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Sample records for plant cysteine proteinases

  1. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. PMID:2327970

  2. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  3. In vitro anthelmintic effects of cysteine proteinases from plants against intestinal helminths of rodents.

    Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann E; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2007-12-01

    Infections with gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are amongst the most prevalent worldwide, especially in tropical climates. Control of these infections is primarily through treatment with anthelmintic drugs, but the rapid development of resistance to all the currently available classes of anthelmintic means that alternative treatments are urgently required. Cysteine proteinases from plants such as papaya, pineapple and fig are known to be substantially effective against three rodent GI nematodes, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Trichuris muris and Protospirura muricola, both in vitro and in vivo. Here, based on in vitro motility assays and scanning electron microscopy, we extend these earlier reports, demonstrating the potency of this anthelmintic effect of plant cysteine proteinases against two GI helminths from different taxonomic groups - the canine hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum, and the rodent cestode, Rodentolepis microstoma. In the case of hookworms, a mechanism of action targeting the surface layers of the cuticle indistinguishable from that reported earlier appears to be involved, and in the case of cestodes, the surface of the tegumental layers was also the principal location of damage. Hence, plant cysteine proteinases have a broad spectrum of activity against intestinal helminths (both nematodes and cestodes), a quality that reinforces their suitability for development as a much-needed novel treatment against GI helminths of humans and livestock. PMID:18005461

  4. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against the rat tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta in vivo.

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2016-05-01

    Hymenolepis diminuta is a natural parasite of the common brown rat Rattus norvegicus, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of the anthelmintic activity of novel drugs against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of rats infected with H. diminuta with a supernatant extract of papaya latex, containing a mixture of four cysteine proteinases, was moderately efficacious, resulting in a significant, but relatively small, reduction in worm burden and biomass. However, faecal egg output was not affected by treatment. In our experiments these effects were only partially dose-dependent, although specific inhibition by E-64 confirmed the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in papaya latex affecting worm growth but not statistically reducing worm burden. Data collected for a further 7 days after treatment indicated that the effects of papaya latex supernatant on worm loss and on worm growth were not enhanced. Our findings provide a starting point for further refinement in formulation and delivery, or assessment of alternative natural plant-derived cysteine proteinases in efforts to develop these naturally occurring enzymes into broad-spectrum anthelmintics, with efficacy against cestodes as well as nematodes. PMID:25761568

  5. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against Hymenolepis microstoma in vivo.

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the efficacy of cysteine proteinases (CP) as anthelmintics for cestode infections in vivo. Hymenolepis microstoma is a natural parasite of house mice, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of novel drugs for anthelmintic activity against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of H. microstoma infections in mice with the supernatant of papaya latex (PLS), containing active cysteine proteinases, is only minimally efficacious. The statistically significant effects seen on worm burden and biomass showed little evidence of dose dependency, were temporary and the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in PLS was not confirmed by specific inhibition with E-64. Worm fecundity was not affected by treatment at the doses used. We conclude also that this in vivo host-parasite system is not sensitive enough to be used reliably for the detection of cestocidal activity of compounds being screened as potential, novel anthelmintics. PMID:25226116

  6. The anthelmintic efficacy of plant-derived cysteine proteinases against the rodent gastrointestinal nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, in vivo

    Stepek, Gillian; Lowe, Ann; Buttle, David J.; Duce, I.R.; Behnke, Jerzy M.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are important disease-causing organisms, controlled primarily through treatment with synthetic drugs, but the efficacy of these drugs has declined due to widespread resistance, and hence new drugs, with different modes of action, are required. Some medicinal plants, used traditionally for the treatment of worm infections, contain cysteine proteinases known to damage worms irreversibly in vitro. Here we (i) confirm that papaya latex has marked efficacy in vivo a...

  7. The relative anthelmintic efficacy of plant-derived cysteine proteinases on intestinal nematodes.

    Luoga, W; Mansur, F; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Garnett, M C; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2015-03-01

    We examined the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of plant cysteine proteinases (CPs) derived from pineapple (Ananas comosus) and kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa), and compared their efficacy as anthelmintics to the known effects of CPs from the latex of papaya (Carica papaya) against the rodent intestinal nematode, Heligmosomoides bakeri. Both fruit bromelain and stem bromelain had significant in vitro detrimental effects on H. bakeri but in comparison, actinidain from kiwi fruit had very little effect. However, in vivo trials indicated far less efficacy of stem bromelain and fruit bromelain than that expected from the in vitro experiments (24.5% and 22.4% reduction in worm burdens, respectively) against H. bakeri. Scanning electron microscopy revealed signs of cuticular damage on worms incubated in fruit bromelain, stem bromelain and actinidain, but this was far less extensive than on those incubated in papaya latex supernatant. We conclude that, on the basis of presently available data, CPs derived from pineapples and kiwi fruits are not suitable for development as novel anthelmintics for intestinal nematode infections. PMID:24176056

  8. Molecular basis of Colorado potato beetle adaptation to potato plant defence at the level of digestive cysteine proteinases

    Gruden, K.; Kuipers, A.G.J.; Guncar, G.; Slapar, N.; Strukelj, B.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Potato synthesises high levels of proteinase inhibitors in response to insect attack. This can adversely affect protein digestion in the insects, leading to reduced growth, delayed development and lowered fecundity. Colorado potato beetle overcomes this defence mechanism by changing the composition

  9. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  10. Assessing the stability of cystatin/cysteine proteinase complexes using mildly-denaturing gelatin-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Michaud, D; Cantin, L; Raworth, D A; Vrain, T C

    1996-01-01

    A method for assessing the stability of cystatin/cysteine proteinase complexes using mildly-denaturing gelatin-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (gelatin-PAGE) is described. As suggested by the use of well-known cystatins (human stefins A and B, and oryzacystatins I and II) and the plant cysteine proteinase papain, the ability of cystatin/cysteine proteinase complexes to remain stable during electrophoresis is associated with the degree of affinity between the enzyme and the inhibitor (and inversely associated with the Ki values), at least with the disulfide bond-lacking cystatins. Complexes with Ki values > or = 10(-8) M (weak interactions) are partly or completely dissociated under the conditions used, while those with lower Ki values (strong interactions) remain stable. As shown by the differential effects of two plant cystatins, oryzacystatins I and II, against a cysteine proteinase present in crude (complex) extracts from a plant pest -- the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch), the gelatin-PAGE procedure is suitable for studying the ability of cystatins to form highly stable complexes with cysteine proteinases, without the need for prior purification steps. Considering the well-recognized potential of proteinase inhibitors for pest and pathogen control, this analytical approach will be useful for rapidly assessing the respective potential of various cystatins for protection of plants, animals, and humans. PMID:8907521

  11. The nematicidal effect of cysteine proteinases on the root knot nematode Meloidogne incognita

    Gorny, Samuel Victor

    2013-01-01

    Despite current control measures, plant parasitic nematodes are estimated to be responsible for > $100 billion of damage to worldwide crop production per annum. Current nematicides are highly toxic, and due to health and environmental safety concerns, many are being withdrawn from the market under directive 914/414/EEC. Alternative control strategies are urgently required. The cysteine proteinases papain, actinidain and recombinant endoproteinase B isoform 2 (R.EP-B2) have been demonstrate...

  12. Selective loss of cysteine residues and disulphide bonds in a potato proteinase inhibitor II family.

    Xiu-Qing Li

    Full Text Available Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C, and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution.

  13. The death enzyme CP14 is a unique papain-like cysteine proteinase with a pronounced S2 subsite selectivity.

    Paireder, Melanie; Mehofer, Ulrich; Tholen, Stefan; Porodko, Andreas; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Biniossek, Martin L; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Lenarcic, Brigita; Novinec, Marko; Schilling, Oliver; Mach, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    The cysteine protease CP14 has been identified as a central component of a molecular module regulating programmed cell death in plant embryos. CP14 belongs to a distinct subfamily of papain-like cysteine proteinases of which no representative has been characterized thoroughly to date. However, it has been proposed that CP14 is a cathepsin H-like protease. We have now produced recombinant Nicotiana benthamiana CP14 (NbCP14) lacking the C-terminal granulin domain. As typical for papain-like cysteine proteinases, NbCP14 undergoes rapid autocatalytic activation when incubated at low pH. The mature protease is capable of hydrolysing several synthetic endopeptidase substrates, but cathepsin H-like aminopeptidase activity could not be detected. NbCP14 displays a strong preference for aliphatic over aromatic amino acids in the specificity-determining P2 position. This subsite selectivity was also observed upon digestion of proteome-derived peptide libraries. Notably, the specificity profile of NbCP14 differs from that of aleurain-like protease, the N. benthamiana orthologue of cathepsin H. We conclude that CP14 is a papain-like cysteine proteinase with unusual enzymatic properties which may prove of central importance for the execution of programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:27246477

  14. Factors affecting the anthelmintic efficacy of cysteine proteinases against GI nematodes and their formulation for use in ruminants

    Luoga, Wenceslaus

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are important helminth pathogens responsible for severe losses to livestock industries and human health throughout the world. Control of these infections relies primarily on chemotherapy; however there is rapid development of resistance to all available classes of anthelmintic drugs, and therefore new alternative treatments are urgently required. Plant cysteine proteinases (CPs) from papaya latex, pineapple fruit and stem extracts have been demonstrated to b...

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis Cysteine Proteinase Inhibition by κ-Casein Peptides ▿

    Toh, Elena C. Y.; Dashper, Stuart G.; Huq, N. Laila; Attard, Troy J.; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Cross, Keith J.; Stanton, David P.; Paolini, Rita A.; Eric C. Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth. The Arg-specific (RgpA/B) and Lys-specific (Kgp) cysteine proteinases of P. gingivalis are major virulence factors for the bacterium. In this study κ-casein(109-137) was identified in a chymosin digest of casein as an inhibiting peptide of the P. gingivalis proteinases. The peptide was synthesized and shown to inhibit proteolytic activity associat...

  16. A cysteine proteinase in the penetration glands of the cercariae of Cotylurus cornutus (Trematoda, Strigeidae)

    Moczoń, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    A cysteine proteinase from the penetration glands of Cotylurus cornutus cercariae was examined with histochemical and biochemical methods. The enzyme hydrolyzed gelatin, azocoll, azocasein, azoalbumin, N-blocked-l-arginine-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide, and N-blocked-p-nitroanilide, but did not degrade elastin. The metal ion complexane ethylenediamine tetraacetate and the thiol-reducing compound dithioerythritol enhanced the proteinase activity, whereas the thiol-blocking compounds p-hydroxymercu...

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of CMS1MS2: a cysteine proteinase from Carica candamarcensis latex

    CMS1MS2, a cysteine proteinase from C. candamarcensis, displays high amidase activity against the substrate BAPNA. The enzyme was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop method and preliminary diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution. Cysteine proteinases from the latex of plants of the family Caricaceae are widely used industrially as well as in pharmaceutical preparations. In the present work, a 23 kDa cysteine proteinase from Carica candamarcensis latex (designated CMS1MS2) was purified for crystallization using three chromatography steps. The enzyme shows about fourfold higher activity than papain with BAPNA as substrate. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction experiments were obtained by the hanging-drop method in the presence of PEG and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals are monoclinic (space group P21), with unit-cell parameters a = 53.26, b = 75.71, c = 53.23 Å, β = 96.81°, and diffract X-rays to 1.8 Å resolution

  18. Biochemical and immunological characterization of a recombinantly-produced antifungal cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa).

    Popovic, Milica; Andjelkovic, Uros; Burazer, Lidija; Lindner, Buko; Petersen, Arnd; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2013-10-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are considered important defense molecules against insect and pathogen attack. The cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) belongs to the cystatin family and shows potent antifungal activity (in vitro and in vivo). However, the low abundance of this molecule in fruit (6μg/g of fresh fruit) seems to limit further investigations on the interaction between phytocystatin and photopathogenic fungi. In this paper the cDNA of the kiwi CPI was expressed in Escherichia coli. Fifteen N-terminal amino acids were identified by Edman degradation, and 77% of the rCPI primary structure was confirmed by mass fingerprint. The structural homology of recombinant CPI (rCPI) to its natural counterpart has been clearly demonstrated in immunological assays (immunoblot and ELISA inhibition). Biological activity of rCPI was demonstrated in inhibition assay with cysteine proteinase papain (EC50 2.78nM). In addition, rCPI reveals antifungal properties toward pathogenic fungi (Alternaria radicina and Botrytis cinerea), which designates it as an interesting model protein for the exploration of plant phytocystatins - pathogen interactions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of natural plant resistance could lead to the development of ecologically safe fungicides for controlling post-harvest diseases and maintaining food quality. PMID:23830694

  19. Allicin from garlic strongly inhibits cysteine proteinases and cytopathic effects of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Ankri, S; Miron, T; Rabinkov, A; Wilchek, M; Mirelman, D

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to destroy monolayers of baby hamster kidney cells is inhibited by allicin, one of the active principles of garlic. Cysteine proteinases, an important contributor to amebic virulence, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase, are strongly inhibited by allicin.

  20. Recombinant Cysteine Proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi Implicated in Human and Dog T-Cell Responses

    da Costa Pinheiro, Paulo Henrique; de Souza Dias, Suzana; EULÁLIO, Kelsen Dantas; Mendonça, Ivete L.; Katz, Simone; Barbiéri, Clara Lúcia

    2005-01-01

    High in vitro lymphoproliferative responses were induced in humans and dogs by a recombinant Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi cysteine proteinase, with secretion of IFN-γ in asymptomatic subjects or of IFN-γ, interleukin 4 (IL-4), and IL-10 in oligosymptomatic subjects. In contrast, responses of symptomatic patients and dogs were lower, with production of IL-4 and IL-10.

  1. Functional Properties of a Cysteine Proteinase from Pineapple Fruit with Improved Resistance to Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Wei Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plant cells, many cysteine proteinases (CPs are synthesized as precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and then are subject to post-translational modifications to form the active mature proteinases. They participate in various cellular and physiological functions. Here, AcCP2, a CP from pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus L. belonging to the C1A subfamily is analyzed based on the molecular modeling and homology alignment. Transcripts of AcCP2 can be detected in the different parts of fruits (particularly outer sarcocarps, and gradually increased during fruit development until maturity. To analyze the substrate specificity of AcCP2, the recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from Pichia pastoris. The precursor of purified AcCP2 can be processed to a 25 kDa active form after acid treatment (pH 4.3. Its optimum proteolytic activity to Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-NH-Mec is at neutral pH. In addition, the overexpression of AcCP2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana can improve the resistance to fungal pathogen of Botrytis cinerea. These data indicate that AcCP2 is a multifunctional proteinase, and its expression could cause fruit developmental characteristics of pineapple and resistance responses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  2. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research. PMID:23619703

  3. Identification of stable plant cystatin/nematode proteinase complexes using mildly denaturing gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Michaud, D; Cantin, L; Bonadé-Bottino, M; Jouanin, L; Vrain, T C

    1996-08-01

    The biochemical interactions between two cystatins from rice seeds, oryzacystatin I (OCI) and oryzacystatin II (OCII), and the cysteine proteinases from three plant parasitic nematodes, Meloidogyne hapla, M. incognita and M. javanica, were assessed using standard protease assays and mildly denaturing gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (gelatin/PAGE). Activity detected in extracts of preparasitic second-stage larvae (J2) from M. hapla was optimal at pH 5.5 and was inhibited in vitro by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane, hen egg cystatin, OCI, and OCII. As demonstrated by class-specific activity staining, all the activity measured between pH 3.5 and pH 7.5 was accounted for by a major proteinase form, Mhp1, and two minor forms, Mhp2 and Mhp3. Mhps were also detected in extracts and excretions of parasitic J2 and adult females, indicating their continuous expression throughout development of M. hapla, and their possible involvement in the extracellular degradation of proteins. Interestingly, the two plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors OCI and OCII showed different degrees of affinity for the major proteinase form, Mhp1. Both inhibitors almost completely inactivated this proteinase in native conditions but, unlike OCII, OCI conserved a high affinity for Mhp1 during mildly denaturing gelatin/PAGE, showing the differential stabilities of the OCI/Mhp1 and OCII/Mhp1 complexes. In contrast to Mhp1, the major cysteine proteinases detected in the two closely related species M. incognita and M. javanica were strongly inhibited by OCII, while the inhibition of OCI was partly prevented during electrophoresis. This species-related efficiency of plant cystatins against nematode cysteine proteinases could have practical implications when planning their use to control nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. PMID:8874065

  4. Protective role of purified cysteine proteinases against Fasciola gigantica infection in experimental animals.

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Rabia, Ibrahim; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; Diab, Tarek; Zada, Suher

    2012-03-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the public health problems in the world. Cysteine proteinases (CP) released by Fasciola gigantica play a key role in parasite feeding, migration through host tissues, and in immune evasion. There has been some evidence from several parasite systems that proteinases might have potential as protective antigens against parasitic infections. Cysteine proteinases were purified and tested in vaccine trials of sheep infected with the liver fluke. Multiple doses (2 mg of CP in Freund's adjuvant followed by 3 booster doses 1 mg each at 4 week intervals) were injected intramuscularly into sheep 1 week prior to infect orally with 300 F. gigantica metacercariae. All the sheep were humanely slaughtered 12 weeks after the first immunization. Changes in the worm burden, ova count, and humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. Significant reduction was observed in the worm burden (56.9%), bile egg count (70.7%), and fecel egg count (75.2%). Immunization with CP was also found to be associated with increases of total IgG, IgG(1), and IgG(2) (P<0.05). Data showed that the serum cytokine levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, revealed significant decreases (P<0.05). However, the anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6, showed significant increases (P<0.05). In conclusion, it has been found that CP released by F. gigantica are highly important candidates for a vaccine antigen because of their role in the fluke biology and host-parasite relationships. PMID:22451733

  5. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models. PMID:19722028

  6. Cysteine proteinase inhibitor in eccrine sweat is derived from sweat gland.

    Yokozeki, H; Hibino, T; Takemura, T; Sato, K

    1991-02-01

    Although cysteine proteinases have been reported to be present in human eccrine sweat, their endogenous inhibitors, cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs), have remained unstudied. We now present evidence that CPIs are indeed a true ingredient of human eccrine sweat. Sweat induced in sauna was collected over a Vaseline barrier placed on the skin to minimize epidermal contamination. The absence of major epidermal contamination of the sweat was further ensured by monitoring an epidermal marker, high-molecular-mass aminopeptidase. Sweat CPI was purified sequentially by chromatography with Sephacryl S-200, carboxymethylated papain-Sepharose, and anion-exchange Mono Q fast-protein liquid chromatography columns. Sweat CPI has a molecular mass of approximately 15 kDa, is stable for temperature (up to 80 degrees C) and pH (from 3 to 10), and inhibits papain, ficin, and sweat cathepsin B- and H-like enzymes. Sweat CPI may be of sweat gland origin because 1) the rate of CPI output in sweat (CPI concentration x sweat rate) is constant over 45 min; 2) antibody against epidermal CPI, which cross-reacts with sweat CPI, localized immunoreactivity in the sweat duct; 3) CPI activity was present in the glandular extracts of control and methacholine-stimulated (for 1 h in vitro) human sweat glands; and 4) the peaks of CPI activity in the glandular extract and sweat CPI were both eluted (by high-pressure liquid chromatography) at around 15 kDa. Sweat CPI may be very similar to epidermal CPI (which belongs to the stefin family of CPIs) because of many shared characteristics. The identity and function of sweat CPI remain to be studied. PMID:1899981

  7. Response of digestive cysteine proteinases from the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) and the black vine weevil (Otiorynchus sulcatus) to a recombinant form of human stefin A.

    Michaud, D; Nguyen-Quoc, B; Vrain, T C; Fong, D; Yelle, S

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the cystatins, human stefin A (HSA) and oryzacystatin I (OCI) on digestive cysteine proteinases of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB), Leptinotarsa decemlineata, and the black vine weevil (BVW), Otiorynchus sulcatus, were assessed using complementary inhibition assays, cystatin-affinity chromatography, and recombinant forms of the two inhibitors. For both insects, either HSA and OCI used in excess (10 or 20 microM) caused partial and stable inhibition of total proteolytic (azocaseinase) activity, but unlike for OCI the HSA-mediated inhibitions were significantly increased when the inhibitor was used in large excess (100 microM). As demonstrated by complementary inhibition assays, this two-step inhibition of the insect proteases by HSA was due to the differential inactivation of two distinct cysteine proteinase populations in either insect extracts, the rapidly (strongly) inhibited population corresponding to the OCI-sensitive fraction. After removing the cystatin-sensitive proteinases from CPB and BVW midgut extracts using OCI- (or HSA-) affinity chromatography, the effects of the insect "non-target" proteases on the structural integrity of the two cystatins were assessed. While OCI remained essentially stable, HSA was subjected to hydrolysis without the accumulation of detectable stable intermediates, suggesting the presence of multiple exposed cleavage sites sensitive to the action of the insect proteases on this cystatin. This apparent susceptibility of HSA to proteolytic cleavage may partially explain its low efficiency to inactivate the insect OCI-insensitive cysteine proteinases when not used in large excess. It could also have major implications when planning the use of cystatin-expressing transgenic plants for the control of coleopteran pests. PMID:8920105

  8. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V.; Sampaio, Misako U.

    2009-01-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized,...

  9. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    Maria Luiza V. Oliva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.Obtidas de sementes leguminosas, várias proteínas inibem proteinases de origem animal, incluindo humanas, e podem ser consideradas para o desenvolvimento de compostos com atividade biológica. Inibidores da família Bowman-Birk e da família Kunitz vegetal tem sido caracterizados em relação a especificidade para proteinase, estrutura primária e sitio reativo. O nosso grupo majoritariamente vem estudando o gênero Bauhinia, principalmente as espécies bauhinioides, rufa, ungulatae variegata. Em algumas espécies, mais de um inibidor com propriedades diferentes foi caracterizado. Embora tais proteínas apresentem alta similaridade estrutural, diferem quanto à inibição de proteinases, e foram exploradas em estudos utilizando diversos modelos biológicos.

  10. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  11. Human cysteine-proteinase inhibitors: nucleotide sequence analysis of three members of the cystatin gene family.

    Saitoh, E; Kim, H S; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    1987-01-01

    Three genes from the human cystatin gene family of cysteine-proteinase inhibitors have been isolated from a bacteriophage lambda library containing HindIII digests of human genomic DNA. Two of the genes code for salivary cystatin SN and SA, the third is a pseudogene. The cloned genes were identified with a probe made from a salivary cystatin cDNA. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene that codes for the precursor form of the neutral salivary protein, cystatin SN, was determined. The gene, which we name CST1, contains three exons and two intervening sequences. The expected CAT and ATA boxes are present in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Partial nucleotide sequence determination of a second gene revealed that it codes for the precursor form of the acidic salivary protein, cystatin SA. This gene, which we name CST2, has the same gene organization as CST1. The complete nucleotide sequence of a third gene was determined. It does not contain a typical ATA box, and in addition, a premature stop codon and a frameshift deletion mutation occur within the gene. These inactivation mutations show that this gene, which we name CSTP1, is a cystatin pseudogene. These data combined with our genomic Southern-blot analyses show that the cystatin genes form a multigene family with at least seven members. PMID:3446578

  12. Cysteine proteinase inhibitor level in tumor and normal tissues in control and cured mice.

    Poteryaeva, O N; Falameyeva, O V; Korolenko, T A; Kaledin, V I; Djanayeva, S J; Nowicky, J W; Sandula, J

    2000-01-01

    Cystatin C is the best known extracellular endogenous cysteine proteinase inhibitor and has been studied as a possible index of tumor growth and as a marker of the effectiveness of antitumor therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate cystatin C concentrations in murine tumor tissues (compared with other organs not directly involved with tumor development, such as the liver and spleen) during treatment with several antitumor drugs (Ukrain and/or cyclophosphane). Cystatin C concentrations in murine tissues and biological fluids was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay. The cystatin C ELISA test is a sandwich immunoassay, which uses immobilized rabbit antihuman cystatin C Pab and mouse antihuman cystatin C Mab-HRP (monoclonal antibodies, conjugated with horseradish peroxidase). We observed decreased serum cystatin C concentrations compared with controls in all nontreated tumor models: HA-1 hepatoma (solid and ascitic forms), lung adenocarcinoma (solid and ascitic forms) and LS lymphosarcoma. In the ascitic fluid of mice with HA-1 hepatoma the cystatin C concentration was much lower than in the serum of the same mice (about 20-fold lower). In the HA-1 model of hepatoma cells cystatin C concentration decreased about 2-3-fold compared with the control (intact liver) and Ukrain significantly increased the cystatin C concentration. Cyclophosphane treatment of LS lymphosarcoma significantly increased the cystatin C concentration in serum. Cyclophosphane treatment (50 mg/kg, single injection) increased cystatin C by up to 8-fold more in tumor issue. Ukrain treatment of LS lymphosarcoma was also followed by increased levels of cystatin C in tumor tissue (4-fold); cyclophosphane plus Ukrain had a similar positive effect. In the group with LS lymphosarcoma Ukrain or cyclophosphane plus Ukrain treatment induced a significant increase in cystatin C concentration in liver. Liver cystatin C concentration decreased in the HA-1 hepatoma group and treatment with

  13. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  14. Characterisation of cysteine proteinases responsible for digestive proteolysis in guts of larval Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) by expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    Bown, D.P.; Wilkinson, H.S.; Jongsma, M.A.; Gatehouse, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are the major class of enzymes responsible for digestive proteolysis in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), a serious pest of maize. A larval gut extract hydrolysed typical cathepsin substrates, such as Z-phe-arg-AMC and Z-arg-arg-AMC, and hydrolysis was inhibited by Z

  15. High-affinity binding of two molecules of cysteine proteinases to low-molecular-weight kininogen.

    Turk, B.; Stoka, V.; Björk, I.; Boudier, C.; Johansson, G.; Dolenc, I.; Colic, A.; Bieth, J. G.; Turk, V.

    1995-01-01

    Human low-molecular-weight kininogen (LK) was shown by fluorescence titration to bind two molecules of cathepsins L and S and papain with high affinity. By contrast, binding of a second molecule of cathepsin H was much weaker. The 2:1 binding stoichiometry was confirmed by titration monitored by loss of enzyme activity and by sedimentation velocity experiments. The kinetics of binding of cathepsins L and S and papain showed the two proteinase binding sites to have association rate constants k...

  16. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  17. The dynamics of cysteine proteinase activity in brain structures of irrigated rat descendants during ontogenetic development

    Чорна, Валентина Іванівна; Лянна, Ольга Леонідівна

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate the kind of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L activity dependency in brain structures of irradiated rat descendants during ontogenetic development. It was shown that fractional x-ray radiation (25 cGy) of the female rats induced different changes of cathepsin L activity levels and their redistribution in brain structures of female rats’ descendants during postnatal development with the advantages of nonsedimentational activity that had maximum at the 6th da...

  18. Antitumor Effects In Vitro and In Vivo and Mechanisms of Protection against Melanoma B16F10-Nex2 Cells By Fastuosain, a Cysteine Proteinase from Bromelia fastuosa

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Carla A; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Renato A Mortara; Hamilton Cabral; Fabiana A. Serrano; Ricardo Ribeiro-dos-Santos; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the antitumor effect of fastuosain, a cysteine proteinase from Bromelia fastuosa, was investigated. In the intravenous model of lung colonization in C57BI/6 mice, fastuosain and bromelain injected intraperitoneally were protective, very few nodules of B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells were detected. Tumor cells treated with fastuosain showed reduced expression of CD44 and decreased invasion through Matrigel, lost their cytoplasmic extensions and substrate adherence, became round...

  19. Bmcystatin, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor characterized from the tick Boophilus microplus

    The bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a blood-sucking animal, which is responsible for Babesia spp and Anaplasma marginale transmission for cattle. From a B. microplus fat body cDNA library, 465 selected clones were sequenced randomly and resulted in 60 Contigs. An open reading frame (ORF) contains 98 amino acids named Bmcystatin, due to 70% amino acid identity to a classical type 1 cystatin from Ixodes scapularis tick (GenBank Accession No. DQ066227). The Bmcystatin amino acid sequence analysis showed two cysteine residues, theoretical pI of 5.92 and Mr of 11kDa. Bmcystatin gene was cloned in pET 26b vector and the protein expressed using bacteria Escherichia coli BL21 SI. Recombinant Bmcystatin (rBmcystatin) purified by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA-agarose column and ionic exchange chromatography on HiTrap Q column presented molecular mass of 11kDa, by SDS-PAGE and the N-terminal amino acid sequenced revealed unprocessed N-terminal containing part of pelB signal sequence. Purified rBmcystatin showed to be a C1 cysteine peptidase inhibitor with Ki value of 0.1 and 0.6nM for human cathepsin L and VTDCE (vitellin degrading cysteine endopeptidase), respectively. The rBmcystatin expression analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the amplification of a specific DNA sequence (294bp) in the fat body and ovary cDNA preparation. On the other hand, a protein band was detected in the fat body, ovary, and the salivary gland extracts using anti-Bmcystatin antibody by Western blot. The present results suggest a possible role of Bmcystatin in the ovary, even though the gene was cloned from the fat body, which could be another site of this protein synthesis

  20. Cysteine Proteinase-1 and Cut Protein Isoform Control Dendritic Innervation of Two Distinct Sensory Fields by a Single Neuron

    Gray R. Lyons

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites often exhibit structural changes in response to local inputs. Although mechanisms that pattern and maintain dendritic arbors are becoming clearer, processes regulating regrowth, during context-dependent plasticity or after injury, remain poorly understood. We found that a class of Drosophila sensory neurons, through complete pruning and regeneration, can elaborate two distinct dendritic trees, innervating independent sensory fields. An expression screen identified Cysteine proteinase-1 (Cp1 as a critical regulator of this process. Unlike known ecdysone effectors, Cp1-mutant ddaC neurons pruned larval dendrites normally but failed to regrow adult dendrites. Cp1 expression was upregulated/concentrated in the nucleus during metamorphosis, controlling production of a truncated Cut homeodomain transcription factor. This truncated Cut, but not the full-length protein, allowed Cp1-mutant ddaC neurons to regenerate higher-order adult dendrites. These results identify a molecular pathway needed for dendrite regrowth after pruning, which allows the same neuron to innervate distinct sensory fields.

  1. Molecular characterization and mapping of murine genes encoding three members of the stefin family of cysteine proteinase inhibitors

    Tsui, F.W.L.; Hingwo Tsui; Mok, S. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Toronto Hospital, Ontario (Canada)); Mlinaric, I.; Siminovitch, K.A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. (NCI-Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, MD (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Stefins or Type 1 cystatins belong to a large, evolutionarily conserved protein superfamily, the members of which inhibit the papain-like cysteine proteinases. The authors report here on the molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of three newly identified members of the murine stefin gene family. These genes, designated herein as mouse stefins 1, 2, and 3, were isolated on the basis of their relatively increased expression in moth-eaten viable compared to normal congenic mouse bone marrow cells. The open reading frames of the stefin cDNAs encode proteins of approximately 11.5 kDa that show between 50 and 92% identity to sequences of stefins isolated from various other species. Data from Southern analysis suggest that the murine stefin gene family encompasses at least 6 and possible 10-20 membranes, all of which appear to be clustered in the genome. Analysis of interspecific backcross mice indicates that the genes encoding the three mouse stefins all map to mouse chromosome 16, a localization that is consistent with the recent assignment of the human stefin A gene to a region of conserved homology between human chromosome 3q and the proximal region of mouse chromosome 16. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  2. The TvLEGU-1, a Legumain-Like Cysteine Proteinase, Plays a Key Role in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytoadherence

    Francisco Javier Rendón-Gandarilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was to characterize a Trichomonas vaginalis cysteine proteinase (CP legumain-1 (TvLEGU-1 and determine its potential role as a virulence factor during T. vaginalis infection. A 30-kDa band, which migrates in three protein spots (pI~6.3, ~6.5, and ~6.7 with a different type and level of phosphorylation, was identified as TvLEGU-1 by one- and two-dimensional Western blot (WB assays, using a protease-rich trichomonad extract and polyclonal antibodies produced against the recombinant TvLEGU-1 (anti-TvLEGU-1r. Its identification was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Immunofluorescence, cell binding, and WB assays showed that TvLEGU-1 is upregulated by iron at the protein level, localized on the trichomonad surface and in lysosomes and Golgi complex, bound to the surface of HeLa cells, and was found in vaginal secretions. Additionally, the IgG and Fab fractions of the anti-TvLEGU-1r antibody inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence up to 45%. Moreover, the Aza-Peptidyl Michael Acceptor that inhibited legumain proteolytic activity in live parasites also reduced levels of trichomonal cytoadherence up to 80%. In conclusion, our data show that the proteolytic activity of TvLEGU-1 is necessary for trichomonal adherence. Thus, TvLEGU-1 is a novel virulence factor upregulated by iron. This is the first report that a legumain-like CP plays a role in a pathogen cytoadherence.

  3. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato. PMID:25820664

  4. "Purification and evaluation of somatic, excretory-secretory and Cysteine proteinase antigens of Fasciola Hepatica using IgG-ELISA in diagnosing Fascioliasis "

    "Rokni MB

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis, or liver fluke disease, caused by parasites of the genus Fasciola is emerging as an important disease in man and animals, in the world and Iran, particularly in nortern parts. The economical losses in domestic animals are considerable. In the recent decade there were two major outbreaks of human fasciolosis in the Caspian region, northern part of Iran with 7000-10000 infected cases. Sicne it is impossible to diagnose fasciolosis in acute phase using coprological methods and even in chronic phases its sensitivity is low, evaluating and establishing a reliable and cost-effetive test is indispensable and notewortly.In the present survey, we produced and examined the sensitivity and specificity of liver fluke homogenate (LFH , excretory-secetory (ES and cysteine proteinase (CP antigens of F. hepatica using IgG-ELISA test. A 25-27 kilo Dalton coomassie blue-stained band was observed and using of specific inhibitors indicated that this antigen belongs to the class of cysteine proteinase. The sensitivity of LFH, ES and CP antigen in IgG-ELISa was 100% for each, while their specificity was 97.8%, 98.8% and 98.8% respectively. There was a significant difference in mean OD values between cases of proven fasciolosis and other true negative cases, including healthy control individuals and patients with other parasitic diseases.This present report is the first to demonstrate the purification and evaluation of F. hepatica cysteine proteinase antigen by IgG-ELISA test for the diagnosis of fasciolosis in Iran. In conclusion, the IgG-ELISa using ES and CP show high sensitivity and specificity and would be a valuable tool to diagnose human fasciolosis in Iran, particularly in endemic areas.

  5. An aspartic proteinase gene family in the filamentous fungus Botrytis cinerea contains members with novel features

    Have, ten A.; Dekkers, E.; Kay, J.; Phylip, L.H.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea, an important fungal plant pathogen, secretes aspartic proteinase (AP) activity in axenic cultures. No cysteine, serine or metalloproteinase activity could be detected. Proteinase activity was higher in culture medium containing BSA or wheat germ extract, as compared to minimal medi

  6. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    A limited intralysosomal proteolytic degradation is probably a key event in the accessory cell processing of large protein antigens before their presentation to T cells. With the aid of highly specific inhibitors of proteinases, we have examined the role of proteolysis in the presentation of anti...... inhibitor. Another inhibitor, pepstatin A, which selectively blocks aspartic proteinases, did not block the presentation of dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine. The results identify cysteine proteinases, probably lysosomal, as one of the groups of enzymes involved in antigen processing....

  7. Humoral and cellular immune responses against Type I cysteine proteinase of Leishmania infantum are higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic dogs selected from a naturally infected population.

    Nakhaee, Alireza; Taheri, Tahere; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Salmanian, Ali-Hatef; Fasel, Nicolas; Rafati, Sima

    2004-01-30

    Canids are natural reservoirs of Leishmania infantum and have been promoted as experimental hosts to decipher the pathogenesis of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). In this study, the presence of IgG antibodies as well as the presence of mononuclear leukocytes reactive to different cysteine proteinases (CPs) were examined in 13 L. infantum-infected dogs (six with symptoms, seven asymptomatic). Cysteine proteinases which belong to papain-like enzymes known as clan CA are the most studied CPs of parasite protozoa. These molecules are expressed by the intracellular stages of the parasite and could be immunogenic. We studied Type II CP (CPA) and Type I CP (CPB) with its long C-terminal extension (CTE) which could be highly immunogenic. We showed that the level of antibodies reactive to rCPA is low in both symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs. In contrast, when CPB and CTE were used as antigens, the level of total IgG (with IgG2 superior to IgG1) reached higher values in asymptomatic dogs than in dogs with VL. While the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) reactivity was significant when cultured in the presence of freezed/thawed (F/T) lysate, it remained low in presence of CP although always higher for PBMC recovered from asymptomatic dogs. We showed the importance of CPB and CTE in particular as a target of immune response and their potential use for serodiagnosis in asymptomatic dogs. PMID:14746971

  8. Silencing of cystatin M in metastatic oral cancer cell line MDA-686Ln by siRNA increases cysteine proteinases and legumain activities, cell proliferation and in vitro invasion.

    Vigneswaran, N.; Wu, J.; Nagaraj, N.; James, R.; Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Zacharias, W.

    2006-01-01

    Cystatins are inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteinases. Cystatin M demonstrates more diverse tissue distribution, target specificity and biological function than other cystatins from the same family. We utilized small interference RNAs (siRNA) to silence cystatin M gene expression in a metastati

  9. The Characterization of SaPIN2b, a Plant Trichome-Localized Proteinase Inhibitor from Solanum americanum

    Zeng-Fu Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase inhibitors play an important role in plant resistance of insects and pathogens. In this study, we characterized the serine proteinase inhibitor SaPIN2b, which is constitutively expressed in Solanum americanum trichomes and contains two conserved motifs of the proteinase inhibitor II (PIN2 family. The recombinant SaPIN2b (rSaPIN2b, which was expressed in Escherichia coli, was demonstrated to be a potent proteinase inhibitor against a panel of serine proteinases, including subtilisin A, chymotrypsin and trypsin. Moreover, rSaPIN2b also effectively inhibited the proteinase activities of midgut trypsin-like proteinases that were extracted from the devastating pest Helicoverpa armigera. Furthermore, the overexpression of SaPIN2b in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced resistance against H. armigera. Taken together, our results demonstrated that SaPIN2b is a potent serine proteinase inhibitor that may act as a protective protein in plant defense against insect attacks.

  10. In situ localization of proteinase inhibitor mRNA in rice plant challenged by brown planthopper

    2003-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitor (PI) mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization in tissue sections of root, stem and leaf of the resistant rice (B5) plant fed by brown planthopper nymphs. In the rice material without BPH feeding, PI gene was expressed in the root, stem and leaf, while the abundance of PI mRNA was low. In the rice material fed by BPH, PI gene was expressed substantially in the parenchyma of rice stem and leaf, but weakly in the root. The results indicated that the PI gene was up-regulated in the rice plant challenged by brown planthopper. For the first time, we reported the expression changes of proteinase inhibitor gene in plant which was infested by a piercing/sucking insect.

  11. Trypanoplasma borreli cystein proteinase activities support a conservation of function with respect to digestion of host proteins in common carp

    Ruszczyk, A.; Forlenza, M.; Joerink, M.; Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Jurecka, P.M.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanoplasma borreli is an extracellular parasite that is transmitted by a leech vector and is naturally found in the blood of cyprinid fish. High parasitemia and associated severe anemia together with splenomegaly are typical of infection of common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. Papain-like cysteine pro

  12. Global proteome changes in larvae of Callosobruchus maculatus Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae:Bruchinae) following ingestion of a cysteine proteinase inhibitor

    Nogueira, Fábio C S; Silva, Carlos P; Alexandre, Daniel;

    2012-01-01

    The seed-feeding beetle Callosobruchus maculatus is an important cowpea pest (Vigna unguiculata) as well as an interesting model to study insect digestive physiology. The larvae of C. maculatus rely on cysteine and aspartic peptidases to digest proteins in their diet. In this work, the global...

  13. Structure of the streptococcal endopeptidase IdeS, a cysteine proteinase with strict specificity for IgG

    Wenig, Katja; Chatwell, Lorenz; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Björck, Lars; Huber, Robert; Sondermann, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have developed complex and diverse virulence mechanisms that weaken or disable the host immune defense system. IdeS (IgG-degrading enzyme of Streptococcus pyogenes) is a secreted cysteine endopeptidase from the human pathogen S. pyogenes with an extraordinarily high degree of substrate specificity, catalyzing a single proteolytic cleavage at the lower hinge of human IgG. This proteolytic degradation promotes inhibition of opsonophagocytosis and interferes with the killing ...

  14. Antitumor Effects In Vitro and In Vivo and Mechanisms of Protection against Melanoma B16F10-Nex2 Cells By Fastuosain, a Cysteine Proteinase from Bromelia fastuosa1

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Carla A; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Renato A Mortara; Cabral, Hamilton; Fabiana A. Serrano; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the antitumor effect of fastuosain, a cysteine proteinase from Bromelia fastuosa, was investigated. In the intravenous model of lung colonization in C57Bl/6 mice, fastuosain and bromelain injected intraperitoneally were protective, and very few nodules of B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells were detected. Tumor cells treated with fastuosain showed reduced expression of CD44 and decreased invasion through Matrigel, lost their cytoplasmic extensions and substrate adherence, and beca...

  15. 杜梨CPI基因的克隆、序列分析及表达%Cloning, sequencing and expression of a cysteine proteinase inhibitor gene (PbCPI) from Pyrus betulaefolia Bunge

    李慧; 丛郁; 常有宏; 蔺经; 盛宝龙

    2011-01-01

    植物半胱氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂(Cysteine proteinase inhibitor,CPI)在植物的抗逆基因工程中发挥着越来越重要的作用,分离和克隆植物CPI基因进而研究该基因的功能是植物抗逆基因工程研究的热点.为从分子水平上揭示CPI基因在杜梨防御机制中所起的作用,利用RACE和PCR方法,从杜梨种子中克隆CPI基因的cDNA和DNA序列,并采用跨内含子表达引物进行半定量RT-PCR来分析该基因在不同胁迫条件下的表达情况.结果表明:PbCPI基因cDNA长度为987 bp,开放阅读框包含738个核苷酸,编码1个由信号肽(26个氨基酸)和成熟肽(219个氨基酸)组成的多肽.该多肽预测的等电点为6.68,估计的相对分子质量为27 190.其对应基因组DNA序列由3个外显子(1 ~302 bp,401 ~772 bp,1615~1 897 bp)和2个内含子(303~400 bp,773~1 614 bp)组成.通过PSORT进行亚细胞定位分析发现PbCPI蛋白位于内质网上.PbCPI基因编码的多肽具有植物CPI产生抑制活性所必需的一级结构:2个甘氨酸残基( Gly46-Gly47)、假定的反应域QXVXG(Q90 -V91 -V92 -A93 -G94)和A/PW基序(p120-w121);并包含植物CPI家族高度保守的特征序列模式LARFAVQEHN、QVVAG和YQAKVWVKPW.进化树分析表明PbCP1和蔷薇科植物CPI蛋白位于分子进化树的同一发育分支上,并且与苹果MdCPI(AAO19652)蛋白具有较高的一致性(95.92%).杜梨叶片中PbCPI为诱导型表达,高温(30℃)、低温(4℃)、NaCl、机械损伤、MeJA或ABA处理4h后其表达量明显上调,即其对温度胁迫、盐碱、机械损伤和外源激素处理均存在转录响应,这表明该基因参与了杜梨对生物或非生物胁迫的防御机制.%Plant cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) has played more and more important roles in the fields of plant genetic engineering for resistance to adverse environments. It is one of the hot issues to isolate and validate CPI gene functions in the stress-tolerance gene engineering at present

  16. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Jamshidi, Shahram; Shirian, Sadegh; Mahdavi, Niousha; Hassankhani, Mehdi; Daneshbod, Yahya; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL) is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE) and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL. PMID:26197085

  17. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Mehdi Shahbazi

    Full Text Available Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL.

