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Sample records for paranodal myelin splitting

  1. Contactin-1 regulates myelination and nodal/paranodal domain organization in the central nervous system

    Çolakoğlu, Gülsen; Bergstrom-Tyrberg, Ulrika; Berglund, Erik O.; Ranscht, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered membrane sheath that encircles axons to enable rapid information processing and protect neurons. Formation of myelin requires communication between axons and oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells in the CNS. Here we identify Contactin-1 as a critical signal for axon–glia communication in CNS myelin. Gene ablation in mice shows that Contactin-1 is necessary for myelin sheath formation by oligodendrocytes and establishment of paranodal axoglial junctions that regul...

  2. Subtle paranodal injury slows impulse conduction in a mathematical model of myelinated axons.

    Charles F Babbs

    Full Text Available This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity.

  3. Real-time CARS imaging reveals a calpain-dependent pathway for paranodal myelin retraction during high-frequency stimulation.

    Terry B Huff

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation is becoming a promising therapy for neurological disorders, however the response of the central nervous system to stimulation remains poorly understood. The current work investigates the response of myelin to electrical stimulation by laser-scanning coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS imaging of myelin in live spinal tissues in real time. Paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation. Retraction was seen to begin minutes after the onset of stimulation and continue for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased, but was found to reverse after a 2 h recovery period. The myelin retraction resulted in exposure of Kv 1.2 potassium channels visualized by immunofluorescence. Accordingly, treating the stimulated tissue with a potassium channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine, led to the appearance of a shoulder peak in the compound action potential curve. Label-free CARS imaging of myelin coupled with multiphoton fluorescence imaging of immuno-labeled proteins at the nodes of Ranvier revealed that high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down.

  4. Defects in myelination, paranode organization and Purkinje cell innervation in the ether lipid-deficient mouse cerebellum.

    Teigler, Andre; Komljenovic, Dorde; Draguhn, Andreas; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W

    2009-06-01

    Ether lipids (ELs), particularly plasmalogens, are essential constituents of the mammalian central nervous system. The physiological role of ELs, in vivo, however is still enigmatic. In the present study, we characterized a mouse model carrying a targeted deletion of the peroxisomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase gene that results in the complete lack of ELs. Investigating the cerebellum of these mice, we observed: (i) defects in foliation patterning and delay in precursor granule cell migration, (ii) defects in myelination and concomitant reduction in the level of myelin basic protein, (iii) disturbances in paranode organization by extending the Caspr distribution and disrupting axo-glial septate-like junctions, (iv) impaired innervation of Purkinje cells by both parallel fibers and climbing fibers and (v) formation of axon swellings by the accumulation of inositol-tris-phosphate receptor 1 containing smooth ER-like tubuli. Functionally, conduction velocity of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum was significantly reduced. Most of these phenotypes were already apparent at P20 but still persisted in 1-year-old animals. In summary, these data show that EL deficiency results in severe developmental and lasting structural alterations at the cellular and network level of the cerebellum, and reveal an important role of ELs for proper brain function. Common molecular mechanisms that may underlie these phenotypes are discussed. PMID:19270340

  5. Disrupted axon-glia interactions at the paranode in myelinated nerves cause axonal degeneration and neuronal cell death in the aged Caspr mutant mouse shambling.

    Takagishi, Yoshiko; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that axonal degeneration is a disease mechanism in various neurodegenerative diseases and that the paranodes at the nodes of Ranvier may be the initial site of pathogenesis. We investigated the pathophysiology of the disease process in the central and peripheral nervous systems of a Caspr mutant mouse, shambling (shm), which is affected by disrupted paranodal structures and impaired nerve conduction of myelinated nerves. The shm mice manifest a progressive neurological phenotype as mice age. We found extensive axonal degeneration and a loss of neurons in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system in aged shm mice. Axonal alteration of myelinated nerves was defined by abnormal distribution and expression of neurofilaments and derangements in the status of phosphorylated and non/de-phosphorylated neurofilaments. Autophagy-related structures were also accumulated in degenerated axons and neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that disrupted axon-glia interactions at the paranode cause the cytoskeletal alteration in myelinated axons leading to neuronal cell death, and the process involves detrimental autophagy and aging as factors that promote the pathogenesis. PMID:27255813

  6. Contactin-1 IgG4 antibodies cause paranode dismantling and conduction defects.

    Manso, Constance; Querol, Luis; Mekaouche, Mourad; Illa, Isabel; Devaux, Jérôme J

    2016-06-01

    Paranodal axoglial junctions formed by the association of contactin-1, contactin-associated protein 1, and neurofascin-155, play important functions in nerve impulse propagation along myelinated axons. Autoantibodies to contactin-1 and neurofascin-155 define chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy subsets of patients with specific clinical features. These autoantibodies are mostly of the IgG4 isotype, but their pathogenicity has not been proven. Here, we investigated the mechanisms how IgG subclasses to contactin-1 affect conduction. We show that purified anti-contactin-1 IgG1 and IgG4 bind to paranodes. To determine whether these isotypes can pass the paranodal barrier, we incubated isolated sciatic nerves with the purified antibody or performed intraneural injections. We found that IgG4 diffused into the paranodal regions in vitro or after intraneural injections. IgG4 infiltration was slow and progressive. In 24 h, IgG4 accessed the paranode borders near the nodal lumen, and completely fill the paranodal segments by 3 days. By contrast, control IgG, anti-contactin-1 IgG1, or even anti-contactin-associated-protein-2 IgG4 did not pass the paranodal barrier. To determine whether chronic exposure to these antibodies is pathogenic, we passively transferred anti-contactin-1 IgG1 and IgG4 into Lewis rats immunized with P2 peptide. IgG4 to contactin-1, but not IgG1, induced progressive clinical deteriorations combined with gait ataxia. No demyelination, axonal degeneration, or immune infiltration were observed. Instead, these animals presented a selective loss of the paranodal specialization in motor neurons characterized by the disappearance of the contactin-associated protein 1/contactin-1/neurofascin-155 complex at paranodes. Paranode destruction did not affect nodal specialization, but resulted in a moderate node lengthening. The sensory nerves and dorsal root ganglion were not affected in these animals. Electrophysiological examination further

  7. Myelination and myelin disorders

    The first part of this thesis contains the results of a study into the capabilities of MR in the assessment of normal cerebral development. The process of normal myelination under the age of 1 year is divided into stages with specific MRI characteristics. An indication of normal age limits for each stage is given. The relationships between changes in signal intensities and biochemical background, and between progress of myelination and psychomotor development are discussed. The latter in the light of a study performed in hydrocephalic children, prior to and repeatedly after shunt implantation. Normal changes in 1H and 31P spectra of the brain in infants and children are described. The relationship between observed spectral changes and cerebral maturational processes is discussed. The second part deals with assessment of myelin disorders with MRI. Basic information about demyelinating disorders and biochemical background are reviewed. A new classification of myelin disorders, underlying the development of an MRI pattern recognition scheme, is proposed based on the most recent scientific developments. Common histological characteristics are described for all main categories of myelin disorders. Extensive information is presented about MRI patterns of abnormalities in patients in whom the disease is predominantly or exclusively located in the white matter. On the basis of the data of these patients a global MRI pattern recognition scheme has been developed covering all white matter disorders that were encountered. Also an example of an in-depth pattern recognition in a circumscribed category of disorders is presented. Finally a study of MRS in demyelinating disorders as opposed to neuronal disorders is described. While MRI provides information about the extent of the process of demyelination and about the disease category, MRS turns out to provide information about the severity of the demyelination and of the concomitant neuronal damage. (H.W.). 725 refs.; 53 figs

  8. Myelination and myelin disorders

    Knaap, M.S. van der.

    1991-05-28

    The first part of this thesis contains the results of a study into the capabilities of MR in the assessment of normal cerebral development. The process of normal myelination under the age of 1 year is divided into stages with specific MRI characteristics. An indication of normal age limits for each stage is given. The relationships between changes in signal intensities and biochemical background, and between progress of myelination and psychomotor development are discussed. The latter in the light of a study performed in hydrocephalic children, prior to and repeatedly after shunt implantation. Normal changes in {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P spectra of the brain in infants and children are described. The relationship between observed spectral changes and cerebral maturational processes is discussed. The second part deals with assessment of myelin disorders with MRI. Basic information about demyelinating disorders and biochemical background are reviewed. A new classification of myelin disorders, underlying the development of an MRI pattern recognition scheme, is proposed based on the most recent scientific developments. Common histological characteristics are described for all main categories of myelin disorders. Extensive information is presented about MRI patterns of abnormalities in patients in whom the disease is predominantly or exclusively located in the white matter. On the basis of the data of these patients a global MRI pattern recognition scheme has been developed covering all white matter disorders that were encountered. Also an example of an in-depth pattern recognition in a circumscribed category of disorders is presented. Finally a study of MRS in demyelinating disorders as opposed to neuronal disorders is described. While MRI provides information about the extent of the process of demyelination and about the disease category, MRS turns out to provide information about the severity of the demyelination and of the concomitant neuronal damage.

  9. Assembly of juxtaparanodes in myelinating DRG culture: Differential clustering of the Kv1/Caspr2 complex and scaffolding protein 4.1B.

    Hivert, Bruno; Pinatel, Delphine; Labasque, Marilyne; Tricaud, Nicolas; Goutebroze, Laurence; Faivre-Sarrailh, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    The precise distribution of ion channels at the nodes of Ranvier is essential for the efficient propagation of action potentials along myelinated axons. The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv1.1/1.2 are clustered at the juxtaparanodes in association with the cell adhesion molecules, Caspr2 and TAG-1 and the scaffolding protein 4.1B. In the present study, we set up myelinating cultures of DRG neurons and Schwann cells to look through the formation of juxtaparanodes in vitro. We showed that the Kv1.1/Kv1.2 channels were first enriched at paranodes before being restricted to distal paranodes and juxtaparanodes. In addition, the Kv1 channels displayed an asymmetric expression enriched at the distal juxtaparanodes. Caspr2 was strongly co-localized with Kv1.2 whereas the scaffolding protein 4.1B was preferentially recruited at paranodes while being present at juxtaparanodes too. Kv1.2/Caspr2 but not 4.1B, also transiently accumulated within the nodal region both in myelinated cultures and developing sciatic nerves. Studying cultures and sciatic nerves from 4.1B KO mice, we further showed that 4.1B is required for the proper targeting of Caspr2 early during myelination. Moreover, using adenoviral-mediated expression of Caspr-GFP and photobleaching experiments, we analyzed the stability of paranodal junctions and showed that the lateral stability of paranodal Caspr was not altered in 4.1B KO mice indicating that 4.1B is not required for the assembly and stability of the paranodal junctions. Thus, developing an adapted culture paradigm, we provide new insights into the dynamic and differential distribution of Kv1 channels and associated proteins during myelination. GLIA 2016;64:840-852. PMID:26840208

  10. The polarity protein Scribble regulates myelination and remyelination in the central nervous system.

    Jarjour, Andrew A; Boyd, Amanda; Dow, Lukas E; Holloway, Rebecca K; Goebbels, Sandra; Humbert, Patrick O; Williams, Anna; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-03-01

    The development and regeneration of myelin by oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS), requires profound changes in cell shape that lead to myelin sheath initiation and formation. Here, we demonstrate a requirement for the basal polarity complex protein Scribble in CNS myelination and remyelination. Scribble is expressed throughout oligodendroglial development and is up-regulated in mature oligodendrocytes where it is localised to both developing and mature CNS myelin sheaths. Knockdown of Scribble expression in cultured oligodendroglia results in disrupted morphology and myelination initiation. When Scribble expression is conditionally eliminated in the myelinating glia of transgenic mice, myelin initiation in CNS is disrupted, both during development and following focal demyelination, and longitudinal extension of the myelin sheath is disrupted. At later stages of myelination, Scribble acts to negatively regulate myelin thickness whilst suppressing the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP) kinase pathway, and localises to non-compact myelin flanking the node of Ranvier where it is required for paranodal axo-glial adhesion. These findings demonstrate an essential role for the evolutionarily-conserved regulators of intracellular polarity in myelination and remyelination. PMID:25807062

  11. The polarity protein Scribble regulates myelination and remyelination in the central nervous system.

    Andrew A Jarjour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The development and regeneration of myelin by oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS, requires profound changes in cell shape that lead to myelin sheath initiation and formation. Here, we demonstrate a requirement for the basal polarity complex protein Scribble in CNS myelination and remyelination. Scribble is expressed throughout oligodendroglial development and is up-regulated in mature oligodendrocytes where it is localised to both developing and mature CNS myelin sheaths. Knockdown of Scribble expression in cultured oligodendroglia results in disrupted morphology and myelination initiation. When Scribble expression is conditionally eliminated in the myelinating glia of transgenic mice, myelin initiation in CNS is disrupted, both during development and following focal demyelination, and longitudinal extension of the myelin sheath is disrupted. At later stages of myelination, Scribble acts to negatively regulate myelin thickness whilst suppressing the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase pathway, and localises to non-compact myelin flanking the node of Ranvier where it is required for paranodal axo-glial adhesion. These findings demonstrate an essential role for the evolutionarily-conserved regulators of intracellular polarity in myelination and remyelination.

  12. Nodes of ranvier and paranodes in chronic acquired neuropathies.

    Carmen Cifuentes-Diaz

    Full Text Available Chronic acquired neuropathies of unknown origin are classified as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (CIDP and chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathies (CIAP. The diagnosis can be very difficult, although it has important therapeutic implications since CIDP can be improved by immunomodulating treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the possible abnormalities of nodal and paranodal regions in these two types of neuropathies. Longitudinal sections of superficial peroneal nerves were obtained from biopsy material from 12 patients with CIDP and 10 patients with CIAP and studied by immunofluorescence and in some cases electron microscopy. Electron microscopy revealed multiple alterations in the nodal and paranodal regions which predominated in Schwann cells in CIDP and in axons in CIAP. In CIDP paranodin/Caspr immunofluorescence was more widespread than in control nerves, extending along the axon in internodes where it appeared intense. Nodal channels Nav and KCNQ2 were less altered but were also detected in the internodes. In CIAP paranodes, paranodin labeling was irregular and/or decreased. To test the consequences of acquired primary Schwann cells alteration on axonal proteins, we used a mouse model based on induced deletion of the transcription factor Krox-20 gene. In the demyelinated sciatic nerves of these mice we observed alterations similar to those found in CIDP by immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting demonstrated increased levels of paranodin. Finally we examined whether the alterations in paranodin immunoreactivity could have a diagnosis value. In a sample of 16 biopsies, the study of paranodin immunofluorescence by blind evaluators led to correct diagnosis in 70 ± 4% of the cases. This study characterizes for the first time the abnormalities of nodes of Ranvier in CIAP and CIDP, and the altered expression and distribution of nodal and paranodal proteins. Marked differences were observed between CIDP and CIAP

  13. Nodes of Ranvier and Paranodes in Chronic Acquired Neuropathies

    Carmen Cifuentes-Diaz; Odile Dubourg; Theano Irinopoulou; Marc Vigny; Sylvie Lachkar; Laurence Decker; Patrick Charnay; Natalia Denisenko; Thierry Maisonobe; Jean-Marc Léger; Karine Viala; Jean-Jacques Hauw; Jean-Antoine Girault

    2011-01-01

    Chronic acquired neuropathies of unknown origin are classified as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (CIDP) and chronic idiopathic axonal polyneuropathies (CIAP). The diagnosis can be very difficult, although it has important therapeutic implications since CIDP can be improved by immunomodulating treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the possible abnormalities of nodal and paranodal regions in these two types of neuropathies. Longitudinal sections of superficial per...

  14. Protein 4.1B contributes to the organization of peripheral myelinated axons.

    Carmen Cifuentes-Diaz

    Full Text Available Neurons are characterized by extremely long axons. This exceptional cell shape is likely to depend on multiple factors including interactions between the cytoskeleton and membrane proteins. In many cell types, members of the protein 4.1 family play an important role in tethering the cortical actin-spectrin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. Protein 4.1B is localized in myelinated axons, enriched in paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions, and also all along the internodes, but not at nodes of Ranvier where are localized the voltage-dependent sodium channels responsible for action potential propagation. To shed light on the role of protein 4.1B in the general organization of myelinated peripheral axons, we studied 4.1B knockout mice. These mice displayed a mildly impaired gait and motility. Whereas nodes were unaffected, the distribution of Caspr/paranodin, which anchors 4.1B to the membrane, was disorganized in paranodal regions and its levels were decreased. In juxtaparanodes, the enrichment of Caspr2, which also interacts with 4.1B, and of the associated TAG-1 and Kv1.1, was absent in mutant mice, whereas their levels were unaltered. Ultrastructural abnormalities were observed both at paranodes and juxtaparanodes. Axon calibers were slightly diminished in phrenic nerves and preterminal motor axons were dysmorphic in skeletal muscle. βII spectrin enrichment was decreased along the axolemma. Electrophysiological recordings at 3 post-natal weeks showed the occurrence of spontaneous and evoked repetitive activity indicating neuronal hyperexcitability, without change in conduction velocity. Thus, our results show that in myelinated axons 4.1B contributes to the stabilization of membrane proteins at paranodes, to the clustering of juxtaparanodal proteins, and to the regulation of the internodal axon caliber.

  15. Effects of experimental hypothyroidism on myelin sheath structural organization.

    Ferreira, Andréa A; Nazário, José C; Pereira, Mário J S; Azevedo, Neide L; Barradas, Penha C

    2004-03-01

    A previous study using the 2'3'cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase (CNPase), an oligodendroglial marker that also stain ensheathed fibers, showed a decrease in the number of immunoreactive fibers and a change in the pattern of CNPase immunoreactivity (CNPase+) in hypothyroid animals. CNPase+ fibers, in mature hypothyroid animals, showed a continuous pattern of staining in contrast with a discontinuous one in controls. As CNPase, in adult animals, can be found only in regions in which oligodendrocyte cytoplasm remains as internal, external and paranodal loops, it was suggested that the reduction of thyroid hormone levels leads to a failure in myelin compaction. Previous data showed a higher frequency of some abnormalities in myelin sheath as multiple cytoplasmic loops and redundant myelin profiles in mutant animals that present a failure in myelin compaction. The increase in the frequency of these abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) indicates a failure in the interrelations between the axons and the oligodendroglial processes. To verify if the thyroid hormone deficiency during CNS development disturbs these interrelations, we evaluated the frequency of the morphological abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) in myelin sheath of corpus callosum (cc) in experimental hypothyroidism. Randomic fields were kept by electron microscopy and the analysis of the frequency of morphological abnormalities showed a significant difference in hypothyroid animals at 60-day-old (PND60), with no significant differences at 90-day-old (PND90) animals. The frequency of multiple internal loops is higher in hypothyroid animals at PND60 that indicates a disturbance in the wrapping by the oligodendroglial process. These findings showed that thyroid hormone might modulate the axon-oligodendroglial relationships that are important for the adequate temporal sequence of events that occur during myelinogenesis, with

  16. The development of alpha and gamma motoneuron fibres in the rat. II. A comparative ultrastructural study of their central and peripheral myelination.

    Fraher, J P; Kaar, G F

    1985-01-01

    The abnodal myelin sheaths of the internodes immediately central and peripheral to the transitional node possess a decremental segment over which sheath thickness gradually decreases in the direction of the paranode. This may represent a sustained morphological immaturity of the sheath. Alpha and gamma fibre groups have different sheath thickness to axon circumference relationships at each age during development and at maturity. Gamma fibres have relatively thicker sheaths than alpha fibres. ...

  17. ATP-induced lipid membrane reordering in the myelinated nerve fiber identified using Raman spectroscopy

    We demonstrate a successful application of Raman spectroscopy to the problem of lipid ordering with microscopic resolution in different regions of the myelinated nerve fiber. Simultaneous collection of Raman spectra of lipids and carotenoids has enabled us to characterize membrane fluidity and the degree of lipid ordering based on intensity ratios for the 1527/1160 and 2940/2885 cm−1 bands. We show that the intensity profiles of the major Raman bands vary significantly between the three major regions of myelinated nerve fiber: internode, paranode and the node of Ranvier. Mapping Raman peak intensities over these areas suggested that the carotenoid molecules are localized in the myelin membranes of nerve cells. Paranodal membranes were sensitive to extracellular ATP. ATP solutions (7 mM) influenced the 1527/1160 and 2940/2885 cm−1 intensity ratios. Changes in both carotenoid and lipid Raman spectra were in accord and indicated an increase in lipid ordering degree and decrease in membrane fluidity under ATP administration. The collected data provide evidence for the existence of a regulatory purinergic signaling pathway in the peripheral nervous system. (letter)

  18. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury. PMID:27033551

  19. The 4.1B cytoskeletal protein regulates the domain organization and sheath thickness of myelinated axons

    Einheber, Steven; Maurel, Patrice; Meng, Xiaosong; Rubin, Marina; Lam, Isabel; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Shrager, Peter; Kissil, Joseph; Salzer, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Myelinated axons are organized into specialized domains critical to their function in saltatory conduction, i.e. nodes, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes. Here, we describe the distribution and role of the 4.1B protein in this organization. 4.1B is expressed by neurons, and at lower levels by Schwann cells, which also robustly express 4.1G. Immunofluorescence and immuno-EM demonstrates 4.1B is expressed subjacent to the axon membrane in all domains except the nodes. Mice deficient in ...

  20. Myelin Avoids the JAM.

    Follis, Rose M; Carter, Bruce D

    2016-08-17

    In this issue of Neuron, Redmond et al. (2016) identify junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2) as an inhibitor of somatodendritic myelination in spinal cord neurons, thereby elucidating how myelin forms on axons but avoids dendrites and cell bodies. PMID:27537479

  1. The influence of protein-calorie malnutrition on the development of paranodal regions in spinal roots. A study with the OTAN method on rat.

    Nordborg, C

    1977-11-28

    During the early postnatal development of spinal roots in rats paranodal regions were often found, containing OTAN-positive inclusions in the Schwann cell cytoplasm. The presence of OTAN-positive paranodal regions showed variations in time, which were synchronous for ventral and dorsal roots. Dorsal roots, however, showed a more marked presence during development than ventral roots. Spinal roots of animals submitted to a 50% food restriction, were shown to contain more OTAN-positive paranodal regions than controls. This was true for ventral as well as dorsal roots. It is suggested that crowding of internodal segments could be one factor, determining the presence of paranodal, OTAN-positive material. PMID:414508

  2. Rituximab in treatment-resistant CIDP with antibodies against paranodal proteins

    Querol, Luis; Rojas-García, Ricard; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Barcena, Joseba; Pardo, Julio; Ortega-Moreno, Angel; Sedano, Maria Jose; Seró-Ballesteros, Laia; Carvajal, Alejandra; Ortiz, Nicolau; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the response to rituximab in patients with treatment-resistant chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with antibodies against paranodal proteins and correlate the response with autoantibody titers. Methods: Patients with CIDP and IgG4 anti–contactin-1 (CNTN1) or anti–neurofascin-155 (NF155) antibodies who were resistant to IV immunoglobulin and corticosteroids were treated with rituximab and followed prospectively. Immunocytochemistry was used to detec...

  3. Paranode Abnormalities and Oxidative Stress in Optic Nerve Vulnerable to Secondary Degeneration: Modulation by 670 nm Light Treatment.

    Charis R Szymanski

    Full Text Available Secondary degeneration of nerve tissue adjacent to a traumatic injury results in further loss of neurons, glia and function, via mechanisms that may involve oxidative stress. However, changes in indicators of oxidative stress have not yet been demonstrated in oligodendrocytes vulnerable to secondary degeneration in vivo. We show increases in the oxidative stress indicator carboxymethyl lysine at days 1 and 3 after injury in oligodendrocytes vulnerable to secondary degeneration. Dihydroethidium staining for superoxide is reduced, indicating endogenous control of this particular reactive species after injury. Concurrently, node of Ranvier/paranode complexes are altered, with significant lengthening of the paranodal gap and paranode as well as paranode disorganisation. Therapeutic administration of 670 nm light is thought to improve oxidative metabolism via mechanisms that may include increased activity of cytochrome c oxidase. Here, we show that light at 670 nm, delivered for 30 minutes per day, results in in vivo increases in cytochrome c oxidase activity co-localised with oligodendrocytes. Short term (1 day 670 nm light treatment is associated with reductions in reactive species at the injury site. In optic nerve vulnerable to secondary degeneration superoxide in oligodendrocytes is reduced relative to handling controls, and is associated with reduced paranode abnormalities. Long term (3 month administration of 670 nm light preserves retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to secondary degeneration and maintains visual function, as assessed by the optokinetic nystagmus visual reflex. Light at a wavelength of 670 nm may serve as a therapeutic intervention for treatment of secondary degeneration following neurotrauma.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and myelin

    Postnatal development of the brain is characterized by growth and by myelination. Myelination of the brain normally extends from birth until about two years of age. MRI changes corresponding to the various myelination stages are due mainly to changes in the water content of the cerebral parenchyma. Myelination kinetics follow a fairly precise timetable, with variations across areas of the brain. Abnormalities of white matter are responsible for relatively stereotyped, nonspecific manifestations, which are mainly due to an increase in the amount of water contained in diseased white matter, whatever the cause of the disorder. Interpretation is based on the location, distribution, and progression of lesions. (authors). 7 refs., 5 figs

  5. Laser interference microscopy: a novel approach to the visualization of structural changes in myelin during the propagation of nerve impulses

    Yusipovich, A. I.; Cherkashin, A. A.; Verdiyan, E. E.; Sogomonyan, I. A.; Maksimov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    We used 3D phase images obtained by laser interference microscopy (LIM) for ex vivo evaluation of changes in the structure of myelin during repetitive stimulation. In this work we propose a simple model of myelinated nerve fiber (mNF), which describes phase images as a result of different geometry and membrane-to-cytoplasm ratio in various regions, particularly, the internode and paranodal–nodal–paranodal region, including the node of Ranvier. Application of this model provides clear interpretation of the phase images and also demonstrates that repetitive action potentials are accompanied by structural changes in myelin in the internode and cytoplasmic modification in the node of Ranvier. The first 20 min of stimulation did not induce significant changes in the measured parameters, but then the optical path difference at the periphery of mNF and at the node of Ranvier declined reversibly. We believe that our model is also applicable to other modifications of interference and non-interference imaging.

  6. Dynamics and mechanisms of CNS myelination.

    Bercury, Kathryn K; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-23

    Vertebrate myelination is an evolutionary advancement essential for motor, sensory, and higher-order cognitive function. CNS myelin, a multilamellar differentiation of the oligodendrocyte plasma membrane, ensheaths axons to facilitate electrical conduction. Myelination is one of the most pivotal cell-cell interactions for normal brain development, involving extensive information exchange between differentiating oligodendrocytes and axons. The molecular mechanisms of myelination are discussed, along with new perspectives on oligodendrocyte plasticity and myelin remodeling of the developing and adult CNS. PMID:25710531

  7. Nuc-ErbB3 regulates H3K27me3 levels and HMT activity to establish epigenetic repression during peripheral myelination.

    Ness, Jennifer K; Skiles, Amanda A; Yap, Eng-Hui; Fajardo, Eduardo J; Fiser, Andras; Tapinos, Nikos

    2016-06-01

    Nuc-ErbB3 an alternative transcript from the ErbB3 locus binds to a specific DNA motif and associates with Schwann cell chromatin. Here we generated a nuc-ErbB3 knockin mouse that lacks nuc-ErbB3 expression in the nucleus without affecting the neuregulin-ErbB3 receptor signaling. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit hypermyelination and aberrant myelination at the paranodal region. This phenotype is attributed to de-repression of myelination associated gene transcription following loss of nuc-ErbB3 and histone H3K27me3 promoter occupancy. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit reduced association of H3K27me3 with myelination-associated gene promoters and increased RNA Pol-II rate of transcription of these genes. In addition, nuc-ErbB3 directly regulates levels of H3K27me3 in Schwann cells. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit significant decrease of histone H3K27me3 methyltransferase (HMT) activity and reduced levels of H3K27me3. Collectively, nuc-ErbB3 is a master transcriptional repressor, which regulates HMT activity to establish a repressive chromatin landscape on promoters of genes during peripheral myelination. GLIA 2016;64:977-992. PMID:27017927

  8. In vivo evidence that TRAF4 is required for central nervous system myelin homeostasis.

    Sébastien Blaise

    Full Text Available Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factors (TRAFs are major signal transducers for the TNF and interleukin-1/Toll-like receptor superfamilies. However, TRAF4 does not fit the paradigm of TRAF function in immune and inflammatory responses. Its physiological and molecular functions remain poorly understood. Behavorial analyses show that TRAF4-deficient mice (TRAF4-KO exhibit altered locomotion coordination typical of ataxia. TRAF4-KO central nervous system (CNS ultrastructure shows strong myelin perturbation including disorganized layers and disturbances in paranode organization. TRAF4 was previously reported to be expressed by CNS neurons. Using primary cell culture, we now show that TRAF4 is also expressed by oligodendrocytes, at all stages of their differentiation. Moreover, histology and electron microscopy show degeneration of a high number of Purkinje cells in TRAF4-KO mice, that was confirmed by increased expression of the Bax pro-apoptotic marker (immunofluorescence, TUNEL analysis, and caspase-3 activation and PARP1 cleavage (western blotting. Consistent with this phenotype, MAG and NogoA, two myelin-induced neurite outgrowth inhibitors, and their neuron partners, NgR and p75NTR were overexpressed (Q-RT-PCR and western blotting. The strong increased phosphorylation of Rock2, a RhoA downstream target, indicated that the NgR/p75NTR/RhoA signaling pathway, known to induce actin cytoskeleton rearrangement that favors axon regeneration inhibition and neuron apoptosis, is activated in the absence of TRAF4 (western blotting. Altogether, these results provide conclusive evidence for the pivotal contribution of TRAF4 to myelination and to cerebellar homeostasis, and link the loss of TRAF4 function to demyelinating or neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Myelination in very low birth weight infants

    The prognostic significance of cerebral myelination was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in very low birth weight infants. Myelination was graded in two specified sites, optic radiation and corpus callosum, based on the stages of normal term babies and healthy premature infants. The subjects were 30 preterm infants weighing less than 1,500 gm at birth. MRI was performed at 4 to 7 months (corrected age). The normal myelination stage was seen in 18 cases, while a delayed stage was noticed in 12 cases. In the normal myelination group, only 1 case (6%) had handicaps. In the delayed myelination group, 8 cases (67%) had handicaps. Our results showed that delayed myelination was closely related to a poor prognosis. We believe that MRI would be a very good imaging modality for predicting the outcome of very low birth weight infants, particularly in terms of evaluation of myelination. (author)

  10. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  11. The acquisition of myelin: a success story.

    Zalc, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The myelin sheath, and hence the myelin-forming cells (i.e. Schwann cells in the PNS and oligodendrocytes in the CNS), have been a crucial acquisition of vertebrates. The major function of myelin is to increase the velocity of propagation of nerve impulses. Invertebrate axons are ensheathed by glial cells, but do not have a compact myelin. As a consequence, action potentials along invertebrate axons propagate at about 1 m/s, or less. This is sufficient, however, for the survival of small animals (between 0.1 and 30cm). Among invertebrates, only the cephalopods are larger. By increasing their axonal diameter to 1 mm or more, cephalopods have been able to increase the speed of propagation of action potentials and therefore adapt nerve conduction to their larger body size. However, due to the physical constraint imposed by the skull and vertebrae, vertebrates had to find an alternative solution. This was achieved by introducing the myelin sheath, which leads action potentials to propagate at speeds of 50-100m/s without increasing the diameter of their axons. Not all vertebrate axons, however, are myelinated. In the protovertebrates (lancelets, hagfishes, lampreys), which belong to the agnathes (jawless fishes), axons are not ensheathed by myelin. Among living vertebrates, the most ancient myelinated species are the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays), suggesting that acquisition of myelin is concomitant with the acquisition of a hinged-jaw, i.e. the gnathostoma. The close association between the apparition of a hinged-jaw and the myelin sheath has led to speculation that among the devonian fishes that have disappeared today, the jawless conodonts and ostracoderms were not myelinated, and that myelin was first acquired by the oldest gnathostomes: the placoderms. I also question where myelin first appeared: the PNS, the CNS or both? I provide evidence that, in fact, it is not the type of myelin-forming cell that is crucial, but the appearance of axonal signals

  12. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    Bogie, Jeroen; Jorissen, Winde; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmierlo, Tim; van Horssen, Jack; Hellings, Niels; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, J. J. A.; Nijland, Philip G.; Zelcer, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitri...

  13. MRI assessment of myelination: an age standardization

    777 cerebral MRI examinations of children aged 3 days to 14 years were staged for myelination to establish an age standardization. Staging was performed using a system proposed in a previous paper, separately ranking 10 different regions of the brain. Interpretation of the results led to the identification of foue clinical diagnoses that are frequently associated with delays in myelination: West syndrome, cerebral palsy, developmental retardation, and congenital anomalies. In addition, it was found that assessment of myelination in children with head injuries was not practical as alterations in MRI signal can simulate earlier stages of myelination. Age limits were therefore calculated from the case material after excluding all children with these conditions. When simplifications of the definition of the stages are applied, these age limits for the various stages of myelination of each of the 10 regions of the brain make the staging system applicable for routine assessment of myelination. (orig.)

  14. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases. PMID:27346352

  15. The Myelin Brake: When Enough is Enough

    Macklin, Wendy B.

    2010-01-01

    Myelination by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) is tightly regulated by interactions with axons. Various investigations have shed light on the signaling pathways that mediate the production of myelin, but an important question remains; that is, which signals determine when the cell stops myelinating. New studies demonstrate that in Schwann cells, this is controlled by the abundance of Dlg1, which acts to stop acti...

  16. Adaptive myelination from fish to man.

    Baraban, Marion; Mensch, Sigrid; Lyons, David A

    2016-06-15

    Myelinated axons with nodes of Ranvier are an evolutionary elaboration common to essentially all jawed vertebrates. Myelin made by Schwann cells in our peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in our central nervous system has been long known to facilitate rapid energy efficient nerve impulse propagation. However, it is now also clear, particularly in the central nervous system, that myelin is not a simple static insulator but that it is dynamically regulated throughout development and life. New myelin sheaths can be made by newly differentiating oligodendrocytes, and mature myelin sheaths can be stimulated to grow again in the adult. Furthermore, numerous studies in models from fish to man indicate that neuronal activity can affect distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and the process of myelination itself. This begs questions as to how these effects of activity are mediated at a cellular and molecular level and whether activity-driven adaptive myelination is a feature common to all myelinated axons, or indeed all oligodendrocytes, or is specific to cells or circuits with particular functions. Here we review the recent literature on this topic, elaborate on the key outstanding questions in the field, and look forward to future studies that incorporate investigations in systems from fish to man that will provide further insight into this fundamental aspect of nervous system plasticity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26498877

  17. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to...

  18. Motor skill learning requires active central myelination.

    McKenzie, Ian A; Ohayon, David; Li, Huiliang; de Faria, Joana Paes; Emery, Ben; Tohyama, Koujiro; Richardson, William D

    2014-10-17

    Myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) are formed continuously in the healthy adult brain. In this work, we study the function of these late-forming cells and the myelin they produce. Learning a new motor skill (such as juggling) alters the structure of the brain's white matter, which contains many OLs, suggesting that late-born OLs might contribute to motor learning. Consistent with this idea, we show that production of newly formed OLs is briefly accelerated in mice that learn a new skill (running on a "complex wheel" with irregularly spaced rungs). By genetically manipulating the transcription factor myelin regulatory factor in OL precursors, we blocked production of new OLs during adulthood without affecting preexisting OLs or myelin. This prevented the mice from mastering the complex wheel. Thus, generation of new OLs and myelin is important for learning motor skills. PMID:25324381

  19. Diversity Matters: A Revised Guide to Myelination.

    Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Dershowitz, Lori Bowe; Arlotta, Paola

    2016-02-01

    The evolutionary success of the vertebrate nervous system is largely due to a unique structural feature--the myelin sheath, a fatty envelope that surrounds the axons of neurons. By increasing the speed by which electrical signals travel along axons, myelin facilitates neuronal communication between distant regions of the nervous system. We review the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate the development of myelin as well as its homeostasis in adulthood. We discuss how finely tuned neuron-oligodendrocyte interactions are central to myelin formation during development and in the adult, and how these interactions can have profound implications for the plasticity of the adult brain. We also speculate how the functional diversity of both neurons and oligodendrocytes may impact on the myelination process in both health and disease. PMID:26442841

  20. The scales and tales of myelination: using zebrafish and mouse to study myelinating glia.

    Ackerman, Sarah D; Monk, Kelly R

    2016-06-15

    Myelin, the lipid-rich sheath that insulates axons to facilitate rapid conduction of action potentials, is an evolutionary innovation of the jawed-vertebrate lineage. Research efforts aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms governing myelination have primarily focused on rodent models; however, with the advent of the zebrafish model system in the late twentieth century, the use of this genetically tractable, yet simpler vertebrate for studying myelination has steadily increased. In this review, we compare myelinating glial cell biology during development and regeneration in zebrafish and mouse and enumerate the advantages and disadvantages of using each model to study myelination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26498880

  1. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    FitzGibbon, Thomas; Nestorovski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01). Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01). The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio) seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01) in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes. PMID:24212308

  2. Myelin-based inhibitors of oligodendrocyte myelination: clues from axonal growth and regeneration

    Feng Mei; S.Y.Christin Chong; Jonah R.Chan

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of and myelination by oligodendrocytes (OLs) are exquisitely regulated by a series of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms.As each OL can make differing numbers of myelin segments with variable lengths along similar axon tracts,myelination can be viewed as a graded process shaped by inhibitory/inductive cues during development.Myelination by OLs is a prime example of an adaptive process determined by the microenvironment and architecture of the central nervous system (CNS).In this review,we discuss how myelin formation by OLs may be controlled by the heterogeneous microenvironment of the CNS.Then we address recent findings demonstrating that neighboring OLs may compete for available axon space,and highlight our current understanding of myelin-based inhibitors of axonal regeneration that are potentially responsible for the reciprocal dialogue between OLs and determine the numbers and lengths of myelin internodes.Understanding the mechanisms that control the spatiotemporal regulation of myelinogenic potential during development may provide valuable insight into therapeutic strategies for promoting remyelination in an inhibitory microenvironment.

  3. Myelin sheath survival after guanethidine-induced axonal degeneration

    1992-01-01

    Membrane-membrane interactions between axons and Schwann cells are required for initial myelin formation in the peripheral nervous system. However, recent studies of double myelination in sympathetic nerve have indicated that myelin sheaths continue to exist after complete loss of axonal contact (Kidd, G. J., and J. W. Heath. 1988. J. Neurocytol. 17:245-261). This suggests that myelin maintenance may be regulated either by diffusible axonal factors or by nonaxonal mechanisms. To test these hy...

  4. Myelin Proteomics: Molecular Anatomy of an Insulating Sheath

    Jahn, Olaf; Tenzer, Stefan; Werner, Hauke B.

    2009-01-01

    Fast-transmitting vertebrate axons are electrically insulated with multiple layers of nonconductive plasma membrane of glial cell origin, termed myelin. The myelin membrane is dominated by lipids, and its protein composition has historically been viewed to be of very low complexity. In this review, we discuss an updated reference compendium of 342 proteins associated with central nervous system myelin that represents a valuable resource for analyzing myelin biogenesis and white matter homeost...

