Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F

    2011-01-01

    The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols partially determines their interactions with clouds, radiation, ecosystems, and other components of the Earth system. Several theoretical models predict that the dust size distribution depends on the wind speed at emission, with larger wind speeds predicted to produce smaller aerosols. The present study investigates this prediction using a compilation of published measurements of the size-resolved vertical dust flux emitted by eroding soils. Surprisingly, these measurements indicate that the size distribution of naturally emitted dust aerosols is independent of the wind speed. The recently formulated brittle fragmentation theory of dust emission is consistent with this finding, whereas other theoretical dust emission models are not. The independence of the emitted dust size distribution with wind speed simplifies both the interpretation of geological records of dust deposition and the parameterization of dust emission in atmospheric circulation models.

  15. THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEPTUNE TROJANS AND THE MISSING INTERMEDIATE-SIZED PLANETESIMALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an ultra-deep survey for Neptune Trojans using the Subaru 8.2 m and Magellan 6.5 m telescopes. The survey reached a 50% detection efficiency in the R band at mR = 25.7 mag and covered 49 deg2 of sky. mR = 25.7 mag corresponds to Neptune Trojans that are about 16 km in radius (assuming an albedo of 0.05). A paucity of smaller Neptune Trojans (radii R = 23.5 ± 0.3), which is also very similar to the other stable reservoirs. All the observed stable regions in the solar system show evidence for Missing Intermediate-Sized Planetesimals (MISPs). This indicates a primordial and not collisional origin, which suggests that planetesimal formation proceeded directly from small to large objects. The scarcity of intermediate- and smaller-sized Neptune Trojans may limit them as being a strong source for the short period comets.

  16. Two-size approximation: a simple way of treating the evolution of grain size distribution in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Full calculations of the evolution of grain size distribution in galaxies are in general computationally heavy. In this paper, we propose a simple model of dust enrichment in a galaxy with a simplified treatment of grain size distribution by imposing a `two-size approximation'; that is, all the grain population is represented by small (grain radius a 0.03 micron) grains. We include in the model dust supply from stellar ejecta, destruction in supernova shocks, dust growth by accretion, grain growth by coagulation and grain disruption by shattering, considering how these processes work on the small and large grains. We show that this simple framework reproduces the main features found in full calculations of grain size distributions as follows. The dust enrichment starts with the supply of large grains from stars. At a metallicity level referred to as the critical metallicity of accretion, the abundance of the small grains formed by shattering becomes large enough to rapidly increase the grain abundance by acc...

  17. Determination of primary particle size distributions from time-resolved laser-induced incandescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankers, Stefan; Leipertz, Alfred

    2004-06-20

    For a polydisperse nanoparticle ensemble the evaluation of time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements yields a weighted average value for the primary nanoparticle size. Although this value is sufficient for narrow size distributions, a comprehensive characterization of a particle-evolution process requires the reconstruction of the size distribution. An easy-to-use online approach is presented to evaluate the LII signal regarding higher moments of the distribution. One advantage of this approach is that the size distribution results in a deceleration of the LII signal decay with time after the laser pulse. Therefore LII signal-decay curves are evaluated in two different time intervals after the laser pulse, providing information about the desired distribution parameters that has been tested successfully with experimental curves taken in different soot-formation processes. PMID:15218614

  18. Equilibrium island size distribution in one dimension revisited: analytical models and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The island size distribution, at thermodynamic equilibrium, of interacting particles in a one-dimensional lattice-gas model is revisited. A derivation for the exact island size distribution of nearest neighbor interacting particles using the detailed balance principle is proposed and it is shown that it agrees with the distribution obtained by Gambardella et al who resorted to the minimization of the free energy (2006 Phys. Rev. B 73 245425). We find that the island size distributions change from an exponential shape to one exhibiting a maximum when repulsive interactions with distant neighbors are considered. In this work we present an analytical model that successfully reproduces the island size distribution obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for both interaction schemes and any coverage

  19. Optimizing Batch Size in a Flow-Oriented Synchronized Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Aslan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was prepared for a leading company, Miele GmbH, the global premium brand of domestic appliancesand commercial machines in the field of laundry care, dishwashing and disinfection in Germany. The productionline of Miele GmbH in Bielefeld, Germany was analyzed to develop a model that can be used for all the firms inthe group.Dynamic programming models are widely used by companies to efficiently meet the demand for a variety ofproducts. In a flow shop, each product has to be processed by a number of machines in synchronized lines. Theproduction smoothing problems under the presence of setup and processing times vary among the products. Themaster production-inventory problem of Miele GmbH was divided into two sub-problems which were concernedwith determining the batch sizes and production sequences of products, respectively. A dynamic programmingprocedure was developed to solve the batching problem for the current problem. A dynamic computational studyfor the first case was conducted so that the solution method is effective in meeting the goals of the firm andefficient in its computational requirements.Scientific problem –the firm has a problem of high logistics. Moreover, they want to decrease the cost ofproduction in order to compete with their competitors. Their competitors start to make some of their productionin low labour countries such as China. Miele is a special brand for upper level. However, they now have a morestrict competition with new global players and one way to stay competitive in the market is to decrease the costsand find new market segments.The aim of the research –The dynamic programming algorithm is suggested to them to decrease the costs. Thenumbers of products are decreased to explain the algorithm. An example with calculations of this algorithm wasexplained in this study. The number of variables and constraints can be increased. After the logic of algorithm isunderstood, it can be applied many similar problems. The algorithm can be developed by using differentsoftware such as Java. Then, the variables and values of algorithm can be input for the algorithm and the resultscan be gotten in a short time.The object of the research – Inventory and Production mix projects.The methods of the research –Dynamic Programming.

  20. 3D Hail Size Distribution Interpolation/Extrapolation Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John

    2013-01-01

    Radar data can usually detect hail; however, it is difficult for present day radar to accurately discriminate between hail and rain. Local ground-based hail sensors are much better at detecting hail against a rain background, and when incorporated with radar data, provide a much better local picture of a severe rain or hail event. The previous disdrometer interpolation/ extrapolation algorithm described a method to interpolate horizontally between multiple ground sensors (a minimum of three) and extrapolate vertically. This work is a modification to that approach that generates a purely extrapolated 3D spatial distribution when using a single sensor.

  1. Cluster size distribution in the autocatalytic growth model

    CERN Document Server

    J?drak, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    We generalize the model of transition-metal nanocluster growth in aqueous solution, proposed recently [Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{87}, 022132 (2013)]. In order to model time evolution of the system, kinetic equations describing time dependence of the rate of chemical reactions are combined with Smoluchowski coagulation equation. In the absence of coagulation and fragmentation processes, the model equations are solved in two steps. First, for any injective functional dependence of the autocatalytic reaction rate constant on the cluster size, we obtain explicit analytical form of the $i$-mer concentration, $\\xi_{i}$, as a function of $\\xi_{1}$. This result allows us to reduce considerably the number of time-evolution equations. In the simplest situation, the remaining single kinetic equation for $\\xi_{1}(t)$ is solved in quadratures. In a general case, we obtain small system of time-evolution equations, which, although rarely analytically tractable, can be relatively easily solved by using numerical methods.

  2. Measurement of the size distributions of radon progeny in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major problem in evaluating the health risk posed by airborne radon progeny in indoor atmospheres is the lack of available information on the activity-weighted size distributions that occur in the domestic environment. With an automated, semicontinuous, graded screen array system, we made a series of measurements of activity-weighted size distributions in several houses in the northeastern United States. Measurements were made in an unoccupied house, in which human aerosol-generating activities were simulated. The time evolution of the aerosol size distribution was measured in each situation. Results of these measurements are presented

  3. Effect of a polynomial arbitrary dust size distribution on dust acoustic solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishak-Boushaki, M.; Djellout, D.; Annou, R. [Faculty of Physics, USTHB, P.B. 32 El Alia, Bab-ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-07-15

    The investigation of dust-acoustic solitons when dust grains are size-distributed and ions adiabatically heated is conducted. The influence of an arbitrary dust size-distribution described by a polynomial function on the properties of dust acoustic waves is investigated. An energy-like integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived. The solitary solutions are shown to undergo a transformation into cnoidal ones under some physical conditions. The dust size-distribution can significantly affect both lower and upper critical Mach numbers for both solitons and cnoidal solutions.

  4. Why Does Zipf's Law Break Down in Rank-Size Distribution of Cities?

    CERN Document Server

    Kuninaka, Hiroto

    2008-01-01

    We study rank-size distribution of cities in Japan on the basis of data analysis. From the census data after World War II, we find that the rank-size distribution of cities is composed of two parts, each of which has independent power exponent. In addition, the power exponent of the head part of the distribution changes in time and Zipf's law holds only in a restricted period. We show that Zipf's law broke down due to both of Showa and Heisei great mergers and recovered due to population growth in middle-sized cities after the great Showa merger.

  5. Scaling size distribution functions of heterogeneous clusters in a linear capture coefficient model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.; Berdnikov, Yu. S.; Sokolova, Zh. V.

    2015-03-01

    Balance equations of a model of irreversible heterogeneous growth at nucleation centers with linear (with respect to size) capture coefficients have been theoretically analyzed. It is shown that the exact solution of the problem can be expressed in terms of the Polya distribution. The distribution asymptotics at large sizes exactly satisfies the scaling hypothesis, which has been widely discussed in the literature for the last twenty years. The solution adequately reproduces the experimental size (length) distributions of linear chains of metallic In and Ga adatoms on a Si(100) surface.

  6. Source apportionment of ambient fine particle size distribution using positive matrix factorization in Erfurt, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Wei; Stölzel, Matthias; Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Heinrich, Joachim; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Peters, Annette; Wang, Sheng; Hopke, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Particle size distribution data collected between September 1997 and August 2001 in Erfurt, Germany were used to investigate the sources of ambient particulate matter by positive matrix factorization (PMF). A total of 29,313 hourly averaged particle size distribution measurements covering the size range of 0.01 to 3.0 ?m were included in the analysis. The particle number concentrations (cm?3) for the 9 channels in the ultrafine range, and mass concentrations (ng m?3) for the 41 size bins in t...

  7. Electron impact ionization of size selected hydrogen clusters (H2)N: ion fragment and neutral size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J Peter

    2008-05-21

    Clusters consisting of normal H2 molecules, produced in a free jet expansion, are size selected by diffraction from a transmission nanograting prior to electron impact ionization. For each neutral cluster (H2)(N) (N=2-40), the relative intensities of the ion fragments Hn+ are measured with a mass spectrometer. H3+ is found to be the most abundant fragment up to N=17. With a further increase in N, the abundances of H3+, H5+, H7+, and H9+ first increase and, after passing through a maximum, approach each other. At N=40, they are about the same and more than a factor of 2 and 3 larger than for H11+ and H13+, respectively. For a given neutral cluster size, the intensities of the ion fragments follow a Poisson distribution. The fragmentation probabilities are used to determine the neutral cluster size distribution produced in the expansion at a source temperature of 30.1 K and a source pressure of 1.50 bar. The distribution shows no clear evidence of a magic number N=13 as predicted by theory and found in experiments with pure para-H2 clusters. The ion fragment distributions are also used to extract information on the internal energy distribution of the H3+ ions produced in the reaction H2+ + H2-->H3+ +H, which is initiated upon ionization of the cluster. The internal energy is assumed to be rapidly equilibrated and to determine the number of molecules subsequently evaporated. The internal energy distribution found in this way is in good agreement with data obtained in an earlier independent merged beam scattering experiment. PMID:18500864

  8. Detailed modeling of soot size distribution evolution and pollutant formation inside aircraft and diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Chowdhury G.

    Combustion emission of soot and pollutant gas species contributes to poor regional air quality near emission sources and to climate change. It is important to understand the formation mechanism and time evolution of these pollutants inside the combustion engine, through detailed modeling of combustion chemistry and microphysics as well as comparison with observation. In this thesis, two multi-zone gas parcel combustion engine models, one for aircraft engines and another for diesel engines, have been developed to study soot size distribution evolution and pollutant formation inside the engines as well as emissions. The models take into account size-resolved (sectional) soot aerosol dynamics (nucleation, growth, and coagulation) and detailed combustion chemistry of jet and diesel fuel. For the aircraft engine, the model considers 362 chemical species, 2657 reversible reactions and 75 aerosol size bins. The model was applied to a CFM56-2-C1 aircraft engine for idle operating conditions. This is the first model to simulate soot size distribution evolution inside an aircraft engine (to our knowledge). The simulated values for major species are generally consistent with measurements. Model simulation shows that, for idle operating conditions, concentrations of most key combustion products don't change significantly in the post-combustor, however, HONO, H2SO4, and HO 2 concentrations change by more than a factor of 10. The sulfur oxidation efficiency (SOE), ([SO3]+[H2SO4])/([SO 2]+[SO3] +[H2SO4]), was found to be 2.1% at the engine exit. For the diesel engine, the multi-zone gas parcel model has been further enhanced by including fuel injection, droplet break-up, fuel evaporation and air entrainment rate. The model considers 283 chemical species, 2137 reversible reactions, and 75 aerosol size bins. The developed model calculates the time evolution of concentrations of these chemical species and soot size distributions inside a diesel engine. This is the first model to simulate soot size distribution evolution inside a diesel engine (to our knowledge). Model calculations are generally consistent with measurements. SOE was found to be 2% at end of the expansion stroke. The diesel engine emission model was used to study the effects of fuel sulfur content (FSC), relative humidity (RH) of intake air and fuel injection angle (FIA) on pollutant formation and emission as well as engine performances. The model simulation shows that FSC does not affect non-sulfur species, however, SO2 and SO3 increase linearly with increase in FSC. Simulation also shows that both higher RH and late injection (higher FIA) increase soot but decrease NOx. The model enables us to test the predictive capability of any existing or newly developed chemical kinetic mechanism of surrogate fuel and soot microphysics inside diesel engines.

  9. A Framework for the Generation and Dissemination of Drop Size Distribution (DSD) Characteristics Using Multiple Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David B.; Tokay, Ali; Petersen, Walt; Williams, Christopher; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    Proper characterization of the precipitation drop size distribution (DSD) is integral to providing realistic and accurate space- and ground-based precipitation retrievals. Current technology allows for the development of DSD products from a variety of platforms, including disdrometers, vertical profilers and dual-polarization radars. Up to now, however, the dissemination or availability of such products has been limited to individual sites and/or field campaigns, in a variety of formats, often using inconsistent algorithms for computing the integral DSD parameters, such as the median- and mass-weighted drop diameter, total number concentration, liquid water content, rain rate, etc. We propose to develop a framework for the generation and dissemination of DSD characteristic products using a unified structure, capable of handling the myriad collection of disdrometers, profilers, and dual-polarization radar data currently available and to be collected during several upcoming GPM Ground Validation field campaigns. This DSD super-structure paradigm is an adaptation of the radar super-structure developed for NASA s Radar Software Library (RSL) and RSL_in_IDL. The goal is to provide the DSD products in a well-documented format, most likely NetCDF, along with tools to ingest and analyze the products. In so doing, we can develop a robust archive of DSD products from multiple sites and platforms, which should greatly benefit the development and validation of precipitation retrieval algorithms for GPM and other precipitation missions. An outline of this proposed framework will be provided as well as a discussion of the algorithms used to calculate the DSD parameters.

  10. Undersampling power-law size distributions: effect on the assessment of extreme natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of undersampling on estimating the size of extreme natural hazards from historical data is examined. Tests using synthetic catalogs indicate that the tail of an empirical size distribution sampled from a pure Pareto probability distribution can range from having one-to-several unusually large events to appearing depleted, relative to the parent distribution. Both of these effects are artifacts caused by limited catalog length. It is more difficult to diagnose the artificially depleted empirical distributions, since one expects that a pure Pareto distribution is physically limited in some way. Using maximum likelihood methods and the method of moments, we estimate the power-law exponent and the corner size parameter of tapered Pareto distributions for several natural hazard examples: tsunamis, floods, and earthquakes. Each of these examples has varying catalog lengths and measurement thresholds, relative to the largest event sizes. In many cases where there are only several orders of magnitude between the measurement threshold and the largest events, joint two-parameter estimation techniques are necessary to account for estimation dependence between the power-law scaling exponent and the corner size parameter. Results indicate that whereas the corner size parameter of a tapered Pareto distribution can be estimated, its upper confidence bound cannot be determined and the estimate itself is often unstable with time. Correspondingly, one cannot statistically reject a pure Pareto null hypothesis using natural hazard catalog data. Although physical limits to the hazard source size and by attenuation mechanisms from source to site constrain the maximum hazard size, historical data alone often cannot reliably determine the corner size parameter. Probabilistic assessments incorporating theoretical constraints on source size and propagation effects are preferred over deterministic assessments of extreme natural hazards based on historic data.

  11. Cloud particle size distributions measured with an airborne digital in-line holographic instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Shaw

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Holographic data from the prototype airborne digital holographic instrument HOLODEC (Holographic Detector for Clouds, taken during test flights are digitally reconstructed to obtain the size (equivalent diameters in the range 23 to 1000 ?m, three-dimensional position, and two-dimensional image of ice particles and then ice particle size distributions and number densities are calculated using an automated algorithm with minimal user intervention. The holographic method offers the advantages of a well-defined sample volume size that is not dependent on particle size or airspeed, and offers a unique method of detecting shattered particles. The holographic method also allows the volume sample rate to be increased beyond that of the prototype HOLODEC instrument, limited solely by camera technology.

    HOLODEC size distributions taken in mixed-phase regions of cloud compare well to size distributions from a PMS FSSP probe also onboard the aircraft during the test flights. A conservative algorithm for detecting shattered particles utilizing their depth-position along the optical axis eliminates the obvious ice particle shattering events from the data set. In this particular case, the size distributions of non-shattered particles are reduced by approximately a factor of two for particles 15 to 70 ?m in equivalent diameter, compared to size distributions of all particles.

  12. Cloud particle size distributions measured with an airborne digital in-line holographic instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Fugal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Holographic data from the prototype airborne digital holographic instrument HOLODEC (Holographic Detector for Clouds, taken during test flights are digitally reconstructed to obtain the size (equivalent diameters in the range 23 to 1000 ?m, three-dimensional position, and two-dimensional profile of ice particles and then ice particle size distributions and number densities are calculated using an automated algorithm with minimal user intervention. The holographic method offers the advantages of a well-defined sample volume size that is not dependent on particle size or airspeed, and offers a unique method of detecting shattered particles. The holographic method also allows the volume sample rate to be increased beyond that of the prototype HOLODEC instrument, limited solely by camera technology.

    HOLODEC size distributions taken in mixed-phase regions of cloud compare well to size distributions from a PMS FSSP probe also onboard the aircraft during the test flights. A conservative algorithm for detecting shattered particles utilizing the particles depth-position along the optical axis eliminates the obvious ice particle shattering events from the data set. In this particular case, the size distributions of non-shattered particles are reduced by approximately a factor of two for particles 15 to 70 ?m in equivalent diameter, compared to size distributions of all particles.

  13. The effects of particle size distribution and induced unpinning during grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a second-phase particle size distribution on grain boundary pinning was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Simulations were run using a constant number density of both whisker and rhombohedral particles, and the effect of size distribution was studied by varying the standard deviation of the distribution around a constant mean particle size. The results of present simulations indicate that, in accordance with the stereological assumption of the topological pinning model, changes in distribution width had no effect on the pinned grain size. The effect of induced unpinning of particles on microstructure was also studied. In contrast to predictions of the topological pinning model, a power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size was observed at T=0.0. Based on this, a systematic deviation to the stereological predictions of the topological pinning model is observed. The results of simulations at higher temperatures indicate an increasing power law dependence of pinned grain size on particle size, with the slopes of the power law dependencies fitting an Arrhenius relation. The effect of induced unpinning of particles was also studied in order to obtain a correlation between particle/boundary concentration and equilibrium grain size. The results of simulations containing a constant number density of monosized rhombohedral particles suggest a strong power law correlation between the two parameters. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  14. Estimating Functions of Distributions Defined over Spaces of Unknown Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wolpert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider Bayesian estimation of information-theoretic quantities from data, using a Dirichlet prior. Acknowledging the uncertainty of the event space size m and the Dirichlet prior’s concentration parameter c, we treat both as random variables set by a hyperprior. We show that the associated hyperprior, P(c, m, obeys a simple “Irrelevance of Unseen Variables” (IUV desideratum iff P(c, m = P(cP(m. Thus, requiring IUV greatly reduces the number of degrees of freedom of the hyperprior. Some information-theoretic quantities can be expressed multiple ways, in terms of different event spaces, e.g., mutual information. With all hyperpriors (implicitly used in earlier work, different choices of this event space lead to different posterior expected values of these information-theoretic quantities. We show that there is no such dependence on the choice of event space for a hyperprior that obeys IUV. We also derive a result that allows us to exploit IUV to greatly simplify calculations, like the posterior expected mutual information or posterior expected multi-information. We also use computer experiments to favorably compare an IUV-based estimator of entropy to three alternative methods in common use. We end by discussing how seemingly innocuous changes to the formalization of an estimation problem can substantially affect the resultant estimates of posterior expectations.

  15. Rumen Contents and Ruminal Digesta Particle Size Distribution in Buffalo Steers Fed Three Different Size of Alfalfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Teimouri Yansari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of three sizes of alfalfa and time post-feeding on rumen contents and on particle size distribution of ruminal digesta. Three ruminally fistulated buffalo steers received a diet consisting just alfalfa that was harvested at 15% of flowering and chopped in three sizes. Individual small rectangular bales were chopped with a forage field harvester for theoretical cut length 19 and 10 mm for preparation of long and medium particle size, also the fine particles were prepared by milling. The geometric means and its standard deviation were 8.5, 5.5 and 2.5 mm; and 1.24, 1.16 and 1.06 mm, in coarse, medium and fine, respectively. The experimental design was a repeated 3×3 Latin squares with 21 day periods. The diets were offered twice daily at 09:00 and 21:00 h at ad libitum level. The rumens were evacuated manually at 3, 7.5 and 12h post-feeding and total ruminal contents separated into mat and bailable liquids. Dry matter weight distribution of total recovered particles was determined by a wet-sieving procedure and used to partition ruminal mat and bailable liquids among percentages of large (?4.0 mm, medium (<4.0mm and ?1.18 mm, and fine (<1.18 mm and ?0.05 mm particles. Intake did not influence markedly the distribution of different particle fractions, whereas particle size and time post-feeding had a pronounced effect. With increasing time after feeding, percentage of large and medium particles significantly decreased, whereas the percentage of fine particles significantly increased. The ruminal digesta particle distributions illustrated intensive particle breakdown in the reticulo-rumen for coarse particle more than others. Dry matter contents and the proportion of particulate dry matter in the rumen increased as intake increased, i.e. ruminal mat increased at the expense of bailable liquids. It can be concluded that reduction of forage particle size for buffaloes at maintenance level, influences the structure of rumen contents, ruminal mat formation and consistency, ruminal pH, the mass of ruminal escapable and non escapable dry matter pool size.

  16. Drop Size Distributions of Aerated Liquid Jets injected in Subsonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Adegboyega; Sallam, Khaled; Lin, Kuo-Cheng; Carter, Campbell

    2013-11-01

    An Experimental investigation of the breakup of aerated liquid jets in subsonic crossflow is described. Test conditions include crossflow Mach numbers of 0.3 and 0.6, Gas-to-liquid ratio of 0%, 4%, and 8%. Double pulsed digital holography was used to investigate the spray characteristics at downstream distances of 25, 50, and 100 jet diameters. The holograms are analyzed using image-processing algorithms to yield information about the drop sizes, drop velocities, and mass fluxes. Different drop size distributions are tested and compared including Rosin-Rammler distribution, log-normal distribution, and Simmons' universal root-normal distribution.