  18. Antitumor Effects In Vitro and In Vivo and Mechanisms of Protection against Melanoma B16F10-Nex2 Cells By Fastuosain, a Cysteine Proteinase from Bromelia fastuosa

    Carla A. Guimarães-Ferreira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the antitumor effect of fastuosain, a cysteine proteinase from Bromelia fastuosa, was investigated. In the intravenous model of lung colonization in C57BI/6 mice, fastuosain and bromelain injected intraperitoneally were protective, very few nodules of B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells were detected. Tumor cells treated with fastuosain showed reduced expression of CD44 and decreased invasion through Matrigel, lost their cytoplasmic extensions and substrate adherence, became round and detached, forming strongly bound cell clusters in suspension. Peritoneal cells recruited and activated by fastuosain treatment (mainly monocytic cells and lymphocytes migrated to the lung, where pulmonary melanoma metastases grew. Adoptive transference of peritoneal cells recruited by fastuosain had no protective effect against lung metastases in recipient mice. Treatment of green fluorescent protein -chimeric animals with fastuosain did not change the number of cells that migrated to the lung, compared to PBSinjected control mice, but the number of positive major histocompatibility complex class II cells increased with fastuosain treatment. Murine antibodies against fastuosain, bromelain, cathepsins B and L crossreacted in ELISA and recognized surface and cytoplasmic components expressed on B16F10-Nex2 cells. Anti-fastuosain antibodies were cytotoxic/lytic to B16F10-Nex2 cells. Antitumor effects of fastuosain involve mainly the direct effect of the enzyme and elicitation of protective antibodies.

  19. Transgenic tobacco plants harboring tomato proteinase inhibitor II gene and their insect resistance

    2002-01-01

    The plant expression vectors pBCT2 and pBT2 were constructed with the cDNA sequence (tin2) and genomic DNA sequence (tin2i) of tomato proteinase inhibitor II gene respectively. Then the two expression vectors were transferred into tobacco via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404, and transgenic tobacco plants were generated. Molecular analysis and trypsin activity assay showed that both cDNA and genomic DNA were expressed properly in the transgenic plants. Insecticidal activities in these transgenic plants indicated that transgenic tobacco plants carrying tin2i sequence were more resistant to 2-instar larvae of Heliothis armigera Hubner than those carrying tin2 sequence. Therefore the intron of tin2i sequence might be a contributor to insecticidal activity of the transgenic tobacco.

  20. Identification of Tunisian Leishmania spp. by PCR amplification of cysteine proteinase B (cpb) genes and phylogenetic analysis.

    Chaouch, Melek; Fathallah-Mili, Akila; Driss, Mehdi; Lahmadi, Ramzi; Ayari, Chiraz; Guizani, Ikram; Ben Said, Moncef; Benabderrazak, Souha

    2013-03-01

    Discrimination of the Old World Leishmania parasites is important for diagnosis and epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis. We have developed PCR assays that allow the discrimination between Leishmania major, Leishmania tropica and Leishmania infantum Tunisian species. The identification was performed by a simple PCR targeting cysteine protease B (cpb) gene copies. These PCR can be a routine molecular biology tools for discrimination of Leishmania spp. from different geographical origins and different clinical forms. Our assays can be an informative source for cpb gene studying concerning drug, diagnostics and vaccine research. The PCR products of the cpb gene and the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase (nagt) Leishmania gene were sequenced and aligned. Phylogenetic trees of Leishmania based cpb and nagt sequences are close in topology and present the classic distribution of Leishmania in the Old World. The phylogenetic analysis has enabled the characterization and identification of different strains, using both multicopy (cpb) and single copy (nagt) genes. Indeed, the cpb phylogenetic analysis allowed us to identify the Tunisian Leishmania killicki species, and a group which gathers the least evolved isolates of the Leishmania donovani complex, that was originated from East Africa. This clustering confirms the African origin for the visceralizing species of the L. donovani complex. PMID:23228525

  1. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    Steve Cornick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5 whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS. This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis.

  2. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s) responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5) whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK) and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS). This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27073869

  3. Protective vaccination against experimental canine visceral leishmaniasis using a combination of DNA and protein immunization with cysteine proteinases type I and II of L. infantum.

    Rafati, Sima; Nakhaee, Alireza; Taheri, Tahere; Taslimi, Yasaman; Darabi, Haideh; Eravani, Davood; Sanos, Stephanie; Kaye, Paul; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Jamshidi, Shahram; Rad, Mohammad Ali

    2005-05-25

    Leishmania infantum is known to be associated with visceral leishmaniasis in Iran and canids are natural reservoirs. Control of disease in dogs appears to be one of the most effective approaches for interrupting the domestic cycle of the disease. In search for successful vaccine strategies, we evaluated the cysteine proteinases (CPs) type I and II using a heterologous prime-boost regime for vaccination against experimental visceral leishmaniasis in dogs. Following vaccination and challenge, dogs were followed for 12 months. Ten dogs vaccinated by prime/boost with DNA/recombinant CPs (in combination with CpG ODN and Montanide 720) remained free of infection in their bone morrow. In contrast, three out of four dogs in the control groups had infection in their bone marrow. The peripheral lymphocytes from protected animals had generally higher proliferation responses to F/T antigen, recombinant CPA (rCPA) and recombinant CPB (rCPB) than controls. During post-challenge period, the difference in stimulation index is significant (pdogs had elevated IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas there was a consistent increase in the level of IL-10 in the control groups and some vaccinated dogs. The level of total IgG and IgG2, but not IgG1, to rCPA and rCPB was significantly higher in the vaccinated group (pdog, all dogs in the vaccinated group in comparison to control dogs had strong DTH responses. We propose that the combination of DNA and recombinant protein vaccination using CPs could be instrumental to control (VL) in dogs. PMID:15882533

  4. A recombinant plasmid of composite cysteine proteinase inhibitor/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of periodic Brugia malayi functions on DNA immunity in the host

    Z Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Both cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH play important roles in the pathogenesis of parasites and their relationship with the hosts. We constructed a new eukaryotic recombinant expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH of periodic Brugia malayi for investigation of the DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses. Materials and Methods: We cloned a gene encoding the CPIs and GAPDH from periodic B. malayi into vector pcDNA3.1. The composited plasmid or the control was injected into the tibialis anterior muscle of the hind leg in BALB/c mice, respectively. The target genes were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in muscle tissues. The stimulation index (SI of T-lymphocyte proliferation and the levels of interferon-gamma (INF-g and interleukin-4 ( IL-4 in serum were detected by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: The pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH was amplified from muscle tissues of the mice after immunisation. The SI of the immunised group was significantly higher than that of the two control groups (P < 0.05. The levels of INF-g and IL-4 of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH group were both higher than those of the two control groups (P < 0.05. The level of INF-g of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH group was significantly higher than that of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/CpG group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: We conclude that the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH could elicit specific humoural and cellular immune responses in mice.

  5. Opposite Effects on Spodoptera littoralis Larvae of High Expression Level of a Trypsin Proteinase Inhibitor in Transgenic Plants1

    De Leo, Francesca; Bonadé-Bottino, Michel A.; Ceci, Luigi R.; Gallerani, Raffaele; Jouanin, Lise

    1998-01-01

    This work illustrates potential adverse effects linked with the expression of proteinase inhibitor (PI) in plants used as a strategy to enhance pest resistance. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi) and Arabidopsis [Heynh.] ecotype Wassilewskija) transgenic plants expressing the mustard trypsin PI 2 (MTI-2) at different levels were obtained. First-instar larvae of the Egyptian cotton worm (Spodoptera littoralis Boisd.) were fed on detached leaves of these plants. The high level of MTI-2 expression in leaves had deleterious effects on larvae, causing mortality and decreasing mean larval weight, and was correlated with a decrease in the leaf surface eaten. However, larvae fed leaves from plants expressing MTI-2 at the low expression level did not show increased mortality, but a net gain in weight and a faster development compared with control larvae. The low MTI-2 expression level also resulted in increased leaf damage. These observations are correlated with the differential expression of digestive proteinases in the larval gut; overexpression of existing proteinases on low-MTI-2-expression level plants and induction of new proteinases on high-MTI-2-expression level plants. These results emphasize the critical need for the development of a PI-based defense strategy for plants obtaining the appropriate PI-expression level relative to the pest's sensitivity threshold to that PI. PMID:9808744

  6. Potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors: modulating plant physiology and host resistance.

    Turra, David; Lorito, Matteo

    2011-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) are a large and complex group of plant proteins. Members of the potato type I (Pin1) and II (Pin2) proteinase inhibitor families are among the first and most extensively characterized plant PIs. Many insects and phytopathogenic microorganisms use intracellular and extracellular serine proteases playing important roles in pathogenesis. Plants, however, are able to fight these pathogens through the activation of an intricate defence system that leads to the accumulation of various PIs, including Pin1 and Pin2. Several transgenic plants over-expressing members of the Pin1 and Pin2 families have been obtained in the last twenty years and their enhanced defensive capabilities demonstrated against insects, fungi and bacteria. Furthermore, Pin1 and Pin2 genetically engineered plants showed altered regulation of different plant physiological processes (e.g., dehydratation response, programmed cell death, plant growth, trichome density and branching), supporting an endogenous role in various plant species in addition to the well established defensive one. This review summarizes the current knowledge about Pin1 and Pin2 structure, the role of these proteins in plant defence and physiology, and their potential exploitation in biotechnology. PMID:21418020

  7. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  8. Characterization of cysteine proteases in Malian medicinal plants.

    Bah, Sékou; Paulsen, Berit S; Diallo, Drissa; Johansen, Harald T

    2006-09-19

    Extracts form 10 different Malian medicinal plants with a traditional use against schistosomiasis were investigated for their possible content of proteolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was studied by measuring the hydrolysis of two synthetic peptide substrates Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec and Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec. Legumain- and papain-like activities were found in all tested crude extracts except those from Entada africana, with the papain-like activity being the strongest. Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longepedunculata and Stylosanthes erecta extracts showed high proteolytic activities towards both substrates. After gel filtration the proteolytic activity towards the substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec in root extract of Securidaca longepedunculata appeared to have Mr of 30 and 97kDa, while the activity in extracts from Cissus quadrangularis was at 39kDa. Enzymatic activity cleaving the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec showed apparent Mr of 97 and 26kDa in extracts from roots and leaves of Securidaca longepedunculata, while in Cissus quadrangularis extracts the activity eluted at 39 and 20kDa, with the highest activity in the latter. All Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec activities were inhibited by E-64 but unaffected by PMSF. The legumain activity was unaffected by E-64 and PMSF. The SDS-PAGE analysis exhibited five distinct gelatinolytic bands for Cissus quadrangularis extracts (115, 59, 31, 22 and 20kDa), while two bands (59 and 30kDa) were detected in Securidaca longepedunculata extracts. The inhibition profile of the gelatinolytic bands and that of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates indicate the cysteine protease class of the proteolytic activities. Several cysteine protease activities with different molecular weights along with a strong variability of these activities between species as well as between plant parts from the same species were observed. PMID:16621376

  9. The Onchocerca volvulus cysteine proteinase inhibitor, Ov-CPI-2, is a target of protective antibody response that increases with age.

    Fidelis Cho-Ngwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite considerable efforts, a suitable vaccine against Onchocerca volvulus infection has remained elusive. Herein, we report on the use of molecular tools to identify and characterize O. volvulus antigens that are possibly associated with the development of concomitant immunity in onchocerciasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Third-stage larvae (L3 and molting L3 (mL3 O. volvulus stage-specific cDNA libraries were screened with a pool of sera from chronically infected patients who had likely developed such immunity. The 87 immunoreactive clones isolated were grouped into 20 distinct proteins of which 12 had already been cloned and/or characterized before and 4 had been proven to be protective in a small O. volvulus animal model. One of these, onchocystatin (Ov-CPI-2, a previously characterized O. volvulus cysteine proteinase inhibitor was, overall, the most abundant clone recognized by the immune sera in both the L3 and mL3 cDNA libraries. To further characterize its association with protective immunity, we measured the IgG subclass and IgE class specific responses to the antigen in putatively immune (PI and infected (INF individuals living in a hyperendemic area in Cameroon. It appeared that both groups had similar IgG3 and IgE responses to the antigen, but the INF had significantly higher IgG1 and IgG4 responses than the PI individuals (p<0.05. In the INF group, the IgG3 levels increased significantly with the age of the infected individuals (r = 0.241; p<0.01. The IgG1 responses in the INF were high regardless of age. Notably, culturing L3 in vitro in the presence of anti-Ov-CPI-2 monospecific human antibodies and naïve neutrophils resulted in almost complete inhibition of molting of L3 to L4 and to cytotoxicity to the larvae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results add to the knowledge of protective immunity in onchocerciasis and support the possible involvement of anti-Ov-CPI-2 IgG1 and/or IgG3 cytophilic antibodies in the

  10. The expression analysis of cysteine proteinase-like protein in wild-type and nm2 mutant silkworm (Lepidoptera: Bombyx mori).

    Wu, Fan; Kang, Lequn; Wang, Pingyang; Zhao, Qiaoling

    2016-07-15

    The mutant of non-molting in the 2nd instar (nm2) is a recently discovered mutant of Bombyx mori. The mutant cannot molt and exuviate and died successively in premolting of 2nd instar. In this study, two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed to screen the differential expression of epidermis proteins in pre-molting larvae of 2nd instar between the wild-type and nm2 mutant. Interestingly, a cysteine proteinase-like (BmCP-like) protein in nm2 was significantly higher than that of the wild-type. The transcription profiles of BmCP-like gene were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and the result revealed that BmCP-like mRNA was remarkably higher in nm2 than that of the wild-type. The transcription level of BmCP-like was high in the epidermis while low in the midgut and hemocytes, and fluctuate with development, while the highest in the newly molted larvae of 3rd and lowest in the pre-molting of the 1st and 2nd instar. The body of injected BmCP-like RNAi of 2nd larvae formed a dark spots around the injection place. These results suggested the BmCP-like gene play a key role in the degradation of the cuticle and epidermis layer during molting of 1st and 2nd instar silkworm. Furthermore, the ORF of BmCP-like gene in nm2 was the same to the wild-type. These studies give us a hint that BmCP-like gene maybe not the major gene responsible for nm2, but BmCP-like gene might participate in the immune systems of silkworm, and the upregulation of BmCP-like transcription in the nm2 mutant might be induced by the disadvantages that limit the growth and development of silkworm in order to survive. PMID:27080953

  11. Coexpression of potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors gives cotton plants protection against insect damage in the field

    Dunse, K. M.; Stevens, J. A.; Lay, F. T.; Gaspar, Y. M.; Heath, R. L.; Anderson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Potato type I and II serine protease inhibitors are produced by solanaceous plants as a defense mechanism against insects and microbes. Nicotiana alata proteinase inhibitor (NaPI) is a multidomain potato type II inhibitor (pin II) that is produced at high levels in the female reproductive tissues of the ornamental tobacco, Nicotiana alata. The individual inhibitory domains of NaPI target the major classes of digestive enzymes, trypsin and chymotrypsin, in the gut of lepidopteran larval pests....

  12. The knockdown of each component of the cysteine proteinase-adhesin complex of Entamoeba histolytica (EhCPADH) affects the expression of the other complex element as well as the in vitro and in vivo virulence.

    Ocádiz-Ruiz, Ramón; Fonseca, Wendy; Linford, Alicia S; Yoshino, Timothy P; Orozco, Esther; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite causative of human amoebiasis, disease responsible for 40 000-100 000 deaths annually. The cysteine proteinase-adhesin complex of this parasite (EhCPADH) is a heterodimeric protein formed by a cysteine protease (EhCP112) and an adhesin (EhADH) that plays an important role in the cytopathic mechanism of this parasite. The coding genes for EhCP112 and EhADH are adjacent in the E. histolytica genome, suggesting that their expression may be co-regulated, but this hypothesis has not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed the knockdown of EhCP112 and EhADH using gene-specific short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA), and the effect of these knockdowns on the expression of both complex components as well as on the in vitro and in vivo virulence was analysed. Results showed that the knockdown of one of the EhCPADH components produced a simultaneous downregulation of the other protein. Accordingly, a concomitant reduction in the overall expression of the complex was observed. The downregulation of each component also produced a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo virulence of trophozoites. These results demonstrated that the expression of EhCP112 and EhADH is co-regulated and confirmed that the EhCPADH complex plays an important role in E. histolytica virulence. PMID:26521708

  13. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Lyanna O. L.; Chorna V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic anal...

  14. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  15. Characterization of proteinases in trypanosomatids.

    Branquinha, M H; Vermelho, A B; Goldenberg, S; Bonaldo, M C

    1994-02-01

    Proteinases are important factors in the pathogenicity of many parasitic diseases. In this study, the proteolytic activities of 10 trypanosomatids from five different genera (Crithidia, Phytomonas, Endotrypanum, Trypanosoma and Leishmania) were determined by SDS-PAGE containing copolymerized gelatin as substrate. In almost all species we could detect two proteolytic classes, cysteine- and metalloproteinases, based on the inhibition of their activities by E-64 and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively. In all cases, the metalloproteinase activities did not change over a broad pH range (from 5.5 to 10). E. schaudinni, T. mega, T. dionisii, C. luciliae, C. fasciculata, C. oncopelti and C. guilhermei expressed one or two metalloproteinases of 45-66 kDa, whereas in P. serpens and P. hyssopifolia a double band of this endopeptidase was detected at 94 kDa. In contrast, no metalloproteinase activity was observed in L. tarentolae. The optimal pH for the cysteine-proteinase activities was acidic (about 5.5). In E. schaudinni, T. mega and in Crithidia sp., these proteinases had an apparent molecular weight of 66-94 kDa, while L. tarentolae expressed a broad band from 29 to 45 kDa. In Phytomonas sp., this class of endopeptidase showed a unique feature, in that major cysteine-proteinases were found at 29-66 kDa, but multiple, low-activity bands were detected from 116 to 200 kDa. The most striking characteristic, however, was the very intense cysteine-proteinase activity expressed by T. dionisii (29-66 kDa). We conclude that these differences in the proteolytic profiles could be useful markers to characterize and compare trypanosomatids. PMID:8081271

  16. Carboxy-terminal truncation of oryzacystatin II by oryzacystatin-insensitive insect digestive proteinases.

    Michaud, D; Cantin, L; Vrain, T C

    1995-10-01

    The biochemical interactions between digestive proteinases of the Coleoptera pest black vine weevil (Otiorynchus sulcatus) and two plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors, oryzacystatin I (OCI) and oryzacystatin II (OCII), were assessed using gelatin-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, OCI-affinity chromatography, and recombinant forms of the two plant inhibitors. The insect proteinases were resolved in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels as five major bands, only three of them being totally or partially inactivated by OCI and OCII. The maximal inhibitory effect of both OCs at pH 5.0 was estimated at 40% and the inhibition was stable with time despite the presence of OC-insensitive proteases, indicating the stability of the OCI and OCII effects. After removing OC-sensitive proteinases from the insect crude extract by OCI-affinity chromatography, the effects of the insect cystatin-insensitive proteases on the structural integrity of the free OCs were analyzed. While OCI remained stable, OCII was subjected to limited proteolysis leading to its gradual transformation into a approximately 10.5-kDa unstable intermediate, OCIIi. As shown by the degradation pattern of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)/OCII fusion protein, the appearance of OCIIi resulted from the C-terminal truncation of OCII. Either free or linked to GST, OCIIi was as active against papain and human cathepsin H as OCII, and the initial specificities of the inhibitor for these two cysteine proteinases were conserved after cleavage. Although these observations indicate the high conformational stability of OCII near its active (inhibitory) site, they also suggest a general conformational destabilization of this inhibitor following its initial cleavage, subsequently leading to its complete hydrolysis. This apparent susceptibility of OCII to proteolytic cleavage by the insect proteinases could have major implications when planning the use of this plant cystatin for insect pest control. PMID:7574723

  17. Enzymatic response of the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) to a bis-benzamidine proteinase Inhibitor. i.

    Marinho-Prado, Jeanne Scardini; Lourenção, A L; Guedes, R N C; Pallini, A; Oliveira, J A; Oliveira, M G A

    2012-10-01

    Ingestion of proteinase inhibitors leads to hyperproduction of digestive proteinases, limiting the bioavailability of essential amino acids for protein synthesis, which affects insect growth and development. However, the effects of proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzymes can lead to an adaptive response by the insect. In here, we assessed the biochemical response of midgut proteinases from the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) to different concentrations of berenil, a bis-benzamidine proteinase inhibitor, on eucalyptus. Eucalyptus leaves were immersed in berenil solutions at different concentrations and fed to larvae of T. arnobia. Mortality was assessed daily. The proteolytic activity in the midgut of T. arnobia was assessed after feeding on plants sprayed with aqueous solutions of berenil, fed to fifth instars of T. arnobia for 48 h before midgut removal for enzymatic assays. Larvae of T. arnobia were able to overcome the effects of the lowest berenil concentrations by increasing their trypsin-like activity, but not as berenil concentration increased, despite the fact that the highest berenil concentration resulted in overproduction of trypsin-like proteinases. Berenil also prevented the increase of the cysteine proteinases activity in response to trypsin inhibition. PMID:23950094

  18. A cystatin F homologue from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) inhibits activity of multiple cysteine proteinases and Ii chain processing in vitro.

    Ao, Jingqun; Li, Qiuhua; Yang, Zhijun; Mu, Yinnan

    2016-01-01

    Cystatin F, a member of the family II cystatins, plays important roles in immune response-related processes through inhibiting specific enzyme targets. In this study, a cystatin F homologue, LycCysF, was identified and characterized from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The deduced LycCysF protein exhibits a typical structural feature of type II cystatins, including three evolutionally conserved motifs, Gly(35), QVVRG(79-83) and PW(130-131). Tissue expression analysis showed that LycCysF mRNA was expressed in all tissues examined, albeit at different levels. Recombinant LycCysF (rLycCysF) produced in Pichia pastoris could inhibit the activity of multiple cysteine proteases, including papain, legumain and recombinant large yellow croaker cathepsin B, L and S. Moreover, rLycCysF could inhibit the Ii chain processing by recombinant cathepsin S in vitro. These data suggest that LycCysF may participate in regulation of cathepsins and MHC-II associated Ii chain processing. In addition, mammalian cystatin F is produced as an inactive dimer, becoming activated by proteolysis in the endo/lysosome of immune cells and then exerts its function of regulating downstream proteases activity. However, the N-terminal extension and two additional cysteine residues responsible for dimer formation are absent in LycCysF and cystatin F from other fish species, reptiles and Aves, indicating that these proteins can not form dimer and may regulate the proteases activity via an alternate pathway distinct from mammalian cystatin F. To our knowledge, this is the first report on molecular characteristics of a teleost cystatin F and its role in Ii chain processing. PMID:26578250

  19. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex w...

  20. Clan CD of cysteine peptidases as an example of evolutionary divergences in related protein families across plant clades

    Cambra Marin, Ines; García Ramos, Francisco Javier; Martinez Muñoz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses are powerful tools that can be used to analyze the presence, conservation, and evolution of protein families and to elucidate issues concerning their function. To deal with these questions, we have chosen the clan CD of cysteine peptidases, which is formed by different protein families that play key roles in plants. An evolutionary comparative analysis of clan CD cysteine peptidases in representative species of different taxonomic groups that appeared during the e...

  1. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors. PMID:27165526

  2. The toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza

    Plants play an important role in the fate of nanoparticles in the environment through their uptake, bioaccumulation, and transfer to trophic chains. However, the impacts of nanoparticles on plants as essential components of all ecosystems are not well documented. In the present study, the toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles on Spirodela polyrrhiza as an aquatic higher plant species were studied. l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles were synthesized using hydrothermal method and their characteristics were determined by XRD, SEM, HR-TEM, and FT-IR techniques. The diameter of majority of synthesized nanoparticles was about 15–20 nm. Subsequently, the uptake of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles by the plant species was confirmed using epifluorescence microscopy. The activity of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as antioxidant enzymes was assayed and the relative frond number was calculated in the presence of different concentrations of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles. The obtained results revealed the toxic effects of the synthesized nanoparticles on S. polyrrhiza, leading to growth reduction and significant changes in antioxidant enzymes’ activity.Graphical Abstract

  3. The toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza

    Khataee, Alireza, E-mail: ar_khataee@yahoo.com [University of Tabriz, Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movafeghi, Ali [University of Tabriz, Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazari, Fatemeh [University of Tabriz, Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vafaei, Fatemeh [University of Tabriz, Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadpour, Mohammad Reza [University of Tabriz, Department of Horticultural Science, Faculty of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo, E-mail: swjoo@yu.ac.kr [Yeungnam University, School of Mechanical Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Plants play an important role in the fate of nanoparticles in the environment through their uptake, bioaccumulation, and transfer to trophic chains. However, the impacts of nanoparticles on plants as essential components of all ecosystems are not well documented. In the present study, the toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles on Spirodela polyrrhiza as an aquatic higher plant species were studied. l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles were synthesized using hydrothermal method and their characteristics were determined by XRD, SEM, HR-TEM, and FT-IR techniques. The diameter of majority of synthesized nanoparticles was about 15–20 nm. Subsequently, the uptake of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles by the plant species was confirmed using epifluorescence microscopy. The activity of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as antioxidant enzymes was assayed and the relative frond number was calculated in the presence of different concentrations of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles. The obtained results revealed the toxic effects of the synthesized nanoparticles on S. polyrrhiza, leading to growth reduction and significant changes in antioxidant enzymes’ activity.Graphical Abstract.

  4. Thiol accumulation and cysteine desulfhydrase activity in H2S-fumigated leaves and leaf homogenates of cucurbit plants

    Schütz, Bärbel; De Kok, Luit J.; Rennenberg, Heinz

    1991-01-01

    Fumigation of both, cucurbit plants and cucurbit leaf homogenates with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) resulted in an increase in soluble thiol, mainly glutathione and cysteine. In leaf homogenates this increase was counteracted or prevented by the addition at 1 mM of inhibitors of pyridoxalphosphate depende

  5. An electroblotting, two-step procedure for the detection of proteinases and the study of proteinase/inhibitor complexes in gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels.

    Visal-Shah, S; Vrain, T C; Yelle, T C; Nguyen-Quoc, B; Michaud, D

    2001-08-01

    A two-step gelatin/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (gelatin/PAGE) procedure was devised for the detection of proteinases and the study of proteinase/inhibitor interactions in complex biological extracts. The proteins are first resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE under reducing or nonreducing conditions, and electrotransferred into a 0.75 mm-thick accompanying polyacrylamide slab gel containing 0.1% w/v porcine gelatin. The active proteinase bands are developed by a gelatin proteolysis step in the accompanying gel in the presence or absence of diagnostic proteinase inhibitors, allowing the assessment of proteinase classes and the visual discrimination of inhibitor-'sensitive' and -'insensitive' proteinases in complex extracts. Alternatively, protein extracts are preincubated with specific reversible inhibitors before electrophoresis, allowing a rapid discrimination of strong and weak interactions implicating proteinases and reversible inhibitors. In comparison with the standard gelatin/PAGE procedure, that involves copolymerization of gelatin with acrylamide in the resolving gel, this new procedure simplifies proteinase patterns, avoids overestimation of proteinase numbers in complex extracts, and allows in certain conditions the estimation of proteinase molecular weights. Stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.32), bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4), papain (EC 3.4.22.2), and the extracellular (digestive) cysteine proteinases of five herbivorous pests are used as model enzymes to illustrate the usefulness of this approach in detecting proteinases and in studying their interactions with specific proteinaceous inhibitors potentially useful in biotechnology. PMID:11545387

  6. Proteinases and associated genes of parasitic helminths.

    Tort, J; Brindley, P J; Knox, D; Wolfe, K H; Dalton, J P

    1999-01-01

    Many parasites have deployed proteinases to accomplish some of the tasks imposed by a parasitic life style, including tissue penetration, digestion of host tissue for nutrition and evasion of host immune responses. Information on proteinases from trematodes, cestodes and nematode parasites is reviewed, concentrating on those worms of major medical and economical importance. Their biochemical characterization is discussed, along with their putative biological roles and, where available, their associated genes. For example, proteinases expressed by the various stages of the schistosome life-cycle, in particular the well-characterized cercarial elastase which is involved in the penetration of the host skin and the variety of proteinases, such as cathepsin B (Sm31), cathepsin L1, cathepsin L2, cathepsin D, cathepsin C and legumain (Sm32), which are believed to be involved in the catabolism of host haemoglobin. The various endo- and exoproteinases of Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of liver fluke disease, are reviewed, and recent reports of how these enzymes have been successfully employed in cocktail vaccines are discussed. The various proteinases of cestodes and of the diverse superfamilies of parasitic nematodes are detailed, with special attention being given to those parasites for which most is known, including species of Taenia, Echinococcus, Spirometra, Necator, Acylostoma and Haemonchus. By far the largest number of papers in the literature and entries to the sequence data bases dealing with proteinases of parasitic helminths report on enzymes belonging to the papain superfamily of cysteine proteinases. Accordingly, the final section of the review is devoted to a phylogenetic analysis of this superfamily using over 150 published sequences. This analysis shows that the papain superfamily can be divided into two major branches. Branch A contains the cathepin Bs, the cathepsin Cs and a novel family termed cathepsin Xs, while Branch B contains the cruzipains

  7. Immobilised native plant cysteine proteases: packed-bed reactor for white wine protein stabilisation.

    Benucci, Ilaria; Lombardelli, Claudio; Liburdi, Katia; Acciaro, Giuseppe; Zappino, Matteo; Esti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a feasibility study of using a continuous packed-bed reactor (PBR), containing immobilised native plant cysteine proteases, as a specific and mild alternative technique relative to the usual bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. The operational parameters for a PBR containing immobilised bromelain (PBR-br) or immobilised papain (PBR-pa) were optimised using model wine fortified with synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA). The effectiveness of PBR-br, both in terms of hazing potential and total protein decrease, was significantly higher than PBR-pa, in all the seven unfined, white wines used. Among the wines tested, Sauvignon Blanc, given its total protein content as well as its very high intrinsic instability, was selected as a control wine to evaluate the effect of the treatment on wine as to its soluble protein profile, phenolic composition, mineral component, and sensory properties. The treatment in a PBR containing immobilised bromelain appeared effective in decreasing both wine hazing potential and total protein amount, while it did not significantly affect the phenol compounds, the mineral component nor the sensory quality of wine. The enzymatic treatment in PBR was shown to be a specific and mild technique for use as an alternative to bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. PMID:27162393

  8. PAPAIN, A PLANT ENZYME OF BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE: A REVIEW

    Ezekiel Amri; Florence Mamboya

    2012-01-01

    Papain is a plant proteolytic enzyme for the cysteine proteinase family cysteine protease enzyme in which enormous progress has been made to understand its functions. Papain is found naturally in papaya (Carica papaya L.) manufactured from the latex of raw papaya fruits. The enzyme is able to break down organic molecules made of amino acids, known as polypeptides and thus plays a crucial role in diverse biological processes in physiological and pathological states, drug designs, industrial us...

  9. Proteinase activity regulation by glycosaminoglycans

    Tersariol I.L.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports concerning the biological role and the mechanisms of interaction between proteinases and carbohydrates other than those involved in clotting. It has been shown that the interplay of enzymes and glycosaminoglycans is able to modulate the activity of different proteases and also to affect their structures. From the large number of proteases belonging to the well-known protease families and also the variety of carbohydrates described as widely distributed, only few events have been analyzed more deeply. The term "family" is used to describe a group of proteases in which every member shows an evolutionary relationship to at least one other protease. This relationship may be evident throughout the entire sequence, or at least in that part of the sequence responsible for catalytic activity. The majority of proteases belong to the serine, cysteine, aspartic or metalloprotease families. By considering the existing limited proteolysis process, in addition to the initial idea that the proteinases participate only in digestive processes, it is possible to conclude that the function of the enzymes is strictly limited to the cleavage of intended substrates since the destruction of functional proteins would result in normal tissue damage. In addition, the location as well as the eventual regulation of protease activity promoted by glycosaminoglycans can play an essential role in the development of several physiopathological conditions.

  10. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    Piñeiro Galvin, Manuel; García Olmedo, Francisco; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1...

  11. Cysteine based novel noncompetitive inhibitors of urease(s)--distinctive inhibition susceptibility of microbial and plant ureases.

    Amtul, Zareen; Kausar, Naheed; Follmer, Cristian; Rozmahel, Richard F; Atta-Ur-Rahman; Kazmi, Syed Arif; Shekhani, Mohammed Saleh; Eriksen, Jason L; Khan, Khalid M; Choudhary, Mohammad Iqbal

    2006-10-01

    Based on the catalysis mechanism of urease, a homologous series of 10 cysteine derivatives (CysDs) was designed and synthesized, and their inhibitory activities were evaluated for microbial ureases (Bacillus pasteurii, BPU, and Proteus mirabilis, PMU) and for a plant urease [jack bean (Cavavalia ensiformis), JBU]. As already described, thiol-compounds might inhibit urease activity by chelating the nickel atoms involved in the catalysis process. In contrast to cysteine, which has been reported to be a very weak urease inhibitor, we verified a potential inhibitory activity of these CysDs. The kinetic data demonstrate that thiol derivatives are more effective than the respective thioether derivatives. Besides, thiol-CysDs had a reduced activity in acidic pH (5.0). Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated that the nature of inhibition was of noncompetitive type for all 10 compounds, with the minimum Ki value of 2 microM for N,N-dimethyl L-cysteine. It is proposed that these classes of compounds are more potent inhibitors of the bacterial ureases, compared with the plant-originated urease. Since microbial urease is directly involved in the infection process of many pathological organisms, this work demonstrates that thiol-CysDs represent a class of new potential urease inhibitors. PMID:16859909

  12. Cysteine Protease Profiles of the Medicinal Plant Calotropis procera R. Br. Revealed by De Novo Transcriptome Analysis

    Kwon, Chang Woo; Park, Kyung-Min; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Shin, Sang Woon; Je, Yeon Ho; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2015-01-01

    Calotropis procera R. Br., a traditional medicinal plant in India, is a promising source of commercial proteases, because the cysteine proteases from the plant exhibit high thermo-stability, broad pH optima, and plasma-clotting activity. Though several proteases such as Procerain, Procerain B, CpCp-1, CpCp-2, and CpCp-3 have been isolated and characterized, the information of their transcripts is limited to cDNAs encoding their mature peptides. Due to this limitation, in this study, to determ...

  13. 溶组织内阿米巴半胱氨酸蛋白酶的纯化及其活性的初步研究%Preliminary Study on Isolation, Purification and Hydrolytic Activity of Cysteine Proteinases in Entamoeba histol ytica

    严哲; 陈绳亮; 毛孙忠

    2001-01-01

    目的探索溶组织内阿米巴通过基底膜进入固有膜的机制,了解其半胱氨酸蛋白酶(cysteine pro-teinase, CP)与胞外基质的相互作用.方法阿米巴裂解液通过laminin-Sepharose亲和层析和分离纯化,经分子量测定、测序及抑制剂实验,证明为CP,以凝胶电泳测定其水解活性.结果纯化的CP与1aminin有较强亲和力,其分子量为27 kDa,被EC-64所抑制,并具水解活性.结论溶组织内阿米巴半胱氨酸蛋白酶与胞外基质laminin特异性结合,起水解作用,可能是入侵肠粘膜细胞基底膜的关键.

  14. Antibody in sera of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis is to trichomonad proteinases.

    Alderete, J F; Newton, E.; C. Dennis; Neale, K A

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A recent report demonstrated the immunogenic character of the cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis. It was of interest, therefore, to examine for the presence of serum anti-proteinase antibody among patients with trichomoniasis. METHODS--An immunoprecipitation assay was used involving protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus first coated with the IgG fraction of goat anti-human Ig and then mixed with individual sera of patients to bind human antibody. These antibody-coated...

  15. RESEARCH ON PROTEINASE INHIBITORS OF BEANS PHASEOLUS VULGARIS TO MAKE PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS FROM PESTS AND DISEASES

    Pavlovskaya, N.; Gagarina, I.; Dzumabaeva, B.; Dzangalina, E.

    2014-01-01

    An animal body and seed plants have a complex of proteolytic ferments which react in reserve protein breakdown to amino acids in food digestion and seed sprouting. At present a few hundreds of peptidohydrolases of different origin have been described. In regulation of proteolysis inhibitors of proteolytic ferments react. In a living organism they are presented by means of specific protein. Inhibitors have an ability to slow down or stop fermentation. They react in immunity apoptosis, protect ...

  16. Serine and cysteine protease-like genes in the genome of a gall midge and their interactions with host plant genotypes

    For plant-feeding insects, digestive proteases are targets for engineering protease inhibitors for pest control. In this study, we identified 105 putative serine- and cysteine-protease genes from Hessian fly genome. Among the genes, 31 encode putative trypsins, 18 encode putative chymotrypsins, se...

  17. Structure and function of invertebrate Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors.

    Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2010-04-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. The proteinase inhibitors function as modulators for controlling the extent of deleterious proteinase activity. The Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) in family I1 are among the well-known families of proteinase inhibitors, widely found in mammals, avian and a variety of invertebrates. Like those classical KPIs, the invertebrate KPIs can be single or multiple domain proteins containing one or more Kazal inhibitory domains linked together by peptide spacers of variable length. All invertebrate Kazal domains of about 40-60 amino acids in length share a common structure which is dictated by six conserved cysteine residues forming three intra-domain disulfide cross-links despite the variability of amino acid sequences between the half-cystines. Invertebrate KPIs are strong inhibitors as shown by their extremely high association constant of 10(7)-10(13)M(-1). The inhibitory specificity of a Kazal domain varies widely with a different reactive P(1) amino acid. Different invertebrate KPI domains may arise from gene duplication but several KPI proteins can also be derived from alternative splicing. The invertebrate KPIs function as anticoagulants in blood-sucking animals such as leech, mosquitoes and ticks. Several KPIs are likely involved in protecting host from microbial proteinases while some from the parasitic protozoa help protecting the parasites from the host digestive proteinase enzymes. Silk moths produce KPIs to protect their cocoon from predators and microbial destruction. PMID:19995574

  18. Digestive duet: midgut digestive proteinases of Manduca sexta ingesting Nicotiana attenuata with manipulated trypsin proteinase inhibitor expression.

    Jorge A Zavala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The defensive effect of endogenous trypsin proteinase inhibitors (NaTPIs on the herbivore Manduca sexta was demonstrated by genetically altering NaTPI production in M. sexta's host plant, Nicotiana attenuata. To understand how this defense works, we studied the effects of NaTPI on M. sexta gut proteinase activity levels in different larval instars of caterpillars feeding freely on untransformed and transformed plants. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Second and third instars larvae that fed on NaTPI-producing (WT genotypes were lighter and had less gut proteinase activity compared to those that fed on genotypes with either little or no NaTPI activity. Unexpectedly, NaTPI activity in vitro assays not only inhibited the trypsin sensitive fraction of gut proteinase activity but also halved the NaTPI-insensitive fraction in third-instar larvae. Unable to degrade NaTPI, larvae apparently lacked the means to adapt to NaTPI in their diet. However, caterpillars recovered at least part of their gut proteinase activity when they were transferred from NaTPI-producing host plants to NaTPI-free host plants. In addition extracts of basal leaves inhibited more gut proteinase activity than did extracts of middle stem leaves with the same protein content. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Although larvae can minimize the effects of high NaTPI levels by feeding on leaves with high protein and low NaTPI activity, the host plant's endogenous NaTPIs remain an effective defense against M. sexta, inhibiting gut proteinase and affecting larval performance.

  19. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens. PMID:26853817

  20. Plasmin: indigenous milk proteinase

    Samir Kalit

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The most important characteristic of plasmin, as significant indigenous milk proteinase, its concentration, concentration measuring procedure and activity of plasmin are described. The most important factors, which have an influence on concentration and plasmin activity in milk, are stage of lactation and mastitis (high somatic cell count – SCC. In high SCC milk indigenous proteinase activity increased, especially in plasmin and plasminogen system.Specific hydrolytic activity of plasmin during primary proteolysis of some casein fractions is described. ß-CN is most susceptible fraction, but αs1-CN and αs2-Cn are less susceptible to degradation by plasmin. Almost all fractions of κ-CN are resistant to degradation by plasmin. Activation of plasminogen to plasmin is very complex biochemical process influenced by activators and inhibitors in milk, and can be increased in high SCC milk. There are many various types of inhibitors in milk serum and ßlactoglobulin is the most important after its thermal denaturation. Addition of aprotinin and soybean tripsin inhibitors in milk inhibits plasmin activity. Most important characteristic of plasmin is its thermostability onpasteurisation and even sterilisation. Mechanism of thermal inactivation of plasmin with developing covalent disulphide interaction between molecule of plasmin and serum proteins (mostly ß-laktoglobulin is described. Thermosensitive inhibitors of plasminogen activators and inhibitors of plasmin are inactivated by short pasteurisation and therefore increase plasmin activity,while higher temperature and longer treatment time inactivate plasmin activity.

  1. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  2. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward [3H]-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics

  3. [Proteinase-proteinase inhibitor complex in rats under oxidative stress caused by administration of cobalt chloride].

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2000-01-01

    Mechanisms of proteinase-inhibitor proteinase system response was estimated following of cobalt chloride injection. The increase proteinase activity, which led to significant decrease of alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha-2-MG) level was established that indicated to the removal of the proteinase in complex with alpha-2-MG from the organism. Increase of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha-1-PI) trypsin-inhibitory activity in the kidneys testify about removal of oxidative alpha-1-PI. PMID:10979565

  4. Thiol-activated serine proteinases from nymphal hemolymph of the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria migratorioides.

    Hanzon, Jacob; Smirnoff, Patricia; Applebaum, Shalom W; Mattoo, Autar K; Birk, Yehudith

    2003-02-01

    Two unique serine proteinase isoenzymes (LmHP-1 and LmHP-2) were isolated from the hemolymph of African migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) nymphs. Both have a molecular mass of about 23 kDa and are activated by thiol-reducing agents. PMSF abolishes enzymes activity only after thiol activation, while the cysteine proteinase inhibitors E-64, iodoacetamide, and heavy metals fail to inhibit the thiol-activated enzymes. The N-terminal sequence was determined for the more-abundant LmHP-2 isoenzyme. It exhibits partial homology to that of other insect serine proteinases and similar substrate specificity and inhibition by the synthetic and protein trypsin inhibitors pABA, TLCK, BBI, and STI. The locust trypsins LmHP-1 and LmHP-2 constitute a new category of serine proteases wherein the active site of the enzyme is exposed by thiol activation without cleavage of peptide bonds. PMID:12559979

  5. Thiol proteinase inhibitor - Oryzacystatin. Molecular cloning and expression in E. coli

    Insect depredation is a major reason for the reduction in crop yields world-wide. Promising results have already been achieved with transgenic plants expression cowpea trypsin inhibitor (CpTI) genes and modified delta-endotoxin genes. Insects, in general, hydrolyse ingested proteins with a variety of proteinase. The effect of the serine proteinase inhibitor against Lepidopteran insects is probably caused by the preponderance of serine type gut proteinase and a luminal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. On the other hand, the insect orders Coleoptera and Hemiptera have gut pHs in the mildly acidic range and commonly have thiol type gut proteinases. Plant transformation with a gene coding for a thiol proteinase inhibitor has been suggested as a strategy for interfering with the digestive physiology of Coleopteran and Hemipteran insects. Co-transformation of both the serine proteinase inhibitor and the thiol proteinase inhibitor genes might result in a broader spectrum of activity and increased durability of protection

  6. Inibidores de proteases de hospedeiros nativos e exóticos e sua ação em intestinos de lagartas de Thyrinteina leucoceraea Proteinase inhibitors of novel and native host plants and their action in midgut of Thyrinteina leucoceraea caterpillars

    Jeanne Scardini Marinho

    2008-12-01

    hosts (also Myrtaceae in Brazil and introduced from Australia, suffer attacks by T. leucoceraea, which became a severe pest of this plant. Plants can defend themselves against herbivores using proteinase inhibitors which reduce insect development and lead them to death. Thus, based on studies on the development of T. leucoceraea caterpillars on these two hosts and plant defense, this work aimed to verify the production of proteinase inhibitors by guava and eucalyptus plants upon T. leucoceraea attack, and to observe the biochemical response of the midgut of the caterpillars to these inhibitors. Eucalyptus plants produced more proteinase inhibitors than guava plants. The good development of T. leucoceraea in eucalyptus plants despite the high concentration of proteinase inhibitors may be due to an increase of enzyme activity in the caterpillars' midgut. Our data suggest that T. leucoceraea developed an adaptation to the proteinase inhhibitor produced by eucalyptus plants, by increasing serine-proteinase and cys-proteinase activities.