  5. Schwann cell myelination of the myelin deficient rat spinal cord following X-irradiation

    The myelin-deficient (md) rat is an X-linked myelin mutant that has an abnormality of oligodendrocytes and a severe paucity of myelin throughout the CNS. This lack of myelin makes it an ideal model in which to study the cellular interactions that occur when foreign myelinating cells are induced in the milieu of this nonmyelinated CNS. In this study, Schwann cells were induced in the lumbosacral spinal cord by exposing it to radiation, a technique demonstrated repeatedly in other nonmutant strains of rats. Md rats and their age-matched littermates were irradiated (3,000 to 4,000 R) at 3 days of age and perfused 16-22 days later after pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine. In the md rat, Schwann cell invasion progressed from the area of the spinal cord-nerve root junction and extended into the dorsal columns and adjacent gray matter. Autoradiographic evidence revealed that many of these cells incorporated 3H-thymidine, indicating that they were undergoing proliferation. Ultrastructural observations showed that there was an integration of these intraspinal Schwann cells with the cells normally occurring in this environment, i.e., oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. The extent of migration and division of Schwann cells, as well as their interactions with glial cells, were similar to those seen in the nonmutant irradiated littermates. These studies provide conclusive evidence that md rat axons are normal with respect to their ability to provide trophic and mitogenic signals to myelinating cells

  6. Strategies for myelin regeneration:lessons learned from development

    Abhay Bhatt; Lir-Wan Fan; Yi Pang

    2014-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is indispensably important for patients suffering from several central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI), because it is not only essential for restoring neurophysiology, but also protects denuded axons for secondary degeneration. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying re-myelination is critical for the development of remyelination-speciifc therapeutic approaches. As remyelination shares certain common mechanisms with developmental myelination, knowledge from study of developmental myelination contributes greatly to emerging myelin regeneration therapies, best evidenced as the recently developed human anti-Nogo receptor interacting pro-tein-1 (LINGO-1) monoclonal antibodies to treat MS patients in clinical trials.

  7. N-WASp is required for Schwann cell cytoskeletal dynamics, normal myelin gene expression and peripheral nerve myelination

    Jin, Fuzi; Dong, Baoxia; Georgiou, John; Jiang, Qiuhong; Zhang, Jinyi; Bharioke, Arjun; Qiu, Frank; Lommel, Silvia; Feltri, M. Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Roder, John C.; Eyer, Joel; Chen, Xiequn; Peterson, Alan C.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Schwann cells elaborate myelin sheaths around axons by spirally wrapping and compacting their plasma membranes. Although actin remodeling plays a crucial role in this process, the effectors that modulate the Schwann cell cytoskeleton are poorly defined. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulator, neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASp), is upregulated in myelinating Schwann cells coincident with myelin elaboration. When N-WASp is conditionally deleted in Schwann cells at the onset of myelination, the cells continue to ensheath axons but fail to extend processes circumferentially to elaborate myelin. Myelin-related gene expression is also severely reduced in the N-WASp-deficient cells and in vitro process and lamellipodia formation are disrupted. Although affected mice demonstrate obvious motor deficits these do not appear to progress, the mutant animals achieving normal body weights and living to advanced age. Our observations demonstrate that N-WASp plays an essential role in Schwann cell maturation and myelin formation. PMID:21385763

  8. Myelination and isochronicity in neural networks

    Fumitaka Kimura

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Our brain contains a multiplicity of neuronal networks. In many of these, information sent from presynaptic neurons travels through a variety of pathways of different distances, yet arrives at the postsynaptic cells at the same time. Such isochronicity is achieved either by changes in the conduction velocity of axons or by lengthening the axonal path to compensate for fast conduction. To regulate the conduction velocity, a change in the extent of myelination has recently been proposed in thalamocortical and other pathways. This is in addition to a change in the axonal diameter, a previously identified, more accepted mechanism. Thus, myelination is not a simple means of insulation or acceleration of impulse conduction, but it is rather an exquisite way of actively regulating the timing of communication among various neuronal connections with different length.

  9. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  10. Bilirubin dysregulates myelination in early neonatal life

    Barateiro, Andreia Pereira, 1982-

    2012-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Farmácia (Biologia Celular e Molecular), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Farmácia, 2012 Oligodendrocytes (OL) are neuroglial cells present in the central nervous system responsible for myelin sheath formation, that provide an electric insulation of axons fastening the transmission of electrical signals. During the neonatal period, the brain is particularly vulnerable to toxic insults, like the one induced by hyperbilirubinemia. It has been demonstrated that in th...

  11. Mutant huntingtin downregulates myelin regulatory factor-mediated myelin gene expression and affects mature oligodendrocytes.

    Huang, Brenda; Wei, WenJie; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Feng, Yue; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2015-03-18

    Growing evidence indicates that non-neuronal mutant huntingtin toxicity plays an important role in Huntington's disease (HD); however, whether and how mutant huntingtin affects oligodendrocytes, which are vitally important for neural function and axonal integrity, remains unclear. We first verified the presence of mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes in HD140Q knockin mice. We then established transgenic mice (PLP-150Q) that selectively express mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes. PLP-150Q mice show progressive neurological symptoms and early death, as well as age-dependent demyelination and reduced expression of myelin genes that are downstream of myelin regulatory factor (MYRF or MRF), a transcriptional regulator that specifically activates and maintains the expression of myelin genes in mature oligodendrocytes. Consistently, mutant huntingtin binds abnormally to MYRF and affects its transcription activity. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of mature oligodendrocytes is involved in HD pathogenesis and may also make a good therapeutic target. PMID:25789755

  12. The molecular physiology of the axo-myelinic synapse.

    Micu, Ileana; Plemel, Jason R; Lachance, Celia; Proft, Juliane; Jansen, Andrew J; Cummins, Karen; van Minnen, Jan; Stys, Peter K

    2016-02-01

    Myelinated axons efficiently transmit information over long distances. The apposed myelin sheath confers favorable electrical properties, but restricts access of the axon to its extracellular milieu. Therefore, axonal metabolic support may require specific axo-myelinic communication. Here we explored activity-dependent glutamate-mediated signaling from axon to myelin. 2-Photon microscopy was used to image Ca(2+) changes in myelin in response to electrical stimulation of optic nerve axons ex vivo. We show that optic nerve myelin responds to axonal action potentials by a rise in Ca(2+) levels mediated by GluN2D and GluN3A-containing NMDA receptors. Glutamate is released from axons in a vesicular manner that is tetanus toxin-sensitive. The Ca(2+) source for vesicular fusion is provided by ryanodine receptors on axonal Ca(2+) stores, controlled by L-type Ca(2+) channels that sense depolarization of the internodal axolemma. Genetic ablation of GluN2D and GluN3A subunits results in greater lability of the compact myelin. Our results support the existence of a novel synapse between the axon and its myelin, suggesting a means by which traversing action potentials can signal the overlying myelin sheath. This may be an important physiological mechanism by which an axon can signal companion glia for metabolic support or adjust properties of its myelin in a dynamic manner. The axo-myelinic synapse may contribute to learning, while its disturbances may play a role in the pathophysiology of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia, where subtle abnormalities of myelinated white matter tracts have been shown in the human, or to frank demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26515690

  13. Brain gangliosides in axon-myelin stability and axon regeneration

    Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed at high abundance and complexity in the brain. Altered ganglioside expression results in neural disorders, including seizures and axon degeneration. Brain gangliosides function, in part, by interacting with a ganglioside-binding lectin, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). MAG, on the innermost wrap of the myelin sheath, binds to gangliosides GD1a and GT1b on axons. MAG-ganglioside binding ensures optimal axon-myelin cell-ce...

  14. Oligodendroglial membrane dynamics in relation to myelin biogenesis.

    Ozgen, Hande; Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick; Kahya, Nicoletta

    2016-09-01

    In the central nervous system, oligodendrocytes synthesize a specialized membrane, the myelin membrane, which enwraps the axons in a multilamellar fashion to provide fast action potential conduction and to ensure axonal integrity. When compared to other membranes, the composition of myelin membranes is unique with its relatively high lipid to protein ratio. Their biogenesis is quite complex and requires a tight regulation of sequential events, which are deregulated in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. To devise strategies for remedying such defects, it is crucial to understand molecular mechanisms that underlie myelin assembly and dynamics, including the ability of specific lipids to organize proteins and/or mediate protein-protein interactions in healthy versus diseased myelin membranes. The tight regulation of myelin membrane formation has been widely investigated with classical biochemical and cell biological techniques, both in vitro and in vivo. However, our knowledge about myelin membrane dynamics, such as membrane fluidity in conjunction with the movement/diffusion of proteins and lipids in the membrane and the specificity and role of distinct lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions, is limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent findings about the myelin structure in terms of myelin lipids, proteins and membrane microdomains. To give insight into myelin membrane dynamics, we will particularly highlight the application of model membranes and advanced biophysical techniques, i.e., approaches which clearly provide an added value to insight obtained by classical biochemical techniques. PMID:27141942

  15. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We investiga...... calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  16. Zebrafish as a model to investigate CNS myelination.

    Preston, Marnie A; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems. PMID:25263121

  17. ERK1/ERK2 MAPK signaling is required to increase myelin thickness independent of oligodendrocyte differentiation and initiation of myelination

    Ishii, A.; Fyffe-Maricich, S.L.; Furusho, M.; Miller, R. H.; Bansal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Wrapping of the myelin sheath around axons by oligodendrocytes is critical for the rapid conduction of electrical signals, required for the normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). Myelination is a multistep process where oligodendrocytes progress through a well-coordinated differentiation program regulated by multiple extracellular growth and differentiation signals. The intracellular-transduction of the extracellular signals that regulate myelination is poorly understood. Her...

  18. Myelin membrane assembly is driven by a phase transition of myelin basic proteins into a cohesive protein meshwork.

    Aggarwal, Shweta; Snaidero, Nicolas; Pähler, Gesa; Frey, Steffen; Sánchez, Paula; Zweckstetter, Markus; Janshoff, Andreas; Schneider, Anja; Weil, Marie-Theres; Schaap, Iwan A T; Görlich, Dirk; Simons, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin. To function as an electrical insulator, myelin is generated as a tightly packed, lipid-rich multilayered membrane sheath. Knowledge about the mechanisms that govern myelin membrane biogenesis is required to understand myelin disassembly as it occurs in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that myelin basic protein drives myelin biogenesis using weak forces arising from its inherent capacity to phase separate. The association of myelin basic protein molecules to the inner leaflet of the membrane bilayer induces a phase transition into a cohesive mesh-like protein network. The formation of this protein network shares features with amyloid fibril formation. The process is driven by phenylalanine-mediated hydrophobic and amyloid-like interactions that provide the molecular basis for protein extrusion and myelin membrane zippering. These findings uncover a physicochemical mechanism of how a cytosolic protein regulates the morphology of a complex membrane architecture. These results provide a key mechanism in myelin membrane biogenesis with implications for disabling demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:23762018

  19. Tuning PAK Activity to Rescue Abnormal Myelin Permeability in HNPP.

    Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Zhang, Xuebao; Möbius, Wiebke; Werner, Hauke; Sosinsky, Gina; Ellisman, Mark; Zhang, Yang; Hamilton, Audra; Chernoff, Jonathan; Li, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous systems extend their membranes to wrap axons concentrically and form the insulating sheath, called myelin. The spaces between layers of myelin are sealed by myelin junctions. This tight insulation enables rapid conduction of electric impulses (action potentials) through axons. Demyelination (stripping off the insulating sheath) has been widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms altering the action potential propagation in many neurological diseases. However, the effective nerve conduction is also thought to require a proper myelin seal through myelin junctions such as tight junctions and adherens junctions. In the present study, we have demonstrated the disruption of myelin junctions in a mouse model (Pmp22+/-) of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of Pmp22 gene. We observed a robust increase of F-actin in Pmp22+/- nerve regions where myelin junctions were disrupted, leading to increased myelin permeability. These abnormalities were present long before segmental demyelination at the late phase of Pmp22+/- mice. Moreover, the increase of F-actin levels correlated with an enhanced activity of p21-activated kinase (PAK1), a molecule known to regulate actin polymerization. Pharmacological inhibition of PAK normalized levels of F-actin, and completely prevented the progression of the myelin junction disruption and nerve conduction failure in Pmp22+/- mice. Our findings explain how abnormal myelin permeability is caused in HNPP, leading to impaired action potential propagation in the absence of demyelination. We call it "functional demyelination", a novel mechanism upstream to the actual stripping of myelin that is relevant to many demyelinating diseases. This observation also provides a potential therapeutic approach for HNPP. PMID:27583434

  20. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  1. Stock Splits, A Survey

    Yildizhan, Celim

    2006-01-01

    In this survey paper I summarize the literature's findings on the short-run and long-run effects of stock split announcements as well as what happens in the preceding and subsequent years around a stock split event. I also summarize how firm characteristics influence these results. Furthermore, I discuss the various theories regarding why splits occur and why stock return distributions change subsequent to split events. I specifically focus on the changes in the first and second moments of st...

  2. Proposed Evolutionary Changes In The Role Of Myelin

    JaySCoggan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is the multi-layered lipid sheet periodically wrapped around neuronal axons. It is most frequently found in vertebrates. Myelin allows for saltatory action potential (AP conduction along axons. During this form of conduction, the AP travels passively along the myelin-covered part of the axon, and is recharged at the intermittent nodes of Ranvier. Thus, myelin can reduce the energy load needed and/or increase the speed of AP conduction. Myelin first evolved during the Ordovician period. We hypothesize that myelin's first role was mainly energy conservation. During the later “Mesozoic marine revolution”, marine ecosystems changed towards an increase in marine predation pressure. We hypothesize that the main purpose of myelin changed from energy conservation to conduction speed increase during this Mesozoic marine revolution. To test this hypothesis, we optimized models of myelinated axons for a combination of AP conduction velocity and energy efficiency. We demonstrate that there is a trade-off between these objectives. We then compared the simulation results to empirical data and conclude that while the data are consistent with the theory, additional measurements are necessary for a complete evaluation of the proposed hypothesis.

  3. Myelin-phagocytosing macrophages modulate autoreactive T cell proliferation

    Hellings Niels

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS in which macrophages play a central role. Initially, macrophages where thought to be merely detrimental in MS, however, recent evidence suggests that their functional phenotype is altered following myelin phagocytosis. Macrophages that have phagocytosed myelin may be less inflammatory and may exert beneficial effects. The presence of myelin-containing macrophages in CNS-draining lymph nodes and perivascular spaces of MS patients suggests that these cells are ideally positioned to exert an immune regulatory role. Therefore we evaluated in this study the effect of myelin-phagocytosing macrophages on lymphocyte reactivity. Methods Thioglycolate-elicited rat peritoneal macrophages were loaded with myelin and cocultured with myelin-basic protein (MBP or ovalbumin (OVA reactive lymphocytes. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by CFSE-labeling. The role of nitric oxide in regulating lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by addition of an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase to the coculture. In vivo immune regulation was investigated by treating MBP- and OVA-immunized animals subcutaneously with myelin. Cognate antigen specific lymphocyte proliferation and nitric oxide production were determined 9d post-immunization. Results In this study we demonstrate that myelin-phagocytosing macrophages inhibit TCR-triggered lymphocyte proliferation in an antigen-independent manner. The observed immune suppression is mediated by an increase in NO production by myelin-phagocytosing macrophages upon contact with lymphocytes. Additionally, myelin delivery to primarily CD169+ macrophages in popliteal lymph nodes of OVA-immunized animals results in a reduced cognate antigen specific proliferation. In contrast to OVA-immunized animals, lymphocytes from MBP-immunized animals displayed an increased proliferation after stimulation

  4. Targeted overexpression of a golli–myelin basic protein isoform to oligodendrocytes results in aberrant oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination

    Erin C Jacobs

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several in vitro studies have shown that the golli–myelin basic proteins regulate Ca2+ homoeostasis in OPCs (oligodendrocyte precursor cells and immature OLs (oligodendrocytes, and that a number of the functions of these cells are affected by cellular levels of the golli proteins. To determine the influence of golli in vivo on OL development and myelination, a transgenic mouse was generated in which the golli isoform J37 was overexpressed specifically within OLs and OPCs. The mouse, called JOE (J37-overexpressing, is severely hypomyelinated between birth and postnatal day 50. During this time, it exhibits severe intention tremors that gradually abate at later ages. After postnatal day 50, ultrastructural studies and Northern and Western blot analyses indicate that myelin accumulates in the brain, but never reaches normal levels. Several factors appear to underlie the extensive hypomyelination. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that golli overexpression causes a significant delay in OL maturation, with accumulation of significantly greater numbers of pre-myelinating OLs that fail to myelinate axons during the normal myelinating period. Immunohistochemical studies with cell death and myelin markers indicate that JOE OLs undergo a heightened and extended period of cell death and are unable to effectively myelinate until 2 months after birth. The results indicate that increased levels of golli in OPC/OLs delays myelination, causing significant cell death of OLs particularly in white matter tracts. The results provide in vivo evidence for a significant role of the golli proteins in the regulation of maturation of OLs and normal myelination.

  5. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. GLIA 2016;64:1021-1033. PMID:26988125

  6. Evolution of the CNS myelin gene regulatory program.

    Li, Huiliang; Richardson, William D

    2016-06-15

    Myelin is a specialized subcellular structure that evolved uniquely in vertebrates. A myelinated axon conducts action potentials many times faster than an unmyelinated axon of the same diameter; for the same conduction speed, the unmyelinated axon would need a much larger diameter and volume than its myelinated counterpart. Hence myelin speeds information transfer and saves space, allowing the evolution of a powerful yet portable brain. Myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by a gene regulatory program that features a number of master transcriptional regulators including Olig1, Olig2 and Myrf. Olig family genes evolved from a single ancestral gene in non-chordates. Olig2, which executes multiple functions with regard to oligodendrocyte identity and development in vertebrates, might have evolved functional versatility through post-translational modification, especially phosphorylation, as illustrated by its evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine phospho-acceptor sites and its accumulation of serine residues during more recent stages of vertebrate evolution. Olig1, derived from a duplicated copy of Olig2 in early bony fish, is involved in oligodendrocyte development and is critical to remyelination in bony vertebrates, but is lost in birds. The origin of Myrf orthologs might be the result of DNA integration between an invading phage or bacterium and an early protist, producing a fusion protein capable of self-cleavage and DNA binding. Myrf seems to have adopted new functions in early vertebrates - initiation of the CNS myelination program as well as the maintenance of mature oligodendrocyte identity and myelin structure - by developing new ways to interact with DNA motifs specific to myelin genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26474911

  7. Axonal plasticity elicits long-term changes in oligodendroglia and myelinated fibers

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Gardi, Jonathan E;

    2010-01-01

    Axons are linked to induction of myelination during development and to the maintenance of myelin and myelinated tracts in the adult CNS. Currently, it is unknown whether and how axonal plasticity in adult CNS impacts the myelinating cells and their precursors. In this article, we report that newl...

  8. Splittings of knot groups

    Friedl, Stefan; Silver, Daniel S.; Williams, Susan G.

    2013-01-01

    Let K be a knot of genus g. If K is fibered, then it is well known that the knot group pi(K) splits only over a free group of rank 2g. We show that if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over non-free groups of arbitrarily large rank. Furthermore, if K is not fibered, then pi(K) splits over every free group of rank at least 2g. However, pi(K) cannot split over a group of rank less than 2g. The last statement is proved using the recent results of Agol, Przytycki-Wise and Wise.

  9. Autophagy is involved in the reduction of myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm during myelin maturation of the peripheral nerve.

    So Young Jang

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve myelination involves dynamic changes in Schwann cell morphology and membrane structure. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy regulates organelle biogenesis and plasma membrane dynamics. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in the development and differentiation of myelinating Schwann cells during sciatic nerve myelination. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays have shown that Schwann cells remove excess cytoplasmic organelles during myelination through macroautophagy. Inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific removal of ATG7, an essential molecule for macroautophagy, using a conditional knockout strategy, resulted in abnormally enlarged abaxonal cytoplasm in myelinating Schwann cells that contained a large number of ribosomes and an atypically expanded endoplasmic reticulum. Small fiber hypermyelination and minor anomalous peripheral nerve functions are observed in this mutant. Rapamycin-induced suppression of mTOR activity during the early postnatal period enhanced not only autophagy but also developmental reduction of myelinating Schwann cells cytoplasm in vivo. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is a regulatory mechanism of Schwann cells structural plasticity during myelination.

  10. Disruption of myelin leads to ectopic expression of K(V)1.1 channels with abnormal conductivity of optic nerve axons in a cuprizone-induced model of demyelination.

    Bagchi, Bandita; Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Kaza, Seshu; Scholz, Dimitri; O'Leary, Valerie B; Dolly, J Oliver; Ovsepian, Saak V

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants of abnormal propagation of action potentials along axons and ectopic conductance in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system, like multiple sclerosis (MS), are poorly defined. Widespread interruption of myelin occurs in several mouse models of demyelination, rendering them useful for research. Herein, considerable myelin loss is shown in the optic nerves of cuprizone-treated demyelinating mice. Immuno-fluorescence confocal analysis of the expression and distribution of voltage-activated K⁺ channels (K(V)1.1 and 1.2 α subunits) revealed their spread from typical juxta-paranodal (JXP) sites to nodes in demyelinated axons, albeit with a disproportionate increase in the level of K(V)1.1 subunit. Functionally, in contrast to monophasic compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded in controls, responses derived from optic nerves of cuprizone-treated mice displayed initial synchronous waveform followed by a dispersed component. Partial restoration of CAPs by broad spectrum (4-aminopyridine) or K(V)1.1-subunit selective (dendrotoxin K) blockers of K⁺ currents suggest enhanced K(V)1.1-mediated conductance in the demyelinated optic nerve. Biophysical profiling of K⁺ currents mediated by recombinant channels comprised of different K(V)1.1 and 1.2 stoichiometries revealed that the enrichment of K(V)1 channels K(V)1.1 subunit endows a decrease in the voltage threshold and accelerates the activation kinetics. Together with the morphometric data, these findings provide important clues to a molecular basis for temporal dispersion of CAPs and reduced excitability of demyelinated optic nerves, which could be of potential relevance to the patho-physiology of MS and related disorders. PMID:24498366

  11. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome. PMID:27595822

  12. Focal seizure-induced premature myelination: speculation from serial MRI

    Local changes in the white matter underlying a focus of cortical thickening were monitored using MRI in an epileptic 2-month-old boy. We hypothesise that these changes reflected seizure-induced premature myelination. (orig.) (orig.)

  13. Structural insights into the antigenicity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein

    Breithaupt, Constanze; Schubart, Anna; Zander, Hilke; Skerra, Arne; Huber, Robert; Linington, Christopher; Jacob, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal loss. The immunopathogenesis of demyelination in multiple sclerosis involves an autoantibody response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a type I transmembrane protein located at the surface of CNS myelin. Here we present the crystal structures of the extracellular domain of MOG (MOGIgd) at 1.45-Å resolution and the complex of ...

  14. Split Cord Malformations

    Yurdal Gezercan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Split cord malformations are rare form of occult spinal dysraphism in children. Split cord malformations are characterized by septum that cleaves the spinal canal in sagittal plane within the single or duplicated thecal sac. Although their precise incidence is unknown, split cord malformations are exceedingly rare and represent %3.8-5 of all congenital spinal anomalies. Characteristic neurological, urological, orthopedic clinical manifestations are variable and asymptomatic course is possible. Earlier diagnosis and surgical intervention for split cord malformations is associated with better long-term fuctional outcome. For this reason, diagnostic imaging is indicated for children with associated cutaneous and orthopedic signs. Additional congenital anomalies usually to accompany the split cord malformations. Earlier diagnosis, meticuolus surgical therapy and interdisciplinary careful evaluation and follow-up should be made for good prognosis. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 199-207

  15. Accuracy of tablet splitting.

    McDevitt, J T; Gurst, A H; Chen, Y

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to determine the accuracy of manually splitting hydrochlorothiazide tablets. Ninety-four healthy volunteers each split ten 25-mg hydrochlorothiazide tablets, which were then weighed using an analytical balance. Demographics, grip and pinch strength, digit circumference, and tablet-splitting experience were documented. Subjects were also surveyed regarding their willingness to pay a premium for commercially available, lower-dose tablets. Of 1752 manually split tablet portions, 41.3% deviated from ideal weight by more than 10% and 12.4% deviated by more than 20%. Gender, age, education, and tablet-splitting experience were not predictive of variability. Most subjects (96.8%) stated a preference for commercially produced, lower-dose tablets, and 77.2% were willing to pay more for them. For drugs with steep dose-response curves or narrow therapeutic windows, the differences we recorded could be clinically relevant. PMID:9469693

  16. Rapid myelin water content mapping on clinical MR systems

    We present an algorithm for the fast mapping of myelin water content using standard multiecho gradient echo acquisitions of the human brain. The method extents a previously published approach for the simultaneous measurement of brain T1, T*2 and total water content. Employing the multiexponential T*2 decay signal of myelinated tissue, myelin water content was measured based on the quantification of two water pools ('myelin water' and 'rest') with different relaxation times. As the existing protocol was focussed on the fast mapping of quantitative MR parameters with whole brain coverage in clinically relevant measurement times, the sampling density of the T*2 curve was compromised to 10 echo times with a T Emax of approx. 40 ms. Therefore, pool amplitudes were determined using a quadratic optimisation approach. The optimisation was constrained by including a priori knowledge about brain water pools. All constraints were optimised in a simulation study to minimise systematic error sources given the incomplete knowledge about the real pool-specific relaxation properties. Based on the simulation results, whole brain in vivo myelin water content maps were acquired in 10 healthy controls and one subject with multiple sclerosis. The in vivo results obtained were consistent with previous reports which demonstrates that a simultaneous whole brain mapping of T1, T*2, total and myelin water content is feasible on almost any modern MR scanner in less than 10 minutes. (orig.)

  17. Mutual stimulation by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate and myelin basic protein of their phosphorylation by the kinases solubilized from rat brain myelin

    Myelin basic protein and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate are phosphorylated in vitro by ATP and solubilized rat brain myelin. When both substrates are present together, the rate of phosphorylation of each is increased about eight-fold. It appears likely that the phosphate turnover of myelin basic protein and of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate are coupled in vivo

  18. Ablation of the atrioventricular node executed after paranodal ablation of the atrioventricular node for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial-ventricular node of reentry tachycardia in conditions of artificial blood circulation

    Melikulov A.Kh.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical observation is shown the data of the patient who was previously undergone paranodal ablation of atrial-ventricular junction for the treatment of atrioventricular (AV nodal reentrant tachycardia. Radiofrequency ablation of right lower isthmus for treatment of the paroxysmal form of atrial flutter was made for the patient. Sick sinus node syndrome and paroxysmal form of atrial fibrillation were diagnosed. Then dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted. Antiarrhythmic therapy about the persistent form of atrial fibrillation had no effect. The decision for the implementation of radio frequency modification of atrioventricular connection using right ventriclar access failed because of the lack of verification of the His bundle's spike. Using retrograde access through the aorta we managed to create AV blockade of III degree. Taking into account the fact that in 1990-ies patients with atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia were operated using paranodal ablation of the AV node using extracorporeal circulation, this case has a practical significance when endovascular catheter modification of AV nodal conduction in this category of patients is made.

  19. Market Structure and Stock Splits

    David Michayluk; Paul Kofman

    2001-01-01

    Enhanced liquidity is one possible motivation for stock splits but empirical research frequently documents declines in liquidity following stock splits. Despite almost thirty years of inquiry, little is known about all the changes in a stock's trading activity following a stock split. We examine how liquidity measures change around more than 2,500 stock splits and find a pervasive decline in most measures. Large stock splits exhibit a more severe liquidity decline than small stock splits, esp...

  20. Synergistic interactions of lipids and myelin basic protein

    Hu, Yufang; Doudevski, Ivo; Wood, Denise; Moscarello, Mario; Husted, Cynthia; Genain, Claude; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2004-09-01

    This report describes force measurements and atomic force microscope imaging of lipid-protein interactions that determine the structure of a model membrane system that closely mimics the myelin sheath. Our results suggest that noncovalent, mainly electrostatic and hydrophobic, interactions are responsible for the multilamellar structure and stability of myelin. We find that myelin basic protein acts as a lipid coupler between two apposed bilayers and as a lipid "hole-filler," effectively preventing defect holes from developing. From our protein-mediated-adhesion and force-distance measurements, we develop a simple quantitative model that gives a reasonably accurate picture of the molecular mechanism and adhesion of bilayer-bridging proteins by means of noncovalent interactions. The results and model indicate that optimum myelin adhesion and stability depend on the difference between, rather than the product of, the opposite charges on the lipid bilayers and myelin basic protein, as well as on the repulsive forces associated with membrane fluidity, and that small changes in any of these parameters away from the synergistically optimum values can lead to large changes in the adhesion or even its total elimination. Our results also show that the often-asked question of which membrane species, the lipids or the proteins, are the "important ones" may be misplaced. Both components work synergistically to provide the adhesion and overall structure. A better appreciation of the mechanism of this synergy may allow for a better understanding of stacked and especially myelin membrane structures and may lead to better treatments for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. lipid-protein interactions | myelin membrane structure | membrane adhesion | membrane regeneration/healing | demyelinating diseases

  1. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity.

    Lakhani, Bimal; Borich, Michael R; Jackson, Jacob N; Wadden, Katie P; Peters, Sue; Villamayor, Anica; MacKay, Alex L; Vavasour, Irene M; Rauscher, Alexander; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements) using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus). In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults. PMID:27293906

  2. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Bimal Lakhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus. In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults.

  3. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Lakhani, Bimal; Borich, Michael R.; Jackson, Jacob N.; Wadden, Katie P.; Peters, Sue; Villamayor, Anica; MacKay, Alex L.; Vavasour, Irene M.; Rauscher, Alexander; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements) using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus). In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults. PMID:27293906

  4. Septin/anillin filaments scaffold central nervous system myelin to accelerate nerve conduction

    Patzig, Julia; Erwig, Michelle S; Tenzer, Stefan; Kusch, Kathrin; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Goebbels, Sandra; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Myelination of axons facilitates rapid impulse propagation in the nervous system. The axon/myelin-unit becomes impaired in myelin-related disorders and upon normal aging. However, the molecular cause of many pathological features, including the frequently observed myelin outfoldings, remained unknown. Using label-free quantitative proteomics, we find that the presence of myelin outfoldings correlates with a loss of cytoskeletal septins in myelin. Regulated by phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-levels, myelin septins (SEPT2/SEPT4/SEPT7/SEPT8) and the PI(4,5)P2-adaptor anillin form previously unrecognized filaments that extend longitudinally along myelinated axons. By confocal microscopy and immunogold-electron microscopy, these filaments are localized to the non-compacted adaxonal myelin compartment. Genetic disruption of these filaments in Sept8-mutant mice causes myelin outfoldings as a very specific neuropathology. Septin filaments thus serve an important function in scaffolding the axon/myelin-unit, evidently a late stage of myelin maturation. We propose that pathological or aging-associated diminishment of the septin/anillin-scaffold causes myelin outfoldings that impair the normal nerve conduction velocity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17119.001 PMID:27504968

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging and myelin composition analysis reveal abnormal myelination in corpus callosum of canine mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    Provenzale, James M; Nestrasil, Igor; Chen, Steven; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Le, Steven Q; Jens, Jacqueline K; Snella, Elizabeth M; Vondrak, Kristen N; Yee, Jennifer K; Vite, Charles H; Elashoff, David; Duan, Lewei; Wang, Raymond Y; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Guzman, Miguel A; Shapiro, Elsa G; Dickson, Patricia I

    2015-11-01

    Children with mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) develop hyperintense white matter foci on T2-weighted brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that are associated clinically with cognitive impairment. We report here a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tissue evaluation of white matter in a canine model of MPS I. We found that two DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity) and radial diffusivity (which reflects degree of myelination) were abnormal in the corpus callosum of MPS I dogs compared to carrier controls. Tissue studies of the corpus callosum showed reduced expression of myelin-related genes and an abnormal composition of myelin in MPS I dogs. We treated MPS I dogs with recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase, which is the enzyme that is deficient in MPS I disease. The recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase was administered by intrathecal injection into the cisterna magna. Treated dogs showed partial correction of corpus callosum myelination. Our findings suggest that abnormal myelination occurs in the canine MPS I brain, that it may underlie clinically-relevant brain imaging findings in human MPS I patients, and that it may respond to treatment. PMID:26222335

  6. 48 echo T2 myelin imaging of white matter in first-episode schizophrenia: Evidence for aberrant myelination

    Donna J.M. Lang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin water imaging provides a novel strategy to assess myelin integrity and corresponding clinical relationships in psychosis, of particular relevance in frontal white matter regions. In the current study, T2 myelin water imaging was used to assess the myelin water fraction (MWF signal from frontal areas in a sample of 58 individuals experiencing first-episode psychosis (FEP and 44 healthy volunteers. No differences in frontal MWF were observed between FEP subjects and healthy volunteers; however, differences in normal patterns of associations between frontal MWF and age, education and IQ were seen. Significant positive relationships between frontal MWF and age, North American Adult Reading Test (NAART IQ, and years of completed education were observed in healthy volunteers. In contrast, only the relationship between frontal MWF and NAART IQ was significant after Bonferroni correction in the FEP group. Additionally, significant positive relationships between age and MWF in the anterior and posterior internal capsules, the genu, and the splenium were observed in healthy volunteers. In FEP subjects, only the relationship between age and MWF in the splenium was statistically significant. Frontal MWF was not associated with local white matter volume. Altered patterns of association between age, years of education, and MWF in FEP suggest that subtle disturbances in myelination may be present early in the course of psychosis.

  7. Rapid myelin water content mapping on clinical MR systems

    Tonkova, Vyara; Arhelger, Volker [Fachhochschule Koblenz, RheinAhrCampus Remagen (Germany); Schenk, Jochen [Radiologisches Institut, Koblenz (Germany); Neeb, Heiko [Fachhochschule Koblenz, RheinAhrCampus Remagen (Germany); Koblenz Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Medical Engineering and Information Processing - MTI Mittelrhein

    2012-07-01

    We present an algorithm for the fast mapping of myelin water content using standard multiecho gradient echo acquisitions of the human brain. The method extents a previously published approach for the simultaneous measurement of brain T{sub 1}, T{sup *}{sub 2} and total water content. Employing the multiexponential T{sup *}{sub 2} decay signal of myelinated tissue, myelin water content was measured based on the quantification of two water pools ('myelin water' and 'rest') with different relaxation times. As the existing protocol was focussed on the fast mapping of quantitative MR parameters with whole brain coverage in clinically relevant measurement times, the sampling density of the T{sup *}{sub 2} curve was compromised to 10 echo times with a T {sub Emax} of approx. 40 ms. Therefore, pool amplitudes were determined using a quadratic optimisation approach. The optimisation was constrained by including a priori knowledge about brain water pools. All constraints were optimised in a simulation study to minimise systematic error sources given the incomplete knowledge about the real pool-specific relaxation properties. Based on the simulation results, whole brain in vivo myelin water content maps were acquired in 10 healthy controls and one subject with multiple sclerosis. The in vivo results obtained were consistent with previous reports which demonstrates that a simultaneous whole brain mapping of T{sub 1}, T{sup *}{sub 2}, total and myelin water content is feasible on almost any modern MR scanner in less than 10 minutes. (orig.)

  8. Split spline screw

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A split spline screw type payload fastener assembly, including three identical male and female type split spline sections, is discussed. The male spline sections are formed on the head of a male type spline driver. Each of the split male type spline sections has an outwardly projecting load baring segment including a convex upper surface which is adapted to engage a complementary concave surface of a female spline receptor in the form of a hollow bolt head. Additionally, the male spline section also includes a horizontal spline releasing segment and a spline tightening segment below each load bearing segment. The spline tightening segment consists of a vertical web of constant thickness. The web has at least one flat vertical wall surface which is designed to contact a generally flat vertically extending wall surface tab of the bolt head. Mutual interlocking and unlocking of the male and female splines results upon clockwise and counter clockwise turning of the driver element.

  9. Trends and Properties of Human Cerebral Cortex: Correlations with Cortical Myelin Content

    Glasser, Matthew F.; Goyal, Manu S.; Preuss, Todd M; Raichle, Marcus E.; Van Essen, David C.

    2013-01-01

    “In vivo Brodmann mapping” or non-invasive cortical parcellation using MRI, especially by measuring cortical myelination, has recently become a popular research topic, though myeloarchitectonic cortical parcellation in humans previously languished in favor of cytoarchitecture. We review recent in vivo myelin mapping studies and discuss some of the different methods for estimating myelin content. We discuss some ways in which myelin maps may improve surface registration and be useful for cross...

  10. Sustained axon-glial signaling induces Schwann cell hyperproliferation, Remak bundle myelination, and tumorigenesis

    Gómez-Sánchez, José A.; López de Armentia, Mikel; Luján, Rafael; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Richardson, William D.; Cabedo, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Type III neuregulins exposed on axon surfaces control myelination of the peripheral nervous system. It has been shown, for example, that threshold levels of type IIIβ1a neuregulin dictate not only the myelination fate of axons but also myelin thickness. Here we show that another neuregulin isoform, type III-β3, plays a distinct role in myelination. Neuronal overexpression of this isoform in mice stimulates Schwann cell proliferation and dramatically enlarges peripheral nerves and ganglia -whi...

  11. The onset and rate of myelination in six peripheral and autonomic nerves of the rat.

    K. Schäfer; Friede, R L

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was carried out of the numbers of myelinated fibres in 6 nerves of the rat for 7 age groups from birth to 73 weeks. The hypoglossal nerve and the mandibular branch of the facial nerve had short and early myelination periods, essentially complete by the second week. The glossopharyngeal nerve and the sympathetic rami communicantes myelinated late and over a protracted period. Myelination of the rami communicantes continued up to 20 weeks, followed by a ma...

  12. BRAIN MYELINATION IN PREVALENT NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS: PRIMARY AND COMORBID ADDICTION

    Bartzokis, George

    2005-01-01

    Current concepts of addiction focus on neuronal neurocircuitry and neurotransmitters and are largely based on animal model data, but the human brain is unique in its high myelin content and extended developmental (myelination) phase that continues until middle age. The biology of our exceptional myelination process and factors that influence it have been synthesized into a recently published myelin model of human brain evolution and normal development that cuts across the current symptom-base...

  13. Neuregulin and BDNF Induce a Switch to NMDA Receptor-Dependent Myelination by Oligodendrocytes

    Iben Lundgaard; Aryna Luzhynskaya; Stockley, John H.; Zhen Wang; Evans, Kimberley A.; Matthew Swire; Katrin Volbracht; Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Franklin, Robin J. M.; David Attwell; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T.

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Myelination acts as an insulator for neurons and as such is essential for normal brain function, ensuring fast neuronal communication. Oligodendrocytes are the cells that wrap their membrane around nerve cell axons to form the myelin sheath that enables fast action potential propagation. However, what determines whether an individual axon becomes myelinated remains unknown. We show that there are two distinct modes of myelination: one that is independent of neuronal activity an...

  14. Association of extensive myelinated nerve fibers and high degree myopia: Case report

    Elvan Yalcın; Ozlem Balcı; Ziya Akıngol

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral extensive myelination of the peripapillary nerve fibers may be associated with anisometropic myopia, strabismus, and reduced vision. Myelination of optic nerve fibers terminate at lamina cribrosa. Yet in some patients, myelination progresses into the peripapillary retinal nerve fibers and may affect the visual acuity. In this report, we described 4 patients. All patients presented extensive peripapillary myelinated nerve fibers associated with myopic anisometropia. After routine op...

  15. Splitting Ward identity

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Subradiant split Cooper pairs

    Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis; Yeyati, Alfredo Levy

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a way to characterize the coherence of the split Cooper pairs emitted by a double-quantum-dot based Cooper pair splitter (CPS), by studying the radiative response of such a CPS inside a microwave cavity. The coherence of the split pairs manifests in a strongly nonmonotonic variation of the emitted radiation as a function of the parameters controlling the coupling of the CPS to the cavity. The idea to probe the coherence of the electronic states using the tools of Cavity Quantum Ele...

  17. Split Malcev Algebras

    Antonio J Calderón Martín; Manuel Forero Piulestán; José M Sánchez Delgado

    2012-05-01

    We study the structure of split Malcev algebras of arbitrary dimension over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. We show that any such algebras is of the form $M=\\mathcal{U}+\\sum_jI_j$ with $\\mathcal{U}$ a subspace of the abelian Malcev subalgebra and any $I_j$ a well described ideal of satisfying $[I_j, I_k]=0$ if ≠ . Under certain conditions, the simplicity of is characterized and it is shown that is the direct sum of a semisimple split Lie algebra and a direct sum of simple non-Lie Malcev algebras.