  17. Systematic Procedure for Generating Operational Policies to Achieve Target Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) in Batch Cooling Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gu?rkan; Gernaey, Krist; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    Batch cooling crystallization is one of the important unit operations involving separation of solid-liquid phases. Usually the most common crystal product qualities are directly related to the crystal size distribution (CSD). However the main difficulty in batch crystallization is to obtain a uniform and reproducible CSD. Therefore supersaturation control can be applied to drive the process within the metastable zone and thereby enhance the control of the CSD. Although this approach has been ...

  18. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  19. Calibration of the passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe for airborne determination of the size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work describes calibration methods for the particle sizing and particle concentration systems of the passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe (PCASP. Laboratory calibrations conducted over six years, in support of the deployment of a PCASP on a cloud physics research aircraft, are analyzed. Instead of using the many calibration sizes recommended by the PCASP manufacturer, a relationship between particle diameter and scattered light intensity is established using three sizes of mobility-selected polystyrene latex particles, one for each amplifier gain stage. In addition, studies of two factors influencing the PCASP's determination of the particle size distribution – amplifier baseline and particle shape – are conducted. It is shown that the PCASP-derived size distribution is sensitive to adjustments of the sizing system's baseline voltage, and that for aggregates of spheres, a PCASP-derived particle size and a sphere-equivalent particle size agree within uncertainty dictated by the PCASP's sizing resolution. Robust determinations of aerosol concentration, and size distribution, also require calibration of the PCASP's aerosol flowrate sensor. Sensor calibrations, calibration drift, and the sensor's non-linear response are documented.

  20. Calibration of the passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe for airborne determination of the size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work describes calibration methods for the particle sizing and particle concentration systems of the passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe (PCASP. Laboratory calibrations conducted over six years, in support of the deployment of a PCASP on a cloud physics research aircraft, are analyzed. Instead of using the many calibration sizes recommended by the PCASP manufacturer, a relationship between particle diameter and scattered light intensity is established using three sizes of mobility-selected polystyrene latex particles, one for each amplifier gain stage. In addition, studies of two factors influencing the PCASP's determination of the particle size distribution – amplifier baseline and particle shape – are conducted. It is shown that the PCASP-derived size distribution is sensitive to adjustments of the sizing system's baseline voltage, and that for aggregate spheres, a PCASP-derived particle size and a sphere-equivalent particle size agree within uncertainty dictated by the PCASP's sizing resolution. Robust determination of aerosol concentration, and size distribution, also require calibration of the PCASP's aerosol flowrate sensor. Sensor calibrations, calibration drift, and the sensor's non-linear response are documented.

  1. Quantitative analysis of crystal/grain sizes and their distributions in 2D and 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Putlitz, Benita

    2011-01-01

    We review methods to estimate the average crystal (grain) size and the crystal (grain) size distribution in solid rocks. Average grain sizes often provide the base for stress estimates or rheological calculations requiring the quantification of grain sizes in a rock’s microstructure. The primary data for grain size data are either 1D (i.e. line intercept methods), 2D (area analysis) or 3D (e.g., computed tomography, serial sectioning). These data have been used for different data treatments over...

  2. Snowflake Size Distribution Measurements in South Central Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokay, A.; Bringi, V. N.; Huang, G.; Schoenhuber, M.; Bashor, P. G.; Hudak, D.; Jackson, G. S.; Petersen, W. A.

    2007-05-01

    In support of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission ground validation program, NASA's two laser optical disdrometers (Parsivel) and Colodaro State University (CSU) two-dimensional video disdrometer (2dvd) were deployed to a well-equipped precipitation observation site in South Central Ontario, Canada. The instruments were collocated and have been operating since late November 2006. So far, there has been numerous lake effect and synoptic winter storms over the site. In one event, parsivel disdrometers recorded 50 cm of snowfall. In addition, there have been at least 10 storms where the snow accumulation exceeded 4 cm. The leading objective of this study was to compare the parsivel and 2dvd size and fall velocity measurements for selected cases and relate the findings to the physical processes within and below the cloud. Unlike 2dvd, parsivel measures the maximum dimension of the snowflake in a single plane, while the fall velocity is calculated from the duration of the flake within the laser beam. The 2dvd samples the same flake in two planes from which fall velocity is obtained. The 2dvd also measures the maximum width and height in both planes. At the time of this abstract, two parsivels and 2dvd were operated nearly continuously for almost three months and preliminary data analysis is encouraging. The field site, which is known as Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE), is an atmospheric research facility operated by the Air Quality Research Branch of the Meteorological Service of Canada and is located 80 km north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada in a rural agricultural and forested region. During the past three winters, a field campaign was conduced in support of Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO validation project (c3vp). However, 2006-07 winter was the first since the satellites were in orbit. The coordinated efforts of aircraft missions over the CARE facility during the Intensive Operation Periods will enhance our understanding of cold cloud microphysics.

  3. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined

  4. Lifestyle intervention improves lipoprotein particle size and distribution without weight-loss in obese Latino adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ryder, Justin R.; Vega-López, Sonia; Ortega, Rocio; Konopken, Yolanda; SHAIBI, GABRIEL Q.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a pro-atherogenic phenotype contributing to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This single-arm pilot study examined the effects of a lifestyle intervention on lipoprotein particle size and cholesterol distribution in obese Latino adolescents. Fifteen obese Latino adolescents (15.0±1.0 years) completed a 12-week nutrition education and exercise intervention. LDL particle size and distribution of cholesterol in lipoprotein subclasses were determine...

  5. Estimated variability of below-cloud aerosol removal by rainfall for observed aerosol size distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Andronache, C.

    2002-01-01

    Below-cloud scavenging (BCS) coefficients of aerosols by rainfall are estimated for reported aerosol size distributions measured during field experiments in various environments. The method employed is based on explicit calculations of the efficiency of collision between a raindrop and aerosol particles. Such BCS coefficients can be used in numerical models that describe: 1) the detailed evolution of aerosol size distribution and, 2) the evolution of total aerosol mass concentration. The...

  6. Components of the plasma membrane of growing axons. I. Size and distribution of intramembrane particles

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The plasmalemma of mature and growing olfactory axons of the bullfrog has been studied by freeze-fracture. Intramembrane particles (IMPs) of mature olfactory axons are found to be uniformly distributed along the shaft. However, during growth, a decreasing gradient of IMP density is evident along the somatofugal axis. The size histograms of axolemmal IMPs from different segments of growing nerve reveal regional differences in the particle composition. The distribution of each individual size c...

  7. Mass Size Distribution of Water Soluble Ions in Prague and Wiena in Summer

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol mass size distribution is a key factor that influences aerosol behavior both on local (health effects, visibility) and global (global warming) level. The content of water soluble ions is the most important factor controlling hygroscopic behavior of aerosol particles. Hygroscopicity is a substantial parameter for particle deposition in lungs, particle – cloud interactions, aerosol optical effects etc. Therefore we studied size distribution of water soluble ions in two Central Europea...

  8. Biomass size distributions as a tool for characterizing lake fish communities

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuw, J.J. van der; Nagelkerke, L.A.J.; Densen, W.L.T.; Holmgren, K; Jansen, P A

    2003-01-01

    Biomass size distributions (BSDs) can be useful tools to (1) summarize complex information about fish community structure in a condensed graphical form, facilitating the characterization of freshwater fish communities, (2) compare the position of fish communities along environmental gradients and (3) elucidate major trophic interactions in freshwater fish communities. Biomass size distributions are presented by taxonomic and trophic group, for a selection of fish communities from 35 Scandinav...

  9. The encapsulation of an amphiphile into polystyrene microspheres of narrow size distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Pellach Michal; Margel Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Encapsulation of compounds into nano- or microsized organic particles of narrow size distribution is of increasing importance in fields of advanced imaging and diagnostic techniques and drug delivery systems. The main technology currently used for encapsulation of molecules within uniform template particles while retaining their size distribution is based on particle swelling methodology, involving penetration of emulsion droplets into the particles. The swelling method, however, is ...

  10. FRACTAL SCALING OF PARTICLE AND PORE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND ITS RELATION TO SOIL HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BACCHI O.O.S.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractal scaling has been applied to soils, both for void and solid phases, as an approach to characterize the porous arrangement, attempting to relate particle-size distribution to soil water retention and soil water dynamic properties. One important point of such an analysis is the assumption that the void space geometry of soils reflects its solid phase geometry, taking into account that soil pores are lined by the full range of particles, and that their fractal dimension, which expresses their tortuosity, could be evaluated by the fractal scaling of particle-size distribution. Other authors already concluded that although fractal scaling plays an important role in soil water retention and porosity, particle-size distribution alone is not sufficient to evaluate the fractal structure of porosity. It is also recommended to examine the relationship between fractal properties of solids and of voids, and in some special cases, look for an equivalence of both fractal dimensions. In the present paper data of 42 soil samples were analyzed in order to compare fractal dimensions of pore-size distribution, evaluated by soil water retention curves (SWRC of soils, with fractal dimensions of soil particle-size distributions (PSD, taking the hydraulic conductivity as a standard variable for the comparison, due to its relation to tortuosity. A new procedure is proposed to evaluate the fractal dimension of pore-size distribution. Results indicate a better correlation between fractal dimensions of pore-size distribution and the hydraulic conductivity for this set of soils, showing that for most of the soils analyzed there is no equivalence of both fractal dimensions. For most of these soils the fractal dimension of particle-size distribution does not indicate properly the pore trace tortuosity. A better equivalence of both fractal dimensions was found for sandy soils.

  11. Determination of Pore Size Distribution at the Cell-Hydrogel Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Nowicki Marcin; Díaz-Cuenca Aránzazu; Dietrich-Braumann Ulf; Leal-Egaña Aldo; Bader Augustinus

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Analyses of the pore size distribution in 3D matrices such as the cell-hydrogel interface are very useful when studying changes and modifications produced as a result of cellular growth and proliferation within the matrix, as pore size distribution plays an important role in the signaling and microenvironment stimuli imparted to the cells. However, the majority of the methods for the assessment of the porosity in biomaterials are not suitable to give quantitative informati...

  12. Estimates of zooplankton abundance and size distribution with the Optical Plankton Counter (OPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Petersen, D.; Schnack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The capability of the Optical Plankton Count er (OPC) to examine the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton was tested in Storfjorden, Norway, in June 1993. Selected material obtained from net sampling was measured with a laboratory version of the OPC and compared with microscope analysis in order to identify main species in the in situ size frequency distributions obtained by the submersible version of the OPC. Differences in the particle concentration between shallow and deep water lay...

  13. A simple technique to determine the size distribution of nuclear crater fallback and ejecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of an investigation to find an economic method for determining the block size distribution of nuclear crater fallback and ejecta. It is shown that the modal analysis method of determining relative proportions can be applied with the use of a special sampling technique, to provide a size distribution curve for clastic materials similar to one obtainable by sieving and weighing the same materials

  14. A facile synthesis of Tenanoparticles with binary size distribution by green chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weidong; Krejci, Alex; Lin, Junhao; Osmulski, Max E.; Dickerson, James H.

    2011-04-01

    Our work reports a facile route to colloidal Tenanocrystals with binary uniform size distributions at room temperature. The binary-sized Tenanocrystals were well separated into two size regimes and assembled into films by electrophoretic deposition. The research provides a new platform for nanomaterials to be efficiently synthesized and manipulated.Our work reports a facile route to colloidal Tenanocrystals with binary uniform size distributions at room temperature. The binary-sized Tenanocrystals were well separated into two size regimes and assembled into films by electrophoretic deposition. The research provides a new platform for nanomaterials to be efficiently synthesized and manipulated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic procedures, FTIR analysis, ED pattern, AFM image, and EPD current curve. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10025d

  15. Transformation on steel products distribution in Poland and Slovakia

    OpenAIRE

    R. Stefko; B. Slusarczyk; S. Kot; C. Kolmasiak

    2012-01-01

    Steel industry is one of the most globalized branch, globalization has had the influence on iron ore supply, steel production and distribution as well. In last years, steel products distribution process has changed significantly, because of rising competitiveness due to common world market influence and main global players actions. The paper presents changes in steel products distribution in Poland and Slovakia focusing on main steel producers activity in distribution as well as distributors ...

  16. Demographic properties shape tree size distribution in a Malaysian rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Takashi S; Potts, Matthew D; Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Kassim, Abd Rahman; Ashton, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain how vertical and horizontal heterogeneity in light conditions enhances tree species coexistence in forest ecosystems. The foliage partitioning theory proposes that differentiation in vertical foliage distribution, caused by an interspecific variation in mortality-to-growth ratio, promotes stable coexistence. In contrast, successional niche theory posits that horizontal light heterogeneity, caused by gap dynamics, enhances species coexistence through an interspecific trade-off between growth rate and survival. To distinguish between these theories of species coexistence, we analyzed tree inventory data for 370 species from the 50-ha plot in Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia. We used community-wide Bayesian models to quantify size-dependent growth rate and mortality of every species. We compared the observed size distributions and the projected distributions from size-dependent demographic rates. We found that the observed size distributions were not simply correlated with the rate of population increase but were related to demographic properties such as size growth rate and mortality. Species with low relative abundance of juveniles in size distribution showed high growth rate and low mortality at small tree sizes and low per-capita recruitment rate. Overall, our findings were in accordance with those predicted by foliage partitioning theory. PMID:25674691

  17. Placement and Sizing of DG Using PSO&HBMO Algorithms in Radial Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.Taghikhani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Optimal placement and sizing of DG in distribution network is an optimization problem with continuous and discrete variables. Many researchers have used evolutionary methods for finding the optimal DG placement and sizing. This paper proposes a hybrid algorithm PSO&HBMO for optimal placement and sizing of distributed generation (DG in radial distri-bution system to minimize the total power loss and improve the voltage profile. The proposed method is tested on a standard 13 bus radial distribution system and simulation results carried out using MATLAB software. The simulation results indicate that PSO&HBMO method can obtain better results than the simple heuristic search method and PSO algorithm. The method has a potential to be a tool for identifying the best location and rating of a DG to be installed for improving voltage profile and line losses reduction in an electrical power system. Moreover, current reduction is obtained in distribution system.

  18. Multimodal size distributions of {gamma}' precipitates during continuous cooling of UDIMET 720 Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radis, R., E-mail: rene.radis@tugraz.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for ' Early Stages of Precipitation' , Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)] [Institute for Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Schaffer, M.; Albu, M.; Kothleitner, G.; Poelt, P. [Research Institute for Electron Microscopy, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Kozeschnik, E. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for ' Early Stages of Precipitation' , Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)] [Materials Center Leoben Forschung GmbH, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)] [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-11-15

    The technological properties of many nickel-based superalloys originate in the morphology and distribution of Ni{sub 3}(Al, Ti) particles ({gamma}' precipitates). Starting from the solution-annealed condition, the distribution and the morphology of {gamma}' precipitates are investigated experimentally during continuous cooling of the nickel-base superalloy UDIMET 720 Li. Characterization of the precipitates is carried out by scanning electron microscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy investigations. Depending on cooling rate, monomodal, bimodal and even trimodal size distributions are observed. The experimental observations of the size distributions are confirmed by numerical simulations of the {gamma}' precipitation kinetics. The theoretical background for occurrence of multimodal size distributions during continuous cooling is discussed.

  19. Effect of limestone particle size on egg production and eggshell quality of hens during late production

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    F.H. de, Witt; N.P., Kuleile; H.J., van der Merwe; M.D., Fair.

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the influence of different particle size limestone in layer diets on egg production and eggshell quality during the later stages of egg production (>54 weeks of age). Calcitic limestone (360 g Ca/kg), consisting of small ([...] 2.0 - 3.8 mm) particles were obtained from a specific South African source that is extensively used in poultry diets Isoenergetic (14.32 MJ AME/kg DM) and isonitrogenous (172.01 g CP/kg DM) diets with a dietary Ca content of 39.95 g Ca/kg DM were used. Sixty nine, individual caged Lohmann-Silver pullets, 17 weeks of age, were randomly allocated to the three treatments (n = 23) for the determination of various egg production and eggshell quality characteristics. Egg production and eggshell quality data recorded on individual basis at 54, 58, 64 and 70 weeks of age were pooled to calculate and statistical analysed parameter means for the late production period. Different limestone particle sizes had no effect on any of the tested egg production and eggshell quality parameters. These results suggested that larger particles limestone are not necessarily essential to provide sufficient Ca2+ to laying hens for egg production and eggshell quality at end-of-lay, provided that the dietary Ca content satisfies the requirements of the laying hen.

  20. Linking size and age at sexual maturation to body growth, productivity and recruitment of Atlantic cod stocks spanning the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, Fritz; Trippel, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual maturation patterns of 22 North Atlantic stocks of cod (Gadus morhua) were examined and related to geographical distribution area, ambient water temperature, growth and surplus production. Four patterns were identified, i.e. sexual maturation early in life at small size, early in life at large size, late in life at small size and lastly, late in life at large size. These maturation patterns were geographically clustered and associated with differences in growth and surplus production. Stocks maturing late in life at small size were characterised by slow growth and low surplus production (e.g. stocks in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador/Newfoundland). Stocks maturing early in life at large size exhibited high to intermediate growth and surplus production (e.g. Celtic Sea, North Sea). Stocks maturing late in life at large size had low to intermediate growth rates and surplus production (e.g. Iceland, North East Arctic), while stocks maturing early in life at small size generally showed intermediate growth and surplus production (e.g. Baltic stocks). Production of recruits per unit biomass showed a latitudinal trend, but appeared largely independent of maturation pattern, growth rate and surplus production. Recruit production of northernmost stocks was lowest and variability highest, mid-latitude stocks exhibited highest productivity and least variability, while stocks at the southern distribution range also showed low productivity. Thus, southern Gulf of St. Lawrence and eastern Scotian Shelf cod maturing late in life at small size with slow growth and low surplus production showed highest recruit production in the Western Atlantic, while the early maturing, fast growing and productive Icelandic and Faroese stocks showed the lowest recruitment production of all Eastern Atlantic stocks. This comparative analysis suggests that maturation patterns relate to growth potential and surplus production whereas annual production of recruits per unit biomass appears unrelated to average size at sexual maturation

  1. Fat globule size distribution in milk of a German buffalo herd

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, M; Swalve, H. H.; Schmidt, R.; R. Schafberg

    2010-01-01

    The volume-surface average diameter of fat globules are larger in buffalo milk than in cow milk and the volume frequency distribution in buffalo milk is more balanced. The globule size was affected by animal, stage of lactation, and test day. An interesting contrast compared to cow milk is the negative correlation between diurnal fat yield and globule size.

  2. Sample size calculation for differential expression analysis of RNA-seq data under Poisson distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chung-I; Su, Pei-Fang; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Sample size determination is an important issue in the experimental design of biomedical research. Because of the complexity of RNA-seq experiments, however, the field currently lacks a sample size method widely applicable to differential expression studies utilizing RNA-seq technology. In this report, we propose several methods for sample size calculation for single-gene differential expression analysis of RNA-seq data under Poisson distribution. These methods are then extended to multiple g...

  3. The Size Distribution of Chinese Manufacturing Firms: From the Perspective of Industry Life Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Yanying CHEN; WANG, LI; Gaofeng TIAN

    2012-01-01

    Using panel data of Chinese manufacturing firms between 2003 and 2008, this paper aims to examine the evolution of firm size distribution (FSD) as the industry goes through its life-cycle. The results reveal that during the life-cycle process, China’s manufacturing firms’ average size becomes larger then shrinks, and the degree of firm size heterogeneity and industry concentration increases all the time. Empirical results also indicate that the change rate of FSD is affected by firms’ net ent...

  4. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-Concentration Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (P0210), an extended-length Nanometer Differential Mobility Analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented.

  5. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-concentration Size Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a fast-response nanometer aerosol size analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 s. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (Po210), an extended-length nanometer differential mobility analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 s per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T-38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented below

  6. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, J. W.; Mahalingam, S.; Princevac, M.; Jung, H.

    2010-08-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern United States fuels with focus on chaparral. The combustion laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (USDA-FSL), Missoula, MT provided a repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for measurements. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing mass size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement 51-68% of particle mass was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 ?m for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most fuels produced a unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using the slopes in MCE (Modified Combustion Efficiency) vs. geometric mean diameter than only using MCE values.

  7. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hosseini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern United States fuels with focus on chaparral. The combustion laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (USDA-FSL, Missoula, MT provided a repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for measurements. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing mass size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement 51–68% of particle mass was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 ?m for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most fuels produced a unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering could be better distinguished using the slopes in MCE (Modified Combustion Efficiency vs. geometric mean diameter than only using MCE values.

  8. Image Analysis of Pellet Size for a Control System in Industrial Feed Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Frosch, Stina

    2011-01-01

    When producing aquaculture fish feed pellets, the size of the output product is of immense importance. As the production method cannot produce pellets of constant and uniform size using constant machine settings, there is a demand for size control. Fish fed with feed pellets of improper size are prone to not grow as expected, which is undesirable to the aquaculture industry. In this paper an image analysis method is proposed for automatic size-monitoring of pellets. This is called granulometr...

  9. Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles of narrow size distribution on polysaccharide templates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Nidhin; R Indumathy; K J Sreeram; Balachandran Unni Nair

    2008-02-01

    We report here the preparation of nanoparticles of iron oxide in the presence of polysaccharide templates. Interaction between iron (II) sulfate and template has been carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the selective and controlled removal of the template to achieve narrow distribution of particle size. Particles of iron oxide obtained have been characterized for their stability in solvent media, size, size distribution and crystallinity and found that when the negative value of the zeta potential increases, particle size decreases. A narrow particle size distribution with 100 = 275 nm was obtained with chitosan and starch templates. SEM measurements further confirm the particle size measurement. Diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectra values show that the template is completely removed from the final iron oxide particles and powder XRD measurements show that the peaks of the diffractogram are in agreement with the theoretical data of hematite. The salient observations of our study shows that there occurs a direct correlation between zeta potential, polydispersity index, bandgap energy and particle size. The crystallite size of the particles was found to be 30–35 nm. A large negative zeta potential was found to be advantageous for achieving lower particle sizes, owing to the particles remaining discrete without agglomeration.

  10. A POSSIBLE DIVOT IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE KUIPER BELT'S SCATTERING OBJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Via joint analysis of a calibrated telescopic survey, which found scattering Kuiper Belt objects, and models of their expected orbital distribution, we explore the scattering-object (SO) size distribution. Although for D > 100 km the number of objects quickly rise as diameters decrease, we find a relative lack of smaller objects, ruling out a single power law at greater than 99% confidence. After studying traditional ''knees'' in the size distribution, we explore other formulations and find that, surprisingly, our analysis is consistent with a very sudden decrease (a divot) in the number distribution as diameters decrease below 100 km, which then rises again as a power law. Motivated by other dynamically hot populations and the Centaurs, we argue for a divot size distribution where the number of smaller objects rises again as expected via collisional equilibrium. Extrapolation yields enough kilometer-scale SOs to supply the nearby Jupiter-family comets. Our interpretation is that this divot feature is a preserved relic of the size distribution made by planetesimal formation, now ''frozen in'' to portions of the Kuiper Belt sharing a ''hot'' orbital inclination distribution, explaining several puzzles in Kuiper Belt science. Additionally, we show that to match today's SO inclination distribution, the supply source that was scattered outward must have already been vertically heated to the of order 10°.