  7. Purification of a cysteine protease inhibitor from larval hemolymph of the Tobacco Hornworm (Manduca sexta) and functional expression of the recombinant protein.

    A cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) with an apparent molecular mass of 11.5 kDa was purified from larval hemolymph of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) by gel filtration of Sephadex G-50 followed by hydrophobic and ion-exchange column chromatographies. The purified cysteine proteinase inhibitor, ...

  8. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding cysteine proteases from senescent leaves of Gossypium hirsutum

    SHEN Fafu; YU Shuxun; HAN Xiulan; FAN Shuli

    2004-01-01

    A gene encoding a cysteine proteinase was isolated from senescent leave of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cv liaomian No. 9 by utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), and a set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal the conserved sequences of plant cysteine protease genes. The cDNA, which designated Ghcysp gene, contained 1368 bp terminating in a poly(A)+ trail, and included a putative 5′(98 bp) and a 3′(235 bp) non-coding region. The opening reading frame (ORF) encodes polypeptide 344 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 37.88 kD and theoretical pI of 4.80. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence in the GenBank database has shown considerable sequence similarity to a novel family of plant cysteine proteases. This putative cotton Ghcysp protein shows from 67% to 82% identity to the other plants. All of them share catalytic triad of residues, which are highly conserved in three regions. Hydropaths analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that the Ghcysp is a potential membrane protein and localizes to the vacuole, which has a transmembrane helix between resides 7-25. A characteristic feature of Ghcysp is the presence of a putative vacuole-targeting signal peptide of 19-amino acid residues at the N-terminal region. The expression of Ghcysp gene was determined using northern blot analysis. The Ghcysp mRNA levels are high in development senescent leaf but below the limit of detection in senescent root, hypocotyl, faded flower, 6 d post anthesis ovule, and young leaf.

  9. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  10. Researches on Sequence of Plant Cystatin: Phytocystatin

    QINQingfeng; HEWei; LIANGJun; ZHANGXingyao

    2005-01-01

    Plant cystatins or phytocystatins are cysteine proteinase inhibitors exist widely in different plant species. Because they can kill insects by inhibiting the digestive function of the cysteine proteinase in gut, they are believed to play an important role in plant's defense against pests. Phytocystatins contain the conserved QXVXG motif and show some features on their sequence different to animal cystatins.After sequencing the protein directly and the cDNA clone, a large number of plant cystatins have been characterized. A multialignment with BLAST software and a detail analysis of 38 phytocystatins show that phytocystatins possess a specific conserved amino acid sequence [LRVI]-[AGT]-[RQKE]-[FY]-[AS]-[VI]-X-[EGHDQV]-[HYFQ]-N different to the conserved sequence demonstrated by Margis in 1998. This conserved sequence can be enough to detect with exclusivity phytocystatin sequences on protein data banks. A classification of these phytocystatins is performed and they can be divided into 3 groups according to their features on amino acid sequence, and the group-I can be still divided into 3 subgroups based on the feature of their amino acid and genomic sequence. By the CLUSTALX software,the most conserved nucleotide sequences of phytocystatins were found, which could be used to design the degenerate premiers to search new phytocystatins with PCR reaction.

  11. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Srinidi Mohan

    Full Text Available When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L. lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM, a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50 values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  12. Reactive oxygen species and anti-proteinases.

    Siddiqui, Tooba; Zia, Mohammad Khalid; Ali, Syed Saqib; Rehman, Ahmed Abdur; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Fahim Halim

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause damage to macromolecules such as proteins, lipids and DNA and alters their structure and function. When generated outside the cell, ROS can induce damage to anti-proteinases. Anti-proteinases are proteins that are involved in the control and regulation of proteolytic enzymes. The damage caused to anti-proteinase barrier disturbs the proteinase-anti-proteinases balance and uncontrolled proteolysis at the site of injury promotes tissue damage. Studies have shown that ROS damages anti-proteinase shield of the body by inactivating key members such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-antitrypsin. Hypochlorous acid inactivates α-1-antitrypsin by oxidizing a critical reactive methionine residue. Superoxide and hypochlorous acid are physiological inactivators of alpha-2-macroglobulin. The damage to anti-proteinase barrier induced by ROS is a hallmark of diseases such as atherosclerosis, emphysema and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, understanding the behaviour of ROS-induced damage to anti-proteinases may helps us in development of strategies that could control these inflammatory reactions and diseases. PMID:26699123

  13. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date. PMID:6385962

  14. Simultaneous determination of individual isothiocyanates in plant samples by HPLC-DAD-MS following SPE and derivatization with N-acetyl-l-cysteine.

    Pilipczuk, Tadeusz; Kusznierewicz, Barbara; Chmiel, Tomasz; Przychodzeń, Witold; Bartoszek, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    The procedure for the isothiocyanates (ITCs) determination that involves derivatization with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and separation by HPLC was developed. Prior to derivatization, plant ITCs were isolated and purified using solid-phase extraction (SPE). The optimum conditions of derivatization are: 500μL of isopropanolic eluate obtained by SPE combined with 500μL of derivatizing reagent (0.2M NAC and 0.2M NaHCO3 in water) and reaction time of 1h at 50°C. The formed dithiocarbamates are directly analyzed by HPLC coupled with diode array detector and mass spectrometer if required. The method was validated for nine common natural ITCs. Calibration curves were linear (R(2)⩾0.991) within a wide range of concentrations and limits of detection were below 4.9nmol/mL. The recoveries were in the range of 83.3-103.7%, with relative standard deviations <5.4%. The developed method has been successfully applied to determine ITCs in broccoli, white cabbage, garden cress, radish, horseradish and papaya. PMID:27507514

  15. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  16. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone. PMID:23859879

  17. A multifaceted study of stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA)-like Arabidopsis lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) suggests diversified roles for these LTPs in plant growth and reproduction

    Chae, Keun; Gonong, Benedict J.; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Balasubramanian, Shruthi; Lord, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    Lily stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA), a plant lipid transfer protein (LTP) which is secreted into the extracellular matrix, functions in pollen tube guidance in fertilization. A gain-of-function mutant (ltp5-1) for Arabidopsis LTP5, an SCA-like molecule, was recently shown to display defects in sexual reproduction. In the current study, it is reported that ltp5-1 plants have dwarfed primary shoots, delayed hypocotyl elongation, various abnormal tissue fusions, and display multibranch...

  18. Cysteine and Cysteine-Related SignalingPathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor moleculeinvolved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its deriva-tive molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine issynthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed byO-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resultingin a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools, in recent years, significant progress has been made inArabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the dis-covery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCSwith S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions.Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signalingmolecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essentialrole in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which isessential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  19. PAPAIN, A PLANT ENZYME OF BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE: A REVIEW

    Ezekiel Amri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Papain is a plant proteolytic enzyme for the cysteine proteinase family cysteine protease enzyme in which enormous progress has been made to understand its functions. Papain is found naturally in papaya (Carica papaya L. manufactured from the latex of raw papaya fruits. The enzyme is able to break down organic molecules made of amino acids, known as polypeptides and thus plays a crucial role in diverse biological processes in physiological and pathological states, drug designs, industrial uses such as meat tenderizers and pharmaceutical preparations. The unique structure of papain gives it the functionality that helps elucidate how proteolytic enzymes work and also makes it valuable for a variety of purposes. In the present review, its biological importance, properties and structural features that are important to an understanding of their biological function are presented. Its potential for production and market opportunities are also discussed.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum proteinases: cloning of the putative gene coding for the merozoite proteinase for erythrocyte invasion (MPEI and determination of hydrolysis sites of spectrin by Pf37 proteinase

    I. Florent

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous proteinase activities have been shown to be essential for the survival of Plasmodium falciparum. One approach to antimalarial chemotherapy, would be to block specifically one or several of these activities, by using compounds structurally analogous to the substrates of these proteinases. Such a strategy requires a detailed knowledge of the active site of the proteinase, in order to identify the best substrate for the proteinase. Aiming at developing such a strategy, two proteinases previously identified in our laboratory, were chosen for further characterization of their molecular structure and properties: the merozoite proteinase for erythrocytic invasion (MPEI, involved in the erythrocyte invasion by the merozoites, and the Pf37 proteinase, which hydrolyses human spectrin in vitro.

  1. Anthropogenic increase in carbon dioxide compromises plant defense against invasive insects

    Zavala, J.; Casteel, C.; DeLucia, E.; Berenbaum, M. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a consequence of anthropogenic global change, can profoundly affect the interactions between crop plants and insect pests and may promote yet another form of global change: the rapid establishment of invasive species. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased the susceptibility of soybean plants grown under field conditions to the invasive Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) and to a variant of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) resistant to crop rotation by down-regulating gene expression related to defense signaling [lipoxygenase 7 (lox7), lipoxygenase 8 (lox8), and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (acc-s)]. The down-regulation of these genes, in turn, reduced the production of cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CystPIs), which are specific deterrents to coleopteran herbivores. Beetle herbivory increased CystPI activity to a greater degree in plants grown under ambient than under elevated CO{sub 2}. Gut cysteine proteinase activity was higher in beetles consuming foliage of soybeans grown under elevated CO{sub 2} than in beetles consuming soybeans grown in ambient CO{sub 2}, consistent with enhanced growth and development of these beetles on plants grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. These findings suggest that predicted increases in soybean productivity under projected elevated CO{sub 2} levels may be reduced by increased susceptibility to invasive crop pests.

  2. [Effect of adrenal stress on activity of proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in rats].

    Samokhina, L M; Kaliman, P A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of adrenal stress on the proteinase and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor activities in blood serum and cytosols of the rat organs were investigated. The reliable change was marked only in the alpha-1-PI level research of lung tissue cytosol. The proteolysis suppression was revealed in the heart and kidney tissue, while the proteolysis activation was revealed in serum and less in the lung tissue cytosol. Changes in proteinase level in the myocardium and kidney tissue play the primary role in respect to those of the other research liquids under study. PMID:7747353

  3. Proteinase genes of cheese starter cultures

    Kok, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The proteolytic enzymes of lactococci are of eminent importance for milk fermentations. By the combined action of proteinases and peptidases milk protein is degraded to peptides and amino acids which are required for cell growth and contribute to the organoleptic properties of the foods. The importa

  4. Cloning and sequence analysis of serine proteinase of Gloydius ussuriensis venom gland

    Objective: To construct a cDNA library by using mRNA from Gloydius ussuriensis (G. Ussuriensis) venom gland, to clone and analyze serine proteinase gene from the cDNA library. Methods: Total RNA was isolated from venom gland of G. ussuriensis, mRNA was purified by using mRNA isolation Kit. The whole length cDNA was synthesized by means of smart cDNA synthesis strategy, and amplified by long distance PCR procedure, lately cDAN was cloned into vector pBluescrip-sk. The recombinant cDNA was transformed into E. coli DH5α. The cDNA of serine proteinase gene in the venom gland of G. ussuriensis was detected and amplified using the in situ hybridization. The cDNA fragment was inserted into pGEMT vector, cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Results: The capacity of cDNA library of venom gland was above 2.3 x 106. Its open reading frame was composed of 702 nucleotides and coded a protein pre-zymogen of 234 amino acids. It contained 12 cysteine residues. The sequence analysis indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA fragment shared high identity with the thrombin-like enzyme genes of other snakes in the GenBank. the query sequence exhibited strong amino acid sequence homology of 85% to the serine proteas of T. gramineus, thrombin-like serine proteinase I of D. acutus and serine protease catroxase II of C. atrox respectively. Based on the amino acid sequences of other thrombin-like enzymes, the catalytic residues and disulfide bridges of this thrombin-like enzyme were deduced as follows: catalytic residues, His41, Asp86, Ser180; and six disulfide bridges Cys7-Cys139, Cys26-Cys42, Cys74-Cys232, Cys118-Cys186, Cys150-Cys165, Cys176-Cys201. Conclusion: The capacity of cDNA library of venom gland is above 2.3 x 106, overtop the level of 105 capicity. The constructed cDNA library of G. ussuriensis venom gland would be helpful platform to detect new target genes and further gene manipulate. The cloned serine proteinase gene exhibits strong amino

  5. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These protei...

  6. Seed-specific aspartic proteinase FeAP12 from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

    Timotijević Gordana S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartic proteinase gene (FeAP12 has been isolated from the cDNA library of developing buckwheat seeds. Analysis of its deduced amino acid sequence showed that it resembled the structure and shared high homology with typical plant aspartic proteinases (AP characterized by the presence of a plant-specific insert (PSI, unique among APs. It was shown that FeAP12 mRNA was not present in the leaves, roots, steam and flowers, but was seed-specifically expressed. Moreover, the highest levels of FeAP12 expression were observed in the early stages of seed development, therefore suggesting its potential role in nucellar degradation.

  7. Autoactivation of proteinase A initiates activation of yeast vacuolar zymogens

    van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1992-01-01

    -expression with PEP4 leads to normal processing, i.e. the mutant zymogen is functional as a substrate for the maturation reaction in trans. We conclude that wild-type pro-proteinase A has the ability to mediate its own activation. Elimination of the co-expressed PEP4 gene did not effectively stop the processing...... of the mutant zymogen, owing to a strong, proteinase-B-dependent, phenotypic lag. In a proteinase-B-negative strain, processing of pro-proteinase A led to an active form of a higher molecular mass than the normal mature form....

  8. [Effect of pentoxyphylline on certain indicators of the proteinase-proteinase inhibitor system in rats upon administration of cycloheximide].

    Samokhin, A A; Kaliman, P A; Samokhinka, L M

    2001-01-01

    The pentoxifylline influence on neutral proteinase, alpha-2-macroglobulin, trypsin-alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor and elastaseinhibitory activity under cycloheximide injection has been investigated. Two hours after cycloheximide injection the activity of neutral proteinases increases in rats serum, lungs, heart, liver and kidneys. The preliminary injection of pentoxifylline prevents increase of neutral proteinases activity. Cycloheximide also decreases alpha-2-macroglobulin activity in serum and liver and trypsin-, elastaseinhibitory activity of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in all investigated organs. At using pentoxifylline the alpha-2-macroglobulin activity doesn't change in liver and increases in serum in comparison with only cycloheximide and there are no observed any alpha-1 inhibitor proteinase activity changes in rats serum and organs. PMID:12035527

  9. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes...

  10. High sequence variability among hemocyte-specific Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors in decapod crustaceans.

    Cerenius, Lage; Liu, Haipeng; Zhang, Yanjiao; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Gunnar Andersson, M; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Crustacean hemocytes were found to produce a large number of transcripts coding for Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs). A detailed study performed with the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the shrimp Penaeus monodon revealed the presence of at least 26 and 20 different Kazal domains from the hemocyte KPIs, respectively. Comparisons with KPIs from other taxa indicate that the sequences of these domains evolve rapidly. A few conserved positions, e.g. six invariant cysteines were present in all domain sequences whereas the position of P1 amino acid, a determinant for substrate specificity, varied highly. A study with a single crayfish animal suggested that even at the individual level considerable sequence variability among hemocyte KPIs produced exist. Expression analysis of four crayfish KPI transcripts in hematopoietic tissue cells and different hemocyte types suggest that some of these KPIs are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis or hemocyte release as they were produced in particular hemocyte types or maturation stages only. PMID:19715720

  11. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    Craik Charles S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins. A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora.

  12. Interaction between pyrite and cysteine

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; LI Bang-mei; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of cysteine on pyrite was studied by amounts adsorbed, FTIR and XRD measurements. The results obtained by adsorption experiment suggest that as the mass ratio of mineral to cysteine mp/mc is greater than 5, the amounts adsorbed on mineral is stable after adsorption for 15 min and cysteine adsorbing with mp/mc shows the same tendency. It can be inferred by its Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm that chemical interaction governs the entire adsorption process. The results from FTIR and XRD prove that the functional groups of cysteine appear with blue shift of their characteristic adsorption peak in FTIR spectrum; meanwhile, the lattice constant obviously decreases and the widening of crystal planes such as (210), (220) and (211) is found after cysteine adsorbing on mineral.

  13. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    Heis Marta D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11

  14. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling sys...

  15. Characterization of cysteine-degrading and H2S-releasing enzymes of higher plants - From the field to the test tube and back

    Jutta, Papenbrock; Anja, Riemenschneider; Kamp, Anja;

    2007-01-01

    Due to the clean air acts and subsequent reduction of emission of gaseous sulfur compounds sulfur deficiency became one of the major nutrient disorders in Northern Europe. Typical sulfur deficiency symptoms can be diagnosed. Especially plants of the Cruciferae family are more susceptible against...

  16. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Oligo(L-cysteine) for Use as a Thermostable Bio-Based Material.

    Ma, Yinan; Sato, Ryota; Li, Zhibo; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of thiol-unprotected L-cysteine ethyl ester (Cys-OEt) catalyzed by proteinase K in aqueous solution has been used to synthesize oligo(L-cysteine) (OligoCys) with a well-defined chemical structure and relatively large degree of polymerization (DP) up to 16-17 (average 8.8). By using a high concentration of Cys-OEt, 78.0% free thiol content was achieved. The thermal properties of OligoCys are stable, with no glass transition until 200 °C, and the decomposition temperature could be increased by oxidation. Chemoenzymatically synthesized OligoCys has great potential for use as a thermostable bio-based material with resistance to oxidation. PMID:26388290

  17. Link between allergic asthma and airway mucosal infection suggested by proteinase-secreting household fungi

    Porter, P; Susarla, SC; Polikepahad, S; Qian, Y; HAMPTON, J.; Kiss, A; Vaidya, S; Sur, S.; Ongeri, V; Yang, T; Delclos, GL; Abramson, S.; Kheradmand, F.; Corry, DB

    2009-01-01

    Active fungal proteinases are powerful allergens that induce experimental allergic lung disease strongly resembling atopic asthma, but the precise relationship between proteinases and asthma remains unknown. Here, we analyzed dust collected from the homes of asthmatic children for the presence and sources of active proteinases to further explore the relationship between active proteinases, atopy, and asthma. Active proteinases were present in all houses and many were derived from fungi, espec...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Hatano, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  20. Evolutionary patterns of proteinase activity in attine ant fungus gardens

    Semenova, Tatyana; Hughes, David Peter; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan;

    2011-01-01

    of evolutionary more derived fungal symbionts. This notion is also supported by buffering capacities of fungus gardens at pH 5.2 being remarkably high, and suggests that the fungal symbiont actively helps to maintain garden acidity at this specific level. Metalloproteinases dominated the activity profiles....... Conclusions: Proteinase pH optima and buffering capacities of fungal symbionts appear to have evolved remarkable adaptations to living in obligate symbiosis with farming ants. Although the functional roles of serine and metalloproteinases in fungus gardens are unknown, the differential production...... hypothesized that fungal proteinase activity may have been under selection for efficiency and that different classes of proteinases might be involved. Results: We determined proteinase activity profiles across a wide pH range for fungus gardens of 14 Panamanian species of fungus-growing ants, representing...

  1. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  2. Proteinase 3 and prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Ng, Leong L.; Khan, Sohail Q; Narayan, Hafid; Quinn, Paulene; Squire, Iain B; Davies, Joan E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A multimarker approach may be useful for risk stratification in AMI patients, particularly utilising pathways that are pathophysiologically distinct. Aim Our aim was to assess the prognostic value of Proteinase 3 in patients post acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We compared the prognostic value of Proteinase 3, an inflammatory marker to an established marker N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) post-AMI. Method We recruited 9...

  3. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known,...

  4. Three distinct secreted aspartyl proteinases in Candida albicans.

    White, T C; Miyasaki, S H; Agabian, N

    1993-01-01

    The secreted aspartyl proteinases of Candida albicans (products of the SAP genes) are thought to contribute to virulence through their effects on Candida adherence, invasion, and pathogenicity. From a single strain of C. albicans (WO-1) which expresses a phenotypic switching system, three secreted aspartyl proteinases have been identified as determined by molecular weight and N-terminal sequence. Each of the three identified proteins represents the mature form of one of three distinct protein...

  5. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with 3H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia

  6. [Effect of quercetin on some indicators of the proteinase-proteinase inhibitor system in rats upon administration of cobalt chloride to them].

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2001-01-01

    The results of quercetin effect on some changes of proteinase--proteinase inhibitor system parameters in rats under cobalt chloride injection are shown. It was established that preliminary quercetin administration prevened neutral proteinase activation and alpha-2-macroglobulin activity decreasing after 2 h of cobalt chloride influence. PMID:12199071

  7. A murine ortholog of the human serpin SCCA2 maps to chromosome 1 and inhibits chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases.

    Bartuski, A J; Kamachi, Y; Schick, C; Massa, H; Trask, B J; Silverman, G A

    1998-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigens (SCCA) 1 and 2 are inhibitory members of the high-molecular-weight serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) family. The biological functions of SCCA1 and 2 are unknown. One approach to determining the function of human proteins is to study orthologs in other species, such as the mouse. The purpose of this study was to determine whether orthologs to human SCCA1 or 2 exist in the mouse. We report the identification and characterization of a novel serpin, sqn5 (now designated Scca2). Comparative amino acid sequence analysis suggests that Scca2 is a member of the ov-serpin subfamily of serpins with highest homology to SCCA1 and SCCA2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the Scca2 mapped near Bcl2 on mouse chromosome 1. This region is syntenic with the human locus for SCCA1 and SCCA2 on 18q21.3. The tissue expression patterns as determined by RT-PCR showed a restricted distribution. Scca2 was detected in the lung, thymus, skin, and uterus, as are SCCA1 and SCCA2. Unlike the SCCAs, however, Scca2 was detected also in the gastrointestinal tract. Enzyme-inhibition assays using a GST-SCCA2 fusion protein revealed that SCCA2 inhibited chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases, but not papain-like cysteine proteinases. SCCA2 inhibited CTSG at 1:1 stoichiometry and with a second-order rate constant of kass = 1.7 x 10(5) M-1 s-1. SCCA2 also inhibited human mast cell chymase but the stoichiometry was 2:1, and the second-order rate constant was kass = 0.9 x 10(4) M-1 s-1. This inhibitory profile is identical to that observed for human SCCA2. Based on these findings, Scca2 appears to be the murine ortholog of human SCCA2. PMID:9828132

  8. Selective modification of phosphoribulokinase cysteines

    Krieger, T.J.; Mende-Mueller, L.M.; Miziorko, H.M.

    1987-05-01

    The most reactive sulfhydryl in native phosphoribulokinase can be selectively alkylated with iodoacetate; complete loss of activity results. Composition and N-terminal analyses of the peptide bearing this -SH show that cys-16 is the modification site. In the presence of Mg and ATP, a nonessential -SH is modified; catalytic activity is unchanged. The peptide bearing this cysteine has been characterized by amino acid composition and N-terminal analyses (Phe-Phe-Asn-Pro-Val-Tyr-(Ile/Leu)...). Enzyme alkylated at this site is subject to reversible oxidative inactivation, showing that this cysteine is not involved in regulation of activity. A cysteine distinct from this nonessential residue is suggested by crosslinking studies to be close (5a) to cys-16. The site-directed inhibitor fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) inactivates enzyme by modifying cys-16. Carboxymethylation of enzyme after FSBA incorporation, followed by DTT treatment, unmasks the initial modification site and allows (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate labeling. The tryptic peptide bearing this residue co-chromatographs with and is identical in composition to the cys-16 containing peptide.

  9. Label-free quantitative proteomics reveals differentially regulated proteins in the latex of sticky diseased Carica papaya L. plants.

    Rodrigues, Silas P; Ventura, José A; Aguilar, Clemente; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Choi, HyungWon; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Nohara, Lilian L; Wermelinger, Luciana S; Almeida, Igor C; Zingali, Russolina B; Fernandes, Patricia M B

    2012-06-18

    Papaya meleira virus (PMeV) is so far the only described laticifer-infecting virus, the causal agent of papaya (Carica papaya L.) sticky disease. The effects of PMeV on the laticifers' regulatory network were addressed here through the proteomic analysis of papaya latex. Using both 1-DE- and 1D-LC-ESI-MS/MS, 160 unique papaya latex proteins were identified, representing 122 new proteins in the latex of this plant. Quantitative analysis by normalized spectral counting revealed 10 down-regulated proteins in the latex of diseased plants, 9 cysteine proteases (chymopapain) and 1 latex serine proteinase inhibitor. A repression of papaya latex proteolytic activity during PMeV infection was hypothesized. This was further confirmed by enzymatic assays that showed a reduction of cysteine-protease-associated proteolytic activity in the diseased papaya latex. These findings are discussed in the context of plant responses against pathogens and may greatly contribute to understand the roles of laticifers in plant stress responses. PMID:22465191

  10. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.; Emr, S D; van den Hazel, H B

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide of...

  11. Isolation and structural analysis of a gene coding for a novel type of aspartic proteinase from buckwheat seed (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

    Milisavljević Mira Đ.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel type of aspartic proteinase gene was isolated from the cDNA library of developing buckwheat seeds. This cDNA, FeAPL1, encoded an AP-like protein lacking the plant-specific insert (PSI domain characteristic of typical plant aspartic proteinases. In addition the corresponding genomic fragment was isolated. It is demonstrated that this gene does not contain introns. Since bioinformatics analysis of the Arabidopsis genome showed that most potential AP genes are intronless and PSI-less, it appears that "atypical" is an inappropriate word for that class of AP. Isolation of this specific buckwheat gene among the small group of those isolated from other plant species provides a new perspective on the diversity of AP family members in plants. .

  12. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling system. Its association is reversible, rendering the first enzyme of cysteine synthesis active and the second one inactive, and vice-versa. Complex formation is triggered by the reaction intermediates of cysteine synthesis in response to supply and demand and gives rise to regulation of genes of sulfur metabolism to adjust cellular sulfur homeostasis. Combinations of biochemistry, forward and reverse genetics, structural- and cell-biology approaches using Arabidopsis have revealed new enzyme functions and the unique pattern of spatial distribution of cysteine metabolism in plant cells. These findings place the synthesis of cysteine in the centre of the network of primary metabolism. PMID:22303278

  13. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N.; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; Van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signa...

  14. Identification, characterization and localization of chagasin, a tight-binding cysteine protease inhibitor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Monteiro, Ana C. S.; Abrahamson, Magnus; Lima, Ana P. C. A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Scharfstein, Julio

    2001-01-01

    Lysosomal cysteine proteases from mammalian cells and plants are regulated by endogenous tight-binding inhibitors from the cystatin superfamily. The presence of cystatin-like inhibitors in lower eukaryotes such as protozoan parasites has not yet been demonstrated, although these cells express large quantities of cysteine proteases and may also count on endogenous inhibitors to regulate cellular proteolysis. Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas heart disease, is a relevant model to...

  15. The aspartic proteinase family of three Phytophthora species

    ten Have Arjen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora species are oomycete plant pathogens with such major social and economic impact that genome sequences have been determined for Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum. Pepsin-like aspartic proteinases (APs are produced in a wide variety of species (from bacteria to humans and contain conserved motifs and landmark residues. APs fulfil critical roles in infectious organisms and their host cells. Annotation of Phytophthora APs would provide invaluable information for studies into their roles in the physiology of Phytophthora species and interactions with their hosts. Results Genomes of Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum contain 11-12 genes encoding APs. Nine of the original gene models in the P. infestans database and several in P. sojae and P. ramorum (three and four, respectively were erroneous. Gene models were corrected on the basis of EST data, consistent positioning of introns between orthologues and conservation of hallmark motifs. Phylogenetic analysis resolved the Phytophthora APs into 5 clades. Of the 12 sub-families, several contained an unconventional architecture, as they either lacked a signal peptide or a propart region. Remarkably, almost all APs are predicted to be membrane-bound. Conclusions One of the twelve Phytophthora APs is an unprecedented fusion protein with a putative G-protein coupled receptor as the C-terminal partner. The others appear to be related to well-documented enzymes from other species, including a vacuolar enzyme that is encoded in every fungal genome sequenced to date. Unexpectedly, however, the oomycetes were found to have both active and probably-inactive forms of an AP similar to vertebrate BACE, the enzyme responsible for initiating the processing cascade that generates the Aβ peptide central to Alzheimer's Disease. The oomycetes also encode enzymes similar to plasmepsin V, a membrane-bound AP that cleaves effector proteins of the malaria parasite

  16. Perspectives of digestive pest control with proteinase inhibitors that mainly affect the trypsin-like activity of Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    M.E. Pereira

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the main characteristics of the proteolytic activities of the velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, and their sensitivity to proteinase inhibitors and activators. Midguts of last instar larvae reared on an artificial diet were homogenized in 0.15 M NaCl and centrifuged at 14,000 g for 10 min at 4ºC and the supernatants were used in enzymatic assays at 30ºC, pH 10.0. Basal total proteolytic activity (azocasein hydrolysis was 1.14 ± 0.15 absorbance variation min-1 mg protein-1, at 420 nm; basal trypsin-like activity (N-benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide, BApNA, hydrolysis was 0.217 ± 0.02 mmol p-nitroaniline min-1 mg protein-1. The maximum proteolytic activities were observed at pH 10.5 using azocasein and at pH 10.0 using BApNA, this pH being identical to the midgut pH of 10.0. The maximum trypsin-like activity occurred at 50ºC, a temperature that reduces enzyme stability to 80 and 60% of the original, when pre-incubated for 5 and 30 min, respectively. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride inhibited the proteolytic activities with an IC50 of 0.39 mM for azocasein hydrolysis and of 1.35 mM for BApNA hydrolysis. Benzamidine inhibited the hydrolysis with an IC50 of 0.69 and 0.076 mM for azocasein and BApNA, respectively. The absence of cysteine-proteinases is indicated by the fact that 2-mercaptoethanol and L-cysteine did not increase the rate of azocasein hydrolysis. These results demonstrate the presence of serine-proteinases and the predominance of trypsin-like activity in the midgut of Lepidoptera insects, now also detected in A. gemmatalis, and suggest this enzyme as a major target for pest control based on disruption of protein metabolism using proteinase inhibitors.

  17. Characterization of peptide proteinase inhibitors isolated from boar seminal plasma

    Jelínková, Petra; Tichá, M.; Jonáková, Věra

    Praha : UOCHB AV ČR, 2003 - (Slaninová, J.; Collinsová, M.; Klasová, L.), s. 1-57 [Biologicky aktivní peptidy /8./. Praha (CZ), 23.04.2003-25.04.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/99/0357; GA ČR GP303/02/P069; GA MZd NJ7463 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 113100001 Keywords : boar seminal plasma proteins * proteinase inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. Plasma cysteine, cystine, and glutathione in cirrhosis.

    Chawla, R K; Lewis, F W; Kutner, M H; Bate, D M; Roy, R G; Rudman, D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma contains three forms of cyst(e)ine: cysteine, cystine, and protein-bound cysteine. The former is a thiol and the latter two are disulfides. The levels of all three types of cyst(e)ine, as well as the cysteinyl tripeptide glutathione, were measured in the plasma of 14 normal and 10 cirrhotic individuals. All subjects ate mixed foods. Some cirrhotic patients were studied during nasogastric hyperalimentation with Vivonex (Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, N.Y.) as well as during total parenteral nutrition with FreAmine III (American McGaw, Irvine, Calif.); neither formula contains cyst(e)ine. Regardless of the nature of the diet, cirrhotic patients had significantly subnormal values for cysteine, glutathione, and albumin. In addition, the following significant changes were found to be diet-dependent: (a) elevated methionine during Vivonex, (b) subnormal taurine during mixed foods and total parenteral nutrition, (c) depressed protein-bound cysteine during total parenteral nutrition, (d) depressed cyst(e)ine thiol/disulfide ratio during mixed foods, and (e) depressed total thiol during Vivonex and total parenteral nutrition. The data indicate multiple abnormalities in sulfur metabolism in cirrhosis. PMID:6468868

  19. Covalent targeting of acquired cysteines in cancer.

    Visscher, Marieke; Arkin, Michelle R; Dansen, Tobias B

    2016-02-01

    The thiolate side chain of cysteine has a unique functionality that drug hunters and chemical biologists have begun to exploit. For example, targeting cysteine residues in the ATP-binding pockets of kinases with thiol-reactive molecules has afforded increased selectivity and potency to drugs like imbrutinib, which inhibits the oncogene BTK, and CO-1686 and AZD9291 that target oncogenic mutant EGFR. Recently, disulfide libraries and targeted GDP-mimetics have been used to selectively label the G12C oncogenic mutation in KRAS. We reasoned that other oncogenes contain mutations to cysteine, and thus screened the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer for frequently acquired cysteines. Here, we describe the most common mutations and discuss how these mutations could be potential targets for cysteine-directed personalized therapeutics. PMID:26629855

  20. Getting a Knack for NAC: N-Acetyl-Cysteine

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    N-acetyl-cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl cysteine, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine are all designations for the same compound, which is abbreviated as NAC. NAC is a precursor to the amino acid cysteine, which ultimately plays two key metabolic roles. Through its metabolic contribution to glutathione production, cysteine participates in the general antioxidant activities of the body. Through its role as a modulator of the glutamatergic system, cysteine influences the reward-reinforcement pathway....

  1. The role of proteinase enzymes in the process of conversion of muscle to meat

    Dümen Emek

    2006-01-01

    Post mortem meat tenderization is a complex mechanism and unfortunately it has not been fully identified scientifically. It is known that endogenous proteinases have an important role in this mechanism. Detailed studies are being performed about the destructive effects of lysosomal proteinases and calcium dependent proteinases on the myofibrils and these are most common topics that are being investigated about meat tenderization processes by the scientists. The aim of this paper is to review ...

  2. Trichoderma harzianum transformant has high extracellular alkaline proteinase expression during specific mycoparasitic interactions

    Goldman Maria Helena S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycoparasite Trichoderma harzianum produces an alkaline proteinase that may be specifically involved in mycoparasitism. We have constructed transformant strains of this fungus that overexpress this alkaline proteinase. Some of the transformants were assessed for alkaline proteinase activity, and those with higher activity than the wild type were selected for further studies. One of these transformant strains produced an elevated and constitutive pbr1 mRNA level during mycoparasitic interactions with Rhizoctonia solani.

  3. Expression of extracellular acid proteinase by proteolytic Candida spp. during experimental infection of oral mucosa.

    Borg, M; Rüchel, R.

    1988-01-01

    We traced an acid proteinase from Candida spp. in the initial stages of the pathogenesis of the mycosis. On infection of human buccal mucosa, proteinase antigens were detected by immuno-scanning electron microscopy on the surface of adhering blastoconidia and invading filamentous cells of C. albicans serotype A. Proteinase antigens were also present on blastoconidia of C. albicans serotype B, but were missing on filamentous cells of this serotype. Proteolytic isolates of C. tropicalis behaved...

  4. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene.

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-06-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  5. The role of proteinase enzymes in the process of conversion of muscle to meat

    Dümen Emek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Post mortem meat tenderization is a complex mechanism and unfortunately it has not been fully identified scientifically. It is known that endogenous proteinases have an important role in this mechanism. Detailed studies are being performed about the destructive effects of lysosomal proteinases and calcium dependent proteinases on the myofibrils and these are most common topics that are being investigated about meat tenderization processes by the scientists. The aim of this paper is to review the role of proteinase enzymes in the process of conversion of muscle to meat. .

  6. Long-term cysteine fortification impacts cysteine/glutathione homeostasis and food intake in ageing rats

    Vidal, Karine; Breuille, Denis; Serrant, Patrick; Denis, Philippe; Glomot, Francoise; Bechereau, Fabienne; PAPET, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Healthy ageing is associated with higher levels of glutathione. The study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary fortification with cysteine increases cysteine and glutathione pools, thus alleviating age-associated low-grade inflammation and resulting in global physiological benefits. The effect of a 14-week dietary fortification with cysteine was studied in non-inflamed (NI, healthy at baseline) and in spontaneously age-related low-grade inflamed (LGI, prefrail at baseline) 21-month-ol...

  7. L-Cysteine inhibits root elongation through auxin/PLETHORA and SCR/SHR pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Zhen Wang; Jie-Li Mao; Ying-Jun Zhao; Chuan-You Li; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2015-01-01

    L‐Cysteine plays a prominent role in sulfur metabo-lism of plants. However, its role in root development is largely unknown. Here, we report that L‐cysteine reduces primary root growth in a dosage‐dependent manner. Elevating cel ular L‐cysteine level by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to high L‐cysteine, buthionine sulphoximine, or O‐acetylserine leads to altered auxin maximum in root tips, the expression of quiescent center cel marker as wel as the decrease of the auxin carriers PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, and PIN7 of primary roots. We also show that high L‐cysteine significantly reduces the protein level of two sets of stem cel specific transcription factors PLETHORA1/2 and SCR/SHR. However, L‐cysteine does not downregulate the transcript level of PINs, PLTs, or SCR/SHR, suggesting that an uncharacterized post‐transcriptional mech-anism may regulate the accumulation of PIN, PLT, and SCR/SHR proteins and auxin transport in the root tips. These results suggest that endogenous L‐cysteine level acts to maintain root stem cel niche by regulating basal‐and auxin‐induced expression of PLT1/2 and SCR/SHR. L‐Cysteine may serve as a link between sulfate assimilation and auxin in regulating root growth.

  8. Proteinase K processing of rabbit muscle creatine kinase

    Leydier, C; Andersen, Jens S.; Couthon, F;

    1997-01-01

    Proteinase K cleaves selectively both cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of creatine kinase leading to the appearance of two fragments, a large N-terminal one (K1) and a small C-terminal peptide (K2) which remain associated together. The loss of enzymatic activity correlates with the extent of...... monomer cleavage. N-terminal sequencing of the K2 fragments from rabbit cytosolic and pig mitochondrial creatine kinase shows that these peptides begin with A328 and A324, respectively. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry demonstrates that K2 peptide is composed of 53 residues (A328-K380). However...

  9. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H.; Roush, William R.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely r...

  10. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    Sojka, Daniel; FRANCISCHETTI, IVO M. B.; Calvo, Eric; KOTSYFAKIS, MICHALIS

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model...

  11. [Activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rat organs under cobalt and mercury chloride injection].

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rats under cobalt and mercury chloride injection was investigated. The calpains activity increase in the lungs, heart, liver and kidneys was revealed after 2 h cobalt chloride action. The mercury chloride gives a reliable increase of calcium-dependent neutral proteinases only in the kidneys. PMID:14574747

  12. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium-Linens ATCC-9174

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8,5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and...

  13. Link between allergic asthma and airway mucosal infection suggested by proteinase-secreting household fungi.

    Porter, P; Susarla, S C; Polikepahad, S; Qian, Y; Hampton, J; Kiss, A; Vaidya, S; Sur, S; Ongeri, V; Yang, T; Delclos, G L; Abramson, S; Kheradmand, F; Corry, D B

    2009-11-01

    Active fungal proteinases are powerful allergens that induce experimental allergic lung disease strongly resembling atopic asthma, but the precise relationship between proteinases and asthma remains unknown. Here, we analyzed dust collected from the homes of asthmatic children for the presence and sources of active proteinases to further explore the relationship between active proteinases, atopy, and asthma. Active proteinases were present in all houses and many were derived from fungi, especially Aspergillus niger. Proteinase-active dust extracts were alone insufficient to initiate asthma-like disease in mice, but conidia of A. niger readily established a contained airway mucosal infection, allergic lung disease, and atopy to an innocuous bystander antigen. Proteinase produced by A. niger enhanced fungal clearance from lung and was required for robust allergic disease. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-5 were required for optimal clearance of lung fungal infection and eosinophils showed potent anti-fungal activity in vitro. Thus, asthma and atopy may both represent a protective response against contained airway infection due to ubiquitous proteinase-producing fungi. PMID:19710638

  14. Differential gene expression for suicide-substrate serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) in vegetative and grain tissues of barley

    Roberts, T.H.; Marttila, S.; Rasmussen, S.K.; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    and vascular tissues of roots, and to the phloem of coleoptiles and leaves. The identification of BSZ4 in vegetative tissues by western blotting was confirmed for the roots by purification and amino acid sequencing, and for the leaves by in vitro reactive-centre loop cleavage studies. Plant serpins...... plant serpins are unknown. Expression studies of genes encoding members of three subfamilies of serpins (BSZx, BSZ4 and BSZ7) in developing grain and vegetative tissues of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) showed that transcripts encoding BSZx, which inhibits distinct proteinases at overlapping reactive...... centres in vitro, were ubiquitous at low levels, but the protein could not be detected. EST analysis showed that expression of genes for serpins with BSZx-type reactive centres in vegetative tissues is widespread in the plant kingdom, suggesting a common regulatory function. For BSZ4 and BSZ7, expression...

  15. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Pandey, Kailash C.; Rajnikant Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. ...

  16. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm

  17. Multifunctional amaranth cystatin inhibits endogenous and digestive insect cysteine endopeptidases: A potential tool to prevent proteolysis and for the control of insect pests.

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Galván-Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, the amaranth cystatin was characterized. This cystatin is believed to provide protection from abiotic stress because its transcription is induced in response to heat, drought, and salinity. It has also been shown that recombinant amaranth cystatin inhibits bromelain, ficin, and cysteine endopeptidases from fungal sources and also inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi. In the present study, evidence is presented regarding the potential function of amaranth cystatin as a regulator of endogenous proteinases and insect digestive proteinases. During amaranth germination and seedling growth, different proteolytic profiles were observed at different pH levels in gelatin-containing SDS-PAGE. Most of the proteolytic enzymes detected at pH 4.5 were mainly inhibited by trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucyl amido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and the purified recombinant amaranth cystatin. Furthermore, the recombinant amaranth cystatin was active against insect proteinases. In particular, the E-64-sensitive proteolytic digestive enzymes from Callosobruchus maculatus, Zabrotes subfasciatus, and Acanthoscelides obtectus were inhibited by the amaranth cystatin. Taken together, these results suggest multiple roles for cystatin in amaranth, specifically during germination and seedling growth and in the protection of A. hypochondriacus against insect predation. Amaranth cystatin represents a promising tool for diverse applications in the control of insect pest and for preventing undesirable proteolytic activity. PMID:25345487

  18. Nonfouling property of zwitterionic cysteine surface.

    Lin, Peter; Ding, Ling; Lin, Chii-Wann; Gu, Frank

    2014-06-10

    Applications of implantable bioelectronics for analytical and curative purposes are currently limited by their poor long-term biofunctionality in physiological media and nonspecific interactions with biomolecules. In an attempt to prolong in vivo functionality, recent advances in surface modifications have demonstrated that zwitterionic coatings can rival the performance of conventional poly(ethylene glycol) polymers in reducing nonspecific protein fouling. Herein, we report the fabrication of a very thin layer of nonfouling zwitterionic cysteine surface capable of protecting implantable bioelectronics from nonspecific adsorption of plasma proteins. This work is the first of its kind to fabricate, through solution chemistry, a cysteine surface exhibiting zwitterionic state as high as 88% and to demonstrate antibiofouling under the exposure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum. The fabricated surface utilized a minimal amount of gold substrate, approximately 10 nm, and an extremely thin antifouling layer at 1.14 nm verified by ellipsometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy assessment of the nitrogen (N1s) and carbon (C1s) spectra conclude that 87.8% of the fabricated cysteine surface is zwitterionic, 2.5% is positively charged, and 9.6% is noncharged. Antibiofouling performance of the cysteine surface is quantitatively determined by bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay as well as qualitatively confirmed using scanning electron spectroscopy. Cysteine surfaces demonstrated a BSA fouling of 3.9 ± 4.84% μg/cm(2), which is 93.6% and 98.5% lower than stainless steel and gold surfaces, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis returned similar results and suggest that a thinner cysteine coating will enhance performance. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the results of BCA assay and suggested that the cysteine surface demonstrated a 69% reduction to serum fouling. The results reported in this paper demonstrate that it is possible to achieve

  19. Reduction of Guanosyl Radical by Cysteine and Cysteine-Glycine Studied by Time-Resolved CIDNP

    Morozova, O.B.; Kaptein, R.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    As a model for chemical DNA repair, reduction of guanosyl radicals in the reaction with cysteine or the dipeptide cysteine-glycine has been studied by time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). Radicals were generated photochemically by pulsed laser irradiation of a solut

  20. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  1. cDNA Cloning and Molecular Modeling of Procerain B, a Novel Cysteine Endopeptidase Isolated from Calotropis procera

    Singh, Abhay Narayan; Yadav, Prity; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Procerain B, a novel cysteine protease (endopeptidase) isolated from Calotropis procera belongs to Asclepiadaceae family. Purification of the enzyme, biochemical characterization and potential applications are already published by our group. Here, we report cDNA cloning, complete amino acid sequencing and molecular modeling of procerain B. The derived amino acid sequence showed high sequence homology with other papain like plant cysteine proteases of peptidase C1A superfamily. The three dimen...