  18. Distances of Heegaard splittings

    Abrams, Aaron; Schleimer, Saul

    2003-01-01

    J Hempel [Topology, 2001] showed that the set of distances of the Heegaard splittings (S,V, h^n(V)) is unbounded, as long as the stable and unstable laminations of h avoid the closure of V in PML(S). Here h is a pseudo-Anosov homeomorphism of a surface S while V is the set of isotopy classes of simple closed curves in S bounding essential disks in a fixed handlebody. With the same hypothesis we show the distance of the splitting (S,V, h^n(V)) grows linearly with n, answering a question of A C...

  19. Dicer in Schwann cells is required for myelination and axonal integrity

    Pereira, Jorge A.; Baumann, Reto; Norrmén, Camilla; Somandin, Christian; Miehe, Michaela; Jacob, Claire; Lühmann, Tessa; Hall-Bozic, Heike; Mantei, Ned; Meijer, Dies; Suter, Ueli

    2010-01-01

    , and Hes1 were increased, providing an additional potential basis for impaired myelination. A minor fraction of SCs, with some peculiar differences between sensory and motor fibers, overcame the myelination block and formed unusually thin myelin, in line with observed impaired neuregulin and AKT...

  20. Role and Specificity of LGI4-ADAM22 Interactions in Peripheral Nerve Myelination

    L. Kegel (Linde)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn the peripheral nervous system, large caliber axons are ensheathed and myelinated by Schwann cells. Myelin is crucial for a faster signal transduction along the nerve. Hence it is not surprising that defects in this myelination process cause serious neurological disease. Despite the me

  1. Plasmonic solar water splitting

    The study of the optoelectronic effects of plasmonic metal nanoparticles on semiconductors has led to compelling evidence for plasmon-enhanced water splitting. We review the relevant physics, device geometries, and research progress in this area. We focus on localized surface plasmons and their effects on semiconductors, particularly in terms of energy transfer, scattering, and hot electron transfer.

  2. Neuroimaging evidence of deficient axon myelination in Wolfram syndrome.

    Lugar, Heather M; Koller, Jonathan M; Rutlin, Jerrel; Marshall, Bess A; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Urano, Fumihiko; Bischoff, Allison N; Shimony, Joshua S; Hershey, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by insulin dependent diabetes and vision, hearing and brain abnormalities which generally emerge in childhood. Mutations in the WFS1 gene predispose cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis and may induce myelin degradation in neuronal cell models. However, in vivo evidence of this phenomenon in humans is lacking. White matter microstructure and regional volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging in children and young adults with Wolfram syndrome (n = 21) and healthy and diabetic controls (n = 50). Wolfram patients had lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in major white matter tracts and lower volume in the basilar (ventral) pons, cerebellar white matter and visual cortex. Correlations were found between key brain findings and overall neurological symptoms. This pattern of findings suggests that reduction in myelin is a primary neuropathological feature of Wolfram syndrome. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-related dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome may interact with the development of myelin or promote degeneration of myelin during the progression of the disease. These measures may provide objective indices of Wolfram syndrome pathophysiology that will be useful in unraveling the underlying mechanisms and in testing the impact of treatments on the brain. PMID:26888576

  3. Development and maturation of central nervous system myelin: Comparison of immunohistochemical localization of proteolipid protein and basic protein in myelin and oligodendrocytes

    Hartman, Boyd K.; Agrawal, Harish C.; Agrawal, Daya; Kalmbach, Sandra

    1982-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of two myelin specific proteins—basic protein (BP) and proteolipid protein (PLP)—was compared during the process of myelination. Although both proteins were present in oligodendrocytes, (i) neither protein was observed in oligodendrocytes not already closely associated with nerve fibers exhibiting a fluorescent coating; (ii) in any discrete anatomical area oligodendrocytes were positive for BP before PLP was visible; and (iii) as myelination progressed, im...

  4. Expression of recombinant myelin-associated glycoprotein in primary Schwann cells promotes the initial investment of axons by myelinating Schwann cells

    1990-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is an integral membrane protein expressed by myelinating glial cells that occurs in two developmentally regulated forms with different carboxyterminal cytoplasmic domains (L- MAG and S-MAG). To investigate the role of MAG in myelination a recombinant retrovirus was used to introduce a MAG cDNA (L-MAG form) into primary Schwann cells in vitro. Stably infected populations of cells were obtained that constitutively expressed MAG at the cell surface without th...

  5. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  6. Data supporting the role of Fyn in initiating myelination in the peripheral nervous system

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Tamano, Moe; Torii, Tomohiro; Kawahara, Kazuko; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Takada, Shuji; Yamauchi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice, which express active Fyn tyrosine kinase under the control of a glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, have been produced. This promoter induces protein expression in the initiation stage of myelination in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) “Phosphorylation of cytohesin-1 by Fyn is required for initiation of myelination and the extent of myelination during development (Yamauchi et al., 2015 [1])”. Herein we provide the data regarding myelination-related protein markers and myelin ultrastructure in transgenic mice. PMID:27115022

  7. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance

    Brazhe, Alexey; Maksimov, G. V.; Mosekilde, Erik; Sosnovtseva, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    . Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes...... in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range...

  8. Formation of compact myelin is required for maturation of the axonal cytoskeleton

    Brady, S. T.; Witt, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, L. L.; de Waegh, S. M.; Readhead, C.; Tu, P. H.; Lee, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    Although traditional roles ascribed to myelinating glial cells are structural and supportive, the importance of compact myelin for proper functioning of the nervous system can be inferred from mutations in myelin proteins and neuropathologies associated with loss of myelin. Myelinating Schwann cells are known to affect local properties of peripheral axons (de Waegh et al., 1992), but little is known about effects of oligodendrocytes on CNS axons. The shiverer mutant mouse has a deletion in the myelin basic protein gene that eliminates compact myelin in the CNS. In shiverer mice, both local axonal features like phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and neuronal perikaryon functions like cytoskeletal gene expression are altered. This leads to changes in the organization and composition of the axonal cytoskeleton in shiverer unmyelinated axons relative to age-matched wild-type myelinated fibers, although connectivity and patterns of neuronal activity are comparable. Remarkably, transgenic shiverer mice with thin myelin sheaths display an intermediate phenotype indicating that CNS neurons are sensitive to myelin sheath thickness. These results indicate that formation of a normal compact myelin sheath is required for normal maturation of the neuronal cytoskeleton in large CNS neurons.

  9. Neuronal Regulation of Schwann Cell Mitochondrial Ca2+ Signaling during Myelination

    Daisuke Ino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs myelinate peripheral neurons to promote the rapid conduction of action potentials, and the process of myelination is known to be regulated by signals from axons to SCs. Given that SC mitochondria are one of the potential regulators of myelination, we investigated whether SC mitochondria are regulated by axonal signaling. Here, we show a purinergic mechanism that sends information from neurons to SC mitochondria during myelination. Our results show that electrical stimulation of rat sciatic nerve increases extracellular ATP levels enough to activate purinergic receptors. Indeed, electrical stimulation of sciatic nerves induces Ca2+ increases in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix of surrounding SCs via purinergic receptor activation. Chronic suppression of this pathway during active myelination suppressed the longitudinal and radial development of myelinating SCs and caused hypomyelination. These results demonstrate a neuron-to-SC mitochondria signaling, which is likely to have an important role in proper myelination.

  10. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  11. Variation in myelin lipid composition induced by change in environmental temperature of goldfish (Carassius auratus L. )

    Selivonchick, D.P.; Roots, B.I.

    1976-04-01

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) were acclimated to 5, 15, and 30/sup 0/C, and the lipid and protein composition of brain and spinal cord myelin was determined. Goldfish myelin contains less galactolipid, but more protein and phospholipid than mammalian and bird myelin. Phosphatidyl choline was the predominant phospholipid in both brain and spinal cord myelin. Fish myelin also showed a greater plasmalogen content with an average ethanolamine plasmalogen/total phosphatidyl ethanolamine ratio of 0.84. Total brain and myelin lipids, with the exception of plasmalogens, showed a resistance to change with thermal acclimation. Differences between brain and spinal cord myelin protein and phospholipids were not observed. It is suggested that temperature acclimation in poikilotherms may be used as a tool in the study of membrane adaptability.

  12. Specific inhibition of secreted NRG1 types I-II by heparin enhances Schwann Cell myelination.

    Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Gordon, Aaron; Sukhanov, Natalya; Peles, Elior

    2016-07-01

    Primary cultures of mixed neuron and Schwann cells prepared from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are extensively used as a model to study myelination. These dissociated DRG cultures have the particular advantage of bypassing the difficulty in purifying mouse Schwann cells, which is often required when using mutant mice. However, the drawback of this experimental system is that it yields low amounts of myelin. Here we report a simple and efficient method to enhance myelination in vitro. We show that the addition of heparin or low molecular weight heparin to mixed DRG cultures markedly increases Schwann cells myelination. The myelin promoting activity of heparin results from specific inhibition of the soluble immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing isoforms of neuregulin 1 (i.e., NRG1 types I and II) that negatively regulates myelination. Heparin supplement provides a robust and reproducible method to increase myelination in a simple and commonly used culture system. GLIA 2016;64:1227-1234. PMID:27143444

  13. STOCK SPLITS AND ADVERSE SELECTION

    Sara Soltanizadeh; Abhishek Rokade

    2015-01-01

    What impact can the market expect from a stock split announcement? This paper delves into the effect of stock split announcements on the immediate excess return over the market for stocks in the US market by considering stock splits over a span of 35 years from 1980 to 2014 across different industries.   We find that the average market reaction to stock splits announcement is 1.5%. We also find that excess return over the market after stock split announcement is negatively correlat...

  14. Support of Nerve Conduction by Respiring Myelin Sheath: Role of Connexons.

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Adriano, Enrico; Garbati, Patrizia; Ferrando, Sara; Ramoino, Paola; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Balestrino, Maurizio; Panfoli, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that myelin conducts an extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, hypothesizing a novel supportive role for myelin in favor of the axon. We have also hypothesized that the ATP produced in myelin could be transferred thought gap junctions. In this work, by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques, the existence of a connection among myelin to the axon was evaluated, to understand how ATP could be transferred from sheath to the axoplasm. Data confirm a functional expression of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin. Moreover, WB and immunohistochemistry on optic nerve slices show that connexins 32 and 43 are present in myelin and colocalize with myelin basic protein. Interestingly, addition of carbenoxolone or oleamide, two gap junction blockers, causes a decrease in oxidative metabolism in purified myelin, but not in mitochondria. Similar effects were observed on conduction speed in hippocampal Schaffer collateral, in the presence of oleamide. Confocal analysis of optic nerve slices showed that lucifer yellow (that only passes through aqueous pores) signal was found in both the sheath layers and the axoplasma. In the presence of oleamide, but not with oleic acid, signal significantly decreased in the sheath and was lost inside the axon. This suggests the existence of a link among myelin and axons. These results, while supporting the idea that ATP aerobically synthesized in myelin sheath could be transferred to the axoplasm through gap junctions, shed new light on the function of the sheath. PMID:26033217

  15. MYELIN, COPPER, AND THE CUPRIZONE MODEL OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Herring, Nicole R.; Konradi, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In recent years increasing evidence is pointing toward white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. The present paper will provide an overview over the role of myelin in cognition and brain function, and its potential involvement in brain disorders. Furthermore, we will examine one particular experimental model for the study of dysmyelination, created by the administration of the toxin cuprizone. Cuprizone, a copper chelator, causes white matter abnormalities i...

  16. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Bimal Lakhani; Borich, Michael R.; Jackson, Jacob N.; Wadden, Katie P.; Sue Peters; Anica Villamayor; MacKay, Alex L.; Vavasour, Irene M.; Alexander Rauscher; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent ch...

  17. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    Kevelam, Sietske H.; Taube, Jennifer R.; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M. L.; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A.; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E.; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R.; Friederich, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immatu...

  18. Myelinated axon counts of human inferior alveolar nerves.

    Heasman, P A; Beynon, A D

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative, postmortem study of 36 human inferior alveolar nerves is described. The total myelinated fibre count (TMFC) of nerves was not related to sex or age of the subjects but significant positive correlations were found between TMFC and subject body weight in both dentate (r = 0.616) and edentulous (r = 0.676) groups. The TMFC was significantly lower in nerves from edentulous subjects than in nerves from dentate subjects.

  19. Oligodendrocyte progenitor programming and reprogramming: Toward myelin regeneration.

    Lopez Juarez, Alejandro; He, Danyang; Richard Lu, Q

    2016-05-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are among the most disabling and cost-intensive neurological disorders. The loss of myelin in the central nervous system, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), impairs saltatory nerve conduction, leading to motor and cognitive deficits. Immunosuppression therapy has a limited efficacy in MS patients, arguing for a paradigm shift to strategies that target OL lineage cells to achieve myelin repair. The inhibitory microenvironment in MS lesions abrogates the expansion and differentiation of resident OL precursor cells (OPCs) into mature myelin-forming OLs. Recent studies indicate that OPCs display a highly plastic ability to differentiate into alternative cell lineages under certain circumstances. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that maintain and control OPC fate and differentiation into mature OLs in a hostile, non-permissive lesion environment may open new opportunities for regenerative therapies. In this review, we will focus on 1) the plasticity of OPCs in terms of their developmental origins, distribution, and differentiation potentials in the normal and injured brain; 2) recent discoveries of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and small molecule compounds that control OPC specification and differentiation; and 3) therapeutic potential for motivation of neural progenitor cells and reprogramming of differentiated cells into OPCs and their likely impacts on remyelination. OL-based therapies through activating regenerative potentials of OPCs or cell replacement offer exciting opportunities for innovative strategies to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in devastating demyelinating diseases like MS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only). PMID:26546966

  20. Split Special Lagrangian Geometry

    Harvey, F. Reese; Lawson Jr, H. Blaine

    2010-01-01

    One purpose of this article is to draw attention to the seminal work of J. Mealy in 1989 on calibrations in semi-riemannian geometry where split SLAG geometry was first introduced. The natural setting is provided by doing geometry with the complex numbers C replaced by the double numbers D, where i with i^2 = -1 is replaced by tau with tau^2 = 1. A rather surprising amount of complex geometry carries over, almost untouched, and this has been the subject of many papers. We briefly review this ...

  1. MyelStones: the executive roles of myelin basic protein in myelin assembly and destabilization in multiple sclerosis.

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2015-11-15

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP, 14-21.5 kDa) are essential to formation of the multilamellar myelin sheath of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform links together the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocytes, but additionally participates in cytoskeletal turnover and membrane extension, Fyn-mediated signalling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides and maintenance of calcium homoeostasis. All MBP isoforms are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that interact via molecular recognition fragments (MoRFs), which thereby undergo local disorder-to-order transitions. Their conformations and associations are modulated by environment and by a dynamic barcode of post-translational modifications, particularly phosphorylation by mitogen-activated and other protein kinases and deimination [a hallmark of demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The MBPs are thus to myelin what basic histones are to chromatin. Originally thought to be merely structural proteins forming an inert spool, histones are now known to be dynamic entities involved in epigenetic regulation and diseases such as cancer. Analogously, the MBPs are not mere adhesives of compact myelin, but active participants in oligodendrocyte proliferation and in membrane process extension and stabilization during myelinogenesis. A central segment of these proteins is pivotal in membrane-anchoring and SH3 domain (Src homology 3) interaction. We discuss in the present review advances in our understanding of conformational conversions of this classic basic protein upon membrane association, including new thermodynamic analyses of transitions into different structural ensembles and how a shift in the pattern of its post-translational modifications is associated with the pathogenesis and potentially onset of demyelination in MS. PMID:26518750

  2. Disruption of Cnp1 uncouples oligodendroglial functions in axonal support and myelination.

    Lappe-Siefke, Corinna; Goebbels, Sandra; Gravel, Michel; Nicksch, Eva; Lee, John; Braun, Peter E; Griffiths, Ian R; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2003-03-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes enables rapid impulse propagation in the central nervous system. But long-term interactions between axons and their myelin sheaths are poorly understood. Here we show that Cnp1, which encodes 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in oligodendrocytes, is essential for axonal survival but not for myelin assembly. In the absence of glial cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, mice developed axonal swellings and neurodegeneration throughout the brain, leading to hydrocephalus and premature death. But, in contrast to previously studied myelin mutants, the ultrastructure, periodicity and physical stability of myelin were not altered in these mice. Genetically, the chief function of glia in supporting axonal integrity can thus be completely uncoupled from its function in maintaining compact myelin. Oligodendrocyte dysfunction, such as that in multiple sclerosis lesions, may suffice to cause secondary axonal loss. PMID:12590258

  3. Enhanced microglial clearance of myelin debris in T cell-infiltrated central nervous system

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Fenger, Christina;

    2009-01-01

    Acute multiple sclerosis lesions are characterized by accumulation of T cells and macrophages, destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and axonal damage. There is, however, limited information on neuroimmune interactions distal to sites of axonal damage in the T cell-infiltrated central nervous...... system. We investigated T-cell infiltration, myelin clearance, microglial activation, and phagocytic activity distal to sites of axonal transection through analysis of the perforant pathway deafferented dentate gyrus in SJL mice that had received T cells specific for myelin basic protein (TMBP) or...... with TMBP but not TOVA enhanced the microglial response to axonal transection and microglial phagocytosis of myelin debris associated with the degenerating axons. Because myelin antigen-specific immune responses may provoke protective immunity, increased phagocytosis of myelin debris might enhance...

  4. Advances in myelin imaging with potential clinical application to pediatric imaging

    Spader, Heather S.; Ellermeier, Anna; O’Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dean, Douglas C.; Dirks, Holly; BOXERMAN, JERROLD L.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Deoni, Sean C.L.

    2013-01-01

    White matter development and myelination are critical processes in neurodevelopment. Myelinated white matter facilitates the rapid and coordinated brain messaging required for higher-order cognitive and behavioral processing. Whereas several neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis are associated with gross white matter damage and demyelination, other disorders such as epilepsy may involve altered myelination in the efferent or afferent white matter pathways adjoining epileptic foci....

  5. Progesterone and Nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex

    el-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and anti-inflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammator...

  6. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Douglas Fields

    2009-01-01

    Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between corti...

  7. Arrest of Myelination and Reduced Axon Growth when Schwann Cells Lack mTOR

    Sherman, Diane L.; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man N.; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    In developing peripheral nerves differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years there has been an increasing understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination together with a growing appreciation of some of the signalling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete....

  8. The evolution of vertebrate and invertebrate myelin: a theoretical computational study.

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2015-06-01

    Multilayered, lipid-rich myelin increases nerve impulse conduction velocity, contributes to compact nervous systems, and reduces metabolic costs of neural activity. Based on the hypothesis that increased impulse conduction velocity provides a selective advantage that drives the evolution of myelin, we simulated a sequence of plausible intermediate stages of myelin evolution, each of which providing an enhancement of conduction speed. We started with the expansion of insulating glial coverage, which led first to a single layer of myelin surrounding the axon and then to multiple myelin wraps with well-organized nodes. The myelinated fiber was modeled at three levels of complexity as the hypothesized evolutionary progression became more quantitatively exacting: 1) representing the fiber as a mathematically-tractable uniform active cylinder with the effect of myelination approximated by changing its specific capacitance (C(m)); 2) representing it as a chain of simple, cable-model compartments having alternating nodal and internodal parameters subject to optimization, and 3) representing it in a double cable model with the axon and myelin sheath treated separately. Conduction velocity was optimized at each stage. To maintain optimal conduction velocities, increased myelin coverage of axonal surface must be accompanied by an increase in channel density at the evolving nodes, but along with increases in myelin thickness, a reduction in overall average channel density must occur. Leakage under the myelin sheath becomes more of a problem with smaller fiber diameters, which may help explain the tendency for myelin to occur preferentially in larger nerve fibers in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25832903

  9. Signals regulating myelination in peripheral nerves and the Schwann cell response to injury

    Glenn, Thomas D.; William S Talbot

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cells form myelin, which facilitates the rapid conduction of action potentials along axons in the vertebrate nervous system. Myelinating Schwann cells are derived from neural crest progenitors in a step-wise process that is regulated by extracellular signals and transcription factors. In addition to forming the myelin sheath, Schwann cells orchestrate much of the regenerative response that occurs after injury to peripheral nerves. In response to injury, myelinati...

  10. Arf6 guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-2 regulates myelination in nerves.

    Torii, Tomohiro; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Takashima, Shou; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-05-01

    In postnatal development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths, increasing the nerve conduction velocity. To produce the mature myelin sheath with its multiple layers, Schwann cells undergo dynamic morphological changes. While extracellular molecules such as growth factors and cell adhesion ligands are known to regulate the myelination process, the intracellular molecular mechanism underlying myelination remains unclear. In this study, we have produced Schwann cell-specific conditional knockout mice for cytohesin-2, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specifically activating Arf6. Arf6, a member of the Ras-like protein family, participates in various cellular functions including cell morphological changes. Cytohesin-2 knockout mice exhibit decreased Arf6 activity and reduced myelin thickness in the sciatic nerves, with decreased expression levels of myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major myelin marker protein. These results are consistent with those of experiments in which Schwann cell-neuronal cultures were treated with pan-cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3. On the other hand, the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in knockout mice and controls are comparable, indicating that cytohesin-2 does not have a positive effect on cell numbers. Thus, signaling through cytohesin-2 is required for myelination by Schwann cells, and cytohesin-2 is added to the list of molecules known to underlie PNS myelination. PMID:25824033

  11. BMP7 retards peripheral myelination by activating p38 MAPK in Schwann cells.

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Yahong; Peng, Su; Zhang, Shuqiang; Wang, Meihong; Chen, Yeyue; Zhang, Shan; Yang, Yumin; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) myelination is pivotal for the proper physiological functioning of the nervous system, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains less well understood. Here, we showed that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) inversely correlates with myelin gene expression during peripheral myelination, which suggests that BMP7 is likely a negative regulator for myelin gene expression. Our experiments further showed that the application of BMP7 attenuates the cAMP induced myelin gene expression in SCs. Downstream pathway analysis suggested that both p38 MAPK and SMAD are activated by exogenous BMP7 in SCs. The pharmacological intervention and gene silence studies revealed that p38 MAPK, not SMAD, is responsible for BMP7-mediated suppression of myelin gene expression. In addition, c-Jun, a potential negative regulator for peripheral myelination, was up-regulated by BMP7. In vivo experiments showed that BMP7 treatment greatly impaired peripheral myelination in newborn rats. Together, our results established that BMP7 is a negative regulator for peripheral myelin gene expression and that p38 MAPK/c-Jun axis might be the main downstream target of BMP7 in this process. PMID:27491681

  12. X-ray studies on the bilayer structure of trypsin-treated rat brain myelin

    Trypsin-treated rat brain myelin was subjected to biochemical and x-ray studies. Untreated myelin gave rise to a pattern of three rings with a fundamental repeat period of 155 A consisting of two bilayers per repeat period, whereas myelin treated with trypsin showed a fundamental repeat period of 75 A with one bilayer per repeat period. The integrated raw intensity of the h = 4 reflection with respect to the h = 2 reflection is 0.38 for untreated myelin. The corresponding value reduced to 0.23, 0.18, 0.17 for myelin treated with 5, 10, 40 units of trypsin per mg of myelin, respectively, for 30 min at 30 degC. The decrease in relative raw intensity of the higher-order reflection relative to the lower-order reflection is suggestive of a disordering of the phosphate groups upon trypsin treatment or an increased mosaicity of the membrane or a combination of both these effects. However, trypsin treatment does not lead to a complete breakdown of the membrane. The integrated intensity of the h = 1 reflection, though weak, is above the measurable threshold for untreated myelin, whereas the corresponding intensity is below the measurable threshold for trypsin-treated myelin, indicating a possible asymmetric to symmetric transition of the myelin bilayer structure about its centre after trypsin treatment. (author). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. X-Ray Studies On The Bilayer Structure Of Trypsin-Treated Rat-Brain Myelin

    Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Viswamitra, MA; Mohan, PM; Sastry, PS

    1995-01-01

    Trypsin-treated rat brain myelin was subjected to biochemical and X-ray studies. Untreated myelin gave rise to a pattern of three rings with a fundamental repeat period of 155 Angstrom consisting of two bilayers per repeat period, whereas myelin treated with trypsin showed a fundamental repeat period of 75 Angstrom with one bilayer per repeat period. The integrated raw intensity of the h=4 reflection with respect to the h=2 reflection is 0.38 for untreated myelin. The corresponding value redu...

  14. Binding of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase to myelin: an in vitro study.

    De Angelis, D A; Braun, P E

    1996-06-01

    The binding of 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase isoform 1 (CNP1) to myelin and its association with cytoskeletal elements of the sheath have been characterized with in vitro synthesized polypeptides and purified myelin. We have previously shown that the cysteine residue present in the carboxy-terminal CXXX box of CNP1 is isoprenylated, and that both C15 farnesyl and C20 geranylgeranyl isoprenoids can serve as substrates for the modification. Here, we have mutated the CXXX box to obtain selectively farnesylated CNP1 or geranyl- geranylated CNP1 and found that these two modified forms of CNP1 behave identically in all of the assays performed. Isoprenylation is essential but not sufficient for the binding of in vitro synthesized CNP1 to purified myelin, because a control nonmyelin protein is isoprenylated, yet unable to bind to myelin. In our assay, membrane-bound CNP1 partitions quantitatively into the nonionic detergent-insoluble phase of myelin, suggesting that CNP1 binds to cytoskeletal elements within myelin. However, isoprenylated CNP1 fails to bind to the cytoskeletal matrix isolated from myelin by detergent treatment, implying that both detergent-soluble and insoluble myelin components are involved in the binding of CNP1. A model for the interactions between CNP1 and myelin is presented, consistent with models proposed for other isoprenylated proteins. PMID:8632178

  15. Cystine/glutamate antiporter blockage induces myelin degeneration.

    Soria, Federico N; Zabala, Alazne; Pampliega, Olatz; Palomino, Aitor; Miguelez, Cristina; Ugedo, Luisa; Sato, Hideyo; Matute, Carlos; Domercq, María

    2016-08-01

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter is a membrane transport system responsible for the uptake of extracellular cystine and release of intracellular glutamate. It is the major source of cystine in most cells, and a key regulator of extrasynaptic glutamate in the CNS. Because cystine is the limiting factor in the biosynthesis of glutathione, and glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter, the cystine/glutamate antiporter is a central player both in antioxidant defense and glutamatergic signaling, two events critical to brain function. However, distribution of cystine/glutamate antiporter in CNS has not been well characterized. Here, we analyzed expression of the catalytic subunit of the cystine/glutamate antiporter, xCT, by immunohistochemistry in histological sections of the forebrain and spinal cord. We detected labeling in neurons, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but not in GFAP(+) astrocytes. In addition, we examined xCT expression and function by qPCR and cystine uptake in primary rat cultures of CNS, detecting higher levels of antiporter expression in neurons and oligodendrocytes. Chronic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter caused high toxicity to cultured oligodendrocytes. In accordance, chronic blockage of cystine/glutamate antiporter as well as glutathione depletion caused myelin disruption in organotypic cerebellar slices. Finally, mice chronically treated with sulfasalazine, a cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitor, showed a reduction in the levels of myelin and an increase in the myelinated fiber g-ratio. Together, these results reveal that cystine/glutamate antiporter is expressed in oligodendrocytes, where it is a key factor to the maintenance of cell homeostasis. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1381-1395. PMID:27247047

  16. Tcf7l2 is Tightly Controlled During Myelin Formation

    Fu, Hui; Kesari, Santosh; Cai, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Recent, studies have shown that Tcf7l2, an important transcription factor in Wnt pathway, plays critical roles in oligodendrocyte development. In this article we report a study showing that Tcf7l2 is under tight regulation during myelin formation. We have found that during early development, Tcf7l2 mRNA appears much earlier than the protein, suggesting a regulation at the translational level. We induced demyelination in a mouse model by a dietary toxin, where remyelination followed after a fe...

  17. The splitting principle and singularities

    Kovács, Sándor J.

    2011-01-01

    The splitting principle states that morphisms in a derived category do not "split" accidentally. This has been successsfully applied in several characterizations of rational, DB, and other singularities. In this article I prove a general statement that implies many of the previous individual statements and improves some of the characterizations in the process.

  18. Tablet Splitting: A Risky Practice

    ... splitting unless it's specified in the drug’s professional prescribing information. If a patient is considering splitting a tablet, FDA recommends that the patient get advice directly from his or her doctor or pharmacist to determine whether it is appropriate or not ...

  19. Clemastine Enhances Myelination in the Prefrontal Cortex and Rescues Behavioral Changes in Socially Isolated Mice.

    Liu, Jia; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Gacias, Mar; Frawley, Rebecca; Sikder, Tamjeed; Naik, Payal; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2016-01-20

    Altered myelin structure and oligodendrocyte function have been shown to correlate with cognitive and motor dysfunction and deficits in social behavior. We and others have previously demonstrated that social isolation in mice induced behavioral, transcriptional, and ultrastructural changes in oligodendrocytes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation could be beneficial in reversing such changes remains unexplored. To test this hypothesis, we orally administered clemastine, an antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro, for 2 weeks in adult mice following social isolation. Clemastine successfully reversed social avoidance behavior in mice undergoing prolonged social isolation. Impaired myelination was rescued by oral clemastine treatment, and was associated with enhanced oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation and epigenetic changes. Clemastine induced higher levels of repressive histone methylation (H3K9me3), a marker for heterochromatin, in oligodendrocytes, but not neurons, of the PFC. This was consistent with the capability of clemastine in elevating H3K9 histone methyltransferases activity in cultured primary mouse oligodendrocytes, an effect that could be antagonized by cotreatment with muscarine. Our data suggest that promoting adult myelination is a potential strategy for reversing depressive-like social behavior. Significance statement: Oligodendrocyte development and myelination are highly dynamic processes influenced by experience and neuronal activity. However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation is beneficial to treat depressive-like behavior has been unexplored. Mice undergoing prolonged social isolation display impaired myelination in the prefrontal cortex. Clemastine, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance myelination under

  20. Split-ball resonator

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Viswanathan, Vignesh; Rahmani, Mohsen; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kivshar, Yuri; Pickard, Daniel S; Lukiyanchuk, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept of split-ball resonator and demonstrate a strong omnidirectional magnetic dipole response for both gold and silver spherical plasmonic nanoparticles with nanometer-scale cuts. Tunability of the magnetic dipole resonance throughout the visible spectral range is demonstrated by a change of the depth and width of the nanoscale cut. We realize this novel concept experimentally by employing the laser-induced transfer method to produce near-perfect spheres and helium ion beam milling to make cuts with the nanometer resolution. Due to high quality of the spherical particle shape, governed by strong surface tension forces during the laser transfer process, and the clean, straight side walls of the cut made by helium ion milling, magnetic resonance is observed at 600 nm in gold and at 565 nm in silver nanoparticles. Structuring arbitrary features on the surface of ideal spherical resonators with nanoscale dimensions provides new ways of engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-f...

  1. Split supersymmetry radiates flavor

    Baumgart, Matthew; Stolarski, Daniel; Zorawski, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of mini-split supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and dark matter as a weakly interacting massive particle. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY-breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  2. Split SUSY Radiates Flavor

    Baumgart, Matthew; Zorawski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Radiative flavor models where the hierarchies of Standard Model (SM) fermion masses and mixings are explained via loop corrections are elegant ways to solve the SM flavor puzzle. Here we build such a model in the context of Mini-Split Supersymmetry (SUSY) where both flavor and SUSY breaking occur at a scale of 1000 TeV. This model is consistent with the observed Higgs mass, unification, and WIMP dark matter. The high scale allows large flavor mixing among the sfermions, which provides part of the mechanism for radiative flavor generation. In the deep UV, all flavors are treated democratically, but at the SUSY breaking scale, the third, second, and first generation Yukawa couplings are generated at tree level, one loop, and two loops, respectively. Save for one, all the dimensionless parameters in the theory are O(1), with the exception being a modest and technically natural tuning that explains both the smallness of the bottom Yukawa coupling and the largeness of the Cabibbo angle.

  3. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway.

    Fernando, Ruani N; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry-diameter and length-is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy(2j/2j) mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  4. Myelin Biogenesis And Oligodendrocyte Development: Parsing Out The Roles Of Glycosphingolipids

    Jackman, Nicole; Ishii, Akihiro; Bansal, Rashmi

    2009-01-01

    The myelin sheath is an extension of the oligoddendrocyte (OL) plasma membrane enriched in lipids which ensheaths the axons of the central and peripheral nervous system. Here we review the involvement of glycosphingolipid in myelin/OL functions; including the regulation of OL differentiation, lipid raft-mediated trafficking and signaling, and neuron-glia interactions.

  5. Convergence and divergence in the etiology of myelin impairment in psychiatric disorders and drug addiction.

    Feng, Yue

    2008-10-01

    Impairment of oligodendroglia (OL)-dependent myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is a remarkable parallel recently identified in major psychiatric disorders and chronic drug abuse. Neuroimaging and neuropathological studies revealed myelin defects and microarray-profiling analysis demonstrated aberrant expression of myelin-related genes in schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD) and cocaine addiction. However, the etiology underlying myelin impairment in these clinically distinct subjects remains elusive. This article reviews myelin impairment in line with dopaminergic dysfunction, a prime neuropathophysiological trait shared in psychiatric disorders and drug abuse, as well as the genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with these diseases. The current findings support the hypothesis that aberrant dopamine (DA) action on OLs is a common pathologic mechanism for myelin impairment in the aforementioned mental morbidities, whereas inherited genetic variations that specifically affect OL development and myelinogenesis may further increase myelin vulnerability in psychiatric disorders. Importantly, OL defect is not only a pathological consequence but also a causative factor for dopaminergic dysfunction. Hence, myelin impairment is a key factor in the pathogenic loop of psychiatric diseases and drug addiction. PMID:18404371

  6. The effects of normal aging on myelinated nerve fibers in monkey central nervous system

    Alan Peters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aging on myelinated nerve fibers of the central nervous system are complex. Many myelinated nerve fibers in white matter degenerate and are lost, leading to some disconnections between various parts of the central nervous system. Other myelinated nerve fibers are affected differently, because only their sheaths degenerate, leaving the axons intact. Such axons are remyelinated by a series of internodes that are much shorter than the original ones and are composed of thinner sheaths. Thus the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system, the oligodendrocytes, remain active during aging. Indeed, not only do these neuroglial cell remyelinate axons, with age they also continue to add lamellae to the myelin sheaths of intact nerve fibers, so that sheaths become thicker. It is presumed that the degeneration of myelin sheaths is due to the degeneration of the parent oligodendrocyte, and that the production of increased numbers of internodes as a consequence of remyelination requires additional oligodendrocytes. Whether there is a turnover of oligodendrocytes during life has not been studied in primates, but it has been established that over the life span of the monkey, there is a substantial increase in the numbers of oligodendrocytes. While the loss of some myelinated nerve fibers leads to some disconnections, the degeneration of other myelin sheaths and the subsequent remyelination of axons by shorter internodes slow down the rate conduction along nerve fibers. These changes affect the integrity and timing in neuronal circuits, and there is evidence that they contribute to cognitive decline.

  7. Myelin loss and axonal ion channel adaptations associated with gray matter neuronal hyperexcitability

    Hamada, Mustafa S; Kole, Maarten H P

    2015-01-01

    Myelination and voltage-gated ion channel clustering at the nodes of Ranvier are essential for the rapid saltatory conduction of action potentials. Whether myelination influences the structural organization of the axon initial segment (AIS) and action potential initiation is poorly understood. Using

  8. Depth-sensing nano-indentation on a myelinated axon at various stages

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Liao, Jiunn-Der [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chou-Ching K [Department of Neurology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Ju, Ming-Shaung, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-08

    A nano-mechanical characterization of a multi-layered myelin sheath structure, which enfolds an axon and plays a critical role in the transmission of nerve impulses, is conducted. Schwann cells co-cultured in vitro with PC12 cells for various co-culture times are differentiated to form a myelinated axon, which is then observed using a transmission electron microscope. Three major myelination stages, with distinct structural characteristics and thicknesses around the axon, can be produced by varying the co-culture time. A dynamic contact module and continuous depth-sensing nano-indentation are used on the myelinated structure to obtain the load-on-sample versus measured displacement curve of a multi-layered myelin sheath, which is used to determine the work required for the nano-indentation tip to penetrate the myelin sheath. By analyzing the harmonic contact stiffness versus the measured displacement profile, the results can be used to estimate the three stages of the multi-layered structure on a myelinated axon. The method can also be used to evaluate the development stages of myelination or demyelination during nerve regeneration.

  9. Depth-sensing nano-indentation on a myelinated axon at various stages

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Lin, Chou-Ching K.; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2011-07-01

    A nano-mechanical characterization of a multi-layered myelin sheath structure, which enfolds an axon and plays a critical role in the transmission of nerve impulses, is conducted. Schwann cells co-cultured in vitro with PC12 cells for various co-culture times are differentiated to form a myelinated axon, which is then observed using a transmission electron microscope. Three major myelination stages, with distinct structural characteristics and thicknesses around the axon, can be produced by varying the co-culture time. A dynamic contact module and continuous depth-sensing nano-indentation are used on the myelinated structure to obtain the load-on-sample versus measured displacement curve of a multi-layered myelin sheath, which is used to determine the work required for the nano-indentation tip to penetrate the myelin sheath. By analyzing the harmonic contact stiffness versus the measured displacement profile, the results can be used to estimate the three stages of the multi-layered structure on a myelinated axon. The method can also be used to evaluate the development stages of myelination or demyelination during nerve regeneration.

  10. Myelin-associated Glycoprotein gene and brain morphometry in schizophrenia

    Daniel Felsky

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelin and oligodendrocyte disruption may be a core feature of schizophrenia pathophysiology. The purpose of the present study was to localize the effects of previously identified risk variants in the myelin associated glycoprotein gene on brain morphometry in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. 45 schizophrenia patients and 47 matched healthy controls underwent clinical, structural magnetic resonance imaging, and genetics procedures. Gray and white matter cortical lobe volumes along with subcortical structure volumes were calculated from T1-weighted MRI scans. Each subject was also genotyped for the two disease-associated MAG single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs720308 and rs720309. Repeated measures general linear model analysis found significant region by genotype and region by diagnosis interactions for the effects of MAG risk variants on lobar gray matter volumes. No significant associations were found with lobar white matter volumes or subcortical structure volumes. Follow-up univariate general linear models found the AA genotype of rs720308 predisposed schizophrenia patients to left temporal and parietal gray matter volume deficits. These results suggest that the effects of the MAG gene on cortical gray matter volume in schizophrenia patients can be localized to temporal and parietal cortices. Our results support a role for MAG gene variation in brain morphometry in schizophrenia, align with other lines of evidence implicating MAG in schizophrenia, and provide genetically-based insight into the heterogeneity of brain imaging findings in this disorder.

  11. BACE1 Processing of NRG1 Type III Produces a Myelin-Inducing Signal but Is Not Essential for the Stimulation of Myelination

    Velanac, Viktorija; Unterbarnscheidt, Tilmann; Hinrichs, Wilko; Gummert, Maike N.; Fischer, Tobias M; Rossner, Moritz J.; Trimarco, Amelia; Brivio, Veronica; Taveggia, Carla; Willem, Michael; Haass, Christian; Möbius, Wiebke; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Schwab, Markus H

    2011-01-01

    Myelin sheath thickness is precisely adjusted to axon caliber, and in the peripheral nervous system, neuregulin 1 (NRG1) type III is a key regulator of this process. It has been proposed that the protease BACE1 activates NRG1 dependent myelination. Here, we characterize the predicted product of BACE1-mediated NRG1 type III processing in transgenic mice. Neuronal overexpression of a NRG1 type III-variant, designed to mimic prior cleavage in the juxtamembrane stalk region, induces hypermyelinat...