  11. Effects of pore-size and shape distributions on diffusion pore imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In medical imaging and porous media research, NMR diffusion measurements are extensively used to investigate the structure of diffusion restrictions such as cell membranes. Recently, several methods have been proposed to unambiguously determine the shape of arbitrary closed pores or cells filled with an NMR-visible medium by diffusion experiments. The first approach uses a combination of a long and a short diffusion-weighting gradient pulse, while the other techniques employ short gradient pulses only. While the eventual aim of these methods is to determine pore-size and shape distributions, the focus has been so far on identical pores. Thus, the aim of this work is to investigate the ability of these different methods to resolve pore-size and orientation distributions. Simulations were performed comparing the various pore imaging techniques employing different distributions of pore size and orientation and varying timing parameters. The long-narrow gradient profile is most advantageous to investigate pore distributions, because average pore images can be directly obtained. The short-gradient methods suppress larger pores or induce a considerable blurring. Moreover, pore-shape-specific artifacts occur; for example, the central part of a distribution of cylinders may be largely underestimated. Depending on the actual pore distribution, short-gradient methods may nonetheless yield good approximations of the average pore shape. Furthermore, the application of short-gradient methods can be advantageous to differentiate whether pore-size distributions or intensity distributions, e.g., due to surface relaxation, are predominant.

  12. Preparation and stability of rhenium [188Re] sulfide suspension with different particle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different dispersion methods were studied in order to obtain rhenium [188Re] sulfide suspension with different particle size distributions. The manufactured swirling device offers Suspension I with larger particles (55% > 5 ?m, 19% > 10 ?m). However, ultrasonication can only produce Suspension II with smaller particles (93% 10 ?m). Stability tests indicated that deposition appears after 6 and 15 minutes for Suspensions I and II, respectively. Radiochemical purity and particle size distribution did not change distinctively within 24 hours. So, both suspensions can be used in animal tests to find out the optimal particle size ranges for intra-articular injection. (author)

  13. Measurements of Particle Size Distribution Based on Mie Scattering Theory and Markov Chain Inversion Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Ye

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring particle size distribution through calculating light scattering intensity is a typical inverse problem. This paper builds an inverse mathematical model based on Mie scattering, deduces the inversion formulas for particle size, and calculates the relative coefficients through programming with built-in functions in MATLAB. In order to improve the accuracy and noise immunity of particle size distribution measurement, the development of stochastic inversion algorithm: an inverse problem model based on Markov chain algorithm is proposed. Results of numerical simulation are added acceptable noise indicate that the algorithm of Markov chain has strong noise immunity and can meet the requirements of on-line measurement.

  14. Detection of the Concentration and Size Distribution of Indoor Inhalable Particle Based on Mathematical Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Adopting the microscopic observation imaging and digital image processing technologies, this paper researches a new measuring method of indoor inhalable particulate matter concentration and size distribution .It realizes denoising, binarization, filtering and edge detection to based on mathematical morphology, regional filled and calibration detection to particulate matter image, designs the parameters recognition algorithm for particulate matter size, fractal dimension ,shape factors and so on, then calculates the concentration and size distribution of particulate matter using data fusion method. The experimental results show that the method has advantages with intuitive, high precision, fast processing speed ,easily data statistics, clearly data analysis and stable measuring results.

  15. Predicting Whole Forest Structure, Primary Productivity, and Biomass Density From Maximum Tree Size and Resource Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Kempes, Christopher P; Dooris, William; West, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01

    In the face of uncertain biological response to climate change and the many critiques concerning model complexity it is increasingly important to develop predictive mechanistic frameworks that capture the dominant features of ecological communities and their dependencies on environmental factors. This is particularly important for critical global processes such as biomass changes, carbon export, and biogenic climate feedback. Past efforts have successfully understood a broad spectrum of plant and community traits across a range of biological diversity and body size, including tree size distributions and maximum tree height, from mechanical, hydrodynamic, and resource constraints. Recently it was shown that global scaling relationships for net primary productivity are correlated with local meteorology and the overall biomass density within a forest. Along with previous efforts, this highlights the connection between widely observed allometric relationships and predictive ecology. An emerging goal of ecological...

  16. Relationships between the Raindrop Size Distribution and Properties of the Environment and Clouds Inferred from TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, Stephen Joseph; Kummerow, Christian; Elsaesser, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Variability in the raindrop sized distribution (DSD) has long been recognized as a source of uncertainty in relationships between radar reflectivity Z and rain rate R. In this study, we analyze DSD retrievals from two years of data gathered by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and processed with a combined radar-radiometer retrieval algorithm over the global oceans equatorward of 35?. Numerous variables describing properties of each reflectivity profile, large-scale organization, and the background environment are examined for relationships to the reflectivity-normalized median drop diameter, epsilonDSD. In general, we find that higher freezing levels and relative humidities are associated with smaller epsilonDSD. Within a given environment, the mesoscale organization of precipitation and the vertical profile of reflectivity are associated with DSD characteristics. In the tropics, the smallest epsilonDSD values are found in large but shallow convective systems, where warm rain formation processes are thought to be predominant, whereas larger sizes are found in the stratiform regions of organized deep convection. In the extratropics, the largest epsilonDSD values are found in the scattered convection that occurs when cold, dry continental air moves over the much warmer ocean after the passage of a cold front. The geographical distribution of the retrieved DSDs is consistent with many of the observed regional Z-R relationships found in the literature as well as discrepancies between the TRMM radar-only and radiometer-only precipitation products. In particular, mid-latitude and tropical regions near land tend to have larger drops for a given reflectivity, whereas the smallest drops are found in the eastern Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  17. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  18. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2011-11-01

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  19. Aerosol size distribution estimation and associated uncertainty for measurement with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquelin, L.; Fischer, N.; Motzkus, C.; Mace, T.; Gensdarmes, F.; Le Brusquet, L.; Fleury, G.

    2013-04-01

    Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) is a high resolution nanoparticle sizing system that has long been hailed as the researcher's choice for airborne nanoparticle size characterization for nano applications including nanotechnology research and development. SMPS is widely used as the standard method to measure airborne particle size distributions below 1 ?m. It is composed of two devices: a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) selects particle sizes thanks to their electrical mobility and a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) enlarges particles to make them detectable by common optical counters. System raw data represent the number of particles counted over several classes of mobility diameters. Then, common inversion procedures lead to the estimation of the aerosol size distribution. In this paper, we develop a methodology to compute the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the size distribution when several experiences have been carried out. The requirement to repeat the measure ensures a realistic variability on the simulated data to be generated. The work we present consists in considering both the uncertainties coming from the experimental dispersion and the uncertainties induced by the lack of knowledge on physical phenomena. Experimental dispersion is quantified with the experimental data while the lack of knowledge is modelled via the existing physical theories and the judgements of experts in the field of aerosol science. Thus, running Monte-Carlo simulations give an estimation of the size distribution and its corresponding confidence region.

  20. Aerosol size distribution estimation and associated uncertainty for measurement with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) is a high resolution nanoparticle sizing system that has long been hailed as the researcher's choice for airborne nanoparticle size characterization for nano applications including nanotechnology research and development. SMPS is widely used as the standard method to measure airborne particle size distributions below 1 ?m. It is composed of two devices: a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) selects particle sizes thanks to their electrical mobility and a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) enlarges particles to make them detectable by common optical counters. System raw data represent the number of particles counted over several classes of mobility diameters. Then, common inversion procedures lead to the estimation of the aerosol size distribution. In this paper, we develop a methodology to compute the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the size distribution when several experiences have been carried out. The requirement to repeat the measure ensures a realistic variability on the simulated data to be generated. The work we present consists in considering both the uncertainties coming from the experimental dispersion and the uncertainties induced by the lack of knowledge on physical phenomena. Experimental dispersion is quantified with the experimental data while the lack of knowledge is modelled via the existing physical theories and the judgements of experts in the field of aerosol science. Thus, running Monte-Carlo simulations give an estimation of the size distribution and its corresponding confidence region.

  1. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Kai-Biao [Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  2. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  3. Fission gas release during grain growth in a microstructure with a distribution of grain sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission gas diffusion from a microstructure with a distribution of grain sizes undergoing grain growth is analyzed. Hillert's theory is used to describe the evolution in grain morphology, during which some grains enlarge while others shrink and may even disappear. Limiting cases of Booth release (when only diffusion occurs) and Malen release (when grain-boundary sweeping is dominant) are derived for a body with a distribution of grain sizes. The moving boundary diffusion equation that couples the diffusion and sweeping mechanisms is derived. The grain-size distribution is divided into 25 groups for which the diffusion equations are solved numerically for the average intragranular gas concentration. The results are compared to existing single-grain-size models which, in all cases, overpredict the fractional release. Depletion of intragranular fission gas provides a source for migration via grain boundaries to the free surface. (orig.)

  4. Size distribution and waiting times for the avalanches of the Cell Network Model of Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Kun, Ferenc; Linero, Dorian L.; Muñoz, Jose D.

    2010-01-01

    The Cell Network Model is a fracture model recently introduced that resembles the microscopical structure and drying process of the parenchymatous tissue of the Bamboo Guadua angustifolia. The model exhibits a power-law distribution of avalanche sizes, with exponent -3.0 when the breaking thresholds are randomly distributed with uniform probability density. Hereby we show that the same exponent also holds when the breaking thresholds obey a broad set of Weibull distributions...

  5. Multi-Scale Particle Size Distributions of Mars, Moon and Itokawa based on a time-maturation dependent fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present the development of a soil evolution framework and multiscale modelling of the surface of Mars, Moon and Itokawa thus providing an atlas of extra-terrestrial Particle Size Distributions (PSD). These PSDs are profoundly based on a tailoring method which interconnects several datasets from different sites captured by the various missions. The final integrated product is then fully justified through a soil evolution analysis model mathematically constructed via fundamental physical principles (Charalambous, 2013). The construction of the PSD takes into account the macroscale fresh primary impacts and their products, the mesoscale distributions obtained by the in-situ data of surface missions (Golombek et al., 1997, 2012) and finally the microscopic scale distributions provided by Curiosity and Phoenix Lander (Pike, 2011). The distribution naturally extends at the magnitudinal scales at which current data does not exist due to the lack of scientific instruments capturing the populations at these data absent scales. The extension is based on the model distribution (Charalambous, 2013) which takes as parameters known values of material specific probabilities of fragmentation and grinding limits. Additionally, the establishment of a closed-form statistical distribution provides a quantitative description of the soil's structure. Consequently, reverse engineering of the model distribution allows the synthesis of soil that faithfully represents the particle population at the studied sites (Charalambous, 2011). Such representation essentially delivers a virtual soil environment to work with for numerous applications. A specific application demonstrated here will be the information that can directly be extracted for the successful drilling probability as a function of distance in an effort to aid the HP3 instrument of the 2016 Insight Mission to Mars. Pike, W. T., et al. "Quantification of the dry history of the Martian soil inferred from in situ microscopy." Geophysical Research Letters 38.24 (2011). C. A. Charalambous and W. T. Pike (2013). 'Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time' Abstract Submitted to the AGU 46th Fall Meeting. Charalambous, C., Pike, W. T., Goetz, W., Hecht, M. H., & Staufer, U. (2011, December). 'A Digital Martian Soil based on In-Situ Data.' In AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (Vol. 1, p. 1669). Golombek, M., & Rapp, D. (1997). 'Size-frequency distributions of rocks on Mars and Earth analog sites: Implications for future landed missions.' Journal of Geophysical Research, 102(E2), 4117-4129. Golombek, M., Huertas, A., Kipp, D., & Calef, F. (2012). 'Detection and characterization of rocks and rock size-frequency distributions at the final four Mars Science Laboratory landing sites.' Mars, 7, 1-22.

  6. Size distributions of aerosols produced from substitute materials by the Laskin cold DOP aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Test aerosols of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DOP) produced by Laskin nozzle aerosol generators are widely used for in-place filter testing and respirator fit testing. Concern for the health effects of this material has led to a search for substitute materials for test aerosols. Aerosols were generated with a Laskin generator and diluted 6000-fold with clean air. Size distributions were measured for DOP, di(2-ethylhexyl)sebecate, polyethylene glycol, mineral oil, and corn oil aerosols with a PMS ASAS-X optical particle counter. Distributions were slightly bimodal with count median diameters from 0.22 to 0.30 ?m. Size distributions varied little with aerosol material, operating pressure, or liquid level. Mineral oil and corn oil gave the best agreement with the DOP size distribution

  7. Size distribution of matter related to radionuclides released from Fukushima nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In relation to the Fukushima accident among March 24 to April 13, 2011 were performed consecutive aerosol samples for determination of specific activity depending on its size distribution. The extraction used three five-cascade impactors distributed within SURO Prague. Volume activity deposited on the collection of base liners and filters was determined by semiconductor gamma spectrometry. The obtained spectra were evaluated in terms of size distribution of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs, compared to control and were also provided for 7Be. The results were compared with data obtained in May and June 1986 after the Chernobyl disaster, when an average AMAD value of volatile radionuclides (which include 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) 0.5 ?m. The comparison shows that size distribution and the values of AMAD disaster at Chernobyl NPP and Fukushima NPP disaster were very similar.

  8. DOMAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF Y-TZP NANO-PARTICLES USING XRD AND HRTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Boulc'h

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Yttria doped nanocrystalline zirconia powder was prepared by spray-pyrolysis technique. Powder crystallized into tetragonal form, as dense and compositionally homogeneous polycrystalline spheres. X-Ray diffraction (XRD and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM have been used in order to characterize the mean size and the size distribution of crystalline domains. An average size of 6 nm was calculated by Scherrer formula from X-Ray diffraction pattern. The domain size, determined by analysis method developed by Hytch from HRTEM observations, ranges from 5 to 22 nm with a main population around the value 12 nm. Limits and complementary nature of XRD and HRTEM methods are discussed.

  9. On the behavior of mud floc size distribution: Model calibration and model behavior:

    OpenAIRE

    Mietta, F.; Chassagne, C; Verney, R.; Winterwerp, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study a population balance equation (PBE) where flocs are distributed into classes according to their mass. Each class i contains i primary particles with mass m p and size L p. All differently sized flocs can aggregate, binary breakup into two equally sized flocs is used, and the floc’s fractal dimension is d 0?=?2, independently of their size. The collision efficiency is kept constant, and the collision frequency derived by Saffman and Turner (J Fluid Mech 1:16–30, 1956) i...

  10. Seismic cycles, size of the largest events, and the avalanche size distribution in a model of seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Aragón, L E; Rosso, A

    2012-01-01

    We address several questions on the behavior of a numerical model recently introduced to study seismic phenomena, that includes relaxation in the plates as a key ingredient. We make an analysis of the scaling of the largest events with system size, and show that when parameters are appropriately interpreted, the typical size of the largest events scale as the system size, without the necessity to tune any parameter. Secondly, we show that the temporal activity in the model is inherently non-stationary, and obtain from here justification and support for the concept of a "seismic cycle" in the temporal evolution of seismic activity. Finally, we ask for the reasons that make the model display a realistic value of the decaying exponent $b$ in the Gutenberg-Richter law for the avalanche size distribution. We explain why relaxation induces a systematic increase of $b$ from its value $b\\simeq 0.4$ observed in the absence of relaxation. However, we have not been able to justify the actual robustness of the model in d...

  11. Relationships between annual plant productivity, nitrogen deposition and fire size in low-elevation California desert scrub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Leela E.; Matchett, John R.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Johnson, Robert F.; Minnich, Richard A.; Allen, Edith B.

    2014-01-01

    Although precipitation is correlated with fire size in desert ecosystems and is typically used as an indirect surrogate for fine fuel load, a direct link between fine fuel biomass and fire size has not been established. In addition, nitrogen (N) deposition can affect fire risk through its fertilisation effect on fine fuel production. In this study, we examine the relationships between fire size and precipitation, N deposition and biomass with emphasis on identifying biomass and N deposition thresholds associated with fire spreading across the landscape. We used a 28-year fire record of 582 burns from low-elevation desert scrub to evaluate the relationship of precipitation, N deposition and biomass with the distribution of fire sizes using quantile regression. We found that models using annual biomass have similar predictive ability to those using precipitation and N deposition at the lower to intermediate portions of the fire size distribution. No distinct biomass threshold was found, although within the 99th percentile of the distribution fire size increased with greater than 125 g m–2 of winter fine fuel production. The study did not produce an N deposition threshold, but did validate the value of 125 g m–2 of fine fuel for spread of fires.

  12. Comparison of crystal orientation mapping-based and image-based measurement of grain size and grain size distribution in a thin aluminum film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal orientation maps of a nanocrystalline Al film were obtained using precession electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. The orientation maps were then subjected to a series of well-defined clean-up procedures for removal of badly indexed points and pseudosymmetry boundaries. The mean grain size and grain size distribution were obtained from the reconstructed boundary network. The grain size and grain size distribution were also measured by the conventional transmission electron microscopy bright-field-imaging-based hand-tracing methodology, and were compared quantitatively with the orientation mapping results. It was found that the mean grain size from the two methodologies agree within experimental error. On the other hand, the orientation mapping methodology produced a somewhat different grain size distribution compared with the distribution obtained by the hand-tracing methodology. The reasons for the differences in the distributions are discussed

  13. The Determinants of Parental Effort in Education Production: Do Parents Respond to Changes in Class Size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesronning, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The present paper supplements the traditional class size literature by exploring the causal relationship between class size and parental effort in education production. Class size variation that is exogenous to parental effort comes from interaction between enrollment and a maximum class size rule of 30 students in the lower secondary school in…

  14. The ?-generalized distribution: A new descriptive model for the size distribution of incomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, F.; Di Matteo, T.; Gallegati, M.; Kaniadakis, G.

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes the ?-generalized distribution as a model for describing the distribution and dispersion of income within a population. Formulas for the shape, moments and standard tools for inequality measurement-such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini coefficient-are given. A method for parameter estimation is also discussed. The model is shown to fit extremely well the data on personal income distribution in Australia and in the United States.

  15. The k-generalized distribution: A new descriptive model for the size distribution of incomes

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, F; Gallegati, M; Kaniadakis, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes the k-generalized distribution as a model for describing the distribution and dispersion of income within a population. Formulas for the shape, moments and standard tools for inequality measurement - such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini coefficient - are given. A method for parameter estimation is also discussed. The model is shown to fit extremely well the data on personal income distribution in Australia and the United States.

  16. Inelasticity distribution and its implications for many particle production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inelasticity distribution is shown to affect in a decisive manner many particle production processes determining the correlation between transverse momenta and multiplicities. The effects on the energy dependence of and the multiplicity distributions are also studied. (orig.)

  17. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balden, M.; Endstrasser, N.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Rohde, V.; Rasinski, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Elgeti, S.; Neu, R.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-07-01

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007-2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ˜50?000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B-C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG.

  18. Collection strategy, inner morphology, and size distribution of dust particles in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dust collection and analysis strategy in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is described. During five consecutive operation campaigns (2007–2011), Si collectors were installed, which were supported by filtered vacuum sampling and collection with adhesive tapes in 2009. The outer and inner morphology (e.g. shape) and elemental composition of the collected particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The majority of the ?50?000 analysed particles on the Si collectors of campaign 2009 contain tungsten—the plasma-facing material in AUG—and show basically two different types of outer appearance: spheroids and irregularly shaped particles. By far most of the W-dominated spheroids consist of a solid W core, i.e. solidified W droplets. A part of these particles is coated with a low-Z material; a process that seems to happen presumably in the far scrape-off layer plasma. In addition, some conglomerates of B, C and W appear as spherical particles after their contact with plasma. By far most of the particles classified as B-, C- and W-dominated irregularly shaped particles consist of the same conglomerate with varying fraction of embedded W in the B–C matrix and some porosity, which can exceed 50%. The fragile structures of many conglomerates confirm the absence of intensive plasma contact. Both the ablation and mobilization of conglomerate material and the production of W droplets are proposed to be triggered by arcing. The size distribution of each dust particle class is best described by a log-normal distribution allowing an extrapolation of the dust volume and surface area. The maximum in this distribution is observed above the resolution limit of 0.28 µm only for the W-dominated spheroids, at around 1 µm. The amount of W-containing dust is extrapolated to be less than 300 mg on the horizontal areas of AUG. (paper)

  19. Supply of FDG : production and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim: To review the means of production of PET tracers and the logistIcs of their distribution, with special emphasis on 18 FDG - from an end-user point of view. Material and method: The experience of a satellite center (i.e. without in-house cyclotron) over one year. Results: The following topics are presented: Basic introduction to FDG and its radio-synthesis; properties of cyclotrons and linear accelerators; the economics of buying and running a cyclotron to produce FDG; satellite facilities (availability from radiopharmacies; fraction of FDG in the cost of running a PET center; recent developments in PET cameras, and their implications of FDG supply; diversification in the offer of commercial PET tracers; regulatory issues, and their influence on FDG supply; possible developments in onco-PET, neuro-PET, cardio-PET; generators and full PET Nuclear Medicine. Conclusion: The European experience is not necessarily completely applicable to a large country like South Africa; the question can be raised whether it is advisable to move the patients, the FDG or the camera around the country or its provinces. (author)

  20. The effect of particle size distribution on the usage of the ac susceptibility in biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutting, Joseph; Antony, Jiji; Meyer, Daniel; Sharma, Amit; Qiang, You

    2006-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in a liquid have two relaxation times, Néel relaxation ?N and Brownian relaxation ?B. For particle size larger than 25 nm, ?N quickly becomes much larger than ?B and can be ignored. ?B has a relaxation period from 10-1 to 10-5 s, and related to the particle's hydrodynamic volume, which includes coatings and biomolecules attached to the magnetic nanoparticle cores. This causes the imaginary part of the ac magnetic susceptibility to display a maximum at a frequency f=1/2??B, and can be used to create a sensor capable of detecting biomolecules. Because this is based on particle size, a size distribution will broaden the curve and reduce the sensitivity. Although the magnetic nanoparticles may have a narrow size distribution, this may not be true once coatings have been added and biomolecules have bonded to the magnetic cores. Our group has examined the effects of normal and lognormal size distributions on the ac magnetic susceptibility using several theoretical measurements, and we have found that the effect of size distributions on the ability to use ?B and the ac magnetic susceptibility as the basis of a biosensor is not significant.

  1. Research of CWS’ Particle Size Distribution based on Ultrasonic Attenuation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Weidong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available the key to reduce coal pollution is the development of clean coal technology and the improvement of the backward coal-burning technology. The coal water slurry (CWS is the first substitute of the oil. The particle size distribution of CWS plays an important role in the quality control of CWS. Now there are three methods that are used to analysis the particle size distribution of CWS, screening method, settlement method, laser method. These methods produce some disadvantages when be used to forecast the distribution of CWS. Thus, this article proposes an ultrasonic method with effective medium theory model which can be accurately reflected in the acoustic attenuation characteristics of coal-water slurry based on structural average. Experimental simulation proved that effective medium model is fully capable of achieving on-line detection of coal-water slurry particle size, for detection of fine-and coarse-sized particle size distribution. Non-linear relationship between attenuation and particle size, the three-frequency method can be used to inverse calculation of its. Which we can achieve CWS granularity on-line, and continuously control the quality of CWS.