  2. Proteinase inhibitory activities of two two-domain Kazal proteinase inhibitors from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the importance of the P(2) position in proteinase inhibitory activity.

    Donpudsa, Suchao; Söderhäll, Irene; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Cerenius, Lage; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2010-11-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors are found ubiquitously in living organisms and involved in homeostasis of processes using proteinases as well as innate immune defense. Two two-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors (KPIs), KPI2 and KPI8, have been identified from the hemocyte cDNA library of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Unlike other KPIs from P. leniusculus, they are found specific to the hemocytes and contain an uncommon P(2) amino acid residue, Gly. To unveil their inhibitory activities, the two KPIs and their domains were over-expressed. By testing against subtilisin, trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase, the KPI2 was found to inhibit strongly against subtilisin and weakly against trypsin, while the KPI8 was strongly active against only trypsin. With their P(1) Ser and Lys residues, the KPI2_domain2 and KPI8_domain2 were responsible for strong inhibition against subtilisin and trypsin, respectively. Mutagenesis of KPI8_domain1 at P(2) amino acid residue from Gly to Pro, mimicking the P(2) residue of KPI8_domain2, rendered the KPI8_domain1 strongly active against trypsin, indicating the important role of P(2) residue in inhibitory activities of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors. Only the KPI2 was found to inhibit against the extracellular serine proteinases from the pathogenic oomycete of the freshwater crayfish, Aphanomyces astaci. PMID:20621193

  3. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  4. Serpins in plants and green algae

    Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    . Serpins have been found in diverse species of the plant kingdom and represent a distinct clade among serpins in multicellular organisms. Serpins are also found in green algae, but the evolutionary relationship between these serpins and those of plants remains unknown. Plant serpins are potent inhibitors...... of mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family in vitro but, intriguingly, plants and green algae lack endogenous members of this proteinase family, the most common targets for animal serpins. An Arabidopsis serpin with a conserved reactive centre is now known to be capable of inhibiting...

  5. In vivo and in vitro effect of Acacia nilotica seed proteinase inhibitors on Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) larvae

    S Ramesh Babu; B Subrahmanyam; Srinivasan; I M Santha

    2012-06-01

    Acacia nilotica proteinase inhibitor (AnPI) was isolated by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and resulted in a purification of 10.68-fold with a 19.5% yield. Electrophoretic analysis of purified AnPI protein resolved into a single band with molecular weight of approximately 18.6+1.00 kDa. AnPI had high stability at different pH values (2.0 to 10.0) except at pH 5.0 and are thermolabile beyond 80°C for 10 min. AnPI exhibited effective against total proteolytic activity and trypsin-like activity, but did not show any inhibitory effect on chymotrypsin activity of midgut of Helicoverpa armigera. The inhibition kinetics studies against H. armigera gut trypsin are of non-competitive type. AnPI had low affinity for H. armigera gut trypsin when compared to SBTI. The partially purified and purified PI proteins-incorporated test diets showed significant reduction in mean larval and pupal weight of H. armigera. The results provide important clues in designing strategies by using the proteinase inhibitors (PIs) from the A. nilotica that can be expressed in genetically engineered plants to confer resistance to H. armigera.

  6. Partial characterization of hepatopancreatic and extracellular digestive proteinases of wild and cultivated Octopus maya

    Martinez, Romain; R. Santos; A Alvarez; Cuzon, Gerard; L. Arena; M. Mascaro; Pascual, C; Rosas, C

    2011-01-01

    Proteinases from hepatopancreas (HP) and gastric juice (GJ) from wild and cultured red octopus (Octopus maya) were characterized. Hepatopancreas assays revealed optimal activity at pH 4, 9-10 and 10 for wild and pH 3, 8, and 9, for cultured octopuses, for total proteinases, trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. In the gastric juice, maximum activity was recorded at pH 6, 8, and 7 for total proteinases, trypsin, and chymotrypsin, respectively for both wild and cultured octopus. A reduction o...

  7. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8.5 and 50(deg)C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 126 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that the native enzyme exists as a dimer. Mg(sup2+) and Ca(sup2+) activated the proteinase, as did NaCl; however, Hg(sup2+), Fe(sup2+), and Zn(sup2+) caused strong i...

  8. Cysteine-proteases and cystatins from barley: molecular and functional characterization in housekeeping and defense processes

    Martinez Muñoz, Manuel; Cambra Marin, Ines; Gonzalez-Melendi de Leon, Pablo; Santamaria, Maria E.; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Plant cysteine-proteases (CysProt) represent a well-characterized type of proteolytic enzymes that fulfill tightly regulated physiological functions (senescence and seed germination among others) and defense roles. This article is focused on the group of papain-proteases C1A (family C1, clan CA) and their inhibitors, phytocystatins (PhyCys). In particular, the protease–inhibitor interaction and their mutual participation in specific pathways throughout the plant's life are reviewed. C1A CysPr...

  9. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  10. Cysteine Prevents Menopausal Syndromes in Ovariectomized Mouse.

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is well known to be involved in oxidation-reduction reactions, serving as a source of sulfides in the body. Amino acids are known to improve menopausal symptoms and significantly reduce morbidity. This study aims to find an unrevealed effect of Cys with estrogenic and osteogenic actions. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice were treated with Cys daily for 8 weeks. Estrogen-related and osteoporosis-related factors were analyzed in the vagina, serum, and tibia. Cys was treated in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells and ER-positive human breast cancer Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. Cysteine administration ameliorated overweightness of the body and vaginal atrophy in the OVX mice. Cysteine increased the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 17β-estradiol in the serum of the OVX mice and improved the bone mineral density in the OVX mice. In MG-63 cells, Cys increased the proliferation, ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, and estrogen response element (ERE) activity. Cysteine increased the ALP activity and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In MCF-7 cells, Cys also increased the proliferation, ERβ mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Cys has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. The novel insights gained here strongly imply the potential use of Cys as a new agent for postmenopausal women. PMID:26494699

  11. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  12. Centenary celebrations article: Cysteine proteases of human malaria parasites

    Pandey, Kailash C.

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs against malaria, which takes millions of lives annually. Cysteine proteases are potential new drug targets, especially when current drugs are showing resistance. Falcipains and vivapains are well characterized cysteine proteases of P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases specific genes have suggested their roles in hemoglobin hydrolysis. In P. falciparum, falcipain-2 and falci...

  13. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  14. Serine proteinase inhibitors from nematodes and the arms race between host and pathogen

    Zang, Xingxing; Maizels, Rick

    2001-01-01

    Parasite nematode genomics is a relatively new field9, but already two of the most interesting gene families to be found encode serine proteinase inhibitors. This article describes a family of nematode proteinase inhibitors with homology to mammalian serpins, as well as a distinct set of lower-molecularweight inhibitors first discovered by biochemical analysis of the human roundworm Ascaris10.Taking these two examples into account, it thus appears that parasitic nem...

  15. Neutrophil-derived Oxidants and Proteinases as Immunomodulatory Mediators in Inflammation

    V. Witko-Sarsat; B. Descamps-Latscha

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophils generate potent microbicidal molecules via the oxygen-dependent pathway, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), and via the non-oxygen dependent pathway, consisting in the release of serine proteinases and metalloproteinases stored in granules. Over the past years, the concept has emerged that both ROI and proteinases can be viewed as mediators able to modulate neutrophil responses as well as the whole inflammatory process. This is w...

  16. Sap6, a secreted aspartyl proteinase, participates in maintenance the cell surface integrity of Candida albicans

    Buu, Leh-Miauh; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Background The polymorphic species Candida albicans is the major cause of candidiasis in humans. The secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) of C. albicans, encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, have been investigated as the virulent factors during candidiasis. However, the biological functions of most Sap proteins are still uncertain. In this study, we applied co-culture system of C. albicans and THP-1 human monocytes to explore the pathogenic roles and biological functions of Sap proteinases. R...

  17. Proteinases of Proteus spp.: purification, properties, and detection in urine of infected patients.

    Loomes, L M; Senior, B. W.; Kerr, M A

    1992-01-01

    The proteinases secreted by pathogenic strains of Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris biotype 2, P. vulgaris biotype 3, and P. penneri were purified with almost 100% recovery by affinity chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The proteinase purified from the urinary tract pathogen P. mirabilis, which we had previously shown to degrade immunoglobulins A and G, appeared as a composite of a single band and a double band (53 and 50 kDa, respectively) on sodium do...

  18. In Vivo Analysis of Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Expression in Human Oral Candidiasis

    Naglik, Julian R.; Newport, George; White, Theodore C.; Fernandes-Naglik, Lynette L.; Greenspan, John S.; Greenspan, Deborah; Sweet, Simon P.; Challacombe, Stephen J; Agabian, Nina

    1999-01-01

    Secreted aspartyl proteinases are putative virulence factors in Candida infections. Candida albicans possesses at least nine members of a SAP gene family, all of which have been sequenced. Although the expression of the SAP genes has been extensively characterized under laboratory growth conditions, no studies have analyzed in detail the in vivo expression of these proteinases in human oral colonization and infection. We have developed a reliable and sensitive procedure to detect C. albicans ...

  19. A structural model of picornavirus leader proteinases based on papain and bleomycin hydrolase

    Skern, Tim; Fita, Ignacio; Guarné, Alba

    1998-01-01

    The leader (L) proteinases of aphthoviruses (foot-and-mouth disease viruses) and equine rhinovirus serotypes 1 and 2 cleave themselves from the growing polyprotein. This cleavage occurs intramolecularly between the C terminus of the L proteinases and the N terminus of the subsequent protein VP4. The foot-and-mouth disease virus enzyme has been shown, in addition, to cleave at least one cellular protein, the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G. Mechanistically, inhibitor studies and sequence analy...

  20. Effect of the Solvent Temperatures on Dynamics of Serine Protease Proteinase K

    Peng Sang; Qiong Yang; Xing Du; Nan Yang; Li-Quan Yang; Xing-Lai Ji; Yun-Xin Fu; Zhao-Hui Meng; Shu-Qun Liu

    2016-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about the effect of the solvent temperatures on protein dynamics, multiple long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of serine protease proteinase K with the solute and solvent coupled to different temperatures (either 300 or 180 K) have been performed. Comparative analyses demonstrate that the internal flexibility and mobility of proteinase K are strongly dependent on the solvent temperatures but weakly on the protein temperatures. The constructed free energy la...

  1. Salicylic acid and cysteine contribute to arbutin-induced alleviation of angular leaf spot disease development in cucumber.

    Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Wielanek, Marzena; Chwatko, Grażyna; Głowacki, Rafał; Libik-Konieczny, Marta; Piątek, Milena; Gajewska, Ewa; Skłodowska, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Arbutin induced suppression of angular leaf spot disease in cucumber resulting from lower populations of Pseudomonas syringae pv lachrymans in the infected tissues. This study provides insight into mechanisms that may potentially account for this effect. In the absence of the pathogen, exogenous arbutin-induced expression of PR1, the marker of salicylic acid signaling, increased the content of salicylic acid and modulated the cysteine pool. This suggested that arbutin promoted cucumber plants to a "primed" state. When challenged with the pathogen, the arbutin-treated plants showed strongly reduced infection symptoms 7 days after inoculation. At this time point, they were characterized by higher contents of free and protein-bound cysteine due to higher cysteine biosynthetic capacity related to increased activities of serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase when compared with plants infected without arbutin treatment. Moreover, in the arbutin-treated and infected plants the contents of free salicylic acid and its conjugates were also increased, partly owing to its biosynthesis via the phenylpropanoid pathway. We suggest that arbutin-induced abrogation of angular leaf spot disease in cucumber could be mediated by salicylic acid and cysteine-based signaling. PMID:25955697

  2. Selectively colorimetric detection of cysteine with triangular silver nanoprisms

    Tong Wu; Yuan Fang Li; Cheng Zhi Huang

    2009-01-01

    Triangular silver nanoprisms were prepared and applied to make colorimetric detection of cysteine based on our findings that cysteine could lead to the blue shift of the dipole plasmon resonance absorption,but other 19 kinds of natural amino acids could not.Cysteine with a concentration 160 nmol/L can result in a color change that can be discerned with naked eyes.

  3. Gamma irradiation or hydrocortisone treatment of rats increases the proteinase activity associated with histones of thymus nuclei

    An increase in the activity of histone-associated rat thymus nucleus proteinases specific for histones H2A, H2B and H1 was shown after γ irradiation or hydrocortisone treatment of animals. Histone H1-specific proteinase activity is dependent on DNA and increases in the presence of denatured DNA, whereas proteinases specific for core histones are inhibited in the presence of denatured DNA. The increase in the activity of histone-associated proteinases depends on the radiation dose and the time after irradiation or hydrocortisone injection. In the presence of dithiothreitol and sodium dodecyl sulfate, these proteinases dissociate from histones. It was found by gel electrophoresis that several proteinases of various molecular masses are closely associated with histones obtained from thymus nuclei of irradiated or hydrocortisone-treated rats. 43 refs., 7 figs

  4. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...... active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. One of the key cysteine proteases in Barley...

  5. Assessment of cathepsin D and L-like proteinases of poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), as potential vaccine antigens.

    Bartley, Kathryn; Huntley, John F; Wright, Harry W; Nath, Mintu; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2012-05-01

    Vaccination is a feasible strategy for controlling the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. A cDNA library enriched for genes upregulated after feeding was created to identify potential vaccine antigens. From this library, a gene (Dg-CatD-1) encoding a 383 amino acid protein (Dg-CatD-1) with homology to cathepsin D lysosomal aspartyl proteinases was identified as a potential vaccine candidate. A second gene (Dg-CatL-1) encoding a 341 amino acid protein (Dg-CatL-1) with homology to cathepsin L cysteine proteinases was also selected for further study. IgY obtained from naturally infested hens failed to detect Dg-CatD-1 suggesting that it is a concealed antigen. Conversely, Dg-CatL-1 was detected by IgY derived from natural-infestation, indicating that infested hens are exposed to Dg-CatL-1. Mortality rates 120 h after mites had been fed anti-Dg-CatD-1 were significantly higher than those fed control IgY (PF<0·01). In a survival analysis, fitting a proportional hazards model to the time of death of mites, anti-Dg-CatD-1 and anti-Dg-CatL-1 IgY had 4·42 and 2·13 times higher risks of dying compared with controls (PF<0·05). Dg-CatD-1 and L-1 both have potential as vaccine antigens as part of a multi-component vaccine and have the potential to be improved as vaccine antigens using alternative expression systems. PMID:22310226

  6. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector. PMID:16310789

  7. Lipases and proteinases in milk : occurrence, heat inactivation, and their importance for the keeping quality of milk products

    Driessen, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence and heat inactivation of native and bacterial lipases and proteinases in milk were studied.Production of these enzymes by Gram-negative psychrotrophic bacteria in milk was found to take place towards the end of exponential growth and in the stationary growth phase.Kinetics of heat inactivation in milk of milk lipoprotein lipase, alkaline milk proteinase and lipases and proteinases of some Gram-negative bacteria are given.The effects of residual lipolytic and proteolytic activit...

  8. Overexpression of serine acetlytransferase produced large increases in O-acetylserine and free cysteine in developing seeds of a grain legume.

    Tabe, Linda; Wirtz, Markus; Molvig, Lisa; Droux, Michel; Hell, Ruediger

    2010-03-01

    There have been many attempts to increase concentrations of the nutritionally essential sulphur amino acids by modifying their biosynthetic pathway in leaves of transgenic plants. This report describes the first modification of cysteine biosynthesis in developing seeds; those of the grain legume, narrow leaf lupin (Lupinus angustifolius, L.). Expression in developing lupin embryos of a serine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSAT1 or AtSerat 2;1) was associated with increases of up to 5-fold in the concentrations of O-acetylserine (OAS), the immediate product of SAT, and up to 26-fold in free cysteine, resulting in some of the highest in vivo concentrations of these metabolites yet reported. Despite the dramatic changes in free cysteine in developing embryos of SAT overexpressers, concentrations of free methionine in developing embryos, and the total cysteine and methionine concentrations in mature seeds were not significantly altered. Pooled F(2) seeds segregating for the SAT transgene and for a transgene encoding a methionine- and cysteine-rich sunflower seed storage protein also had increased OAS and free cysteine, but not free methionine, during development, and no increase in mature seed total sulphur amino acids compared with controls lacking SAT overexpression. The data support the view that the cysteine biosynthetic pathway is active in developing seeds, and indicate that SAT activity limits cysteine biosynthesis, but that cysteine supply is not limiting for methionine biosynthesis or for storage protein synthesis in maturing lupin embryos in conditions of adequate sulphur nutrition. OAS and free methionine, but not free cysteine, were implicated as signalling metabolites controlling expression of a gene for a cysteine-rich seed storage protein. PMID:19939888

  9. Antisense-mediated depletion of a potato lipoxygenase reduces wound induction of proteinase inhibitors and increases weight gain of insect pests

    Royo, Joaquín; León, José; Vancanneyt, Guy; Albar, Juan Pablo; Rosahl, Sabine; Ortego, Félix; Castañera, Pedro; Sánchez-Serrano, José J.

    1999-01-01

    De novo jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis is required for wound-induced expression of proteinase inhibitors and other defense genes in potato and tomato. The first step in JA biosynthesis involves lipoxygenase (LOX) introducing molecular oxygen at the C-13 position of linolenic acid. We previously have shown that, in potato, at least two gene families code for 13-LOX proteins. We have now produced transgenic potato plants devoid of one specific 13-LOX isoform (LOX-H3) through antisense-mediated de...

  10. The reactions of nitrosyl complexes with cysteine.

    Roncaroli, Federico; Olabe, José A

    2005-06-27

    The reaction kinetics of a set of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes, {(X)5MNO}n, containing different coligands X (polypyridines, NH3, EDTA, pz, and py) with cysteine (excess conditions), were studied by UV-vis spectrophotometry, using stopped-flow techniques, at an appropriate pH, in the range 3-10, and T = 25 degrees C. The selection of coligands afforded a redox-potential range from -0.3 to +0.5 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for the NO+/NO bound couples. Two intermediates were detected. The first one, I1, appears in the range 410-470 nm for the different complexes and is proposed to be a 1:1 adduct, with the S atom of the cysteinate nucleophile bound to the N atom of nitrosyl. The adduct formation step of I1 is an equilibrium, and the kinetic rate constants for the formation and dissociation of the corresponding adducts were determined by studying the cysteine-concentration dependence of the formation rates. The second intermediate, I2, was detected through the decay of I1, with a maximum absorbance at ca. 380 nm. From similar kinetic results and analyses, we propose that a second cysteinate adds to I1 to form I2. By plotting ln k1(RS-) and ln k2(RS-) for the first and second adduct formation steps, respectively, against the redox potentials of the NO+/NO couples, linear free energy plots are obtained, as previously observed with OH- as a nucleophile. The addition rates for both processes increase with the nitrosyl redox potentials, and this reflects a more positive charge at the electrophilic N atom. In a third step, the I2 adducts decay to form the corresponding Ru-aqua complexes, with the release of N2O and formation of cystine, implying a two-electron process for the overall nitrosyl reduction. This is in contrast with the behavior of nitroprusside ([Fe(CN)5NO]2-; NP), which always yields the one-electron reduction product, [Fe(CN)5NO]3-, either under substoichiometric or in excess-cysteine conditions. PMID:15962980

  11. Determination of germ tube, phospholipase, and proteinase production by bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans

    Antonella Souza Mattei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida albicans is a commensal and opportunistic agent that causes infection in immunocompromised individuals. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of this yeast, including the production of germ tubes (GTs and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate GT production and phospholipase and proteinase activities in bloodstream isolates of C. albicans. Methods One hundred fifty-three C. albicans isolates were obtained from blood samples and analyzed for GT, phospholipase, and proteinase production. The assays were performed in duplicate in egg yolk medium containing bovine serum albumin and human serum. Results Detectable amounts of proteinase were produced by 97% of the isolates, and 78% of the isolates produced phospholipase. GTs were produced by 95% of the isolates. A majority of the isolates exhibited low levels of phospholipase production and high levels of proteinase production. Conclusions Bloodstream isolates of C. albicans produce virulence factors such as GT and hydrolytic enzymes that enable them to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  12. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    Leah Theresa Sigle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2. Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania.

  13. Proteinase-antiproteinase balance in tracheal aspirates from neonates.

    Sluis, K B; Darlow, B A; Vissers, M C; Winterbourn, C C

    1994-02-01

    We wanted to identify the inhibitors of neutrophil elastase, quantify their activities in the upper airways of neonates, and relate these to the presence of active elastase and the likelihood of elastolytic injury occurring due to inhibitory capacity being overwhelmed. Activities of neutrophil elastase and its inhibitors were measured in tracheal aspirates from 17 infants, 10 of whom subsequently developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia. All aspirates contained immunologically detectable alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI), but their inhibitory capacity against neutrophil elastase ranged from being undetectable to being in excess of the amount of alpha 1-PI detected immunologically. When the alpha 1-PI was removed from each of the aspirates, using a specific antibody, from 0-50% of the original activity remained, indicating the presence of another elastase inhibitor. Its properties were consistent with it being the low molecular mass, secretory leucoproteinase inhibitor (SLPI), also known as bronchial antileucoproteinase. The alpha 1-PI was from 0-100% active. Most of the inactive inhibitor was shown by western blotting to be complexed with elastase, with a small amount of cleaved material. There was no evidence of major oxidative inactivation. Free elastase was detected in only three of the aspirates; these had little or no detectable elastase inhibitory capacity, and most of their alpha 1-PI was complexed. Elastase load, comprising the sum of free and complexed elastase, correlated closely with myeloperoxidase activity, a recognized marker of inflammatory activity. Active SLPI levels showed a positive correlation with gestational age (r = 0.66). We conclude that most neutrophil elastase in the upper airways of ventilated infants is complexed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7909297

  14. Neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3 trafficking routes in myelomonocytic cells

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (PR3) differ in intracellular localization, which may reflect different trafficking mechanisms of the precursor forms when synthesized at immature stages of neutrophils. To shed further light on these mechanisms, we compared the trafficking of precursor NE (proNE) and precursor PR3 (proPR3). Like proNE [1], proPR3 interacted with CD63 upon heterologous co-expression in COS cells but endogenous interaction was not detected although cell surface proNE/proPR3/CD63 were co-endocytosed in myelomonocytic cells. Cell surface proNE/proPR3 turned over more rapidly than cell surface CD63 consistent with processing/degradation of the pro-proteases but recycling of CD63. Colocalization of proNE/proPR3/CD63 with clathrin and Rab 7 suggested trafficking through coated vesicles and late endosomes. Partial caveolar trafficking of proNE/CD63 but not proPR3 was suggested by colocalization with caveolin-1. Blocking the C-terminus of proNE/proPR3 by creating a fusion with FK506 binding protein inhibited endosomal re-uptake of proNE but not proPR3 indicating 'proC'-peptide-dependent structural/conformational requirements for proNE but not for proPR3 endocytosis. The NE aminoacid residue Y199 of a proposed NE sorting motif that interacts with AP-3 [2] was not required for proNE processing, sorting or endocytosis in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells expressing heterologous Y199-deleted proNE; this suggests operation of another AP-3-link for proNE targeting. Our results show intracellular multi-step trafficking to be different between proNE and proPR3 consistent with their differential subcellular NE/PR3 localization in neutrophils.

  15. Inhibitory selectivity of canecystatin: a recombinant cysteine peptidase inhibitor from sugarcane

    The cDNA of a cystein peptidase inhibitor was isolated from sugarcane and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, named canecystatin, has previously been shown to exert antifungal activity on the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Herein, the inhibitory specificity of canecystatin was further characterized. It inhibits the cysteine peptidases from plant source papain (Ki=3.3 nM) and baupain (Ki=2.1x10-8 M), but no inhibitory effect was observed on ficin or bromelain. Canecystatin also inhibits lysosomal cysteine peptidases such as human cathepsin B (Ki=125 nM), cathepsin K (Ki=0.76 nM), cathepsin L (Ki=0.6 nM), and cathepsin V (Ki=1.0 nM), but not the aspartyl peptidase cathepsin D. The activity of serine peptidases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic, and neutrophil elastases, and human plasma kallikrein is not affected by the inhibitor, nor is the activity of the metallopeptidases angiotensin converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of a sugarcane cystatin on cysteine peptidases

  16. C1A Cysteine protease-cystatin interactions in leaf senescence

    Díaz Mendoza, María Mercedes; Velasco Arroyo, Blanca; González Melendi, Pablo; Martinez Muñoz, Manuel; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Senescence-associated proteolysis in plants is a crucial process to relocalize nutrients from leaves to growing or storage tissues. The massive net degradation of proteins involves broad metabolic networks, different subcellular compartments, and several types of proteases and regulators. C1A cysteine proteases, grouped as cathepsin L-, B-, H-, and F-like according to their gene structures and phylogenetic relationships, are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity d...

  17. Cleavage of fibrinogen by proteinases elicits allergic responses through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Shaw, Joanne; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Mak, Garbo; Roberts, Luz; Song, Li-Zhen; Knight, J Morgan; Creighton, Chad J; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2013-08-16

    Proteinases and the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are essential for expression of allergic inflammation and diseases such as asthma. A mechanism that links these inflammatory mediators is essential for explaining the fundamental basis of allergic disease but has been elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TLR4 is activated by airway proteinase activity to initiate both allergic airway disease and antifungal immunity. These outcomes were induced by proteinase cleavage of the clotting protein fibrinogen, yielding fibrinogen cleavage products that acted as TLR4 ligands on airway epithelial cells and macrophages. Thus, allergic airway inflammation represents an antifungal defensive strategy that is driven by fibrinogen cleavage and TLR4 activation. These findings clarify the molecular basis of allergic disease and suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23950537

  18. A new method of research on molecular evolution of pro-teinase superfamily

    2001-01-01

    The molecular evolutionary tree, also known as a phylogenetic tree, of the serine proteinase superfamily was constructed by means of structural alignment. Three-dimensional structures of proteins were aligned by the SSAP program of Orengo and Taylor to obtain evolutionary dis-tances. The resulting evolutionary tree provides a topology graph that can reflect the evolution of structure and function of homology proteinase. Moreover, study on evolution of the serine proteinase superfamily can lead to better under-standing of the relationship and evolutionary difference among proteins of the superfamily, and is of significance to protein engineering, molecular design and protein structure prediction. Structure alignment is one of the useful methods of research on molecular evolution of protein.

  19. Antimalarial Synergy of Cysteine and Aspartic Protease Inhibitors

    Semenov, Andrey; Olson, Jed E.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain and aspartic proteases plasmepsin I and plasmepsin II act cooperatively to hydrolyze hemoglobin as a source of amino acids for erythrocytic parasites. Inhibitors of each of these proteases have potent antimalarial effects. We have now evaluated the antimalarial effects of combinations of cysteine and aspartic protease inhibitors. When incubated with cultured P. falciparum parasites, cysteine and aspartic protease ...

  20. Two pathways for cysteine biosynthesis in Leishmania major

    Williams, Roderick A. M.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Genome mining and biochemical analyses have shown that L. major possesses two pathways for cysteine synthesis - the de novo biosynthesis pathway comprising serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS) and the reverse transsulfuration (RTS) pathway comprising cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL). The L. major CS (LmjCS) is similar to the type A CSs of bacteria and catalyses the synthesis of cysteine using O-acetyserine and sulfide...

  1. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  2. Modulation of ion transport across rat distal colon by cysteine

    MartinDiener

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of stimulation of endogenous production of H2S by cysteine, the substrate for the two H2S-producing enzymes, cystathionin-beta-synthase and cystathionin-gamma-lyase, on ion transport across rat distal colon. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc induced by cysteine were measured in Ussing chambers. Free cysteine caused a concentration-dependent, transient fall in Isc, which was sensitive to amino-oxyacetate and beta-cyano-L-alanine, i.e. inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes. In contrast, Na cysteinate evoked a biphasic change in Isc, i.e. an initial fall followed by a secondary increase, which was also reduced by these enzyme inhibitors. All responses were dependent on the presence of Cl- and inhibited by bumetanide, suggesting that free cysteine induces an inhibition of transcellular Cl- secretion, whereas Na cysteinate – after a transient inhibitory phase – activates anion secretion. The assumed reason for this discrepancy is a fall in the cytosolic pH induced by free cysteine, but not by Na cysteinate, as observed in isolated colonic crypts loaded with the pH-sensitive dye, BCECF. Intracellular acidification is known to inhibit epithelial K+ channels. Indeed, after preinhibition of basolateral K+ channels with tetrapentylammonium or Ba2+, the negative Isc induced by free cysteine was reduced significantly. In consequence, stimulation of endogenous H2S production by Na cysteinate causes, after a short inhibitory response, a delayed activation of anion secretion, which is missing in the case of free cysteine, probably due to the cytosolic acidification. In contrast, diallyl trisulfide, which is intracellularly converted to H2S, only evoked a monophasic increase in Isc without the initial fall observed with Na cysteinate. Consequently, time course and amount of produced H2S seem to strongly influence the functional response of the colonic epithelium evoked by this gasotransmitter.

  3. TcCYPR04, a Cacao Papain-Like Cysteine-Protease Detected in Senescent and Necrotic Tissues Interacts with a Cystatin TcCYS4

    Thyago Hermylly Santana Cardoso; Ana Camila Oliveira Freitas; Bruno Silva Andrade; Aurizangela Oliveira de Sousa; André da Silva Santiago; Daniela Martins Koop; Karina Peres Gramacho; Fátima Cerqueira Alvim; Fabienne Micheli; Carlos Priminho Pirovani

    2015-01-01

    The interaction amongst papain-like cysteine-proteases (PLCP) and their substrates and inhibitors, such as cystatins, can be perceived as part of the molecular battlefield in plant-pathogen interaction. In cacao, four cystatins were identified and characterized by our group. We identified 448 proteases in cacao genome, whereof 134 were cysteine-proteases. We expressed in Escherichia coli a PLCP from cacao, named TcCYSPR04. Immunoblottings with anti-TcCYSPR04 exhibited protein increases during...

  4. Coronavirus 3CLpro proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    Blom Nikolaj

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the passing of more than a year since the first outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, efficient counter-measures are still few and many believe that reappearance of SARS, or a similar disease caused by a coronavirus, is not unlikely. For other virus families like the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection. Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network was trained to recognise the cleavage sites in the genomes obtaining a sensitivity of 87.0% and a specificity of 99.0%. Several proteins known to be cleaved by other viruses were submitted to prediction as well as proteins suspected relevant in coronavirus pathology. Cleavage sites were predicted in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-1, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage candidates were identified which might be important to elucidate coronavirus pathology. Furthermore, the method might assist in design of proteinase inhibitors for treatment of SARS and possible future diseases caused by coronaviruses. It is made available for public use at our website: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCorona/.

  5. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  6. The significance of cysteine synthesis for acclimation to high light conditions.

    Speiser, Anna; Haberland, Stefan; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Wirtz, Markus; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Situations of excess light intensity are known to result in the emergence of reactive oxygen species that originate from the electron transport chain in chloroplasts. The redox state of glutathione and its biosynthesis contribute importantly to the plant's response to this stress. In this study we analyzed the significance of cysteine synthesis for long-term acclimation to high light conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Emphasis was put on the rate-limiting step of cysteine synthesis, the formation of the precursor O-acetylserine (OAS) that is catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SERAT). Wild type Arabidopsis plants responded to the high light condition (800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 10 days) with synthesis of photo-protective anthocyanins, induction of total SERAT activity and elevated glutathione levels when compared to the control condition (100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). The role of cysteine synthesis in chloroplasts was probed in mutant plants lacking the chloroplast isoform SERAT2;1 (serat2;1) and two knock-out alleles of CYP20-3, a positive interactor of SERAT in the chloroplast. Acclimation to high light resulted in a smaller growth enhancement than wild type in the serat2;1 and cyp20-3 mutants, less induction of total SERAT activity and OAS levels but similar cysteine and glutathione concentrations. Expression analysis revealed no increase in mRNA of the chloroplast SERAT2;1 encoding SERAT2;1 gene but up to 4.4-fold elevated SERAT2;2 mRNA levels for the mitochondrial SERAT isoform. Thus, lack of chloroplast SERAT2;1 activity or its activation by CYP20-3 prevents the full growth response to high light conditions, but the enhanced demand for glutathione is likely mediated by synthesis of OAS in the mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine synthesis in the chloroplast is important for performance but is dispensable for survival under long-term exposure to high light and can be partially complemented by cysteine synthesis in mitochondria. PMID:25653656

  7. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  8. Cysteine could change the transport mechanism of PVP-coated silver nanoparticles in porous media

    Yang, X.; Lin, S.; Wiesner, M.

    2012-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can hardly be removed by wastewater treatment plant and have big potential to enter groundwater, jeopardizing the water quality & aquatic ecosystem. Most AgNPs have surface coatings such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which dominate their transport in porous media. Our previous study shows that PVP may promote the deposition of AgNPs on silica surface by a bridging mechanism. This study further explored how cysteine, a natural organic matter type, may influence the role of the PVP coating on AgNP translocation. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurement (Figure 1A) shows that the PVP coating rendered the AgNP dispersion high stability during the measuring period (3hrs). Addition of 100 ppm cysteine to the dispersion resulted in a rapid decrease in particle size from 100nm to 52nm within one hour, following which no further decline in particle size occurred. Column experiment results (Figure 1B) show that corresponding to the particle size change was a substantial decrease in particle deposition rates: introduction of 100 ppm cysteine into the particle dispersion resulted in a decrease in AgNP attenuation by the porous medium from 67% to 26%. The decline in particle size suggested that cysteine may have displaced the macromolecular PVP from the particle surface. Desorption of PVP resulted in a weakening or vanish of polymer bridging effect which in turn lowered the deposition rates substantially. This study demonstrated an implication of environmental transformation of coated AgNPs to their mobility in saturated sand aquifers. Acknowledgment Xinyao Yang appreciates the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.:41101475) for covering the registration fee and traveling costs.igure 1 Particle size measurement (A) and breakthrough curves (B) of PVP-coated silver nanoparticle in the absence and presence of cysteine: pH=7.0, ionic strength=1mM, flow rate=1ml/min.

  9. Negative effects of a nonhost proteinase inhibitor of ~19.8 kDa from Madhuca indica seeds on developmental physiology of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner).

    Jamal, Farrukh; Singh, Dushyant; Pandey, Prabhash K

    2014-01-01

    An affinity purified trypsin inhibitor from the seed flour extracts of Madhuca indica (MiTI) on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that MiTI consisted of a single polypeptide chain with molecular mass of ~19.8 kDa. MiTI inhibited the total proteolytic and trypsin-like activities of the midgut proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera larvae by 87.51% and 76.12%, respectively, at concentration of 5 µg/mL with an IC50 of 1.75 µg/mL against trypsin like midgut proteinases. The enzyme kinetic studies demonstrated that MiTI is a competitive inhibitor with a K i value of 4.1 × 10(-10) M for Helicoverpa trypsin like midgut proteinases. In vivo experiments with different concentrations of MiTI in artificial diet (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% w/w) showed an effective downfall in the larval body weight and an increase in larval mortality. The concentration of MiTI in the artificial diet to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of larvae was 1.5% w/w and that to cause reduction in mass of larvae by 50% (ED50) was 1.0% w/w. Nutritional indices observations suggest the toxic and adverse effects of MiTI on the growth and development of H. armigera larvae. The results suggest a strong bioinsecticidal potential of affinity purified MiTI which can be exploited in insect pest management of crop plants. PMID:25298962

  10. Negative Effects of a Nonhost Proteinase Inhibitor of ~19.8 kDa from Madhuca indica Seeds on Developmental Physiology of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner

    Farrukh Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An affinity purified trypsin inhibitor from the seed flour extracts of Madhuca indica (MiTI on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that MiTI consisted of a single polypeptide chain with molecular mass of ~19.8 kDa. MiTI inhibited the total proteolytic and trypsin-like activities of the midgut proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera larvae by 87.51% and 76.12%, respectively, at concentration of 5 µg/mL with an IC50 of 1.75 µg/mL against trypsin like midgut proteinases. The enzyme kinetic studies demonstrated that MiTI is a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 4.1×10−10 M for Helicoverpa trypsin like midgut proteinases. In vivo experiments with different concentrations of MiTI in artificial diet (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% w/w showed an effective downfall in the larval body weight and an increase in larval mortality. The concentration of MiTI in the artificial diet to cause 50% mortality (LD50 of larvae was 1.5% w/w and that to cause reduction in mass of larvae by 50% (ED50 was 1.0% w/w. Nutritional indices observations suggest the toxic and adverse effects of MiTI on the growth and development of H. armigera larvae. The results suggest a strong bioinsecticidal potential of affinity purified MiTI which can be exploited in insect pest management of crop plants.

  11. The refined 2.4 A X-ray crystal structure of recombinant human stefin B in complex with the cysteine proteinase papain: a novel type of proteinase inhibitor interaction.

    Stubbs, M T; Laber, B; Bode, W; Huber, R; Jerala, R. (Roman); Lenarcic, B; Turk, V.

    1990-01-01

    A stoichiometric complex of human stefin B and carboxymethylated papain has been crystallized in a trigonal crystal form. Data to 2.37 A resolution were collected using the area detector diffractometer FAST. The crystal structure of the complex has been solved by Patterson search techniques using papain as search model. Starting from the structure of chicken cystatin, the stefin structure was elucidated through cycles of model building and crystallographic refinement. The current crystallogra...

  12. Inhibition of invasion and metastasis of MHCC97H cells by expression of snake venom cystatin through reduction of proteinases activity and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Tang, Nanhong; Xie, Qun; Wang, Xiaoqian; Li, Xiujin; Chen, Yanlin; Lin, Xu; Lin, Jianyin

    2011-05-01

    Snake venom cystatin (sv-cystatin) is a member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors. To further evaluate the possibility of sv-cystatin in cancer therapy, this study examined the effects of sv-cystatin on the invasion and metastasis of liver cancer cells (MHCC97H) in vitro and in vivo as well as the underlying mechanism. sv-cystatin cDNA was transfected into MHCC97H cells and the anti-invasion and antimetastasis effects of sv-cystatin were determined using migration and matrigel invasion assays and a lung-metastasis mice model. The results suggest that sv-cyst clone (sv-cystatin expression in MHCC97H cells) delayed the invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo compared to the parental, mock and si-sv-cyst clone cells (inhibited sv-cystatin expression by siRNA). The decreased activities of cathepsin B, MMP-2 and MMP-9 and EMT change index including higher E-cadherin, lower N-cadherin and decreased Twist activity were observed in the sv-cyst clone, which contributes to the change in invasion and metastasis ability of MHCC97H cells. This study provides evidence that expression of the sv-cystatin gene in MHCC97H cells inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis through the reduction of the proteinases activity and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), which might contribute to the anticancer research of the sv-cystatin protein. PMID:21656364

  13. S-Nitrosation of Conserved Cysteines Modulates Activity and Stability of S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase (GSNOR).

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO(•)) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO(•)-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, whereas the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting that catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and trinitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc-coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity-properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO(•) signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  14. To study the recovery of L-Cysteine using halloysite nanotubes after heavy metal removal

    Thakur, Juhi

    2016-04-01

    Industrial wastes are a major source of soil and water pollution that originate from mining industries, chemical industries, metal processing industries, etc. These wastes consist of a variety of chemicals including phenolics, heavy metals, etc. Use of industrial effluent and sewage sludge on agricultural land has become a common practice in the world which results in these toxic metals being transferred and ultimately concentrate in plant tissues from water and the soil. The metals that get accumulated, prove detrimental to plants themselves and may also cause damage to the healths of animals as well as man. This is because the heavy metals become toxins above certain concentrations, over a narrow range. As a further matter, these metals negatively affect the natural microbial populations as well, that leads to the disruption of fundamental ecological processes. However, many techniques and methods have been advanced to clear the heavy metal polluted soils and waters. One important method is by removing heavy metals with the help of amino acids like L-Cysteine and L-Penicillamine. But also, economy of removal of pollutant heavy metals from soils and waters is a major concern. Present study helps in decreasing the cost for large-scale removal of heavy metals from polluted water by recovering the amino acid (L-Cysteine) after removal of nickel (Ni+2) at a fixed pH, by binding the Ni+2 with halloysite nanotubes(HNT), so that L-Cysteine can be reused again for removal of heavy metals.

  15. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B;

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and...

  16. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  17. Determination of Disulfide Bond Connectivity of Cysteine-rich Peptide IpTx{sub a}

    Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Jim Il [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Sato, Kazuki [Fukuoka Women' s Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Cysteine-rich peptides stabilized by intramolecular disulfide bonds have often been isolated from venoms of microbes, animals and plants. These peptides typically have much higher stability and improved biopharmaceutical properties compared to their linear counterparts. Therefore the correct disulfide bond formation of small proteins and peptides has been extensively studied for a better understanding of their folding mechanism and achieving efficient generation of the naturally occurring biologically active product. Imperatoxin A (IpTx{sub a}), a peptide toxin containing 6 cysteine residues, was isolated from the venom of scorpion Pandinus imperator, selectively binds the ryanodine receptors and activates Ca{sup 2+} release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IpTx{sub a} increases the binding of ryanodine to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and encourages reconstituted single channel to induce subconductance states.

  18. Determination of Disulfide Bond Connectivity of Cysteine-rich Peptide IpTxa

    Cysteine-rich peptides stabilized by intramolecular disulfide bonds have often been isolated from venoms of microbes, animals and plants. These peptides typically have much higher stability and improved biopharmaceutical properties compared to their linear counterparts. Therefore the correct disulfide bond formation of small proteins and peptides has been extensively studied for a better understanding of their folding mechanism and achieving efficient generation of the naturally occurring biologically active product. Imperatoxin A (IpTxa), a peptide toxin containing 6 cysteine residues, was isolated from the venom of scorpion Pandinus imperator, selectively binds the ryanodine receptors and activates Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IpTxa increases the binding of ryanodine to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and encourages reconstituted single channel to induce subconductance states

  19. Concurrent occurrence of insect proteinases and their inhibitors in insect midgut

    Taranushenko, J.; Sehnal, František

    Izmir : Entomological Society of Turkey , 2006. s. 134-134. [European Congress of Entomology /8./. 17.09.2006-22.09.2006, Izmir] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/1591 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : serin proteinases Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  20. The aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds its own inhibitor into a helix

    Li, M; Phylip, L H; Lees, W E; Winther, Jakob R.; Dunn, B M; Wlodawer, A; Kay, J; Gustchina, A

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinase A from yeast is specifically and potently inhibited by a small protein called IA3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although this inhibitor consists of 68 residues, we show that the inhibitory activity resides within the N-terminal half of the molecule. Structures solved at 2.2 a...

  1. Successful treatment of murine muscular dystrophy with the proteinase inhibitor leupeptin.

    Sher, J H; Stracher, A.; Shafiq, S A; Hardy-Stashin, J

    1981-01-01

    Mice with genetic muscular dystrophy were treated with intraperitoneal injections of the proteinase inhibitor leupeptin, beginning before the onset of weakness. A significant number of the treated animals failed to develop histological evidence of dystrophy, compared with controls. Leupeptin treatment prevented (or delayed) the onset of muscular dystrophy in this experiment.

  2. Secreted aspartate proteinases, a virulence factor of Candida spp.: Occurrence among clinical isolates

    Hamal, P.; Dostál, Jiří; Raclavský, V.; Krylová, M.; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2004), s. 491-496. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI6485 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : Candida spp. * aspartate proteinases * RAPD typing Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  3. Serine proteinase of Renibacterium salmoninarum digests a major autologous extracellular and cell-surface protein.