  12. The Actin-Severing Protein Cofilin Is Downstream of Neuregulin Signaling and Is Essential For Schwann Cell Myelination

    Sparrow, Nicklaus; Manetti, Maria Elisa; Bott, Marga; Fabianac, Tiffany; Petrilli, Alejandra; Bates, Margaret Longest; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Lambert, Stephen; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Myelination is a complex process requiring coordination of directional motility and an increase in glial cell size to generate a multilamellar myelin sheath. Regulation of actin dynamics during myelination is poorly understood. However, it is known that myelin thickness is related to the abundance of neuregulin-1 (NRG1) expressed on the axon surface. Here we identify cofilin1, an actin depolymerizing and severing protein, as a downstream target of NRG1 signaling in rat Schwann cells (SCs). In...

  13. Role of ERK1/2 MAPK Signaling in the Maintenance of Myelin and Axonal Integrity in the Adult CNS

    Ishii, Akihiro; Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Bansal, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes form myelin during postnatal development and then maintain a functional myelin sheath throughout adult life. While many regulators of developmental myelination have been identified, the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte functions in adulthood are not well understood. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), have emerged as prominent regulators of myelin formation...

  14. A quantitative measure of myelination development in infants, using MR images

    Carmody, Dennis P. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Dunn, Stanley M.; Boddie-Willis, Akiza S. [The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); DeMarco, J. Kevin [Laurie Imaging Center, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lewis, Michael [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Institute for the Study of Child Development, New Brunswick (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure myelination of frontal lobe changes in infants and young children. Twenty-four cases of infants and children (age range 12-121 months) were evaluated by a quantitative assessment of T2-weighted MR image features. Reliable quantitative changes between white and gray matter correlated with developmental age in a group of children with no neurological findings. Myelination appears to be an increasing exponential function with the greatest rate of change occurring over the first 3 years of life. The quantitative changes observed were in accordance with previous qualitative judgments of myelination development. Children with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) showed delays in achieving levels of myelination when compared to normal children and adjusted for chronological age. The quantitative measure of myelination development may prove to be useful in assessing the stages of development and helpful in the quantitative descriptions of white matter disorders such as PVL. (orig.)

  15. Stereological method for objectively quantifying myelin sheaths in the rat hippocampus

    Lei Zhang; Wei Lu; Shu Yang; Lin Chen; Xuan Qiu; Guohua Cheng; Yong Tang

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, tissue blocks were randomly sampled from the entire hippocampus of 6-week-old Long-Evans rats. Isotropic, uniform and random sections, 60 nm thick, were prepared by isector. Fifteen fields of view were randomly selected for each section and photographed using a transmission electron microscope. The mean internal and external diameters of the myelin sheaths were obtained by measuring the longest profile diameter perpendicular to its longest axis.The inner and outer perimeters of the myelin sheaths were estimated using the equidistant parallel test lines. The thickness of the myelin sheaths was estimated by direct orthogonal measurements in uniform, random locations. These stereological methods should permit an unbiased quantitative assessment of changes in the myelin sheaths of myelinated fibers in the hippocampus.

  16. A quantitative measure of myelination development in infants, using MR images

    The objective of this study was to measure myelination of frontal lobe changes in infants and young children. Twenty-four cases of infants and children (age range 12-121 months) were evaluated by a quantitative assessment of T2-weighted MR image features. Reliable quantitative changes between white and gray matter correlated with developmental age in a group of children with no neurological findings. Myelination appears to be an increasing exponential function with the greatest rate of change occurring over the first 3 years of life. The quantitative changes observed were in accordance with previous qualitative judgments of myelination development. Children with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) showed delays in achieving levels of myelination when compared to normal children and adjusted for chronological age. The quantitative measure of myelination development may prove to be useful in assessing the stages of development and helpful in the quantitative descriptions of white matter disorders such as PVL. (orig.)

  17. Investigating white matter development in infancy and early childhood using myelin water faction and relaxation time mapping

    Deoni, Sean C.L.; Dean, Douglas C.; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dirks, Holly; Jerskey, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    The elaboration of the myelinated white matter is essential for normal neurodevelopment, establishing and mediating rapid communication pathways throughout the brain. These pathways facilitate the synchronized communication required for higher order behavioral and cognitive functioning. Altered neural messaging (or ‘disconnectivity’) arising from abnormal white matter and myelin development may underlie a number of neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. Despite the vital role myelin plays,...

  18. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN-expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    J.J. Garcia-Vallejo; J.M. Ilarregui; H. Kalay; S. Chamorro; N. Koning; W.W. Unger; M. Ambrosini; V. Montserrat; R.J. Fernandes; S.C.M. Bruijns; J.R.T. van Weering; N.J. Paauw; T. O'Toole; J. van Horssen; P. van der Valk; K. Nazmi; J.G.M. Bolscher; J. Bajramovic; C.D. Dijkstra; B.A. 't Hart; Y. van Kooyk

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-gly

  19. Frobenius Splitting in Commutative Algebra

    Smith, Karen E.; ZHANG, WENLIANG

    2014-01-01

    This is a survey of Frobenius splitting techniques in commutative algebra, based on the first author's lectures at the introductory workshop for the special year in commutative algebra at MSRI in fall 2012.

  20. ISR split-field magnet

    1975-01-01

    The experimental apparatus used at intersection 4 around the Split-Field Magnet by the CERN-Bologna Collaboration (experiment R406). The plastic scintillator telescopes are used for precise pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements.

  1. On train track splitting sequences

    Masur, Howard; Schleimer, Saul

    2010-01-01

    We show that the subsurface projection of a train track splitting sequence is an unparameterized quasi-geodesic in the curve complex of the subsurface. For the proof we introduce induced tracks, efficient position, and wide curves. This result is an important step in the proof that the disk complex is Gromov hyperbolic. As another application we show that train track sliding and splitting sequences give quasi-geodesics in the train track graph, generalizing a result of Hamenstaedt [Invent. Math.].

  2. Heterodimensional FET with split drain

    Chang, Tongwei; Mathewson, Alan; Kennedy, Michael Peter; Greer, James C.

    2004-01-01

    A modification to heterodimensional field effect transistors (HDFET) is introduced and demonstrated to provide novel switching capabilities. The modification consists of introducing a split drain into the HDFET structure allowing the transistor to operate as a single pole-double throw switch. By extension, multiple pole-multiple throw switches can be made within a single transistor structure by introduction of multiple split drains or sources. If the device is fabricated on silicon germanium ...

  3. Lattice splitting under intermittent flows

    Schläpfer, Markus; Trantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    We study the splitting of regular square lattices subject to stochastic intermittent flows. Various flow patterns are produced by different groupings of the nodes, based on their random alternation between two possible states. The resulting flows on the lattices decrease with the number of groups according to a power law. By Monte Carlo simulations we reveal how the time span until the occurrence of a splitting depends on the flow patterns. Increasing the flow fluctuation frequency shortens t...

  4. CEO Turnover in Reverse Splits

    Li-Hsun Wang; Chu-Hsiung Lin; Hsien-Ming Chen

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the application of CEO turnover on reverse stock splits firms. Using Taiwanese samples, we find that non-CEO turnover firms receive negative long-term abnormal returns, and their financial performances continue to decline following reverse splits. These findings are consistent with prior studies. Contrarily, neither significantly negative long-term abnormal returns nor changes on financial performance were found for CEO turnover firms. This study concludes that applying CE...

  5. Translation of myelin basic protein mRNA in oligodendrocytes is regulated by integrin activation and hnRNP-K

    Laursen, Lisbeth Schmidt; Chan, Colin W; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system provides a unique example of how cells establish asymmetry. The myelinating cell, the oligodendrocyte, extends processes to and wraps multiple axons of different diameter, keeping the number of wraps proportional to the axon diameter. Local regulation of...... translation of a key sheath protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), by reversing the inhibitory effect of the mRNA 3′UTR. During oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination α6β1-integrin interacts with hnRNP-K, an mRNA-binding protein, which binds to MBP mRNA and translocates from the nucleus to the myelin...

  6. Heterogeneity of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Multislice Myelin Water Imaging.

    Tobias Djamsched Faizy

    Full Text Available To assess neuroprotection and remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis (MS, we applied a more robust myelin water imaging (MWI processing technique, including spatial priors into image reconstruction, which allows for lower SNR, less averages and shorter acquisition times. We sought to evaluate this technique in MS-patients and healthy controls (HC.Seventeen MS-patients and 14 age-matched HCs received a 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI examination including MWI (8 slices, 12 minutes acquisition time, T2w and T1mprage pre and post gadolinium (GD administration. Black holes (BH, contrast enhancing lesions (CEL and T2 lesions were marked and registered to MWI. Additionally, regions of interest (ROI were defined in the frontal, parietal and occipital normal appearing white matter (NAWM/white matter (WM, the corticospinal tract (CST, the splenium (SCC and genu (GCC of the corpus callosum in patients and HCs. Mean values of myelin water fraction (MWF were determined for each ROI.Significant differences (p≤0.05 of the MWF were found in all three different MS-lesion types (BH, CEL, T2 lesions, compared to the WM of HCs. The mean MWF values among the different lesion types were significantly differing from each other. Comparing MS-patients vs. HCs, we found a significant (p≤0.05 difference of the MWF in all measured ROIs except of GCC and SCC. The mean reduction of MWF in the NAWM of MS-patients compared to HCs was 37%. No age, sex, disability score and disease duration dependency was found for the NAWM MWF.MWF measures were in line with previous studies and lesions were clearly visible in MWI. MWI allows for quantitative assessment of NAWM and lesions in MS, which could be used as an additional sensitive imaging endpoint for larger MS studies. Measurements of the MWF also differ between patients and healthy controls.

  7. Structural insights into the antigenicity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein

    Breithaupt, Constanze; Schubart, Anna; Zander, Hilke; Skerra, Arne; Huber, Robert; Linington, Christopher; Jacob, Uwe

    2003-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal loss. The immunopathogenesis of demyelination in multiple sclerosis involves an autoantibody response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a type I transmembrane protein located at the surface of CNS myelin. Here we present the crystal structures of the extracellular domain of MOG (MOGIgd) at 1.45-Å resolution and the complex of MOGIgd with the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of the MOG-specific demyelinating monoclonal antibody 8-18C5 at 3.0-Å resolution. MOGIgd adopts an IgV like fold with the A′GFCC′C″ sheet harboring a cavity similar to the one used by the costimulatory molecule B7-2 to bind its ligand CTLA4. The antibody 8-18C5 binds to three loops located at the membrane-distal side of MOG with a surprisingly dominant contribution made by MOG residues 101–108 containing a strained loop that forms the upper edge of the putative ligand binding site. The sequence R101DHSYQEE108 is unique for MOG, whereas large parts of the remaining sequence are conserved in potentially tolerogenic MOG homologues expressed outside the immuno-privileged environment of the CNS. Strikingly, the only sequence identical to DHSYQEE was found in a Chlamydia trachomatis protein of unknown function, raising the possibility that Chlamydia infections may play a role in the MOG-specific autoimmune response in man. Our data provide the structural basis for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies targeting the pathogenic autoantibody response to MOG. PMID:12874380

  8. Heterogeneity of Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Multislice Myelin Water Imaging

    Faizy, Tobias Djamsched; Thaler, Christian; Kumar, Dushyant; Sedlacik, Jan; Broocks, Gabriel; Grosser, Malte; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Heesen, Christoph; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess neuroprotection and remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), we applied a more robust myelin water imaging (MWI) processing technique, including spatial priors into image reconstruction, which allows for lower SNR, less averages and shorter acquisition times. We sought to evaluate this technique in MS-patients and healthy controls (HC). Materials and Methods Seventeen MS-patients and 14 age-matched HCs received a 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examination including MWI (8 slices, 12 minutes acquisition time), T2w and T1mprage pre and post gadolinium (GD) administration. Black holes (BH), contrast enhancing lesions (CEL) and T2 lesions were marked and registered to MWI. Additionally, regions of interest (ROI) were defined in the frontal, parietal and occipital normal appearing white matter (NAWM)/white matter (WM), the corticospinal tract (CST), the splenium (SCC) and genu (GCC) of the corpus callosum in patients and HCs. Mean values of myelin water fraction (MWF) were determined for each ROI. Results Significant differences (p≤0.05) of the MWF were found in all three different MS-lesion types (BH, CEL, T2 lesions), compared to the WM of HCs. The mean MWF values among the different lesion types were significantly differing from each other. Comparing MS-patients vs. HCs, we found a significant (p≤0.05) difference of the MWF in all measured ROIs except of GCC and SCC. The mean reduction of MWF in the NAWM of MS-patients compared to HCs was 37%. No age, sex, disability score and disease duration dependency was found for the NAWM MWF. Conclusion MWF measures were in line with previous studies and lesions were clearly visible in MWI. MWI allows for quantitative assessment of NAWM and lesions in MS, which could be used as an additional sensitive imaging endpoint for larger MS studies. Measurements of the MWF also differ between patients and healthy controls. PMID:26990645

  9. Making Myelin Basic Protein -from mRNA transport to localized translation

    Christina eMüller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system (CNS of most vertebrates, oligodendrocytes enwrap neuronal axons with extensions of their plasma membrane to form the myelin sheath. Several proteins are characteristically found in myelin of which Myelin Basic Protein (MBP is the second most abundant one after Proteolipid Protein (PLP. The lack of functional MBP in rodents results in a severe hypomyelinated phenotype in the CNS demonstrating its importance for myelin synthesis. Mbp mRNA is transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane and is translated locally at the axon-glial contact site. Axonal properties such as diameter or electrical activity influence the degree of myelination. As oligodendrocytes can myelinate many axonal segments with varying properties, localized MBP translation represents an important part of a rapid and axon-tailored synthesis machinery. MBP’s ability to compact cellular membranes may be problematic for the integrity of intracellular membranous organelles and can also explain why MBP is transported in oligodendrocytes in the form of an mRNA rather than as a protein. Here we review the recent findings regarding intracellular transport and signalling mechanisms leading to localized translation of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes. More detailed insights into the MBP synthesis pathway are important for a better understanding of the myelination process and may foster the development of remyelination therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  10. A large fraction of neocortical myelin ensheathes axons of local inhibitory neurons

    Micheva, Kristina D; Wolman, Dylan; Mensh, Brett D; Pax, Elizabeth; Buchanan, JoAnn; Smith, Stephen J; Bock, Davi D

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is best known for its role in increasing the conduction velocity and metabolic efficiency of long-range excitatory axons. Accordingly, the myelin observed in neocortical gray matter is thought to mostly ensheath excitatory axons connecting to subcortical regions and distant cortical areas. Using independent analyses of light and electron microscopy data from mouse neocortex, we show that a surprisingly large fraction of cortical myelin (half the myelin in layer 2/3 and a quarter in layer 4) ensheathes axons of inhibitory neurons, specifically of parvalbumin-positive basket cells. This myelin differs significantly from that of excitatory axons in distribution and protein composition. Myelin on inhibitory axons is unlikely to meaningfully hasten the arrival of spikes at their pre-synaptic terminals, due to the patchy distribution and short path-lengths observed. Our results thus highlight the need for exploring alternative roles for myelin in neocortical circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15784.001 PMID:27383052

  11. Progesterone and nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex.

    El-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation, and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and antiinflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II(+) mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR-knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin. PMID:25092805

  12. In vivo labeling of peroxisomes by photoconvertible mEos2 in myelinating glia of mice.

    Richert, Sarah; Kleinecke, Sandra; Günther, Jenniffer; Schaumburg, Florian; Edgar, Julia; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kassmann, Celia M

    2014-03-01

    Mutations of several genes encoding peroxisomal proteins have been associated with human diseases. Some of these display specific white matter abnormalities in the brain, although the affected proteins are ubiquitously expressed. To better understand the etiology of peroxisomal myelin diseases, we aimed to label these organelles in vivo and in a cell type specific fashion. We had previously shown that in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells numerous peroxisomes reside in the cytoplasmic channels of "non-compacted" myelin. These organelles are smaller and biochemically distinct from non-myelin peroxisomes. Targeting peroxisomal functions in various cell types of the brain has demonstrated that oligodendroglial peroxisomes are specifically important for long-term integrity of the CNS. To visualize myelin peroxisomes in intact cells and tissues by live imaging, we have generated a novel line of transgenic mice for the expression of fluorescently tagged peroxisomes specifically in myelinating glia. This was achieved by modifying the gene for a photoconvertible mEos2 with a peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) and generating a fusion gene with the myelin-specific Cnp1 promoter. In the brain of resulting transgenic mice, peroxisomes are selectively labeled in oligodendrocytes. In this novel genetic tool, photoconversion of single peroxisomes from green to red fluorescence can be used to monitor the fate of single organelles and to determine the dynamics of PTS1-mediated protein import in the context of myelin diseases that affect peroxisomal functions. PMID:24262602

  13. Mapping an index of the myelin g-ratio in infants using magnetic resonance imaging

    Dean, Douglas C.; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dirks, Holly; Travers, Brittany G.; Adluru, Nagesh; Alexander, Andrew L.; Deoni, Sean C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal myelination of neuronal axons is essential for effective brain and cognitive function. The ratio of the axon diameter to the outer fiber diameter, known as the g-ratio, is a reliable measure to assess axonal myelination and is an important index reflecting the efficiency and maximal conduction velocity of white matter pathways. Although advanced neuroimaging techniques including multicomponent relaxometry (MCR) and diffusion tensor imaging afford insight into the microstructural characteristics of brain tissue, by themselves they do not allow direct analysis of the myelin g-ratio. Here, we show that by combining myelin content information (obtained with mcDESPOT MCR) with neurite density information (obtained through NODDI diffusion imaging) an index of the myelin g-ratio may be estimated. Using this framework, we present the first quantitative study of myelin g-ratio index changes across childhood, examining 18 typically developing children 3 months to 7.5 years of age. We report a spatio-temporal pattern of maturation that is consistent with histological and developmental MRI studies, as well as theoretical studies of the myelin g-ratio. This work represents the first ever in vivo visualization of the evolution of white matter g-ratio indices throughout early childhood. PMID:26908314

  14. MR imaging of the various stages of normal myelination during the first year of life

    The normal process of myelination of the brain mainly occurs during the first year of life. This process as known from histology can be visualized by MRI. Because of the very long T1 and T2 of immature brain tissue it is necessary to use adjusted pulse sequences with a long TR in order to obtain sufficient tissue contrast. With long TR SE images five stages can be recognized in the process of normal myelination and brain maturation. During the first month of life long TR short TE SE images show what are believed to be myelinated structures by correlation with published histological studies with a high signal intensity, unmyelinated white matter with a low signal intensity and gray matter with an intermediate signal intensity. The signal intensity of unmyelinated and myelinated white matter is reversed on long TR long TE SE images. In the course of a few weeks the signal intensity of unmyelinated white matter becomes high and the signal intensity of myelinated white matter becomes low also on long TR short TE SE images. These changes are believed to be caused by a loss of water and a change in chemical composition of brain tissue just prior to the onset of a wave of myelination. With progression of myelination the signal intensity of white matter changes from high to intermediate to low. These changes result in stages of isointensity, first in the central parts of the brain, later in the lobar parts. At the end of the first year the adult contrast pattern is reached in all parts of the brain. IR images are also able to depict the progress of myelination, but appear to be less sensitive to subtle changes in the degree of myelination. The precise normal values for the five stages depend on the magnetic field strength and the pulse sequences used. (orig.)

  15. Nogo receptor is involved in the adhesion of dendritic cells to myelin

    Martin Roland

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nogo-66 receptor NgR1 and its structural homologue NgR2 are binding proteins for a number of myelin-associated inhibitory factors. After neuronal injury, these inhibitory factors are responsible for preventing axonal outgrowth via their interactions with NgR1 and NgR2 expressed on neurons. In vitro, cells expressing NgR1/2 are inhibited from adhering to and spreading on a myelin substrate. Neuronal injury also results in the presence of dendritic cells (DCs in the central nervous system, where they can come into contact with myelin debris. The exact mechanisms of interaction of immune cells with CNS myelin are, however, poorly understood. Methods Human DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes and mouse DCs were differentiated from wild type and NgR1/NgR2 double knockout bone marrow precursors. NgR1 and NgR2 expression were determined with quantitative real time PCR and immunoblot, and adhesion of cells to myelin was quantified. Results We demonstrate that human immature myeloid DCs express NgR1 and NgR2, which are then down-regulated upon maturation. Human mature DCs also adhere to a much higher extent to a myelin substrate than immature DCs. We observe the same effect when the cells are plated on Nogo-66-His (binding peptide for NgR1, but not on control proteins. Mature DCs taken from Ngr1/2 knockout mice adhere to a much higher extent to myelin compared to wild type mouse DCs. In addition, Ngr1/2 knockout had no effect on in vitro DC differentiation or phenotype. Conclusions These results indicate that a lack of NgR1/2 expression promotes the adhesion of DCs to myelin. This interaction could be important in neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis in which peripheral immune cells come into contact with myelin debris.

  16. Activity-Dependent and Experience-Driven Myelination Provide New Directions for the Management of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Jensen, Samuel K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-06-01

    Despite an appreciation of the importance of myelination and the consequences of pathological demyelination, the fundamental mechanisms regulating myelination are only now being resolved. Neuronal activity has long been considered a plausible regulatory signal for myelination. However, controversy surrounding its dispensability in certain contexts and the difficulty in determining to what degree it influences myelination has limited its widespread acceptance. Recent studies have shed new light on the role of neuronal activity in regulating oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Further, the dynamics of myelin in adulthood and the association between skilled learning and myelination have become increasingly well characterized. These advances present new considerations for the management of multiple sclerosis and open up new approaches to facilitate remyelination following pathological demyelination. PMID:27113322

  17. Natural electromagnetic waveguide structures based on myelin sheath in the neural system

    Xue, Jiongwei; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-01-01

    The saltatory propagation of action potentials on myelinated axons is conventionally explained by the mechanism employing local circuit ionic current flows between nodes of Ranvier. Under this framework, the myelin sheath with up to 100 layers of membrane only serves as the insulating shell. The speed of action potentials is measured to be as fast as 100 m/s on myelinated axons, but ions move in fluids at just 100 nm/s in a 1 V/m electric field. We show here the action potentials, in the form...

  18. The apolipoprotein A-I gene is actively expressed in the rapidly myelinating avian peripheral nerve

    1989-01-01

    The expression of the apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) gene was investigated in the myelinating sciatic nerve. Hybridization analysis with an apo A-I cDNA probe obtained from a cDNA library of mRNA isolated from rapidly myelinating chick sciatic nerve indicated that apo A-I coding transcripts increase during development in the chick sciatic nerve in parallel with the increase of myelin lamellae. Substantial apo A-I-like immunoreactivity in chick sciatic nerve homogenates was detected by Western b...

  19. α6β4 integrin and dystroglycan cooperate to stabilize the myelin sheath

    Nodari, A.; Previtali, S.C.; Dati, G.; Occhi, S.; Court, FA.; Colombelli, C.; Zambroni, D.; Dina, G.; Del Carro, U.; Campbell, K. P.; Quattrini, A; Wrabetz, L.; Feltri, ML.

    2008-01-01

    Schwann cells integrate signals deriving from the axon and the basal lamina to myelinate peripheral nerves. Integrin α6β4 is a laminin receptor synthesized by Schwann cells and displayed apposed to the basal lamina. α6β4 integrin expression in Schwann cells is induced by axons at the onset of myelination, and rise in adulthood. The β4 chain has a uniquely long cytoplasmic domain that interacts with intermediate filaments such as dystonin, important in peripheral myelination. Furthermore, α6β4...

  20. Solar water splitting: efficiency discussion

    Juodkazyte, Jurga; Sebeka, Benjaminas; Savickaja, Irena; Malinauskas, Tadas; Badokas, Kazimieras; Juodkazis, Kestutis; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    The current state of the art in direct water splitting in photo-electrochemical cells (PECs) is presented together with: (i) a case study of water splitting using a simple solar cell with the most efficient water splitting electrodes and (ii) a detailed mechanism analysis. Detailed analysis of the energy balance and efficiency of solar hydrogen production are presented. The role of hydrogen peroxide formation as an intermediate in oxygen evolution reaction is newly revealed and explains why an oxygen evolution is not taking place at the thermodynamically expected 1.23 V potential. Solar hydrogen production with electrical-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 52% is demonstrated using a simple ~0.7%-efficient n-Si/Ni Schottky solar cell connected to a water electrolysis cell. This case study shows that separation of the processes of solar harvesting and electrolysis avoids photo-electrode corrosion and utilizes optimal electrodes for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions and achieves ~10% efficiency in light...

  1. On Split Lie Triple Systems

    Antonio J Calderón Martín

    2009-04-01

    We begin the study of arbitrary split Lie triple systems by focussing on those with a coherent 0-root space. We show that any such triple systems with a symmetric root system is of the form $T=\\mathcal{U}+\\sum_j I_j$ with $\\mathcal{U}$ a subspace of the 0-root space $T_0$ and any $I_j$ a well described ideal of , satisfying $[I_j,T,I_k]=0$ if $j≠ k$. Under certain conditions, it is shown that is the direct sum of the family of its minimal ideals, each one being a simple split Lie triple system, and the simplicity of is characterized. The key tool in this job is the notion of connection of roots in the framework of split Lie triple systems.

  2. Testing Split Supersymmetry with Inflation

    Craig, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Split supersymmetry (SUSY) -- in which SUSY is relevant to our universe but largely inaccessible at current accelerators -- has become increasingly plausible given the absence of new physics at the LHC, the success of gauge coupling unification, and the observed Higgs mass. Indirect probes of split SUSY such as electric dipole moments (EDMs) and flavor violation offer hope for further evidence but are ultimately limited in their reach. Inflation offers an alternate window into SUSY through the direct production of superpartners during inflation. These particles are capable of leaving imprints in future cosmological probes of primordial non-gaussianity. Given the recent observations of BICEP2, the scale of inflation is likely high enough to probe the full range of split SUSY scenarios and therefore offers a unique advantage over low energy probes. The key observable for future experiments is equilateral non-gaussianity, which will be probed by both cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large scale structure (L...

  3. Split supersymmetry in brane models

    Ignatios Antoniadis

    2006-11-01

    Type-I string theory in the presence of internal magnetic fields provides a concrete realization of split supersymmetry. To lowest order, gauginos are massless while squarks and sleptons are superheavy. For weak magnetic fields, the correct Standard Model spectrum guarantees gauge coupling unification with sin2 W = 3/8 at the com-pactification scale of GUT ≃ 2 × 1016 GeV. I discuss mechanisms for generating gaugino and higgsino masses at the TeV scale, as well as generalizations to models with split extended supersymmetry in the gauge sector.

  4. Geometrical Applications of Split Octonions

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2015-01-01

    Physical signals and space-time intervals are described in terms of split octonions. Geometrical symmetries are represented by the automorphism group of the algebra - the real non-compact form of Cartan's smallest exceptional group G2. This group generates specific rotations of (3+4)-vector parts of split octonions with three extra time-like coordinates and in certain limits reduces to standard Lorentz group. In this picture several physical characteristics of ordinary (3+1)-dimensional theory (such as: number of spatial dimensions, existence of maximal velocities, the uncertainty principle, some quantum numbers) are naturally emerge from the properties of the algebra.

  5. Splitting strings on integrable backgrounds

    Vicedo, Benoit

    2011-05-15

    We use integrability to construct the general classical splitting string solution on R x S{sup 3}. Namely, given any incoming string solution satisfying a necessary self-intersection property at some given instant in time, we use the integrability of the worldsheet {sigma}-model to construct the pair of outgoing strings resulting from a split. The solution for each outgoing string is expressed recursively through a sequence of dressing transformations, the parameters of which are determined by the solutions to Birkhoff factorization problems in an appropriate real form of the loop group of SL{sub 2}(C). (orig.)

  6. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  7. Erythropoietin treatment alleviates ultrastructural myelin changes induced by murine cerebral malaria

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Staalsø, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    , adjunctive therapy, which is not available at present. Previously, erythropoietin (EPO) was reported to significantly improve the survival and outcome in a murine CM model. The study objectives were to assess myelin thickness and ultrastructural morphology in the corpus callosum in murine CM and to adress...... for electron microscopy. Myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum were analysed with transmission electron microscopy and stereology. RESULTS: The infection caused clinical CM, which was counteracted by EPO. The total number of myelinated axons was identical in the four groups and mice with CM did not......, perivascular oedemas and intracerebral haemorrhages. CONCLUSIONS: EPO treatment reduced clinical signs of CM and reduced cerebral pathology. Murine CM does not reduce the general thickness of myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum....

  8. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of normal myelination in infantile brain

    Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: ADC values decrease with progressive increase of age. Using ADC values is useful in assessment of normal myelination development in the infantile brain and matches the results of conventional MRI.

  9. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins. (authors)

  10. Association of extensive myelinated nerve fibers and high degree myopia: Case report

    Elvan Yalcın

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral extensive myelination of the peripapillary nerve fibers may be associated with anisometropic myopia, strabismus, and reduced vision. Myelination of optic nerve fibers terminate at lamina cribrosa. Yet in some patients, myelination progresses into the peripapillary retinal nerve fibers and may affect the visual acuity. In this report, we described 4 patients. All patients presented extensive peripapillary myelinated nerve fibers associated with myopic anisometropia. After routine ophthalmic and orthoptic examinations, all patients underwent treatment for amblyopia through correction with spectacles, contact lenses, and the occlusion of the good eye. Corrected visual acuity improved in 1 patient, but 3 patients had no increase in visual acuity despite treatment with full cycloplegic refraction and appropriate patching. Probably because of structural abnormalies of the macula, visual results are often disappointing with appropriate correction of the refractive error and occlusion.

  11. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    Samantha F Kornfeld

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as

  12. Soluble Mannosylated Myelin Peptide Inhibits the Encephalitogenicity of Autoreactive T Cells during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Kel, Junda; Oldenampsen, Judith; Luca, Mariken; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Koning, Frits; Nagelkerken, Lex

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that immunization with a mannosylated myelin peptide in complete adjuvant induces tolerance instead of disease in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model for multiple sclerosis. In this report we demonstrate that treatment with a soluble mannosylated epitope of proteolipid protein (M-PLP139-151) significantly inhibits disease mediated by autoreactive myelin-specific T cells during EAE. Treatment with M-PLP139-151, applied in different EAE model...

  13. Decreased white matter integrity in late-myelinating fiber pathways in Alzheimer's disease supports retrogenesis

    Stricker, N.H.; Schweinsburg, B.C.; DELANO-WOOD, L.; WIERENGA, C.E.; Bangen, K.J.; Haaland, K.Y; Frank, L.R.; Salmon, D.P.; Bondi, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    The retrogenesis model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that white matter (WM) degeneration follows a pattern that is the reverse of myelogenesis. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test this model, we predicted greater loss of microstructural integrity in late-myelinating WM fiber pathways in AD patients than in healthy older adults, whereas differences in early-myelinating WM fiber pathways were not expected. We compared 16 AD patients and 14 demographically-matched healthy older adu...

  14. Membrane interactions in nerve myelin: II. Determination of surface charge from biochemical data.

    Inouye, H; Kirschner, D A

    1988-01-01

    In our accompanying paper (Inouye and Kirschner, 1988) we calculated the surface charge density at the extracellular surfaces in peripheral and central nervous system (PNS; CNS) myelins from observations on the dependency of the width of the extracellular space on pH and ionic strength. Here, we have determined the surface charge density of the membrane surfaces in myelin from its chemical composition and the localization of some of its molecular components. We then analyzed the attractive an...

  15. Acceleration of conduction velocity linked to clustering of nodal components precedes myelination

    Freeman, Sean A.; Desmazières, Anne; Simonnet, Jean; Gatta, Marie; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Aigrot, Marie Stéphane; Rappeneau, Quentin; Guerreiro, Serge; Michel, Patrick Pierre; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barbin, Gilles; Brophy, Peter. J.; Fricker, Desdemona; Lubetzki, Catherine; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of nodes of Ranvier of myelinated axons in the CNS are still only partly understood. Our study shows the influence of intrinsic cues and glial extrinsic factors for nodal protein clustering before myelination on specific hippocampal neuronal subpopulations and extends to electrophysiological understandings and in vivo relevance. Although conduction velocity along axons has long been thought to mostly rely on the insulating properties o...

  16. Patterns of morphological variation within myelin internodes of normal peripheral nerve: quantitative analysis by confocal microscopy.

    Reynolds, R. J.; Heath, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of variations in the morphology of normal myelinated peripheral nerve fibres is fundamental to subsequent interpretation of neuropathology. It would be advantageous for structural analysis of normal variations to be based on entire myelin internodes, but acquisition of such data via the classic approach of nerve fibre teasing has been hindered by limitations in optical resolution and specimen preparation. This study addressed these limitations through a new confocal imaging method w...

  17. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Oligodendrocytes Regulates Myelin Sheath Thickness

    Furusho, M.; Dupree, J. L.; Nave, K-A; Bansal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of the central nervous system (CNS) white matter is developmentally tightly regulated, but the molecules and mechanisms of myelination control in the postnatal CNS are poorly understood. Here, we show that myelin growth is controlled by Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling, originally identified as a proliferative signal for oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) in vitro. We created two lines of mice lacking both FGF-receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells ...

  18. Age- and brain-region-specific effects of dietary vitamin K on myelin sulfatides

    Crivello, Natalia A.; Casseus, Sherley L.; Peterson, James W.; Smith, Donald E.; Sarah L. Booth

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of myelin sulfatides is a risk factor for cognitive decline with age. Vitamin K is present in high concentrations in the brain and has been implicated in the regulation of sulfatide metabolism. Our objective was to investigate the age-related interrelation between dietary vitamin K and sulfatides in myelin fractions isolated from the brain regions of Fischer 344 male rats fed one of two dietary forms of vitamin K: phylloquinone or its hydrogenated form, dihydrophylloquinone for ...

  19. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of normal myelination in infantile brain

    Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel; Moataz M. Montasser; Ashraf N. Etaby; Reda M.A. Darweesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myelination is a dynamic process starting during fetal life and proceeds predominantly after birth in a well-defined, predetermined manner. MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted images and the measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) have been applied to the study of normal brain development. Aim of the work: To demonstrate the role of Diffusion Weighted Imaging and ADC maps in assessing normal progression of the infantile brain myelination. Patients and me...

  20. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair. PMID:26962228

  1. Polarization-dependent responses of fluorescent indicators partitioned into myelinated axons

    Micu, Ileana; Brideau, Craig; Stys, Peter K.

    2012-02-01

    Myelination, i.e. the wrapping of axons in multiple layers of lipid-rich membrane, is a unique phenomenon in the nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates, that greatly increases the speed and efficiency of signal transmission. In turn, disruption of axo-myelinic integrity underlies disability in numerous clinical disorders. The dependence of myelin physiology on nanometric organization of its lamellae makes it difficult to accurately study this structure in the living state. We expected that fluorescent probes might become highly oriented when partitioned into the myelin sheath, and in turn, this anisotropy could be interrogated by controlling the polarization state of the exciting laser field used for 2-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF). Live ex vivo myelinated rodent axons were labeled with a series of lipohilic and hydrophilic fluorescenct probes, and TPEF images acquired while laser polarization was varied at the sample over a broad range of ellipticities and orientations of the major angle [see Brideau, Micu & Stys, abstract this meeting]. We found that most probes exhibited strong dependence on both the major angle of polarization, and perhaps more surprisingly, on ellipticity as well. Lipophilic vs. hydrophilic probes exhibited distinctly different behavior. We propose that polarization-dependent TPEF microscopy represents a powerful tool for probing the nanostructural architecture of both myelin and axonal cytoskeleton in a domain far below the resolution limit of visible light microscopy. By selecting probes with different sizes and physicochemical properties, distinct aspects of cellular nanoarchitecture can be accurately interrogated in real-time in living tissue.

  2. The role of myelin in Theiler's virus persistence in the central nervous system.

    Jean-Pierre Roussarie

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus, a picornavirus, persists for life in the central nervous system of mouse and causes a demyelinating disease that is a model for multiple sclerosis. The virus infects neurons first but persists in white matter glial cells, mainly oligodendrocytes and macrophages. The mechanism, by which the virus traffics from neurons to glial cells, and the respective roles of oligodendrocytes and macrophages in persistence are poorly understood. We took advantage of our previous finding that the shiverer mouse, a mutant with a deletion in the myelin basic protein gene (Mbp, is resistant to persistent infection to examine the role of myelin in persistence. Using immune chimeras, we show that resistance is not mediated by immune responses or by an efficient recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system. With both in vivo and in vitro experiments, we show that the mutation does not impair the permissiveness of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and macrophages to the virus. We demonstrate that viral antigens are present in cytoplasmic channels of myelin during persistent infection of wild-type mice. Using the optic nerve as a model, we show that the virus traffics from the axons of retinal ganglion cells to the cytoplasmic channels of myelin, and that this traffic is impaired by the shiverer mutation. These results uncover an unsuspected axon to myelin traffic of Theiler's virus and the essential role played by the infection of myelin/oligodendrocyte in persistence.

  3. Structure and expression of a novel compact myelin protein – Small VCP-interacting protein (SVIP)

    Wu, Jiawen [Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (United States); Peng, Dungeng [Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (United States); Voehler, Markus [Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University (United States); Sanders, Charles R. [Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (United States); Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University (United States); Li, Jun, E-mail: jun.li.2@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (United States); Tennessee Valley Healthcare System (TVHS) – Nashville VA (United States)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin. •We determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). •The helical content of SVIP increases dramatically during its interaction with negatively charged lipid membrane. •This study provides structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes. -- Abstract: SVIP (small p97/VCP-interacting protein) was initially identified as one of many cofactors regulating the valosin containing protein (VCP), an AAA+ ATPase involved in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD). Our previous study showed that SVIP is expressed exclusively in the nervous system. In the present study, SVIP and VCP were seen to be co-localized in neuronal cell bodies. Interestingly, we also observed that SVIP co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP) in compact myelin, where VCP was absent. Furthermore, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic measurements, we determined that SVIP is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). However, upon binding to the surface of membranes containing a net negative charge, the helical content of SVIP increases dramatically. These findings provide structural insight into interactions between SVIP and myelin membranes.

  4. Damage to Myelin and Oligodendrocytes: A Role in Chronic Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury?

    William L. Maxwell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence in the experimental and clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI literature that loss of central myelinated nerve fibers continues over the chronic post-traumatic phase after injury. However, the biomechanism(s of continued loss of axons is obscure. Stretch-injury to optic nerve fibers in adult guinea-pigs was used to test the hypothesis that damage to the myelin sheath and oligodendrocytes of the optic nerve fibers may contribute to, or facilitate, the continuance of axonal loss. Myelin dislocations occur within internodal myelin of larger axons within 1–2 h of TBI. The myelin dislocations contain elevated levels of free calcium. The volume of myelin dislocations increase with greater survival and are associated with disruption of the axonal cytoskeleton leading to secondary axotomy. Waves of Ca2+ depolarization or spreading depression extend from the initial locus injury for perhaps hundreds of microns after TBI. As astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are connected via gap junctions, it is hypothesized that spreading depression results in depolarization of central glia, disrupt axonal ionic homeostasis, injure axonal mitochondria and allow the onset of axonal degeneration throughout an increasing volume of brain tissue; and contribute toward post-traumatic continued loss of white matter.