  2. Size distribution of particles in Saturn's rings from aggregation and fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilliantov, Nikolai; Krapivsky, P L; Bodrova, Anna; Spahn, Frank; Hayakawa, Hisao; Stadnichuk, Vladimir; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's rings consist of a huge number of water ice particles, with a tiny addition of rocky material. They form a flat disk, as the result of an interplay of angular momentum conservation and the steady loss of energy in dissipative interparticle collisions. For particles in the size range from a few centimeters to a few meters, a power-law distribution of radii, ~r(-q) with q ? 3, has been inferred; for larger sizes, the distribution has a steep cutoff. It has been suggested that this size distribution may arise from a balance between aggregation and fragmentation of ring particles, yet neither the power-law dependence nor the upper size cutoff have been established on theoretical grounds. Here we propose a model for the particle size distribution that quantitatively explains the observations. In accordance with data, our model predicts the exponent q to be constrained to the interval 2.75 ? q ? 3.5. Also an exponential cutoff for larger particle sizes establishes naturally with the cutoff radius being set by the relative frequency of aggregating and disruptive collisions. This cutoff is much smaller than the typical scale of microstructures seen in Saturn's rings. PMID:26183228

  3. Remote sensing of water cloud droplet size distributions using the backscatter glory: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mayer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud single scattering properties are mainly determined by the effective radius of the droplet size distribution. There are only few exceptions where the shape of the size distribution affects the optical properties, in particular the rainbow and the glory directions of the scattering phase function. Using observations by the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI in 180° backscatter geometry, we found that high angular resolution aircraft observations of the glory provide unique new information which is not available from traditional remote sensing techniques: Using only one single wavelength, 753 nm, we were able to determine not only optical thickness and effective radius, but also the width of the size distribution at cloud top. Applying this novel technique to the ACE-2 CLOUDYCOLUMN experiment, we found that the size distributions were much narrower than usually assumed in radiation calculations which is in agreement with in-situ observations during this campaign. While the shape of the size distribution has only little relevance for the radiative properties of clouds, it is extremely important for understanding their formation and evolution.

  4. Aerosol Size Distribution Determined From Multiple Field-Of-View Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.; Uesugi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol size distribution is essential for its influence on atmosphere and human health, especially for small particles because they are able to penetrate lung tissues, thus increasing the risk of bronchitis or lung diseases. Lidar as an active optical remote sensing technique is effective for monitoring aerosols with high temporal and spatial variations. Particles with diameters comparable to the detecting light wavelength have been effectively detected by using UV, VIS, and near-IR wavelengths. However, to quantitatively estimate the shape of the particle size distribution, more information is required with respect to sub-micrometer and smaller particles. Conventional lidar employs tiny field-of-view (FOV) to detect single scatter reflected from aerosols in the direction opposite to incident light. However, the complicated reflection on the path of laser causes multiple scatter which contains also the size distribution information of aerosols. In this study, a UV Lidar with multiple FOV receiver was used for detecting such multiple scattering effects in order to obtain more quantitative information related to particle size distribution. The FOV of Lidar receiver was program controlled in a range from 0.1 mrad to 12.4 mrad. The pacific retrieval method for aerosol size distribution using this feature and field measurement results will be introduced in the presentation.

  5. Size-fractionated characterization and quantification of nanoparticle release rates from a consumer spray product containing engineered nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes methods developed for reliable quantification of size- and element-specific release of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) from consumer spray products. A modified glove box setup was designed to allow controlled spray experiments in a particle-minimized environment. Time dependence of the particle size distribution in a size range of 10-500 nm and ENP release rates were studied using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). In parallel, the aerosol was transferred to a size-calibrated electrostatic TEM sampler. The deposited particles were investigated using electron microscopy techniques in combination with image processing software. This approach enables the chemical and morphological characterization as well as quantification of released nanoparticles from a spray product. The differentiation of solid ENP from the released nano-sized droplets was achieved by applying a thermo-desorbing unit. After optimization, the setup was applied to investigate different spray situations using both pump and gas propellant spray dispensers for a commercially available water-based nano-silver spray. The pump spray situation showed no measurable nanoparticle release, whereas in the case of the gas spray, a significant release was observed. From the results it can be assumed that the homogeneously distributed ENP from the original dispersion grow in size and change morphology during and after the spray process but still exist as nanometer particles of size <100 nm. Furthermore, it seems that the release of ENP correlates with the generated aerosol droplet size distribution produced by the spray vessel type used. This is the first study presenting results concerning the release of ENP from spray products.

  6. Well-crystallized zinc oxide quantum dots with narrow size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, pulsed laser ablation, online annealing, and following size classification using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) were employed to fabricate quantum dots (QDs) of zinc oxide (ZnO). The irregularly shaped ZnO particles were obtained at annealing temperature less than 873 K, which gradually transformed into spherical QDs with increasing the annealing temperature. Finally, ZnO QDs with narrow size distribution having spherical shapes were successfully obtained at temperatures above 1173 K under the DMA classification at a nominal size of 10 nm. TEM observation demonstrated that the ZnO QDs obtained by this process were well-crystallized single crystallites with a wurtzite structure. Further, ZnO QDs with average sizes in the range of 4.8-8.1 nm were successfully fabricated by reducing the specified sizes of DMA. These features of the fabricated ZnO QDs are favorable for investigation of intrinsic quantum size effect in ZnO.

  7. The Effects of Grain Size and Temperature Distributions on the Formation of Interstellar Ice Mantles

    CERN Document Server

    Pauly, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    Computational models of interstellar gas-grain chemistry have historically adopted a single dust-grain size of 0.1 micron, assumed to be representative of the size distribution present in the interstellar medium. Here, we investigate the effects of a broad grain-size distribution on the chemistry on dust-grain surfaces and the subsequent build-up of molecular ices on the grains, using a three-phase gas-grain chemical model of a quiescent dark cloud. We include an explicit treatment of the grain temperatures, governed both by the visual extinction of the cloud and the size of each individual grain-size population. We find that the temperature difference plays a significant role in determining the total bulk ice composition across the grain-size distribution, while the effects of geometrical differences between size populations appear marginal. We also consider collapse from a diffuse to a dark cloud, allowing dust temperatures to fall. Under the initial diffuse conditions, small grains are too warm to promote ...

  8. Moessbauer and magnetic studies in nickel ferrite nanoparticles: Effect of size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in the form of powders, prepared by the sol-gel process and subjected to different annealing temperatures, were investigated using both static and dynamic measurements namely hysteresis, zero field cooled-field cooled magnetization (ZFC-FC) measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies reveal particle sizes ?2-8nm for the as-prepared particles which increases upto 52 nm with annealing. A bimodal distribution, upto an annealing temperature of 300oC was observed. ZFC-FC measurements for the as-prepared samples reveal twin peaks, indicative of the bimodal size distribution. ZFC-FC measurements performed for fields varying from 100 Oe to 3 kOe show a superparamagnetic phase with blocking temperatures between 320 and 85K. Numerical simulations for the ZFC-FC studies indicate that the signature of the bimodal size distribution can be seen only at very low fields. The variation of coercivity with particle size, as determined from the hysteresis measurements, shows a transition from a single domain to a multi domain state for particle sizes larger than 35 nm. Moessbauer measurements performed at room temperature for the as-prepared sample shows a six finger pattern for the samples with higher particle size and a doublet pattern for the samples with smaller particle size, which is indicative of their superparamagnetic nature.

  9. Moessbauer and magnetic studies in nickel ferrite nanoparticles: Effect of size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Rakesh [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Annapoorni, S., E-mail: annapoorni@physics.du.ac.i [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Lamba, Subhalakshmi [Indira Gandhi National Open University, Maidangarhi, Delhi 110 068 (India); Raghavendra Reddy, V.; Gupta, Ajay [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India); Sharma, Parmanand; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The magnetic properties of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in the form of powders, prepared by the sol-gel process and subjected to different annealing temperatures, were investigated using both static and dynamic measurements namely hysteresis, zero field cooled-field cooled magnetization (ZFC-FC) measurements and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies reveal particle sizes {approx}2-8nm for the as-prepared particles which increases upto 52 nm with annealing. A bimodal distribution, upto an annealing temperature of 300{sup o}C was observed. ZFC-FC measurements for the as-prepared samples reveal twin peaks, indicative of the bimodal size distribution. ZFC-FC measurements performed for fields varying from 100 Oe to 3 kOe show a superparamagnetic phase with blocking temperatures between 320 and 85K. Numerical simulations for the ZFC-FC studies indicate that the signature of the bimodal size distribution can be seen only at very low fields. The variation of coercivity with particle size, as determined from the hysteresis measurements, shows a transition from a single domain to a multi domain state for particle sizes larger than 35 nm. Moessbauer measurements performed at room temperature for the as-prepared sample shows a six finger pattern for the samples with higher particle size and a doublet pattern for the samples with smaller particle size, which is indicative of their superparamagnetic nature.

  10. Changes in concentration and size distribution of aerosols during fog over the south Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vimlesh Pant; C G Deshpande; A K Kamra

    2010-08-01

    Measurements of the concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles in the size-ranges of 0.5–20 m and 16–700 nm diameters were made during six fog episodes over the south Indian Ocean. Observations show that concentrations of particles of all sizes start decreasing 1–2 hours before the occurrence of fog. This decrease is more prominent for coarse particles of < 1 m diameter and continues until 10–20 minutes before the onset of fog when particle concentrations in all size ranges rapidly increase by one/two orders of magnitude in ?20 minutes. Thereafter, concentrations of particles of all sizes gradually decrease until the dissipation of fog. After the fog dissipation, concentrations of coarse mode particles rapidly increase and restore to their pre-fog levels but concentrations of the Aitken mode particles decrease slowly and reach their pre-fog levels only after 1–2 hours. The net effect of fog is to change the bimodal size distributions of aerosols with a coarse mode at 1.0 m and an accumulation mode at 40–60 nm to a power law size distribution. It is proposed that the preferential growth and sedimentation of the coarse mode hygroscopic particles in the initial phase cause a large decrease in the aerosol surface area. As a result, the low vapour pressure gases which were initially being used for the growth of coarse mode particles, now accelerate the growth rates of the accumulation and Aitken mode particles.

  11. Multimodal particle size distributions emitted from HFA-134a solution pressurized metered-dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Hugh D C; Hickey, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the measurement and in vitro delivery implications of multimodal distributions, occurring near or in the respirable range, emitted from pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs). Particle size distributions of solution pMDIs containing hydrofluoroalkane-134a (HFA-134a) and ethanol were evaluated using 2 complementary particle-sizing methods: laser diffraction (LD) and cascade impaction (CI). Solution pMDIs were formulated from mixtures of HFA-134a (50%-97.5% wt/wt) and ethanol. A range of propellant concentrations was selected for a range of vapor pressures. The fluorescent probe, Rhodamine B, was included for chemical analysis. The complementary nature of LD and CI allowed identification of 2 dominant particle size modes at 1 and 10 micro m or greater. Increasing propellant concentrations resulted in increases in the proportion of the size distributions at the 1- micro m mode and also reduced the particle size of the larger droplet population. Despite significant spatial differences and time scales of measurement between the particle-sizing techniques, the fine particle fractions obtained from LD and CI were practically identical. This was consistent with LD experiments, which showed that particle sizes did not decrease with increasing measurement distance, and may be explained by the absence of significant evaporation/disintegration of larger droplets. The fine particle fractions (FPFs) emitted from HFA-134a/ethanol solution pMDI can be predicted on the basis of formulation parameters and is independent of measurement technique. These results highlight the importance of presenting particle size distribution data from complementary particle size techniques. PMID:14621970

  12. Size and composition distribution of fine particulate matter emitted from wood burning, meat charbroiling, and cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dilution source sampling system is augmented to measure the size-distributed chemical composition of fine particle emissions from air pollution sources. Measurements are made using a laser optical particle counter (OPC), a differential mobility analyzer/condensation nucleus counter (DMA/CNC) combination, and a pair of microorifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs). The sources tested with this system include wood smoke (pine, oak, eucalyptus), meat charbroiling, and cigarettes. The particle mass distributions from all wood smoke sources have a single mode that peaks at approximately 0.1--0.2 microm particle diameter. The smoke from meat charbroiling shows a major peak in the particle mass distribution at 0.1--0.2 microm particle diameter, with some material present at larger particle sizes. Particle mass distributions from cigarettes peak between 0.3 and 0.4 microm particle diameter. Chemical composition analysis reveals that particles emitted from the sources tested here are largely composed of organic compounds. Noticeable concentrations of elemental carbon are found in the particles emitted from wood burning. The size distributions of the trace species emissions from these sources also are presented, including data for Na, K, Ti, Fe, Br, Ru, Cl, Al, Zn, Ba, Sr, V, Mn, Sb, La, Ce, as well as sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion when present in statistically significant amounts. These data are intended for use with air quality models that seek to predict the size distribution of the chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles

  13. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Ammonium Sulphate Dried in a Rotary Dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susianto Susianto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study theoretically, by mathematical model development, the effect of particle size distribution on the performance of rotary dryer to dry ammonium sulphate fertilizer assuming plug flow with axial dispersion pattern (PFDA model for solid particle flow. The mathematical model development was carried out by combining the drying processes model with particle size distribution model. Particle size distribution models used are Rosin-Rommler model and Gamma distribution model. For simplicity, the model of drying processes of solid particles in the rotary dryer was developed by assuming of uniform air conditions (temperature and humidity along the rotary dryer as in the entry conditions. The resulting differential equations were solved analytically under Matlab 6.1 facility.Since this model, solid hold up, and axial dispersion number were obtained from empirical correlations in the literatures. The drying rate of ammonium sulphate fertilizer in rotary dryer was estimated using isothermal diffusion model with effective diffusivity of moisture in the particle obtained from previous study [2]. Using Gamma function distribution, this research showed that for the value of the coefficient of variance (CV less than 0.5, particle size distribution does not have significant effect on dryer performance. For the value of CV greater than 0.5, the dryer performance increase (or outlet solid moisture content decrease with increasing the value of CV. The application of Rosin-Rammler model gives lower prediction of outlet solid moisture content compared to the application of Gamma function model.

  14. Micro-Sized Particle Production of Momordicas sp Extract Using Spray Dryer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizirwan Mel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Spray drying is the most widely used industrial process involving particle formation and drying. It is highly suited for the continuous production of dry solids in either powder, granulate or agglomerate form from liquid feed-stocks as solutions, emulsions and pump able suspensions. Therefore, spray drying is an ideal process where the end-product must comply with precise quality standards regarding particle size distribution, residual moisture content, bulk density, and particle shape. In this study, Momordica sp extract product has been successfully spray dried into micro scale of powder particle and will be used as plant-based insulin. The process optimized using Taguchi method with four factors and three levels has given a good quality of the product. The average of particle size was obtained at about 11 microns.ABSTRAK: Kering sembur digunakan secara meluas dalam proses industri yang melibatkan pembentukan zarah dan pengeringan. Ia amat sesuai dalam penghasilan pepejal kering secara beterusan dalam bentuk serbuk, butiran atau gumpalan daripada simpanan suapan bendalir sebagai larutan, emulsi dan ampaian boleh dipam. Maka, kering sembur adalah proses yang ideal apabila hasil akhir harus mematuhi piawaian kualiti yang tepat berkaitan dengan pengagihan saiz zarah, kandungan kelengsaan sisa, ketumpatan pukal dan bentuk zarah. Dalam kajian ini, produk ekstrak Momordica sp (dikenali juga sebagai peria katak telah berjaya dikering sembur menjadi serbuk zarah berskala mikro dan akan digunakan sebagai insulin berasaskan tumbuhan. Proses ini dioptimumkan dengan pengunaan kaedah Taguchi empat faktor dan tiga peringkat, agar memberikan hasil produk yang berkualiti. Kadar purata saiz zarah yang terhasil adalah lebih kurang 11 mikron.KEY WORDS: micro-sized, particle, Momordica sp, spray dryer.

  15. The exact solution of the asymmetric exclusion problem with particles of asrbitrary size: matrix product ansatz

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Francisco C., Alcaraz; Matheus J., Lazo.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The exact solution of the asymmetric exclusion problem and several of its generalizations is obtained by a matrix product ansatz. Due to the similarity of the master equation and the Schrodinger equation at imaginary times the solution of these problems reduces to the diagonalization of a one dimens [...] ional quantum Hamiltonian. Initially, we present the solution of the problem when an arbitrary mixture of molecules, each of then having an arbitrary size (s = 0; 1; 2; ...) in units of lattice spacing, diffuses asymmetrically on the lattice. The solution of the more general problem where we have the diffusion of particles belonging to N distinct classes of particles (c = 1; ... ; N), with hierarchical order and arbitrary sizes, is also presented. Our matrix product ansatz asserts that the amplitudes of an arbitrary eigenfunction of the associated quantum Hamiltonian can be expressed by a product of matrices. The algebraic properties of the matrices defining the ansatz depend on the particular associated Hamiltonian. The absence of contradictions in the algebraic relations defining the algebra ensures the exact integrability of the model. In the case of particles distributed in N > 2 classes, the associativity of this algebra implies the Yang-Baxter relations of the exact integrable model.

  16. Prediction of size distribution of Ag nanoparticles synthesized via gamma-ray radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jia-liang; Shen, Sheng-wen; Ye, Sheng-ying; Ye, Lü-meng

    2015-09-01

    The spherical shape Ag nanoparticles synthesized via gamma-ray radiolysis were observed with the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Diameters of Ag nanoparticles were measured from the TEM photographs. Statistical analysis showed that the particle diameter complied with a linear-converted Poisson distribution. The distribution parameter, which was the average of diameters, was related to the ultraviolet-visible spectrum peak position of the nanosilver collosol. An empirical equation was established to predicting size distribution of Ag nanoparticles with the peak position. Nanosilver of different sizes could be synthesized by adjusting the intensity of ?-irradiation, the kind and the addition amount of the stabilizing agent. Because particle size affects the physiochemical properties of nanosilver material, results of this paper would be of practical significance for the application of nanosilver.

  17. Increasing Returns to Scale, Dynamics of Industrial Structure and Size Distribution of Firms

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y; Di, Z; Fan, Ying; Li, Menghui; Di, Zengru

    2004-01-01

    A model is presented of the market dynamics to emphasis the effects of increasing returns to scale, including the description of the born and death of the adaptive producers. The evolution of market structure and its behavior with the technological shocks are discussed. Its dynamics is in good agreement with some empirical stylized facts of industrial evolution. Together with the diversities of demand and adaptive growth strategies of firms, the generalized model has reproduced the power-law distribution of firm size. Three factors mainly determine the competitive dynamics and the skewed size distributions of firms: 1. Self-reinforcing mechanism; 2. Adaptive firm grows strategies; 3. Demand diversities or widespread heterogeneity in the technological capabilities of different firms. Key words: Econophysics, Increasing returns, Industry dynamics, Size distribution of firms

  18. Particle size distribution of halogenated flame retardants and implications for atmospheric deposition and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonski, Krzysztof; Degrendele, Céline; Melymuk, Lisa; Landlová, Linda; Kuku?ka, Petr; Vojta, Šimon; Kohoutek, Ji?í; ?upr, Pavel; Klánová, Jana

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates the distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and a group of novel flame retardants (NFRs) on atmospheric aerosols. Two high volume cascade impactors were used to collect particulate fractions of ambient air over a one year period at urban and rural sites. The majority of FRs were found on the finest aerosols (Dechlorane Plus) distributed more uniformly across all particulate size fractions. The seasonal, spatial, and compound-specific differences are of crucial importance when estimating dry and wet deposition of FRs as smaller aerosols have longer atmospheric residence times. Estimated wet and dry deposition of four representative FRs (BDE-47, BDE-209, HBCD, and Dechlorane Plus) using size-segregated aerosol data resulted in lower deposition estimates than when bulk aerosol data were used. This has implications for estimates of long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric residence times, as it suggests that without size-specific distributions, these parameters could be underestimated for FRs. PMID:25380095

  19. Methodology for measuring exhaust aerosol size distributions using an engine test under transient operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the sources of variability in the measurement of particle size distribution using a two-stage dilution system and an engine exhaust particle sizer was conducted to obtain a comprehensive and repeatable methodology that can be used to measure the particle size distribution of aerosols emitted by a light-duty diesel engine under transient operating conditions. The paper includes three experimental phases: an experimental validation of the measurement method; an evaluation of the influence of sampling factors, such as dilution system pre-conditioning; and a study of the effects of the dilution conditions, such as the dilution ratio and the dilution air temperature. An examination of the type and degree of influence of each studied factor is presented, recommendations for reducing variability are given and critical parameter values are identified to develop a highly reliable measurement methodology that could be applied to further studies on the effect of engine operating parameters on exhaust particle size distributions

  20. Numerical Model to Predict Wax Crystal Size Distribution in Solvent Dewaxing Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassir D. Mokhlif

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model was implemented to predict the wax crystal size distribution of distillate lube oil SN500. The model solved the coupled equations for the heat transfer and moments of the population balance numerically. The predicted temperatures and wax crystal size distributions were validated with actual unit database and experimental measurements. The kinetics of the wax crystallization considered only the nucleation and crystal growth. N-alkanes from n-C22 to n-C36 were tested to select compound for representation of the wax fraction. The nucleation process order constant was fitted from wax recovery experimental measurements. The developed numerical model was proved to be capable to predict wax crystal size distribution in real solvent dewaxing plant. The model results were found to be in good agreement with the process data

  1. Size-frequency distribution of boulders ?7 m on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajola, Maurizio; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Güttler, Carsten; Lee, Jui-Chi; Bertini, Ivano; Massironi, Matteo; Simioni, Emanuele; Marzari, Francesco; Giacomini, Lorenza; Lucchetti, Alice; Barbieri, Cesare; Cremonese, Gabriele; Naletto, Giampiero; Pommerol, Antoine; El-Maarry, Mohamed R.; Besse, Sébastien; Küppers, Michael; La Forgia, Fiorangela; Lazzarin, Monica; Thomas, Nicholas; Auger, Anne-Thérèse; Sierks, Holger; Lamy, Philippe; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst U.; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Barucci, Maria A.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; De Cecco, Mariolino; Debei, Stefano; Ferri, Francesca; Fornasier, Sonia; Fulle, Marco; Groussin, Olivier; Gutierrez, Pedro J.; Hviid, Stubbe F.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kramm, J.-Rainer; Kürt, Ekkehard; Lara, Luisa M.; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lopez Moreno, Jose J.; Magrin, Sara; Marchi, Simone; Michalik, Harald; Moissl, Richard; Mottola, Stefano; Oklay, Nilda; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Tubiana, Cecilia

    2015-11-01

    Aims: We derive for the first time the size-frequency distribution of boulders on a comet, 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P), computed from the images taken by the Rosetta/OSIRIS imaging system. We highlight the possible physical processes that lead to these boulder size distributions. Methods: We used images acquired by the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera, NAC, on 5 and 6 August 2014. The scale of these images (2.44-2.03 m/px) is such that boulders ?7 m can be identified and manually extracted from the datasets with the software ArcGIS. We derived both global and localized size-frequency distributions. The three-pixel sampling detection, coupled with the favorable shadowing of the surface (observation phase angle ranging from 48° to 53°), enables unequivocally detecting boulders scattered all over the illuminated side of 67P. Results: We identify 3546 boulders larger than 7 m on the imaged surface (36.4 km2), with a global number density of nearly 100/km2 and a cumulative size-frequency distribution represented by a power-law with index of -3.6 +0.2/-0.3. The two lobes of 67P appear to have slightly different distributions, with an index of -3.5 +0.2/-0.3 for the main lobe (body) and -4.0 +0.3/-0.2 for the small lobe (head). The steeper distribution of the small lobe might be due to a more pervasive fracturing. The difference of the distribution for the connecting region (neck) is much more significant, with an index value of -2.2 +0.2/-0.2. We propose that the boulder field located in the neck area is the result of blocks falling from the contiguous Hathor cliff. The lower slope of the size-frequency distribution we see today in the neck area might be due to the concurrent processes acting on the smallest boulders, such as i) disintegration or fragmentation and vanishing through sublimation; ii) uplifting by gas drag and consequent redistribution; and iii) burial beneath a debris blanket. We also derived the cumulative size-frequency distribution per km2 of localized areas on 67P. By comparing the cumulative size-frequency distributions of similar geomorphological settings, we derived similar power-law index values. This suggests that despite the selected locations on different and often opposite sides of the comet, similar sublimation or activity processes, pit formation or collapses, as well as thermal stresses or fracturing events occurred on multiple areas of the comet, shaping its surface into the appearance we see today.