    Rockey, D D; Turaga, P S; Wiens, G D; Cook, B A; Kaattari, S L

    1991-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a pathogen of salmonid fish that produces large amounts of extracellular protein (ECP) during growth. A proteolytic activity present in ECP at elevated temperatures digested the majority of the proteins in ECP. This digestion was also associated with the loss of ECP immunosuppressive function. In vitro activity of the proteinase in ECP was temperature dependent: it was not detected in an 18-h digest at 4 and 17 degrees C but became readily apparent at 37 degrees C. Proteinase activity was detected at bacterial physiological temperatures (17 degrees C) in reactions incubated for several days. Under these conditions, digestion of partially purified p57, a major constituent of ECP and a major cell-surface protein, yielded a spectrum of breakdown products similar in molecular weight and antigenicity to those in ECP. This pattern of digestion suggests that most of the immunologically related constituents of ECP are p57 and its breakdown products. The proteolytic activity was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, methanol, and ethanol and to 10-min incubation at temperatures above 65 degrees C. Electrophoretic analysis of the proteinase on polyacrylamide gels containing proteinase substrates indicated the native form to be 100 kDa or greater. The enzyme was active against selected unrelated substrates only when coincubated with a denaturant (0.1% lauryl sulfate) and (or) a reducing agent (20 mM dithiothreitol). PMID:1777853

  4. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L proteinase-based synthetic peptide for immunodiagnosis and prevention of sheep fasciolosis

    Ježek, Jan; El Ridi, R.; Salah, M.; Wagih, A.; Aziz, H. W.; Tallima, H.; El Shafie, M. H.; Khalek, T. A.; Ammou, F. F. A.; Strongylis, C.; Moussis, V.; Tsikaris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 3 (2008), s. 349-357. ISSN 0006-3525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cathepsin L proteinase * peptides * sequential oligopeptide carriers * synthetic peptide vaccine * Fasciiola gigantica Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.823, year: 2008

  5. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  6. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  7. Activities of amylase, proteinase, and lipase enzymes from Lactococcus chungangensis and its application in dairy products.

    Konkit, Maytiya; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-07-01

    Several enzymes are involved in the process of converting milk to lactic acid and coagulated milk to curd and, therefore, are important in dairy fermented products. Amylase, proteinase, and lipase are enzymes that play an important role in degrading milk into monomeric molecules such as oligosaccharides, amino acids, and fatty acids, which are the main molecules responsible for flavors in cheese. In the current study, we determined the amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T), a bacterial strain of nondairy origin, and compared them with those of the reference strain, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), which is commonly used in the dairy industry. Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T) were both found to have amylase, proteinase, and lipase activities in broth culture, cream cheese, and yogurt. Notably, the proteinase and lipase activities of L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) were higher than those of L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), with proteinase activity of 10.50 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.64 U/mL in cream cheese, and lipase activity of 100 U/mL of tryptic soy broth, and 100 U/mL of cream cheese. In contrast, the amylase activity was low, with 5.28 U/mL in tryptic soy broth and 8.86 U/mL in cream cheese. These enzyme activities in L. chungangensis CAU 28(T) suggest that this strain has potential to be used for manufacturing dairy fermented products, even though the strain is of nondairy origin. PMID:27108177

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  10. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection. PMID:19780820

  11. Purification and characterization of cysteine aminotransferase from rat liver cytosol.

    Akagi,Reiko

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine aminotransferase (L-cysteine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.3 was purified over 400-fold from the high-speed supernatant fraction of rat liver. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by gel filtration, isoelectric focusing and disc electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was about 74,000 by gel filtration and the isoelectric point was 6.2 (4 degrees C. The enzyme catalyzed transamination between L-cysteine and 2-oxoglutarate and the reverse reaction. The optimum pH was 9.7. The Km value for L-cysteine was 22.2 mM, and that for 2-oxoglutaric acid was 0.06 mM. L-Aspartate was a potent inhibitor of the cysteine aminotransferase reaction. The enzyme was very active toward L-alanine 3-sulfinic acid at pH 8.0, and was also very active toward L-aspartic acid (Km = 1.6 mM. Ratios of activities for L-aspartic acid and L-cysteine were essentially constant during the purification of the enzyme. Evidence based on substrate specificity, enzyme inhibition, and physicochemical properties indicates that cytosolic cysteine aminotransferase is identical with cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase (L-aspartate: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.1.

  12. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  13. Effect of Exogenous MJA Treatment of Tea Plants on the Growth of Geometrid Larvae

    GUI Lian-you; CHEN Zong-mao; LIU Shu-sheng

    2005-01-01

    The effect of tea plant Camellia sinensis induced by exogenous methyl jasmonate (MJA) on lipoxygenase (LOX), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and proteinase inhibitor (PI) activity in the leaves of tea plants, as well as the growth and midgut proteinase activity of the geometrid Ectropis obliqua larvae were studied. MJA significantly induced LOX, PPO and PI activity in leaves of tea plants. When geometrid larvae have fed on leaves of tea plants treated with MJA, the activities of the high alkaline trypsin-like enzyme and chymotrypsin-like enzyme in their midgut were significantly inhibited, but the activities of the low alkaline trypsin-like enzyme in their midgut were unaffected, leading to imbalance between different types of proteinase activity in the midgut of the larvae and in turn, the growth were inhibited. These chains of response may be an important mechanism of the direct resistance induced by MJA-treatment of tea plant on geometrid larvae.

  14. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene (HbCP1) from Hevea brasiliensis

    Shi-Qing Peng; Jia-Hong Zhu; Hui-Liang Li; Wei-Min Tian

    2008-12-01

    The full-length cDNA encoding a cysteine protease, designated HbCP1, was isolated for the first time from Hevea brasiliensis by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. HbCP1 contained a 1371 bp open reading frame encoding 457 amino acids. The deduced HbCP1 protein, which showed high identity to cysteine proteases of other plant species, was predicted to possess a putative repeat in toxin (RTX) domain at the N-terminal and a granulin (GRAN) domain at the C-terminal. Southern blot analysis indicated that the HbCP1 gene is present as a single copy in the rubber tree. Transcription pattern analysis revealed that HbCP1 had high transcription in laticifer, and low transcription in bark and leaf. The transcription of HbCP1 in latex was induced by ethylene and tapping. Cloning of the HbCP1 gene will enable us to further understand the molecular characterization of cysteine protease and its possible function in the rubber tree.

  15. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  16. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  17. Highly conserved salt bridge stabilizes a proteinase K subfamily enzyme, Aqualysin I, from Thermus aquaticus YT-1

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Osaku, Kanae; Maejima, Susumu; Ohno, Nao; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The proteinase K subfamily enzymes, thermophilic Aqualysin I (AQN) from Thermus aquaticus YT-1 and psychrophilic serine protease (VPR) from Vibrio sp. PA-44, have six and seven salt bridges, respectively. To understand the possible significance of salt bridges in the thermal stability of AQN, we prepared mutant proteins in which amino acid residues participating in salt bridges common to proteinase K subfamily members and intrinsic to AQN were replaced to disrupt the bridges one at a time. Di...

  18. Relationship between Candida albicans producing proteinase (CAPP) and its environmental pH--comparison with a case of trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    Ko, I. J.; Kim, C. W.; Houh, W.; Tsuboi, R; Matsuda, K; Ogawa, H.

    1987-01-01

    Candida albicans produced a karatinolytic proteinase (KPase) or C. albicans producing proteinase (CAPP), a proposed new term for this enzyme, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes also produced KPase when cultivated in liquid medium containing human stratum corneum (HSC) as the nitrogen source, but were unable to do so when cultivated in sabouraud dextrose broth. Purified KPase from the culture supernatants of C. albicans had a molecular weight of 42,000 and an optimum pH at 4.0. The KPase was foun...

  19. Effect of insulin on the mRNA expression of procollagen N-proteinases in chondrosarcoma OUMS-27 cells

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Cömertoğlu, İsmail; FIRAT, RIDVAN; Çakmak, Özlem; YUKSELTEN, YUNUS; ERDEN, GÖNÜL; Ugurcu, Veli; Demircan,Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is one of the most common bone tumors, and at present, there is no non-invasive treatment option for this cancer. The chondrosarcoma OUMS-27 cell line produces proteoglycan and type II, IX, and XI collagens, which constitutes cartilage tissue. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) proteases are a group of secreted proteases, which include the procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS-2, -3 and -14. These procollagen N-proteinases perform a role in the p...

  20. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam;

    2012-01-01

    Targeting noncatalytic cysteine residues with irreversible acrylamide-based inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity. Nevertheless, concerns about off-target modification motivate the development of reversible cysteine-targeting strategies. Here we...... show that electron-deficient olefins, including acrylamides, can be tuned to react with cysteine thiols in a rapidly reversible manner. Installation of a nitrile group increased the olefins' intrinsic reactivity, but, paradoxically, eliminated the formation of irreversible adducts. Incorporation of...... targeted cysteine. Disruption of these interactions by protein unfolding or proteolysis promoted instantaneous cleavage of the covalent bond. Our results establish a chemistry-based framework for engineering sustained covalent inhibition without accumulating permanently modified proteins and peptides....

  1. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen are the same protein

    Abdul Waheed; Md Imtaiyaz Hassan; Robert L Van Etten; Faizan Ahmad

    2008-06-01

    Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were each isolated from human seminal fluid and compared. Both are glycoproteins of 32–34 kDa with protease activities. Based on some physicochemical, enzymatic and immunological properties, it is concluded that these proteins are in fact identical. The protein exhibits properties similar to kallikrein-like serine protease, trypsin, chymotrypsin and thiol acid protease. Tests of the activity of the enzyme against some potential natural and synthetic substrates showed that bovine serum albumin was more readily hydrolysed than casein. The results of this study should be useful in purifying and assaying this protein. Based on published studies and the present results, the broad proteolytic specificity of human seminal proteinase suggests a role for this protein in several physiological functions.

  2. Enhanced Response of a Proteinase K-Based Conductometric Biosensor Using Nanoparticles

    Wided Nouira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Proteinases are involved in a multitude of important physiological processes, such as protein metabolism. For this reason, a conductometric enzyme biosensor based on proteinase K was developed using two types of nanoparticles (gold and magnetic. The enzyme was directly adsorbed on negatively charged nanoparticles and then deposited and cross-linked on a planar interdigitated electrode (IDE. The biosensor was characterized with bovine serum albumin (BSA as a standard protein. Higher sensitivity was obtained using gold nanoparticles. The linear range for BSA determination was then from 0.5 to 10 mg/L with a maximum response of 154 µs. These results are greater than that found without any nanoparticles (maximum response of 10 µs. The limit of detection (LOD was 0.3 mg/L. An inter-sensor reproducibility of 3.5% was obtained.

  3. The procollagen N-proteinases ADAMTS2, 3 and 14 in pathophysiology.

    Bekhouche, Mourad; Colige, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of most of the extracellular matrices where they provide a structural support to cells, tissues and organs. Fibril-forming procollagens are synthetized as individual chains that associate to form homo- or hetero-trimers. They are characterized by the presence of a central triple helical domain flanked by amino and carboxy propeptides. Although there are some exceptions, these two propeptides have to be proteolytically removed to allow the almost spontaneous assembly of the trimers into collagen fibrils and fibers. While the carboxy-propeptide is mainly cleaved by proteinases from the tolloid family, the amino-propeptide is usually processed by procollagen N-proteinases: ADAMTS2, 3 and 14. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning this subfamily of ADAMTS enzymes and discusses their potential involvement in physiopathological processes that are not directly linked to fibrillar procollagen processing. PMID:25863161

  4. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Butler, Tracy R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity ...

  5. Nitric Oxide Negatively Modulates Wound Signaling in Tomato Plants1

    Orozco-Cárdenas, Martha L.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2002-01-01

    Synthesis of proteinase inhibitor I protein in response to wounding in leaves of excised tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants was inhibited by NO donors sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine. The inhibition was reversed by supplying the plants with the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxiphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide. NO also blocked the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and proteinase inhibitor synthesis that was induced by systemin, oligouronides, and jasmonic acid (JA). However, H2O2 generated by glucose oxidase and glucose was not blocked by NO, nor was H2O2-induced proteinase inhibitor synthesis. Although the expression of proteinase inhibitor genes in response to JA was inhibited by NO, the expression of wound signaling-associated genes was not. The inhibition of wound-inducible H2O2 generation and proteinase inhibitor gene expression by NO was not due to an increase in salicylic acid, which is known to inhibit the octadecanoid pathway. Instead, NO appears to be interacting directly with the signaling pathway downstream from JA synthesis, upstream of H2O2 synthesis. The results suggest that NO may have a role in down-regulating the expression of wound-inducible defense genes during pathogenesis. PMID:12226527

  6. Proteinase 3 contributes to transendothelial migration of NB1-positive neutrophils

    Kuckleburg, Christopher J.; Tilkens, Sarah M.; Santoso, Sentot; Newman, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil transmigration requires the localization of neutrophils to endothelial cell junctions, where receptor-ligand interactions and the action of serine proteases promote leukocyte diapedesis. NB1 (CD177) is a neutrophil-expressed surface molecule that has been reported to bind proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease released from activated neutrophils. PR3 has demonstrated proteolytic activity on a number of substrates, including extracellular matrix proteins, although its role in neutrop...

  7. Sulfonate salts of amino acids: novel inhibitors of the serine proteinases.

    Groutas, W C; Brubaker, M J; Zandler, M E; Stanga, M A; Huang, T L; Castrisos, J C; Crowley, J P

    1985-04-16

    A series of amino acid-derived sulfonate salts have been synthesized. They were found to inactivate efficiently and selectively human leukocyte elastase. The sulfonate salts of the methyl esters of L-norleucine, L-norvaline and L-valine were the most potent. The enzyme is inactivated irreversibly with concomitant release of bisulfite ion. The results demonstrate for the first time that ionic compounds can indeed function as novel inhibitors for the serine proteinases. PMID:3885950

  8. Cloning and expression of an active aspartic proteinase from Mucor circinelloides in Pichia pastoris

    Gama Salgado, Jose Antonio; Kangwa, Martin; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracellular aspartic proteinase (MCAP) produced by Mucor circinelloides in solid state fermentations has been shown to possess milk clotting activity and represents a potential replacement for bovine chymosin in cheese manufacturing. Despite its prospects in the dairy industry, the molecular characteristics of this enzyme remain unknown. This work focuses on MCAP cloning and optimization of heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, and characterization of the enzyme. Results Th...

  9. Proteinases of the mammary gland: developmental regulation in vivo and vectorial secretion in culture

    Talhouk, Rabih S.; CHIN, JENNIE R.; UNEMORI, ELAINE N.; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J.

    1991-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of mammary epithelial cell function both in vivo and in culture. Substantial remodeling of ECM accompanies the structural changes in the mammary gland during gestation, lactation and involution. However, little is known about the nature of the enzymes and the processes involved. We have characterized and studied the regulation of cell-associated and secreted mammary gland proteinases active at neutral pH that may be involved in degradat...

  10. Effect of acute ozone exposure on the proteinase-antiproteinase balance in the rat lung

    Lung disease may result from a persisting proteinase excess or a depletion of antiproteinase in pulmonary parenchyma. We investigated the in vivo effect of a 48-hr exposure to ozone at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm on proteinase and antiproteinase activity of rat lungs. Elastase inhibitory capacities of serum, lung tissue, and airway washings were measured as indicators of antielastase activity. Trypsin inhibitory capacity was measured using an esterolytic procedure. Proteinase was measured as radioactive release from a 14C-globin substrate. The 48-hr exposures to O3 at levels up to 1 ppm produced concentration-dependent decreases of 35-80% of antiproteinase activities in serum and in lung tissue. However, exposure to 1.5 ppm O3 resulted in no decrease in antiproteinase activities. Acid proteinase activities (pH 4.2) were increased 65-120% by exposure to 1 or 1.5 ppm O3, which correlated with inflammatory cells noted histologically. At 1.5 ppm O3, pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were noted in histologic sections. These changes led to a flooding of the alveoli with up to 40 times normal protein levels and a greater than fivefold increase in airway antiproteinase. These data suggest that serum and soluble lung tissue antiproteinase activity decreased upon exposure to low levels of ozone. However, if O3 exposure is high enough to produce pulmonary hemorrhage, antiproteinase may increase following serum exudation. These changes may be important in the development of ozone-induced lung diseases, especially emphysema

  11. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    Lund, Leif R.; Rømer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J.; Danø, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when ...

  12. Luminal trypsin may regulate enterocytes through proteinase-activated receptor 2

    Kong, Wuyi; McConalogue, Karen; Khitin, Lev M.; Hollenberg, Morley D; Payan, Donald G.; Böhm, Stephan K.; Nigel W. Bunnett

    1997-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is a recently characterized G-protein coupled receptor that is cleaved and activated by pancreatic trypsin. Trypsin is usually considered a digestive enzyme in the intestinal lumen. We examined the hypothesis that trypsin, at concentrations normally present in the lumen of the small intestine, is also a signaling molecule that specifically regulates enterocytes by activating PAR-2. PAR-2 mRNA was highly expressed in the mucosa of the small intestine and...

  13. In vitro differential activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases of clinical isolates of Candida

    Aurean D'Eça Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Candida yeasts are commensals; however, if the balance of normal flora is disrupted or the immune defenses are compromised, Candida species can cause disease manifestations. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida, including the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases in clinical isolates of Candida spp. METHODS: Eighty-two isolates from hospitalized patients collected from various sites of origin were analyzed. Phospholipase production was performed in egg yolk medium and the production of proteinase was verified in a medium containing bovine serum albumin. The study was performed in triplicate. RESULTS: Fifty-six (68.3% of isolates tested were phospholipase positive and 16 (44.4% were positive for proteinase activity. C. tropicalis was the species with the highest number of positive isolates for phospholipase (91.7%. Statistically significant differences were observed in relation to production of phospholipases among species (p<0,0001 and among the strains from different sites of origin (p=0.014. Regarding the production of acid protease, the isolates of C. parapsilosis tested presented a larger number of producers (69.2%. Among the species analyzed, the percentage of protease producing isolates did not differ statistically (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901 (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of C. non-albicans and all C. albicans isolates were great producers of hydrolytic enzymes and, consequently, might be able to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  14. In vitro evaluation of proteinase, phospholipase and haemolysin activities of Candida species isolated from clinical specimens

    Sachin C.D; Ruchi K; Santosh S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Virulence attributes of Candida species include adherence to host tissues, morphological changes and secretion of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. These enzymes play pivotal roles in pathogenicity of candida infection. Aim: The present study aimed to determine phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin activities in Candida species isolated from various clinical samples. Material and Method: A total of 110 Candida species isolated from various clinical specimens were identified up ...

  15. Alanine substitutions of noncysteine residues in the cysteine-stabilized αβ motif

    Yang, Ying-Fang; Cheng, Kuo-Chang; Tsai, Ping-Hsing; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Tian-Ren; Ping-Chiang Lyu

    2009-01-01

    The protein scaffold is a peptide framework with a high tolerance of residue modifications. The cysteine-stabilized αβ motif (CSαβ) consists of an α-helix and an antiparallel triple-stranded β-sheet connected by two disulfide bridges. Proteins containing this motif share low sequence identity but high structural similarity and has been suggested as a good scaffold for protein engineering. The Vigna radiate defensin 1 (VrD1), a plant defensin, serves here as a model protein to probe the amino ...

  16. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lbpro) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lbpro L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. 15N-HSQC measurements of Lbpro L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLbpro, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lbpro, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lbpro and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lbpro. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes

  17. [Characteristics of proteinase digestive function in invertebrates--inhabitants of cold seas].

    Mukhin, V A; Smirnova, E B; Novikov, V Iu

    2007-01-01

    Digestive proteinases of various taxa of invertebrates of the Northern seas have been studied: crustaceans Paralithodes camtchaticus, Pandalus borealis; molluscs Chlamys islandicus, Buccinum undatum, Serripes groenlandicus, and echinoderms Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, Cucumaria frondosa, Asterias rubens, and Grossaster papposus. The presence of two proteolytic activity peaks in the acid (pH 2.5-3.5) and low alkaline zones (pH 7.5-8.5) and a similar proteinase spectrum have been revealed in digestive organs of the studied animals. The proteolytic activity in digestive organs of the Barents Sea invertebrates exceeds significantly that of terrestrial homoiothermal animals, which seems to be an extensive compensation for poor differentiation of the digestive system and for low substrate specificity of the enzymes as well as for cold conditions of the habitat. The principal qualitative difference between vertebrates and invertebrates consists in that the latter have no pepsin activity, but do have the cathepsin activity that is absent in vertebrate digestive organs. Contribution to the acid proteolysis is made by lysosomal cathepsins, rather than by pepsins. Activity in the alkaline and neutral pH zones is provided by serine proteinases. In digestive cavities of invertebrates, hydrolysis of proteins and mechanical processing of food occur only in the low alkaline zone, whereas acid proteolysis has intracellular lysosomal localization. PMID:18038635

  18. Implantation Serine Proteinases heterodimerize and are critical in hatching and implantation

    Meng Guoliang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently reported the expression of murine Implantation Serine Proteinase genes in pre-implantation embryos (ISP1 and uterus (ISP1 and ISP2. These proteinases belong to the S1 proteinase family and are similar to mast cell tryptases, which function as multimers. Results Here, we report the purification and initial characterization of ISP1 and 2 with respect to their physico-chemical properties and physiological function. In addition to being co-expressed in uterus, we show that ISP1 and ISP2 are also co-expressed in the pre-implantation embryo. Together, they form a heterodimer with an approximate molecular weight of 63 kD. This complex is the active form of the enzyme, which we have further characterized as being trypsin-like, based on substrate and inhibitor specificities. In addition to having a role in embryo hatching and outgrowth, we demonstrate that ISP enzyme is localized to the site of embryo invasion during implantation and that its activity is important for successful implantation in vivo. Conclusion On the basis of similarities in structural, chemical, and functional properties, we suggest that this ISP enzyme complex represents the classical hatching enzyme, strypsin. Our results demonstrate a critical role for ISP in embryo hatching and implantation.

  19. Aggregation properties of whey protein hydrolysates generated with Bacillus licheniformis proteinase activities.

    Spellman, David; Kenny, Patricia; O'Cuinn, Gerard; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2005-02-23

    Hydrolysis of whey protein concentrate (WPC) with Alcalase 2.4 L, a Bacillus licheniformis proteinase preparation, induces gelation. The aggregation behavior of WPC hydrolysates generated with Alcalase and Prolyve 1000, a Bacillus licheniformis proteinase that did not induce gelation, were studied by turbidity and particle size analysis. With the use of synthetic peptide substrates, it was shown that Alcalase contains a glutamyl endopeptidase (GE) activity not present in Prolyve. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of WPC hydrolysates generated with Alcalase, Prolyve, and combinations of Prolyve with a GE activity isolated from Alcalase showed that GE was responsible for the observed enzyme-induced peptide aggregation in Alcalase hydrolysates. Hydrolysates generated with Prolyve, having a degree of hydrolysis (DH) of 11.8% and 10.4% of peptide material greater than 10 kDa, could be induced to aggregate by the addition of GE. These results emphasize the contribution of enzyme specificity to the physicochemical and functional characteristics of proteinase hydrolysates of WPC. PMID:15713050

  20. Effect of bilineobin, a thrombin-like proteinase from the venom of common cantil (Agkistrodon bilineatus).

    Komori, Y; Nikai, T; Ohara, A; Yagihashi, S; Sugihara, H

    1993-03-01

    A thrombin-like proteinase, named bilineobin, was isolated from Agkistrodon bilineatus venom by Sephadex G-75, DEAE-Sephacel and Heparin-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. The purified enzyme has a mol. wt of 57,000 and catalysed the hydrolysis of arginine esters and thrombin substrates Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-MCA and Boc-Asp(OBz)-Pro-Arg-MCA. Although bilineobin converted fibrinogen into fibrin resulting in the production of fibrinopeptides, the activity was relatively low (0.65 NIH units/mg). Fibrinopeptides released upon hydrolysis by this proteinase were identified as fibrinopeptide A (FpA) and fibrinopeptide B (FpB) by measuring fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectra and amino acid sequence. This indicates that bilineobin hydrolyses the Arg(19)-Gly(20) bond in the A alpha chain and the Arg(21)-Gly(22) bond in the B beta chain of the bovine fibrinogen molecule. Kinetic study of FpA and FpB release reveals that bilineobin has a preference for cleaving the B beta chain. In addition, bilineobin is resistant to thrombin inhibitors such as hirudin. These suggest that the mechanism of action of bilineobin is similar but not identical to that of thrombin. It was demonstrated that the NH2-terminal region of bilineobin has significant similarities in sequence with thrombin-like proteinases from other snake venoms; however, only three residues were common with thrombin up to residue number 24. PMID:8470131

  1. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    Di Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized.

  2. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells.

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3C(pro)s) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3C(pro) plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3C(pro) are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3C(pro) can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3C(pro) and these essential factors, 3C(pro) is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3C(pro) are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3C(pro) may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3C(pro) is summarized. PMID:26999188

  3. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor from the Plerocercoid of Spirometra erinacei

    Chung, Young-Bae; Yang, Hyun-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Helminthic cysteine proteases are well known to play critical roles in tissue invasion, nutrient uptake, and immune evasion of the parasites. In the same manner, the sparganum, the plerocercoid of Spirometra mansoni, is also known to secrete a large amount of cysteine proteases. However, cysteine protease inhibitors regulating the proteolytic activities of the cysteine protease are poorly illustrated. In this regard, we partially purified an endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor from spargan...

  4. Genetic analysis of regulatory mutants affecting synthesis of extracellular proteinases in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica: identification of a RIM101/pacC homolog.

    Lambert, M.; Blanchin-Roland, S; Le Louedec, F; Lepingle, A; Gaillardin, C.

    1997-01-01

    Depending on the pH of the growth medium, the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica secretes both an acidic proteinase and an alkaline proteinase, the synthesis of which is also controlled by carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur availability, as well as by the presence of extracellular proteins. Recessive mutations at four unlinked loci, named PAL1 to PAL4, were isolated which prevent alkaline proteinase derepression under conditions of carbon and nitrogen limitation at pH 6.8. These mutations markedly affect ma...

  5. Cysteine- and glutathione-mediated uptake of lead and cadmium into Zea mays and Brassica napus roots

    This study examines a new mechanism for the uptake of Pb and Cd into Brassica napus and Zea mays roots. During hydroponic experiments, the uptake of Pb and Cd was enhanced in the presence of cysteine and glutathione, whereas no or very low uptake was observed in EDTA and penicillamine controls. Uptake rates were also enhanced after pre-exposure to cysteine or glutathione and inhibited in the presence of vanadate, suggesting a biological mechanism of uptake. Increasing concentrations of glutathione in solution resulted in decreasing Pb uptake rates, indicating competition for transport between free-glutathione and Pb-glutathione species. Pb uptake in the presence of increasing cysteine concentrations resulted in decreased uptake initially but linearly increasing uptake at higher concentrations. Experimentation showed concentration dependent Pb uptake rates. We speculate that there are specific transporters for these thiol ligands and describe what barriers remain for application of this novel transport mechanism in chelator-assisted phytoremediation. - Cysteine and glutathione mediate the transport of lead and cadmium into plant roots.

  6. Cysteine- and glutathione-mediated uptake of lead and cadmium into Zea mays and Brassica napus roots

    Vadas, Timothy M., E-mail: tvadas@umbc.ed [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, 320 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ahner, Beth A., E-mail: baa7@cornell.ed [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, 320 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    This study examines a new mechanism for the uptake of Pb and Cd into Brassica napus and Zea mays roots. During hydroponic experiments, the uptake of Pb and Cd was enhanced in the presence of cysteine and glutathione, whereas no or very low uptake was observed in EDTA and penicillamine controls. Uptake rates were also enhanced after pre-exposure to cysteine or glutathione and inhibited in the presence of vanadate, suggesting a biological mechanism of uptake. Increasing concentrations of glutathione in solution resulted in decreasing Pb uptake rates, indicating competition for transport between free-glutathione and Pb-glutathione species. Pb uptake in the presence of increasing cysteine concentrations resulted in decreased uptake initially but linearly increasing uptake at higher concentrations. Experimentation showed concentration dependent Pb uptake rates. We speculate that there are specific transporters for these thiol ligands and describe what barriers remain for application of this novel transport mechanism in chelator-assisted phytoremediation. - Cysteine and glutathione mediate the transport of lead and cadmium into plant roots.

  7. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come.

  8. A phytopathogenic cysteine peptidase from latex of wild rubber vine Cryptostegia grandiflora.

    Ramos, M V; Souza, D P; Gomes, M T R; Freitas, C D T; Carvalho, C P S; Júnior, P A V R; Salas, C E

    2014-04-01

    A 24,118 Da (MALDI-TOF) cysteine peptidase (EC 3.4.22.16) was purified from the latex extract of Cryptostegia grandiflora by two chromatographic steps involving ion exchange and Reverse-phase HPLC. The purified protein (Cg24-I) exhibits a single band profile following reduced SDS-PAGE and a unique amino terminal sequence, 1VPASIDWREKGTVL14, that is similar to other plant cysteine peptidases. Cg24-I displayed optimal proteolytic activity at pH 8.0 with 25 mM phosphate buffer. The proteolytic activity was inhibited with 0.2 mM E-64 and 1 mM iodoacetamide and was stimulated with 1 mM DTT. Cg24-I fully inhibited spore germination of phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium solani at a dose of 28.1 μg/mL. Its toxicity involves the membrane permeabilization of spores as probed by propidium iodide uptake. These results show that latex peptidases are part of the plant's defensive strategy against phytopathogens and that they most likely act synergistically with other recognized defensive proteins. PMID:24596120

  9. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    Steinberger, Jutta [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Kontaxis, Georg [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Campus Vienna Biocenter 5, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Rancan, Chiara [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Department of Gene Vectors, Haematologikum, Marchioninistrasse 25, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Skern, Tim, E-mail: timothy.skern@meduniwien.ac.at [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb{sup pro}) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb{sup pro} L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. {sup 15}N-HSQC measurements of Lb{sup pro} L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb{sup pro}, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb{sup pro}, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb{sup pro} and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb{sup pro}. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes.

  10. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  11. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  12. Inhibition of tryptase and chymase induced nucleated cell infiltration by proteinase inhibitors

    Shao-heng HE; Han-qiu CHEN; Jian ZHENG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of proteinase inhibitors to modulate nucleated cell infiltration into the peritoneum of mice induced by tryptase and chymase. METHODS: Human lung tryptase and skin chymase were purified by a similar procedure involving high salt extraction, heparin agarose affinity chromatography followed by S-200 Sephacryl gel filtration chromatography. The actions of proteinase inhibitors on tryptase and chymase induced nucleated cell accumulation were examined with a mouse peritoneum model. RESULTS: A selective chymase inhibitor Z-Ile-GluPro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPPF) was able to inhibit approximately 90% neutrophil, 73% eosinophil, 87% lymphocyte and 60% macrophage accumulation induced by chymase at 16 h following injection. Soy bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI), chymostatin, and α1-antitrypsin showed slightly less potency than ZIGPPF in inhibition of the actions of chymase. While all tryptase inhibitors tested were able to inhibit neutrophil, eosinophil, and macrophage accumulation provoked by tryptase at 16 h following injection, only leupeptin, APC366, and aprotinin were capable of inhibiting tryptase induced lymphocyte accumulation. The inhibitiors of tryptase tested were also able to inhibit tryptase induced neutrophil and eosinophil accumulation at 6 h following injection. When being injected alone, all inhibitors of chymase and tryptase at the concentrations tested by themselves had no significant effect on the accumulation of nucleated cells in the peritoneum of mice at both 6 h and 16 h. CONCLUSION: Proteinase inhibitors significantly inhibited tryptase and chymase-induced nucleated cell accumulation in vivo, and therefore they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  13. In vitro assay for HCV serine proteinase expressed in insect cells

    Li-Hua Hou; Gui-Xin Du; Rong-Bin Guan; Yi-Gang Tong; Hai-Tao Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To produce the recombinant NS3 protease of hepatitis C virus with enzymatic activity in insect cells.METHODS: The gene of HCV serine proteinase domain which encodes 181 amino acids was inserted into pFastBacHTc and the recombinant plasmid pFBCNS3N was transformed into DH10Bac competent cells for transposition.After the recombinant bacmids had been determined to be correct by both blue-white colonies and PCR analysis, the isolated bacmid DNAs were transfected into Sf9 insect cells.The bacmids DNA was verified to replicate in insect cells and packaged into baculovirus particles via PCR and electronic microscopic analysis. The insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus were determined by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot assays. The recombinant protein was soluted in N-lauryl sarcosine sodium (NLS) and purifed by metalchelated-affinity chromatography, then the antigenicity of recombinant protease was determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay and its enzymatic activity was detected.RESULTS: The HCV NS3 protease domain was expressed in insect cells at high level and it was partially solved in NLS.Totally 0.2 mg recombinant serine proteinase domain with high purity was obtained by metal-chelated-affinity chromatography from 5×107 cells, and both antigenicity and specificity of the protein were evaluated to be high when used as antigen to detect hepatitis C patients′ sera in indirect ELISA format. In vitro cleavage assay corroborated its enzymatic activity.CONCLUSION: The recombinant HCV NS3 proteinase expressed by insect cells is a membrane-binding protein with good antigenicity and enzymatic activity.

  14. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  15. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine beta-casein.

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P. F.; Healy, A.

    1997-01-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine beta-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The major sites of hydrolysis were Ser-18-Ser-19, Glu-20-Glu-21, Gln-56-Ser-57, Gln-72-Asn-73, ...

  16. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein.

    Rattray, F P; Fox, P. F.; Healy, A.

    1996-01-01

    The specificity of the extracellular proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 on bovine alpha s1-casein was studied. Hydrolysis was monitored over time by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and urea-PAGE. The major pH 4.6-soluble peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. The time course of peptide formation indicated that His-8-Gln-9, Ser-161-Gly-162, and eithe...

  17. Structural Studies of the Serine-Carboxyl Proteinase Kumamolisin and the Metallopeptidase Peptidyl-Dipeptidase Dcp

    Comellas Bigler, Mireia

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the serine-carboxyl proteinase kumamolisin was solved in native form and in complex with two aldehyde inhibitors. The structures show a subtilisin-like fold with a modified catalytic triad (Ser-Glu-Asp), which allows proteolytic activity at acidic pH. The crystal structure analysis of the full-length prokumamolisin S278A exhibits an uncleaved linker segment that extends along the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. This evidence points to an autocatalytic cl...

  18. Fibrinogen degradation by two neutral granulocyte proteinases. Influence of calcium on the generation of fibrinogen degradation products with anticlotting properties.

    Bingenhkeimer, C; Gramse, M; Egbring, R; Havemann, K

    1981-07-01

    Degradation of human fibrinogen by elastase-like proteinase, chymotrypsin-like proteinase and plasmin, was done in the presence and absence of calcium ions, respectively. The resulting fibrinogen degradation products were tested for their coagulant and anti-coagulant properties. The results show that 1. fibrinogenolysis is delayed in the presence of calcium ions. Higher enzyme concentrations are required to get unclottable split products when calcium ions are present. 2. The fibrinogen fragments obtained in the presence of calcium are different in their molecular weights and anticoagulant activities compared to those obtained in the absence of calcium ions. This effect of calcium is most striking during fibrinogen cleavage by chymotrypsin-like proteinase. Elastase and plasmin-induced fibrinogenolysis was substantially influenced by calcium only at a late degradation stage. PMID:6456216

  19. Purification and characterization of a collagenolytic serine proteinase from the skeletal muscle of red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    Wu, Guo-Ping; Chen, Su-Hua; Liu, Guang-Ming; Yoshida, Asami; Zhang, Ling-Jing; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2010-03-01

    A collagenolytic serine proteinase (CSP) was purified from red sea bream (Pagrus major) skeletal muscle to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation and chromatographies including DEAE-Sephacel, Phenyl Sepharose and Hydroxyapatite. The molecular mass of CSP was approximately 85 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Optimum temperature and pH of CSP were 40 degrees C and 8.0, respectively. CSP was specifically inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors, while inhibitors to other type proteinases did not show much inhibitory effects. The K(m) and k(cat) values of CSP for Boc-Leu-Lys-Arg-MCA were 3.58 microM and 0.13 s(-1) at 37 degrees C, respectively. Furthermore, CSP hydrolyzed gelatin and native type I collagen effectively though its degradation on myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not significant, suggesting its involvement in the texture tenderization of fish muscle during the post-mortem stage. PMID:19945542

  20. Comparison of ACE inhibitory activity in skimmed goat and cow milk hydrolyzed by alcalase, flavourzyme, neutral protease and proteinase K

    Bao Chunju

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory peptides derived from milk proteins have obvious effect of lowering blood pressure, safe and non-toxic side effects. This study compared four commercial proteases, namely alcalase, flavourzyme, neutral protease and proteinase K for their ACE inhibitory activity in skimmed goat and cow milk and identified the best one with higher ACE inhibitory activity. The degree of hydrolysis (DH of alcalase and proteinase K were much higher than flavourzyme, neutral protease for both skimmed goat and cow milk. Alcalase was the best enzyme to produce ACE inhibitory peptides from goat milk, with the ACE inhibitory activity 95.31%, while proteinase K was the optimal protease for hydrolyzing cow milk, with 81.28% ACE inhibitory activity. Furthermore, no correlation was obtained between the ACE inhibitory activity and DH for both goat and cow milk.

  1. Sequence comparison, molecular modeling, and network analysis predict structural diversity in cysteine proteases from the Cape sundew, Drosera capensis.

    Butts, Carter T; Zhang, Xuhong; Kelly, John E; Roskamp, Kyle W; Unhelkar, Megha H; Freites, J Alfredo; Tahir, Seemal; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-01-01

    Carnivorous plants represent a so far underexploited reservoir of novel proteases with potentially useful activities. Here we investigate 44 cysteine proteases from the Cape sundew, Drosera capensis, predicted from genomic DNA sequences. D. capensis has a large number of cysteine protease genes; analysis of their sequences reveals homologs of known plant proteases, some of which are predicted to have novel properties. Many functionally significant sequence and structural features are observed, including targeting signals and occluding loops. Several of the proteases contain a new type of granulin domain. Although active site residues are conserved, the sequence identity of these proteases to known proteins is moderate to low; therefore, comparative modeling with all-atom refinement and subsequent atomistic MD-simulation is used to predict their 3D structures. The structure prediction data, as well as analysis of protein structure networks, suggest multifarious variations on the papain-like cysteine protease structural theme. This in silico methodology provides a general framework for investigating a large pool of sequences that are potentially useful for biotechnology applications, enabling informed choices about which proteins to investigate in the laboratory. PMID:27471585

  2. Chitosan in Plant Protection

    Abdelbasset El Hadrami

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitin and chitosan are naturally-occurring compounds that have potential in agriculture with regard to controlling plant diseases. These molecules were shown to display toxicity and inhibit fungal growth and development. They were reported to be active against viruses, bacteria and other pests. Fragments from chitin and chitosan are known to have eliciting activities leading to a variety of defense responses in host plants in response to microbial infections, including the accumulation of phytoalexins, pathogen-related (PR proteins and proteinase inhibitors, lignin synthesis, and callose formation. Based on these and other proprieties that help strengthen host plant defenses, interest has been growing in using them in agricultural systems to reduce the negative impact of diseases on yield and quality of crops. This review recapitulates the properties and uses of chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives, and will focus on their applications and mechanisms of action during plant-pathogen interactions.

  3. Regulation of basal resistance by a powdery mildew-induced cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase in barley

    Rayapuram, Channabasavangowda; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Maiser, Fabian;

    2012-01-01

    The receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) constitute a large and diverse group of proteins controlling numerous plant physiological processes, including development, hormone perception and stress responses. The cysteine-rich RLKs (CRKs) represent a prominent subfamily of transmembrane-anchored RLKs...... affect R-gene-mediated resistance. Silencing of HvCRK1 phenocopied the effective penetration resistance found in mlo-resistant barley plants, and the possible link between HvCRK1 and MLO was substantiated by the fact that HvCRK1 induction on Bgh inoculation was dependent on Mlo. Finally, using both...

  4. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  5. Purification and characterization of cysteine protease from germinating cotyledons of horse gram

    Rao Sridhar K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes play central role in the biochemical mechanism of germination and intricately involved in many aspects of plant physiology and development. To study the mechanism of protein mobilization, undertaken the task of purifying and characterizing proteases, which occur transiently in germinating seeds of horse gram. Results Cysteine protease (CPRHG was purified to homogeneity with 118 fold by four step procedure comprising Crude extract, (NH42SO4 fractionation, DEAE-Cellulose and CM-sephacel chromatography from the 2 day germinating cotyledons of horse gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam. Verdc.. CPRHG is a monomer with molecular mass of 30 k Da, was determined by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The purified enzyme on IEF showed two isoforms having pI values of 5.85 and 6.1. CPRHG composed of high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and serine. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by pCMB, iodoacetate and DEPC indicating cysteine and histidine residues at the active site. However, on addition of sulfhydryl reagents (cysteine, dithiothreitol, glutathione and beta-ME reverse the strong inhibition by pCMB. The enzyme is fairly stable toward pH and temperature. Immunoblot analysis shows that the enzyme synthesized as zymogen (preproenzyme with 81 kDa and processed to a 40 kDa proenzyme which was further degraded to give 30 kDa active enzyme. Conclusion It appears that the newly synthesized protease is inactive, and activation takes place during germination. CPRHG has a broad substrate specificity and stability in pH, temperature, etc. therefore, this protease may turn out to be an efficient choice for the pharmaceutical, medicinal, food, and biotechnology industry.

  6. High-level expression of Proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber in Pichia pastoris using multi-copy expression strains.

    Yang, Hu; Zhai, Chao; Yu, Xianhong; Li, Zhezhe; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yunyun; Ma, Xiaojian; Zhong, Xing; Li, Guolong; Wu, Di; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Proteinase K is widely used in scientific research and industries. This report was aimed to achieve high-level expression of proteinase K using Pichia pastoris GS115 as the host strain. The coding sequence of a variant of proteinase K that has higher activity than the wild type protein was chosen and optimized based on the codon usage preference of P. pastoris. The novel open reading frame was synthesized and a series of multi-copy expression vectors were constructed based on the pHBM905BDM plasmid, allowing for the tandem integration of multiple copies of the target gene into the genome of P. pastoris with a single recombination. These strains were used to study the correlation between the gene copy number and the expression level of proteinase K. The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the tandem expression cassettes were integrated into the host genome stably. Meanwhile, the results of qPCR and enzyme activity assays indicated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the target gene increased as the gene copy number increased. Moreover, the effect of gene dosage on the expression level of the recombinant protein was more obvious using high-density fermentation. The maximum expression level and enzyme activity of proteinase K, which were obtained from the recombinant yeast strain bearing 5 copies of the target gene after an 84-h induction, were approximately 8.069 mg/mL and 108,295 U/mL, respectively. The recombinant proteinase was purified and characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for the activity of this protease were approximately pH 11 and 55 °C, respectively. PMID:26892536

  7. Use of pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis for functional mapping of the plum pox virus helper component proteinase suppressor of gene silencing.

    Varrelmann, Mark; Maiss, Edgar; Pilot, Ruth; Palkovics, Laszlo

    2007-03-01

    Helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of Plum pox virus is a multifunctional potyvirus protein that has been examined intensively. In addition to its involvement in aphid transmission, genome amplification and long-distance movement, it is also one of the better-studied plant virus suppressors of RNA silencing. The first systematic analysis using pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis of the silencing suppression function of a potyvirus HC-Pro is presented here. Sixty-three in-frame insertion mutants, each containing five extra amino acids inserted randomly within the HC-Pro protein, were analysed for their ability to suppress transgene-induced RNA silencing using Agrobacterium infiltration in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing green fluorescent protein. A functional map was obtained, consisting of clearly defined regions with different classes of silencing-suppression activity (wild-type, restricted and disabled). This map confirmed that the N-terminal part of the protein, which is indispensable for aphid transmission, is dispensable for silencing suppression and supports the involvement of the central region in silencing suppression, in addition to its role in maintenance of genome amplification and synergism with other viruses. Moreover, evidence is provided that the C-terminal part of the protein, previously known to be necessary mainly for proteolytic activity, also participates in silencing suppression. Pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis has been shown to be a fast and powerful tool to functionally characterize plant virus proteins. PMID:17325375

  8. Isolation and characterization of βA3-crystallin associated proteinase from α-crystallin fraction of human lenses

    Srivastava, O.P.; Srivastava, K.; Chaves, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to characterize the properties of a proteinase activity associated with βA3-crystallin, which was isolated from the α-crystallin fraction of human lenses. Methods An inactive, Arg-bond hydrolyzing proteinase in the α-crystallin fraction, which was isolated from the water soluble (WS) protein fraction of 60- to 70-year-old human lenses, was activated by sodium deoxycholate treatment. The activated enzyme was purified by a three-step procedure that included a size-exclus...