  5. Organotypic Slice Cultures to Study Oligodendrocyte Dynamics and Myelination

    Hill, Robert A.; Medved, Jelena; Patel, Kiran D.; Nishiyama, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    NG2 expressing cells (polydendrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells) are the fourth major glial cell population in the central nervous system. During embryonic and postnatal development they actively proliferate and generate myelinating oligodendrocytes. These cells have commonly been studied in primary dissociated cultures, neuron cocultures, and in fixed tissue. Using newly available transgenic mouse lines slice culture systems can be used to investigate proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells in both gray and white matter regions of the forebrain and cerebellum. Slice cultures are prepared from early postnatal mice and are kept in culture for up to 1 month. These slices can be imaged multiple times over the culture period to investigate cellular behavior and interactions. This method allows visualization of NG2 cell division and the steps leading to oligodendrocyte differentiation while enabling detailed analysis of region-dependent NG2 cell and oligodendrocyte functional heterogeneity. This is a powerful technique that can be used to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic signals influencing these cells over time in a cellular environment that closely resembles that found in vivo. PMID:25177825

  6. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  7. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    Mohedano, Rubén; Chaves, Julio; Falicoff, Waqidi; Hernandez, Maikel; Sorgato, Simone [LPI, Altadena, CA, USA and Madrid (Spain); Miñano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo [LPI, Altadena, CA, USA and Madrid, Spain and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain); Buljan, Marina [Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Köhler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity.

  8. Cool covered sky-splitting spectrum-splitting FK

    Placing a plane mirror between the primary lens and the receiver in a Fresnel Köhler (FK) concentrator gives birth to a quite different CPV system where all the high-tech components sit on a common plane, that of the primary lens panels. The idea enables not only a thinner device (a half of the original) but also a low cost 1-step manufacturing process for the optics, automatic alignment of primary and secondary lenses, and cell/wiring protection. The concept is also compatible with two different techniques to increase the module efficiency: spectrum splitting between a 3J and a BPC Silicon cell for better usage of Direct Normal Irradiance DNI, and sky splitting to harvest the energy of the diffuse radiation and higher energy production throughout the year. Simple calculations forecast the module would convert 45% of the DNI into electricity

  9. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common genetic neuropathy with an incidence of 1 in 2600. Several forms of CMT have been identified arising from different genomic abnormalities such as CMT1 including CMT1A, CMT1B, and CMTX. CMT1 with associated peripheral nervous system (PNS) demyelination, the most frequent diagnosis, demonstrates slowed nerve conduction velocities and segmental demyelination upon nerve biopsy. One of its subtypes, CMT1A, presents a 1.5-Mb duplication in the p11-p12 region of the human chromosome 17 which encodes peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). CMT1B, a less common form, arises from the mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene on chromosome 1, region q22-q23, which encodes the major structural component of the peripheral myelin. A rare type of CMT1 has been found recently and is caused by point mutations in early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), encoding a zinc finger transcription factor in Schwann cells. In addition, CMTX, an X-linked form of CMT, arises from a mutation in the connexin-32 gene. Myelin protein zero, associated with CMT1B, is a transmembrane protein of 219 amino acid residues. Human MPZ consists of three domains: 125 residues constitute the glycosylated immunoglobulin-like extracellular domain; 27 residues span the membrane; and 67 residues comprise the highly basic intracellular domain. MPZ makes up approximately 50% of the protein content of myelin, and is expressed predominantly in Schwann cells, the myelinating cell of the PNS. Myelin protein zero, a homophilic adhesion molecule, is a member of the immunoglobulin super-family and is essential for normal myelin structure and function. In addition, MPZ knockout mice displayed abnormal myelin that severely affects the myelination pathway, and overexpression of MPZ causes congenital hypomyelination of peripheral nerves. Myelin protein zero mutations account for {approx}5% of patients with CMT. To date, over 125

  10. Oral Administration of Lactococcus lactis Expressing Synthetic Genes of Myelin Antigens in Decreasing Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Rats

    Kasarello, Kaja; Kwiatkowska-Patzer, Barbara; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Bardowski, Jacek K.; Szczepankowska, Agnieszka K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis is a human autoimmunological disease that causes neurodegeneration. One of the potential ways to stop its development is induction of oral tolerance, whose effect lies in decreasing immune response to the fed antigen. It was shown in animal models that administration of specific epitopes of the three main myelin proteins – myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), myelin basic protein (MBP), and proteolipid protein (PLP) – results in induction of oral tolerance ...

  11. High-Affinity Binding of Remyelinating Natural Autoantibodies to Myelin-Mimicking Lipid Bilayers Revealed by Nanohole Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Im, Hyungsoon; Xu, Xiaohua; Wootla, Bharath; Watzlawik, Jens; Warrington, Arthur E.; Rodriguez, Moses; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive neurological disorder that results in the degradation of myelin sheaths that insulate axons in the central nervous system. Therefore promotion of myelin repair is a major thrust of multiple sclerosis treatment research. Two mouse monoclonal natural autoantibodies, O1 and O4, promote myelin repair in several mouse models of multiple sclerosis. Natural autoantibodies are generally polyreactive and predominantly of the IgM isotype. The prevailing paradigm is t...

  12. Mutation in the myelin proteolipid protein gene alters BK and SK channel function in the caudal medulla

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Avishai, Nanthawan; Balan, Kannan; Wilson, Christopher G.; Miller, Martha J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (Plp) gene mutation in rodents causes severe CNS dysmyelination, early death, and lethal hypoxic ventilatory depression (Miller et al. 2004). To determine if Plp mutation alters neuronal function critical for control of breathing, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) of four rodent strains were studied: myelin deficient rats (MD), myelin synthesis deficient (Plpmsd), and Plpnull mice, as well as shiverer (Mbpshi) mice, a myelin basic protein mutant. Current-voltage relation...

  13. Planar split dual gate MOSFET

    XIAO DeYuan; CHEN Gary; LEE Roger; LIU Yung; SHEN GhiCheong

    2008-01-01

    A new planar split dual gate (PSDG) MOSFET device, its characteristics and ex-perimental results, as well as the three dimensional device simulations, are re-ported here for the first time. Both theoretical calculation and 3D simulation, as well as the experiment data, show that the two independent split dual gates can provide dynamical control of the device characteristics, such as threshold voltage (Vt) and sub-threshold swing (SS), as well as the device saturated current. The PSDG MOSFET transistor leakage current (loft) can be reduced as much as 78% of the traditional single gate MOSFET. The PSDG is fabricated and fully compatible with our conventional 0.18 μm logic process flow.

  14. Functional Expression of Electron Transport Chain and FoF1-ATP Synthase in Optic Nerve Myelin Sheath.

    Bartolucci, Martina; Ravera, Silvia; Garbarino, Greta; Ramoino, Paola; Ferrando, Sara; Calzia, Daniela; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies reported evidence for aerobic ATP synthesis by myelin from both bovine brainstem and rat sciatic nerve. Considering that the optic nerve displays a high oxygen demand, here we evaluated the expression and activity of the five Respiratory Complexes in myelin purified from either bovine or murine optic nerves. Western blot analyses on isolated myelin confirmed the expression of ND4L (subunit of Complex I), COX IV (subunit of Complex IV) and β subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase. Moreover, spectrophotometric and in-gel activity assays on isolated myelin, as well as histochemical activity assays on both bovine and murine transversal optic nerve sections showed that the respiratory Complexes are functional in myelin and are organized in a supercomplex. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation proteins was also evaluated on bovine optic nerve sections by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Having excluded a mitochondrial contamination of isolated myelin and considering the results form in situ analyses, it is proposed that the oxidative phosphorylation machinery is truly resident in optic myelin sheath. Data may shed a new light on the unknown trophic role of myelin sheath. It may be energy supplier for the axon, explaining why in demyelinating diseases and neuropathies, myelin sheath loss is associated with axonal degeneration. PMID:26334391

  15. Influence of myelin proteins on the structure and dynamics of a model membrane with emphasis on the low temperature regime

    Knoll, W. [University Joseph Fourier, UFR PhiTEM, Grenoble (France); Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Peters, J. [University Joseph Fourier, UFR PhiTEM, Grenoble (France); Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Institut de Biologie Structurale, Grenoble (France); Kursula, P. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); CSSB–HZI, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gerelli, Y. [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Natali, F., E-mail: natali@ill.fr [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); CNR–IOM–OGG, c/o Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2014-11-28

    Myelin is an insulating, multi-lamellar membrane structure wrapped around selected nerve axons. Increasing the speed of nerve impulses, it is crucial for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. Human neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are linked to damage to the myelin sheath through demyelination. Myelin exhibits a well defined subset of myelin-specific proteins, whose influence on membrane dynamics, i.e., myelin flexibility and stability, has not yet been explored in detail. In a first paper [W. Knoll, J. Peters, P. Kursula, Y. Gerelli, J. Ollivier, B. Demé, M. Telling, E. Kemner, and F. Natali, Soft Matter 10, 519 (2014)] we were able to spotlight, through neutron scattering experiments, the role of peripheral nervous system myelin proteins on membrane stability at room temperature. In particular, the myelin basic protein and peripheral myelin protein 2 were found to synergistically influence the membrane structure while keeping almost unchanged the membrane mobility. Further insight is provided by this work, in which we particularly address the investigation of the membrane flexibility in the low temperature regime. We evidence a different behavior suggesting that the proton dynamics is reduced by the addition of the myelin basic protein accompanied by negligible membrane structural changes. Moreover, we address the importance of correct sample preparation and characterization for the success of the experiment and for the reliability of the obtained results.

  16. Influence of myelin proteins on the structure and dynamics of a model membrane with emphasis on the low temperature regime

    Myelin is an insulating, multi-lamellar membrane structure wrapped around selected nerve axons. Increasing the speed of nerve impulses, it is crucial for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. Human neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are linked to damage to the myelin sheath through demyelination. Myelin exhibits a well defined subset of myelin-specific proteins, whose influence on membrane dynamics, i.e., myelin flexibility and stability, has not yet been explored in detail. In a first paper [W. Knoll, J. Peters, P. Kursula, Y. Gerelli, J. Ollivier, B. Demé, M. Telling, E. Kemner, and F. Natali, Soft Matter 10, 519 (2014)] we were able to spotlight, through neutron scattering experiments, the role of peripheral nervous system myelin proteins on membrane stability at room temperature. In particular, the myelin basic protein and peripheral myelin protein 2 were found to synergistically influence the membrane structure while keeping almost unchanged the membrane mobility. Further insight is provided by this work, in which we particularly address the investigation of the membrane flexibility in the low temperature regime. We evidence a different behavior suggesting that the proton dynamics is reduced by the addition of the myelin basic protein accompanied by negligible membrane structural changes. Moreover, we address the importance of correct sample preparation and characterization for the success of the experiment and for the reliability of the obtained results

  17. Electromagnetic Compressive Split Hopkinson Bar

    Martins, P. A. F.; Rosa, P. A. R.; Silva, C. M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new design for the compressive split Hopkinson bar that makes use of the intense pressure created in a transient magnetic field formed by the passage of a pulse of electric current through a series of coils. The proposed technology enables to characterize the behaviour of materials under high strain-rates with a small acceleration path length of the striker bar and, because propulsion is purely electromagnetic, the overall performance can be easily controlled and nearly ...

  18. Splitting Methods for Convex Clustering

    Chi, Eric C.; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental problem in many scientific applications. Standard methods such as $k$-means, Gaussian mixture models, and hierarchical clustering, however, are beset by local minima, which are sometimes drastically suboptimal. Recently introduced convex relaxations of $k$-means and hierarchical clustering shrink cluster centroids toward one another and ensure a unique global minimizer. In this work we present two splitting methods for solving the convex clustering problem. The fir...

  19. Quantum Teleportation and Beam Splitting

    Fichtner, Karl-Heinz; Ohya, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Following the previous paper in which quantum teleportation is rig orously discussed with coherent entangled states given by beam splittings, we further discuss two types of models, perfect teleportation model and non-perfect teleportation model, in general scheme. Then the difference among several models, i.e., the perfect models and the non-perfect models, is studied. Our teleportation models are constructed by means of coherent states in some Fock space with counting measures, so that our ...

  20. Split NMSSM with electroweak baryogenesis

    Demidov, S V; Kirpichnikov, D V

    2016-01-01

    In light of the Higgs boson discovery we reconsider generation of the baryon asymmetry in the non-minimal split Supersymmetry model with an additional singlet superfield in the Higgs sector. We find that successful baryogenesis during the first order electroweak phase transition is possible within phenomenologically viable part of the model parameter space. We discuss several phenomenological consequences of this scenario, namely, predictions for the electric dipole moments of electron and neutron and collider signatures of light charginos and neutralinos.

  1. Some Comments on "Split" Supersymmetry

    Drees, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    An argument against tolerating finetuning in the Higgs sector is presented, by emphasizing the difference between (well understood) quantum corrections to scalar masses and the (unsolved) problem of the cosmological constant. I also point out that ``split'' supersymmetry, where all scalars except one Higgs boson have masses many orders of magnitude above the weak scale, is not compatible with simple mechanisms of transmitting supersymmetry breaking (gravity, gauge or anomaly mediation), unles...

  2. Characterization of dodecylphosphocholine/myelin basic protein complexes

    The stoichiometry of myelin basic protein (MBP)/dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) complexes and the location of protein segments in the micelle have been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), ultracentrifugation, photon correlation light scattering, 31P, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electron microscopy. Ultracentrifugation measurements indicate that MBP forms stoichiometrically well-defined complexes consisting of 1 protein molecule and approximately 140 detergent molecules. The spin-labels 5-, 12-, and 16-doxylstearate have been incorporated into DPC/MBP aggregates. EPR spectral parameters and 13C and 1H NMR relaxation times indicate that the addition of MBP does not affect the environment and location of the labels or the organization of the micelles except for a slight increase in size. Previous results indicating that the protein lies primarily near the surface of the micelle have been confirmed by comparing 13C NMR spectra of the detergent with and without protein with spectra of protein/detergent aggregates containing spin-labels. Electron micrographs of the complexes taken by using the freeze-fracture technique confirm that the estimated size obtained by light-scattering measurements. Overall, these results indicate that mixtures of MBP and DPC can form highly porous particles with well-defined protein and lipid stoichiometry. The structural integrity of these particles appears to be based on protein-lipid interactions. In addition, electron micrographs of aqueous DPC/MBP suspensions show the formation of a small amount of material consisting of large arrays of detergent micelles, suggesting that MBP is capable of inducing large changes in the overall organization of the detergent

  3. 7 CFR 51.2002 - Split shell.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split shell. 51.2002 Section 51.2002 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2002 Split shell. Split shell means a shell... of the shell, measured in the direction of the crack....

  4. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated to play critical roles in early neural development. Recent reports have suggested that perinatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) resulted in cortical network miswiring, abnormal social behavior, callosal myelin malformation, as well as oligodendrocyte (OL) pathology in rats. To gain further insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SSRIs-induced OL and myelin abnormalities, we investigated the effect of 5-HT exposure on OL development, cell death, and myelination in cell culture models. First, we showed that 5-HT receptor 1A and 2A subtypes were expressed in OL lineages, using immunocytochemistry, Western blot, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) measurement. We then assessed the effect of serotonin exposure on the lineage development, expression of myelin proteins, cell death, and myelination, in purified OL and neuron-OL myelination cultures. For pure OL cultures, our results showed that 5-HT exposure led to disturbance of OL development, as indicated by aberrant process outgrowth and reduced myelin proteins expression. At higher doses, such exposure triggered a development-dependent cell death, as immature OLs exhibited increasing susceptibility to 5-HT treatment compared to OL progenitor cells (OPC). We showed further that 5-HT-induced immature OL death was mediated at least partially via 5-HT2A receptor, since cell death could be mimicked by 5-HT2A receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride, but atten-uated by pre-treatment with 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin. Utilizing a neuron-OL myelination co-culture model, our data showed that 5-HT exposure significantly reduced the number of myelinated internodes. In contrast to cell injury observed in pure OL cultures, 5-HT exposure did not lead to OL death or reduced OL density in neuron-OL co-cultures. However, abnormal

  5. CNS myelin structural modification induced in vitro by phospholipases A2.

    Yunes Quartino, Pablo J; Pusterla, Julio M; Galván Josa, Victor M; Fidelio, Gerardo D; Oliveira, Rafael G

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is the self-stacked membrane surrounding axons; it is also the target of several pathological and/or neurodegenerative processes like multiple sclerosis. These processes involve, among others, the hydrolytic attack by phospholipases. In this work we describe the changes in isolated myelin structure after treatment with several secreted PLA2 (sPLA2), by using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. It was observed that myelin treated with all the tested sPLA2s (from cobra and bee venoms and from pig pancreas) preserved the lamellar structure but displayed an enlarged separation between membranes in certain zones. Additionally, the peak due to membrane asymmetry was clearly enhanced. The coherence length was also lower than the non-treated myelin, indicating increased disorder. These SAXS results were complemented by Langmuir film experiments to follow myelin monolayer hydrolysis at the air/water interface by a decrease in electric surface potential at different surface pressures. All enzymes produced hydrolysis with no major qualitative difference between the isoforms tested. PMID:26514604

  6. Movement and structure of mitochondria in oligodendrocytes and their myelin sheaths.

    Rinholm, Johanne E; Vervaeke, Koen; Tadross, Michael R; Tkachuk, Ariana N; Kopek, Benjamin G; Brown, Timothy A; Bergersen, Linda H; Clayton, David A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria play several crucial roles in the life of oligodendrocytes. During development of the myelin sheath they are essential providers of carbon skeletons and energy for lipid synthesis. During normal brain function their consumption of pyruvate will be a key determinant of how much lactate is available for oligodendrocytes to export to power axonal function. Finally, during calcium-overload induced pathology, as occurs in ischemia, mitochondria may buffer calcium or induce apoptosis. Despite their important functions, very little is known of the properties of oligodendrocyte mitochondria, and mitochondria have never been observed in the myelin sheaths. We have now used targeted expression of fluorescent mitochondrial markers to characterize the location and movement of mitochondria within oligodendrocytes. We show for the first time that mitochondria are able to enter and move within the myelin sheath. Within the myelin sheath the highest number of mitochondria was in the cytoplasmic ridges along the sheath. Mitochondria moved more slowly than in neurons and, in contrast to their behavior in neurons and astrocytes, their movement was increased rather than inhibited by glutamate activating NMDA receptors. By electron microscopy we show that myelin sheath mitochondria have a low surface area of cristae, which suggests a low ATP production. These data specify fundamental properties of the oxidative phosphorylation system in oligodendrocytes, the glial cells that enhance cognition by speeding action potential propagation and provide metabolic support to axons. GLIA 2016;64:810-825. PMID:26775288

  7. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  8. Role of ERK1/2 MAPK signaling in the maintenance of myelin and axonal integrity in the adult CNS.

    Ishii, Akihiro; Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Bansal, Rashmi

    2014-11-26

    Oligodendrocytes form myelin during postnatal development and then maintain a functional myelin sheath throughout adult life. While many regulators of developmental myelination have been identified, the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte functions in adulthood are not well understood. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), have emerged as prominent regulators of myelin formation. Here, we investigated whether these signaling molecules are also required for myelin maintenance in the adult CNS. Inducible conditional ablation of Erk1/2 in oligodendrocytes of the adult CNS resulted in a downregulation of myelin gene expression. Although myelin thickness was reduced and some axons were demyelinated, the majority of axons were wrapped by intact myelin sheaths that appeared structurally normal. However, late onset of progressive axonal degeneration, accompanied by astrogliosis, microglial activation, partial loss of oligodendrocytes, and functional impairment, occurred in the adult mice lacking ERK1/2 activity. Conditional ablation of Fibroblast Growth Factor receptors-1 and -2 (FGFR1/2) in oligodendrocytes also resulted in downregulation of myelin gene expression and development of axonal degeneration as the mice aged. Further, the level of the key transcription factor myelin gene regulatory factor (Myrf) was downregulated or upregulated in mice with genetic loss or gain of ERK1/2 function, respectively. Together, our studies demonstrate that ERK1/2-MAPK signaling is required for the long-term maintenance of myelin and axonal integrity in the adult CNS and suggest that FGFR1/2 and Myrf may, in part, contribute to signaling upstream and downstream of ERK1/2 in maintaining these oligodendrocyte functions during adulthood. PMID:25429144

  9. Staining Myelin And Myelin-like Degradation Products In The Spinal Cords Of Chronic Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (cr-eae) Rats Using Sudan Black B Staining Of Glycol Methacrylate-embedded Material.

    Gerrits, Pieter; Brekelmans-Bartels, M.; Mast, L.; 's Gravenmade, Eduard; Horobin, R.W.; Holstege, Gert

    1992-01-01

    A high-resolution light-microscopical (HRLM) technique is described to visualize myelin, and macrophages containing degradation products of myelin, in the spinal cords of chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (Cr-EAE) rats. This HRLM technique was developed to optimalize the corr

  10. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    The simultaneous incorporation of [3H]fucose and [1-14C]leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration

  11. Application of multispectral imaging detects areas with neuronal myelin loss, without tissue labelling.

    Vazgiouraki, Eleftheria; Papadakis, Vassilis M; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Lazaridis, Iakovos; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Fotakis, Costas; Gravanis, Achille

    2016-04-01

    The application of multispectral imaging to discriminate myelinated and demyelinated areas of neural tissue is herein presented. The method is applied through a custom-made, multispectral imaging monochromator, coupled to a commercially available microscope. In the present work, a series of spinal cord sections were analysed derived from mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model widely used to study multiple sclerosis (MS). The multispectral microscope allows imaging of local areas with loss of myelin without the need of tissue labelling. Imaging with the aforementioned method and system is compared in a parallel way with conventional methods (wide-field and confocal fluorescence microscopies). The diagnostic sensitivity of our method is 90.4% relative to the 'gold standard' method of immunofluorescence microscopy. The presented method offers a new platform for the possible future development of anin vivo, real-time, non-invasive, rapid imaging diagnostic tool of spinal cord myelin loss-derived pathologies. PMID:26510556

  12. Quantum teleportation and beam splitting

    Following the previous paper in which quantum teleportation is rigorously discussed with coherent entangled states given by beam splittings, we further discuss two types of models, the perfect teleportation model and non-perfect teleportation model, in a general scheme. Then the difference among several models, i.e., the perfect models and the non-perfect models, is studied. Our teleportation models are constructed by means of coherent states in some Fock space with counting measures, so that our model can be treated in the frame of usual optical communication. (orig.)

  13. Split quaternion nonlinear adaptive filtering.

    Ujang, Bukhari Che; Took, Clive Cheong; Mandic, Danilo P

    2010-04-01

    A split quaternion learning algorithm for the training of nonlinear finite impulse response adaptive filters for the processing of three- and four-dimensional signals is proposed. The derivation takes into account the non-commutativity of the quaternion product, an aspect neglected in the derivation of the existing learning algorithms. It is shown that the additional information taken into account by a rigorous treatment of quaternion algebra provides improved performance on hypercomplex processes. A rigorous analysis of the convergence of the proposed algorithms is also provided. Simulations on both benchmark and real-world signals support the approach. PMID:19926443

  14. Locomotion, physical development, and brain myelination in rats treated with ionizing radiation in utero

    Effects of ionizing radiation on the emergence of locomotion skill and some physical development parameters were studied in laboratory rats (Fisher F-344 inbred strain). Rats were treated with 3 different doses of radiation (150 R, 15 R, and 6.8 R) delivered on the 20th day of the prenatal life. Results indicated that relatively moderate (15 R) to high (150 R) doses of radiation have effects on certain locomotion and physical development parameters. Exposure to 150 R affected pivoting, cliff-avoidance, upper jaw tooth eruption, body weight, and organs, such as brain, cerebral cortex, ovary, kidney, heart and spleen weights. Other parameters, such as negative geotaxis, eye opening, and lower jaw tooth eruption appeared to be affected in the 150 R treated animals. Exposure to 15 R affected pivoting and cliff-avoidance parameters. The cerebral cortex weight of the 15 R treated animals was found to be reduced at the age of day 30. Exposure to 6.8 R had no adverse effects on these parameters. Prenatal exposure to 150 R of radiation reduced the cerebral cortex weight by 22.07% at 30 days of age, and 20.15% at 52 days of age which caused a reduction in cerebral cortex myelin content by 20.16, and 22.89% at the ages of day 30 and day 52 respectively. Exposure to 150 R did not affect the myelin content of the cerebellum or the brain stem; or the myelin concentration (mg myelin/g brain tissue weight) of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and the brain stem. Exposure to 15 R, and 6.8 R did not affect either the myelin content or the myelin concentration of these brain areas

  15. Structural characterization of the human cerebral myelin sheath by small angle x-ray scattering

    DeFelici, M.; Felici, R.; Ferrero, C.; Tartari, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Finet, S.

    2008-10-01

    Myelin is a multi-lamellar membrane surrounding neuronal axons and increasing their conduction velocity. When investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), the lamellar quasi-periodical arrangement of the myelin sheath gives rise to distinct peaks, which allow the determination of its molecular organization and the dimensions of its substructures. In this study we report on the myelin sheath structural determination carried out on a set of human brain tissue samples coming from surgical biopsies of two patients: a man around 60 and a woman nearly 90 years old. The samples were extracted either from white or grey cerebral matter and did not undergo any manipulation or chemical-physical treatment, which could possibly have altered their structure, except dipping them into a formalin solution for their conservation. Analysis of the scattered intensity from white matter of intact human cerebral tissue allowed the evaluation not only of the myelin sheath periodicity but also of its electronic charge density profile. In particular, the thicknesses of the cytoplasm and extracellular regions were established, as well as those of the hydrophilic polar heads and hydrophobic tails of the lipid bilayer. SAXS patterns were measured at several locations on each sample in order to establish the statistical variations of the structural parameters within a single sample and among different samples. This work demonstrates that a detailed structural analysis of the myelin sheath can also be carried out in randomly oriented samples of intact human white matter, which is of importance for studying the aetiology and evolution of the central nervous system pathologies inducing myelin degeneration.

  16. Chronic intermittent ethanol induced axon and myelin degeneration is attenuated by calpain inhibition.

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H; Patel, Kaushal S; Mulholland, Patrick J; Becker, Howard C; Banik, Naren L

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes multifaceted damage to the central nervous system (CNS), underlying mechanisms of which are gradually being unraveled. In our previous studies, activation of calpain, a calcium-activated neutral protease has been found to cause detrimental alterations in spinal motor neurons following ethanol (EtOH) exposure in vitro. However, it is not known whether calpain plays a pivotal role in chronic EtOH exposure-induced structural damage to CNS in vivo. To test the possible involvement of calpain in EtOH-associated neurodegenerative mechanisms the present investigation was conducted in a well-established mouse model of alcohol dependence - chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure and withdrawal. Our studies indicated significant loss of axonal proteins (neurofilament light and heavy, 50-60%), myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, 20-40% proteolipid protein, 25%) and enzyme (2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, 21-55%) following CIE in multiple regions of brain including hippocampus, corpus callosum, cerebellum, and importantly in spinal cord. These CIE-induced deleterious effects escalated after withdrawal in each CNS region tested. Increased expression and activity of calpain along with enhanced ratio of active calpain to calpastatin (sole endogenous inhibitor) was observed after withdrawal compared to EtOH exposure. Pharmacological inhibition of calpain with calpeptin (25 μg/kg) prior to each EtOH vapor inhalation significantly attenuated damage to axons and myelin as demonstrated by immuno-profiles of axonal and myelin proteins, and Luxol Fast Blue staining. Calpain inhibition significantly protected the ultrastructural integrity of axons and myelin compared to control as confirmed by electron microscopy. Together, these findings confirm CIE exposure and withdrawal induced structural alterations in axons and myelin, predominantly after withdrawal and corroborate calpain inhibition as a potential protective strategy against

  17. White matter involvement after TBI: Clues to axon and myelin repair capacity.

    Armstrong, Regina C; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M

    2016-01-01

    Impact-acceleration forces to the head cause traumatic brain injury (TBI) with damage in white matter tracts comprised of long axons traversing the brain. White matter injury after TBI involves both traumatic axonal injury (TAI) and myelin pathology that evolves throughout the post-injury time course. The axon response to initial mechanical forces and secondary insults follows the process of Wallerian degeneration, which initiates as a potentially reversible phase of intra-axonal damage and proceeds to an irreversible phase of axon fragmentation. Distal to sites of axon disconnection, myelin sheaths remain for prolonged periods, which may activate neuroinflammation and inhibit axon regeneration. In addition to TAI, TBI can cause demyelination of intact axons. These evolving features of axon and myelin pathology also represent opportunities for repair. In experimental TBI, demyelinated axons exhibit remyelination, which can serve to both protect axons and facilitate recovery of function. Myelin remodeling may also contribute to neuroplasticity. Efficient clearance of myelin debris is a potential target to attenuate the progression of chronic pathology. During the early phase of Wallerian degeneration, interventions that prevent the transition from reversible damage to axon disconnection warrant the highest priority, based on the poor regenerative capacity of axons in the CNS. Clinical evaluation of TBI will need to address the challenge of accurately detecting the extent and stage of axon damage. Distinguishing the complex white matter changes associated with axons and myelin is necessary for interpreting advanced neuroimaging approaches and for identifying a broader range of therapeutic opportunities to improve outcome after TBI. PMID:25697845

  18. Internalization and presentation of myelin antigens by the brain endothelium guides antigen-specific T cell migration

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kamermans, Alwin; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van het Hof, Bert; Wierts, Laura; O'Toole, Tom; Boeve, Daniël; Verstege, Marleen; van der Pol, Susanne MA; van Kooyk, Yvette; de Vries, Helga E; Unger, Wendy WJ

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells across the brain endothelium, an essential step in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), is suggested to be an antigen-specific process, yet which cells provide this signal is unknown. Here we provide direct evidence that under inflammatory conditions, brain endothelial cells (BECs) stimulate the migration of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells by acting as non-professional antigen presenting cells through the processing and presentation of myelin-derived antigens in MHC-II. Inflamed BECs internalized myelin, which was routed to endo-lysosomal compartment for processing in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, myelin/MHC-II complexes on inflamed BECs stimulated the trans-endothelial migration of myelin-reactive Th1 and Th17 2D2 cells, while control antigen loaded BECs did not stimulate T-cell migration. Furthermore, blocking the interaction between myelin/MHC-II complexes and myelin-reactive T-cells prevented T-cell transmigration. These results demonstrate that endothelial cells derived from the brain are capable of enhancing antigen-specific T cell recruitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13149.001 PMID:27336724

  19. Running Exercise Reduces Myelinated Fiber Loss in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    Chao, Fenglei; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Yanmin; Xiao, Qian; Lv, Fulin; He, Qi; Zhou, Chunni; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Lin; Jiang, Rong; Gu, Hengwei; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of running exercise on myelinated fibers in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus during Alzheimer's disease (AD), 6-month-old male APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to control or running groups. The running group mice were subjected to a running protocol for four months. The behaviors of the mice from both group mice were then assessed using the Morris water maze, and the total volume of the DG and the related quantitative parameters with characteristics of the myelinated nerve fiber and the myelin sheath in the DG were investigated using unbiased stereological techniques and electron microscopy. Learning and spatial memory performances were both significantly increased in the running group compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the gratio of the myelinated axons between the two groups. However, the DG volume, the myelinated fiber length and volume in the DG, and the myelin sheath volume and thickness in the DG were all significantly increased in the running group mice compared with the control group mice. These results indicated that running exercise was able to prevent DG atrophy and delay the progression of the myelinated fiber loss and the demyelination of the myelin sheaths in the DG in an AD mouse model, which may underlie the running-induced improvement in learning and spatial memory. Taken together, these results demonstrated that running exercise could delay the progression of AD. PMID:25817255

  20. Involvement of MeCP2 in Regulation of Myelin-Related Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Oligodendrocytes.

    Sharma, Kedarlal; Singh, Juhi; Pillai, Prakash P; Frost, Emma E

    2015-10-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a multifunctional protein which binds to methylated CpG, mutation of which cause a neurodevelopmental disorder, Rett syndrome. MeCP2 can function as both transcriptional activator and repressor of target gene. MeCP2 regulate gene expression in both neuron and glial cells in central nervous system (CNS). Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of CNS, are required for normal functioning of neurons and are regulated by several transcription factors during their differentiation. In current study, we focused on the role of MeCP2 as transcription regulator of myelin genes in cultured rat oligodendrocytes. We have observed expression of MeCP2 at all stages of oligodendrocyte development. MeCP2 knockdown in cultured oligodendrocytes by small interference RNA (siRNA) has shown increase in myelin genes (myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein (PLP), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein (MOBP)), neurotrophin (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), and transcriptional regulator (YY1) transcripts level, which are involved in regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Further, we also found that protein levels of MBP, PLP, DM-20, and BDNF also significantly upregulated in MeCP2 knockdown oligodendrocytes. Our study suggests that the MeCP2 acts as a negative regulator of myelin protein expression. PMID:26140854

  1. Translational control of myelin basic protein expression by ERK2 MAP kinase regulates timely remyelination in the adult brain.

    Michel, Kelly; Zhao, Tianna; Karl, Molly; Lewis, Katherine; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2015-05-20

    Successful myelin repair in the adult CNS requires the robust and timely production of myelin proteins to generate new myelin sheaths. The underlying regulatory mechanisms and complex molecular basis of myelin regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of ERK MAP kinase signaling in this process. Conditional deletion of Erk2 from cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage resulted in delayed remyelination following demyelinating injury to the adult mouse corpus callosum. The delayed repair occurred as a result of a specific deficit in the translation of the major myelin protein, MBP. In the absence of ERK2, activation of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its downstream target, ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP), was impaired at a critical time when premyelinating oligodendrocytes were transitioning to mature cells capable of generating new myelin sheaths. Thus, we have described an important link between the ERK MAP kinase signaling cascade and the translational machinery specifically in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results suggest an important role for ERK2 in the translational control of MBP, a myelin protein that appears critical for ensuring the timely generation of new myelin sheaths following demyelinating injury in the adult CNS. PMID:25995471

  2. Malnutrition and myelin structure: an X-ray scattering study of rat sciatic and optic nerves

    Vargas, V.; Vargas, R.; Marquez, G.; Vonasek, E.; Mateu, L. [Dept. de Biologia Estructural, Caracas (Venezuela); Luzzati, V. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Borges, J. [Servicio de Neurologia, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2000-07-01

    Taking advantage of the fast and accurate X-ray scattering techniques recently developed in our laboratory, we tackled the study of the structural alterations induced in myelin by malnutrition. Our work was performed on sciatic and optic nerves dissected from rats fed with either a normal or a low-protein caloric diet, as a function of age (from birth to 60 days). By way of electrophysiological controls we also measured (on the sciatic nerves) the height and velocity of the compound action potential. Malnutrition was found to decrease the amount of myelin and to impair the packing order of the membranes in the sheaths. (orig.)

  3. Malnutrition and myelin structure: an X-ray scattering study of rat sciatic and optic nerves

    Taking advantage of the fast and accurate X-ray scattering techniques recently developed in our laboratory, we tackled the study of the structural alterations induced in myelin by malnutrition. Our work was performed on sciatic and optic nerves dissected from rats fed with either a normal or a low-protein caloric diet, as a function of age (from birth to 60 days). By way of electrophysiological controls we also measured (on the sciatic nerves) the height and velocity of the compound action potential. Malnutrition was found to decrease the amount of myelin and to impair the packing order of the membranes in the sheaths. (orig.)

  4. Expression of Transcripts for Myelin Related Genes in Postmortem Brain from Cocaine Abusers

    Kristiansen, Lars V.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Bannon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic abuse of cocaine is known to cause neuroadaptive changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). In addition, altered expression of the myelin-related genes MBP, MOBP, PLP1 as well as of MAL2 in NAc was recently reported by gene array analysis in brains from cocaine abusers. In the present study we used in situ hybridization to quantify transcript expression of these four genes, as well as for the myelin-related transcripts encoding quaking, EDG2, claudin-11, ...

  5. Association between brain metastasis from lung cancer and the serum level of myelin basic protein

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Jing; WEI, YUJUAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association between the expression of myelin basic protein in the serum and the metastasis of lung cancer to the brain. A total of 68 lung cancer patients, treated in the Department of Respiratory Medicine of the People’s Hospital of Rizhao (Rizhao, China), were divided into two groups, those with brain metastasis (32 cases) and those without brain metastasis (36 cases). The expression levels of myelin basic protein were measured for all the p...

  6. Endocytic depletion of L-MAG from CNS myelin in quaking mice

    1995-01-01

    Quaking is an autosomal recessive hypo/dysmyelinating mutant mouse which has a 1-Mbp deletion on chromosome 17. The mutation exhibits pleiotrophy and does not include genes encoding characterized myelin proteins. The levels of the 67-kD isoform of the myelin-associated glycoprotein (S-MAG) relative to those of the 72-kD isoform (L-MAG) are increased in the quaking CNS, but not in other dysmyelinating mutants. Abnormal expression of MAG isoforms in quaking may result from altered transcription...

  7. Effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on myelin basic protein expression in the rat lateral olfactory tract

    Kun Xiong; He Huang; Hui Wang; Yan Cai; Jing Yang; Jufang Huang; Xuegang Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dithiocarbamates can cause demyelination of axons in the peripheral nervous system. Its derivate, diethyldithiocarbamate, is cytotoxic, and causes olfactory mucosal damage and atrophy of the olfactory bulb. However, it is still unclear whether the myelin sheath of the lateral olfactory tract is affected by diethyldithiocarbamate.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on the myelin sheath of the rat lateral olfactory tract. This was done by examining changes in myelin basic protein expression after diethyldithiocarbamate treatment.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study was performed at the Laboratory of the Department of Human Anatomy and Neurobiology, Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, China from July to November 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 72 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned into a diethyldithiocarbamate group (n=32), a solvent control group (n=32), and a blank control group (n=8). The diethyldithiocarbamate and solvent control groups were separately divided into 3-d, 7-d, 14-d and 28-d survival subgroups, with eight rats in each. Diethyldithiocarbamate (Sigma, USA) and goat anti-myelin basic protein polyclonal antibody (Santa Cruz, USA) were used in this study.METHODS: Rats in the diethyldithiocarbamate and solvent control groups were subcutaneously injected with diethyldithiocarbamate (600 mg/kg) and 0.01 mol/L phosphate buffered saline (600 mg/kg) at the posterior neck, respectively. Rats in the blank control group received no treatment.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot assay were used to measure myelin basic protein expression in the rat lateral olfactory tract.RESULTS: Following immunohistochemical staining, myelin basic protein was uniformly distributed in the rat lateral olfactory tract in the blank control and solvent control groups. Western blot assay showed 21.5, 18, 17 and 14 ku positive bands. No significant difference was found

  8. Rectangular split-ring resonators with single-split and two-splits under different excitations at microwave frequencies

    Zahertar, S.; Yalcinkaya, A. D.; Torun, H.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, transmission characteristics of rectangular split-ring resonators with single-split and two-splits are analyzed at microwave frequencies. The resonators are coupled with monopole antennas for excitation. The scattering parameters of the devices are investigated under different polarizations of E and H fields. The magnetic resonances induced by E and H fields are identified and the differences in the behavior of the resonators due to orientations of the fields are explained based on simulation and experimental results. The addition of the second split of the device is investigated considering different configurations of the excitation vectors. It is demonstrated that the single-split and the two-splits resonators exhibit identical transmission characteristics for a certain excitation configuration as verified with simulations and experiments. The presented resonators can effectively function as frequency selective media for varying excitation conditions.

  9. Signature splitting in 135Pr

    In-beam spectroscopic study of 135Pr was made using 91 MeV 120Sn(19F,4n) reaction. A strong negative parity proton band based on the h/sub 11/2-/ 1/2[550] configuration with α = -1/2 was observed. Possibly α = +1/2 unfavored band is observed. Also two positive parity proton bands are observed most likely based on the g/sub 7/2+/ 5/2[413] configurations with α = +-1/2. In all cases (except for the (π,α) = (-,+1/2) band) the backbending is caused by alignment of two h/sub 11/2-/ 9/2[514] quasi-neutrons. For the strongly decoupled π(-) bands the observed signature splitting decreases with increasing rotational frequency. The signature splitting of the positive parity bands increases with rotational frequency and then inverts above the backbending. This is interpreted to be caused by the quasi-neutrons, which drive the γ-deformation to the negative values. 18 refs., 6 figs

  10. Generalized Forward-Backward Splitting

    Raguet, Hugo; Peyré, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the generalized forward-backward splitting algorithm for minimizing convex functions of the form $F + \\sum_{i=1}^n G_i$, where $F$ has a Lipschitz-continuous gradient and the $G_i$'s are simple in the sense that their Moreau proximity operators are easy to compute. While the forward-backward algorithm cannot deal with more than $n = 1$ non-smooth function, our method generalizes it to the case of arbitrary $n$. Our method makes an explicit use of the regularity of $F$ in the forward step, and the proximity operators of the $G_i$'s are applied in parallel in the backward step. This allows the generalized forward backward to efficiently address an important class of convex problems. We prove its convergence in infinite dimension, and its robustness to errors on the computation of the proximity operators and of the gradient of $F$. Examples on inverse problems in imaging demonstrate the advantage of the proposed methods in comparison to other splitting algorithms.