  2. Size and DNA distributions of electrophoretically separated cultured human kidney cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic purification of purifying cultured cells according to function presumes that the size of cycle phase of a cell is not an overriding determinant of its electrophoretic velocity in an electrophoretic separator. The size distributions and DNA distributions of fractions of cells purified by density gradient electrophoresis were determined. No systematic dependence of electrophoretic migration upward in a density gradient column upon either size or DNA content were found. It was found that human leukemia cell populations, which are more uniform function and found in all phases of the cell cycle during exponential growth, separated on a vertical sensity gradient electrophoresis column according to their size, which is shown to be strictly cell cycle dependent.

  3. A model for the size distribution of shops in a price driven market

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hulst, R

    2000-01-01

    A microscopic model is introduced to investigate the size distribution of shops. In the model, shops are constrained to comply with the market price, as expected by the customers, while customers can only buy at the prices offered by the shops. We show numerically and analytically that the size distribution scales like a power-law, with an exponent in agreement with empirical data on company sizes in the U.S. and debt sizes in Japan. A mean-field version of our model is also introduced and we determine for which value of the parameters the mean-field model agrees with both the microscopic model and the empirical data. Finally, possible extensions of the mean-field model are discussed, to cope with other empirical data.

  4. Evaluation of Morphology and Size Distribution of Silicon and Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles Generated by Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanometer-sized particles of silicon and titanium oxide were generated by irradiating solid targets using a nanosecond pulsed-Nd : YAG laser in a low pressure atmosphere. A low pressure differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA) was used to classify the size of the generated particles. The LP-DMA and electron microscopes (SEM and TEM) were used to measure the change in the size distribution and morphology of the generated particles with laser power density and system pressure. The size distribution of both silicon and titanium oxide ranged from two to one hundred nanometers in diameter depending on the laser power density and pressure. From the high resolution TEM observation and electron diffraction, it was found that the generated titanium oxide nanoparticles were composed of a 'core' of faceted metallic single crystals with an oxide layer 'shell'

  5. Controls on the evolving grain size distribution of ash in explosive eruptions and feedback in vent proximal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The dispersal range of eruptive products and types of hazards they present is determined in large part by the volume and size fraction of particles that exit the volcanic vent and how this grain size distribution changes during transport. This talk will examine the physical processes that modify the grain size distribution of particles across a spectrum of energies due to eruptive processes from the conduit, multiphase interaction in the plume, and due to microscale aggregation of ash. The size distribution of volcanic particles has widely been interpreted to be associated with the initial fragmentation process, where particle size has been attributed to fragmentation style and efficiency. Here we evaluate the likelihood that pumice particles survive intact the high-energy environment of the volcanic conduit from the point of initial fragmentation to ejection into the atmosphere. We show that the probability of particles surviving intact is strongly controlled by the particles initial size and the depth of the fragmentation level, with large particles and deep fragmentation producing the most disruption events. The consequence of numerous high-energy collisions results in a more homogeneous, fine-grained mixture of particles leaving the volcanic vent for volcanoes with deep fragmentation levels. These fine particles are well coupled to the magmatic gases exiting the vent, can reduce their sound speed and influence the ability of the mixture to entrain ambient air, thus influencing eruptive style. After exiting the volcanic vent, ash is subject to a range of microphysical processes such adsorption of water and aggregation. After briefly reviewing recent experimental advances in ash microphysical phenomena we will illustrate how these processes can influence near vent dynamics by incorporating these microphysical experimental results into a high resolution Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model. We will particularly focus on the dual roles of aggregation and sorting of ash in large-scale turbulent features on the overall budget of ash that reaches the upper atmosphere.

  6. The uniqueness of company size distribution function from tent-shaped growth rate distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Atushi

    2007-01-01

    We report the proof that the extension of Gibrat's law in the middle scale region is unique and the probability distribution function (pdf) is also uniquely derived from the extended Gibrat's law and the law of detailed balance. In the proof, two approximations are employed. The pdf of growth rate is described as tent-shaped exponential functions and the value of the origin of the growth rate distribution is constant. These approximations are confirmed in profits data of Jap...

  7. Receptor modelling of both particle composition and size distribution from a background site in London, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. S. Beddows

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF analysis was applied to PM10 chemical composition and particle Number Size Distribution (NSD data measured at an urban background site (North Kensington in London, UK for the whole of 2011 and 2012. The PMF analyses revealed six and four factors respectively which described seven sources or aerosol types. These included Nucleation, Traffic, Diffuse Urban, Secondary, Fuel Oil, Marine and Non-Exhaust/Crustal sources. Diffuse Urban, Secondary and Traffic sources were identified by both the chemical composition and particle number size distribution analysis, but a Nucleation source was identified only from the particle Number Size Distribution dataset. Analysis of the PM10 chemical composition dataset revealed Fuel Oil, Marine, Non-Exhaust Traffic/Crustal sources which were not identified from the number size distribution data. The two methods appear to be complementary, as the analysis of the PM10 chemical composition data is able to distinguish components contributing largely to particle mass whereas the number particle size distribution dataset is more effective for identifying components making an appreciable contribution to particle number. Analysis was also conducted on the combined chemical composition and number size distribution dataset revealing five factors representing Diffuse Urban, Nucleation, Secondary, Aged Marine and Traffic sources. However, the combined analysis appears not to offer any additional power to discriminate sources above that of the aggregate of the two separate PMF analyses. Day-of-the-week and month-of-the-year associations of the factors proved consistent with their assignment to source categories, and bivariate polar plots which examined the wind directional and wind speed association of the different factors also proved highly consistent with their inferred sources.

  8. Size distribution and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles from dry-season biomass burning in Amazonia

    OpenAIRE

    Rissler, J; Vestin, A.; Swietlicki, E; Fisch, G.; Zhou, J.; Artaxo, P; Andreae, M. O.

    2005-01-01

    Aerosol particle number size distributions and hygroscopic properties were measured at a pasture site in the southwestern Amazon region (Rondonia). The measurements were performed 11 September-14 November 2002 as part of LBA-SMOCC (Large scale Biosphere atmosphere experiment in Amazonia - SMOke aerosols, Clouds, rainfall and Climate), and cover the later part of the dry season (with heavy biomass burning), a transition period, and the onset of the wet period. Particle number size distributio...

  9. Explaining National Differences in the Size and Industrial Distribution of Employment

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Steven J.; Henrekson, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    What factors determine national differences in the size and industry distribution of employment? This study stresses the role of business taxation, employment security laws, credit market policies, wage-setting institutions and the size of the public sector. We characterize these aspects of the economic policy environment in Sweden prior to 1990-91 and compare them to the situation in other European countries and the United States. Our characterization and international comparisons show that ...

  10. SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NANOPARTICLES GENERATED BY A HEATING STOVE BURNING WOOD PELLETS

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Commodo; Lee Anne Sgro; Andrea D’Anna; Patrizia Minutolo

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate the size distribution of particulate matter emitted from a heating stove burning pellet. The effect of fuel contamination by metal nanoparticle is also investigated by seeding the pellet with Cu nanoparticles. Pellet stove emit mainly nanometric particles. The initial transient regime is characterized by stronger oscillations over time and a larger amount of emitted particles respect to the stationary regime. The larger number of emitted particles are in the size r...

  11. Determination of Crystallite Size Distribution Histogram in Nanocrystalline Anatase Powders by XRD.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mat?j, Z.; Mat?jová, Lenka; Novotný, F.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Kužel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 1, - (2011), s. 87-92. [European Powder Diffraction Conference EPDIC 12 /12./. Darmstadt, 27.08.2010-30.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : titanium dioxide * crystallite size * crystallite size distribution Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry http://www.oldenbourg-link.com/toc/zkpr/current

  12. Performance of DMPS/C System in Determining Aerosol Particle Size Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of performance of DMPS/C system TSI-3932 in determining aerosol particle size has been carried out. The evaluation consist of validity of experimentally transfer function, instrument resolution, and test of measurement accuracy and precision for monodisperse and polydisperse aerosol size distribution. Evaluation of measurement accuracy gave a deviation of 0.74 %, and evaluation of measurement precision gave variation coefficient of 0,50 % and 1.63 % for monodisperse aerosol and polydisperse aerosol respectively

  13. Air Mass Back Trajectories and Dry Atmospheric Aerosol Mass Size Distributions in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Ambient aerosol size distribution is an important factor influencing aerosol behavior and properties including particle deposition in lungs and aerosol influence on clouds. Both influences are also driven by aerosol hygroscopicity. Cascade impactors used for size resolved determination of chemical composition suffer from changes of ambient RH during sampling. Due to this factor the same particle might be deposited at different impactor stage when it is sampled at noon at 40% RH or in the earl...

  14. The Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Performance of Ceramic Particulate Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Rasteiro, Maria da Graça; Jorge, Albano

    2007-01-01

    During the preparation of ceramic glaze suspensions it is necessary to guarantee that the suspension possesses the required properties, with several parameters having to be rigorously controlled, e.g., particle size and solids concentration, composition of the suspension and ionic charge of the liquid. This study focuses attention on the influence of particle size distribution on three important properties of glaze suspensions: rheological behavior, opacity and reflectance characteristics and...

  15. Does size matter? The impact of changes in household structure on income distribution in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Peichl, Andreas; Pestel, Nico; Schneider, Hilmar

    2010-01-01

    In Germany, two observations can be made over the past 20 years: First, income inequality has been constantly increasing while, second, the average household size has been declining dramatically. The analysis of income distribution relies on equivalence-weighted incomes which take into account household size. Therefore, there is an obvious link between these two developments. The aim of the paper is to quantify how the trend towards smaller households has influenced the change in income distr...

  16. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF STEREOLOGICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING 3D GRAIN SIZE AND TOPOLOGICAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoquan Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The conventional serial sectioning analysis and a set of modern stereological methods, including disector, selector, point-sampled intercepts, point-sampled area, and their combinations, have been used in this paper to measure the grain size, grain size distribution, topological parameters and their distributions in a spacefilling single-phase grain structure of steel. The results from different methods are compared and used to evaluate the methods quantitatively, based on which some suggestions will be given for selection of experimental methods in materials stereology research.

  17. Composition, structure and size distribution of suspended particulates from the Rhine River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartiges, B S; Deneux-Mustin, S; Villemin, G; Mustin, C; Barrès, O; Chamerois, M; Gerard, B; Babut, M

    2001-03-01

    Fluvial suspended particulates collected from the Rhine River were investigated in terms of composition, structure and size distribution. Elemental analysis and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy reveal that most particulate organic matter is formed from material derived from microorganisms. Transmission Electron Microscopy observations on resin-embedded samples and structural characterization from break-up experiments, show that fluvial particulate matter should be viewed as fractal aggregates organized by bacterial exopolymeric substances. The shape of particulate size distribution suggests that the formation and dynamics of suspended particulate matter are controlled mainly by physical processes. Finally, particulate growth and structure are consistent with a cluster-cluster aggregation scheme. PMID:11228980

  18. Size distribution of particles in Saturn's rings from aggregation and fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Brilliantov, Nikolai; Krapivsky, Pavel; Bodrova, Anna; Spahn, Frank; Hayakawa, Hisao; Stadnichuk, Vladimir; Schmidt, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's rings consist of a huge number of water ice particles, with a tiny addition of rocky material. They form a flat disk, as the result of an interplay of angular momentum conservation and the steady loss of energy in dissipative inter-particle collisions. For particles in the size range from a few centimeters to a few meters, a power-law distribution of radii, $\\sim r^{-q}$ with $q \\approx 3$, has been inferred; for larger sizes, the distribution has a steep cutoff. It...

  19. Ultrasonic Production of Nano-Size Dispersions and Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Hielscher, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound is a well-established method for particle size reduction in dispersions and emulsions. Ultrasonic processors are used in the generation of nano-size material slurries, dispersions and emulsions because of the potential in the deagglomeration and the reduction of primaries. These are the mechanical effects of ultrasonic cavitation. Ultrasound can also be used to influence chemical reactions by the cavitation energy. This is sonochemistry. As the market for nano-siz...

  20. Multi-product allocation and distribution

    OpenAIRE

    D.C. Currin; H.W. Ittmann

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes techniques used by a beer company to optimise the allocation and distribution of their beer. These techniques are also applicable to other manufacturing and distribution environments. Of particular interest is a two-phase model that allows a "look-ahead" to future sales, the decomposition of the problem into a large number of sub-problems (to reduce solution time), and the equitable distribution of material when stocks are over- or undersupplied. The optimisation is part ...

  1. A prognostic model of the sea-ice floe size and thickness distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, C.; Tziperman, E.

    2015-11-01

    Sea ice exhibits considerable seasonal and longer-term variations in extent, concentration, thickness, and age, and is characterized by a complex and continuously changing distribution of floe sizes and thicknesses, particularly in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). Models of sea ice used in current climate models keep track of its concentration and of the distribution of ice thicknesses, but do not account for the floe size distribution and its potential effects on air-sea exchange and sea-ice evolution. Accurately capturing sea-ice variability in climate models may require a better understanding and representation of the distribution of floe sizes and thicknesses. We develop and demonstrate a model for the evolution of the joint sea-ice floe size and thickness distribution that depends on atmospheric and oceanic forcing fields. The model accounts for effects due to multiple processes that are active in the MIZ and seasonal ice zones: freezing and melting along the lateral side and base of floes, mechanical interactions due to floe collisions (ridging and rafting), and sea-ice fracture due to wave propagation in the MIZ. The model is then examined and demonstrated in a series of idealized test cases.

  2. The variability of tidewater-glacier calving: origin of event-size and interval distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Chapuis, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Calving activity at the front of tidewater glaciers is characterized by a large variability in iceberg sizes and inter-event intervals. We present calving-event data obtained from continuous observations of the fronts of two tidewater glaciers on Svalbard, and show that the distributions of event sizes and inter-event intervals can be reproduced by a simple calving model focusing on the mutual interplay between calving and the destabilization of the glacier front. The event-size distributions of both the field and the model data extend over several orders of magnitude and resemble power laws. The distributions of inter-event intervals are broad, but have a less pronounced tail. In the model, the width of the size distribution increases with the calving susceptibility of the glacier front, a parameter measuring the effect of calving on the stress in the local neighborhood of the calving region. Inter-event interval distributions, in contrast, are insensitive to the calving susceptibility. Above a critical susc...

  3. Size distribution and waiting times for the avalanches of the Cell Network Model of Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Linero, Dorian L; Muñoz, Jose D

    2010-01-01

    The Cell Network Model is a fracture model recently introduced that resembles the microscopical structure and drying process of the parenchymatous tissue of the Bamboo Guadua angustifolia. The model exhibits a power-law distribution of avalanche sizes, with exponent -3.0 when the breaking thresholds are randomly distributed with uniform probability density. Hereby we show that the same exponent also holds when the breaking thresholds obey a broad set of Weibull distributions, and that the humidity decrements between successive avalanches (the equivalent to waiting times for this model) follow in all cases an exponential distribution. Moreover, the fraction of remaining junctures shows an exponential decay in time. In addition, introducing partial breakings and cumulative damages induces a crossover behavior between two power-laws in the avalanche size histograms. This results support the idea that the Cell Network Model may be in the same universality class as the Random Fuse Model.

  4. Size distribution and waiting times for the avalanches of the Cell Network Model of Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Kun, Ferenc; Linero, Dorian L.; Muñoz, José D.

    2011-09-01

    The Cell Network Model is a fracture model recently introduced that resembles the microscopical structure and drying process of the parenchymatous tissue of the Bamboo Guadua angustifolia. The model exhibits a power-law distribution of avalanche sizes, with exponent -3.0 when the breaking thresholds are randomly distributed with uniform probability density. Hereby we show that the same exponent also holds when the breaking thresholds obey a broad set of Weibull distributions, and that the humidity decrements between successive avalanches (the equivalent to waiting times for this model) follow in all cases an exponential distribution. Moreover, the fraction of remaining junctures shows an exponential decay in time. In addition, introducing partial breakings and cumulative damages induces a crossover behavior between two power-laws in the histogram of avalanche sizes. This results support the idea that the Cell Network Model may be in the same universality class as the Random Fuse Model.

  5. Finite Size Effects on the Real-Space Pair Distribution Function of Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The pair distribution function (PDF) method is a powerful approach for the analysis of the structure of nanoparticles. An important approximation used in nanoparticle PDF simulations is the incorporation of a form factor describing nanoparticle size and shape. The precise effect of the form factor on the PDF is determined by both particle shape and structure if these characteristics are both anisotropic and correlated. The correct incorporation of finite size effects is important for distinguishing and quantifying the structural consequences of small particle size in nanomaterials.

  6. PSO Based Multi Objective Approach for Optimal Sizing and Placement of Distributed Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Aref; Mohsen Davoudi; Mohammad Dosaranian Moghadam; Iraj Ganjkhany Majid Davoodi; Robabe Jahanbakhshi

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a multi-objective formulation using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) approach, for optimal placement and sizing of Distributed Generation (DG) resources in the power distribution systems in order to minimize the cost of power losses and improve the voltage profile and energy not supplied. The proposed method considers the options of the DGs installation and takes more number of significant parameters into account compare to the previous studies which consider only a few p...

  7. Statistical physics studies of multilayer adsorption isotherm in food materials and pore size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouaini, F.; Knani, S.; Ben Yahia, M.; Ben Lamine, A.

    2015-08-01

    Water sorption isotherms of foodstuffs are very important in different areas of food science engineering such as for design, modeling and optimization of many processes. The equilibrium moisture content is an important parameter in models used to predict changes in the moisture content of a product during storage. A formulation of multilayer model with two energy levels was based on statistical physics and theoretical considerations. Thanks to the grand canonical ensemble in statistical physics. Some physicochemical parameters related to the adsorption process were introduced in the analytical model expression. The data tabulated in literature of water adsorption at different temperatures on: chickpea seeds, lentil seeds, potato and on green peppers were described applying the most popular models applied in food science. We also extend the study to the newest proposed model. It is concluded that among studied models the proposed model seems to be the best for description of data in the whole range of relative humidity. By using our model, we were able to determine the thermodynamic functions. The measurement of desorption isotherms, in particular a gas over a solid porous, allows access to the distribution of pore size PSD.

  8. The emergence of different tail exponents in the distributions of firm size variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atushi; Fujimoto, Shouji; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Mizuno, Takayuki

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a mechanism through which inversion symmetry (i.e., invariance of a joint probability density function under the exchange of variables) and Gibrat’s law generate power-law distributions with different tail exponents. Using a dataset of firm size variables, that is, tangible fixed assets K, the number of workers L, and sales Y, we confirm that these variables have power-law tails with different exponents, and that inversion symmetry and Gibrat’s law hold. Based on these findings, we argue that there exists a plane in the three dimensional space (logK,logL,logY), with respect to which the joint probability density function for the three variables is invariant under the exchange of variables. We provide empirical evidence suggesting that this plane fits the data well, and argue that the plane can be interpreted as the Cobb-Douglas production function, which has been extensively used in various areas of economics since it was first introduced almost a century ago.

  9. Optimum siting and sizing of a large distributed generator in a mesh connected system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnashar, Mohab M.; El Shatshat, Ramadan; Salama, Magdy M.A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    This paper proposes a new approach to optimally determine the appropriate size and location of the distributed generator (DG) in a large mesh connected system. This paper presents a visual optimization approach in which the planner plays an important role in determining the optimal siting and sizing of the DG through the choice of the appropriate weight factors of the parameters included in the optimization technique according to the system deficiencies. Losses, voltage profile and short circuit level are used in the algorithm to determine the optimum sizes and locations of the DG. The short circuit level parameter is introduced to represent the protective device requirements in the selection of the size and location of the DG. The proposed technique has been tested on the IEEE 24 - bus mesh connected test system. The obtained results showed clearly that the optimal size and location can be simply determined through the proposed approach. (author)

  10. International intercalibration and intercomparison measurements of radon progeny particle size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Keng-Wu

    1997-07-01

    Because there is no standard method for {sup 222}Rn progeny size measurements, verifying the performance of various measurement techniques is important. This report describes results of an international intercomparison and calibration of {sup 222}Rn progeny size measurements involving low pressure impactors (MOUDI and Berner) and diffusion battery systems, as well as both alpha- and gamma- counting methods. The intercomparison was at EML on June 12-15, 1995. 5 different particle sizes (80, 90, 165, 395, 1200 nm) of near monodisperse condensation Carbauba wax aerosol and 2 bimodal size spectra (160 and 365 nm, and 70 and 400 nm) were used. 20 tests were completed, covering both low and high concentrations of {sup 222}Rn and test aerosols. For the single-mode test aerosol, the measurements agreed within the size range. Best agreement was found between the two low pressure impactors. Some differences between the impactor and diffusion battery methods were observed in the specific peak locations and the resultant geometric mean diameters. For the two bimodal size distribution aerosols, the MOUDI measurements showed two modes, while the other 3 devices showed a single mode size distribution.

  11. Size Distribution Measurements of Ambient Biomass Burning Particulate Matter During Recent Southern California Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, D.; McCrowey, C.; Okoshi, R.

    2010-12-01

    Particle size and number density are important quantities for studies of Earth’s climate and radiative balance, remote sensing studies, and public health. Particle size distribution measurements were made of ambient biomass burning particles for five wildfires in southern California during 2008-2010. Particle number density was measured for ambient particle diameters ranging from 30-900 nm using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) comprising a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) and Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) (TSI, Inc.). Measurements were performed 20 m above ground on the campus of California State University Northridge, located in the San Fernando Valley, a suburban area of Los Angeles. The sampling site was located at distances from the fires ranging from approximately 5-50 km, allowing sampling to occur within minutes of particle formation for some measurements. Particle diameters generally matched previous measurements of biomass burning particle size, with lognormal size distributions peaking near 100 nm. However, some changes in particle size were measured during sampling, including changes observed during the extinguishing of one fire. Particle number concentrations integrated across the sampled size range exceeded 40000 cm-3 for some fires. Particle Size and Number Density vs. Time of Day for biomass burning particulate matter for the Camarillo Fire, as measured at California State University.

  12. International intercalibration and intercomparison measurements of radon progeny particle size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because there is no standard method for 222Rn progeny size measurements, verifying the performance of various measurement techniques is important. This report describes results of an international intercomparison and calibration of 222Rn progeny size measurements involving low pressure impactors (MOUDI and Berner) and diffusion battery systems, as well as both alpha- and gamma- counting methods. The intercomparison was at EML on June 12-15, 1995. 5 different particle sizes (80, 90, 165, 395, 1200 nm) of near monodisperse condensation Carbauba wax aerosol and 2 bimodal size spectra (160 and 365 nm, and 70 and 400 nm) were used. 20 tests were completed, covering both low and high concentrations of 222Rn and test aerosols. For the single-mode test aerosol, the measurements agreed within the size range. Best agreement was found between the two low pressure impactors. Some differences between the impactor and diffusion battery methods were observed in the specific peak locations and the resultant geometric mean diameters. For the two bimodal size distribution aerosols, the MOUDI measurements showed two modes, while the other 3 devices showed a single mode size distribution

  13. Scale economies and optimal size in the Swiss gas distribution sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the cost structure of Swiss gas distribution utilities. Several econometric models are applied to a panel of 26 companies over 1996–2000. Our main objective is to estimate the optimal size and scale economies of the industry and to study their possible variation with respect to network characteristics. The results indicate the presence of unexploited scale economies. However, very large companies in the sample and companies with a disproportionate mixture of output and density present an exception. Furthermore, the estimated optimal size for majority of companies in the sample has shown a value far greater than the actual size, suggesting remarkable efficiency gains by reorganization of the industry. The results also highlight the effect of customer density on optimal size. Networks with higher density or greater complexity have a lower optimal size. - highlights: • Presence of unexploited scale economies for small and medium sized companies. • Scale economies vary considerably with customer density. • Higher density or greater complexity is associated with lower optimal size. • Optimal size varies across the companies through unobserved heterogeneity. • Firms with low density can gain more from expanding firm size

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE MAIN PETROLEUM PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION STRATEGY

    OpenAIRE

    Florea Vlad

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the main petroleum product distribution strategy. Three main criteria are identified in this respect: the economic criterion, the control criterion and adjustment criterion. In addition, aspects pertaining to the administration of petroleum product distribution network are also revealed.