  9. Brewer's spent grain and corn steep liquor as alternative culture medium substrates for proteinase production by Streptomyces malaysiensis AMT-3

    Rodrigo Pires do Nascimento

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Brewer's spent grain and corn steep liquor or yeast extract were used as the sole organic forms for proteinase production by Streptomyces malaysiensis in submerged fermentation. The influence of the C and N concentrations, as well as the incubation periods, were assessed. Eight proteolytic bands were detected through gelatin-gel-electrophoresis in the various extracts obtained from the different media and after different incubation periods, with apparent molecular masses of 20, 35, 43, 50, 70, 100, 116 and 212 kDa. The results obtained suggest an opportunity for exploring this alternative strategy for proteinases production by actinomycetes, using BSG and CSL as economically feasible substrates.

  10. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  11. Chloro(triphenylphosphole)gold(I) - A selective Chemosensor for Cysteine

    Maruthai Kumaravel; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Photophysical studies of luminescent gold complex of triphenylphosphole has been described. Addition of biologically relevant thio compounds was found to quench its fluorescence in methanol solution. Based on this, a simple and selective luminescence sensing method for cysteine detection has been developed.

  12. Isolation of recombinant cysteine dioxygenase protein from Trichophyton mentagrophytes

    Kašperová, A.; Kunert, J.; Horynová, M.; Weigl, E.; Sebela, M.; Lenobel, René; Raška, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2011), E456-E462. ISSN 0933-7407 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cysteine dioxygenase * dermatophytes * recombinant protein * keratinolytic fungi * cDNA Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2011

  13. DISULFIND: A DISULFIDE BONDING STATE AND CYSTEINE CONNECTIVITY PREDICTION SERVER

    Ceroni, A; Passerini, A.; Vullo,A; Frasconi, P.

    2006-01-01

    DISULFIND is a server for predicting the disulfide bonding state of cysteines and their disulfide connectivity starting from sequence alone. Optionally, disulfide connectivity can be predicted from sequence and a bonding state assignment given as input. The output is a simple visualization of the assigned bonding state (with confidence degrees) and the most likely connectivity patterns. The server is available at .

  14. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    sequential C-terminal degradation pattern characteristic of this dipeptylpeptidase. The substrate primary structure was not found to be essential for regulation of the proteolytic activity of the cysteine peptidases studied. However, the degradation patterns obtained imply that calpains are involved in...

  15. Synthesis of Protein Bioconjugates via Cysteine-maleimide Chemistry.

    Mason, Alexander F; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-01-01

    The chemical linking or bioconjugation of proteins to fluorescent dyes, drugs, polymers and other proteins has a broad range of applications, such as the development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) and nanomedicine, fluorescent microscopy and systems chemistry. For many of these applications, specificity of the bioconjugation method used is of prime concern. The Michael addition of maleimides with cysteine(s) on the target proteins is highly selective and proceeds rapidly under mild conditions, making it one of the most popular methods for protein bioconjugation. We demonstrate here the modification of the only surface-accessible cysteine residue on yeast cytochrome c with a ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine maleimide. The protein bioconjugation is verified by gel electrophoresis and purified by aqueous-based fast protein liquid chromatography in 27% yield of isolated protein material. Structural characterization with MALDI-TOF MS and UV-Vis is then used to verify that the bioconjugation is successful. The protocol shown here is easily applicable to other cysteine - maleimide coupling of proteins to other proteins, dyes, drugs or polymers. PMID:27501061

  16. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  17. Cysteine functionalized copper organosol: synthesis, characterization and catalytic application

    We herein report a facile one-pot synthesis, stabilization, redispersion and Cu-S interaction of L-cysteine and dodecanethiol (DDT) protected copper organosol in toluene from precursor copper stearate using sodium borohydride in toluene under a nitrogen atmosphere. Surface modification of the synthesized copper organosol with an amino acid L-cysteine and an alkanethiol (dodecanethiol, DDT) is accomplished by a thiolate bond between the used ligands and nanoparticle surface. The cysteine molecule binds the copper surface via a thiolate and amine linkage but not through electrostatic interaction with the carboxylate group due to the solvent polarity and dielectric medium. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis was performed to confirm the surface functionalization of the amino acid and DDT to the copper surface. Copper organosol has been characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV/vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The as-synthesized particles are spherical in shape and exhibit a Mie scattering profile with an absorption maxima in the visible range. Copper nanoparticles capped by cysteine and/or DDT in non-aqueous media are found to represent an interesting catalytic approach for the synthesis of octylphenyl ether

  18. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    2010-04-01

    ... the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 92-93, which is incorporated by reference. Copies may... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine. 184.1271 Section 184.1271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    2010-04-01

    ...). (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 92-93... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184.1272 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  20. Development and Characterization of an Electroless Plated Silver/Cysteine Sensor Platform for the Electrochemical Determination of Aflatoxin B1

    Alex Paul Wacoo; Mathew Ocheng; Deborah Wendiro; Peter California Vuzi; Joseph F. Hawumba

    2016-01-01

    An electroless plated silver/cysteine sensor platform [Glass|silver|cysteine|aflatoxin B1|horseradish peroxidase] for the Electrochemical detection of aflatoxin B1 was developed and characterized. This involved four major steps: (1) an electroless deposition of silver (plating) onto a glass slide, (2) immobilization of cysteine; (3) conjugation of aflatoxin B1 to cysteine groups; and (4) blocking of free cysteine groups with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The binding of cysteine to the silver...

  1. Intracellular localization of Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase in chronic periodontitis

    Emilia Marttila

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treponema denticola is an important periodontal pathogen capable of tissue invasion. Its chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP can degrade a number of basement membrane components in vitro, thus suggesting a contribution to tissue invasion by the spirochete. The aim of this study was to analyze the localization of CTLP in chronic periodontitis tissues ex vivo. A polyclonal antibody specific to T. denticola cell-bound CTLP was used to detect the spirochetes in the gingival tissues of patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis (n=25 by immunohistochemistry and periodic acid-Schiff staining (PAS. The presence of T. denticola in the periodontal tissue samples was analyzed by PCR. Periodontal tissue samples of 12 of the 25 patients were found to be positive for T. denticola by PCR. Moreover, CTLP could be detected in the periodontal tissues of all these patients by immunohistochemistry. In the epithelium, the CTLP was mostly intracellular. Typically, the positive staining could be seen throughout the whole depth of the epithelium. When detected extracellularly, CTLP was localized mainly as granular deposits. The connective tissue stained diffusely positive in four cases. The positive staining co-localized with the PAS stain in nine cases. T. denticola and its CTLP could be detected in diseased human periodontium both intra- and extracellularly. The granular staining pattern was suggestive of the presence of T. denticola bacteria, whereas the more diffused staining pattern was indicative of the recent presence of the bacterium and shedding of the cell-bound proteinase.

  2. Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Biomass, Metabolic Activity and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Production.

    Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sónia; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    According to epidemiological data, Candida tropicalis has been related to urinary tract infections and haematological malignancy. Several virulence factors seem to be responsible for C. tropicalis infections, for example: their ability to adhere and to form biofilms onto different indwelling medical devices; their capacity to adhere, invade and damage host human tissues due to enzymes production such as proteinases. The main aim of this work was to study the behaviour of C. tropicalis biofilms of different ages (24-120 h) formed in artificial urine (AU) and their ability to express aspartyl proteinase (SAPT) genes. The reference strain C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and two C. tropicalis isolates from urine were used. Biofilms were evaluated in terms of culturable cells by colony-forming units enumeration; total biofilm biomass was evaluated using the crystal violet staining method; metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT assay; and SAPT gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. All strains of C. tropicalis were able to form biofilms in AU, although with differences between strains. Candida tropicalis biofilms showed a decrease in terms of the number of culturable cells from 48 to 72 h. Generally, SAPT3 was highly expressed. C. tropicalis strains assayed were able to form biofilms in the presence of AU although in a strain- and time-dependent way, and SAPT genes are expressed during C. tropicalis biofilm formation. PMID:26572148

  3. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor is preferentially increased in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Sallenave, J M; Donnelly, S C; Grant, I S; Robertson, C; Gauldie, J; Haslett, C

    1999-05-01

    Inappropriate release of proteases from inflammatory and stromal cells can lead to destruction of the lung parenchyma. Antiproteinases such as alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-Pi), secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor (elafin) control excess production of human neutrophil elastase. In the present study, the concentrations of alpha1-Pi, SLPI and elafin found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from control subjects, patients at risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients with established ARDS were determined. Levels of all three inhibitors were raised in patients compared with normal subjects. SLPI was increased in the group of patients who were at risk of ARDS and went on to develop the condition, compared with the "at-risk" group who did not progress to ARDS (p=0.0083). Alpha1-Pi and elafin levels were similar in these two populations. In patients with established ARDS, both alpha1-Pi and SLPI levels were significantly increased, compared to patients at risk of ARDS who did (p=0.0089) or did not (p=0.0003) progress to ARDS. The finding of increased antiproteinases shortly before the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome provide further evidence for enhanced inflammation prior to clinical disease. PMID:10414400

  4. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor is a major leukocyte elastase inhibitor in human neutrophils.

    Sallenave, J M; Si Tahar, M; Cox, G; Chignard, M; Gauldie, J

    1997-06-01

    Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is the main neutrophil elastase (HLE) inhibitor found in the upper airways during pulmonary inflammation. It has been shown to be synthesized and secreted in vitro by epithelial cells and has been localized in tracheal glands and bronchiolar epithelial cells by immunocytochemistry. In this study, using immunodetection and immunopurification techniques with specific anti-SLPI immunoglobulin G (IgG), we show that SLPI is present as a native 14-kDa molecule in neutrophil cytosol. In addition, we demonstrate that SLPI is the major inhibitor of HLE present in neutrophil cytosol because pre-incubation with specific anti-SLPI IgG was able to inhibit completely the anti-HLE activity of the cytosol. SLPI can be secreted (probably in an inactive form) by neutrophils and its secretion is enhanced when the cells are stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Elafin, an elastase-specific inhibitor, is also present in minute amounts in neutrophil cytosol and its secretion can be up-regulated. The presence of SLPI in the cytosol of neutrophils may serve as a protective screen against proteinases spilling from azurophilic granules. An alternative or supplementary role may be the maintenance of a differentiated phenotype. PMID:9201260

  5. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%. PMID:26304452

  6. Age-dependent changes in extracellular proteins, aminopeptidase and proteinase activities in Frankia isolate BR.

    Müller, A; Benoist, P; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1991-12-01

    To investigate protein secretion by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia isolate BR, we designed a rapid DEAE adsorption, salt elution and Biogel P6DG desalination method to concentrate protein from the growth medium. Secreted proteins reached a maximum concentration (5.6 gm l-1) in the medium at growth arrest. Analysis by SDS-PAGE detected up to 63 extracellular polypeptides when Frankia cells were grown under stirred conditions in BAP medium supplemented with phosphatidylcholine and MES buffer and 65 proteins in stirred BAP media alone. The pattern of extracellular polypeptides changed during growth. Several extracellular proteolytic activities were detected and compared with intracellular ones. The substrate specificity of the extracellular and intracellular aminopeptidase activities were the same. Also, the electrophoretic migration patterns of secreted and intracellular aminopeptidases could not be distinguished. Secretion of the proline-specific aminopeptidase FAP proteinase (PF) were secreted: 10 had the same electrophoretic mobility as their intracellular counterparts after SDS-gelatine-PAGE while five (PF - 39.5, PF - 38.5, PF - 36.5, PF - 25.5 and PF - 20.5 kDa) had a different electrophoretic mobility and, therefore, appeared to be exclusively extracellular. At least seven extracellular proteinases appeared to increase coordinately in activity shortly before growth arrest. PMID:15101385

  7. Functional significance of conserved cysteines in the human organic cation transporter 2

    Pelis, Ryan M.; Dangprapai, Yodying; Cheng, Yaofeng; Zhang, Xiaohong; Terpstra, Jennifer; Wright, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    The significance of conserved cysteines in the human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2), namely the six cysteines in the long extracellular loop (loop cysteines) and C474 in transmembrane helix 11, was examined. Uptake of tetraethylammonium (TEA) and 1-methyl-4-phenypyridinium (MPP) into Chinese hamster ovary cells was stimulated >20-fold by hOCT2 expression. Both cell surface expression and transport activity were reduced considerably following mutation of individual loop cysteines (C51, C...

  8. Schistosomiasis mansoni: novel chemotherapy using a cysteine protease inhibitor.

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis is a chronic, debilitating parasitic disease infecting more than 200 million people and is second only to malaria in terms of public health importance. Due to the lack of a vaccine, patient therapy is heavily reliant on chemotherapy with praziquantel as the World Health Organization-recommended drug, but concerns over drug resistance encourage the search for new drug leads. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The efficacy of the vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 was tested in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni. Disease parameters measured were worm and egg burdens, and organ pathology including hepato- and splenomegaly, presence of parasite egg-induced granulomas in the liver, and levels of circulating alanine aminotransferase activity as a marker of hepatocellular function. K11777 (25 mg/kg twice daily [BID], administered intraperitoneally at the time of parasite migration through the skin and lungs (days 1-14 postinfection [p.i.], resulted in parasitologic cure (elimination of parasite eggs in five of seven cases and a resolution of other disease parameters. K11777 (50 mg/kg BID, administered at the commencement of egg-laying by mature parasites (days 30-37 p.i., reduced worm and egg burdens, and ameliorated organ pathology. Using protease class-specific substrates and active-site labeling, one molecular target of K11777 was identified as the gut-associated cathepsin B1 cysteine protease, although other cysteine protease targets are not excluded. In rodents, dogs, and primates, K11777 is nonmutagenic with satisfactory safety and pharmacokinetic profiles. CONCLUSIONS: The significant reduction in parasite burden and pathology by this vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor validates schistosome cysteine proteases as drug targets and offers the potential of a new direction for chemotherapy of human schistosomiasis.

  9. Assay of Cysteine in Human Serum with Quinine-Ce4+ Chemiluminescence System

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and selective chemiluminescence (CL) method was developed for the determination of cysteine. This method is based on that the weak CL of cysteine oxidized with cerium (IV) can be greatly enhanced by quinine, and the total cysteine in human serum can be detected through simply diluting with water, showing a simpler analytical characteristic.

  10. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  11. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of l-Cysteine Metabolism: Physiological Role and Fate of l-Cysteine in the Enteric Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Sato, Dan; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT l-Cysteine is essential for virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Besides having a role in the synthesis of virtually all proteins and of taurine, cysteamine, glutathione, and other redox-regulating proteins, l-cysteine has important functions under anaerobic/microaerophilic conditions. In anaerobic or microaerophilic protozoan parasites, such as Entamoeba histolytica, l-cysteine has been implicated in growth, attachment, survival, and protection from ox...

  12. Lipases and proteinases in milk : occurrence, heat inactivation, and their importance for the keeping quality of milk products

    Driessen, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence and heat inactivation of native and bacterial lipases and proteinases in milk were studied.Production of these enzymes by Gram-negative psychrotrophic bacteria in milk was found to take place towards the end of exponential growth and in the stationary growth phase.Kinetics of heat ina

  13. Production of proteinase A by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a cell-recycling fermentation system: Experiments and computer simulations

    Grøn, S.; Biedermann, K.; Emborg, Claus

    1996-01-01

    Overproduction of proteinase A by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated by cultivations in a cell-recycling bioreactor. Membrane filtration was used to separate cells from the broth. Recycling ratios and dilution rates were varied and the effect on enzyme production was studied both...

  14. Molecular cloning and functional characterisation of a cathepsin L-like proteinases from the fish kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma carassii

    Ruszczyk, A.; Forlenza, M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma carassii is a fish kinetoplastid parasite that belongs to the family Trypanosomatida. In the present study we cloned a cathepsin L-like proteinase from T. carassii. The nucleotide sequence of 1371 bp translated into a preproprotein of 456 amino acids. The preproprotein contained the oxya

  15. The Contribution of Proteinase-Activated Receptors to Intracellular Signaling, Transcellular Transport and Autophagy in Alzheimer´s Disease

    Matěj, R.; Rohan, Z.; Holada, K.; Olejár, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 2-12. ISSN 1567-2050 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s Disease * autophagy * proteinase-activated receptors Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.889, year: 2014

  16. Divalent metals stabilize cellular prion proteins and alter the rate of proteinase-K dependent limited proteolysis

    Background: The key biochemical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases is the conversion of normal cellular prion proteins (PrP**c) to the proteinase K (PK) resistant, abnormal form (PrP**sc); however, the cellular mechanisms underlying the conversion remain enigmatic. Binding of divalent ca...

  17. Proteinases of betaretroviruses bind single-stranded nucleic acids through a novel interaction module, the G-patch

    Švec, Martin; Bauerová, Helena; Pichová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Stříšovský, Kvido

    Praha : JPM, 2004 - (Hunter, E.; Ruml, T.; Pichová, I.; Rumlová, M.; Sakalian, M.). s. 75 ISBN 80-86313-13-1. [The Retrovirus Assembly Meeting. 02.10.2004-06.10.2004, Praha] Keywords : proteinases * betaretroviruses Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. The epidermal growth factor precursor in the rat kidney seems to be processed by an aprotinin sensitive proteinase

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Raaberg, Lasse

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is synthesized as a membrane bound precursor in the rat kidney. The precursor seems to be processed by an aprotinin sensitive proteinase. Intravenous infusion of aprotinin reduces the urinary excretion of EGF by 85% and increases the amount of renal EGF. Kidney...

  19. Plant caspase-like proteases in plant programmed cell death

    Xu, Qixian; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically-controlled disassembly of the cell. In animal systems, the central core execution switch for apoptotic PCD is the activation of caspases (Cysteine-containing Aspartate-specific proteases). Accumulating evidence in recent years suggests the existence of caspase-like activity in plants and its functional involvement in various types of plant PCD, although no functional homologs of animal caspases were identified in plant genome. In this mini-review, ...

  20. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases: heterologous expression, purification and characterization

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2011-01-01

    During germination of barley seeds, mobilization of protein is essential and cysteine proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme and is activated through reduction of the active...... site cysteines and by removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. A cDNA clone of the barley key cysteine endoprotease...

  1. Processing of predicted substrates of fungal Kex2 proteinases from Candida albicans, C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris

    Bader Oliver

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kexin-like proteinases are a subfamily of the subtilisin-like serine proteinases with multiple regulatory functions in eukaryotes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the Kex2 protein is biochemically well investigated, however, with the exception of a few well known proteins such as the α-pheromone precursors, killer toxin precursors and aspartic proteinase propeptides, very few substrates are known. Fungal kex2 deletion mutants display pleiotropic phenotypes that are thought to result from the failure to proteolytically activate such substrates. Results In this study we have aimed at providing an improved assembly of Kex2 target proteins to explain the phenotypes observed in fungal kex2 deletion mutants by in vitro digestion of recombinant substrates from Candida albicans and C. glabrata. We identified CaEce1, CA0365, one member of the Pry protein family and CaOps4-homolog proteins as novel Kex2 substrates. Conclusion Statistical analysis of the cleavage sites revealed extended subsite recognition of negatively charged residues in the P1', P2' and P4' positions, which is also reflected in construction of the respective binding pockets in the ScKex2 enzyme. Additionally, we provide evidence for the existence of structural constrains in potential substrates prohibiting proteolysis. Furthermore, by using purified Kex2 proteinases from S. cerevisiae, P. pastoris, C. albicans and C. glabrata, we show that while the substrate specificity is generally conserved between organisms, the proteinases are still distinct from each other and are likely to have additional unique substrate recognition.

  2. Cd-Cysteine Nanorods as a Fluorescence Sensor for Determination of Fe (III) in Real Samples.

    Ghiamati, Ebrahim; Boroujerdi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    A new Cd-Cysteine complex nanorods (Cd-Cys NRs) were synthesized in one step at room temperature, and its morphology, structure and spectral properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis (EA), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), solid state and normal UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and spectrofluorometry. The developed Cd-Cys NRs were used as a fluorescence sensor for detection of Fe (III) in different aqueous matrices. The selectivity and sensitivity of the fabricated nano-sensor based on its fluorescence quenching in the presence of Fe (III) were probed according to the Stern-Volmer equation. The detection limit of the method was in micro-molar per liter range. Cd-Cys NRs response tested in different complex samples such as Rosemary plant leaves, exhibited a well-defined response. Anticoagulation measurements were performed to evaluate their blood biocompatibility. PMID:26518579

  3. Biospecific haemosorbents based on proteinase inhibitor. II. Efficiency of biospecific antiproteinase haemosorbent 'Ovosorb' in complex treatment of experimental generalized purulent peritonitis and acute destructive pancreatitis in dogs.

    Platé, N A; Kirkovsky, V V; Antiperovich, O F; Nicolaichik, V V; Valueva, T A; Sinilo, S B; Moin, V M; Lobacheva, G A

    1994-03-01

    The biospecific antiproteinase haemosorbent (BAH) 'Ovosorb' containing, in the bulk of polyacryamide gel, the ovomucoid from whites of duck eggs, was used for a complex treatment of the experimental generalized purulent peritonitis and acute destructive pancreatitis in dogs. The efficiency of BAH was manifested in the significant reduction of lethality of the experimental animals, a more rapid liquidation of proteinasaemia, normalization in plasma of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and protein metabolism. Thus, by eliminating proteinases from circulation, Ovosorb contributes to the cessation of imbalance in the proteinase-inhibitor system and is efficient in the therapy of pathological states related to this imbalance. PMID:8031989

  4. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Chapman Harold A; Wolters Paul J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically ...

  5. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines inhibits microtubule polymerization

    Clark, Hillary M; Hagedorn, Tara D.; Landino, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. In addition, protein thiol redox reactions are increasingly identified as a mechanism to regulate protein structure and function. We assessed the effect of hypothiocyanous acid on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by hypothiocyanous and hypochlorous acids was monitored by labeling tubulin with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein and by detecting higher molecula...

  6. Proteinase 3 carries small unusual carbohydrates and associates with αlpha-defensins

    Zoega, Morten; Ravnsborg, Tina; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar; Schou, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The neutrophil granulocyte is an important first line of defense against intruding pathogens and it contains a range of granules armed with antibacterial peptides and proteins. Proteinase 3 (PR3) is one among several serine proteases of the azurophilic granules in neutrophil granulocytes. Here, we...... characterize the glycosylation of PR3 and its association with antimicrobial human neutrophil peptides (HNPs, α-defensins) and the effect of these on the mechanism of inhibition of the major plasma inhibitor of PR3, α1-antitrypsin. The glycosylation of purified, mature PR3 showed some heterogeneity with...... carbohydrates at Asn 102 and 147 carrying unusual small moieties indicating heavy processing. Mass spectrometric analysis and immuno blotting revealed strong association of highly purified PR3 with α-defensins and oligomers hereof. Irreversible inhibition of PR3 by α1-antitrypsin did not affect its association...

  7. Specificity of the collagenolytic serine proteinase from the pancreas of the catfish (Parasilurus asotus).

    Yoshinaka, R; Sato, M; Yamashita, M; Itoko, M; Ikeda, S

    1987-01-01

    The collagenolytic serine proteinase from the pancreas of the catfish (Parasilus asotus) had a pH optimum of 7.5 for native, reconstituted calf skin collagen fibrils. The enzyme was most stable at pH 6-9. The enzyme hydrolyzed heat-denatured collagen (gelatin), casein, hemoglobin and elastin in addition to native collagen but not virtually Tos-Arg-OEe, Bz-Tyr-OEe and Suc-(Ala)3-NA. The enzyme cleaved Leu-Gly (or Gln-Gly), Gly-Ile and Ile-Ala bonds on DNP-Pro-Leu-Gly-Ile-Ala-Gly-Arg-NH2 and DNP-Pro-Gln-Gly-Ile-Ala-Gly-Gln-D-Arg. PMID:3480788

  8. Purification and characterization of elastase-specific inhibitor. Sequence homology with mucus proteinase inhibitor.

    Sallenave, J M; Ryle, A P

    1991-01-01

    Elastase-specific inhibitor (ESI) was purified from sputum of patients with chronic bronchitis and compared with mucus proteinase inhibitor (MPI, BrI) isolated, without the use of affinity chromatography on an enzyme, from non-purulent sputum of a patient with bronchial carcinoma. The N-terminal sequence of 27 residues of the latter was determined and showed serine as the only N-terminus. The partial N-terminal amino-acid sequence of ESI shows some homology with MPI, especially around the reactive site of MPI for human neutrophil elastase. This region could therefore be the reactive site of ESI. The thermodynamic and kinetic constants of the reactions of ESI with human neutrophil elastase and with porcine pancreatic elastase show that ESI is a fast-acting inhibitor. PMID:2039600

  9. Carcass characteristics, the calpain proteinase system, and aged tenderness of Angus and Brahman crossbred steers.

    Pringle, T D; Williams, S E; Lamb, B S; Johnson, D D; West, R L

    1997-11-01

    We used 69 steers of varying percentage Brahman (B) breeding (0% B, n = 11; 25% B, n = 13; 37% B, n = 10; 50% B, n = 12; 75% B, n = 12; 100% B, n = 11) to study the relationship between carcass traits, the calpain proteinase system, and aged meat tenderness in intermediate B crosses. Calpains and calpastatin activities were determined on fresh longissimus muscle samples using anion-exchange chromatography. The USDA yield and quality grade data (24 h) were collected for each carcass. Longissimus steaks were removed and aged for 5 or 14 d for determination of shear force and 5 d for sensory panel evaluation. Even though some yield grade factors were affected by the percentage of B breeding, USDA yield grades did not differ (P > .15) between breed types. Marbling score and USDA quality grade decreased linearly (P Brahman crosses. PMID:9374310

  10. The effect of proteinases (keratinases) in the pathogenesis of Dermatophyte infection using scanning electron microscope

    Objective: To study the inter-relationship between the stratum corneum of host and the fungal micro-organisms using scanning electron microscopy for a complete understanding of the host parasite relationship. Material and Methods: Skin surface biopsies were obtained two patients suffering from tinea cruris infection. One patient was infected with trichophyton rubrum and the other with epidermophytom floccosum strains. Results: The scanning electron microphotographs obtained from two patients showed a large number of villi in the infected area. The fungal hyphae were seen to placed intercellularly as well seem to be traversing through the corneocytes in many places. Conclusion: From the results observed in this study it could be suggested that the secretion of proteinases from the fungal hyphae together with the mechanical force of the invading organisms in vivo might be playing part in the invasion of the organisms. (author)

  11. Protein degradation in Euglena gracilis: Purification and characterization of the major proteinase

    Protolysis in a crude extract of Euglena gracilis was characterized by autolysis and the hydrolysis of 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA). Both procedures showed similar properties: stimulation by dithiothreitol, inhibition by leupeptin, and the same pH optima. Hydrolysis of 125I-BSA increased with growth stage and with the depletion of nutrient in the medium. The major proteolytic enzyme was purified to near homogeneity from extracts of dark-grown, stationary-phase Euglena gracilis by acid treatment, and by chromatography on CM-cellulose, DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxyapatite using 125I-BSA as substrate. The molecular weight of the proteinase was 30,000 when determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and 15,000 when estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The enzyme therefore appears to be composed of two subunits

  12. Expression of Candida Albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase in Acute Vaginal Candidiasis

    LIN Nengxing; FENG Jing; TU Yating; FENG Aiping

    2007-01-01

    In order to analyze the in vivo expression of Candida albicans secreted aspartyl proteinases (SAP) in human vaginal infection, the vaginal secretion from 29 human subjects was collected by vaginal swab, and the expression of SAP1-SAP6 was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using specific primer sets. It was found that Sap2 and Sap5 were the most common genes expressed during infection; Sap3 and Sap4 were detected in all subjects and all 6 SAP genes were simultaneously expressed in some patients with vaginal candidiasis. It was suggested that the SAP family is expressed by Candida albicans during infection in human and that Candida albicans infection is associated with the differential expression of individual SAP genes which may be involved in the pathogenesis of vaginal candidiasis.

  13. Bacterial proteinases as targets for the development of second-generation antibiotics.

    Travis, J; Potempa, J

    2000-03-01

    The emergence of bacterial pathogen resistance to common antibiotics strongly supports the necessity to develop alternative mechanisms for combating drug-resistant forms of these infective organisms. Currently, few pharmaceutical companies have attempted to investigate the possibility of interrupting metabolic pathways other than those that are known to be involved in cell wall biosynthesis. In this review, we describe multiple, novel roles for bacterial proteinases during infection using, as a specific example, the enzymes from the organism Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontopathogen, which is known to be involved in the development and progression of periodontal disease. In this manner, we are able to justify the concept of developing synthetic inhibitors against members of this class of enzymes as potential second-generation antibiotics. Such compounds could not only prove valuable in retarding the growth and proliferation of bacterial pathogens but also lead to the use of this class of inhibitors against invasion by other infective organisms. PMID:10708847

  14. Human lamin B contains a farnesylated cysteine residue

    We recently showed that HeLa cell lamin B is modified by a mevalonic acid derivative. Here we identified the modified amino acid, determined its mode of linkage to the mevalonic acid derivative, and established the derivative's structure. A cysteine residue is modified because experiments with lamin B that had been biosynthetically labeled with [3H]mevalonic acid or [35S]cysteine and then extensively digested with proteases yielded 3H- or 35S-labeled products that co-chromatographed in five successive systems. A thioether linkage rather than a thioester linkage is involved because the mevalonic acid derivative could be released from the 3H-labeled products in a pentane-extractable form by treatment with Raney nickel but not with methanolic KOH. The derivative is a farnesyl moiety because the Raney nickel-released material was identified as 2,6,10-trimethyl-2,6,10-dodecatriene by a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The thioether-modified cysteine residue appears to be located near the carboxyl end of lamin B because treatment of 3H-labeled lamin B with cyanogen bromide yielded a single labeled polypeptide that mapped toward this end of the cDNA-inferred sequence of human lamin B

  15. Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor-treated monocyte inhibits human CD4(+) lymphocyte proliferation.

    Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Maffía, Paulo C; Reiteri, Romina M; Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Villalonga, Ximena; Sanchez, Mercedes L; Estein, Silvia M; Garcia, Verónica E; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, Héctor E

    2011-08-01

    Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is the main serine proteinase inhibitor produced by epithelial cells and has been shown to be a pleiotropic molecule with anti-inflammatory and microbicidal activities. However, the role of SLPI on the adaptive immune response is not well established. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of SLPI on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were treated with mitogens plus SLPI and proliferation was assessed by [(3) H]thymidine uptake. The SLPI decreased the lymphocyte proliferation induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) or OKT3 monoclonal antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was not observed when depleting monocytes from the PBMC and it was restored by adding monocytes and SLPI. SLPI-treated monocyte slightly decreased MHC II and increased CD18 expression, and secreted greater amounts of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the cell culture supernatants. SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant inhibited the CD4(+) lymphocyte proliferation but did not affect the proliferation of CD8(+) cells. Moreover, IL-2 increased T-bet expression and the presence of SLPI significantly decreased it. Finally, SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant dramatically decreased interferon-γ but increased IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the presence of IL-2-treated T cells. Our results demonstrate that SLPI target monocytes, which in turn inhibit CD4 lymphocyte proliferation and T helper type 1 cytokine secretion. Overall, these results suggest that SLPI is an alarm protein that modulates not only the innate immune response but also the adaptive immune response. PMID:21574992

  16. Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor-treated monocyte inhibits human CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation

    Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Maffía, Paulo C; Reiteri, Romina M; Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Villalonga, Ximena; Sanchez, Mercedes L; Estein, Silvia M; Garcia, Verónica E; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, Héctor E

    2011-01-01

    Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is the main serine proteinase inhibitor produced by epithelial cells and has been shown to be a pleiotropic molecule with anti-inflammatory and microbicidal activities. However, the role of SLPI on the adaptive immune response is not well established. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of SLPI on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were treated with mitogens plus SLPI and proliferation was assessed by [3H]thymidine uptake. The SLPI decreased the lymphocyte proliferation induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) or OKT3 monoclonal antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was not observed when depleting monocytes from the PBMC and it was restored by adding monocytes and SLPI. SLPI-treated monocyte slightly decreased MHC II and increased CD18 expression, and secreted greater amounts of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the cell culture supernatants. SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant inhibited the CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation but did not affect the proliferation of CD8+ cells. Moreover, IL-2 increased T-bet expression and the presence of SLPI significantly decreased it. Finally, SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant dramatically decreased interferon-γ but increased IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the presence of IL-2-treated T cells. Our results demonstrate that SLPI target monocytes, which in turn inhibit CD4 lymphocyte proliferation and T helper type 1 cytokine secretion. Overall, these results suggest that SLPI is an alarm protein that modulates not only the innate immune response but also the adaptive immune response. PMID:21574992

  17. Secretion of mucus proteinase inhibitor and elafin by Clara cell and type II pneumocyte cell lines.

    Sallenave, J M; Silva, A; Marsden, M E; Ryle, A P

    1993-02-01

    The regulation of proteinases secreted by neutrophils is very important for the prevention of tissue injury. We recently described the isolation of elafin from bronchial secretions, a new elastase-specific inhibitor that is also found in the skin of patients with psoriasis. In this study, we investigated the secretion of elafin and mucus proteinase inhibitor (MPI), another inhibitor showing sequence similarity with elafin, in two lung carcinoma cell lines, NCI-H322 and A549, which have features of Clara cells and type II alveolar cells, respectively. The results presented show that the two inhibitors are produced when the cells are cultured either in serum-free or in serum-containing media. MPI was detected immunologically as a unique molecule of M(r) 14 kD, in accordance with previous studies. Conversely, one or two elafin-immunoreactive species were detected depending on the cell line: a 12- to 14-kD species was observed in the A549 cell line, regardless of the culture conditions, whereas in the NCI-H322 cell line we detected a 6-kD species in serum-containing (10% fetal calf serum) conditions and a 12- to 14-kD species in serum-free conditions. The 12- to 14-kD molecule probably represents an active precursor of elafin. Whether the cleavage of the 12- to 14-kD precursor giving rise to the elafin molecule is of any physiologic significance is not known. In showing for the first time that MPI and elafin (and its precursor) are secreted by the A549 cell line, this report implicates the type II alveolar cell in the defense of the peripheral lung against the neutrophil elastase secreted during inflammation. PMID:8427705

  18. Purification and characterization of a stable cysteine protease ervatamin B, with two disulfide bridges, from the latex of Ervatamia coronaria.

    Kundu, S; Sundd, M; Jagannadham, M V

    2000-02-01

    Latex of the medicinal plant Ervatamia coronaria was found to contain at least three cysteine proteases with high proteolytic activity, called ervatamins. One of these proteases, named ervatamin B, has been purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange chromatography and crystallization. The molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 26 000 Da by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The extinction coefficient (epsilon(1%)(280 nm)) of the enzyme was 20.5 with 7 tryptophan and 10 tyrosine residues per molecule. The enzyme hydrolyzed denatured natural substrates such as casein, azoalbumin, and azocasein with a high specific activity. In addition, it showed amidolytic activity toward N-succinyl-alanine-alanine-alanine-p-nitroanilide with an apparent K(m) and K(cat) of 6.6 +/- 0.5 mM and 1.87 x 10(2) s(-)(1), respectively. The pH optima was 6.0-6.5 with azocasein as substrate and 7.0-7.5 with azoalbumin as substrate. The temperature optimum was around 50-55 degrees C. The enzyme was basic with an isoelectric point of 9.35 and had no carbohydrate content. Both the proteolytic and amidolytic activity of the enzyme was strongly inhibited by thiol-specific inhibitors. Interestingly, the enzyme had only two disulfide bridges versus three as in most plant cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily. The enzyme was relatively stable toward pH, denaturants, temperature, and organic solvents. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the pure enzyme gave a single precipitin line in Ouchterlony's double immunodiffusion and typical color in ELISA. Other related proteases do not cross-react with the antisera to ervatamin B showing that the enzyme is immunologically distinct. The N-terminal sequence showed conserved amino acid residues and considerable similarity to typical plant cysteine proteases. PMID:10691612

  19. Copper Inhibits the Protease from Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 by Both Cysteine-Dependent and Cysteine-Independent Mechanisms

    Karlstrom, Anders R.; Levine, Rodney L.

    1991-07-01

    The protease of the human immunodeficiency virus is essential for replication of the virus, and the enzyme is therefore an attractive target for antiviral action. We have found that the viral protease is inhibited by approximately stoichiometric concentrations of copper or mercury ions. Inactivation by Cu2+ was rapid and not reversed by subsequent exposure to EDTA or dithiothreitol. Direct inhibition by Cu2+ required the presence of cysteine residue(s) in the protease. Thus, a synthetic protease lacking cysteine residues was not inhibited by exposure to copper. However, addition of dithiothreitol as an exogenous thiol rendered even the synthetic protease susceptible to inactivation by copper. Oxygen was not required for inactivation of either the wild-type or the synthetic protease. These results provide the basis for the design of novel types of protease inhibitors.

  20. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserv...

  1. Copper inhibits the protease from human immunodeficiency virus 1 by both cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent mechanisms.

    Karlström, A R; Levine, R L

    1991-01-01

    The protease of the human immunodeficiency virus is essential for replication of the virus, and the enzyme is therefore an attractive target for antiviral action. We have found that the viral protease is inhibited by approximately stoichiometric concentrations of copper or mercury ions. Inactivation by Cu2+ was rapid and not reversed by subsequent exposure to EDTA or dithiothreitol. Direct inhibition by Cu2+ required the presence of cysteine residue(s) in the protease. Thus, a synthetic prote...

  2. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a polyethylene glycol-induced cysteine protease in common wheat

    Qing-Wei Zang; Cai-Xiang Wang; Xu-Yan Li; Zhi-Ai Guo; Rui-Lian Jing; Jun Zhao; Xiao-Ping Chang

    2010-09-01

    Plant cysteine protease (CP) genes are induced by abiotic stresses such as drought, yet their functions remain largely unknown. We isolated the full-length cDNA encoding a Triticum aestivum CP gene, designated TaCP, from wheat by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. Sequence analysis revealed that TaCP contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids, which is 96% identical to barley cysteine protease HvSF42. The TaCP transcript level in wheat seedlings was upregulated during polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress, with a peak appearing around 12 h after treatment. TaCP expression level increased rapidly with NaCl treatment at 48 h. TaCP responded strongly to low temperature (4°C) treatment from 1 h post-treatment and reached a peak of about 40-fold at 72 h. However, it showed only a very slight response to abscisic acid (ABA). More than one copy of TaCP was present in each of the three genomes of hexaploid wheat and its diploid donors. TaCP fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was located in the plasma membrane of onion epidermis cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaCP showed stronger drought tolerance and higher CP activity under water-stressed conditions than wild-type Arabidopsis plants. The results suggest that TaCP plays a role in tolerance to water deficit.

  3. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein interacts with the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Hak, Hagit; Mett, Anahit; Belausov, Eduard; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2012-01-01

    The V2 protein of Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV) is an RNA-silencing suppressor that counteracts the innate immune response of the host plant. However, this anti-host defense function of V2 may include targeting of other defensive mechanisms of the plant. Specifically, we show that V2 recognizes and directly binds the tomato CYP1 protein, a member of the family of papain-like cysteine proteases which are involved in plant defense against diverse pathogens. This binding occurred b...

  4. Inhibitory plant serpins with a sequence of three glutamine residues in the reactive center

    Hejgaard, Jørn

    2005-01-01

    Serpins appear to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, except fungi, and are also present in some bacteria, archaea and viruses. Inhibitory serpins with a glutamine as the reactive-center P1 residue have been identified exclusively in a few plant species. Unique serpins with a reactive center sequence of...... proteinases that specifically degrade storage prolamins containing Gln-rich repetitive sequences, most likely for digestive proteinases of insect pests or fungal pathogens that infect cereals. An assembled full-length amino acid sequence of a serpin expressed in cotton boll fiber (GaZ1) included conserved...... regions essential for serpin-proteinase interaction, suggesting inhibitory capacity at a putative reactive center P2-P2' with a sequence of four Gln residues....

  5. EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC H2S ON THIOL COMPOSITION OF CROP PLANTS

    BUWALDA, F; DE KOK, LJ; Stulen, I.

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of crop plants to H2S resulted in an increase in thiol level and a change in the composition of the thiol pool. Non-leguminous species accumulated cysteine and glutathione in the light, whereas in the dark, substantial amounts of gamma-glutamyl-cysteine were also detected. In leguminous spe

  6. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Marian Dorcas Quain; Karl Kunert; Christine Helen Foyer; Ignatious Ncube; Matome Eugene Makgopa; Stefan van Wyk; Magdeleen du Plessis; Urte Schlüter; Barend Juan Vorster

    2013-01-01

    Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of...

  7. Activity of recombinant trypsin isoforms on human proteinase-activated receptors (PAR): mesotrypsin cannot activate epithelial PAR-1, -2, but weakly activates brain PAR-1

    Grishina, Zoryana; Ostrowska, Ewa; Halangk, Walter; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Reiser, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin-like serine proteinases trigger signal transduction pathways through proteolytic cleavage of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in many tissues. Three members, PAR-1, PAR-2 and PAR-4, are trypsin substrates, as trypsinolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus produces receptor activation. Here, the ability of the three human pancreatic trypsin isoforms (cationic trypsin, anionic trypsin and mesotrypsin (trypsin IV)) as recombinant proteins was tested on PARs.Using fura 2 [Ca2...

  8. Epicutaneous Administration of Papain Induces IgE and IgG Responses in a Cysteine Protease Activity-Dependent Manner

    Hideo Iida; Toshiro Takai; Yusuke Hirasawa; Seiji Kamijo; Sakiko Shimura; Hirono Ochi; Izumi Nishioka; Natsuko Maruyama; Hideoki Ogawa; Ko Okumura; Shigaku Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epicutaneous sensitization to allergens is important in the pathogenesis of not only skin inflammation such as atopic dermatitis but also "atopic march" in allergic diseases such as asthma and food allergies. We here examined antibody production and skin barrier dysfunction in mice epicutaneously administered papain, a plant-derived occupational allergen belonging to the same family of cysteine proteases as mite major group 1 allergens. Methods: Papain and Staphylococcus aureus...

  9. Overexpression of serine acetlytransferase produced large increases in O-acetylserine and free cysteine in developing seeds of a grain legume

    Tabe, Linda; Wirtz, Markus; Molvig, Lisa; Droux , Michel; Hell, Ruediger

    2009-01-01

    There have been many attempts to increase concentrations of the nutritionally essential sulphur amino acids by modifying their biosynthetic pathway in leaves of transgenic plants. This report describes the first modification of cysteine biosyntheis in developing seeds; those of the grain legume, narrow leaf lupin (Lupinus angustifolius, L.). Expression in developing lupin embryos of a serine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSAT1 or AtSerat 2;1) was associated with increase...