  11. THE SPLITTING OF COMET HALLEY

    Chen Daohan; Liu Linzhong; Alan Gilmore

    2000-01-01

    In combination with the authors previous obsewation about the splitting of Comet Halley in March 1986, the events involving the sharp, straight feature in the antisolar direction observed in the head of Comet Halley in 1910 (such as those occurring on May 14, 25 and 31, and June 2) are rediscussed The analysis leads to the following scenario: When Comet Halley explodes and splits, a fragment jettisoned or thrown off from the nucleus will, after moving in the direction of its tail, develop into a mini-comet. Although not well developed or permanent, it has its own plasma tail and, sometimes, a dust tail. If Bobrovnikoffs definition of a secondary nucleus is assumed, then the fragment should be considered as a real secondary nucleus. It seems that the current idea of a tailward jet suggested by Sekanina and Larson is a wrong explanation for the plasma tail of a mini-comet and hence the rotation period of 52-53h for Comet Halley is doubtful

  12. Myelin repair by Schwann cells in the regenerating goldfish visual pathway: regional patterns revealed by X-irradiation

    Nona, S.N.; Stafford, C.A.; Cronly-Dillon, J.R. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology); Duncan, A. (Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Anatomy); Scholes, J. (University Coll., London (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-01

    In the regenerating goldfish optic nerves, Schwann cells of unknown origin reliably infiltrate the lesion site forming a band of peripheral-type myelinating tissue by 1-2 months, sharply demarcated form the adjacent new CNS myelin. To investigate this effect, we have interfered with cell proliferation by locally X-irradiating the fish visual pathway 24 h after the lesion. As assayed by immunohistochemistry and EM, irradiation retards until 6 months formation of new myelin by Schwann cells at the lesion site, and virtually abolishes oligodendrocyte myelination distally, but has little or no effect on nerve fibre regrowth. Optic nerve astrocyte processes normally fail to re-infiltrate the lesion, but re-occupy it after irradiation, suggesting that they are normally excluded by early cell proliferation at this site. Moreover, scattered myelinating Schwann cells also appear in the oligodendrocyte-depleted distal optic nerve after irradiation, although only as far as the optic tract. (Author).

  13. The MT pool size ratio and the DTI radial diffusivity may reflect the myelination in shiverer and control mice

    Ou, Xiawei; Sun, Shu-Wei; Liang, Hsiao-Fang; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Gochberg, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) technique was employed to quantify the ratio of the sizes of the bound and free water proton pools in ex vivo mouse brains. The goal was to determine the pool size ratio sensitivity to myelin. Fixed brains from both shiverer mice and control littermates were imaged. The pool size ratio in the corpus callosum of shiverer mice was substantially lower than that in the control mice, while there was no distinguishable difference in the pool size ratio in the gray matter. These results correlate with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived radial diffusivity which previously was shown to reflect myelin integrity in this animal model. Histological study reveals the presence of myelin in control mice white matter and the absence of myelin in shiverer mice white matter, supporting the qMT and DTI results. Our findings support the view that qMT may be used for estimating myelin integrity. PMID:19123230

  14. Algebraic techniques for diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix in split quaternionic mechanics

    In the study of the relation between complexified classical and non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, physicists found that there are links to quaternionic and split quaternionic mechanics, and this leads to the possibility of employing algebraic techniques of split quaternions to tackle some problems in complexified classical and quantum mechanics. This paper, by means of real representation of a split quaternion matrix, studies the problem of diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix and gives algebraic techniques for diagonalization of split quaternion matrices in split quaternionic mechanics

  15. Telugu Bigram Splitting using Consonant-based and Phrase-based Splitting

    T. Kameswara Rao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Splitting is a conventional process in most of Indian languages according to their grammar rules. It is called ‘pada vicchEdanam’ (a Sanskrit term for word splitting and is widely used by most of the Indian languages. Splitting plays a key role in Machine Translation (MT particularly when the source language (SL is an Indian language. Though this splitting may not succeed completely in extracting the root words of which the compound is formed, but it shows considerable impact in Natural Language Processing (NLP as an important phase. Though there are many types of splitting, this paper considers only consonant based and phrase based splitting.

  16. Algebraic techniques for diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix in split quaternionic mechanics

    Jiang, Tongsong; Jiang, Ziwu; Zhang, Zhaozhong

    2015-08-01

    In the study of the relation between complexified classical and non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, physicists found that there are links to quaternionic and split quaternionic mechanics, and this leads to the possibility of employing algebraic techniques of split quaternions to tackle some problems in complexified classical and quantum mechanics. This paper, by means of real representation of a split quaternion matrix, studies the problem of diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix and gives algebraic techniques for diagonalization of split quaternion matrices in split quaternionic mechanics.

  17. Algebraic techniques for diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix in split quaternionic mechanics

    Jiang, Tongsong, E-mail: jiangtongsong@sina.com [Department of Mathematics, Linyi University, Linyi, Shandong 276005 (China); Department of Mathematics, Heze University, Heze, Shandong 274015 (China); Jiang, Ziwu; Zhang, Zhaozhong [Department of Mathematics, Linyi University, Linyi, Shandong 276005 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In the study of the relation between complexified classical and non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, physicists found that there are links to quaternionic and split quaternionic mechanics, and this leads to the possibility of employing algebraic techniques of split quaternions to tackle some problems in complexified classical and quantum mechanics. This paper, by means of real representation of a split quaternion matrix, studies the problem of diagonalization of a split quaternion matrix and gives algebraic techniques for diagonalization of split quaternion matrices in split quaternionic mechanics.

  18. Structural insight into the function of myelin basic protein as a ligand for integrin αMβ2

    Stapulionis, Romualdas; Oliveira, Cristiano; Gjelstrup, Mikkel Carstensen; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Hokland, Marianne; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Poulsen, Knud; Jacobsen, Christian; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease where phagocytic cells infiltrate the nerve tissue and act as terminal agents in destruction of the myelin sheath. However, the mechanism that triggers the ability of these cells to recognize myelin remains obscure. We show that myelin basic...

  19. Testing PVLAS axions with resonant photon splitting

    Gabrielli, E; Gabrielli, Emidio; Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    The photon splitting gamma -> gamma gamma in a time-independent and inhomogeneous magnetized background is considered when neutral and ultralight spin-0 particles are coupled to two-photons. Depending on the inhomogeneity scale of the external field, resonant photon splitting can occur. If an optical laser crosses a magnetic field of few Tesla with typical inhomogeneity scale of the order of the meter, a potentially observable rate of photon splittings is expected for the PVLAS range of couplings and masses.

  20. - RENTABILIDAD Y LIQUIDEZ ALREDEDOR DE LOS SPLITS

    Juan Carlos Gómez Sala

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the empirical behaviour of stock prices around the ex dates of stock splits in order to detect anomalous returns. Also, it is investigated the determinant factors of the split size, its effects on the liquidity and the influence of the market microstructure in the abnormal returns. The obtained evidence in the Spanish capital market indicates that the split average abnormal returns is about 1%, on the execution day. These results can not be explained by an improvement in t...

  1. Gauge Mediated Mini-Split

    Cohen, Timothy; Knapen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the $\\mu-b_\\mu$ problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on $\\mu$ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small $a$-terms and small $\\tan \\beta$ -- the stop mass ranges from $10^5$ to $10^8 \\mbox{ GeV}$. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  2. Minimal Doubling and Point Splitting

    Minimally-doubled chiral fermions have the unusual property of a single local field creating two fermionic species. Spreading the field over hypercubes allows construction of combinations that isolate specific modes. Combining these fields into bilinears produces meson fields of specific quantum numbers. Minimally-doubled fermion actions present the possibility of fast simulations while maintaining one exact chiral symmetry. They do, however, introduce some peculiar aspects. An explicit breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry allows additional counter-terms to appear in the renormalization. While a single field creates two different species, spreading this field over nearby sites allows isolation of specific states and the construction of physical meson operators. Finally, lattice artifacts break isospin and give two of the three pseudoscalar mesons an additional contribution to their mass. Depending on the sign of this mass splitting, one can either have a traditional Goldstone pseudoscalar meson or a parity breaking Aoki-like phase.

  3. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  4. Signature splitting in 129Ce

    LIU Ying; WU Xiao-Guang; ZHU Li-Hua; LI Guang-Sheng; HE Chuang-Ye; LI Xue-Qin; PAN Bo; HAO Xin; LI Li-Hua; WANG Zhi-Min; LI Zhong-Yu; XU Qiang

    2009-01-01

    The high spin states of 129Ce have been populated via heavy-ion fusion evaporation reaction 96Mo (37C1, 1p3n) 129Ce. The γ-γ coincidence and intensity balance used to measure the B(M1; I→I-1)/B(E2; I→I-2) (the probability ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transition) in v7/2[523] rotational band of 129Ce. And the energy splitting (Δe') has been got through the experimental Routhians. The lifetimes and quadrupole moments Qt have been extracted from the lineshape analyses using DSAM. The deformation of the v7/2[523] rotational band of 129Ce was extracted from the Qt and moment of inertia JRR.

  5. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture

    Highlights: ► Lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EpoR expression in OPCs. ► In association with elevated EpoR, EPO increased OPCs proliferation. ► EPO enhanced the oligodendrogenesis via activation of JAK2 pathway. ► EPO promoted myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. -- Abstract: Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to a limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

  6. Myelination Is Associated with Processing Speed in Early Childhood: Preliminary Insights.

    Nicolas Chevalier

    Full Text Available Processing speed is an important contributor to working memory performance and fluid intelligence in young children. Myelinated white matter plays a central role in brain messaging, and likely mediates processing speed, but little is known about the relationship between myelination and processing speed in young children. In the present study, processing speed was measured through inspection times, and myelin volume fraction (VFM was quantified using a multicomponent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI approach in 2- to 5-years of age. Both inspection times and VFM were found to increase with age. Greater VFM in the right and left occipital lobes, the body of the corpus callosum, and the right cerebellum was significantly associated with shorter inspection times, after controlling for age. A hierarchical regression showed that VFM in the left occipital lobe predicted inspection times over and beyond the effects of age and the VFM in the other brain regions. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that myelin supports processing speed in early childhood.

  7. On the biogenesis of myelin membranes : Sorting, trafficking and cell polarity

    Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick

    2010-01-01

    In the central nervous system, a multilayered membrane layer known as the myelin sheath enwraps axons, and is required for optimal saltatory signal conductance. The sheath develops from membrane processes that extend from the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes and displays a unique lipid and protei

  8. MYELIN BASIC PROTEIN-MRNA USED TO MONITOR TRIMETHYLTIN TOXIC NEUROPATHY IN RATS

    Trimethyltin (TMT) is an alkyltin that selectively targets neurons of the limbic system. ene probe (i.e., mRNA) for myelin basic protein (MBP) was used to monitor this toxic neuropathy. prague Dawley rats, were dosed (IP) acutely with hydroxide at neuropathic (8.0 mg/kg) or non-n...

  9. Nitric oxide plays a key role in myelination in the developing brain.

    Olivier, Paul; Loron, Gauthier; Fontaine, Romain H; Pansiot, Julien; Dalous, Jérémie; Thi, Hoa Pham; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Gressens, Pierre; Baud, Olivier

    2010-08-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is one of the most promising therapies used in neonates, but there is little information available about its effect on the developing brain. We explored the effects of both iNO and endogenous NO on developing white matter in rodents. Rat or mouse pups and their mothers were placed in a chamber containing 5 to 20 ppm of NO for 7 days after birth. Neonatal exposure to iNO was associated with a transient increase in central nervous system myelination in rats and C57BL/6 mice without any deleterious effects at low doses (5 ppm) or behavioral consequences in adulthood. Exposure to iNO was associated with a proliferative effect on immature oligodendrocytes and a subsequent promaturational effect. The role of endogenous NO in myelination was investigated in animals treated with the nitric oxides synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in the neonatal period; this led to protracted myelination defects and subsequent behavioral deficits in adulthood. These effects were reversed by rescuing L-NAME-treated animals with iNO. Thus, we demonstrate considerable effect of both exogenous and endogenous NO on myelination in rodents. These data point to potential new avenues for neuroprotection in human perinatal brain damage. PMID:20613635

  10. AxonSeg: Open Source Software for Axon and Myelin Segmentation and Morphometric Analysis.

    Zaimi, Aldo; Duval, Tanguy; Gasecka, Alicja; Côté, Daniel; Stikov, Nikola; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting axon and myelin from microscopic images is relevant for studying the peripheral and central nervous system and for validating new MRI techniques that aim at quantifying tissue microstructure. While several software packages have been proposed, their interface is sometimes limited and/or they are designed to work with a specific modality (e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) only). Here we introduce AxonSeg, which allows to perform automatic axon and myelin segmentation on histology images, and to extract relevant morphometric information, such as axon diameter distribution, axon density and the myelin g-ratio. AxonSeg includes a simple and intuitive MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) and can easily be adapted to a variety of imaging modalities. The main steps of AxonSeg consist of: (i) image pre-processing; (ii) pre-segmentation of axons over a cropped image and discriminant analysis (DA) to select the best parameters based on axon shape and intensity information; (iii) automatic axon and myelin segmentation over the full image; and (iv) atlas-based statistics to extract morphometric information. Segmentation results from standard optical microscopy (OM), SEM and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy are presented, along with validation against manual segmentations. Being fully-automatic after a quick manual intervention on a cropped image, we believe AxonSeg will be useful to researchers interested in large throughput histology. AxonSeg is open source and freely available at: https://github.com/neuropoly/axonseg. PMID:27594833

  11. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    axons. Axonal counts do not reflect the number of regenerated neurons because of axonal branching and because myelinated axons form unmyelinated sprouts. Two days to 10 weeks after crushing, the distal sural or peroneal nerves were cut and exposed to fluoro-dextran. Large and small dorsal root ganglion...

  12. Autophagic myelin destruction by schwann cells during wallerian degeneration and segmental demyelination.

    Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Park, So Young; Park, Joo Youn; Lee, Hye Jeong; Yoo, Young Hyun; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Hwan Tae

    2016-05-01

    As lysosomal hydrolysis has long been suggested to be responsible for myelin clearance after peripheral nerve injury, in this study, we investigated the possible role of autophagolysosome formation in myelin phagocytosis by Schwann cells and its final contribution to nerve regeneration. We found that the canonical formation of autophagolysosomes was induced in demyelinating Schwann cells after injury, and the inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific knockout of the atg7 gene or pharmacological intervention of lysosomal function caused a significant delay in myelin clearance. However, Schwann cell dedifferentiation, as demonstrated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and c-Jun induction, and redifferentiation were not significantly affected, and thus the entire repair program progressed normally in atg7 knockout mice. Finally, autophagic Schwann cells were also found during segmental demyelination in a mouse model of inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is the self-myelin destruction mechanism of Schwann cells, but mechanistically, it is a process distinct from Schwann cell plasticity for nerve repair. GLIA 2016;64:730-742. PMID:26712109

  13. p25alpha relocalizes in oligodendroglia from myelin to cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy

    Song, Yun Ju C; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Huang, Yue;

    2007-01-01

    cytoplasmic inclusions. Overall, the data indicate that changes in the cellular interactions between MBP and p25alpha occur early in MSA and contribute to abnormalities in myelin and subsequent alpha-synuclein aggregation and the ensuing neuronal degeneration that characterizes this disease....

  14. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  15. Quintessence and phantom emerging from the split-complex field, split-quaternion field and split-complex DBI field

    Gao, Changjun; Shen, You-Gen

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the mathematic theory of split-complex numbers (or hyperbolic numbers, also perplex numbers) and the split-quaternion numbers (or coquaternion numbers), we define the notion of split-complex scalar field and the split-quaternion scalar field. Then we explore the cosmic evolution of these scalar fields in the background of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe. We find that both the quintessence field and the phantom field could naturally emerge in these scalar fields. Introducing the metric of field space, these theories fall into a subclass of the multi-field theories which have been extensively studied in inflationary cosmology. Using the brane world model, the split-complex Dirac-Born-Infeld Lagrangian is constructed and analyzed.

  16. Panglial gap junctional communication is essential for maintenance of myelin in the CNS.

    Tress, Oliver; Maglione, Marta; May, Dennis; Pivneva, Tatjyana; Richter, Nadine; Seyfarth, Julia; Binder, Sonja; Zlomuzica, Armin; Seifert, Gerald; Theis, Martin; Dere, Ekrem; Kettenmann, Helmut; Willecke, Klaus

    2012-05-30

    In this study, we have investigated the contribution of oligodendrocytic connexin47 (Cx47) and astrocytic Cx30 to panglial gap junctional networks as well as myelin maintenance and function by deletion of both connexin coding DNAs in mice. Biocytin injections revealed complete disruption of oligodendrocyte-to-astrocyte coupling in the white matter of 10- to 15-d-old Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice, while oligodendrocyte-to-oligodendrocyte coupling was maintained. There were no quantitative differences regarding cellular networks in acute brain slices obtained from Cx30/Cx47 double-null mice and control littermates, probably caused by the upregulation of oligodendrocytic Cx32 in Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice. We observed early onset myelin pathology, and ∼40% of Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient animals died within 42 to 90 d after birth, accompanied by severe motor impairments. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed severe vacuolization and myelination defects in all white matter tracts of the CNS. Furthermore, Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice exhibited a decreased number of oligodendrocytes, severe astrogliosis, and microglial activation in white matter tracts. Although less affected concerning motor impairment, surviving double-knock-out (KO) mice showed behavioral alterations in the open field and in the rotarod task. Vacuole formation and thinner myelin sheaths were evident also with adult surviving double-KO mice. Since interastrocytic coupling due to Cx43 expression and interoligodendrocytic coupling because of Cx32 expression are still maintained, Cx30/Cx47 double-deficient mice demonstrate the functional role of both connexins for interastrocytic, interoligodendrocytic, and panglial coupling, and show that both connexins are required for maintenance of myelin. PMID:22649229

  17. Acceleration of conduction velocity linked to clustering of nodal components precedes myelination.

    Freeman, Sean A; Desmazières, Anne; Simonnet, Jean; Gatta, Marie; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Aigrot, Marie Stéphane; Rappeneau, Quentin; Guerreiro, Serge; Michel, Patrick Pierre; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Barbin, Gilles; Brophy, Peter J; Fricker, Desdemona; Lubetzki, Catherine; Sol-Foulon, Nathalie

    2015-01-20

    High-density accumulation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels at nodes of Ranvier ensures rapid saltatory conduction along myelinated axons. To gain insight into mechanisms of node assembly in the CNS, we focused on early steps of nodal protein clustering. We show in hippocampal cultures that prenodes (i.e., clusters of Nav channels colocalizing with the scaffold protein ankyrinG and nodal cell adhesion molecules) are detected before myelin deposition along axons. These clusters can be induced on purified neurons by addition of oligodendroglial-secreted factor(s), whereas ankyrinG silencing prevents their formation. The Nav isoforms Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 are detected at prenodes, with Nav1.6 progressively replacing Nav1.2 over time in hippocampal neurons cultured with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. However, the oligodendrocyte-secreted factor(s) can induce the clustering of Nav1.1 and Nav1.2 but not of Nav1.6 on purified neurons. We observed that prenodes are restricted to GABAergic neurons, whereas clustering of nodal proteins only occurs concomitantly with myelin ensheathment on pyramidal neurons, implying separate mechanisms of assembly among different neuronal subpopulations. To address the functional significance of these early clusters, we used single-axon electrophysiological recordings in vitro and showed that prenode formation is sufficient to accelerate the speed of axonal conduction before myelination. Finally, we provide evidence that prenodal clusters are also detected in vivo before myelination, further strengthening their physiological relevance. PMID:25561543

  18. Ribosomal trafficking is reduced in Schwann cells following induction of myelination

    James M. Love

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Local synthesis of proteins within the Schwann cell periphery is extremely important for efficient process extension and myelination, when cells undergo dramatic changes in polarity and geometry. Still, it is unclear how ribosomal distributions are developed and maintained within Schwann cell projections to sustain local translation. In this multi-disciplinary study, we expressed a plasmid encoding a fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunit (L4-GFP in cultured primary rat Schwann cells. This enabled the generation of high-resolution, quantitative data on ribosomal distributions and trafficking dynamics within Schwann cells during early stages of myelination, induced by ascorbic acid treatment. Ribosomes were distributed throughout Schwann cell projections, with ~2-3 bright clusters along each projection. Clusters emerged within 1 day of culture and were maintained throughout early stages of myelination. Three days after induction of myelination, net ribosomal movement remained anterograde (directed away from the Schwann cell body, but ribosomal velocity decreased to about half the levels of the untreated group. Statistical and modeling analysis provided additional insight into key factors underlying ribosomal trafficking. Multiple regression analysis indicated that net transport at early time points was dependent on anterograde velocity, but shifted to dependence on anterograde duration at later time points. A simple, data-driven rate kinetics model suggested that the observed decrease in net ribosomal movement was primarily dictated by an increased conversion of anterograde particles to stationary particles, rather than changes in other directional parameters. These results reveal the strength of a combined experimental and theoretical approach in examining protein localization and transport, and provide evidence of an early establishment of ribosomal populations within Schwann cell projections with a reduction in trafficking following

  19. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity.

    A Heckel

    Full Text Available To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology.MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP and compound muscle action potential (CMAP as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons.DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr. and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr. but not with markers of axon integrity.AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Loss of ceramide synthase 2 activity, necessary for myelin biosynthesis, precedes tau pathology in the cortical pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Couttas, Timothy A; Kain, Nupur; Suchowerska, Alexandra K; Quek, Lake-Ee; Turner, Nigel; Fath, Thomas; Garner, Brett; Don, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    The anatomical progression of neurofibrillary tangle pathology throughout Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis runs inverse to the pattern of developmental myelination, with the disease preferentially affecting thinly myelinated regions. Myelin is comprised 80% of lipids, and the prototypical myelin lipids, galactosylceramide, and sulfatide are critical for neurological function. We observed severe depletion of galactosylceramide and sulfatide in AD brain tissue, which can be traced metabolically to the loss of their biosynthetic precursor, very long chain ceramide. The synthesis of very long chain ceramides is catalyzed by ceramide synthase 2 (CERS2). We demonstrate a significant reduction in CERS2 activity as early as Braak stage I/II in temporal cortex, and Braak stage III/IV in hippocampus and frontal cortex, indicating that loss of myelin-specific ceramide synthase activity precedes neurofibrillary tangle pathology in cortical regions. These findings open a new vista on AD pathogenesis by demonstrating a defect in myelin lipid biosynthesis at the preclinical stages of the disease. We posit that, over time, this defect contributes significantly to myelin deterioration, synaptic dysfunction, and neurological decline. PMID:27255818

  1. The occurrence of diffuse axonal injury in the brain:associated with the accumulation and clearance of myelin debris

    Liang Wen; Jun Xu; Tianxiang Zhan; Hao Wang; Xin Huang; Wenchao Liu; Xiaofeng Yang; Renya Zhan

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of myelin debris may be a major contributor to the inlfammatory response after diffuse axonal injury. In this study, we examined the accumulation and clearance of myelin debris in a rat model of diffuse axonal injury. Oil Red O staining was performed on sections from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem to identify the myelin debris. Seven days after diffuse axonal injury, many Oil Red O-stained particles were observed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. In the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, the amount of myelin debris peaked at 14 days after injury, and decreased signiifcantly at 28 days. In the brain stem, the amount of myelin debris peaked at 7 days after injury, and decreased signiifcantly at 14 and 28 days. In the cortex and hippocampus, some myelin debris could still be observed at 28 days after diffuse axonal injury. Our ifndings suggest that myelin debris may persist in the rat central ner-vous system after diffuse axonal injury, which would hinder recovery.

  2. Ectrodactyly/split hand feet malformation

    Jindal Geetanjali; Parmar Veena; Gupta Vipul

    2009-01-01

    Split-hand/split-foot malformation is a rare limb malformation with median clefts of the hands and feet and aplasia/hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals and metatarsals. When present as an isolated anomaly, it is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant form. We report a case of autosomal recessive inheritance and discuss the antenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling and treatment for the malformation.

  3. Transferring Goods or Splitting a Resource Pool

    Dijkstra, Jacob; Van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the consequences for exchange outcomes of the violation of an assumption underlying most social psychological research on exchange. This assumption is that the negotiated direct exchange of commodities between two actors (pure exchange) can be validly represented as two actors splitting a fixed pool of resources (split pool…

  4. Split Dimensional Regularization for the Temporal Gauge

    Chen, Y H; Lin, C; Chen, Yaw-Hwang; Hsieh, Ron-Jou; Lin, Chilong

    1996-01-01

    A split dimensional regularization, which was introduced for the Coulomb gauge by Leibbrandt and Williams, is used to regularize the spurious singularities of Yang-Mills theory in the temporal gauge. Typical one-loop split dimensionally regularized temporal gauge integrals, and hence the renormalization structure of the theory are shown to be the same as those calculated with some nonprincipal-value prescriptions.

  5. Nucleon mass splitting in the isospin medium

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Park, Chanyong

    2014-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we investigate a nucleon mass splitting and nucleon-pion coupling in the isospin medium. We find that there exists a nucleon mass splitting which is exactly given by the half of the meson mass splitting because nucleon has the half isospin charge of the charged mesons. In addition, we also investigate the nucleon-pion coupling, which requires the modification of the known Abelian-type unitary gauge fixing term because non-Abelian fluctuations should be taken into account in the isospin medium. In this paper, after constructing an appropriate unitary gauge fixing term, we find that in spite of the nucleon's and meson's mass splittings, there is no nucleon-pion coupling splitting in the isospin medium.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the myelin g-ratio from electron microscopy images of the macaque corpus callosum

    Nikola Stikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We provide a detailed morphometric analysis of eight transmission electron micrographs (TEMs obtained from the corpus callosum of one cynomolgus macaque. The raw TEM images are included in the article, along with the distributions of the axon caliber and the myelin g-ratio in each image. The distributions are analyzed to determine the relationship between axon caliber and g-ratio, and compared against the aggregate metrics (myelin volume fraction, fiber volume fraction, and the aggregate g-ratio, as defined in the accompanying research article entitled ‘In vivo histology of the myelin g-ratio with magnetic resonance imaging’ (Stikov et al., NeuroImage, 2015.

  7. Innovative solar thermochemical water splitting.

    Hogan, Roy E. Jr.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Evans, Lindsey R.; Moss, Timothy A.; Stuecker, John Nicholas (Robocasting Enterprises, Albuquerque, NM); Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); James, Darryl L. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX)

    2008-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating the potential of an innovative approach for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using two-step thermochemical cycles. Thermochemical cycles are heat engines that utilize high-temperature heat to produce chemical work. Like their mechanical work-producing counterparts, their efficiency depends on operating temperature and on the irreversibility of their internal processes. With this in mind, we have invented innovative design concepts for two-step solar-driven thermochemical heat engines based on iron oxide and iron oxide mixed with other metal oxides (ferrites). The design concepts utilize two sets of moving beds of ferrite reactant material in close proximity and moving in opposite directions to overcome a major impediment to achieving high efficiency--thermal recuperation between solids in efficient counter-current arrangements. They also provide inherent separation of the product hydrogen and oxygen and are an excellent match with high-concentration solar flux. However, they also impose unique requirements on the ferrite reactants and materials of construction as well as an understanding of the chemical and cycle thermodynamics. In this report the Counter-Rotating-Ring Receiver/Reactor/Recuperator (CR5) solar thermochemical heat engine and its basic operating principals are described. Preliminary thermal efficiency estimates are presented and discussed. Our ferrite reactant material development activities, thermodynamic studies, test results, and prototype hardware development are also presented.

  8. Semi-strong split domination in graphs

    Anwar Alwardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Given a graph $G = (V,E$, a dominating set $D subseteq V$ is called a semi-strong split dominating set of $G$ if $|V setminus D| geq 1$ and the maximum degree of the subgraph induced by $V setminus D$ is 1. The minimum cardinality of a semi-strong split dominating set (SSSDS of G is the semi-strong split domination number of G, denoted $gamma_{sss}(G$. In this work, we introduce the concept and prove several results regarding it.

  9. 2-Photon tandem device for water splitting

    Seger, Brian; Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Within the field Of photocatalytic water splitting there are several strategies to achieve the goal of efficient and cheap photocatalytic water splitting. This work examines one particular strategy by focusing on monolithically stacked, two-photon photoelectrochemical cells. The overall aim of the...... properties. These results show that without protective layers there are scarcely any materials which seem viable as photoabsorbers whereas with protection layers there are significantly more candidates. Since the protection layer (and redox catalysts) on the light facing side should not interfere with light...... photocatalytic water splitting by using a large bandgap photocathode and a low bandgap photoanode with attached protection layers....

  10. Conformal covariance and the split property

    Morinelli, Vincenzo; Weiner, Mihály

    2016-01-01

    We show that for a conformal local net of observables on the circle, the split property is automatic. Both full conformal covariance (i.e. diffeomorphism covariance) and the circle-setting play essential roles in this fact, while by previously constructed examples it was already known that even on the circle, M\\"obius covariance does not imply the split property. On the other hand, here we also provide an example of a local conformal net living on the two-dimensional Minkowski space, which - although being diffeomorphism covariant - does not have the split property.

  11. Communication: Tunnelling splitting in the phosphine molecule.

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Splitting due to tunnelling via the potential energy barrier has played a significant role in the study of molecular spectra since the early days of spectroscopy. The observation of the ammonia doublet led to attempts to find a phosphine analogous, but these have so far failed due to its considerably higher barrier. Full dimensional, variational nuclear motion calculations are used to predict splittings as a function of excitation energy. Simulated spectra suggest that such splittings should be observable in the near infrared via overtones of the ν2 bending mode starting with 4ν2. PMID:27608982

  12. Stock splits on the Athens Stock exchange

    Μάλαμα, Στυλιανή

    2007-01-01

    This study is based on a sample of stock splits initiated by Greek firms between January 1st 1999 and April 30th 2006. We investigate the price reaction to Greek stock splits by applying the “market model methodology” as described in Brown and Warner (1985). Moreover, a cross- sectional analysis is presented so as to identify the factors that can explain any abnormal stock returns around split announcement. The rest of this study is organized as follows. Section 2 describes the...

  13. Stock Split Bubble and Livedoor-Shock

    Youki Kohsaka

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines whether the stock split bubble in Japan burst by not only reformed system, but also Livedoor-shock. It is difficult to identify the effects of the both events, because they occurred in the same month (January, 2006). Thus, I identify both effects by dividing the samples into the following three; the split stocks in the old system and the split stocks in the new system, the news of which was announced before and after Livedoor-shock. Empirical results reveal that restrictio...

  14. Nanofibers Support Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Growth and Function as a Neuron-Free Model for Myelination Study

    Li, Yongchao; CEYLAN, Muhammet; Shrestha, Bikesh; Wang, Haibo; Lu, Q. Richard; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yao, Li

    2013-01-01

    Nanofiber-based scaffolds may simultaneously provide immediate contact guidance for neural regeneration and act as a vehicle for therapeutic cell delivery to enhance axonal myelination. Additionally, nanofibers can serve as a neuron-free model to study myelination of oligodendrocytes. In this study, we fabricated nanofibers using a polycaprolactone and gelatin co-polymer. The ratio of the gelatin component in the fibers was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The addition of ge...

  15. The contributions of myelin and axonal caliber to transverse relaxation time in shiverer and neurofilament-deficient mouse models

    Dyakin, Victor V.; Chen, Yuanxin; Branch, Craig A.; Veeranna; Yuan, Aidong; Rao, Mala; Kumar, Asok; Peterhoff, Corrinne M.; Nixon, Ralph A

    2010-01-01

    White matter disorders can involve injury to myelin or axons but the respective contribution of each to clinical course is difficult to evaluate non-invasively. Here, to develop a paradigm for further investigations of axonal pathology by MRI, we compared two genetic mouse models exhibiting relatively selective axonal or myelin deficits using quantitative MRI relaxography of the transverse relaxation times (T2) in vivo and ultrastructural morphometry. In HM-DKO mice, which lack genes encoding...

  16. The effect of buffer molarity on the size, shape and sheath thickness of peripheral myelinated nerve fibres.

    Holland, G R

    1982-01-01

    Nineteen rats were perfused intracardially with a 2% glutaraldehyde solution in cacodylate buffers adjusted in molarity from 0 to 0.4 M. Ultrathin sections of the inferior alveolar nerve were photographed in the electron microscope. The circumference, a shape factor, small diameter and myelin sheath thickness of each myelinated nerve fibre were measured using a semi-automatic image analysis system. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the nerve profiles increasingly deviate from a t...

  17. Myelin repair in vivo is increased by targeting oligodendrocyte precursor cells with nanoparticles encapsulating leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    Rittchen, Sonja; Boyd, Amanda; Burns, Alasdair; Park, Jason; Fahmy, Tarek M; Metcalfe, Su; Williams, Anna

    2015-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Many nerve axons are insulated by a myelin sheath and their demyelination not only prevents saltatory electrical signal conduction along the axons but also removes their metabolic support leading to irreversible neurodegeneration, which currently is untreatable. There is much interest in potential therapeutics that promote remyelination and here we explore use of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a cytokine known to play a key regulatory role in self-tolerant immunity and recently identified as a pro-myelination factor. In this study, we tested a nanoparticle-based strategy for targeted delivery of LIF to oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) to promote their differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes able to repair myelin. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based nanoparticles of ∼120 nm diameter were constructed with LIF as cargo (LIF-NP) with surface antibodies against NG-2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, expressed on OPC. In vitro, NG2-targeted LIF-NP bound to OPCs, activated pSTAT-3 signalling and induced OPC differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes. In vivo, using a model of focal CNS demyelination, we show that NG2-targeted LIF-NP increased myelin repair, both at the level of increased number of myelinated axons, and increased thickness of myelin per axon. Potency was high: a single NP dose delivering picomolar quantities of LIF is sufficient to increase remyelination. Impact statement Nanotherapy-based delivery of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) directly to OPCs proved to be highly potent in promoting myelin repair in vivo: this delivery strategy introduces a novel approach to delivering drugs or biologics targeted to myelin repair in diseases such as MS. PMID:25934281

  18. Myelin Formation during Development of the CNS Is Delayed in Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and -12 Null Mice

    Larsen, Peter Hjørringgaard; DaSilva, Angelika G.; Conant, Kathrine; Young, V. Wee

    2006-01-01

    around a demyelinating lesion of the spinal cord of adult mice facilitated remyelination. In the current study, we have addressed whether and how MMPs might be required for myelin formation in normal ontogeny. Using a probe for multiple MMPs and the developing mouse optic nerve, we found two members, MMP...... to remain high in MMP-deficient mice. These results reveal a novel function for MMP-9 and -12 in developmental myelination likely through regulating IGF-1 bioavailability....

  19. Myelin Abnormalities in Schizophrenia: Insights from Proteomic Investigations of Post-Mortem Schizophrenia and Pre-Clinical Animal Models

    Farrelly, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from epidemiologic and clinical findings report that both exposure to prenatal inflammation and prenatal iron deficiency significantly increase the risk of developing Schizophrenia in the offspring. Abnormalities in myelin are the most robust neuropathological findings in post-mortem human Schizophrenia, however the exact mechanisms at the protein and pathway levels owing to the myelin deficits are largely unknown. Animal models offer a fruitful approach to study the ...

  20. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Regeneration of myelinated and unmyelinated sensory nerve fibres after a crush lesion of the rat sciatic nerve was investigated by means of retrograde labelling. The advantage of this method is that the degree of regeneration is estimated on the basis of sensory somata rather than the number of...... axons. Axonal counts do not reflect the number of regenerated neurons because of axonal branching and because myelinated axons form unmyelinated sprouts. Two days to 10 weeks after crushing, the distal sural or peroneal nerves were cut and exposed to fluoro-dextran. Large and small dorsal root ganglion...... large neurons after crush and regeneration than in controls, indicating that regeneration of small neurons was less complete than that of large ones. This contrasted with the fact that unmyelinated axons in the regenerated sural nerve after 74 days were only slightly reduced....

  1. Bromodomains: Translating the words of lysine acetylation into myelin injury and repair.

    Ntranos, Achilles; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2016-06-20

    Bromodomains are evolutionarily highly conserved α-helical structural motifs that recognize and bind acetylated lysine residues. Lysine acetylation is being increasingly recognized as a major posttranslational modification involved in diverse cellular processes and protein interactions and its deregulation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various human diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and cancer. Bromodomain-containing proteins can have a wide variety of functions, ranging from histone acetyltransferase activity and chromatin remodeling to transcriptional mediation and co-activation. The role of bromodomains in translating a deregulated cell acetylome into disease phenotypes was recently unveiled by the development of small molecule bromodomain inhibitors. This breakthrough discovery highlighted bromodomain-containing proteins as key players of inflammatory pathways responsible for myelin injury and also demonstrated their role in several aspects of myelin repair including oligodendrocyte differentiation and axonal regeneration. PMID:26472704

  2. Damage to the optic chiasm in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    Herrera, Sheryl L; Palmer, Vanessa L; Whittaker, Heather; Smith, Blair Cardigan; Kim, Annie; Schellenberg, Angela E; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Buist, Richard; Del Bigio, Marc R; Martin, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Optic chiasm lesions in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice were characterized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and validated using electron microscopy (EM). MR images were collected from 3 days after induction to remission, approximately 20 days after induction. Hematoxylin and eosin, solochrome cyanin-stained sections, and EM images were obtained from the optic chiasms of some mice approximately 4 days after disease onset when their scores were thought to be the highest. T2-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map hyperintensities corresponded to abnormalities in the optic chiasms of EAE mice. Mixed inflammation was concentrated at the lateral surface. Degeneration of oligodendrocytes, myelin, and early axonal damage were also apparent. A marked increase in chiasm thickness was observed. T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI can detect abnormalities in the optic chiasms of MOG-EAE mice. MRI is an important method in the study of this model toward understanding optic neuritis. PMID:25520558

  3. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture

    Cho, Yun Kyung; Kim, Gunha; Park, Serah; Sim, Ju Hee; Won, You Jin [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chang Ho [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Jeonha-dong, Dong-gu, Ulsan 682-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jong Yoon, E-mail: jyyoo@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hea Nam, E-mail: hnhong@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EpoR expression in OPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In association with elevated EpoR, EPO increased OPCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO enhanced the oligodendrogenesis via activation of JAK2 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO promoted myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. -- Abstract: Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to a limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

  4. Myelin basic protein peptide 45–89 induces the release of nitric oxide from microglial cells.

    Shanshiashvili, L.; Pichkhadze, B.; Machaidze, G.; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Mikeladze, D.

    2002-01-01

    Continuous (24 h) exposure of mixed oligodendrocyte/microglial cells to peptides 45–89 derived from citrullinated C8 isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) induces cell death. In contrast, MBP-C8 at the same molecular concentration is not toxic to oligodendrocyte/microglial cells as detected by the MTT test and trypan blue exclusion method. The loss of oligodendrocyte/microglial cells resulted in the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, suggesting MBP 45–89-induced apo...