  15. The uniqueness of company size distribution function from tent-shaped growth rate distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, A

    2007-01-01

    We report the proof that the extension of Gibrat's law in the middle scale region is unique and the probability distribution function (pdf) is also uniquely derived from the extended Gibrat's law and the law of detailed balance. In the proof, two approximations are employed. The pdf of growth rate is described as tent-shaped exponential functions and the value of the origin of the growth rate distribution is constant. These approximations are confirmed in profits data of Japanese companies 2003 and 2004. The resultant profits pdf fits with the empirical data with high accuracy. This guarantees the validity of the approximations.

  16. Modeling rainfall drop size distribution in southern England using a Gaussian Mixture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerete, K'ufre-Mfon E.; Hunt, Francis H.; Jeffery, Judith L.; Otung, Ifiok E.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding and modeling the rainfall drop size distribution is important in a number of applications, in particular predicting and mitigating attenuation of satellite signals in the millimeter band. Various standard statistical distributions have been proposed as suitable models, the first widely accepted being the exponential distribution. Subsequently, gamma and lognormal distributions have been shown to provide better rainfall rate computations. Some empirical studies have revealed bimodal distributions under some circumstances. A natural question to ask therefore is how often gamma and lognormal distributions fit the empirical data. In this paper we fit lognormal and gamma distributions to 1 min slices of rainfall drop size distributions taken from 7 year data from the Chilbolton Observatory in southern England. The chi-square goodness of fit of the models against the data is calculated, and it is found that failure to fit is greater than would normally be expected. This failure to fit is broken down and examined against seasonal variations, different rain rates, atmospheric temperature, and wind speed. Possible reasons for the lack of fit are explored, and alternative fits using models based on Gaussian Mixture Models are developed and found to be an improvement.

  17. Size distribution of trace organic species emitted from biomass combustion and meat charbroiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, Michael J.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Fine, Philip M.; Hays, Michael D.; Schauer, James J.; Hannigan, Michael P.

    Size-resolved particulate matter emissions from pine, California oak, east coast oak, eucalyptus, rice straw, cigarette smoke, and meat cooking were analyzed for trace organic species using solvent-extraction followed by GC-MS analysis. Six particle size fractions were studied between 0.056, 0.1, 0.18, 0.32, 0.56, 1.0, and 1.8 ?m particle diameter. The smallest particle size fraction analyzed was in the ultrafine (Dprice straw smoke with the most abundant compound (benzo[ a]pyrene) emitted at 0.01 (mg kg -1 rice straw burned). The most abundant PAH measured in the ultrafine size fraction of cigarette smoke was benzo[ ghi]fluoranthene (0.07 mg cigarette -1) followed closely by chrysene/triphenylene (0.06 mg cigarette -1). Besides PAHs, the most abundant compounds identified in the wood included levoglucosan (0.9) with the size distribution of particle-phase organic carbon (OC) and/or elemental carbon (EC). The only organic compounds besides PAHs detected in the ultrafine size fraction of rice straw and cigarette smoke were benz[ de]anthracen-7-one (0.19 mg kg -1 rice straw burned) and 4-methylphenylacetone (2.64 mg cigarette -1), respectively. Caffeine was measured in cigarette smoke size fractions >0.1 ?m with a total PM 1.8 emissions rate of 1 (mg cigarette -1). The most abundant organic species measured in meat cooking smoke was cholesterol with a size distribution that was highly correlated with both OC and EC. The concentration of each compound normalized by the concentration of total OC was relatively uniform for all particle sizes. Cholesterol and levoglucosan should prove to be useful tracers for meat cooking and wood smoke emissions in the ultrafine size range.

  18. Variation of particle size distribution in Saturn's rings and search for density waves in Uranus rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bimodal size distribution for particles in Saturn's rings has been determined via an analysis of PPS, UVS and RSS occultation data. The variation of the size distribution in featureless regions indicates that the dust variation is nearly constant in the Saturn's rings and exhibits a slight anti-correlation with 1 cm sized particles. Sub-centimeter sized particles increase outward in the rings, with a maximum in the B ring, similar to the variation of 1 cm sized particles. However, the ratio of subcentimeter sized particles to 1 cm sized particles does not vary significantly in the rings. Janus 5:4 density wave differs significantly from the featureless regions. The amount of dust is greater by a factor of about 2. Both dust and sub-centimeter sized particles are strongly anti-correlated with 1 cm sized particles. Partial formation of gaps is evident for both sub- and supra-centimeter sized particles, consistent with the predictions of Goldreich and Tremaine (1978). Dust is insensitive to the gravitational torque associated with the resonance. The results are also consistent with Dones (1987). In wave regions, large particles collide and produce dust and do not break up into smaller particles. The author searched the Uranian rings, via time series analysis methods, to identify periodic phenomena in the rings. A possible wave-like feature has been identified in both the ? and the ? rings of Uranus. A density wave has been identified in the inner half of the ? ring. It implies the existence of a moonlet between the ? and ? rings and a possible shepherd for the outer edge of the ? ring and an inner shepherd for the ? ring. Comparison of density waves in the two ring systems are similar, indicating the similarity of the local ring environments

  19. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time, open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time, background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation, albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%, this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  20. Effect of lubricant oil additive on size distribution, morphology, and nanostructure of diesel particulate matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pour point depressant (PPD) has great impact on particulate matters. • The number of nanoparticles increases sharply after PPD is added. • Ambiguous boundaries can be found when the PPD additive was added. • PPD changes the size distribution into bimodal logarithmic. • Three nanostructure parameters are changed greatly by PPD. - Abstract: Effects of lubricant oil additive on the characterization of particles from a four-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine were investigated. Neat diesel and blended fuel containing oil pour point depressant (PPD) additive were chosen as the test fuels. Effects of different fuels on size distribution, morphology, and nanostructure of the diesel particles were studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) were employed to study the morphology and nanostructure parameters. Particle size distribution was measured by fast particulate spectrometer (DMS 500). According to the experimental results, distribution of the primary particles size of the two fuels conforms to Gaussian distribution, whereas the mean diameter of blended fuel is larger than that of neat diesel at 1200 rpm, which is contrarily smaller at 2400 rpm. Besides, fractal dimension (Df) of aggregates increases close to 2 (Df = 1.991), indicating that the structure became compacter with adding PPD. As to the nanostructure parameters of the blended fuel particles, the layer fringe length decreases from 1.191 nm to 1.064 nm, while both the separation distance and tortuosity increase. The changes in the nanostructure parameters indicate that the particles are more ordered and compressed with burning pure diesel. Results of blended fuel from DMS show that more particles, particularly nucleation mode particles, were discharged. In addition, its size distribution become bimodal logarithmic at 2400 rpm. All these results can provide new information of the effects of oil PPD additive on the formation and characterization of diesel particles

  1. Dynamic scaling, island size distribution, and morphology in the aggregation regime of submonolayer pentacene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaling behavior of the island size distribution through a universal scaling function f(u) is demonstrated for submonolayer pentacene islands in the aggregation regime (0.1distribution of f(u) suggests that four molecules constitute the smallest stable island. The structure factor S(k) of the submonolayer films calculated from AFM micrographs compares well with diffuse x-ray intensities from in situ experiments. The structure factor was decomposed into the contribution from the average island shape and the interisland distribution confirming that a unique characteristic length scale regulates the growth dynamics

  2. Beyond initiation-limited translational bursting: the effects of burst size distributions on the stability of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-04

    A main source of gene expression noise in prokaryotes is translational bursting. It arises from efficient translation of mRNAs with low copy numbers, which makes the production of protein copies highly variable and pulsatile. To obtain analytical solutions, previous models to capture this noise source had to assume translation to be initiation-limited, representing the burst size by a specific type of a long-tail distribution. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that the initiation is not the rate-limiting step in certain settings, for example, under stress conditions. Here, to overcome the limitations imposed by the initiation-limited assumption, we present a new analytical approach that can evaluate biological consequences of the protein burst size with a general distribution. Since our new model can capture the contribution of other factors to the translational noise, it can be used to analyze the effects of gene expression noise in more general settings. We used this new model to analytically analyze the connection between the burst size and the stability of gene expression processes in various settings. We found that the burst size with different distributions can lead to quantitatively and qualitatively different stability characteristics of protein abundance and can have non-intuitive effects. By allowing analysis of how the stability of gene expression processes changes based on various distributions of translational noise, our analytical approach is expected to enable deeper insights into the control of cell fate decision-making, the evolution of cryptic genetic variations, and fine-tuning of gene circuits.

  3. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  4. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J. [Département de Physique et Regroupement Québécois sur les Matériaux de Pointe (RQMP), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  5. A study of the drop size distributions and hold-up in short Kühni columns

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    N. S., Oliveira; D. Moraes, Silva; M. P. C., Gondim; M. Borges, Mansur.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic behaviour of a short Kühni column was investigated under no mass transfer conditions using the binary system water (continuous phase) and Exxsol D-80 (dispersed phase). The counter-current flow pattern of the liquid phases was characterised regarding the Sauter mean drop diameter, d [...] rop size distribution and hold-up; a photographic method was used to assess drop sizes. The following operating variables were studied: rotor speed, flow rate of both liquid phases and column stage. The log-normal probability density function was found to be adequate to fit the experimental drop size distributions along the column. As expected, smaller drops and more uniform drop size distributions were obtained with the increase of rotor speed and column stage number, thus indicating the predominance of drop breakage phenomena in short columns. The total hold-up was influenced mainly by rotor speed and flow rate of the dispersed phase. Recommended correlations available in the literature were found to be inadequate for predicting experimental drop sizes and hold-up, so alternative expressions, valid only for short Kühni columns, were proposed.

  6. A study of the drop size distributions and hold-up in short Kühni columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The hydrodynamic behaviour of a short Kühni column was investigated under no mass transfer conditions using the binary system water (continuous phase and Exxsol D-80 (dispersed phase. The counter-current flow pattern of the liquid phases was characterised regarding the Sauter mean drop diameter, drop size distribution and hold-up; a photographic method was used to assess drop sizes. The following operating variables were studied: rotor speed, flow rate of both liquid phases and column stage. The log-normal probability density function was found to be adequate to fit the experimental drop size distributions along the column. As expected, smaller drops and more uniform drop size distributions were obtained with the increase of rotor speed and column stage number, thus indicating the predominance of drop breakage phenomena in short columns. The total hold-up was influenced mainly by rotor speed and flow rate of the dispersed phase. Recommended correlations available in the literature were found to be inadequate for predicting experimental drop sizes and hold-up, so alternative expressions, valid only for short Kühni columns, were proposed.

  7. Features of thermal adsorption spectroscopy to find the size distribution of biological polymers and their fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work deals with the determination of various biopolymer fragments' distribution (DNA and proteins) by their size on the basis of thermal adsorption technique. New features of thermal adsorption spectroscopy with the determination of the length of the DNA fragments and proteins, also analysis of the role of buffer solution in the thermal desorption of biopolymer fragments have been found. (authors)

  8. Measuring Particle Size Distribution using Laser Diffraction: Implications for Predicting Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods to predict soil hydraulic properties frequently require information on the particle size distribution (PSD). The objectives of this study were to investigate various protocols for rapidly measuring PSD using the laser diffraction technique, compare the obtained PSDs with those determined usi...

  9. Track structure calculation, chromatin fibre structure and DNA fragment size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulation code has been developed that is able to describe a variety of chromatin fibre structures, allowing for stochastic arrangements of nucleosomes along the fibre. DNA fragment size distributions were simulated for radiation exposures of lymphocytes with three different assumed chromatin fibre structures. (authors)

  10. On-line measurement of particle size distribution of radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device based on the varying impaction efficiencies of particles as a function of their aerodynamic equivalent diameters has been designed and built. It is being installed and calibrated in a dog exposure chamber where it will be used to determine in real time the particle size distribution of the aerosols being inhaled by the animals. (U.S.)

  11. Air Mass Back Trajectories and Dry Atmospheric Aerosol Mass Size Distributions in Prague.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarz, Jaroslav; Štefancová, Lucia; Maenhaut, W.; Smolík, Ji?í; Ždímal, Vladimír

    Prague : Czech Aerosol Society, 2013, A228. ISBN N. [European Aerosol Conference (EAC 2013). Prague (CZ), 01.09.2013-06.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP209/11/1342 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : mass size distribution * air mass back trajectories * water soluble ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://eac2013.cz/index.php

  12. Investigations on suspended sediment particles size distribution in a small agricultural watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of suspended sediment size distribution (SSSD) was carried on in a small agricultural watershed of Zagozdzonka river. The Low Angle Laser Light Scattering method was used for SSSD determination. Received results has shown annual changeability in SSSD. The d50 characteristic diameter varied from 0.045 do 0.10 micrometer. The relationship between d50 and mean flow was described

  13. Size distribution of aerosols. Some ideas about the techniques used to obtain it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper makes a classification of the techniques permitting to estimate the size distribution of aerosols in three categories: dynamical methods (cascade impactors, diffusion batteries, SDI 2000, APS - Aerodynamic Particle Sizer), electrical methods (DMA - Differential Electrical Mobility Analysers, DMPS, SMEC) and optical ones (CNC - Continuous Flow Condensation Nucleus Counter). Performance and limits of different devices/instruments are indicated. (author)

  14. Atmospheric Aerosols in Suburb of Prague: The Dynamics of Particle Size Distributions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?imná?ová, Daniela; Ždímal, Vladimír; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Smolík, Ji?í; ?imná?, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 101, ?. 3 (2011), s. 539-552. ISSN 0169-8095 Grant ostatní: MF NF(CZ) CZ0049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * atmospheric nucleation * part size distribution Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.911, year: 2011

  15. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seif, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.seif@iwm-extern.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institut für Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg 79108 (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States); Ghoniem, Nasr M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô’s calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium–vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium–vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the implementation of a path-integral approach may proceed if the distribution is known experimentally to significantly stray from a Gaussian description.

  16. A stochastic differential equations approach for the description of helium bubble size distributions in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rate theory model based on the theory of nonlinear stochastic differential equations (SDEs) is developed to estimate the time-dependent size distribution of helium bubbles in metals under irradiation. Using approaches derived from Itô’s calculus, rate equations for the first five moments of the size distribution in helium–vacancy space are derived, accounting for the stochastic nature of the atomic processes involved. In the first iteration of the model, the distribution is represented as a bivariate Gaussian distribution. The spread of the distribution about the mean is obtained by white-noise terms in the second-order moments, driven by fluctuations in the general absorption and emission of point defects by bubbles, and fluctuations stemming from collision cascades. This statistical model for the reconstruction of the distribution by its moments is coupled to a previously developed reduced-set, mean-field, rate theory model. As an illustrative case study, the model is applied to a tungsten plasma facing component under irradiation. Our findings highlight the important role of stochastic atomic fluctuations on the evolution of helium–vacancy cluster size distributions. It is found that when the average bubble size is small (at low dpa levels), the relative spread of the distribution is large and average bubble pressures may be very large. As bubbles begin to grow in size, average bubble pressures decrease, and stochastic fluctuations have a lessened effect. The distribution becomes tighter as it evolves in time, corresponding to a more uniform bubble population. The model is formulated in a general way, capable of including point defect drift due to internal temperature and/or stress gradients. These arise during pulsed irradiation, and also during steady irradiation as a result of externally applied or internally generated non-homogeneous stress fields. Discussion is given into how the model can be extended to include full spatial resolution and how the implementation of a path-integral approach may proceed if the distribution is known experimentally to significantly stray from a Gaussian description

  17. 18th ICPR paper: NEGOTIATION IN DISTRIBUTED PRODUCTION PLANNING ENVIRONMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Nigro, G; Bruccoleri, Manfredi; Perrone, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Mass customization and global competition push enterprises to adopt proper business models able to capture all the opportunities arising from emerging competition rules. An increasing number of industrial enterprise distributes its production capacity world wide to achieve lower production costs, lower distribution costs (due to the higher closeness to customers), and deeper knowledge of customer needs. As drawback, coordination of the different production plants and the b...

  18. Size effects on void growth in single crystals with distributed voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    The effect of void size on void growth in single crystals with uniformly distributed cylindrical voids is studied numerically using a finite deformation strain gradient crystal plasticity theory with an intrinsic length parameter. A plane strain cell model is analyzed for a single crystal with three in-plane slip systems. It is observed that small voids allow much larger overall stress levels than larger voids for all the stress triaxialities considered. The amount of void growth is found to be suppressed for smaller voids at low stress triaxialities. Significant differences are observed in the distribution of slips and on the shape of the deformed voids for different void sizes. Furthermore, the orientation of the crystalline lattice is found to have a pronounced effect on the results, especially for the smaller void sizes.

  19. Effect of ground granulated blast furnace slag particle size distribution on paste rheology: A preliminary model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Alireza; Provis, John L.; van Deventer, Jannie S. J.

    2013-06-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely combined with Portland cement as a supplementary material, and is also used in alkali-activated binders (geopolymers) and in supersulfated cements, which are potential replacements for Portland cement with significantly reduced carbon dioxide emissions. The rheology of a cementitious material is important in terms of its influence on workability, especially in self leveling concretes. The current research investigates the effects of different particle size distributions of slag particles on paste rheology. Rheological measurements results show a direct relationship between the modal particle size and the yield stress of the paste. An empirical model is introduced to calculate the yield stress value of each paste based on the particle size distribution, and applied to a range of systems at single water to solids ratio. The model gives a very good match with the experimental data.

  20. Modelling the elastic–plastic transition of polycrystalline metals with a distribution of grain sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of recent studies have indicated that the extent of the elastoplastic stage in nanocrystalline polycrystals, with grain sizes smaller than several hundred nanometres, is appreciably larger than that for coarse-grained polycrystals (i.e. grain sizes larger than ?1?µm). The so-called tangent modulus approach has, accordingly, been used in order to identify the extent of this stage and to define the stress at which all the grains of a polycrystal become plastic. In this work, the applicability of this methodology to single-phase polycrystals, where deformation is accommodated by dislocation slip, is examined in the context of a grain size dependent elastoplastic self-consistent model. Assuming the size distribution is the primary cause of inhomogeneous yielding among the grains of a polycrystal, the stress–strain behaviour of a number of lognormal, fcc polycrystals with varying mean grain sizes and standard deviations is simulated. The true yield strength of the polycrystals is determined by monitoring the evolution of the volume fraction of yielded grains as a function of imposed deformation. It is found that yielding is essentially complete when the tangent modulus (i.e. the work hardening rate) of the polycrystal drops below ?E/20, with E being Young's modulus. A simple statistical model for the simulation of the elastoplastic response of polycrystals is introduced. Using this model, the offset strain corresponding to the onset of macro-plasticity in copper polycrystals having different grain size distributions is determined

  1. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation, it was demonstrated that the energy barrier for martensitic phase transformation in nanocrystalline nitinol increase drastically with decreasing the grain size. Finite element simulations of phase transformations and structure evolution in nanocrystalline nitinol under mechanical (tensile) loading are carried out for different structures of the materials. It was observed that the volume content of martensitic phase decreases drastically with reducing the grain size. When the grain size is smaller than some critical value (around 50–80nm, both in our simulations and in experimental data), the martensitic phase transformation are totally suppressed. Graded and localized distributions of grain sizes of nitinol were compared with nitinolsamples with homogeneous grain size distribution. In the materials with localized region of small grains, it was observed that the martensite rich regions form first on the border between the coarse and fine grained regions, and expand inside the region with small grains along the shear band direction.

  2. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter ? 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  3. Explicit expressions of the Pietra index for the generalized function for the size distribution of income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia, José María; Jordá, Vanesa

    2014-12-01

    The importance of the Pietra index in socioeconomic systems and econophysics has been highlighted by Eliazar and Sokolov (2010). In this paper, we obtain closed expressions for the Pietra index for the generalized function for the size of income proposed by McDonald (1984). This family is composed of three classes of distributions: the generalized gamma distribution (GG), the generalized beta of the first kind (GB1) and the generalized beta of the second kind (GB2). For the different distributions, we obtain closed and simple expressions of the Pietra index, which can be easily computed. We also obtain the Pietra index for other relevant income models including finite mixtures of distributions and the ?-generalized distribution (Clementi et al., 2008). Finally, two empirical applications with real income data are given.

  4. Intra-community spatial variability of particulate matter size distributions in southern California/Los Angeles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krudysz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine particle (UFP number concentrations vary significantly on small spatial and temporal scales due to their short atmospheric lifetimes and multiplicity of sources. To determine UFP exposure gradients within a community, simultaneous particle number concentration measurements at a network of sites are necessary. Concurrent particle size distribution measurements aid in identifying UFP sources, while providing data to investigate local scale effects of both photochemical and physical processes on UFP. From April to December 2007, we monitored particle size distributions at 13 sites within 350 m to 11 km of each other in the vicinity of the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPS. Typically, three SMPS units were simultaneously deployed and rotated among sites at 1–2 week intervals. Total particle number concentration measurements were conducted continuously at all sites. Seasonal and diurnal size distribution patterns are complex, highly dependent on local meteorology, nearby PM sources, and times of day, and cannot be generalized over the study area nor inferred from one or two sampling locations. Spatial variation in particle number size distributions was assessed by calculating the coefficient of divergence (COD and correlation coefficients (r between site pairs. Results show an overall inverse relationship between particle size and CODs, implying that number concentrations of smaller particles (<40 nm differ from site to site, whereas larger particles tend to have similar concentrations at various sampling locations. In addition, variations in r values as a function of particle size are not necessarily consistent with corresponding COD values, indicating that using results from correlation analysis alone may not accurately assess spatial variability.

  5. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high East Antarctic plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm?3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm?3 and 0.086 ?m3 cm?3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm?3 and 0.009 ?m3 cm?3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, natural new particle formation was observed on 60 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm in size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h?1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm?3 s?1. Most of the events were similar to those observed at other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events slowly growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in central Antarctica.

  6. Seasonal cycle and modal structure of particle number size distribution at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied new particle formation and modal behavior of ultrafine aerosol particles on the high Antarctic East-Plateau at the Concordia station, Dome C (75°06' S, 123°23' E. Aerosol particle number size distributions were measured in the size range 10–600 nm from 14 December 2007 to 7 November 2009. We used an automatic algorithm for fitting up to three modes to the size distribution data. The total particle number concentration was low with the median of 109 cm?3. There was a clear seasonal cycle in the total particle number and the volume concentrations. The concentrations were at their highest during the austral summer with the median values of 260 cm?3 and 0.086 ?m3 cm?3, and at their lowest during the austral winter with corresponding values of 15 cm?3 and 0.009 ?m3 cm?3. New particle formation events were determined from the size distribution data. During the measurement period, new particle formation was seen on 80 days and for 15 of these days the particle growth rates from 10 to 25 nm size could be determined. The median particle growth rate during all these events was 2.5 nm h?1 and the median formation rate of 10 nm particles was 0.023 cm?3 s?1. Most of the events were similar to those observed in other continental locations, yet also some variability in event types was observed. Exceptional features in Dome C were the winter events that occurred during dark periods, as well as the events for which the growth could be followed during several consecutive days. We called these latter events as slowly-growing events. This paper is the first one to analyze long-term size distribution data from Dome C, and also the first paper to show that new particle formation events occur in the central Antarctica.