  10. Silencing Brassinosteroid Receptor BRI1 Impairs Herbivory-elicited Accumulation of Jasmonic Acid-isoleucine and Diterpene Glycosides, but not Jasmonic Acid and Trypsin Proteinase Inhibitors in Nicotiana attenuata

    Da-Hai Yang; lan T.Baldwin; Jianqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    The brassinosteroid (BR) receptor,BR insensitive 1 (BRI1),plays a critical role in plant development,but whether BRI1-mediated BR signaling is involved in plant defense responses to herbivores was largely unknown.Here,we examined the function of BRI1 in the resistance of Nicotiana attenuata (Solanaceae) to its specialist insect herbivore Manduca sexta.Jasmonic acid (JA) and JA-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile) are important hormones that mediate resistance to herbivores and we found that after wounding or simulated herbivory NaBRI1 had little effect on JA levels,but was important for the induction of JA-Ile.Further experiments revealed that decreased JAR (the enzyme for JA-Ile production) activity and availability of lie in NaBRI1-silenced plants were likely responsible for the low JA-Ile levels.Consistently,M.sexta larvae gained more weight on NaBRI1-silenced plants than on the control plants.Quantification of insect feeding-induced secondary metabolites revealed that silencing NaBRI1 resulted in decreased levels of carbon-rich defensive secondary metabolites (hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides,chlorogenic acid,and rutin),but had little effect on the nitrogen-rich ones (nicotine and trypsin proteinase inhibitors).Thus,NaBRI1-mediated BR signaling is likely involved in plant defense responses to M.sexta,including maintaining JA-Ile levels and the accumulation of several carbon-rich defensive secondary metabolites.

  11. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the

  12. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  13. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

  14. Proteinases from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum moench seeds: Purification and properties of the 47 kDa enzyme

    Timotijević Gordana S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartic proteinases from buckwheat seeds are analyzed. Three forms of 47 kDa, 40 kDa and 28 kDa, were purified from mature buckwheat seeds, while two forms of 47 kDa and 28 kDa were detected in developing buckwheat seeds using pepstatin A affinity chromatography. A form of 47 kDa was selectively precipitated from other forms by ammonium sulfate precipitation. This enzyme resembles the chymosin-like pattern of proteolytic activity, as it was shown using BSA and k-casein as substrates, clarifying its ability for milk-clotting. The 47 kDa aspartic proteinase form is localized in the membrane fraction. .

  15. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  16. Biosynthesis and Reactivity of Cysteine Persulfides in Signaling.

    Yadav, Pramod K; Martinov, Michael; Vitvitsky, Victor; Seravalli, Javier; Wedmann, Rudolf; Filipovic, Milos R; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-13

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) elicits pleiotropic physiological effects ranging from modulation of cardiovascular to CNS functions. A dominant method for transmission of sulfide-based signals is via posttranslational modification of reactive cysteine thiols to persulfides. However, the source of the persulfide donor and whether its relationship to H2S is as a product or precursor is controversial. The transsulfuration pathway enzymes can synthesize cysteine persulfide (Cys-SSH) from cystine and H2S from cysteine and/or homocysteine. Recently, Cys-SSH was proposed as the primary product of the transsulfuration pathway with H2S representing a decomposition product of Cys-SSH. Our detailed kinetic analyses demonstrate a robust capacity for Cys-SSH production by the human transsulfuration pathway enzymes, cystathionine beta-synthase and γ-cystathionase (CSE) and for homocysteine persulfide synthesis from homocystine by CSE only. However, in the reducing cytoplasmic milieu where the concentration of reduced thiols is significantly higher than of disulfides, substrate level regulation favors the synthesis of H2S over persulfides. Mathematical modeling at physiologically relevant hepatic substrate concentrations predicts that H2S rather than Cys-SSH is the primary product of the transsulfuration enzymes with CSE being the dominant producer. The half-life of the metastable Cys-SSH product is short and decomposition leads to a mixture of polysulfides (Cys-S-(S)n-S-Cys). These in vitro data, together with the intrinsic reactivity of Cys-SSH for cysteinyl versus sulfur transfer, are consistent with the absence of an observable increase in protein persulfidation in cells in response to exogenous cystine and evidence for the formation of polysulfides under these conditions. PMID:26667407

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can secrete Sapp1p proteinase of Candida parapsilosis but cannot use it for efficient nitrogen acquisition

    Vinterová, Zuzana; Bauerová, Václava; Dostál, Jiří; Sychrová, Hana; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2013), s. 336-344. ISSN 1225-8873 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1945; GA ČR GAP302/12/1151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * Saccharomyces cerevisiae * secreted aspartic proteinase * SAPP1 * nitrogen metabolism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EE - Microbiology, Virology (FGU-C) Impact factor: 1.529, year: 2013

  18. Protective role of antimannan and anti-aspartyl proteinase antibodies in an experimental model of Candida albicans vaginitis in rats.

    De Bernardis, F.; Boccanera, M; Adriani, D; Spreghini, E; G. Santoni; Cassone, A.

    1997-01-01

    The role of antibodies (Abs) in the resistance to vaginal infection by Candida albicans was investigated by using a rat vaginitis model. Animals receiving antimannoprotein (anti-MP) and anti-aspartyl proteinase (Sap) Ab-containing vaginal fluids from rats clearing a primary C. albicans infection showed a highly significant level of protection against vaginitis compared to animals given Ab-free vaginal fluid from noninfected rats. Preabsorption of the Ab-containing fluids with either one or bo...

  19. prtH2, Not prtH, Is the Ubiquitous Cell Wall Proteinase Gene in Lactobacillus helveticus▿

    Genay, M.; Sadat, L.; Gagnaire, V.; Lortal, S

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus strains possess an efficient proteolytic system that releases peptides which are essential for lactobacillus growth in various fermented dairy products and also affect textural properties or biological activities. Cell envelope proteinases (CEPs) are bacterial enzymes that hydrolyze milk proteins. In the case of L. helveticus, two CEPs with low percentages of amino acid identity have been described, i.e., PrtH and PrtH2. However, the distribution of the genes that enc...

  20. Effects of systemic flunixin meglumine, topical oxytetracycline, and topical prednisolone acetate on tear film proteinases innormal horses

    Rainbow, Marc E

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of three medical treatments, topical oxytetracycline, topical prednisolone acetate, and systemic flunixin meglumine, on the activity of two proteinases, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), in equine tear film. The study design consisted of twelve ophthalmically normal horses separated into three groups of four in a cross-over study design. Each group was treated for 5 days with flunixin meglumine (...

  1. Evidence for the presence of proteolytically active secreted aspartic proteinase 1 of Candida parapsilosis in the cell wall

    Vinterová, Zuzana; Šanda, Miloslav; Dostál, Jiří; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 12 (2011), s. 2004-2012. ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * secreted aspartic proteinases * Sapp1p * cell wall * biotin * proteolytic activity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.798, year: 2011

  2. Modulation of enteroviral proteinase cleavage of poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) by conformation and PABP-associated factors

    Rivera, Carlos I.; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) causes a drastic inhibition of cellular cap-dependant protein synthesis due to the cleavage of translation factors eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly (A) binding protein (PABP). Only about half of cellular PABP is cleaved by viral 2A and 3C proteinases during infection. We have investigated PABP cleavage determinants that regulate this partial cleavage. PABP cleavage kinetics analyses indicate that PABP exists in multiple conformations, some of which are resistan...

  3. Proteinases of betaretroviruses bind single-stranded nucleic acids through a novel interaction module, the G-patch

    Švec, Martin; Bauerová, Helena; Pichová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Stříšovský, Kvido

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 576, 1/2 (2004), s. 271-276. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055304; GA MŠk LN00A032 Grant ostatní: 5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : retrovirus * aspartic proteinase * maturation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.843, year: 2004

  4. Differential induction of two procesing proteases controls the processing pattern of the trypsin proteinase inhibitor precursor in Nicotiana attenuata

    Horn, Martin; Patankar, A. G.; Zavala, J. A.; Wu, J.; Marešová, Lucie; Vůjtěchová, Milana; Mareš, Michael; Baldwin, I. T.

    Ljubljana : -, 2005. s. 94. [International Symposium on Proteinase Inhibitors and Biological Control /9./. 25.06.2005-29.06.2005, Brdo Estate] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055303; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/04/1286 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : posttranslational modifications * differential fragmentation * vacuolar processing enzyme Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  5. Extensive expansion of A1 family aspartic proteinases in fungi revealed by evolutionary analyses of 107 complete eukaryotic proteomes

    Revuelta, M.V.; Kan, van, J.; Kay, J; Have, ten, P.

    2014-01-01

    The A1 family of eukaryotic aspartic proteinases (APs) forms one of the 16 AP families. Although one of the best characterized families, the recent increase in genome sequence data has revealed many fungal AP homologs with novel sequence characteristics. This study was performed to explore the fungal AP sequence space and to obtain an in-depth understanding of fungal AP evolution. Using a comprehensive phylogeny of approximately 700 AP sequences from the complete proteomes of 87 fungi and 20 ...

  6. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 4 counter-regulate endostatin and VEGF release from human platelets

    Ma, Li; Perini, Rafael; McKnight, Webb; Dicay, Michael; Klein, Andre; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Wallace, John L

    2004-01-01

    The roles of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in platelet functions other than aggregation are not well understood. Among these is the release of factors that regulate the process of angiogenesis, such as endostatin and VEGF, which, respectively, inhibit and promote angiogenesis. PAR1 and PAR4 are expressed on the surface of human platelets and can be activated by thrombin. In the present study, we have attempted to determine the roles of PAR1 and PAR4 in regulating release of endostatin...

  7. An atypical catalytic mechanism involving three cysteines of thioredoxin

    Koh, Cha San; Navrot, Nicolas; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Knaff, David B.; WINGSLE, GUNNAR; Samian, Razip; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Corbier, Catherine; Gelhaye, Éric

    2008-01-01

    Unlike other thioredoxins h characterized so far, a poplar thioredoxin of the h type, PtTrxh4, is reduced by glutathione and glutaredoxin (Grx) but not NADPH:thioredoxin reductase (NTR). PtTrxh4 contains three cysteines: one localized in an N-terminal extension (Cys4) and two (Cys58 and Cys61) in the classical thioredoxin active site (57WCGPC61). The property of a mutant in which Cys58 was replaced by serine demonstrates that it is responsible for the initial nucleophilic attack during the ca...

  8. Characterization of Cysteine Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agent

    Reza Ahmadi; Ning Gu; Hamid Reza Madaah Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a kind of stabilized ferrofluid based on magnetite nanoparticles (mean core and its coating size about 21.9 and 1.6 nm, respectively) was synthesized via coprecipitation method. Cysteine was used as surfactant due to its proper conjunction to the surface of magnetite nanoparticles. Coating density and synthesized ferrofluids were characterized by using transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, dynamic light scattering and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging studies show that the synthesized ferrofluid can be used as a potential contrast enhancement agent especially for imaging lymphatic system.

  9. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate e...

  10. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    Judge Bryan S; James Laura P; Green Jody L; Heard Kennon J; Zolot Liza; Rhyee Sean; Dart Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS) are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from ...

  11. Irreversible effect of cysteine protease inhibitors on the release of malaria parasites from infected erythrocytes

    Glushakova, Svetlana; Mazar, Julia; Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F; Hama, Erinn; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    By studying the inactivation of malaria parasite culture by cysteine protease inhibition using confocal microscopy of living cells, and electron microscopy of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted cells, we report the precise step in the release of malaria parasites from erythrocytes that is likely regulated by cysteine proteases: the opening of the erythrocyte membrane, liberating parasites for the next round of infection. Inhibition of cysteine proteases within the last few minutes of...

  12. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alter...

  13. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen varian...

  14. Excretory bladder: the source of cysteine proteases in Paragonimus westermani metacercariae

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Young-Bae; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2002-01-01

    The cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani metacercariae are involved in metacercarial excystment, host immune modulation, and possibly in tissue penetration. In order to clarify the origin of the enzymes, 28 and 27 kDa cysteine proteases in metacercarial excretory-secretory products were purified through the FPLC system using Mono Q column chromatography. The polyclonal antibodies to the enzymes were produced in BALB/c mice. Immunolocalization studies revealed that both cysteine protea...

  15. α-Ketoheterocycles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    Steert, Koen; Berg, Maya; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes and also play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites. Inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Inspired by the in vivo antiparasitic activity of the vinyl sulfone based cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs), a series of α-ketoheterocycles 1-15 has been developed as reversible inhibitors of a r...

  16. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    Marton Siklos; Manel BenAissa; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families...

  17. Identification of semicarbazones, thiosemicarbazones and triazine nitriles as inhibitors of leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    Schroder, J.; S. Noack; Marhofer, R.J.; Mottram, J. C.; Coombs, G.H.; Selzer, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput sc...

  18. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Bradford W Gibson; Julie K. Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in muri...

  19. Cysteine-associated distribution of aromatic residues in disulfide-stabilized extracellular protein families

    H. Tina Guraya; Melissa A. Sealie; Stephen R. Campion; Jeffrey D. Longenberger

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine-dependent protein sequences were downloaded from annotated database resources to generate comprehensive EGF, Sushi, Laminin and Immu- noglobulin (IgC) motif-specific sequence files. Each dataset was vertically registered and the cumulative distribution of amino acid functional group chemistry determined relative to the respective complement of cysteine residues providing critical disulfide stabilization of these four well-known modular motif families. The cysteine-aligned amino acid...

  20. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is ...

  1. Functional contribution of cysteine residues to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope.

    Tschachler, E; Buchow, H; Gallo, R C; Reitz, M S

    1990-01-01

    Although the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 shows considerable strain variability, cysteine residues of the envelope protein are strongly conserved, suggesting that they are important to the envelope structure. We constructed and analyzed mutants of a biologically active molecular clone of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in which different cysteines were replaced by other amino acids in order to determine their functional importance. Substitution of cysteines 296 and...

  2. Convergent evolution of cysteine-rich proteins in feathers and hair

    Strasser, Bettina; Mlitz, Veronika; Hermann, Marcela; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Background Feathers and hair consist of cornified epidermal keratinocytes in which proteins are crosslinked via disulfide bonds between cysteine residues of structural proteins to establish mechanical resilience. Cysteine-rich keratin-associated proteins (KRTAPs) are important components of hair whereas the molecular components of feathers have remained incompletely known. Recently, we have identified a chicken gene, named epidermal differentiation cysteine-rich protein (EDCRP), that encodes ...

  3. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  4. Changes of balance between proteinase and their inhibitors in blood of pigs with high-velocity missile wounds

    周元国; 朱佩芳; 周继红; 李晓炎

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of imbalance between lysosomal enzymes and their inhibitors in blood on disturbance of the local and whole body after trauma. Methods: The dynamic changes of lysosomal enzymes and proteinase inhibitors were studied in 12 pigs with femoral comminuted fractures in both hind limbs caused by high velocity missiles. Four normal pigs served as controls. Results: After injury, the activity of Cathepsin D in arterial plasma increased gradually and reached the highest level at 8 hours, acid phosphatase in serum began to increase at 12 hours and the value of serum elastase did not change significantly. The level of α1-antitrypsin, a proteinase inhibitor in plasma, decreased significantly in the early stage after injury [73.5%±6.4% and 81.0%±5.1% of the baseline value (1.67 μmol*ml-1*min-1± 0.29 μmol*ml-1*min-1) at l and 2 hours after injury, respectively, P<0.05], then increased gradually and was higher than the baseline value at 12 hours after injury. Conclusions: Imbalance between lysosomal enzymes and proteinase inhibitors occurs soon after injury, which might result in continuous tissue damage and play an important role in the disturbance of general reaction after injury.

  5. Regulation of human ADAM 12 protease by the prodomain. Evidence for a functional cysteine switch

    Loechel, F; Overgaard, M T; Oxvig, C;

    1999-01-01

    prodomain maintaining the protease in a latent form. We now provide evidence that the latency mechanism of ADAM 12 can be explained by the cysteine switch model, in which coordination of Zn2+ in the active site of the catalytic domain by a cysteine residue in the prodomain is critical for inhibition of the...... protease. Replacing Cys179 with other amino acids results in an ADAM 12 proform that is proteolytically active, but latency can be restored by placing cysteine at other positions in the propeptide. None of the amino acids adjacent to the crucial cysteine residue is essential for blocking activity of the...

  6. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia. PMID:26212225

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the cysteine protease ervatamin A from Ervatamia coronaria

    Ervatamin A is a papain-family cysteine protease with high activity and stability. It has been isolated and purified from the latex of the medicinal flowering plant E. coronaria and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. Crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The ervatamins are highly stable cysteine proteases that are present in the latex of the medicinal plant Ervatamia coronaria and belong to the papain family, members of which share similar amino-acid sequences and also a similar fold comprising two domains. Ervatamin A from this family, a highly active protease compared with others from the same source, has been purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Needle-shaped crystals of ervatamin A diffract to 2.1 Å resolution and belong to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 31.10, b = 144.17, c = 108.61 Å. The solvent content using an ervatamin A molecular weight of 27.6 kDa is 43.9%, with a VM value of 2.19 Å3 Da−1 assuming one protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found using the structure of ervatamin C as a search model

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the cysteine protease ervatamin A from Ervatamia coronaria

    Chakraborty, Sibani; Biswas, Sampa; Chakrabarti, Chandana; Dattagupta, Jiban K., E-mail: jibank.dattagupta@saha.ac.in [Saha Institue of Nuclear Physics, Crystallography and Molecular Biology Division, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2005-06-01

    Ervatamin A is a papain-family cysteine protease with high activity and stability. It has been isolated and purified from the latex of the medicinal flowering plant E. coronaria and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique. Crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. The ervatamins are highly stable cysteine proteases that are present in the latex of the medicinal plant Ervatamia coronaria and belong to the papain family, members of which share similar amino-acid sequences and also a similar fold comprising two domains. Ervatamin A from this family, a highly active protease compared with others from the same source, has been purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography and crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Needle-shaped crystals of ervatamin A diffract to 2.1 Å resolution and belong to space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 31.10, b = 144.17, c = 108.61 Å. The solvent content using an ervatamin A molecular weight of 27.6 kDa is 43.9%, with a V{sub M} value of 2.19 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} assuming one protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found using the structure of ervatamin C as a search model.

  9. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  10. Cysteine proteases: mode of action and role in epidermal differentiation.

    Brocklehurst, Keith; Philpott, Mike P

    2013-02-01

    Desquamation or cell shedding in mammalian skin is known to involve serine proteases, aspartic proteases and glycosidases. In addition, evidence continues to accumulate that papain-like cysteine proteases and an inhibitor cystatin M/E largely confined to the cutaneous epithelia also play key roles in the process. This involves the complete proteolysis of cell adhesive structures of the stratum corneum, the corneodesmosomes and notably of the desmogleins. Continual cell replacement in the epidermis is the result of the balance between the loss of the outer squames and mitosis of the cells in the basal cell layer. This article provides a brief account of the salient features of the characteristics and catalytic mechanism of cysteine proteases, followed by a discussion of the relevant epidermal biology. The proteases include the asparaginyl endopeptidase legumain, which exerts a strict specificity for the hydrolysis of asparaginyl bonds, cathepsin-V and cathepsin-L. The control of these enzymes by cystatin M/E regulates the processing of transglutaminases and is crucial in the biochemical pathway responsible for regulating the cross-linking and desquamation of the stratum corneum. In addition, caspase-14 has now been shown to play a major part in epidermal maturation. Uncontrolled proteolytic activity leads to abnormal hair follicle formation and deleterious effects on the skin barrier function. PMID:23344364

  11. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sumana, Gajjala, E-mail: sumanagajjala@gmail.com [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Tiwari, Ida [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-09-08

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10{sup −4 }cm s{sup −1}. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  12. NMR analysis of the interaction of picornaviral proteinases Lb and 2A with their substrate eukaryotic initiation factor 4GII.

    Aumayr, Martina; Fedosyuk, Sofiya; Ruzicska, Katharina; Sousa-Blin, Carla; Kontaxis, Georg; Skern, Tim

    2015-12-01

    Messenger RNA is recruited to the eukaryotic ribosome by a complex including the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E (the cap-binding protein), the scaffold protein eIF4G and the RNA helicase eIF4A. To shut-off host-cell protein synthesis, eIF4G is cleaved during picornaviral infection by a virally encoded proteinase; the structural basis of this reaction and its stimulation by eIF4E is unclear. We have structurally and biochemically investigated the interaction of purified foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader proteinase (Lb(pro)), human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) 2A proteinase (2A(pro)) and coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4) 2A(pro) with purified eIF4GII, eIF4E and the eIF4GII/eIF4E complex. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we completed (13)C/(15) N sequential backbone assignment of human eIF4GII residues 551-745 and examined their binding to murine eIF4E. eIF4GII551-745 is intrinsically unstructured and remains so when bound to eIF4E. NMR and biophysical techniques for determining stoichiometry and binding constants revealed that the papain-like Lb(pro) only forms a stable complex with eIF4GII(551-745) in the presence of eIF4E, with KD values in the low nanomolar range; Lb(pro) contacts both eIF4GII and eIF4E. Furthermore, the unrelated chymotrypsin-like 2A(pro) from HRV2 and CVB4 also build a stable complex with eIF4GII/eIF4E, but with K(D) values in the low micromolar range. The HRV2 enzyme also forms a stable complex with eIF4E; however, none of the proteinases tested complex stably with eIF4GII alone. Thus, these three picornaviral proteinases have independently evolved to establish distinct triangular heterotrimeric protein complexes that may actively target ribosomes involved in mRNA recruitment to ensure efficient host cell shut-off. PMID:26384734

  13. Stable and Simple Immobilization of Proteinase K Inside Glass Tubes and Microfluidic Channels.

    Küchler, Andreas; Bleich, Julian N; Sebastian, Bernhard; Dittrich, Petra S; Walde, Peter

    2015-11-25

    Engyodontium album proteinase K (proK) is widely used for degrading proteinaceous impurities during the isolation of nucleic acids from biological samples, or in proteomics and prion research. Toward applications of proK in flow reactors, a simple method for the stable immobilization of proK inside glass micropipette tubes was developed. The immobilization of the enzyme was achieved by adsorption of a dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugate from aqueous solution. This conjugate was first synthesized from a polycationic dendronized polymer (denpol) and proK and consisted, on average, of 2000 denpol repeating units and 140 proK molecules, which were attached along the denpol chain via stable bis-aryl hydrazone bonds. Although the immobilization of proK inside the tube was based on nonspecific, noncovalent interactions only, the immobilized proK did not leak from the tube and remained active during prolonged storage at 4 °C and during continuous operation at 25 °C and pH = 7.0. The procedure developed was successfully applied for the immobilization of proK on a glass/PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchip, which is a requirement for applications in the field of proK-based protein analysis with such type of microfluidic devices. PMID:26536248

  14. Proteinase 3 contributes to transendothelial migration of NB1-positive neutrophils.

    Kuckleburg, Christopher J; Tilkens, Sarah B; Santoso, Sentot; Newman, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Neutrophil transmigration requires the localization of neutrophils to endothelial cell junctions, in which receptor-ligand interactions and the action of serine proteases promote leukocyte diapedesis. NB1 (CD177) is a neutrophil-expressed surface molecule that has been reported to bind proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease released from activated neutrophils. PR3 has demonstrated proteolytic activity on a number of substrates, including extracellular matrix proteins, although its role in neutrophil transmigration is unknown. Recently, NB1 has been shown to be a heterophilic binding partner for the endothelial cell junctional protein, PECAM-1. Disrupting the interaction between NB1 and PECAM-1 significantly inhibits neutrophil transendothelial cell migration on endothelial cell monolayers. Because NB1 interacts with endothelial cell PECAM-1 at cell junctions where transmigration occurs, we considered that NB1-PR3 interactions may play a role in aiding neutrophil diapedesis. Blocking Abs targeting the heterophilic binding domain of PECAM-1 significantly inhibited transmigration of NB1-positive neutrophils through IL-1β-stimulated endothelial cell monolayers. PR3 expression and activity were significantly increased on NB1-positive neutrophils following transmigration, whereas neutrophils lacking NB1 demonstrated no increase in PR3. Finally, using selective serine protease inhibitors, we determined that PR3 activity facilitated transmigration of NB1-positive neutrophils under both static and flow conditions. These data demonstrate that PR3 contributes in the selective recruitment of the NB1-positive neutrophil population. PMID:22266279

  15. Circulating ADAM17 Level Reflects Disease Activity in Proteinase-3 ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    Bertram, Anna; Lovric, Svjetlana; Engel, Alissa; Beese, Michaela; Wyss, Kristin; Hertel, Barbara; Park, Joon-Keun; Becker, Jan U; Kegel, Johanna; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion; Kirsch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides are characterized by inflammatory destruction of small vessels accompanied by enhanced cleavage of membrane-bound proteins. One of the main proteases responsible for ectodomain shedding is disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17). Given its potential role in aggravating vascular dysfunction, we examined the role of ADAM17 in active proteinase-3 (PR3)-positive ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ADAM17 concentration was significantly increased in plasma samples from patients with active PR3-AAV compared with samples from patients in remission or from other controls with renal nonvascular diseases. Comparably, plasma levels of the ADAM17 substrate syndecan-1 were significantly enhanced in active AAV. We also observed that plasma-derived ADAM17 retained its specific proteolytic activity and was partly located on extracellular microparticles. Transcript levels of ADAM17 were increased in blood samples of patients with active AAV, but those of ADAM10 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3, which inhibits ADAMs, were not. We also performed a microRNA (miR) screen and identified miR-634 as significantly upregulated in blood samples from patients with active AAV. In vitro, miR-634 mimics induced a proinflammatory phenotype in monocyte-derived macrophages, with enhanced expression and release of ADAM17 and IL-6. These data suggest that ADAM17 has a prominent role in AAV and might account for the vascular complications associated with this disease. PMID:25788529

  16. Activation of human tonsil and skin mast cells by agonists of proteinase activated receptor-2

    Shao-heng HE; Hua XIE; Yi-ling FU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of the agonists of proteinase activated receptor (PAR)-2,and histamine on degranulation of human mast cells. Methods: Human mast cells were enzymatically dispersed from tonsil and skin tissues. The dis persed cells were then cultured with various stimuli, and tryptase and histamine levels in cell supernatants collected from challenge tubes were measured. Results:PAR-2 agonist peptide SLIGKV provoked a dose-dependent release of histamine from skin mast cells. It also induced tryptase release from tonsil mast cells, tcLIGRLO appeared less potent than SLIGKV in induction of release of histamine and tryptase. Trypsin was able to induce a "bell" shape increase in tryptase release from tonsil mast cells. It was also able to induce a dose-dependent release of histamine from both tonsil and skin mast cells. The actions of trypsin on mast cells were inhibited by soy bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) or α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT).Time course study revealed that both stimulated tryptase or histamine release initiated within 10 s and reached their peak release between 4 and 6 min. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors or pertussis toxin reduced the ability of mast cells to release tryptase or histamine. Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the in vitro tryptase release properties of human tonsil and skin mast cells suggested a novel type of mast cell heterogeneity. The activation of mast cells by PAR-2 agonists indicated a self-amplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  17. Mucolysis of the colonic mucus barrier by faecal proteinases: inhibition by interacting polyacrylate.

    Hutton, D A; Pearson, J P; Allen, A; Foster, S N

    1990-03-01

    1. Mucolytic (mucus solubilizing) activity in human faeces has been characterized with both purified human and pig colonic mucin and shown to be mediated by proteolysis. 2. Mucolytic activity was demonstrated by: (i) a drop in mucin viscosity; (ii) a substantial reduction in mucin size, from polymer to degraded subunit, as assessed by Sepharose CL-2B gel filtration; (iii) formation of new N-terminal peptides. 3. Mucolytic activity was also followed in faecal extracts by its proteolytic activity using standard succinyl albumin substrate. Proteolysis extended over the pH range 4.5-11.0. Proteolysis was inhibited at pH 7.5 by soybean trypsin inhibitor and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride, suggesting the presence of serine proteinases. 4. The polyacrylate carbomer (934P) inhibited both mucolysis of pig colonic mucin and proteolysis of succinyl albumin. 5. Interaction between the polyacrylate (carbomer 934P) and purified human and pig colonic mucin was demonstrated by a marked synergistic increase in solution viscosity (360% above control). 6. The results demonstrate the presence of a mucolytic activity in the human colonic lumen that has the potential to degrade the mucus barrier, and that polyacrylates inhibit this mucolysis and interact to strengthen the colonic mucus barrier. Polyacrylates may therefore have therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel disease where luminal proteolytic activity can be raised. PMID:2156646

  18. Original features of cell-envelope proteinases of Lactobacillus helveticus. A review.

    Sadat-Mekmene, Leila; Genay, Magali; Atlan, Danièle; Lortal, Sylvie; Gagnaire, Valérie

    2011-03-15

    Lactobacillus helveticus is a lactic acid bacterium very used in fermented milks and cheese. The rapid growth of L. helveticus in milk is supported by an efficient cell envelope proteinase (CEP) activity, due to subtilisin-like serine proteases. These enzymes play also crucial roles in texture and flavor formation in dairy products as well as in generating in situ bioactive peptides. In L. helveticus, several genes encoding putative CEPs were detected and characterized by a large intraspecific diversity; little is known about regulation of expression of CEP-encoding genes. Anchored at the bacterial surface, CEPs are large-sized enzymes (> 150 kDa) hydrolyzing β- and α(s1)-casein as well. Substrate cleavages occur after almost all types of amino acids residues, but mass spectrometry analysis revealed L. helveticus strains with specific profiles of substrate hydrolysis, which could explain identification of strains associated with interesting technological properties. In this review, the most recent data regarding CEP-encoding genes, CEP activities toward caseins and L. helveticus strain diversity are discussed. PMID:21354644

  19. Proton NMR spectroscopy of the active site histidine of α-lytic proteinase

    A histidine auxotroph of Lysobacter enzymogenes (ATC 29847) was grown on media containing either isotopically labeled [90% 13Cesup(epsilon)]L- or [90%15Nsup(delta), 90% 15Nsup(epsilon)]D,L-histidine. The enzyme, α-lytic proteinase (EC 3.4.21.12), was isolated from these cultures as well as from cultures of wild-type bacteria grown on unlabeled medium. 1H NMR spectra at 360 MHz were obtained with all 3 purified enzymes. Presence of the adjacent 15N labels broadened the histidine Csup(epsilon)-H peak by about a factor of 2 by unresolved scalar coupling. Presence of a direcly bonded 13C led to disappearance of the histidine Csup(epsilon)-H peak by a combination of scalar coupling and dipolar broadening. These effects should be useful for the cross-assignment of 1H NMR peaks of 13C and 15N enriched proteins. The 13C and 15N labeled proteins were found to undergo the reversible a-b conformational transition which changes the pKsub(a)' of His57 from 6.5-5.9. (Auth.)

  20. A subset of ulcerative colitis with positive proteinase-3antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody

    Jin Xu; Chuan-Hua Yang; Xiao-Yu Chen; Xu-Hang Li; Min Dai; Shu-Dong Xiao

    2008-01-01

    A small subset of patients with active ulcerative colitis is non-responsive to major known non-biological therapies.We reported 5 patients with positive serum proteinase-3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA) and tried to (1) identify the common clinical features of these patients; (2) investigate the efficacy of a novel therapy using a Chinese medicine compound; and (3) attract more gastroenterologists to be engaged in further study of this subset of patients. The common manifestations of disease in these 5 patients included recurrent bloody diarrhea and inflammatory lesions involving the entire colorectal mucosa. Initial treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone successfully induced remission.Four of these 5 patients were steroid-dependence,and immunosuppressants, such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide, were ineffective. In 3 patients,only the particular Chinese medicine compound could induce and maintain remission. One patient underwent colectomy. No vascular inflammatory lesions were found by histopathological examination. Although more cases are needed for confirmation, our study indicates that ulcerative colitis with positive PR3-ANCA may belong to a subtype of refractory ulcerative colitis. The particular Chinese medicine compound used in our study is by far the most effective in the management of these patients,with additional advantages of having no noticeable sideeffects and less financial burden.

  1. SufA--a novel subtilisin-like serine proteinase of Finegoldia magna.

    Karlsson, Christofer; Andersson, Marie-Louise; Collin, Mattias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Björck, Lars; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2007-12-01

    Finegoldia magna is an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium and commensal, which is also associated with clinically important conditions such as skin and soft tissue infections. This study describes a novel subtilisin-like extracellular serine proteinase of F. magna, denoted SufA (subtilase of Finegoldia magna), which is believed to be the first subtilase described among Gram-positive anaerobic cocci. SufA is associated with the bacterial cell surface, but is also released in substantial amounts during bacterial growth. Papain was used to release SufA from the surface of F. magna and the enzyme was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. A protein band on SDS-PAGE corresponding to the dominating proteolytic activity on gelatin zymography was analysed by MS/MS. Based on the peptide sequences obtained, the sufA gene was sequenced. The gene comprises 3466 bp corresponding to a preprotein of 127 kDa. Like other members of the subtilase family, SufA contains the catalytic triad of aspartic acid, histidine and serine with surrounding conserved residues. A SufA homologue was identified in 33 of 34 investigated isolates of F. magna, as revealed by PCR and immunoprinting. The enzyme forms dimers, which are more proteolytically active than the monomeric protein. SufA was found to efficiently cleave and inactivate the antibacterial peptide LL-37 and the CXC chemokine MIG/CXCL9, indicating that the enzyme promotes F. magna survival and colonization. PMID:18048934

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis of starry triggerfish (Abalistes stellaris) muscle using liver proteinase from albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga).

    Sripokar, P; Chaijan, M; Benjakul, S; Kishimura, H; Klomklao, S

    2016-02-01

    Proteinases from liver extract from albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) were used to produce protein hydrolysate from starry triggerfish (Abalistes stellaris) muscle. Hydrolysis conditions for preparing protein hydrolysate from starry triggerfish muscle were optimized. Enzyme level, reaction time and fish muscle/buffer ratio significantly affected the hydrolysis (p < 0.05). Optimum conditions for triggerfish muscle hydrolysis were 5.5 % liver extract, 40 min reaction time and fish muscle/buffer ratio of 1:3 (w/v). The freeze-dried protein hydrolysate was characterized with respect to chemical composition, amino acid composition and color. The product contained 91.73 % protein, 2.04 % lipid and 6.48 % ash. The protein hydrolysate exhibited high amount of essential amino acids (45.62 %). It was light yellow in color (L (*) = 82.94, a (*) = 0.84, b (*) = 22.83). The results indicate that the extract from liver of albacore tuna could be used to produce fish protein hydrolysate and protein hydrolysate from starry triggerfish muscle may potentially serve as a good source of desirable peptide and amino acids. PMID:27162384

  3. Anomalous uptake and circulatory characteristics of the plant-based small RNA MIR2911

    Yang, Jian; Hotz, Tremearne; Broadnax, LaCassidy; Yarmarkovich, Mark; Elbaz-Younes, Ismail; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent detection of plant-based dietary small RNAs in circulation has thwarted the use of dietary RNA therapeutics. Here we demonstrate mice consuming diets rich in vegetables displayed enhanced serum levels of the plant specific small RNA MIR2911. Differential centrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, and proteinase K treatment of plant extracts suggest this RNA resides within a proteinase K-sensitive complex. Plant derived MIR2911 was more bioavailable than the synthetic RNA. Furthermore, MIR2911 exhibited unusual digestive stability compared with other synthetic plant microRNAs. The characteristics of circulating MIR2911 were also unusual as it was not associated with exosomes and fractionated as a soluble complex that was insensitive to proteinase K treatment, consistent with MIR2911 being stabilized by modifications conferred by the host. These results indicate that intrinsic stability and plant-based modifications orchestrate consumer uptake of this anomalous plant based small RNA and invite revisiting plant-based microRNA therapeutic approaches. PMID:27251858

  4. Purification and characterization of four new cysteine endopeptidases from fruits of Bromelia pinguin L. grown in Cuba.

    Payrol, Juan Abreu; Obregón, Walter D; Trejo, Sebastián A; Caffini, Néstor O

    2008-02-01

    Bromelia pinguin L. is a plant broadly distributed in Central America and Caribbean islands. The fruits have been used in traditional medicine as anthelmintic, probably owed to the presence of a mixture of cysteine endopeptidases, initially termed pinguinain. This work deals with the purification and characterization of the four main components of that mixture, two of them showing acid pI and the other two alkaline pI. Molecular masses (SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF), N-terminal sequence and the reactivity and kinetic parameters versus synthetic substrates (p-nitrophenyl-N-alpha-CBZ-amino acid esters, PFLNA, Z-Arg-Arg-p-NA, and Z-Phe-Arg-p-NA) of the studied peptidases are given, as well as the N-terminal sequences of the enzymes and the homology degree with other plant endopeptidases. PMID:17932734

  5. Expression of a yeast-derived invertase in the cell wall of tobacco and Arabidopsis plants leads to accumulation of carbohydrate and inhibition of photosynthesis and strongly influences growth and phenotype of transgenic tobacco plants.

    von Schaewen, A; Stitt, M; Schmidt, R.; Sonnewald, U; Willmitzer, L

    1990-01-01

    Chimeric genes consisting of the coding sequence of the yeast invertase gene suc 2 and different N-terminal portions of the potato-derived vacuolar protein proteinase inhibitor II fused to the 35S CaMV promoter and the poly-A site of the octopine synthase gene were transferred into tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana plants using Agrobacterium based systems. Regenerated transgenic plants display a 50- to 500-fold higher invertase activity compared to non-transformed control plants. This invertas...

  6. Distinct and stage specific nuclear factors regulate the expression of falcipains, Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases

    Malhotra Pawan; Chauhan Virander S; Sunil Sujatha

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases (falcipains) play indispensable roles in parasite infection and development, especially in the process of host erythrocyte rupture/invasion and hemoglobin degradation. No detailed molecular analysis of transcriptional regulation of parasite proteases especially cysteine proteases has yet been reported. In this study, using a combination of transient transfection assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we demonstrate...

  7. Identification of Covalent Binding Sites Targeting Cysteines Based on Computational Approaches.

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Danfeng; Tian, Haozhong; Jiao, Yu; Shi, Zhihao; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Qiao, Xin; Pan, Jing; Yin, Lingfeng; Zhou, Weineng; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Covalent drugs have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to good inhibitory activity and selectivity. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with irreversible inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity because cysteines can form covalent bonds with inhibitors through their nucleophilic thiol groups. However, most human kinases have multiple noncatalytic cysteines within the active site; to accurately predict which cysteine is most likely to form covalent bonds is of great importance but remains a challenge when designing irreversible inhibitors. In this work, FTMap was first applied to check its ability in predicting covalent binding site defined as the region where covalent bonds are formed between cysteines and irreversible inhibitors. Results show that it has excellent performance in detecting the hot spots within the binding pocket, and its hydrogen bond interaction frequency analysis could give us some interesting instructions for identification of covalent binding cysteines. Furthermore, we proposed a simple but useful covalent fragment probing approach and showed that it successfully predicted the covalent binding site of seven targets. By adopting a distance-based method, we observed that the closer the nucleophiles of covalent warheads are to the thiol group of a cysteine, the higher the possibility that a cysteine is prone to form a covalent bond. We believe that the combination of FTMap and our distance-based covalent fragment probing method can become a useful tool in detecting the covalent binding site of these targets. PMID:27483186

  8. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in children with severe childhood undernutrition: cysteine kinetics

    Children with edematous but not nonedematous severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) have lower plasma and erythrocyte-free concentrations of cysteine, the rate-limiting precursor of glutathione synthesis. We propose that these lower cysteine concentrations are due to reduced production secondary to s...

  9. Nitric oxide-generating l-cysteine-grafted graphene film as a blood-contacting biomaterial.

    Du, Zhen; Dou, Ruixia; Zu, Mian; Liu, Xueying; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Jingbo; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun

    2016-06-24

    By using polyethylenimine molecules as the linker, l-cysteine was immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, endowing the biocompatible l-cysteine-functionalized graphene film with the ability for catalytic decomposition of exogenous or endogenous donors to generate nitric oxide, and thus inhibiting the platelet activation and aggregation and reducing platelet adhesion. PMID:27111404

  10. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  11. A fluorescence enhancement probe based on BODIPY for the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione.

    Gong, Deyan; Tian, Yuejun; Yang, Chengduan; Iqbal, Anam; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zhu, Xiangtao; Guo, Huichen

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a fluorescent probe BODIPY-based glyoxal hydrazone (BODIPY-GH) (1) for cysteine based on inhibiting of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) quenching process upon reaction with the unsaturated aldehyde has been synthesized, which exhibits longer excitation wavelength, selective and sensitive colorimetric and fluorimetric response toward cysteine in natural media. The probe shows highly selectivity towards cysteine over homocysteine and glutathione as well as other amino acids with a significant fluorescence enhancement response within 15min In the presence of 50 equiv. of homocysteine, the emission increased slightly within 15min and completed in 2.5h to reach its maximum intensity. Therefore, the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione can be achieved through detection of probe 1. It shows low cytotoxicity and excellent membrane permeability toward living cells, which was successfully applied to detect and image intracellular cysteine effectively by confocal fluorescence imaging. PMID:27176916

  12. Production of hydrogen sulfide from D-cysteine and its therapeutic potential

    NorihiroShibuya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that H2S has physiological functions in various tissues and organs. It includes regulation of neuronal activity, vascular tension, a release of insulin, and protection of the heart, kidney and brain from ischemic insult. H2S is produced by enzymes from L-cysteine; cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST along with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT. We recently discovered an additional pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine. D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO provides 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP for 3MST to produce H2S. D-Cysteine protects cerebellar neurons from oxidative stress and attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury caused in the kidney more effectively than L-cysteine. This review focuses on a novel pathway for the production of H2S and its therapeutic application especially to the renal diseases.

  13. The role of lysosomal cysteine proteases in crustacean immune response

    FL Garcia-Carreño

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the long course of evolution and under the selective pressure exerted by pathogens and parasites, animals have selectively fixed a number of defense mechanisms against the constant attack of intruders. The immune response represents a key component to optimize the biological fitness of individuals. Two decades ago, prevention and control of diseases in crustacean aquaculture systems were considered priorities in most shrimp-producing countries, but knowledge was scarce and various pathogens have severely affected aquaculture development around the world. Scientific contributions have improved our understanding of the crustacean immune response. Several studies confirm the central role played by proteases in the immune response of animals, and the cooperative interaction of these enzymes in a wide variety of organisms is well known. This review summarizes the current information regarding the role of cysteine proteases in the immune system of Crustacea and points to aspects that are needed to provide a better integration of our knowledge.

  14. Development of 68Ga ethyl cysteinate dimer for PET studies

    In this work development of 68Ga-ethyl cysteinate dimer (68Ga-ECD) a 68Ga tracer for possible cerebral blood flow based on 99mTc ECD homolog is reported. 68Ga-ECD was prepared using generator-based 68GaCl3 and ECD at optimized conditions. Quality control, stability, partition co-efficient and the biodistribution of the tracer (by tissue counting and PET/CT in rats) was studied. Significant metabolism of the lipophilic tracer into water soluble metabolite(s) led to urinary excretion of the tracer, un-comparable to that of homologous 99mTc-compound. Cardiac uptake of the complex suggests formation of a possible lipophil cationic complex and/or metabolite. (author)

  15. H2O2-Activated Up-Regulation of Glutathione in Arabidopsis Involves Induction of Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Cysteine Synthesis in the Chloroplast

    Guillaume Queval; Dorothée Thominet; Hélène Vanacker; Myroslawa Miginiac-Maslow; Bertrand Gakière; Graham Noctor

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione is a key player in cellular redox homeostasis and, therefore, in the response to H2O2, but the factors regulating oxidation-activated glutathione synthesis are still unclear. We investigated H2O2-induced glutathione synthesis in a conditional Arabidopsis catalase-deficient mutant (cat2). Plants were grown from seed at elevated CO2 for 5 weeks, then transferred to air in either short-day or long-day conditions. Compared to cat2 at elevated CO2 or wild-type plants in any condition, transfer of cat2 to air in both photoperiods caused measurable oxidation of the leaf glutathione pool within hours. Oxidation continued on subsequent days and was accompanied by accumulation of glutathione. This effect was stronger in cat2 transferred to air in short days, and was not linked to appreciable increases in the extractable activities of or transcripts encoding enzymes involved in the committed pathway of glutathione synthesis. In contrast, it was accompanied by increases in serine, O-acetylserine, and cysteine. These changes in metabolites were accompanied by induction of genes encoding adenosine phosphosulfate reductase (APR), particularly APR3, as well as a specific serine acetyltransferase gene (SAT2.1) encoding a chloroplastic SAT. Marked induction of these genes was only observed in cat2 transferred to air in short-day conditions, where cysteine and glutathione accumulation was most dramatic. Unlike other SAT genes, which showed negligible induction in cat2, the relative abundance of APR and SAT2.1 transcripts was closely correlated with marker transcripts for H2O2 signaling. Together, the data underline the importance of cysteine synthesis in oxidant-induced up-regulation of glutathione synthesis and suggest that the chloroplast makes an important contribution to cysteine production under these circumstances.