  5. Proteolysis of multiple myelin basic protein isoforms after neurotrauma: characterization by mass spectrometry

    Ottens, Andrew K.; Golden, Erin C.; Bustamante, Liliana; Hayes, Ronald L.; Denslow, Nancy D; Wang, Kevin K.W.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotrauma, as in the case of traumatic brain injury, promotes protease over-activation characterized by the select fragmentation of brain proteins. The resulting polypeptides are indicators of biochemical processes, which can be used to study post-injury dynamics and may also be developed into biomarkers. To this end, we devised a novel mass spectrometry approach to characterize post-injury calpain proteolytic processing of myelin basic protein (MBP), a biomarker of brain injury that denote...

  6. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U.

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internod...

  7. Autophagy Promotes Oligodendrocyte Survival and Function following Dysmyelination in a Long-Lived Myelin Mutant

    Smith, Chelsey M.; Mayer, Joshua A.; Duncan, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    The Long–Evans shaker (les) rat has a mutation in myelin basic protein that results in severe CNS dysmyelination and subsequent demyelination during development. During this time, les oligodendrocytes accumulate cytoplasmic vesicles, including lysosomes and membrane-bound organelles. However, the mechanism and functional relevance behind these oligodendrocyte abnormalities in les have not been investigated. Using high-magnification electron microscopy, we identified the accumulations in les o...

  8. Conformational epitopes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein are targets of potentially pathogenic antibody responses in multiple sclerosis

    Menge Til; Lalive Patrice H; von Büdingen H -Christian; Genain Claude P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a putative autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS). Establishing the pathological relevance and validity of anti-MOG antibodies as biomarkers has yielded conflicting reports mainly due to different MOG isoforms used in different studies. Because epitope specificity may be a key factor determining anti-MOG reactivity we aimed at identifying a priori immunodominant MOG epitopes by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and at assessing clini...

  9. Analysis of the proximal transcriptional element of the myelin basic protein gene.

    Devine-Beach, K; Haas, S.; Khalili, K

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding myelin basic protein (MBP) contains multiple activator sequences spanning upstream of its transcriptional initiation site which differentially promote transcription in glial cells. The proximal activator sequence, designated MB1, activates transcription in a glial cell type specific manner. This sequence resides between -14 to -50 with respect to the RNA initiation site of the MBP gene. We have identified within the MB1 sequence a 10-nucleotide domain, 5'-ACCTTCAAAG-3', that...

  10. THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING OPTICAL STIMULATION OF MYELINATED AXONS EXPRESSING CHANNELRHODOPSIN-2

    ARLOW, R. L.; FOUTZ, T. J.; MCINTYRE, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous clinical conditions can be treated by neuromodulation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Typical electrical PNS therapies activate large diameter axons at lower electrical stimulus thresholds than small diameter axons. However, recent animal experiments with peripheral optogenetic neural stimulation (PONS) of myelinated axons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have shown that this technique activates small diameter axons at lower irradiances than large diameter axons. We hypot...

  11. Skin-derived neural precursors competitively generate functional myelin in adult demyelinated mice

    Mozafari, Sabah; Laterza, Cecilia; Roussel, Delphine; Bachelin, Corinne; Marteyn, Antoine; Deboux, Cyrille; Martino, Gianvito; Evercooren, Anne Baron-Van

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived (iPS-derived) neural precursor cells may represent the ideal autologous cell source for cell-based therapy to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in myelin diseases. So far, the therapeutic potential of reprogrammed cells has been evaluated in neonatal demyelinating models. However, the repair efficacy and safety of these cells has not been well addressed in the demyelinated adult CNS, which has decreased cell plasticity and scarring. Moreover, it i...

  12. Myelin Basic Protein Priming Reduces the Expression of Foxp3 in T Cells via Nitric Oxide

    Brahmachari, Saurav; Pahan, Kalipada

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a vital role in autoimmune disorders. Among several markers, forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) is the most specific with regard to Treg activity. Therefore, understanding mechanisms that regulate Foxp3 expression is a critical step for unraveling the complicacy of autoimmune pathophysiology. The present study was undertaken to investigate the crosstalk between NO and Tregs. Interestingly, after myelin basic protein (MBP) priming, the expression of Foxp3 decreased in MBP-...

  13. Repair of astrocytes, blood vessels, and myelin in the injured brain: possible roles of blood monocytes

    Jeong, Hey-Kyeong; Ji, Kyung-min; Kim, Jun; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-hye

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation in injured tissue has both repair functions and cytotoxic consequences. However, the issue of whether brain inflammation has a repair function has received little attention. Previously, we demonstrated monocyte infiltration and death of neurons and resident microglia in LPS-injected brains (Glia. 2007. 55:1577; Glia. 2008. 56:1039). Here, we found that astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, myelin, and endothelial cells disappeared in the damage core within 1–3 d and then re-appeared at 7...

  14. Coseeded Schwann cells myelinate neurites from differentiated neural stem cells in neurotrophin-3-loaded PLGA carriers

    Xiong Y

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Yi Xiong1,*, Ji-Xiang Zhu2,*, Zheng-Yu Fang1, Cheng-Guang Zeng2, Chao Zhang1, Guo-Long Qi3, Man-Hui Li1, Wei Zhang1, Da-Ping Quan2, Jun Wan1,41Biomedical Research Institute, Shenzhen-PKU-HKUST Medical Center, Shenzhen, 2DSAPM Lab, PCFM Lab, Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 3Department of Medical Information, Medical Collage of Jinan University, Guangzhou, 4Division of Life Science, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this manuscriptAbstract: Biomaterials and neurotrophic factors represent promising guidance for neural repair. In this study, we combined poly-(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA conduits and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 to generate NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers in vitro. Bioactive NT-3 was released stably and constantly from PLGA conduits for up to 4 weeks. Neural stem cells (NSCs and Schwann cells (SCs were coseeded into an NT-releasing scaffold system and cultured for 14 days. Immunoreactivity against Map2 showed that most of the grafted cells (>80% were differentiated toward neurons. Double-immunostaining for synaptogenesis and myelination revealed the formation of synaptic structures and myelin sheaths in the coculture, which was also observed under electron microscope. Furthermore, under depolarizing conditions, these synapses were excitable and capable of releasing synaptic vesicles labeled with FM1-43 or FM4-64. Taken together, coseeding NSCs and SCs into NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers increased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons, developed synaptic connections, exhibited synaptic activities, and myelination of neurites by the accompanying SCs. These results provide an experimental basis that supports transplantation of functional neural construction in spinal cord injury.Keywords: PLGA, NT-3, neural stem cells, Schwann cells, myelin sheath

  15. MYELIN ANTIGEN LOAD INFLUENCES ANTIGEN PRESENTATION AND SEVERITY OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AUTOIMMUNITY

    Jaini, Ritika; Popescu, Daniela C.; Flask, Chris A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to understand the impact of self-antigen load on manifestation of organ specific autoimmunity. Using a transgenic mouse model characterized by CNS hypermyelination, we show that larger myelin content results in greater severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis attributable to an increased number of microglia within the hypermyelinated brain. We conclude that a larger self-antigen load affects an increase in number of tissue resident antigen presenting cells...

  16. Circulating antibody to myelin basic protein in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Sera from multiple sclerosis patients with relapsing-remitting disease and normal subjects were tested for antibody to myelin basic protein by a sensitive radioimmunoassay. The results showed a marginally decreased titre in multiple sclerosis superimposed on a seasonal variation. There was no correlation with the clinical state of the patients. Results are discussed briefly in relation to humoral antibody function in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. (author)

  17. Novel myelin penta- and hexa-acetyl-galactosyl-ceramides: structural characterization and immunoreactivity in cerebrospinal fluid

    Podbielska, Maria; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Levery, Steven B;

    2010-01-01

    Fast migrating cerebrosides (FMC) are derivatives of galactosylceramide (GalCer). The structures of the most hydrophobic FMC-5, FMC-6, and FMC-7 were determined by electrospray ionization linear ion-trap mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy complementing previous......GL-II from Mycoplasma fermentans. The cross-reactivity of highly acetylated GalCer with microbial acyl-glycolipid raises the possibility that myelin-O-acetyl-cerebrosides, bacterial infection, and neurological disease are linked....

  18. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of NRG1 type III dediates postnatal peripheral myelination

    Fleck, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) type III is a growth factor on the surface of neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). It is required for initial myelination of nerves by Schwann cells after birth and for remyelination after injury. Neuregulin-1 type III is activated by cleavage (shedding) in its extracellular juxtamembrane region generating a membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) that contains a bioactive epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain. This domain signals to neighboring Schwann cel...

  19. Long-term consequences of chronic fluoxetine exposure on the expression of myelination-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

    Kroeze, Y; Peeters, D; Boulle, F; van den Hove, D L A; van Bokhoven, H; Zhou, H; Homberg, J R

    2015-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine is widely prescribed for the treatment of symptoms related to a variety of psychiatric disorders. After chronic SSRI treatment, some symptoms remediate on the long term, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet well understood. Here we studied the long-term consequences (40 days after treatment) of chronic fluoxetine exposure on genome-wide gene expression. During the treatment period, we measured body weight; and 1 week after treatment, cessation behavior in an SSRI-sensitive anxiety test was assessed. Gene expression was assessed in hippocampal tissue of adult rats using transcriptome analysis and several differentially expressed genes were validated in independent samples. Gene ontology analysis showed that upregulated genes induced by chronic fluoxetine exposure were significantly enriched for genes involved in myelination. We also investigated the expression of myelination-related genes in adult rats exposed to fluoxetine at early life and found two myelination-related genes (Transferrin (Tf) and Ciliary neurotrophic factor (Cntf)) that were downregulated by chronic fluoxetine exposure. Cntf, a neurotrophic factor involved in myelination, showed regulation in opposite direction in the adult versus neonatally fluoxetine-exposed groups. Expression of myelination-related genes correlated negatively with anxiety-like behavior in both adult and neonatally fluoxetine-exposed rats. In conclusion, our data reveal that chronic fluoxetine exposure causes on the long-term changes in expression of genes involved in myelination, a process that shapes brain connectivity and contributes to symptoms of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26393488

  20. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  1. Functional phylogenetic analysis of LGI proteins identifies an interaction motif crucial for myelination.

    Kegel, Linde; Jaegle, Martine; Driegen, Siska; Aunin, Eerik; Leslie, Kris; Fukata, Yuko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fukata, Masaki; Meijer, Dies

    2014-04-01

    The cellular interactions that drive the formation and maintenance of the insulating myelin sheath around axons are only partially understood. Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play important roles in nervous system development and mutations in their genes have been associated with epilepsy and amyelination. Their function involves interactions with ADAM22 and ADAM23 cell surface receptors, possibly in apposing membranes, thus attenuating cellular interactions. LGI4-ADAM22 interactions are required for axonal sorting and myelination in the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS). Functional analysis revealed that, despite their high homology and affinity for ADAM22, LGI proteins are functionally distinct. To dissect the key residues in LGI proteins required for coordinating axonal sorting and myelination in the developing PNS, we adopted a phylogenetic and computational approach and demonstrate that the mechanism of action of LGI4 depends on a cluster of three amino acids on the outer surface of the LGI4 protein, thus providing a structural basis for the mechanistic differences in LGI protein function in nervous system development and evolution. PMID:24715463

  2. The Transcriptional Activator Krüppel-like Factor-6 Is Required for CNS Myelination

    Mariani, John N.; Zhang, Jingya; Liu, Jia; Sawai, Setsu; Chapouly, Candice; Horng, Sam; Kramer, Elisabeth G.; Loo, Hannah; Burlant, Natalie; Nudelman, German; Lee, Young-Min; Braun, David A.; Lu, Q. Richard; Narla, Goutham; Raine, Cedric S.; Friedman, Scott L.; Casaccia, Patrizia; John, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors of the gp130 family promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and viability, and myelination, but their mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Here, we show that these effects are coordinated, in part, by the transcriptional activator Krüppel-like factor-6 (Klf6). Klf6 is rapidly induced in oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLP) by gp130 factors, and promotes differentiation. Conversely, in mice with lineage-selective Klf6 inactivation, OLP undergo maturation arrest followed by apoptosis, and CNS myelination fails. Overlapping transcriptional and chromatin occupancy analyses place Klf6 at the nexus of a novel gp130-Klf-importin axis, which promotes differentiation and viability in part via control of nuclear trafficking. Klf6 acts as a gp130-sensitive transactivator of the nuclear import factor importin-α5 (Impα5), and interfering with this mechanism interrupts step-wise differentiation. Underscoring the significance of this axis in vivo, mice with conditional inactivation of gp130 signaling display defective Klf6 and Impα5 expression, OLP maturation arrest and apoptosis, and failure of CNS myelination. PMID:27213272

  3. Myocilin mediates myelination in the peripheral nervous system through ErbB2/3 signaling.

    Kwon, Heung Sun; Johnson, Thomas V; Joe, Myung Kuk; Abu-Asab, Mones; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi Chao; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2013-09-13

    The glaucoma-associated gene, myocilin, is expressed in ocular and non-ocular tissues including the peripheral nervous system, but its functions in these tissues remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that in sciatic nerve, myocilin is expressed in Schwann cells with high concentrations at the nodes of Ranvier. There, myocilin interacts with gliomedin, neurofascin, and NrCAM, which are essential for node formation and function. Treatment of isolated dorsal root ganglion cultures with myocilin stimulates clustering of the nodal proteins neurofascin and sodium channel Nav1.2. Sciatic nerves of myocilin null mice express reduced levels of several myelin-associated and basal membrane proteins compared with those of wild-type littermates. They also demonstrate reduced myelin sheath thickness and partial disorganization of the nodes. Myocilin signaling through ErbB2/3 receptors may contribute to these observed effects. Myocilin binds to ErbB2/ErbB3, activates these receptors, and affects the downstream PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. These data implicate a role for myocilin in the development and/or maintenance of myelination and nodes of Ranvier in sciatic nerve. PMID:23897819

  4. Live animal myelin histomorphometry of the spinal cord with video-rate multimodal nonlinear microendoscopy

    Bélanger, Erik; Crépeau, Joël; Laffray, Sophie; Vallée, Réal; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    In vivo imaging of cellular dynamics can be dramatically enabling to understand the pathophysiology of nervous system diseases. To fully exploit the power of this approach, the main challenges have been to minimize invasiveness and maximize the number of concurrent optical signals that can be combined to probe the interplay between multiple cellular processes. Label-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, for example, can be used to follow demyelination in neurodegenerative diseases or after trauma, but myelin imaging alone is not sufficient to understand the complex sequence of events that leads to the appearance of lesions in the white matter. A commercially available microendoscope is used here to achieve minimally invasive, video-rate multimodal nonlinear imaging of cellular processes in live mouse spinal cord. The system allows for simultaneous CARS imaging of myelin sheaths and two-photon excitation fluorescence microendoscopy of microglial cells and axons. Morphometric data extraction at high spatial resolution is also described, with a technique for reducing motion-related imaging artifacts. Despite its small diameter, the microendoscope enables high speed multimodal imaging over wide areas of tissue, yet at resolution sufficient to quantify subtle differences in myelin thickness and microglial motility.

  5. A rare myelin protein zero (MPZ variant alters enhancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Anthony Antonellis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myelin protein zero (MPZ is a critical structural component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. The MPZ gene is regulated, in part, by the transcription factors SOX10 and EGR2. Mutations in MPZ, SOX10, and EGR2 have been implicated in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that components of this transcriptional network are candidates for harboring disease-causing mutations (or otherwise functional variants that affect MPZ expression. METHODOLOGY: We utilized a combination of multi-species sequence comparisons, transcription factor-binding site predictions, targeted human DNA re-sequencing, and in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays to study human non-coding MPZ variants. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our efforts revealed a variant within the first intron of MPZ that resides within a previously described SOX10 binding site is associated with decreased enhancer activity, and alters binding of nuclear proteins. Additionally, the genomic segment harboring this variant directs tissue-relevant reporter gene expression in zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first reported MPZ variant within a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element. While we were unable to implicate this variant in disease onset, our data suggests that similar non-coding sequences should be screened for mutations in patients with neurological disease. Furthermore, our multi-faceted approach for examining the functional significance of non-coding variants can be readily generalized to study other loci important for myelin structure and function.

  6. Coseeded Schwann cells myelinate neurites from differentiated neural stem cells in neurotrophin-3-loaded PLGA carriers.

    Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Fang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Cheng-Guang; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Guo-Long; Li, Man-Hui; Zhang, Wei; Quan, Da-Ping; Wan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials and neurotrophic factors represent promising guidance for neural repair. In this study, we combined poly-(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduits and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to generate NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers in vitro. Bioactive NT-3 was released stably and constantly from PLGA conduits for up to 4 weeks. Neural stem cells (NSCs) and Schwann cells (SCs) were coseeded into an NT-releasing scaffold system and cultured for 14 days. Immunoreactivity against Map2 showed that most of the grafted cells (>80%) were differentiated toward neurons. Double-immunostaining for synaptogenesis and myelination revealed the formation of synaptic structures and myelin sheaths in the coculture, which was also observed under electron microscope. Furthermore, under depolarizing conditions, these synapses were excitable and capable of releasing synaptic vesicles labeled with FM1-43 or FM4-64. Taken together, coseeding NSCs and SCs into NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers increased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons, developed synaptic connections, exhibited synaptic activities, and myelination of neurites by the accompanying SCs. These results provide an experimental basis that supports transplantation of functional neural construction in spinal cord injury. PMID:22619535

  7. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Zhe Zhu; Lu Ding; Wen-feng Qiu; Hong-fu Wu; Rui Li

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present inSalvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study,in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 µg/mL. Forin vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of re-generating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  8. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    Peter Göttle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS.

  9. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Zhe Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  10. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons.

    Zhu, Zhe; Ding, Lu; Qiu, Wen-Feng; Wu, Hong-Fu; Li, Rui

    2016-03-01

    Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. PMID:27127491

  11. Dominated splittings for flows with singularities

    We obtain sufficient conditions for an invariant splitting over a compact invariant subset of a C1 flow Xt to be dominated. In particular, we reduce the requirements to obtain sectional hyperbolicity and hyperbolicity. (paper)

  12. Small-molecule-dependent split aptamer ligation.

    Sharma, Ashwani K; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2011-08-17

    Here we describe the first use of small-molecule binding to direct a chemical reaction between two nucleic acid strands. The reported reaction is a ligation between two fragments of a DNA split aptamer using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Utilizing the split aptamer for cocaine, we demonstrate small-molecule-dependent ligation that is dose-dependent over a wide range of cocaine concentrations and is compatible with complex biological fluids such as human blood serum. Moreover, studies of split aptamer ligation at varying salt concentrations and using structurally similar analogues of cocaine have revealed new insight into the assembly and small-molecule binding properties of the cocaine split aptamer. The ability to translate the presence of a small-molecule target into the output of DNA ligation is anticipated to enable the development of new, broadly applicable small-molecule detection assays. PMID:21761903

  13. Ectrodactyly/split hand feet malformation

    Jindal Geetanjali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Split-hand/split-foot malformation is a rare limb malformation with median clefts of the hands and feet and aplasia/hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals and metatarsals. When present as an isolated anomaly, it is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant form. We report a case of autosomal recessive inheritance and discuss the antenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling and treatment for the malformation.

  14. Antenna Splitting Functions for Massive Particles

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    An antenna shower is a parton shower in which the basic move is a color-coherent 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting process. In this paper, we give compact forms for the spin-dependent antenna splitting functions involving massive partons of spin 0 and spin 1/2. We hope that this formalism we have presented will be useful in describing the QCD dynamics of the top quark and other heavy particles at LHC.

  15. Split-Quaternions and the Dirac Equation

    Antonuccio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We show that Dirac 4-spinors admit an entirely equivalent formulation in terms of 2-spinors defined over the split-quaternions. In this formalism, a Lorentz transformation is represented as a $2 \\times 2$ unitary matrix over the split-quaternions. The corresponding Dirac equation is then derived in terms of these 2-spinors. In this framework the $SO(3,2; {\\bf R})$ symmetry of the Lorentz invariant scalar $\\overline{\\psi}\\psi$ is manifest.

  16. Reminiscing Stock Splits Announcement: A Malaysian Case

    Zahiruddin Ghazali; Fauziah Md. Taib; Noraini Othman

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to understands and verify the effects of stock splits on the abnormal returns of announcing companies share prices using Market Adjusted Returns (MAR) Model. Test findings reveal splits announcements in Malaysia result in positive but insignificant abnormal returns. Additional OLS test was carry out to examine the relationship between companies’ cumulative abnormal returns (CAAR) and prior dividend yield (PDY). Result from uni-variate regression analysis shows there is min...

  17. Split-plot designs for multistage experimentation

    Kulahci, Murat; Tyssedal, John

    2016-01-01

    at the same time will be more efficient. However, there have been only a few attempts in the literature to provide an adequate and easy-to-use approach for this problem. In this paper, we present a novel methodology for constructing two-level split-plot and multistage experiments. The methodology is based...... be accommodated in each stage. Furthermore, split-plot designs for multistage experiments with good projective properties are also provided....

  18. Split School of High Energy Physics 2015

    2015-01-01

    Split School of High Energy Physics 2015 (SSHEP 2015) was held at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FESB), University of Split, from September 14 to September 18, 2015. SSHEP 2015 aimed at master and PhD students who were interested in topics pertaining to High Energy Physics. SSHEP 2015 is the sixth edition of the High Energy Physics School. Previous five editions were held at the Department of Physics, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  19. Detection of flux emergence, splitting, merging, and cancellation of network field. I Splitting and Merging

    Iida, Y; Yokoyama, T

    2012-01-01

    Frequencies of magnetic patch processes on supergranule boundary, namely flux emergence, splitting, merging, and cancellation, are investigated through an automatic detection. We use a set of line of sight magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode satellite. We found 1636 positive patches and 1637 negative patches in the data set, whose time duration is 3.5 hours and field of view is 112" \\times 112". Total numbers of magnetic processes are followed: 493 positive and 482 negative splittings, 536 positive and 535 negative mergings, 86 cancellations, and 3 emergences. Total numbers of emergence and cancellation are significantly smaller than those of splitting and merging. Further, frequency dependences of merging and splitting processes on flux content are investigated. Merging has a weak dependence on flux content only with a power- law index of 0.28. Timescale for splitting is found to be independent of parent flux content before splitting, which corresponds to \\sim 33 minutes. ...

  20. THE MARKET REACTION TO STOCK SPLIT ON ACTUAL STOCK SPLIT DAY

    Yu Huang; Yixin Fan

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented in the literature that there are positive abnormal returns on the announcement days of stock splits. However, few studies investigated the stock return on the actual split day. We examine market reaction on the actual split day and find that it is positive. We also find a negative relationship between the market reaction and firm size as well as the previous trading volume. The result is in support of the inattention theory.

  1. Quintessence and phantom emerging from the split-complex field and the split-quaternion field

    Gao, Changjun; Chen, Xuelei; Shen, You-Gen

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the mathematic theory of split-complex numbers (or hyperbolic numbers, also perplex numbers) and the split-quaternion numbers (or coquaternion numbers), we define the notion of split-complex scalar field and the split-quaternion scalar field. Then we explore the cosmic evolution of these scalar fields in the background of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe. We find that both the quintessence field and the phantom field could naturally emerge in these scalar fields. Introducing the metric of field space, these theories fall into a subclass of the multi-field theories which have been extensively studied in inflationary cosmology.

  2. The Effects of Threonine Phosphorylation on the Stability and Dynamics of the Central Molecular Switch Region of 18.5-kDa Myelin Basic Protein

    Vassall, Kenrick A.; Kyrylo Bessonov; Miguel De Avila; Eugenia Polverini; George Harauz

    2013-01-01

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease mul...

  3. Oct4 transcription factor in conjunction with valproic acid accelerates myelin repair in demyelinated optic chiasm in mice.

    Dehghan, S; Hesaraki, M; Soleimani, M; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, J; Fathollahi, Y; Javan, M

    2016-03-24

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease with severe neurological symptoms due to blockage of signal conduction in affected axons. Spontaneous remyelination via endogenous progenitors is limited and eventually fails. Recent reports showed that forced expression of some transcription factors within the brain converted somatic cells to neural progenitors and neuroblasts. Here, we report the effect of valproic acid (VPA) along with forced expression of Oct4 transcription factor on lysolecithin (LPC)-induced experimental demyelination. Mice were gavaged with VPA for one week, and then inducible Oct4 expressing lentiviral particles were injected into the lateral ventricle. After one-week induction of Oct4, LPC was injected into the optic chiasm. Functional remyelination was assessed by visual-evoked potential (VEP) recording. Myelination level was studied using FluoroMyelin staining and immunohistofluorescent (IHF) against proteolipid protein (PLP). IHF was also performed to detect Oct4 and SSEA1 as pluripotency markers and Olig2, Sox10, CNPase and PDGFRα as oligodendrocyte lineage markers. One week after injection of Oct4 expressing vector, pluripotency markers SSEA1 and Oct4 were detected in the rims of the 3rd ventricle. LPC injection caused extensive demyelination and significantly delayed the latency of VEP wave. Animals pre-treated with VPA+Oct4 expressing vector, showed faster recovery in the VEP latency and enhanced myelination. Immunostaining against oligodendrocyte lineage markers showed an increased number of Sox10+ and myelinating cells. Moreover, transdifferentiation of some Oct4-transfected cells (GFP+ cells) to Olig2+ and CNPase+ cells was confirmed by immunostaining. One-week administration of VPA followed by one-week forced expression of Oct4 enhanced myelination by converting transduced cells to myelinating oligodendrocytes. This finding seems promising for enhancing myelin repair within the adult brains. PMID:26804242

  4. Urban pattern: Layout design by hierarchical domain splitting

    Yang, Yongliang

    2013-11-01

    We present a framework for generating street networks and parcel layouts. Our goal is the generation of high-quality layouts that can be used for urban planning and virtual environments. We propose a solution based on hierarchical domain splitting using two splitting types: streamline-based splitting, which splits a region along one or multiple streamlines of a cross field, and template-based splitting, which warps pre-designed templates to a region and uses the interior geometry of the template as the splitting lines. We combine these two splitting approaches into a hierarchical framework, providing automatic and interactive tools to explore the design space.

  5. Split hand Split foot, iris/choroid coloboma, hypospadias and subfertility : a new developmental malformation syndrome?

    Giltay, JC; Wittebol-Post, D; van Bokhoven, H; Kastrop, PMM; Lock, MTWT

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a patient with the following malformations: split hand and split foot on the left side, a hypoplastic fifth ray of the right hand and a hypoplastic first ray of the right foot with a small cleft between the first and second ray; eye abnormalities which consist of a complete iris

  6. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin [Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Nagar, Geet Kumar [Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI) (India); Mitra, Kalyan [Electron Microscopy Unit, CSIR-CDRI, Lucknow 226001 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra, E-mail: sanghmitra@iitr.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India)

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  7. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  8. The Impact of Clientele Changes: Evidence from Stock Splits

    Ravi Dhar; William Goetzmann; Ning Zhu; EFA Moscow

    2004-01-01

    We examine the trades of individual and professional investors around stock splits and find that splits bring about a significant shift in investor clientele. We find that a higher fraction of post-split trades are made by less sophisticated investors, as individual investors increase and professional investors reduce their aggregate buying activity following stock splits. This behavior supports the common practitioners' belief that stock splits help attract new investors and improve stock li...

  9. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator. PMID:20967092

  10. Observers and splitting structures in relativistic electrodynamics

    We introduce a relativistic splitting structure as a means to map fields and equations of electromagnetism from curved four-dimensional space–time to three-dimensional observer's space. We focus on a minimal set of mathematical structures that are directly motivated by the language of the physical theory. Space–time, world-lines, time translation, space platforms and time synchronization all find their mathematical counterparts. The splitting structure is defined without recourse to coordinates or frames. This is noteworthy since, in much of the prevalent literature, observers are identified with adapted coordinates and frames. Among the benefits of the approach is a concise and insightful classification of splitting structures that is juxtaposed to a classification of observers. The application of the framework to the Ehrenfest paradox and Schiff's ‘Question in General Relativity’ further illustrates the advantages of the framework, enabling a compact, yet profound analysis of the problems at hand. (paper)

  11. Pathological relationships involving iron and myelin may constitute a shared mechanism linking various rare and common brain diseases

    Heidari, Moones; Gerami, Sam H.; Bassett, Brianna; Graham, Ross M.; Chua, Anita C.G.; Aryal, Ritambhara; House, Michael J.; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Ryten, Mina; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie; Johnstone, Daniel M.; Milward, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated elevated brain iron levels in myelinated structures and associated cells in a hemochromatosis Hfe−/−xTfr2mut mouse model. This was accompanied by altered expression of a group of myelin-related genes, including a suite of genes causatively linked to the rare disease family ‘neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation’ (NBIA). Expanded data mining and ontological analyses have now identified additional myelin-related transcriptome changes in response to brain iron loading. Concordance between the mouse transcriptome changes and human myelin-related gene expression networks in normal and NBIA basal ganglia testifies to potential clinical relevance. These analyses implicate, among others, genes linked to various rare central hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and peripheral neuropathies including Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease as well as genes linked to other rare neurological diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease. The findings may help understand interrelationships of iron and myelin in more common conditions such as hemochromatosis, multiple sclerosis and various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27500074

  12. Myocilin is involved in NgR1/Lingo-1-mediated oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination of the optic nerve.

    Kwon, Heung Sun; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Kim, Hong Sug; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2014-04-16

    Myocilin is a secreted glycoprotein that belongs to a family of olfactomedin domain-containing proteins. Although myocilin is detected in several ocular and nonocular tissues, the only reported human pathology related to mutations in the MYOCILIN gene is primary open-angle glaucoma. Functions of myocilin are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that myocilin is a mediator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and is involved in the myelination of the optic nerve in mice. Myocilin is expressed and secreted by optic nerve astrocytes. Differentiation of optic nerve oligodendrocytes is delayed in Myocilin-null mice. Optic nerves of Myocilin-null mice contain reduced levels of several myelin-associated proteins including myelin basic protein, myelin proteolipid protein, and 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase compared with those of wild-type littermates. This leads to reduced myelin sheath thickness of optic nerve axons in Myocilin-null mice compared with wild-type littermates, and this difference is more pronounced at early postnatal stages compared with adult mice. Myocilin also affects differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors in vitro. Its addition to primary cultures of differentiating oligodendrocyte precursors increases levels of tested markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and stimulates elongation of oligodendrocyte processes. Myocilin stimulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation occurs through the NgR1/Lingo-1 receptor complex. Myocilin physically interacts with Lingo-1 and may be considered as a Lingo-1 ligand. Myocilin-induced elongation of oligodendrocyte processes may be mediated by activation of FYN and suppression of RhoA GTPase. PMID:24741044

  13. Studies on the Wolfgram high molecular weight CNS myelin proteins: relationship to 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase.

    Sprinkle, T J; Wells, M R; Garver, F A; Smith, D B

    1980-11-01

    Evidence is presented that the major protein components of the high molecular weight CNS myelin proteins designated as the Wolfgram protein doublet (W1 and W2) contain the enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.37, CNP). CNP is a basic hydrophobic protein containing about 830 to 840 amino acid residues. When electrophoresed on SDS polyacrylamide gels, CNP appears as a protein doublet, separated by a molecular weight difference of about 2500-3000 in bovine, human, rat, guinea pig, and rabbit. A similar protein doublet has been identified as the Wolfgram proteins W2 and W1 in myelin and in the chloroform-methanol-insoluble pellet obtained from myelin. Moreover, the relative Coomassie blue staining intensity of the CNP2 plus CNP1 protein doublet among the species examined was remarkably similar to that observed for electrophoresed myelin and chloroform-methanol-insoluble pellet derived from myelin. Antisera raised against purified bovine CNP recognized the W1 and W2 proteins isolated from bovine and human brain. The amino acid composition of pure bovine CNP is presented and compared with the compositions of several rat and bovine Wolfgram proteins obtained by other investigators. Our electrophoretic, compositional, and immunological data support the contention that the enzyme CNP is a major component of the Wolfgram protein doublet. PMID:6256502

  14. Osmic acid staining of myelin sheath in normal and regenerated peripheral nerves

    WEI Li-ping; HE Feng-chun; CHEN Xun-wen; LU Shi-bi; Marco Lanzetta; Robbert De Iongh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To introduce a practical, economical, and time-saving method to stain (with osmic acid) the myelin sheath in normal and regenerated peripheral nerves. Methods: A total of 12 Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 250-320 g (mean=276 g±38 g),were divided into two groups: a normal nerve group (n=6) and a regenerated nerve group (n=6).In the normal nerve group, the ventral and dorsal roots of L4 to L6 and their sciatic nerves were harvested for histological analysis. While in the regenerated nerve group, the right sciatic nerves were severed and then repaired with an epineurial microsuture method. The repaired nerves were harvested 12 weeks postoperatively. All the specimens were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and transferred to 2% osmic acid for 3-5 days. Then the specimens were kept in 75% alcohol before being embedded in paraffin. The tissues were cut into sections of 3 μm in thickness with a conventional microtome. Results: Under a light microscope, myelin sheaths were clearly visible at all magnifications in both groups. They were stained in clear dark colour with a light yellow or colorless background, which provided high contrast images to allow reliable morphometric measurements. Morphological assessment was made in both normal and regenerated sciatic nerves. The ratios of the myelin area to the fibre area were 60.28%±7.66% in the normal nerve group and 51.67%±6.85% in the regenerated nerve group, respectively (P<0.01). Conclusions: Osmic acid staining is easy to perform and a very clear image for morphometrical assessment is easy to obtain. Therefore, it is a reliable technique for quantitative evaluation of nerve morphology.

  15. Anosmin-1 over-expression regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, migration and myelin sheath thickness.

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Martínez-Hernández, José; Gruart, Agnès; Luján, Rafael; Delgado-García, José María; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    During development of the central nervous system, anosmin-1 (A1) works as a chemotropic cue contributing to axonal outgrowth and collateralization, as well as modulating the migration of different cell types, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) being the main receptor involved in all these events. To further understand the role of A1 during development, we have analysed the over-expression of human A1 in a transgenic mouse line. Compared with control mice during development and in early adulthood, A1 over-expressing transgenic mice showed an enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and a higher number of OPCs in the subventricular zone and in the corpus callosum (CC). The migratory capacity of OPCs from the transgenic mice is increased in vitro due to a higher basal activation of ERK1/2 mediated through FGFR1 and they also produced more myelin basic protein (MBP). In vivo, the over-expression of A1 resulted in an elevated number of mature oligodendrocytes with higher levels of MBP mRNA and protein, as well as increased levels of activation of the ERK1/2 proteins, while electron microscopy revealed thicker myelin sheaths around the axons of the CC in adulthood. Also in the mature CC, the nodes of Ranvier were significantly longer and the conduction velocity of the nerve impulse in vivo was significantly increased in the CC of A1 over-expressing transgenic mice. Altogether, these data confirmed the involvement of A1 in oligodendrogliogenesis and its relevance for myelination. PMID:25662897

  16. Systemic 5-fluorouracil treatment causes a syndrome of delayed myelin destruction in the central nervous system

    Han Ruolan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer treatment with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents often is associated with delayed adverse neurological consequences. Despite their clinical importance, almost nothing is known about the basis for such effects. It is not even known whether the occurrence of delayed adverse effects requires exposure to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, the presence of both chemotherapeutic agents and the body's own response to cancer, prolonged damage to the blood-brain barrier, inflammation or other such changes. Nor are there any animal models that could enable the study of this important problem. Results We found that clinically relevant concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a widely used chemotherapeutic agent were toxic for both central nervous system (CNS progenitor cells and non-dividing oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Short-term systemic administration of 5-FU caused both acute CNS damage and a syndrome of progressively worsening delayed damage to myelinated tracts of the CNS associated with altered transcriptional regulation in oligodendrocytes and extensive myelin pathology. Functional analysis also provided the first demonstration of delayed effects of chemotherapy on the latency of impulse conduction in the auditory system, offering the possibility of non-invasive analysis of myelin damage associated with cancer treatment. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that systemic treatment with a single chemotherapeutic agent, 5-FU, is sufficient to cause a syndrome of delayed CNS damage and provide the first animal model of delayed damage to white-matter tracts of individuals treated with systemic chemotherapy. Unlike that caused by local irradiation, the degeneration caused by 5-FU treatment did not correlate with either chronic inflammation or extensive vascular damage and appears to represent a new class of delayed degenerative damage in the CNS.

  17. Spinal activity of interleukin 6 mediates myelin basic protein-induced allodynia.

    Ko, Justin S; Eddinger, Kelly A; Angert, Mila; Chernov, Andrei V; Dolkas, Jennifer; Strongin, Alex Y; Yaksh, Tony L; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2016-08-01

    Mechanosensory fibers are enveloped by myelin, a unique multilamellar membrane permitting saltatory neuronal conduction. Damage to myelin is thought to contribute to severe pain evoked by innocuous tactile stimulation (i.e., mechanical allodynia). Our earlier (Liu et al., 2012) and present data demonstrate that a single injection of a myelin basic protein-derived peptide (MBP84-104) into an intact sciatic nerve produces a robust and long-lasting (>30days) mechanical allodynia in female rats. The MBP84-104 peptide represents the immunodominant epitope and requires T cells to maintain allodynia. Surprisingly, only systemic gabapentin (a ligand of voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ1), but not ketorolac (COX inhibitor), lidocaine (sodium channel blocker) or MK801 (NMDA antagonist) reverse allodynia induced by the intrasciatic MBP84-104. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the sciatic nerve followed by the bioinformatics analyses of the expression changes identified interleukin (IL)-6 as the major cytokine induced by MBP84-104 in both the control and athymic T cell-deficient nude rats. The intrasciatic MBP84-104 injection resulted in both unilateral allodynia and unilateral IL-6 increase the segmental spinal cord (neurons and astrocytes). An intrathecal delivery of a function-blocking IL-6 antibody reduced the allodynia in part by the transcriptional effects in large-diameter primary afferents in DRG. Our data suggest that MBP regulates IL-6 expression in the nervous system and that the spinal IL-6 activity mediates nociceptive processing stimulated by the MBP epitopes released after damage or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. PMID:26970355

  18. Recognition of Unipolar and Generalised Split Graphs

    Colin McDiarmid

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A graph is unipolar if it can be partitioned into a clique and a disjoint union of cliques, and a graph is a generalised split graph if it or its complement is unipolar. A unipolar partition of a graph can be used to find efficiently the clique number, the stability number, the chromatic number, and to solve other problems that are hard for general graphs. We present an O(n2-time algorithm for recognition of n-vertex generalised split graphs, improving on previous O(n3-time algorithms.

  19. Isospin splitting in double isovector excitations

    Expressions are derived for the relative locations of the different isospin components of double isovector excitations. The splittings between the isospin components are found to be similar in magnitude to the isospin splittings in single excitations. Formulas are given for the relative strengths for exciting the different isospin components of the double excitations. Energy-weighted centroids are calculated in terms of isovector and isotensor energies. Examples are given, using available data for the double giant-dipole resonance. The Lane potential is found to be similar in magnitude to that for the single giant-dipole resonance

  20. The transversely split gracilis twin free flaps

    Upadhyaya Divya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gracilis muscle is a Class II muscle that is often used in free tissue transfer. The muscle has multiple secondary pedicles, of which the first one is the most consistent in terms of position and calibre. Each pedicle can support a segment of the muscle thus yielding multiple small flaps from a single, long muscle. Although it has often been split longitudinally along the fascicles of its nerve for functional transfer, it has rarely been split transversely to yield multiple muscle flaps that can be used to cover multiple wounds in one patient without subjecting him/her to the morbidity of multiple donor areas .

  1. Photoinduced Polaron-Splitting in Polymer

    TANG Fei; XU Xiao-Hua; SUN Xin

    2004-01-01

    @@ We simulate a relaxation process of a polaron in polymer after photo excitation, and a new state is realized by means of proper excitation. The original lattice configuration of the polaron splits into two symmetrical peaks,and consequently a double-well potential is formed, where the wavefunctions of electron localized in these two wells are entangled. Thus, this process provides a method to generate the Schrodinger cat state. According to the dynamical process of the lattice configuration, the relaxation time of splitting is about 150fs.