  7. Determination of pore size distribution at the cell-hydrogel interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowicki Marcin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analyses of the pore size distribution in 3D matrices such as the cell-hydrogel interface are very useful when studying changes and modifications produced as a result of cellular growth and proliferation within the matrix, as pore size distribution plays an important role in the signaling and microenvironment stimuli imparted to the cells. However, the majority of the methods for the assessment of the porosity in biomaterials are not suitable to give quantitative information about the textural properties of these nano-interfaces. Findings Here, we report a methodology for determining pore size distribution at the cell-hydrogel interface, and the depth of the matrix modified by cell growth by entrapped HepG2 cells in microcapsules made of 0.8% and 1.4% w/v alginate. The method is based on the estimation of the shortest distance between two points of the fibril-like network hydrogel structures using image analysis of TEM pictures. Values of pore size distribution determined using the presented method and those obtained by nitrogen physisorption measurements were compared, showing good agreement. A combination of these methodologies and a study of the cell-hydrogel interface at various cell culture times showed that after three days of culture, HepG2 cells growing in hydrogels composed of 0.8% w/v alginate had more coarse of pores at depths up to 40 nm inwards (a phenomenon most notable in the first 20 nm from the interface. This coarsening phenomenon was weakly observed in the case of cells cultured in hydrogels composed of 1.4% w/v alginate. Conclusions The method purposed in this paper allows us to obtain information about the radial deformation of the hydrogel matrix due to cell growth, and the consequent modification of the pore size distribution pattern surrounding the cells, which are extremely important for a wide spectrum of biotechnological, pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  8. The Effect of Product Size on the Pulling Force in Pultrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Carlone, Pierpaolo

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, pultrusion of a composite rod is simulated for various part thicknesses using the finite element method. The pultrusion process set-up is taken from literature in which the temperature and the degree of cure evolutions inside the rod were measured. The predicted temperature and degree of cure profiles in the three dimensional (3D) thermo-chemical analysis are found to agree well with the measured data. The contact pressure between the part and the heating die is calculated using a mechanical contact formulation in the 2D mechanical process model for 9 different part thickness values. Using the contact pressure distribution along the die, the process induced pulling force is predicted. For the simulated cases, a non-linear relation is found between the total force and the product size.

  9. Determination of nanoparticle size distribution together with density or molecular weight by 2D analytical ultracentrifugation

    KAUST Repository

    Carney, Randy P.

    2011-06-07

    Nanoparticles are finding many research and industrial applications, yet their characterization remains a challenge. Their cores are often polydisperse and coated by a stabilizing shell that varies in size and composition. No single technique can characterize both the size distribution and the nature of the shell. Advances in analytical ultracentrifugation allow for the extraction of the sedimentation (s) and diffusion coefficients (D). Here we report an approach to transform the s and D distributions of nanoparticles in solution into precise molecular weight (M), density (?P) and particle diameter (dp) distributions. M for mixtures of discrete nanocrystals is found within 4% of the known quantities. The accuracy and the density information we achieve on nanoparticles are unparalleled. A single experimental run is sufficient for full nanoparticle characterization, without the need for standards or other auxiliary measurements. We believe that our method is of general applicability and we discuss its limitations. 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Grain-size distributions and grain boundaries of chalcopyrite-type thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CuInSe2, CuGaSe2, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and CuInS2 thin-film solar absorbers in completed solar cells were studied in cross section by means of electronbackscatter diffraction. From the data acquired, grain-size distributions were extracted, and also the most frequent grain boundaries were determined. The grain-size distributions of all chalcopyrite-type thin films studied can be described well by lognormal distribution functions. The most frequent grainboundary types in these thin films are 60 - left angle 221 right angle tet and 71 - left angle 110 right angle tet (near) ?3 twin boundaries. These results can be related directly to the importance of {112}tet planes during the topotactical growth of chalcopyrite-type thin films. Based on energetic considerations, it is assumed that the most frequent twin boundaries exhibit a 180 - left angle 221 right angle tet constellation. (orig.)

  11. Location and Size of Distributed Generation Using a Modified Water Cycle Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Edwin Candelo Becerra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modified water cycle algorithm (WCA adapted to the problem of finding the location and size of distributed generation (DG. Power losses minimization was used as an objective function to compare the proposed algorithm with particle swarm optimization (PSO, the batinspired Algorithm (BA, and harmony search (HS. The test scenarios consisted of locating five to seven generators with a maximum real and reactive power in the 33-node and 69-node radial distribution networks. The experiment was designed to start iterations from the same initial population to identify the algorithms’ performance when searching for the best solutions. The results demonstrate that the modified WCA found the minimum power losses after locating and sizing distributed generators for most of the test scenarios. The algorithm converged quickly to the best solution and the solutions for all repetitions tested were close to the best for each case simulated.

  12. Radical tessellation of the packing of spheres with a log-normal size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, L. Y.; Dong, K. J.; Zou, R. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    The packing of particles with a log-normal size distribution is studied by means of the discrete element method. The packing structures are analyzed in terms of the topological properties such as the number of faces per radical polyhedron and the number of edges per face, and the metric properties such as the perimeter and area per face and the perimeter, area, and volume per radical polyhedron, obtained from the radical tessellation. The effect of the geometric standard deviation in the log-normal distribution on these properties is quantified. It is shown that when the size distribution gets wider, the packing becomes denser; thus the radical tessellation of a particle has decreased topological and metric properties. The quantitative relationships obtained should be useful in the modeling and analysis of structural properties such as effective thermal conductivity and permeability.

  13. Determining Economic Production Quantity in the Presence of Varying Item Size and Stochastic Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Kizito Paul Mubiru

    2014-01-01

    The classical Economic Production Quantity (EPQ) model as applied in production-inventory management assumes constant demand of a single item, often of a specific size. In this paper, an optimization method is developed for determining the EPQ of an item with varying size and stochastic demand. Adopting a Markov decision process approach, the states of a Markov chain represent possible states of demand for a given size of item. The decision of whether or not to...

  14. MinSORTING: an Excel macro for modelling sediment composition and grain-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resentini, Alberto; Malusà, Marco G.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Detrital mineral analyses are gaining increasing attention in the geosciences as new single-grain analytical techniques are constantly improving their resolution, and consequently widening their range of application, including sedimentary petrology, tectonic geomorphology and archaeology (Mange and Wright, 2007; von Eynatten and Dunkl, 2012). We present here MinSORTING, a new tool to quickly predict the size distribution of various minerals and rock fragments in detrital sediments, based on the physical laws that control sedimentation by tractive wind or water currents (Garzanti et al., 2008). The input values requested by the software are the sediment mean size, sorting, fluid type (seawater, freshwater, air) and standard sediment composition chosen from a given array including nine diverse tectonic settings. MinSORTING calculates the bulk sediment density and the settling velocity. The mean size of each single detrital component, assumed as lognormally-distributed, is calculated from its characteristic size-shift with respect to bulk sediment mean size, dependent in turn on its density and shape. The final output of MinSORTING is the distribution of each single detrital mineral in each size classes (at the chosen 0.25, 0.5 or 1 phi intervals). This allows geochronolgists to select the most suitable grain size of sediment to be sampled in the field, as well as the most representative size-window for analysis. Also, MinSORTING provides an estimate of the volume/weight of the fractions not considered in both sizes finer and coarser than the selected size-window. A beta version of the software is available upon request from: alberto.resentini@unimib.it Mange, M., and Wright, D. (eds), 2007. Heavy minerals in use. Developments in Sedimentology Series, 58. Elsevier, Amsterdam. Garzanti, E., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2008. Settling-equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 273, 138-151. von Eynatten, H., and Dunkl, I., 2012. Assessing the sediment factory: The role of single grain analysis. Earth Sciences Reviews, 115, 97-120.

  15. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Size distribution of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring assemblages of phytoplankton and bacterioplankton were radiolabelled with sodium 14C-bicarbonate and sodium 3H-acetate and size fractionated to determine the size structure of planktonic autotrophy and microheterotrophy in DeGray Reservoir, an oligotrophic impoundment of the Caddo River in south-central Arkansas. Size distributions of autotrophy and microheterotrophy were remarkably uniform seasonally, vertically within the water column, and along the longitudinal axis of the reservoir despite significant changes in environmental conditions. Planktonic autotrophy was dominated by small algal cells with usually >50% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake accounted for by organisms 75% of the planktonic microheterotrophy. Longitudinal patterns in autotrophic and microheterotrophic activities associated with >3-?m and >1-?m size fractions, respectively, suggest an uplake to downlake shift from riverine to lacustrine environmental influences within the reservoir. 83 references, 7 figures

  17. Production of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. L.; Micale, F. J.; Sudol, E. D.; Tseng, C. M.; Silwanowicz, A.

    1984-01-01

    The research program achieved two objectives: (1) it has refined and extended the experimental techniques for preparing monodisperse latexes in quantity on the ground up to a particle diameter of 10 microns; and (2) it has demonstrated that a microgravity environment can be used to grow monodisperse latexes to larger sizes, where the limitations in size have yet to be defined. The experimental development of the monodisperse latex reactor (MLR) and the seeded emulsion polymerizations carried out in the laboratory prototype of the flight hardware, as a function of the operational parameters is discussed. The emphasis is directed towards the measurement, interpretation, and modeling of the kinetics of seeded emulsion polymerization and successive seeded emulsion polymerization. The recipe development of seeded emulsion polymerization as a function of particle size is discussed. The equilibrium swelling of latex particles with monomers was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Extensive studies are reported on both the type and concentration of initiators, surfactants, and inhibitors, which eventually led to the development of the flight recipes. The experimental results of the flight experiments are discussed, as well as the experimental development of inhibition of seeded emulsion polymerization in terms of time of inhibition and the effect of inhibitors on the kinetics of polymerization.

  18. Effects of allometry, productivity and lifestyle on rates and limits of body size evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Okie, Jordan G.; Alison G. Boyer; Brown, James H.; Daniel P. Costa; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Evans, Alistair R.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Marcus J. Hamilton; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Saarinen, Juha J.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    Body size affects nearly all aspects of organismal biology, so it is important to understand the constraints and dynamics of body size evolution. Despite empirical work on the macroevolution and macroecology of minimum and maximum size, there is little general quantitative theory on rates and limits of body size evolution. We present a general theory that integrates individual productivity, the lifestyle component of the slow–fast life-history continuum, and the allometric scaling of generati...

  19. Differences in the distribution of high school achievement: The role of class size and time-in-term

    OpenAIRE

    CORAK, MILES; Lauzon, Darren

    2010-01-01

    This paper adopts the technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996) to decompose differences in the distribution of PISA test scores in Canada, and assesses the relative contribution of differences in the distribution of 'class size' and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-i...

  20. Comparison of Mass Size Distribution of PM and Ions in Prague and Vienna in Winter and Summer

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    The results we obtained on mass size distributions of mass and water soluble ions exhibit common basic features of ambient aerosols in Central Europe. E.g., mass size distributions in winter were dominated by a fine mode. Sulfates and ammonium were almost exclusively present in the fine mode, fine nitrates were mostly low in summer due to high summer temperatures, but they had always a distinct coarse mode. Normal size distributions of ammonium and sulfates were often almost identical in summ...

  1. Determination of the particle size distribution in a powder using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine experimentally the particle size distribution in a powder the meshed method is generally used. This method has the disadvantage that in the obtained distribution is not observed at detail the fine structure of such distribution. In this work, a method for obtaining the distribution of particle size using radiotracers is presented. In the obtained distribution by this method it is observed with more detail the fine structure of the distribution, comparing with the obtained results by the classical method of meshed. The radiotracer method has major resolution for the experimental determination mentioned. In the chapter 1, it is done a brief analysis about theoretical aspects related with the method. In the first part it is analysed the particle behavior (sedimenting) in a fluid. The second part treats the relating with the radioactivity of an activated material as well as its detection. In the chapter 2, a description of the method is done also the experimental problems to applying to the alumina crystals sample are discussed. In the chapter 3 the obtained results and the mistake calculations in such results are showed. Finally, in the chapter 4 the conclusions and recommendations are given which is possible to obtain better results and improve to those in this work were obtained. (Author)

  2. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed {sup 252}Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of {sup 252}Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations.

  3. A Stochastic Theory for Deep Bed Filtration Accounting for Dispersion and Size Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Bedrikovetsky, P. G.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a stochastic theory for filtration of suspensions in porous media. The theory takes into account particle and pore size distributions, as well as the random character of the particle motion, which is described in the framework of the theory of continuous-time random walks (CTRW). In the limit of the infinitely many small walk steps we derive a system of governing equations for the evolution of the particle and pore size distributions. We consider the case of concentrated suspensions, where plugging the pores by particles may change porosity and other parameters of the porous medium. A procedure for averaging of the derived system of equations is developed for polydisperse suspensions with several distinctive particle sizes. A numerical method for solution of the flow equations is proposed. Sample calculations are applied to compare the roles of the particle size distribution and of the particle flight dispersion on the deposition profiles. It is demonstrated that the temporal flight dispersion is the most likely mechanism forming the experimentally observed hyperexponential character of the deposition profiles.

  4. Investigation of Particle-Size Distribution and Friction Factor for a Gravel-Bed river: Marbar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oreizi Z

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of flow and sediment size distribution in gravel –bed Rivers has been the pivotal attention of many researchers for more than three decades. The surface grain size of gravel and cobble-bed rivers re?ects the caliber and volume of sediment that is supplied to the channel and magnitude of discharge events that are capable of moving sediment. Also, defining friction factor, the relationship between the mean shear velocity and the mean flow velocity in rivers, has been a central problem in river studies for a very long time, but it continues to defy a complete analytical solution. Most of rivers in Zagros Mountains located in the central Iran consist of gravel and cobble-bed Rivers showing very difficult flow measurements and various grain size distributions. In this paper, two reaches were selected to investigate the particle-size distribution and friction factor estimation of Marbar River. The results showed that particles stability in pools is due to their larger median diameter in comparison to riffles. The contribution of form friction factor is more important than skin friction in Marbar river.

  5. Effects of the confining solvent on the size distribution of silver NPs by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser ablation of a silver target confined in acetone, ethanol, methanol, propanol, and distilled water allowed us to obtain silver nanoparticles with different size distributions. We employed a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (? = 532 nm, 0.5 J/pulse) with a high fluence of 64 J/cm2 with a scanning density of 2,500 pulses/cm2, having overlapping of consecutive pulses. The analysis of transmission electron micrographs showed that the smaller particle sizes were obtained confining the target in propanol, while the larger ones were obtained employing ethanol. Nanoparticle size distributions were fitted with two Gaussian peaks in all five cases, being the smaller sizes the most frequent. Predominant peaks were centered at 4.8 and 13.9 nm in propanol and ethanol, respectively, having a broader distribution for the nanoparticles obtained in ethanol. Furthermore, comparison of electron micrographs taken the day of synthesis and 4 and 9 months later in the case of water and propanol, respectively, shows that nanoparticle suspension is more stable in propanol.

  6. Product market integration, tax distortions and public sector size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; SØrensen, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The implications of product market integration for public sector activities (transfers and public consumption) are considered in a standard setting. The analysis supports that a larger public sector (higher tax rate) tends to increase wages and worsen wage competitiveness. However, the implications of product market integration for the public sector are far from straightforward. The reason is gains-from-trade effects which tend to increase the tax base and decrease the opportunity costs of public consumption (marginal utility of private consumption falls). It follows that the retrenchment view that product market integration inevitable leads to a downward pressure on public sector activities does not get support in a standard setting. A particularly noteworthy finding is that a country with a large public sector (strong preferences for public consumption) may benefit more by integrating with a country with a smaller public sector (weak preferences for public consumption).

  7. Effect of quantum dot size and size distribution on the intersublevel transitions and absorption coefficients of III-V semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intersublevel absorption peak energy and absorption coefficient of non-uniform quantum dot (QD) ensembles are calculated analytically. The effect of size variations and size distribution of QDs on their energy states is analyzed. The dots are considered as a quantum box with finite potential at the barriers and the size distribution described by a Gaussian function. The influence of the aspect ratio (base to height ratio) of the QDs on the optical transitions is studied. Our model predicts the dot size (height and base) accurately to determine the absorption peaks and corresponding absorption coefficient. We also compute the absorption coefficient of the QD with different size distributions to verify the results calculated using this model with the reported experimental and other theoretical results

  8. Effect of quantum dot size and size distribution on the intersublevel transitions and absorption coefficients of III-V semiconductor quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabi, Sanjib; Perera, A. G. Unil, E-mail: uperera@gsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    The intersublevel absorption peak energy and absorption coefficient of non-uniform quantum dot (QD) ensembles are calculated analytically. The effect of size variations and size distribution of QDs on their energy states is analyzed. The dots are considered as a quantum box with finite potential at the barriers and the size distribution described by a Gaussian function. The influence of the aspect ratio (base to height ratio) of the QDs on the optical transitions is studied. Our model predicts the dot size (height and base) accurately to determine the absorption peaks and corresponding absorption coefficient. We also compute the absorption coefficient of the QD with different size distributions to verify the results calculated using this model with the reported experimental and other theoretical results.

  9. A Markov decision model for optimising economic production lot size under stochastic demand

    OpenAIRE

    PK Mubiru

    2010-01-01

    Traditional approaches towards determining the economic production lot (EPL) size in manufacturing applications assume deterministic demand, often at a constant rate. In this paper, an optimisation model is developed for determining the EPL size that minimises production and inventory costs of a periodic review production-inventory system under stochastic demand. Adopting such a Markov decision process approach, the states of a Markov chain represent possible states of demand. The decision of...

  10. A uniform measurement expression for cross method comparison of nanoparticle aggregate size distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Wagner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Available measurement methods for nanomaterials are based on very different measurement principles and hence produce different values when used on aggregated nanoparticle dispersions. This paper provides a solution for relating measurements of nanomaterials comprised of nanoparticle aggregates determined by different techniques using a uniform expression of a mass equivalent diameter (MED). The obtained solution is used to transform into MED the size distributions of the same sample of synthetic amorphous silica (nanomaterial comprising aggregated nanoparticles) measured by six different techniques: scanning electron microscopy in both high vacuum (SEM) and liquid cell setup (Wet-SEM); gasphase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (GEMMA); centrifugal liquid sedimentation (CLS); nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA); and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection (AF4-ICP-MS). Transformed size distributions are then compared between the methods and conclusions drawn on methods’ measurement accuracy, limits of detection and quantification related to the synthetic amorphous silca’s size. Two out of the six tested methods (GEMMA and AF4-ICP-MS) cross validate the MED distributions between each other, providing a true measurement. The measurement accuracy of other four techniques is shown to be compromised either by the high limit of detection and quantification (CLS, NTA, Wet-SEM) or the sample preparation that is biased by increased retention of smaller nanomaterials (SEM). This study thereby presents a successful and conclusive cross-method comparison of size distribution measurements of aggregated nanomaterials. The authors recommend the uniform MED size expression for application in nanomaterial risk assessment studies and clarifications in current regulations and definitions concerning nanomaterials.

  11. Multimodal grain size distribution and high hardness in fine grained tungsten fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atwani, Osman, E-mail: oelatwan@purdue.edu [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Quach, Dat V. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Efe, Mert [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Cantwell, Patrick R. [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Heim, Bryan [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Schultz, Bradley [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Stach, Eric A. [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Groza, Joanna R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Allain, Jean Paul [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Cross-sectional micrograph of spark plasma sintered tungsten with multimodal grain size distribution: (a) using focused ion beam (b) Bright field TEM image. Highlights: {yields} High applied external pressure during SPS led to high density of the samples. {yields} The consolidated samples by SPS had a multimodal size distribution. {yields} Ultrafine grains were present within the samples sintered at low temperatures. {yields} High Vickers hardness was obtained compared to commercial tungsten. {yields} The consolidated samples were proved to be pure by chemical analysis. - Abstract: Preparation of fine grained, hard and ductile pure tungsten for future fusion reactor applications was tested using the bottom-up approach via powder consolidation by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at different temperature (1300-1800 deg. C) and pressure (90-266 MPa) conditions. Pure tungsten powders with an average particle size of about 1 {mu}m were sintered to high density (about 94%) with almost no grain growth at a temperature below 1400 deg. C and an applied pressure up to 266 MPa. These samples had a multi-modal grain size distribution (resembling the size distribution of the initial powder) and a very high Vickers hardness (up to 530 kg/mm{sup 2}). Above 1500 deg. C fast grain growth occurred and resulted in a drop in hardness. XRD on the surface of bulk samples showed a small amount of tungsten oxides; however, XPS and EDS indicated that these oxides were only surface contaminants and suggested a high purity for the bulk samples. The results demonstrate that SPS can lead to ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten if used to consolidate pure nano tungsten powders.

  12. Equilibrium Distribution of Labor Productivity: A Theoretical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyama, Hideaki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We construct a theoretical model for equilibrium distribution of workers across sectors with different labor productivity, assuming that a sector can accommodate a limited number of workers which depends only on its productivity. A general formula for such distribution of productivity is obtained, using the detail-balance condition necessary for equilibrium in the Ehrenfest-Brillouin model. We also carry out an empirical analysis on the average number of workers in given productivity sectors on the basis of an exhaustive dataset in Japan. The theoretical formula succeeds in explaining the two distinctive observational facts in a unified way, that is, a Boltzmann distribution with negative temperature on low-to-medium productivity side and a decreasing part in a power-law form on high productivity side.

  13. Experimental investigation of the non-oriented portion and of particle size of Rn fission products in residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation of dose rates for humans by the inhalation of Rn fission products is done using close rate calculating models providing conversion equations including also the aerosol size of the oriented and non-oriented portion of Rn fission products as a variable value. These value which are required for the evaluation of Rn inquiry measurements were determined by measurements in appartments. The experimental investigations show that in rooms lacking additional aerosol sources the non-oriented portion of the potential ? energy of the Rn fission products is about 0.08 (fluctuation range 0.05 to 0.15) and that, in the final report of the Rn inquiry measurements, the suppposed non-oriented portion (fsub(p)=0.02) was too small for the dose rate calculation. The measured medians (diameter) of the size distributions of the radioactive aerosol fluctuate in the range of 100 to 200 nm. (orig.)