  16. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines

  17. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  18. Occurrence of Two Distinct Types of Tissue Inhibitors of Metallo-proteinases-2 in Fugu rubripes

    Yoshihiro Yokoyama; Hiroshi Tsukamoto; Tohru Suzuki; Shohshi Mizuta; Reiji Yoshinaka

    2005-01-01

    In this study, genes of two distinct tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) from Japanese puffer fish Fugu rubripes, Fugu TIMP-2a and TIMP-2b, were cloned. The open reading frames of Fugu TIMP-2a and TIMP-2b cDNAs are composed of 660 and 657 nucleotides and 220 and 219 amino acids, respectively. Both Fugu TIMP-2s contain 12 cysteine residues, whichmight form six disulfide bonds as in other animals TIMP-2s. Reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the mRNAs of Fugu TIMP-2a and TIMP-2b to be expressed in some tissues examined with different expression patterns. These findings suggest that the two distinct Fugu TIMP-2s might perform different functions in Fugu tissues.

  19. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  20. Membrane lipid peroxidation in neurodegeneration: Role of thrombin and proteinase-activated receptor-1.

    Citron, Bruce A; Ameenuddin, Syed; Uchida, K; Suo, William Z; SantaCruz, Karen; Festoff, Barry W

    2016-07-15

    Thrombin and membrane lipid peroxidation (MLP) have been implicated in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders from CNS trauma to stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Because thrombin also induces MLP in platelets and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases we hypothesized that its deleterious effects might, in part, involve formation of MLP in neuronal cells. We previously showed that thrombin induced caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in motor neurons, via a proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1). We have now investigated thrombin's influence on the oxidative state of neurons leading to induction of MLP-protein adducts. Translational relevance of thrombin-induced MLP is supported by increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts (HNEPA) in AD and PD brains. We now report for the first time that thrombin dose-dependently induces formation of HNEPA in NSC34 mouse motor neuron cells using anti-HNE and anti-acrolein monoclonal antibodies. The most prominent immunoreactive band, in SDS-PAGE, was at ∼54kDa. Membrane fractions displayed higher amounts of the protein-adduct than cytosolic fractions. Thrombin induced MLP was mediated, at least in part, through PAR1 since a PAR1 active peptide, PAR1AP, also elevated HNEPA levels. Of interest, glutamate and Fe2SO4 also increased the ∼54kDa HNEPA band in these cells but to a lesser extent. Taken together our results implicate the involvement of thrombin and MLP in neuronal cell loss observed in various CNS degenerative and traumatic pathologies. PMID:27138068

  1. Rapid turnover of antimicrobial-type cysteine-rich protein genes in closely related Oryza genomes.

    Shenton, Matthew R; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Nagata, Toshifumi; Feng, Qi; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2015-10-01

    Defensive and reproductive protein genes undergo rapid evolution. Small, cysteine-rich secreted peptides (CRPs) act as antimicrobial agents and function in plant intercellular signaling and are over-represented among reproductively expressed proteins. Because of their roles in defense, reproduction and development and their presence in multigene families, CRP variation can have major consequences for plant phenotypic and functional diversification. We surveyed the CRP genes of six closely related Oryza genomes comprising Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and ssp. indica, Oryza glaberrima and three accessions of Oryza rufipogon to observe patterns of evolution in these gene families and the effects of variation on their gene expression. These Oryza genomes, like other plant genomes, have accumulated large reservoirs of CRP sequences, comprising 26 groups totaling between 676 and 843 genes, in contrast to antimicrobial CRPs in animal genomes. Despite the close evolutionary relationships between the genomes, we observed rapid changes in number and structure among CRP gene families. Many CRP sequences are in gene clusters generated by local duplications, have undergone rapid turnover and are more likely to be silent or specifically expressed. By contrast, conserved CRP genes are more likely to be highly and broadly expressed. Variable CRP genes created by repeated duplication, gene modification and inactivation can gain new functions and expression patterns in newly evolved gene copies. For the CRP proteins, the process of gain/loss by deletion or duplication at gene clusters seems to be an important mechanism in evolution of the gene families, which also contributes to their expression evolution. PMID:25842177

  2. Differential expression of cysteine peptidase genes in the inner integument and endosperm of developing seeds of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae).

    Rocha, Antônio J; Soares, Emanoella L; Costa, José H; Costa, Washington L G; Soares, Arlete A; Nogueira, Fábio C S; Domont, Gilberto B; Campos, Francisco A P

    2013-12-01

    In several plant tissues, programmed cell death (PCD) is mediated by the combined action of cysteine peptidases, namely KDEL-tailed cysteine peptidases (KDEL-CysEP) and vacuolar processing enzymes (VPE). Here, we performed a search of the draft genome of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) and identified 2 genes for KDEL-CysEP (Jc-CysEP1 and Jc-CysEP2) and 3 genes for VPE (Jc-βVPE, Jc-γVPE and Jc-δVPE) and determined the expression patterns of these genes by RT-qPCR in integument and cellular endosperm of seeds collected at seven different developmental stages. We were able to demonstrate that the expression of Jc-CysEP1, Jc-CysEP2, Jc-βVPE and Jc-γVPE proceeded rapidly from Stage IV, with Jc-CysEP2 displaying the highest relative expression; expression of Jc-δVPE could not be detected in any of the tissues/developmental stages analyzed. Additionally, we showed that the expression pattern of these peptidases correlates with anatomical changes in integument and cellular endosperm, thus suggesting a role for both classes of peptidases in PCD and in protein processing, both of which occur simultaneously in each of these tissues. PMID:24157205

  3. Purification and characterization of macrodontain I, a cysteine peptidase from unripe fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) harms (Bromeliaceae).

    López, L M; Sequeiros, C; Natalucci, C L; Brullo, A; Maras, B; Barra, D; Caffini, N O

    2000-03-01

    A new papain-like cysteine peptidase isolated from fruits of Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms, a species closely related to pineapple (Ananas comosus L.), has been purified and characterized. The enzyme, named macrodontain I, is the main proteolytic component present in fruit extracts and was purified by acetone fractionation followed by anion-exchange chromatography. Separation was improved by selecting both an adequate pH value and a narrow saline gradient. Optimum pH range (more than 90% of maximum activity with casein) was achieved at pH 6.1-8.5. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by bidimensional electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy (MS). Molecular mass of the enzyme was 23,459 (MS) and its isoelectric point was 6.1. The alanine, glutamine, and tyrosine derivatives were strongly preferred when the enzyme was assayed on N-alpha-CBZ-l-amino acid p-nitrophenyl esters. The N-terminal sequence of macrodontain (by comparison with the N-terminus of 30 plant proteases with more than 50% homology) showed a great deal of sequence similarity to the other pineapple-stem-derived cysteine endopeptidases, being 85.7, 85. 2, and 77.8% identical to comosain, stem bromelain, and ananain, respectively. It seems clear that the Bromeliaceae endopeptidases are more closely related to each other than to other members of the papain family, suggesting relatively recent divergence. PMID:10686143

  4. "Comparison of Adult Somatic and Cysteine Proteinas Antigens of Fasciola gigantica in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Serodiagnosis of Human Fasciolosis"

    MB Rokni

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica and F.gigantica is one of the major public health problems in the world and in Iran. Considering that stool examination for Fasciola eggs is not a sensitive method and only 25% of infected patients pass the eggs in the faeces , and immunodiagnosis methods are more applicable for this purpose, the present study was conducted to compare the somatic (S and cysteine proteinase (CP antigens of F.gigantica in IgG-ELISA to diagnose human fasciolosis. This has been the first report on this case so far in Iran. Serum samples obtained from 178 individuals collected during the fasciolosis outbreak in 1999 in the Gilan province, northern Iran, that were coprologically positive for fasciolosis, were analyzed by IgG-ELISA for total antibody responses against (S and CP antigens from Fasciola gigantica. The cut-off points for (S and CP were 0.38 and 0.33, respectively. All cases that showed clinical manifestations of fasciolosis, were also seropositive using both (S and CP antigens whereas all 25 non-infected controls were seronegative. Therefore, the sensitivity of the test was 100% for both antigens. On the other hand the specificity of (S and CP antigens were calculated as 96.4% and 98.1%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values of the test regarding (S antigen were 97.8% and 100%, whereas these values as for CP antigen were 98.9% and 100% correspondingly. Two individuals with hydatidosis and two with toxocariasis had antibodies against (S antigen whereas concerning CP antigen, one individual with hydatidosis and another with toxocariasis showed cross reactivity against it. We have demonstrated that altogether CP antigen provide a more conclusive diagnosis as possessing lower cut-off and enabling better to discriminate between seronegative and seropositive subpopulations.This study may be useful to implement a reliable test to diagnose human fasciolosis and for seroepidmiological objectives.

  5. Expression of serine proteinase P186 of Arthrobotrys oligospora and analysis of its nematode-degrading activity.

    Zhao, Hailong; Qiao, Jun; Meng, Qingling; Gong, Shasha; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Tianli; Tian, Lulu; Cai, Xuepeng; Luo, Jianxun; Chen, Chuangfu

    2015-12-01

    The nematode-trapping fungi possess a unique capability of predating and invading nematodes. As a representative nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora has been widely used to study the interactions between nematode-trapping fungi and their hosts. Serine proteinase is one of the important virulence factors during process of invasion of the nematode-trapping fungi into nematodes. In this study, using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we amplified the gene sequence of serine proteinase 186 from A. oligospora, cloned it into pPIC9K vector and expressed it in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed recombinant serine proteinase186 (reP186) was purified via Ni-affinity chromatography. The in vitro nematode-degrading activity of reP186 was analyzed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis revealed that reP186 with molecular weight of 33 kDa was successfully obtained. ReP186 was capable of degrading a series of protein substrates including casein, gelatin, bovine serum albumin, denatured collagen and nematode cortical layer. The reP186 exhibited the maximal activity at pH 8.0 and 55 °C and was highly sensitive to the inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. Treatment of Caenorhabditis elegans and Haemonchus contortus with reP186 for 12, 24 and 36 h, respectively, resulted in 62, 88 and 100 % of killing rates for C. elegans, and 52, 65 and 84 % of killing rates for H. contortus, respectively, indicating a relatively strong nematode-degrading bioactivity of reP186. PMID:26419902

  6. Proteinase treatment of intact hepatic mitochondria has differential effects on inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by different inhibitors.

    Kashfi, K; Cook, G A

    1992-01-01

    Proteolysis of intact mitochondria by Nagarse (subtilisin BPN') and papain resulted in limited loss of activity of the outer-membrane carnitine palmitoyltransferase, but much greater loss of sensitivity to inhibition by malonyl-CoA. In contrast with a previous report [Murthy & Pande (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 378-382], we found that trypsin had no effect on malonyl-CoA sensitivity. Even when 80% of activity was destroyed by trypsin, there was no difference in the malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the enzyme remaining. Trypsin caused release of the intermembrane-space enzyme adenylate kinase, indicating loss of integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane, whereas Nagarse and papain caused no release of that enzyme. Citrate synthase was not released by any of the three proteinases, indicating no damage to the mitochondrial inner membrane. When we examined the effects of proteolysis on the inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by a wide variety of inhibitors having different mechanisms of inhibition, we found differential proteolytic effects that were specific for those inhibitors (malonyl-CoA and hydroxyphenylglyoxylate) that have their inhibitory potencies diminished by changes in physiological state. Both of those inhibitors protected carnitine palmitoyltransferase from the effects of proteolysis, but did not inhibit the proteinases directly. Inhibition by two other inhibitors (DL-2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA and N-benzyladriamycin 14-valerate) was not altered by proteinase treatment, even when most of the enzyme activity had been destroyed. Inhibition by glyburide, which is minimally affected by physiological state, was affected only to a slight extent at the highest concentration of trypsin tested. Proteolysis by Nagarse appeared to produce loss of co-operativity in malonyl-CoA inhibition. The effects of proteolysis are discussed and compared with changes in Ki occurring with changing physiological states. PMID:1554374

  7. A Monoclonal Antibody (MCPR3-7) Interfering with the Activity of Proteinase 3 by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    Hinkofer, Lisa C.; Seidel, Susanne A. I.; Korkmaz, Brice; Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Braun, Dieter; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is an abundant serine protease of neutrophil granules and a major target of autoantibodies (PR3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Some of the PR3 synthesized by promyelocytes in the bone marrow escapes the targeting to granules and occurs on the plasma membrane of naive and primed neutrophils. This membrane-associated PR3 antigen may represent pro-PR3, mature PR3, or both forms. To discriminate between mature PR3 and its inactive zymogen, which have different conformations, we generated and identified a monoclonal antibody called MCPR3-7. It bound much better to pro-PR3 than to mature PR3. This monoclonal antibody greatly reduced the catalytic activity of mature PR3 toward extended peptide substrates. Using diverse techniques and multiple recombinant PR3 variants, we characterized its binding properties and found that MCPR3-7 preferentially bound to the so-called activation domain of the zymogen and changed the conformation of mature PR3, resulting in impaired catalysis and inactivation by α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-antitrypsin). Noncovalent as well as covalent complexation between PR3 and α1-proteinase inhibitor was delayed in the presence of MCPR3-7, but cleavage of certain thioester and paranitroanilide substrates with small residues in the P1 position was not inhibited. We conclude that MCPR3-7 reduces PR3 activity by an allosteric mechanism affecting the S1′ pocket and further prime side interactions with substrates. In addition, MCPR3-7 prevents binding of PR3 to cellular membranes. Inhibitory antibodies targeting the activation domain of PR3 could be exploited as highly selective inhibitors of PR3, scavengers, and clearers of the PR3 autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23902773

  8. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 is required for normal osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation during skeletal growth and repair.

    Georgy, S R; Pagel, C N; Ghasem-Zadeh, A; Zebaze, R M D; Pike, R N; Sims, N A; Mackie, E J

    2012-03-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) is a G-protein coupled receptor expressed by osteoblasts and monocytes. PAR(2) is activated by a number of proteinases including coagulation factors and proteinases released by inflammatory cells. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of PAR(2) in skeletal growth and repair using wild type (WT) and PAR(2) knockout (KO) mice. Micro computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to examine the structure of tibias isolated from uninjured mice at 50 and 90 days of age, and from 98-day-old mice in a bone repair model in which a hole had been drilled through the tibias. Bone marrow was cultured and investigated for the presence of osteoblast precursors (alkaline phosphatase-positive fibroblastic colonies), and osteoclasts were counted in cultures treated with M-CSF and RANKL. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine which proteinases that activate PAR(2) are expressed in bone marrow. Regulation of PAR(2) expression in primary calvarial osteoblasts from WT mice was investigated by quantitative PCR. Cortical and trabecular bone volumes were significantly greater in the tibias of PAR(2) KO mice than in those of WT mice at 50 days of age. In trabecular bone, osteoclast surface, osteoblast surface and osteoid volume were significantly lower in KO than in WT mice. Bone marrow cultures from KO mice showed significantly fewer alkaline phosphatase-positive colony-forming units and osteoclasts compared to cultures from WT mice. Significantly less new bone and significantly fewer osteoclasts were observed in the drill sites of PAR(2) KO mice compared to WT mice 7 days post-surgery. A number of activators of PAR(2), including matriptase and kallikrein 4, were found to be expressed by normal bone marrow. Parathyroid hormone, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3), or interleukin-6 in combination with its soluble receptor down-regulated PAR(2) mRNA expression, and fibroblast growth factor-2 or thrombin stimulated PAR(2

  9. Flexibility of cold- and heat-adapted subtilisin-like serine proteinases evaluated with fluorescence quenching and molecular dynamics

    Sigtryggsdóttir, Asta Rós; Papaleo, Elena; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigríður H.;

    2014-01-01

    activity of cold adapted enzymes when compared to homologues from thermophiles, reflects their higher molecular flexibility. To assess a potential difference in molecular flexibility between the two homologous proteinases, we have measured their Trp fluorescence quenching by acrylamide at different...... have similar flexibility profiles, the cold adapted VPR displays higher flexibility in most regions of the protein structure. Some of these regions contain or are in proximity to some of the Trp residues (Trp6, Trp114 and Trp208) in the proteins. Thus, we observe an overall agreement between...

  10. The leader proteinase of foot-and-mouth disease virus: structure-function relationships in a proteolytic virulence factor

    Steinberger, Jutta; Skern, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The leader proteinase (Lpro) of foot-and-mouth disease virus, inhibits the host innate immune response by at least three different mechanisms. The most well characterised is the prevention of the synthesis of cytokines such as interferons immediately after infection, brought about by specific proteolytic cleavage of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G. This prevents the recruitment of capped cellular mRNA; the viral RNA can however be translated under these conditions. The two other mechanisms are the induction of NF-κB cleavage and the deubiquitination of immune signalling molecules. This review focuses on the structure-function relationships in Lpro responsible for these widely divergent activities. PMID:24670358

  11. Effects of proteinase inhibitor from Adenanthera pavonina seeds on short- and long term larval development of Aedes aegypti.

    Sasaki, Daniele Yumi; Jacobowski, Ana Cristina; de Souza, Antônio Pancrácio; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2015-05-01

    Currently, one of the major global public health concerns is related to the transmission of dengue/yellow fever virus by the vector Aedes aegypti. The most abundant digestive enzymes in Ae. aegypti midgut larvae are trypsin and chymotrypsin. Since protease inhibitors have the capacity to bind to and inhibit the action of insect digestive proteinases, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of Adenanthera pavonina seed proteinase inhibitor (ApTI) on Ae. aegypti larvae, as well as a possible mechanism of adaptation. ApTI had a significant effect on Ae. aegypti larvae exposed to a non-lethal concentration of ApTI during short- and long-duration assays, decreasing survival, weight and proteinase activities of midgut extracts of larvae. The zymographic profile of ApTI demonstrated seven bands; three bands apparently have trypsin-like activity. Moreover, the peritrophic membrane was not disrupted. The enzymes of ApTI-fed larvae were found to be sensitive to ApTI and to have a normal feedback mechanism; also, the larval digestive enzymes were not able to degrade the inhibitor. In addition, ApTI delayed larval development time. Histological studies demonstrated a degeneration of the microvilli of the posterior midgut region epithelium cells, hypertrophy of the gastric caeca cells and an augmented ectoperitrophic space in larvae. Moreover, Ae. aegypti larvae were incapable of overcoming the negative effects of ApTI, indicating that this inhibitor might be used as a promising agent against Ae. aegypti. In addition, molecular modeling and molecular docking studies were also performed in order to construct three-dimensional theoretical models for ApTI, trypsin and chymotrypsin from Ae. aegypti, as well as to predict the possible interactions and affinity values for the complexes ApTI/trypsin and ApTI/chymotrypsin. In this context, this study broadens the base of our understanding about the modes of action of proteinase inhibitors in insects, as well as the way insects

  12. The extracellular PI-type proteinase of Lactococcus lactis hydrolyzes beta-casein into more than one hundred different oligopeptides.

    Juillard, V; van der Laan, H.; Kunji, E R; Jeronimus-Stratingh, C M; Bruins, A P; Konings, W. N.

    1995-01-01

    The peptides released from beta-casein by the action of PI-type proteinase (PrtP) from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 have been identified by on-line coupling of liquid chromatography to mass spectrometry. After 24 h of incubation of beta-casein with purified PrtP, a stable mixture of peptides was obtained. The trifluoroacetic acid-soluble peptides of this beta-casein hydrolysate were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and introduced into the liquid chromatography-...

  13. Heterologous Expression of Three Plant Serpins with Distinct Inhibitory Specificities

    Dahl, Søren Weis; Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Hejgaard, Jørn

    1996-01-01

    For the first time, inhibitory plant serpins, including WSZ1 from wheat, BSZ4, and the previously unknown protein BSZx from barley, have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and a procedure for fast purification of native plant serpins has been developed, BSZx, BSZ4, and WSZ1 were assayed for...... favorable P-2 Leu. BSZ4 inhibited cathepsin G (k(a) = 2.7 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) at P-1 Met but was hydrolyzed by trypsin and chymotrypsin. The three plant serpins formed stable SDS-resistant complexes with the proteinases in accordance with the kinetic data....

  14. Proteins of the kidney microvillar membrane. Aspartate aminopeptidase: purification by immunoadsorbent chromatography and properties of the detergent- and proteinase-solubilized forms

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Norén, O; Sjöström, H;

    1980-01-01

    revealed 1 g-atom of Ca/143000 g of protein. Two forms of the enzyme were purified: an amphipathic form solubilized from the membrane by Triton X-100 (detergent form) and a hydrophilic form released by incubation with trypsin (proteinase form). The detergent form exhibited charge-shift in crossed...... substrates were hydrolysed by traces of aminopeptidase M (EC 3.4.11.2) contaminating the preparation could be excluded on several grounds. Aminopeptidase A was sensitive to inhibition by chelating agents and the inactive enzyme could be reactivated by Ca2+ or Mn2+. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry...... immunoelectrophoresis when anionic or cationic detergents were present. On gel filtration, mol.wts. of 350000--400000 and 270000 were calculated for the detergent and proteinase forms. Electron microscopy after negative staining of the proteinase form revealed a dimeric structure. Electrophoresis of either form in the...

  15. Plant defense against herbivores: chemical aspects.

    Mithöfer, Axel; Boland, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of different chemical defenses covering nearly all classes of (secondary) metabolites that represent a major barrier to herbivory: Some are constitutive; others are induced after attack. Many compounds act directly on the herbivore, whereas others act indirectly via the attraction of organisms from other trophic levels that, in turn, protect the plant. An enormous diversity of plant (bio)chemicals are toxic, repellent, or antinutritive for herbivores of all types. Examples include cyanogenic glycosides, glucosinolates, alkaloids, and terpenoids; others are macromolecules and comprise latex or proteinase inhibitors. Their modes of action include membrane disruption, inhibition of nutrient and ion transport, inhibition of signal transduction processes, inhibition of metabolism, or disruption of the hormonal control of physiological processes. Recognizing the herbivore challenge and precise timing of plant activities as well as the adaptive modulation of the plants' metabolism is important so that metabolites and energy may be efficiently allocated to defensive activities. PMID:22404468

  16. The cysteine-rich region of T1R3 determines responses to intensely sweet proteins.

    Jiang, Peihua; Ji, Qingzhou; Liu, Zhan; Snyder, Lenore A; Benard, Lumie M J; Margolskee, Robert F; Max, Marianna

    2004-10-22

    A wide variety of chemically diverse compounds taste sweet, including natural sugars such as glucose, fructose, sucrose, and sugar alcohols, small molecule artificial sweeteners such as saccharin and acesulfame K, and proteins such as monellin and thaumatin. Brazzein, like monellin and thaumatin, is a naturally occurring plant protein that humans, apes, and Old World monkeys perceive as tasting sweet but that is not perceived as sweet by other species including New World monkeys, mouse, and rat. It has been shown that heterologous expression of T1R2 plus T1R3 together yields a receptor responsive to many of the above-mentioned sweet tasting ligands. We have determined that the molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to brazzein sweetness depends on a site within the cysteine-rich region of human T1R3. Other mutations in this region of T1R3 affected receptor activity toward monellin, and in some cases, overall efficacy to multiple sweet compounds, implicating this region as a previously unrecognized important determinant of sweet receptor function. PMID:15299024

  17. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV–Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the μM range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation–reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V2O5 form.

  18. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  19. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  20. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target. PMID:26597768

  1. Negative Effects of a Nonhost Proteinase Inhibitor of ~19.8 kDa from Madhuca indica Seeds on Developmental Physiology of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)

    Farrukh Jamal; Dushyant Singh; Pandey, Prabhash K.

    2014-01-01

    An affinity purified trypsin inhibitor from the seed flour extracts of Madhuca indica (MiTI) on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that MiTI consisted of a single polypeptide chain with molecular mass of ~19.8 kDa. MiTI inhibited the total proteolytic and trypsin-like activities of the midgut proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera larvae by 87.51% and 76.12%, respectively, at concentration of 5 µg/mL with an IC50 of 1.75 µg/mL against trypsin like midgut proteinases. The enzyme...

  2. Analysis of the VPg-proteinase (NIa) encoded by tobacco etch potyvirus: effects of mutations on subcellular transport, proteolytic processing, and genome amplification.

    Schaad, M C; Haldeman-Cahill, R; Cronin, S; Carrington, J C

    1996-01-01

    A mutational analysis was conducted to investigate the functions of the tobacco etch potyvirus VPg-proteinase (NIa) protein in vivo. The NIa N-terminal domain contains the VPg attachment site, whereas the C-terminal domain contains a picornavirus 3C-like proteinase. Cleavage at an internal site separating the two domains occurs in a subset of NIa molecules. The majority of NIa molecules in TEV-infected cells accumulate within the nucleus. By using a reporter fusion strategy, the NIa nuclear l...

  3. Possible involvement of radical intermediates in the inhibition of cysteine proteases by allenyl esters and amides

    Takeuchi, Yoshio; Fujiwara, Tomoya; Shimone, Yoshihito; Miyataka, Hideki; Satoh, Toshio; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Hori, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate crystallographically the mechanism of inhibition of cysteine protease by α-methyl-γ,γ-diphenylallenecarboxylic acid ethyl ester 3, a cysteine protease inhibitor having in vivo stability, we synthesized N-(α-methyl-γ,γ-diphenylallenecarbonyl)-l-phenylalanine ethyl ester 4. Reaction of 4 with thiophenol, the SH group of which has similar pKa value to that of cysteine protease, produced oxygen-mediated radical adducts 6 and 7 in ambient air but did not proceed under oxyge...

  4. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  5. Adsorption Dynamics and Self-Assembled L-cysteine on Au(100)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Yan, Jiawei;

    As the only amino acid with a functional thiol group, L - cysteine offers a strong perspective both for binding to gold and other metals, and for gentle immobilization of biomolecules. Binding to single - crystal, atomically planar surfaces offers the additional perspective that bound L - cysteine...... can be structurally mapped at the single - molecule level . In this work, we have followed the adsorption of L - cysteine on single - crystal Au(100) by measuring the electrode potential dynamics during the adsorption process. In situ STM revealed the structure of the self - assembled ordered layers...

  6. Cysteine as a non toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper alloys in conservation

    Gravgaard, Mari; van Lanschot, Jettie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to examine cysteine as an alternative to benzotriazole (BTA) for the conservation of archaeological objects with bronze disease. Investigation of the two inhibitors involved the use of electrochemical techniques, measurements of weight change in high humidity and comparative...... studies of colour changes in the corrosion products. The results obtained in this article demonstrate that cysteine could be a non-toxic alternative to BTA. Cysteine performed as well as BTA on pre-corroded coupons with bronze disease in high humidity and showed acceptable results during testing for...

  7. Prospeção de inibidores de serinoproteinases em folhas de leguminosas arbóreas da floresta Amazônica Prospecting serine proteinase inhibitors in leaves from leguminous trees of the Amazon forest

    Larissa Ramos Chevreuil

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Os inibidores de proteinases são proteínas extensivamente investigadas nos tecidos de estocagem, mas pouco prospectadas em outros tecidos vegetais. O objetivo deste estudo foi detectar a presença de inibidores de serinoproteinases em extratos foliares de quinze espécies de leguminosas arbóreas da Amazônia. As espécies estudadas foram: Caesalpinia echinata, C. ferrea, Cedrelinga cateniformis, Copaifera multijuga, Dinizia excelsa, Enterolobium contortisiliquum, E. maximum, E. schomburgkii, Leucaena leucocephala, Ormosia paraensis, Parkia multijuga, P. pendula, P. platycephala, Swartzia corrugata e S. polyphylla. Folhas foram coletadas, secas a 30ºC durante 48 h, trituradas e submetidas à extração com NaCl (0,15 M, 10% p/v resultando no extrato total. Ensaios foram executados para determinar a concentração de proteínas e detectar a atividade inibitória contra a tripsina e quimotripsina bovina. Os teores de proteínas bruta e solúvel nos extratos foliares variaram de 7,9 a 31,2% e 1,3 a 14,8%, respectivamente. A atividade inibitória sobre a tripsina e quimotripsina foi observada em todos os extratos foliares. Contudo, nos extratos de E. maximum, L. leucocephala, P. pendula, S. corrugata e S. polyphylla a inibição foi maior sobre a tripsina, enquanto o extrato de P. multijuga foi mais efetivo contra a quimotripsina. Nós concluímos que nos extratos foliares de leguminosas arbóreas têm inibidores de serinoproteinases e exibem potencial aplicações biotecnológicas.The proteinase inhibitors are proteins extensively investigated in tissue storage, but few prospected in other plant tissues. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of serine proteinase inhibitors in leaf extracts from fifteen species of leguminous trees of the Amazon forest. The species studied were Caesalpinia echinata, C. ferrea, Cedrelinga cateniformis, Copaifera multijuga, Dinizia excelsa, Enterolobium contortisiliquum, E. maximum, E. schomburgkii

  8. Heterologous expression and purification of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine protease in yeast

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2011-01-01

    The mobilization of protein during germination of barley seeds is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...... active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. The barley key cysteine protease, endoprotease...

  9. PLANT PROTEASE INHIBITORS: STRATEGY FOR PEST CONTROL IN CROPS

    R.S.DHANDE1 N.J.CHIKHALE2

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase inhibitors (PIs are naturally occurring proteins in living organisms and are able to inhibit & control the activity of proteases. PIs are a diverse group of proteins that share a common biochemical activity. The role of plant proteinase inhibitors was investigated by Mickel and Standish in 1947 when they observed the insects larvae were unable to develop normally on soybean products. Subsequently, the soybean trypsin inhibitors were found to be lethal to the flour beetle larvae, Tribolium confusum (Lipke et. al., 1954. Now there are diverse examples of protease inhibitors active against many insect species both in vitro (Pannetier et. al., 1997; Koiwa et. al., 1998 and in vivo (Urwin et. al., 1997; Vain et. al., 1998 bioassays.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a serine proteinase with thrombin-like activity from the venom of the snake Bothrops asper

    A.V Pérez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine proteinase with thrombin-like activity was isolated from the venom of the Central American pit viper Bothrops asper. Isolation was performed by a combination of affinity chromatography on aminobenzamidine-Sepharose and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose. The enzyme accounts for approximately 0.13% of the venom dry weight and has a molecular mass of 32 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE, and of 27 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Its partial amino acid sequence shows high identity with snake venom serine proteinases and a complete identity with a cDNA clone previously sequenced from this species. The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme is VIGGDECNINEHRSLVVLFXSSGFL CAGTLVQDEWVLTAANCDSKNFQ. The enzyme induces clotting of plasma (minimum coagulant dose = 4.1 µg and fibrinogen (minimum coagulant dose = 4.2 µg in vitro, and promotes defibrin(ogenation in vivo (minimum defibrin(ogenating dose = 1.0 µg. In addition, when injected intravenously in mice at doses of 5 and 10 µg, it induces a series of behavioral changes, i.e., loss of the righting reflex, opisthotonus, and intermittent rotations over the long axis of the body, which closely resemble the `gyroxin-like' effect induced by other thrombin-like enzymes from snake venoms.

  11. Compatibility in the Ustilago maydis-maize interaction requires inhibition of host cysteine proteases by the fungal effector Pit2.

    André N Mueller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis causes smut disease in maize, with large plant tumors being formed as the most prominent disease symptoms. During all steps of infection, U. maydis depends on a biotrophic interaction, which requires an efficient suppression of plant immunity. In a previous study, we identified the secreted effector protein Pit2, which is essential for maintenance of biotrophy and induction of tumors. Deletion mutants for pit2 successfully penetrate host cells but elicit various defense responses, which stops further fungal proliferation. We now show that Pit2 functions as an inhibitor of a set of apoplastic maize cysteine proteases, whose activity is directly linked with salicylic-acid-associated plant defenses. Consequently, protease inhibition by Pit2 is required for U. maydis virulence. Sequence comparisons with Pit2 orthologs from related smut fungi identified a conserved sequence motif. Mutation of this sequence caused loss of Pit2 function. Consequently, expression of the mutated protein in U. maydis could not restore virulence of the pit2 deletion mutant, indicating that the protease inhibition by Pit2 is essential for fungal virulence. Moreover, synthetic peptides of the conserved sequence motif showed full activity as protease inhibitor, which identifies this domain as a new, minimal protease inhibitor domain in plant-pathogenic fungi.

  12. Cysteine and arginine-rich peptides as molecular carriers.

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Mandal, Dindayal; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Tavakoli, Kathy; Etesham, Matthew; Parang, Keykavous

    2016-01-15

    A number of linear and cyclic peptides containing alternative arginine and cysteine residues, namely linear (CR)3, linear (CR)4, linear (CR)5, cyclic [CR]4, and cyclic [CR]5, were synthesized. The peptides were evaluated for their ability to deliver two molecular cargos, fluorescence-labeled cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptide (F'-GpYEEI) and fluorescence-labeled lamivudine (F'-3TC), intracellularly in human leukemia cancer (CCRF-CEM) cells. We investigated the role of cyclization and the number of amino acids in improving the transporting ability of the peptides. The flow cytometry studies suggested that the synthesized peptides were able to work efficiently as transporters for both cargos. Among all compounds, cyclic [CR]4 was found to be the most efficient peptide in transporting the cargo into cells. For instance, the cellular uptake of F'-3TC (5μM) and F'-GpYEEI (5μM) was enhanced by 16- and 20-fold, respectively, in the presence of cyclic [CR]4 compared to that of the parent compound alone. The mechanism of F'-GpYEEI uptake by cells was found to be energy-independent. The results showed that the number of amino acids and their cyclic nature can impact the efficiency of the peptide in transporting the molecular cargos. PMID:26631317

  13. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D; Hoffer, Michael E; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  14. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  15. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  16. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  17. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors for selective detecting cysteine with upconversion luminescence.

    Guan, Yunlong; Qu, Songnan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Ligong

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent sensors based on upconversion (UC) luminescence have been considered as a promising strategy to detect bio-analyte due to their advantages in deep penetration, minimum autofluorescence, and ratiometric fluorescent output. A prototype of nanosensors combined with mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and a fluorescein-based fluorescent probe loaded in pores was therefore designed to detect cysteine (Cys). The silica shell provided loading space for the probe and enabled the nanosensors to disperse in water. In the presence of Cys, the fluorescent probe was transformed into 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein with an emission band centering at 518 nm which was secondarily excited by the light at around 475 nm from NaYF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+) UCNPs driven by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The intensity ratio between green and blue luminescence (I518/I475) grew exponentially with increasing concentrations of Cys over a range of 20-200 μmolL(-1). The response of the nanosensors towards Cys was recognizable with naked eyes by luminescence color change. Evidences suggest that these nanosensors are capable of sensing Cys in aqueous solution and distinguishing Cys from homocysteine (Hcy) with kinetically-controlled selectivity. The system was further employed to detect Cys in human serum and the result was in agreement with it tested by high performance liquid chromatography with acceptable recovery. PMID:26402589

  18. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Katharine Eakin

    Full Text Available In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI. For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man.

  19. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  20. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  1. Controllable synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials by assisting with l-cysteine and ethylenediamine

    Tao, Yugui

    2013-11-21

    This paper reports a facile l-cysteine-assisted solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials using ethylenediamine (En) and distilled water as solvent. The influence of reaction time, temperature, l-cysteine and solvent was initially investigated. Results demonstrated the reaction temperature, l-cysteine and En significantly imposed impact on the phase and morphology of the particles. Amorphous nanosheets, mixed-crystal nanorods and pure anatase nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by varying reaction temperature. The formation of the amorphous nanosheets and mixed-crystal nanorods were directly affected by the presence of l-cysteine and En. And the presence of En distinctly affected the crystal phase of the products, which was rarely mentioned in other studies. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of three typical samples were excellent. The possible formation mechanism of the sample was also discussed. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  2. Cysteine-Free Proteins in the Immunobiology of Arthropod-Borne Diseases

    J. Santiago Mejia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identify epitopes that could be used in the design of vaccines to control several arthropod-borne diseases simultaneously is to look for common structural features in the secretome of the pathogens that cause them. Using a novel bioinformatics technique, cysteine-abundance and distribution analysis, we found that many different proteins secreted by several arthropod-borne pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and eight species of Proteobacteria, are devoid of cysteine residues. The identification of three cysteine-abundance and distribution patterns in several families of proteins secreted by pathogenic and nonpathogenic Proteobacteria, and not found when the amino acid analyzed was tryptophan, provides evidence of forces restricting the content of cysteine residues in microbial proteins during evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of protein structure and function, antigenicity and immunogenicity, and host-parasite relationships.

  3. Formation scheme and antioxidant activity of a novel Maillard pigment, pyrrolothiazolate, formed from cysteine and glucose.

    Noda, Kyoko; Terasawa, Naoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2016-06-15

    We recently identified 6-hydroxy-3[R],7a[S]-dimethyl-7-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]thiazole-3-calboxylic acid, a novel pyrrolothiazole derivative carrying a carboxy group and named pyrrolothiazolate, as a Mallard pigment formed from l-cysteine and d-glucose. Here we described the formation of its enantiomer, the plausible formation scheme of pyrrolothiazolate, and its antioxidant activity. When d-cysteine was used instead of l-cysteine in the reaction mixture, the enantiomer of pyrrolothiazolate was obtained. The carbon at position 1 of glucose was incorporated into two methyl groups of pyrrolothiazolate. The pigment was considered to be formed through 1-deoxyglucosone (1-DG). The dehydrated isomer of 1-DG would be condensed with the thiol and amino groups of cysteine. This condensate was dehydrated and cyclized to form pyrrolothiazolate. This compound was an antioxidant showing radical scavenging activity. PMID:26987433

  4. The SNO/SOH TMT strategy for combinatorial analysis of reversible cysteine oxidations

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Williamson, James; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Redox homeostasis is essential for normal function of cells and redox imbalance has been recognised as a pathogenic factor of numerous human diseases. Oxidative modifications of cysteine thiols modulate function of many proteins, mediate signalling, and fine-tune transcriptional and...... metabolic processes. In this study we present the SNO/SOH TMT strategy, which enables simultaneous analysis of two different types of cysteine modification: S-nitrosylation (SNO) and S-sulfenylation (SOH). The method facilitates quantitation of modification changes corrected by changes in protein abundance...... strategy is a viable alternative to existing methods for cysteine oxidation analysis and provides new features that will facilitate our understanding of the interplay between SNO and SOH. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: SNO/SOH TMT strategy outperforms other available strategies for cysteine oxidation analysis...

  5. Plant Proteases Involved in Regulated Cell Death.

    Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-12-01

    Each plant genome encodes hundreds of proteolytic enzymes. These enzymes can be divided into five distinct classes: cysteine-, serine-, aspartic-, threonine-, and metalloproteinases. Despite the differences in their structural properties and activities, members of all of these classes in plants are involved in the processes of regulated cell death - a basic feature of eukaryotic organisms. Regulated cell death in plants is an indispensable mechanism supporting plant development, survival, stress responses, and defense against pathogens. This review summarizes recent advances in studies of plant proteolytic enzymes functioning in the initiation and execution of distinct types of regulated cell death. PMID:26878575

  6. Cysteine Mutagenesis and Computer Modeling of the S6 Region of an Intermediate Conductance IKCa Channel

    Simoes, Manuel; Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Banderali, Umberto; Hobeila, Fadi; Roux, Benoit; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2002-01-01

    Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (SCAM) and computer-based modeling were used to investigate key structural features of the S6 transmembrane segment of the calcium-activated K+ channel of intermediate conductance IKCa. Our SCAM results show that the interaction of [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) with cysteines engineered at positions 275, 278, and 282 leads to current inhibition. This effect was state dependent as MTSET appeared less effective at inhibiting IKCa...

  7. Novel Aza Peptide Inhibitors and Active-Site Probes of Papain-Family Cysteine Proteases

    Verhelst, Steven H. L.; Witte, Martin D.; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Fonovic, Marko; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recent characterization of multiple classes of functionalized azapeptides as effective covalent inhibitors of cysteine proteases prompted us to investigate O-acyl hydroxamates and their azapeptide analogues for use as activity-based probes (ABPs). We report here a new class of azaglycine-containing O-acylhydroxamates that form stable covalent adducts with target proteases. This allows them to be used as ABPs for papain family cysteine proteases. A second class of related analogues containing ...

  8. Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (AcStefin) Is Required for Complete Cyst Formation of Acanthamoeba

    Lee, Jung-Yub; Song, Su-Min; Moon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Yu-Ran; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Cha, Hee-Jae; Yu, Hak Sun; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2013-01-01

    The encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions, such as those associated with starvation, low temperatures, and biocides. Furthermore, cysteine proteases have been implicated in the massive turnover of intracellular components required for encystation. Thus, strict modulation of the activities of cysteine proteases is required to protect Acanthamoeba from intra...

  9. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain fam...

  10. A malarial cysteine protease is necessary for Plasmodium sporozoite egress from oocysts

    Aly, Ahmed S.I.; Matuschewski, Kai

    2005-01-01

    The Plasmodium life cycle is a sequence of alternating invasive and replicative stages within the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. How malarial parasites exit their host cells after completion of reproduction remains largely unsolved. Inhibitor studies indicated a role of Plasmodium cysteine proteases in merozoite release from host erythrocytes. To validate a vital function of malarial cysteine proteases in active parasite egress, we searched for target genes that can be analyzed functional...

  11. Identification and Optimization of Inhibitors of Trypanosomal Cysteine Proteases: Cruzain, Rhodesain, and TbCatB

    Mott, Bryan T.; Ferreira, Rafaela S.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Ang, Kenny Kean-Hooi; Leister, William; Shen, Min; Silveira, Julia T.; Doyle, Patricia S; Michelle R. Arkin; McKerrow, James H.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Thomas, Craig J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei are parasites that cause Chagas’ disease and African sleeping sickness, respectively. Both parasites rely on essential cysteine proteases for survival, cruzain for T. cruzi and TbCatB/rhodesain for T. brucei. A recent quantitative high-throughput screen of cruzain identified triazine nitriles, which are known inhibitors of other cysteine proteases, as reversible inhibitors of the enzyme. Structural modifications detailed herein, including core scaffold...

  12. Cysteine Protease Secreted by Paragonimus westermani Attenuates Effector Functions of Human Eosinophils Stimulated with Immunoglobulin G

    Shin, Myeong Heon; Kita, Hirohito; Park, Hae Young; Seoh, Ju Young

    2001-01-01

    An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated surface, such as that found on helminth parasites, is one of the most effective physiologic stimuli for eosinophil activation. The cysteine proteases secreted by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play an important role in evasion of the immune response by degrading the host immunoglobulins. In this study, we investigated whether cysteine proteases in the excretory-secretory product (ESP) produced by Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae (PwNEM), wh...

  13. Two distinct gene subfamilies within the family of cysteine protease genes.

    Karrer, K M; Peiffer, S L; DiTomas, M E

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone for a physiologically regulated Tetrahymena cysteine protease gene was sequenced. The nucleotide sequence predicts that the clone encodes a 336-amino acid protein composed of a 19-residue N-terminal signal sequence followed by a 107-residue propeptide and a 210-residue mature protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein with those of other cysteine proteases revealed a highly conserved interspersed amino acid motif in the propeptide region of the protein,...

  14. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University Kottayam, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  15. Micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics and prebiotics, a review of effectiveness in reducing HIV progression

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics...

  16. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    Ruben Hummelen; Jaimie Hemsworth; Gregor Reid

    2010-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebio...

  17. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, A Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics...

  18. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  19. Techniques for the Analysis of Cysteine Sulfhydryls and Oxidative Protein Folding

    Borges, Chad R.; Sherma, Nisha D.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Modification of cysteine thiols dramatically affects protein function and stability. Hence, the abilities to quantify specific protein sulfhydryl groups within complex biological samples and map disulfide bond structures are crucial to gaining greater insights into how proteins operate in human health and disease. Recent Advances: Many different molecular probes are now commercially available to label and track cysteine residues at great sensitivity. Coupled with mass spectromet...

  20. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    Minu K Srivastava; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which...