  14. Determination of particle size distribution of salt crystals in aqueous slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determining particle size distribution of water-soluble crystals in aqueous slurries is described. The salt slurries, containing sodium salts of predominantly nitrate, but also nitrite, sulfate, phosphate, aluminates, carbonate, and hydroxide, occur in radioactive, concentrated chemical waste from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel elements. The method involves separating the crystals from the aqueous phase, drying them, and then dispersing the crystals in a nonaqueous medium based on nitroethane. Ultrasonic treatment is important in dispersing the sample into its fundamental crystals. The dispersed crystals are sieved into appropriate size ranges for counting with a HIAC brand particle counter. A preponderance of very fine particles in a slurry was found to increase the difficulty of effecting complete dispersion of the crystals because of the tendency to retain traces of aqueous mother liquor. Traces of moisture produce agglomerates of crystals, the extent of agglomeration being dependent on the amount of moisture present. The procedure is applicable to particles within the 2 to 600 ?m size range of the HIAC particle counter. The procedure provides an effective means for measuring particle size distribution of crystals in aqueous salt slurries even when most crystals are less than 10 ?m in size. 19 figures

  15. Shock Reactivity Study on Standard and Reduced Sensitivity Rdx of Different Particle Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, N. M.; Lindfors, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    Embedded gauge experiments have been performed using a three inch high velocity powder gun to assess the effects of RDX particle size and crystal quality on shock induced reactivity in support of the Combat Safe Insensitive Munitions (CSIM) program. Four monomodal experimental compositions containing 73% solids loading by weight and 27% HTPB binder were tested. The compositions were made using either standard or reduced sensitivity grades of RDX in Class 5 or Class 1 150-300 micron sieve cut particle size classes. Results have shown marked changes in the mode of reaction between the two particle size classes. Both RDX grades at the Class 1 sieve cut particle size distribution showed significant reaction at the shock front as well as behind the front. The Class 5 RDX compositions however showed little reaction at the shock front with rapid growth behind the front. Reaction modes were similar but occurring at greater input pressures for the reduced sensitivity grade of RDX compared to the corresponding particle size distribution standard grade RDX counterpart.

  16. On geological interpretations of crystal size distributions: Constant vs. proportionate growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Kile, D.E.; Drits, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    Geological interpretations of crystal size distributions (CSDs) depend on understanding the crystal growth laws that generated the distributions. Most descriptions of crystal growth, including a population-balance modeling equation that is widely used in petrology, assume that crystal growth rates at any particular time are identical for all crystals, and, therefore, independent of crystal size. This type of growth under constant conditions can be modeled by adding a constant length to the diameter of each crystal for each time step. This growth equation is unlikely to be correct for most mineral systems because it neither generates nor maintains the shapes of lognormal CSDs, which are among the most common types of CSDs observed in rocks. In an alternative approach, size-dependent (proportionate) growth is modeled approximately by multiplying the size of each crystal by a factor, an operation that maintains CSD shape and variance, and which is in accord with calcite growth experiments. The latter growth law can be obtained during supply controlled growth using a modified version of the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), an equation that simulates the reaction path followed by a CSD shape as mean size increases.

  17. HAA3B, Heterogeneous Aerosol Transport after LMFBR Accidents, Lognormal Size Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: HAA3B was written to provide an engineering method for calculating heterogeneous aerosol behavior and transport following various hypothetical LMFBR accidents. HAA3B evaluates an approximation to the general integro-differential equation which describes aerosol behavior. The physical model includes particle generation, Brownian and gravitational agglomeration, settling, plating, and leakage for spherical particles. The approximation is the requirement that the size distribution function be lognormal. 2 - Method of solution: HAA3B employs a time-dependent lognormal distribution when agglomeration is prevalent, then switches to a stirred-settling model. The time-dependent parameters which characterize the lognormal size-distribution function are obtained by numerical integration of three simultaneous differential equations for the zeroth through the second volume moments. The volume moments differential equations were obtained by analytic integration of the appropriate moments of the integro-differential equation. Additional differential equations for the plated, settled, and leaked functions are included in the simultaneous set; a mix of Adams-Moulton, Runge-Kutta, and Gaussian procedures are used to solve the system of simultaneous, first-order differential equations. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 1000 time-steps in lognormal model part, 42 discrete radii for leakage distribution calculations, 50 leak-rate input values, 50 source-rate input values. Applicability has been verified for moderate concentrations in moderate-sized vessels, and for limited types of sources, only

  18. Distribution coefficients of TRU-nuclides in natural barriers. Influence of size of colloidal species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption behavior of 237Np(V), 238Pu(IV) and 241Am(III) onto sedimentary materials: coastal sand, tuffaceous sand, ando soil, yellowish soil, reddish soil, sandstone and tuff had been examined by a batch experiment. Size distribution of the colloidal species of the radionuclides in solutions was measured by ultrafiltration method, and valid distribution coefficient for evaluating the migration ability of the radionuclides through the sedimentary materials was decided by taking account of filtration effects of the colloidal species by geological formations. As to 237Np, there is no colloidal 237Np species in the solutions equilibrated with each sedimentary material. The distribution coefficient of 237Np must be not affected by the filtration effects. On the other hand, most of 241Am in the solutions is present as coarse particles larger than 0.45 ?m. Such a particulate 241Am can regard as a fraction trapped by geological formations. There is no colloidal 238Pu species in the solutions equilibrated with tuffaceous sand and reddish soil. Various sizes of colloidal 238Pu species were observed in the solutions equilibrated with coastal sand, yellowish soil, tuff and sandstone. This results point out that it is necessary to grasp colloid size passed through geological formations in order to decide valid distribution coefficient of 238Pu. (author)

  19. Particle-size distribution in capacitor discharge vaporization of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A homogeneous nucleation-condensation growth model was developed for calculating particle-size distributions measured in capacitor discharge vaporization (CDV) experiments conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Uranium dioxide pellets were partially vaporized in an argon environment by rapid energy deposition through capacitor discharge. This was followed by rapid expansion and subsequent condensation of the UO2 vapor. Measured primary particle-size distributions of the resulting aerosols were lognormal, with a geometric mean particle diameter of (0.014 + or - 0.002) ?m and a geometric standard deviation of 1.7 + or - 0.1. It was postulated that the expanding UO2 vapor compressed the surrounding argon as in a spherical shock tube and that the aerosol was generated by homogeneous nucleation and condensation growth in the resulting rarefaction wave. The calculated motion of the UO2-argon interface is in approximate agreement with the movies of the expansion process. The calculated particle-size distributions are in agreement with the measured distributions except at the large particle end. This agreement indicates that the small primary particles from the CDV tests resulted from homogeneous nucleation and condensation growth, as assumed in the analytical model

  20. Effect of the slope and initial moisture content on soil loss, aggregate and particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure degradation has effect through the soil water balance and nutrient supply on the agricultural potential of an area. The soil erosion process comprises two phases: detachment and transport by water. To study the transport phase nozzle type laboratory-scale rainfall simulator was used with constant 80 mmhr-1 intensity on an arable haplic Cambisol. Measuring the aggregate and particle size distribution of the soil loss gives a good approach the erosion process. The primary objective of this study was to examine the sediment concentration, and detect the quality and quantity change of the soil loss during a single precipitation under six treatment combinations (recently tilled and crusty soil surface on two different slope steepness, inland inundation and drought soil conditions). Soil loss were collected continually, and separated per aggregate size fractions with sieves in three rounds during a rain to measure the weights. The particle size distribution was measured with Horiba LA-950 particle size analyzer. In general the ratio of the macro aggregates decreases and the ratio of the micro aggregates and clay fraction increases in the sediment with time during the precipitation due to the raindrop impact. Sediment concentration depends on the slope steepness, as from steeper slopes the runoff can transport bigger amount of sediment, but from the tilled surface bigger aggregates were washing down. Micro aggregate fraction is one of the indicators of good soil structure. The degradation of micro aggregates occurs in steeper slopes and the most erosive time period depends on the micromorphology of the surface. And while the aggregate size distribution of the soil loss of the treatments shows high variety of distribution and differs from the original soil, the particle size distribution of each aggregate size fraction shows similar trends except the 50-250 µm fraction where the fine sand fraction is dominating instead of the loam. This anomaly may be connected with the TC content of this fraction, but more research is needed. In agricultural areas micro aggregate fraction plays important role in nutrient supply thus understanding the erosion process is necessary because of the better protection in the future.

  1. Desulfurization of combustion products from medium-sized plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolik, J.; Jindra, P.; Vlk, Z.

    1986-09-01

    Recent experience is summarized using spray driers to desulfurize combustion products from plants using typical types of Czechoslovak brown coal and with a throughput of about 25,000 m/sup 3//h in order to prevent harmful emissions in urban areas, where this type of power plant is often situated. Basic principles of semi-dry method of desulfurization and the equipment it requires are described. The paper states that the limiting factor may be that the limit concentration of the sorbent is 30-50%, which restricts the ability to recycle desulfurization products. Selection of correct equipment is discussed and design of trial equipment is described for handling brown coal combustion products from an 11.63 MW installation using 23,700 m/sup 3//h of coal. This equipment removed 540 t of SO/sub 2/ in one year as well as an additional 200 t of solid emissions. The main problem is disposal of the desulfurization products and corrosion can also occur. The economics of the system are assessed, concluding that the minimum cost of removing SO/sub 2/ by the semi-dry method is 2.5 Czech Crowns/kg. 7 references.

  2. Distributed production planning and control agent based system

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Rui M., ed. lit.; Sousa, Rui M., ed. lit.; Martins, Paulo Jorge de Figueiredo

    2006-01-01

    A model of an Agent-based Production Planning and Control (PPC) system that can be dynamically adaptable to local and distributed utilization of production resources and materials is presented. The PPC system is based on the selection of resources to deal with one order of different quantities of one product each time. In this way, one scheduling solution is provided for that particular order. The production resources are selected and scheduled using a multi-agent system supported by an imple...

  3. Grain Size Distribution in Mudstones: A Question of Nature vs. Nurture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grain size distribution in mudstones is affected by the composition of the source material, the processes of transport and deposition, and post-depositional diagenetic modification. With regard to source, it does make a difference whether for example a slate belt is eroded vs a stable craton. The former setting tends to provide a broad range of detrital quartz in the sub 62 micron size range in addition to clays and greenschist grade rock fragments, whereas the latter may be biased towards coarser quartz silt (30-60 microns), in addition to clays and mica flakes. In flume experiments, when fine grained materials are transported in turbulent flows at velocities that allow floccules to transfer to bedload, a systematic shift of grain size distribution towards an increasingly finer grained suspended load is observed as velocity is lowered. This implies that the bedload floccules are initially constructed of only the coarsest clay particles at high velocities, and that finer clay particles become incorporated into floccules as velocity is lowered. Implications for the rock record are that clay beds deposited from decelerating flows should show subtle internal grading of coarser clay particles; and that clay beds deposited from continuous fast flows should show a uniform distribution of coarse clays. Still water settled clays should show a well developed lower (coarser) and upper (finer) subdivision. A final complication arises when diagenetic processes, such as the dissolution of biogenic silica, give rise to diagenetic quartz grains in the silt to sand size range. This diagenetic silica precipitates in fossil cavities and pore spaces of uncompacted muds, and on casual inspection can be mistaken for detrital quartz. In distal mudstone successions close to 100 % of "apparent" quartz silt can be of that origin, and reworking by bottom currents can further enhance a detrital perception by producing rippled and laminated silt beds. Although understanding how size distributions in mudstones evolve is considered central to problems in hillslope, fluvial, aeolian, coastal, and submarine systems, one can not simply measure distributions and hope to arrive at an answer. The complex origins of mudstones are reflected in their very broad compositional range, and multiple overprinted processes have to be considered in order to make sense out of observed grain size distributions.

  4. Pore Size Distribution in Chicken Eggs as Determined by Mercury Porosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Scala Jr N

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the application of mercury porosimetry technique into the determination of porosity features in 28 week old hen eggshells. Our results have shown that the majority of the pores have sizes between 1 to 10 mu m in the eggshells studied. By applying mercury porosimetry technique we were able to describe the porosity features better, by determining a pore size distribution in the eggshells. Here, we introduce mercury porosimetry technique as a new routine technique applied into the study of eggshells.

  5. Flow rate through microfilters: Influence of the pore size distribution, hydrodynamic interactions, wall slip, and inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Valente, Andre X. C. N.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the fluid mechanics of viscous flow through filters consisting of perforated thin plates. We classify the effects that contribute to the hydraulic resistance of the filter. Classical analyses assume a single pore size and account only for filter thickness. We extend these results to obtain an analytical formula for the pressure drop across the microfilter versus the flow rate that accounts for the non-uniform distribution of pore sizes, the hydrodynamic interactions between the pores given their layout pattern, and wall slip. Further, we discuss inertial effects and their order of scaling. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. Conductance distribution in nanometer-sized semiconductor devices due to dopant statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Smit, G D J; Caro, J; Klapwijk, T M

    2003-01-01

    We show that individual dopant atoms dominate the transport characteristics of nanometer sized devices, by investigating metal semiconductor diodes down to 15 nm diameter. Room temperature measurements reveal a strongly increasing scatter in the device-to-device conductance towards smaller device sizes. The low-temperature measurements exhibit pronounced features, caused by resonant tunneling through electronic states of individual dopant atoms. We demonstrate by a statistical analysis that this behavior can be explained by the presence of randomly distributed individual dopant atoms in the space charge region.

  7. A priori performance prediction in pharmaceutical wet granulation: testing the applicability of the nucleation regime map to a formulation with a broad size distribution and dry binder addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayrak-Talay, Defne; Litster, James D

    2011-10-14

    In this study, Hapgood's nucleation regime map (Hapgood et al., 2003) was tested for a formulation that consists of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of broad size distribution and a fine dry binder. Gabapentin was used as the API and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) as the dry binder with deionized water as the liquid binder. The formulation was granulated in a 6l Diosna high shear granulator. The effect of liquid addition method (spray, dripping), liquid addition rate (29-245 g/min), total liquid content (2, 4 and 10%), and impeller speed (250 and 500 rpm) on the granule size distribution and lump formation were investigated. Standard methods were successfully used to characterize the process parameters (spray drop size, spray geometry and powder surface velocity) for calculating the dimensionless spray flux. However, the addition of dry binder had a very strong effect on drop penetration time that could not be predicted from simple capillary flow considerations. This is most likely due to preferential liquid penetration into the fine pores related to the dry binder particles and subsequent partial softening and dissolution of the binder. For systems containing a dry binder or other amorphous powders, it is recommended that drop penetration time be measured directly for the blended formulation and then scaled to the drop size during spraying. Using these approaches to characterize the key dimensionless groups (dimensionless spray flux and drop penetration time), Hapgood's nucleation regime map was successfully used to predict a priori the effect of process conditions on the quality of the granule size distribution as measured by lump formation and the span of the size distribution, both before and after wet massing for range of conditions studied. Wider granule size distributions and higher amount of lumps were obtained moving from intermediate to mechanical dispersion regime. Addition of the liquid in the dripping mode gave the broadest size distribution with ungranulated fines and highest percentage of lumps compared to spraying mode. Addition of the liquid by spraying in the intermediate regime gave the narrowest size distribution with the lowest amount of lumps. The effects of impeller speed and wet massing time on granule size distribution were complex. At 2% liquid content, increasing the impeller speed and adding wet massing time caused some breakage of lumps and the production of fines. At higher liquid contents, the effects were less clear, likely due to a balance between increased breakage and increased granule consolidation and growth. Nevertheless, this work has demonstrated that for complex formulations with dry binder addition, the final granule size distribution still depends strongly on the homogeneity of the initial liquid distribution which is well predicted by the nucleation regime map analysis. PMID:21530625

  8. Discover logistik mit SAP procurement, production and distribution logistics

    CERN Document Server

    Kappauf, Jens; Koch, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    This book shows how SAP's business suite supports logistic end-to-end processes, exploring relevant functionality, system and application integration to outline closed-loop supply chain processes in procurement, production, distribution logistics and compliance.

  9. Enhanced Correlations and Wide Charge Distributions in Pion Production

    OpenAIRE

    Andreev, I. V.

    1996-01-01

    Unusual phenomena in pion production are considered.It is argued that pions may be in a squeezed state having enhanced identical pion correlations. Charge distribution in soft chiral pion bremsstrahlung is shown to be very broad.

  10. Near-coastal Antarctic Iceberg Size Distributions Determined From SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesche, Christine; Dierking, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, the iceberg size distribution in Antarctic waters is a recurrent topic. Icebergs are moving sources of freshwater. Their drift and decay have an impact on the hydrology, circulation and biology of the ocean regions and are needed for a realistic simulation of the ocean dynamics. During the Radarsat-1 Antarctic Mapping Project (RAMP) Antarctic Mapping Mission-1 (AMM-1) a mosaic of Antarctica and the adjacent ocean zone was compiled from more than 3000 high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. The mosaic offered the unique opportunity to determine spatial distributions of icebergs sizes along the entire coastline of Antarctica. A combination of automated iceberg detection and visual control as well as a correction of false detections resulted in identifying nearly 7000 icebergs with areas between 0.3 and 4717.7 qkm. Their spatial distribution showed correlations with coastline classes. These classes are based on the spatial distribution of surface features on ice shelves close to the calving front. From the detections and assumed mean iceberg thicknesses, we can calculate the distribution of floating freshwater ice mass within the coastal zone of Antarctica at the time of image acquisitions. For models of ocean dynamics, this dataset offers the opportunity to simulate the freshwater input into the Southern Ocean on a more realistic basis.

  11. Product development practice in medium-sized food processing companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne

    1994-01-01

    Market orientation has in numerous empirical NPD-studies been identified as critical for success. However, this study reveals a severe gap between the normative implications regarding market orientation and current product development practice in number of Danish food-processing companies. Through an action-research project it is attempted to increase the level of market orientation. Results show that market orientation can be improved, but that the change process is difficult and time-con and i...

  12. Improving food safety in the supply chain: Integrating traceability in production and distribution planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunow, Martin; Rong, Aiying

    2008-01-01

    After a number of food safety crises, the design and implementation of traceability systems became an important focus of the food industry. As a result, food product traceability ranks high on senior management agendas for supply chain activities. In the literature, numerous studies deal with traceability from the viewpoint of information system development and technology development such as radio frequency identification (RFID) and DNA-based techniques. However, traceability and its implications for food safety are thus far not incorporated in the standard operations management literature on production and distribution planning. Here, we develop a methodology for production and distribution planning in food supply chains which minimizes production and logistics costs and at the same time reduces food safety concerns, limits the size of potential recalls, and satisfies product quality requirements throughout the supply chain. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology using a small case study.

  13. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  14. A new apparatus for real-time assessment of the particle size distribution of disintegrating tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quodbach, Julian; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is the introduction of a novel apparatus that is capable of continuously measuring the particle size reduction of disintegrating tablets and analysis of the obtained results. The apparatus is constructed such that no particles pass directly through the pumping system. Thereby, the overall energy input into the particle suspension is reduced, and continuous measurement is possible without rapid destruction of the generated particles. The detected particle sizes at the beginning and at the end of the measurement differ greatly, depending on the applied disintegrant. The median particle sizes at the end of the measurement vary between 621.5 and 178.0 ?m for different disintegrants. It is demonstrated that the particle size reduction follows an exponential function and that the fit parameters can be used to describe the disintegration behavior. A strong correlation between the median particle size of crospovidone disintegrants and generated particle size of the tablets is observed. This could be due to a more homogeneous distribution of the disintegrant particles in the tablets. Similar trends are observed for sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium. The new apparatus provides an innovative method to describe disintegrant effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:25223505

  15. Retrieval of collision kernels from the change of droplet size distributions with linear inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Ryo; Takahashi, Keiko [Earth Simulator Center, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Matsuda, Keigo; Kurose, Ryoichi; Komori, Satoru [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: onishi.ryo@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: matsuda.keigo@t03.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takahasi@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: kurose@mech.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: komori@mech.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-12-15

    We have developed a new simple inversion scheme for retrieving collision kernels from the change of droplet size distribution due to collision growth. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of steady isotropic turbulence with colliding droplets are carried out in order to investigate the validity of the developed inversion scheme. In the DNS, air turbulence is calculated using a quasi-spectral method; droplet motions are tracked in a Lagrangian manner. The initial droplet size distribution is set to be equivalent to that obtained in a wind tunnel experiment. Collision kernels retrieved by the developed inversion scheme are compared to those obtained by the DNS. The comparison shows that the collision kernels can be retrieved within 15% error. This verifies the feasibility of retrieving collision kernels using the present inversion scheme.

  16. Retrieval of collision kernels from the change of droplet size distributions with linear inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a new simple inversion scheme for retrieving collision kernels from the change of droplet size distribution due to collision growth. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of steady isotropic turbulence with colliding droplets are carried out in order to investigate the validity of the developed inversion scheme. In the DNS, air turbulence is calculated using a quasi-spectral method; droplet motions are tracked in a Lagrangian manner. The initial droplet size distribution is set to be equivalent to that obtained in a wind tunnel experiment. Collision kernels retrieved by the developed inversion scheme are compared to those obtained by the DNS. The comparison shows that the collision kernels can be retrieved within 15% error. This verifies the feasibility of retrieving collision kernels using the present inversion scheme.

  17. Retrieval of collision kernels from the change of droplet size distributions with linear inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Ryo; Matsuda, Keigo; Takahashi, Keiko; Kurose, Ryoichi; Komori, Satoru

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a new simple inversion scheme for retrieving collision kernels from the change of droplet size distribution due to collision growth. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of steady isotropic turbulence with colliding droplets are carried out in order to investigate the validity of the developed inversion scheme. In the DNS, air turbulence is calculated using a quasi-spectral method; droplet motions are tracked in a Lagrangian manner. The initial droplet size distribution is set to be equivalent to that obtained in a wind tunnel experiment. Collision kernels retrieved by the developed inversion scheme are compared to those obtained by the DNS. The comparison shows that the collision kernels can be retrieved within 15% error. This verifies the feasibility of retrieving collision kernels using the present inversion scheme.

  18. Measurement of particle size distribution and mass concentration of nuclear fuel aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle size distribution and particle mass concentration of a nuclear fuel aerosol is measured by admitting the aerosol into a vertically-extending container, positioning an alpha particle detector within the container so that its window is horizontal and directed vertically, stopping the admission of aerosol into the container, detecting the alpha-activity of the particles of the aerosol sedimenting onto the detector window (for example in a series of equal time intervals until a constant level is reached), and converting the alpha-activity measurements into particle size distribution and/or particle mass concentration measurements. The detector is attached to a pivotted arm and by raising a counterweight can be lowered from the container for cleaning. (author)

  19. Particle size distribution measurements at Hada Al Sham, western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Al-Jeelani, H.; Alghamdi, M.; Hussein, T.; Khodeir, M.; Lihavainen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.

    2013-05-01

    Particle size distribution measurements from 7 nm to 850 nm are being conducted in Western Saudi Arabia utilizing a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS). The early results show that the particle size distribution is highly variable, with signatures from the nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation mode. The accumulation mode dominates from midnight to early morning, after which an elevated Aitken mode appears, denoting to local morning activities. New particle formation begins regularly around 10 am, elevating first the nucleation mode concentrations and then the Aitken mode. During evening hours, the nucleation-and Aitken mode concentrations decrease, and the accumulation mode becomes dominant again. The average particle number concentration from December 2012 was 1640 ?/cm3. The maximum particle concentration in the region is originated from new particle formation, with a maximum 1h-average of 11400 ?/cm3.

  20. Urban particle size distributions during two contrasting dust events originating from Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Suping; Yu, Ye; Xia, Dunsheng; Yin, Daiying; He, Jianjun; Liu, Na; Li, Fang

    2015-12-01

    The dust origins of the two events were identified using HYSPLIT trajectory model and MODIS and CALIPSO satellite data to understand the particle size distribution during two contrasting dust events originated from Taklimakan and Gobi deserts. The supermicron particles significantly increased during the dust events. The dust event from Gobi desert affected significantly on the particles larger than 2.5 ?m, while that from Taklimakan desert impacted obviously on the particles in 1.0-2.5 ?m. It is found that the particle size distributions and their modal parameters such as VMD (volume median diameter) have significant difference for varying dust origins. The dust from Taklimakan desert was finer than that from Gobi desert also probably due to other influencing factors such as mixing between dust and urban emissions. Our findings illustrated the capacity of combining in situ, satellite data and trajectory model to characterize large-scale dust plumes with a variety of aerosol parameters. PMID:26367704