  2. Splitting Strategy for Simulating Genetic Regulatory Networks

    Xiong You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The splitting approach is developed for the numerical simulation of genetic regulatory networks with a stable steady-state structure. The numerical results of the simulation of a one-gene network, a two-gene network, and a p53-mdm2 network show that the new splitting methods constructed in this paper are remarkably more effective and more suitable for long-term computation with large steps than the traditional general-purpose Runge-Kutta methods. The new methods have no restriction on the choice of stepsize due to their infinitely large stability regions.

  3. Explicit Dehn filling and Heegaard splittings

    Futer, David

    2012-01-01

    We prove an explicit, quantitative criterion that ensures the Heegaard surfaces in Dehn fillings behave "as expected." Given a cusped hyperbolic manifold X, and a Dehn filling whose meridian and longitude curves are longer than 2pi(2g-1), we show that every genus g Heegaard splitting of the filled manifold comes from a splitting of the original manifold X. The analogous statement holds for fillings of multiple boundary tori. This gives an effective version of a theorem of Moriah-Rubinstein and Rieck-Sedgwick.

  4. Action potential-simulated weak electric fields can directly initiate myelination

    Lei Liu; Shifu Zhao; Haiming Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myelination is a process whereby glial cells identify, adhere, wrap and enclose axons to form a spiral myelin sheath.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of action potential-simulated weak electric fields on myelination in the central nervous system.DESIGN AND SETTING: This single-sample observation study was performed at the 324 Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Two 5 μm carbon fibers were provided by the Institute of Neuroscience, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. One Sprague Dawley rat, aged 1 day, was used.METHODS: Cerebral cortex was harvested from the rat to prepare a suspension [(1-2)×105/mL] containing neurons and glial cells. To simulate the axon, carbon fibers were placed at the bottom of the neuron-glial cell coculture dish, and were electrified with a single phase square wave current, 1×10-2, 1×10-3, 1×10-4, and 1×10-5 seconds, 1 Hz, 40 mV, and 10 μA, 30 minutes each, once aday for 10 consecutive days to simulate weak negative electric fields during action potential conduction.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glial cell growth and wrapping of carbon fibers were observed by phase contrast microscopy and immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: On culture day 7, cell groups were found to adhere to negative carbon fibers in the 1×10-3 seconds square wave group. Cell membrane-like substances grew out of cell groups, wrapped the carbon fibers, and stretched to the ends of carbon fibers. Only some small and round cells close to negative carbon fibers were found on culture day 12. In the 1×10-4 and 1×10-3 seconds square wave groups, the negative carbon fibers were wrapped by oligodendrocytes or their progenitor cells.CONCLUSION: The local negative electric field which is generated by action potentials at 1×(10-4-10-3)seconds, 40 mV can directly initiate and participate in myelination in the central nervous system.

  5. Myelin Abnormalities in the Optic and Sciatic Nerves in Mice With GM1-Gangliosidosis

    Heinecke, Karie A.; Luoma, Adrienne; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Kirschner, Daniel A; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    GM1-gangliosidosis is a glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage disease involving accumulation of GM1 and its asialo form (GA1) primarily in the brain. Thin-layer chromatography and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the lipid content/composition and the myelin structure of the optic and sciatic nerves from 7- and 10-month old β-galactosidase (β-gal) +/? and β-gal −/− mice, a model of GM1gangliosidosis. Optic nerve weight was lower in the β-gal −/− mice than in unaffected β-gal +/? mice, but ...

  6. Microanatomy and Histological Features of Central Myelin in the Root Exit Zone of Facial Nerve

    Yee, Gi-Taek; Yoo, Chan-Jong; Han, Seong-Rok; Choi, Chan-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the microanatomy and histological features of the central myelin in the root exit zone of facial nerve. Methods Forty facial nerves with brain stem were obtained from 20 formalin fixed cadavers. Among them 17 facial nerves were ruined during preparation and 23 root entry zone (REZ) of facial nerves could be examined. The length of medial REZ, from detach point of facial nerve at the brain stem to transitional area, and the thickness of glial mem...

  7. Rapid Simultaneous Mapping of Total and Myelin Water Content, T1 and T2* in Multiple Sclerosis

    Arhelger, Volker; Gliedstein, Detlef; Lafontaine, Marie-Sofie; Tonkova, Vyara; Holz, Dietrich; Böer, Andreas; Schenk, Jochen; Neeb, Heiko; (,; Koblenz, University of Applied Sciences; Koblenz, Radiologisches Institut Hohenzollernstrasse; Engineering, Institute for Medical; Koblenz, Information Processing; Boeer, Neurologie Dr; Koblenz,

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging might provide a more specific insight into disease process, progression and therapeutic response of multiple sclerosis. We present an extension of a previously published approach for the simultaneous mapping of brain T1, T2* and total water content. In addition to those three parameters, the method presented in the current work allows for the measurement of myelin bound water content, a surrogate marker of tissue myelination. Myelin water was measured based on its distinct relaxation with reduced T2*, resulting in a multiexponential decay signal. However, only 10 points could be acquired on the relaxation curve within a maximum echo time of <40ms as the quantitative protocol has been adapted previously for fast acquisitions with whole brain coverage. The sparse sampling required an adaption of the optimisation approach with additional constraints necessary in order to obtain reliable results. Therefore, the corresponding pool fractions were determined using linear op...

  8. On Split Lie Triple Systems II

    Antonio J Calderón Martín; M Forero Piulestán

    2010-04-01

    In [4] it is studied that the structure of split Lie triple systems with a coherent 0-root space, that is, satisfying $[T_0,T_0,T]=0$ and $[T_0,T_,T_0]≠ 0$ for any nonzero root and where $T_0$ denotes the 0-root space and $T_$ the -root space, by showing that any of such triple systems with a symmetric root system is of the form $T=\\mathcal{U}+\\sum_j I_j$ with $\\mathcal{U}$ a subspace of the 0-root space $T_0$ and any $I_j$ a well described ideal of , satisfying $[I_j,T,I_k]=0$ if $j≠ k$. It is also shown in [4] that under certain conditions, a split Lie triple system with a coherent 0-root space is the direct sum of the family of its minimal ideals, each one being a simple split Lie triple system, and the simplicity of is characterized. In the present paper we extend these results to arbitrary split Lie triple systems with no restrictions on their 0-root spaces.

  9. Algorithms for Unipolar and Generalized Split Graphs

    Eschen, Elaine M

    2011-01-01

    A graph $G=(V,E)$ is a {\\it unipolar graph} if there exits a partition $V=V_1 \\cup V_2$ such that, $V_1$ is a clique and $V_2$ induces the disjoint union of cliques. The complement-closed class of {\\it generalized split graphs} are those graphs $G$ such that either $G$ {\\it or} the complement of $G$ is unipolar. Generalized split graphs are a large subclass of perfect graphs. In fact, it has been shown that almost all $C_5$-free (and hence, almost all perfect graphs) are generalized split graphs. In this paper we present a recognition algorithm for unipolar graphs that utilizes a minimal triangulation of the given graph, and produces a partition when one exists. Our algorithm has running time O($nm^\\prime$), where $m^\\prime$ is the number of edges in a minimal triangulation of the given graph. Generalized split graphs can recognized via this algorithm in O($nm' + n\\OL{m}'$) = O($n^3$) time. We give algorithms on unipolar graphs for finding a maximum independent set and a minimum clique cover in O($n+m$) time ...

  10. Geometrical splitting and reduction of Feynman diagrams

    Davydychev, Andrei I

    2016-01-01

    A geometrical approach to the calculation of N-point Feynman diagrams is reviewed. It is shown that the geometrical splitting yields useful connections between Feynman integrals with different momenta and masses. It is demonstrated how these results can be used to reduce the number of variables in the occurring functions.

  11. Czech, Slovak science ten years after split

    2003-01-01

    Ten years after the split of Czechoslovakia Czech and Slovak science are facing the same difficulties: shortage of money for research, poor salaries, obsolete equipment and brain drain, especially of the young, according to a feature in the Daily Lidove Noviny (1 page).

  12. Conversion efficiency in a solar splitting system

    In this paper we report on concentrator photovoltaic system made by splitting the solar system based on separate Si, GaAs, and InGaN solar cells. The SSCPV module was fabricated and conversion efficiency up to 24.8% was achieved for the concentration factor of 12.8 that is in correlation with theoretical predictions

  13. Helioseismic Solar Cycle Changes and Splitting Coefficients

    S. C. Tripathy; Kiran Jain; A. Bhatnagar

    2000-09-01

    Using the GONG data for a period over four years, we have studied the variation of frequencies and splitting coefficients with solar cycle. Frequencies and even-order coefficients are found to change significantly with rising phase of the solar cycle. We also find temporal variations in the rotation rate near the solar surface.

  14. Three-Rainbow Coloring of Split Graphs

    胡玉梅; 刘婷婷

    2015-01-01

    After a necessary condition is given, 3-rainbow coloring of split graphs with time complexity O(m) is obtained by constructive method. The number of corresponding colors is at most 2 or 3 more than the minimum num-ber of colors needed in a 3-rainbow coloring.

  15. Dynamic expression of Cx47 in mouse brain development and in the cuprizone model of myelin plasticity.

    Parenti, Rosalba; Cicirata, Federico; Zappalà, Agata; Catania, Angela; La Delia, Francesco; Cicirata, Valentina; Tress, Oliver; Willecke, Klaus

    2010-10-01

    The study shows the dynamic expression of connexin47 (Cx47) in oligodendrocytes and myelin of mice, either in myelinogenesis occurring in early development or in an experimental model of new-myelinogenesis of adult mice. Cx47 first appeared in the embryonic mouse brain at E10.5 successively the expression increased, principally in regions populated by developing oligodendrocytes. The expression declined postnatally toward adulthood and immunoreactivity was restricted to a few specific areas, such as the corpus callosum, the striatum, the cerebellum, and the spinal cord. Since the expression of Cx47 in developing oligodendrocytes preceded those of Cx32 and Cx29, a role of Cx47 in myelinogenesis was postulated. This hypothesis was tested in a model of re-myelination, which principally involved the corpus callosum, occurring in adult mice by treatment with cuprizone. Cx47 was upregulated during demyelination and recovered during the remyelination phase. During demyelination, Cx47 was first over-expressed in the corpus callosum and later, when the myelin virtually disappeared in the injured areas, Cx47 was expressed in astrocytes located inside and closely around the demyelinated areas. The remyelination of injured areas occurred after stopping the administration of cuprizone and continued to complete recovery. In this period the expression of Cx47 shifted from astrocytes to newly-formed myelin. Thus, Cx47 exhibits in this model a transient and de novo expression in astrocytes with a topographic segregation in the injured areas, only when oligodendrocytes and the myelin were most severely affected. Taken as a whole the evidence suggests that Cx47 play a key role in myelination. PMID:20578039

  16. Unmyelinated nerve fibers in the human dental pulp express markers for myelinated fibers and show sodium channel accumulations

    Henry Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dental pulp is a common source of pain and is used to study peripheral inflammatory pain mechanisms. Results show most fibers are unmyelinated, yet recent findings in experimental animals suggest many pulpal afferents originate from fibers that are myelinated at more proximal locations. Here we use the human dental pulp and confocal microscopy to examine the staining relationships of neurofilament heavy (NFH, a protein commonly expressed in myelinated afferents, with other markers to test the possibility that unmyelinated pulpal afferents originate from myelinated axons. Other staining relationships studied included myelin basic protein (MBP, protein gene product (PGP 9.5 to identify all nerve fibers, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH to identify sympathetic fibers, contactin-associated protein (caspr to identify nodal sites, S-100 to identify Schwann cells and sodium channels (NaChs. Results Results show NFH expression in most PGP9.5 fibers except those with TH and include the broad expression of NFH in axons lacking MBP. Fibers with NFH and MBP show NaCh clusters at nodal sites as expected, but surprisingly, NaCh accumulations are also seen in unmyelinated fibers with NFH, and in fibers with NFH that lack Schwann cell associations. Conclusions The expression of NFH in most axons suggests a myelinated origin for many pulpal afferents, while the presence of NaCh clusters in unmyelinated fibers suggests an inherent capacity for the unmyelinated segments of myelinated fibers to form NaCh accumulations. These findings have broad implications on the use of dental pulp to study pain mechanisms and suggest possible novel mechanisms responsible for NaCh cluster formation and neuronal excitability.

  17. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness. PMID:23636892

  18. Myelin-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte precursor differentiation can be overcome by pharmacological modulation of Fyn-RhoA and protein kinase C signalling

    Baer, A.; Syed, Y; Kang, S.; Mitteregger, D; Vig, R; Ffrench-Constant, C; Franklin, R.; Altmann, F; Lubec, G; Kotter, M.

    2009-01-01

    Failure of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation contributes significantly to failed myelin sheath regeneration (remyelination) in chronic demyelinating diseases. Although the reasons for this failure are not completely understood, several lines of evidence point to factors present following demyelination that specifically inhibit differentiation of cells capable of generating remyelinating oligodendrocytes. We have previously demonstrated that myelin debris generated by demyel...

  19. Myelin structure is a key difference in the x-ray scattering signature between meningioma, schwannoma and glioblastoma multiforme

    Falzon, G.; Pearson, S.; Murison, R.; Hall, C.; Siu, K.; Round, A.; Schültke, E.; Kaye, A. H.; Lewis, R.

    2007-11-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns of benign and malignant brain tumour tissue were examined. Independent component analysis was used to find a feature set representing the images collected. A set of coefficients was then used to describe each image, which allowed the use of the statistical technique of flexible discriminant analysis to discover a hidden order in the data set. The key difference was found to be in the intensity and spectral content of the second and fourth order myelin scattering peaks. This has clearly demonstrated that significant differences in the structure of myelin exist in the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme as opposed to the benign: meningioma and schwannoma.

  20. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface. PMID:27585118

  1. Regulatory effect of triiodothyronine on brain myelination and astrogliosis after cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice.

    Zendedel, Adib; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Azimzadeh, Maryam; Pasbakhsh, Parichehr; Omidi, Negar; Golestani, Abolfazl; Beyer, Cordian; Clarner, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Chronic demyelination and plaque formation in multiple sclerosis is accompanied by persisting astrogliosis, negatively influencing central nervous system recovery and remyelination. Triiodothyronin (T3) is thought to enhance remyelination in the adult brain by the induction of oligodendrocyte maturation. We investigated additional astrocyte-mediated mechanisms by which T3 might promote remyelination in chronically demyelinated lesions using the cuprizone mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were fed cuprizone for 12 weeks to induce lesions with an impaired remyelination capacity. While the expression of oligodenrocyte progenitor markers, i.e., platelet derived growth factor-α receptor was not affected by T3 administration, myelination status, myelin protein expression as well as total and adult oligodendrocyte numbers were markedly increased compared to cuprizone treated controls. In addition to these effects on oligodendrocyte numbers and function, astrogliosis but not microgliosis was ameliorated by T3 administration. Intermediate filament proteins vimentin and nestin as well as the extracellular matrix component tenascin C were significantly reduced after T3 exposure, indicating additional effects of T3 on astrocytes and astrogliosis. Our data clearly indicate that T3 promotes remyelination in chronic lesions by both enhancing oligodendrocyte maturation and attenuating astrogliosis. PMID:26725831

  2. Supplementation with complex milk lipids during brain development promotes neuroplasticity without altering myelination or vascular density

    Rosamond B. Guillermo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplementation with complex milk lipids (CML during postnatal brain development has been shown to improve spatial reference learning in rats. Objective: The current study examined histo-biological changes in the brain following CML supplementation and their relationship to the observed improvements in memory. Design: The study used the brain tissues from the rats (male Wistar, 80 days of age after supplementing with either CML or vehicle during postnatal day 10–80. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin, glutamate receptor-1, myelin basic protein, isolectin B-4, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was performed. The average area and the density of the staining and the numbers of astrocytes and capillaries were assessed and analysed. Results: Compared with control rats, CML supplementation increased the average area of synaptophysin staining and the number of GFAP astrocytes in the CA3 sub-region of the hippocampus (p<0.01, but not in the CA4 sub-region. The supplementation also led to an increase in dopamine output in the striatum that was related to nigral dopamine expression (p<0.05, but did not alter glutamate receptors, myelination or vascular density. Conclusion: CML supplementation may enhance neuroplasticity in the CA3 sub-regions of the hippocampus. The brain regions-specific increase of astrocyte may indicate a supporting role for GFAP in synaptic plasticity. CML supplementation did not associate with postnatal white matter development or vascular remodelling.

  3. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Müller, Christina; Hochhaus, Nina M; Fontana, Xavier; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Myelin basic proteins (MBP) are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. PMID:26317513

  4. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody in the myelin-associated protein CNP.

    Stricker, R; Kalbacher, H; Reiser, G

    1997-08-18

    The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAb-46-1) directed against the myelin-associated protein CNP (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase; EC 3.1.4.37) from several species was characterized. MAb-46-1 can be employed for immunoprecipitation, immunostaining in Western blots and in immunohistochemistry. Short peptides derived from the human CNP1 peptide sequence were synthesized and used in enzyme linked immunosorbent assays to test the reactivity of MAb-46-1. Coarse screening experiments enabled us to localize the epitope recognized by MAb-46-1 to the amino acid residues 9 to 19 close to the N-terminus. Further investigations using shorter peptides comprising this part of the protein allowed us to identify a 9 amino acid residue long peptide (amino acids 11 to 19: ELQFPFLQD) which represents the minimal epitope recognized by MAb-46-1, probably through a 3-dimensional structure and less likely a straight linear peptide. The epitope seems to be stabilized also by the attached amino acids 7 to 10 (KDKP). The peptide sequence 9-19 is conserved in all CNP sequences described so far. Thus, MAb-46-1 might be of general usefulness for further studies of the not yet identified function of the myelin-associated protein CNP. PMID:9268698

  5. Potential Benefit of the Charge-Stabilized Nanostructure Saline RNS60 for Myelin Maintenance and Repair

    Rao, Vijayaraghava T. S.; Khan, Damla; Jones, Russell G.; Nakamura, Diane S.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Rone, Malena B.; Healy, Luke M.; Watson, Richard; Ghosh, Supurna; Antel, Jack P.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin injury in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been attributed both to “outside-in” primary immune mediated and “inside-out” metabolic stress of oligodendrocyte (OL) related mechanisms. Subsequent remyelination is dependent on recruitment and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). RNS60 is a physically-modified saline containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. Administration of RNS60 has been shown to reduce the severity of EAE by dampening the immune response and myelin loss. Additionally, RNS60 has been demonstrated to enhance mitochondrial ATP synthesis in neurons. Here, we used post-natal rat derived OLs and OPCs to assess the impact of RNS60 on the response of OLs to metabolic stress in vitro (glucose-nutrient deprivation, referred to as ‘NG’) and on OPC differentiation capacity. Under the NG condition, our findings indicate that RNS60 decreases caspases 3/7 activation. Respirometric analyses revealed that RNS60 increased spare glycolytic capacity (SGC) under normal culture conditions. However, RNS60 enhanced OL spare respiratory capacity (SRC) when a metabolic stress was present. Furthermore, we show that RNS60 promotes OPC differentiation under physiological conditions. Our findings provide evidence for the potential therapeutic efficacy of RNS60 through the promotion of OL survival and OPC differentiation. PMID:27451946

  6. Antibody-mediated neutralization of myelin-associated EphrinB3 accelerates CNS remyelination.

    Syed, Yasir A; Zhao, Chao; Mahad, Don; Möbius, Wiebke; Altmann, Friedrich; Foss, Franziska; Sentürk, Aycan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lubec, Gert; Lilley, Kathryn; Franklin, Robin J M; Nave, Klaus-A; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-02-01

    Remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions often remains incomplete despite the presence of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Amongst other factors, successful remyelination depends on the phagocytic clearance of myelin debris. However, the proteins in myelin debris that act as potent and selective inhibitors on OPC differentiation and inhibit CNS remyelination remain unknown. Here, we identify the transmembrane signalling protein EphrinB3 as important mediator of this inhibition, using a protein analytical approach in combination with a primary rodent OPC assay. In the presence of EphrinB3, OPCs fail to differentiate. In a rat model of remyelination, infusion of EphrinB3 inhibits remyelination. In contrast, masking EphrinB3 epitopes using antibodies promotes remyelination. Finally, we identify EphrinB3 in MS lesions and demonstrate that MS lesion extracts inhibit OPC differentiation while antibody-mediated masking of EphrinB3 epitopes promotes it. Our findings suggest that EphrinB3 could be a target for therapies aiming at promoting remyelination in demyelinating disease. PMID:26687980

  7. Direct profiling of myelinated and demyelinated regions in mouse brain by imaging mass spectrometry

    Ceuppens, Ruben; Dumont, Debora; van Brussel, Leen; van de Plas, Babs; Daniels, Ruth; Noben, Jean-Paul; Verhaert, Peter; van der Gucht, Estel; Robben, Johan; Clerens, Stefan; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2007-02-01

    One of the newly developed imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) technologies utilizes matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry to map proteins in thin tissue sections. In this study, we evaluated the power of MALDI IMS as we developed it in our (Bruker) MALDI TOF (Reflex IV) and TOF-TOF (Ultraflex II) systems to study myelin patterns in the mouse central nervous system under normal and pathological conditions. MALDI IMS was applied to assess myelin basic protein (MBP) isoform-specific profiles in different regions throughout the mouse brain. The distribution of ions of m/z 14,144 and 18,447 displayed a striking resemblance with white matter histology and were identified as MBP isoform 8 and 5, respectively. In addition, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the MBP-8 peak intensity upon MALDI IMS analysis of focal ethidium bromide-induced demyelinated brain areas. Our MS images were validated by immunohistochemistry using MBP antibodies. This study underscores the potential of MALDI IMS to study the contribution of MBP to demyelinating diseases.

  8. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Improves Myelination and Attenuates Tissue Damage of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Zhang, Si; Ju, Peijun; Tjandra, Editha; Yeap, Yeeshan; Owlanj, Hamed; Feng, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    Preventing demyelination and promoting remyelination of denuded axons are promising therapeutic strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition was reported to benefit the neural functional recovery and the axon regeneration after SCI. However, its role in de- and remyelination of axons in injured spinal cord is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EGFR inhibitor, PD168393 (PD), on the myelination in mouse contusive SCI model. We found that expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the injured spinal cords of PD treated mice was remarkably elevated. The density of glial precursor cells and oligodendrocytes (OLs) was increased and the cell apoptosis in lesions was attenuated after PD168393 treatment. Moreover, PD168393 treatment reduced both the numbers of OX42 + microglial cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein + astrocytes in damaged area of spinal cords. We thus conclude that the therapeutic effects of EGFR inhibition after SCI involves facilitating remyelination of the injured spinal cord, increasing of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and OLs, as well as suppressing the activation of astrocytes and microglia/macrophages. PMID:26883518

  9. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Christina Müller

    Full Text Available Myelin basic proteins (MBP are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS. In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715 as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells.

  10. Splitting, splitting and splitting again: A brief history of the development of regional government in Indonesia since independence

    Anne Booth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the changes in the structure and role of provincial and sub-provincial governments in Indonesia since independence. Particular attention is paid to the process of splitting both provinces and districts (kabupaten and kota into smaller units. The paper points out that this process has been going on since the 1950s, but has accelerated in the post-Soeharto era. The paper examines why the splitting of government units has occurred in some parts of the Outer Islands to a much greater extent than in Java, and also examines the implications of developments since 1999 for the capacity of local government units to deliver basic services such as health and education.

  11. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  12. Relaxed Extragradient Algorithms for the Split Feasibility Problem

    Youli Yu; Shin Min Kang; Young Chel Kwun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new relaxed extragradient algorithms for the split feasibility problem. Our relaxed extragradient algorithm is new and it generalized some results for solving the split feasibility problem.

  13. A Regularized Algorithm for the Proximal Split Feasibility Problem

    Zhangsong Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal split feasibility problem has been studied. A regularized method has been presented for solving the proximal split feasibility problem. Strong convergence theorem is given.

  14. Splitting of high power, cw proton beams

    Facco, Alberto; Berkovits, Dan; Yamane, Isao

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for splitting a high power, continuous wave (cw) proton beam in two or more branches with low losses has been developed in the framework of the EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line adioactive Ion Beam Facility) design study. The aim of the system is to deliver up to 4 MW of H beam to the main radioactive ion beam production target, and up to 100 kWof proton beams to three more targets, simultaneously. A three-step method is used, which includes magnetic neutralization of a fractionof the main H- beam, magnetic splitting of H- and H0, and stripping of H0 to H+. The method allowsslow raising and individual fine adjustment of the beam intensity in each branch.

  15. Solar Water Splitting Using Semiconductor Photocatalyst Powders.

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy conversion is essential to address the gap between energy production and increasing demand. Large scale energy generation from solar energy can only be achieved through equally large scale collection of the solar spectrum. Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts with a single semiconductor enables the direct generation of H2 from photoreactors and is one of the most economical technologies for large-scale production of solar fuels. Efficient photocatalyst materials are essential to make this process feasible for future technologies. To achieve efficient photocatalysis for overall water splitting, all of the parameters involved at different time scales should be improved because the overall efficiency is obtained by the multiplication of all these fundamental efficiencies. Accumulation of knowledge ranging from solid-state physics to electrochemistry and a multidisciplinary approach to conduct various measurements are inevitable to be able to understand photocatalysis fully and to improve its efficiency. PMID:26134367

  16. Meshed split skin graft for extensive vitiligo

    Srinivas C

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A 30 year old female presented with generalized stable vitiligo involving large areas of the body. Since large areas were to be treated it was decided to do meshed split skin graft. A phototoxic blister over recipient site was induced by applying 8 MOP solution followed by exposure to UVA. The split skin graft was harvested from donor area by Padgett dermatome which was meshed by an ampligreffe to increase the size of the graft by 4 times. Significant pigmentation of the depigmented skin was seen after 5 months. This procedure helps to cover large recipient areas, when pigmented donor skin is limited with minimal risk of scarring. Phototoxic blister enables easy separation of epidermis thus saving time required for dermabrasion from recipient site.

  17. The Unharmonic dc SQUID Energy Level Splitting

    A DC SQUID with Josephson junctions characterized by nonsinusoidal current-phase relation is being considered as a basis for a phase qubit. It has been shown that the second and third harmonic components in the current-phase relation are able to provide a double-well potential and the energy level splitting. The threshold condition for the double-well formation has been determined taking into account the impact of both harmonics. The splitting of the ground state energy level has been calculated as a function of the harmonic amplitudes for different ratio s of characteristic Josephson energy EC to the Coulomb energy EQ0. It has been shown that the gap value comes to about 7EQ0 with increase of the ratio s. No external field needed, no bias current required and no circular currents are the major advantages of such a qubit

  18. Isospin breaking in octet baryon mass splittings

    Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Najjar, J. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Pleiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Juelich Supercomputer Centre; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, School of Chemistry and Physics

    2012-06-15

    Using an SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in the quark mass, we determine the QCD component of the nucleon, Sigma and Xi mass splittings of the baryon octet due to up-down (and strange) quark mass differences in terms of the kaon mass splitting. Provided the average quark mass is kept constant, the expansion coefficients in our procedure can be determined from computationally cheaper simulations with mass degenerate sea quarks and partially quenched valence quarks. Both the linear and quadratic terms in the SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion are considered; it is found that the quadratic terms only change the result by a few percent, indicating that the expansion is highly convergent.

  19. Isospin breaking in octet baryon mass splittings

    Using an SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in the quark mass, we determine the QCD component of the nucleon, Sigma and Xi mass splittings of the baryon octet due to up-down (and strange) quark mass differences in terms of the kaon mass splitting. Provided the average quark mass is kept constant, the expansion coefficients in our procedure can be determined from computationally cheaper simulations with mass degenerate sea quarks and partially quenched valence quarks. Both the linear and quadratic terms in the SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion are considered; it is found that the quadratic terms only change the result by a few percent, indicating that the expansion is highly convergent.

  20. Experimental study on dynamic splitting of recycled concrete using SHPB

    Lu Yubin; Yu Shuisheng; Cai and Yong

    2015-01-01

    To study the recycled concrete splitting tensile properties and fracture state with various recycled coarse aggregate replacement percentage (i.e. 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%), the dynamic splitting test of recycled concrete was carried out using large diameter (75 mm) split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results show that the recycled concrete splitting tensile strength increases with the increase of loading rate, and the loading rate also affects the recycled concrete fracture state, whi...

  1. The announcement effects of stock splits on stock prices

    Κτιστάκη, Δέσποινα

    2001-01-01

    Listed firms often decide to split their stock, in which case they increase the number of shares outstanding by distributing more shares as dividends and adjusting respectively the nominal price of the stock, leaving however the total capital unaffected. In theory a stock split is merely an accounting change, which leaves investors no better or worse off than they were before the split. Yet stock splits are a relatively common corporate event. This implies that there must be some benefit eith...

  2. The market reaction to stock splits: Evidence from Germany

    Wulff, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Although stock splits seem to be a purely cosmetic event, there exists ample empirical evidence from the United States that stock splits are associated with abnormal returns on both the announcement and the execution day, and additionally with an increase in variance following the ex-day. This paper investigates the market reaction to stock splits using a set of German firms. Consistent with the U.S. findings, similar effects are observed for the sample of German stock splits. Institutional d...

  3. Splitting schemes for poroelasticity and thermoelasticity problems

    Kolesov, A. E.; Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasilyeva, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we consider the coupled systems of linear unsteady partial differential equations, which arise in the modeling of poroelasticity processes. Stability estimates of weighted difference schemes for the coupled system of equations are presented. Approximation in space is based on the finite element method. We construct splitting schemes and give some numerical comparisons for typical poroelasticity problems. The results of numerical simulation of a 3D problem are presented. Special ...

  4. Height in Splittings of Hyperbolic Groups

    Mahan Mitra

    2004-02-01

    Suppose is a hyperbolic subgroup of a hyperbolic group . Assume there exists > 0 such that the intersection of essentially distinct conjugates of is always finite. Further assume splits over with hyperbolic vertex and edge groups and the two inclusions of are quasi-isometric embeddings. Then is quasiconvex in . This answers a question of Swarup and provides a partial converse to the main theorem of [23].

  5. Graduate Program in Astrophysics in Split

    Krajnovic, Davor

    2006-01-01

    Beginning in autumn 2008 the first generation of astronomy master students will start a 2 year course in Astrophysics offered by the Physics department of the University of Split, Croatia (http://fizika.pmfst.hr/astro/english/index.html). This unique master course in South-Eastern Europe, following the Bologna convention and given by astronomers from international institutions, offers a series of comprehensive lectures designed to greatly enhance students' knowledge and skills in astrophysics...

  6. Signals for CP Violation in Split Supersymmetry

    Deshpande, N.G.; Jiang, J.

    2005-01-01

    Split supersymmetry is characterized by relatively light chargino and neutralino sector and very heavy sfermion sector. We study the consequence of CP violation in this scenario by evaluating two-loop contributions to electric dipole moments of fermions from Higgs-photon as well as $W$-$W$ diagrams. These contributions add coherently and produce electron and neutron electric dipole moments close to present bounds. We then explore Higgs production at a photon-photon collider, and consider the ...

  7. Photosynthetic water splitting for hydrogen fuel synthesis

    Greenbaum, E.

    Three key advances in photosynthesis research are reported. A significant advance in microalgal water splitting has been made. In the linear, low-intensity region of the light saturation curves, equivalent solar conversion efficiencies of 10% have been measured. A technological advance in the ability to genetically screen individual algal colonies has been made. Successive subcultures of anaerobiosis-stressed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibited enhanced capacity for photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen.

  8. Thick Brane Split Caused by Spacetime Torsion

    Yang, Jie; Li, Yun-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we apply the five-dimensional $f(T)$ gravity with $f(T)=T+k T^n$ to brane scenario to explore the solutions under a given warp factor, and we find that the analytic domain wall solution will be a double-kink solution when the geometric effect of spacetime torsion is strongly enhanced. We also investigate the localization of fermion fields on the split branes corresponding to the double-kink solution.

  9. Split neutrinos - leptogenesis, dark matter and inflation

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Morisi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple framework to split neutrinos with a slight departure from tribimaximal mixing - where two of the neutrinos are Majorana type which provide thermal leptogenesis. The Dirac neutrino with a tiny Yukawa coupling explains primordial inflation and the cosmic microwave background radiation, where the inflaton is the gauge invariant flat direction. The observed baryon asymmetry, and the scale of inflation are intimately tied to the observed reactor angle, which can be further cons...

  10. A thermodynamically compatible splitting procedure in hyperelasticity

    A material is hyperelastic if the stress tensor is obtained by variation of the stored energy function. The corresponding 3D mathematical model of hyperelasticity written in the Eulerian coordinates represents a system of 14 conservative partial differential equations submitted to stationary differential constraints. A classical approach for numerical solving of such a 3D system is a geometrical splitting: the 3D system is split into three 1D systems along each spatial direction and solved then by using a Godunov type scheme. Each 1D system has 7 independent eigenfields corresponding to contact discontinuity, longitudinal waves and shear waves. The construction of the corresponding Riemann solvers is not an easy task even in the case of isotropic solids. Indeed, for a given specific energy it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to check its rank-one convexity which is a necessary and sufficient condition for hyperbolicity of the governing equations. In this paper, we consider a particular case where the specific energy is a sum of two terms. The first term is the hydrodynamic energy depending only on the density and the entropy, and the second term is the shear energy which is unaffected by the volume change. In this case a very simple criterion of hyperbolicity can be formulated. We propose then a new splitting procedure which allows us to find a numerical solution of each 1D system by solving successively three 1D sub-systems. Each sub-system is hyperbolic, if the full system is hyperbolic. Moreover, each sub-system has only three waves instead of seven, and the velocities of these waves are given in explicit form. The last property allows us to construct reliable Riemann solvers. Numerical 1D tests confirm the advantage of the new approach. A multi-dimensional extension of the splitting procedure is also proposed

  11. Molecular characterization of myelin protein zero in Xenopus laevis peripheral nerve

    Xie, Bo; Luo, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Cheng; Priest, Christina Marie; Chan, Shiu-Yung; O'Connor, Peter B.; Kirschner, Daniel A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2007-12-01

    Myelin protein zero (P0), a glycosylated single-pass transmembrane protein, is essential in the formation and maintenance of peripheral nervous system (PNS) compact myelin. P0 in Xenopus (xP0) exists primarily as a dimeric form that remains stable after various physical and chemical treatments. In exploring the nature of the interactions underlying the dimer stability, we found that xP0 dimer dissociated into monomer during continuous elution gel electrophoresis and conventional SDS-PAGE, indicating that the dimer is stabilized by non-covalent interactions. Furthermore, as some of the gel-purified monomer re-associated into dimer on SDS-PAGE gels, there is likely a dynamic equilibrium between xP0 dimer and monomer in vivo. Because the carbohydrate and fatty acyl moieties may be crucial for the adhesion role of P0, we used sensitive mass spectrometry approaches to elucidate the detailed N-glycosylation and S-acylation profiles of xP0. Asn92 was determined to be the single, fully-occupied glycosylation site of xP0, and a total of 12 glycans was detected that exhibited new structural features compared with those observed from P0 in other species: (1) the neutral glycans were composed mainly of high mannose and hybrid types; (2) 5 of 12 were acidic glycans, among which three were sialylated and the other two were sulfated; (3) none of the glycans had core fucosylation; and (4) no glucuronic acid, hence no HNK-1 epitope, was detected. The drastically different carbohydrate structures observed here support the concept of the species-specific variation in N-glycosylation of P0. Cys152 was found to be acylated with stearoyl (C18:0), whereas palmitoyl (C16:0) is the corresponding predominant fatty acyl group on P0 from higher vertebrates. We propose that the unique glycosylation and acylation patterns of Xenopus P0 may underlie its unusual dimerization behavior. Our results should shed light on the understanding of the phylogenetic development of P0's adhesion role in PNS

  12. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 channels differentially regulate action potential initiation and conduction in neocortical myelinated axons

    Battefeld, A.; Tran, B.T.; Gavrilis, J.; Cooper, E.C.; Kole, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of Kv7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Nav ) channels in the axonal

  13. Decreased Myelinated Fibers in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin; Chao, Feng-Lei; Luo, Yan-min; Xiao, Qian; Gu, Heng-Wei; Jiang, Rong; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by deficits in cognition and memory. Although amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is known to be the earliest pathological event that triggers subsequent neurodegeneration, how Aβ accumulation causes behavioral deficits remains incompletely understood. In this study, using the Morris water maze test, ELISA and stereological methods, we examined spatial learning and memory performance, the soluble Aβ concentration and the myelination of fibers in the hippocampus of 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-month-old Tg2576 AD model mice. Our results showed that spatial learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the Tg2576 mice compared to the wild type (WT) controls and that the myelinated fiber length in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was markedly decreased from 0.33 ± 0.03 km in the WT controls to 0.17 ± 0.02 km in the Tg2576 mice at 10 months of age. However, the concentrations of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly increased as early as 4-6 months of age. The decreased myelinated fiber length in the DG may contribute to the spatial learning and memory deficits of Tg2576 mice. Therefore, we suggest that the significant accumulation of soluble Aβ may serve as a preclinical biomarker for AD diagnosis and that protecting myelinated fibers may represent a novel strategy for delaying the progression of early-stage AD. PMID:26971933

  14. Specific interaction of central nervous system myelin basic protein with lipids effects of basic protein on glucose leakage from liposomes

    Gould, R.M.; London, Y.

    1972-01-01

    The leakage from liposomes preloaded with glucose was continuously monitored in a Perkin-Elmer Model 356 dual beam spectrophotometer using an enzyme-linked assay system. The central nervous system myelin basic protein (A1 protein) caused a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of leakage from liposomes prep

  15. Large Bandgap Semiconductors for Solar Water Splitting

    Malizia, Mauro

    Photoelectrochemical water splitting represents an eco-friendly technology that could enable the production of hydrogen using water as reactant and solar energy as primary energy source. The exploitation of solar energy for the production of hydrogen would help modern society to reduce the relian...... on fossil fuels as primary feedstock for hydrogen production and diminish the emission of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, weakening the global warming phenomenon.The dissertation reports the development of GaP (gallium phosphide) photocathodes as a large bandgap semiconductor for...... photoelectrochemical water splitting devices having tandem design. The increase of the photovoltage produced by GaP under illumination was the main goal of this work. GaP has a bandgap of 2.25 eV and could in theory produce a photovoltage of approximately 1.7 V. Instead, the photovoltage produced by the semiconductor...... of BiVO4 (bismuth vanadate) was investigated in view of combining this 2.4 eV large bandgap semiconductor with a Si back-illuminated photocathode. A device obtained by mechanical stacking of BiVO4 photoanode and standard Si photocathode performs non-assisted water splitting under illumination with...

  16. P-wave Cooper pair splitting

    Henning Soller

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Splitting of Cooper pairs has recently been realized experimentally for s-wave Cooper pairs. A split Cooper pair represents an entangled two-electron pair state, which has possible application in on-chip quantum computation. Likewise the spin-activity of interfaces in nanoscale tunnel junctions has been investigated theoretically and experimentally in recent years. However, the possible implications of spin-active interfaces in Cooper pair splitters so far have not been investigated.Results: We analyze the current and the cross correlation of currents in a superconductor–ferromagnet beam splitter, including spin-active scattering. Using the Hamiltonian formalism, we calculate the cumulant-generating function of charge transfer. As a first step, we discuss characteristics of the conductance for crossed Andreev reflection in superconductor–ferromagnet beam splitters with s-wave and p-wave superconductors and no spin-active scattering. In a second step, we consider spin-active scattering and show how to realize p-wave splitting using only an s-wave superconductor, through the process of spin-flipped crossed Andreev reflection. We present results for the conductance and cross correlations.Conclusion: Spin-activity of interfaces in Cooper pair splitters allows for new features in ordinary s-wave Cooper pair splitters, that can otherwise only be realized by using p-wave superconductors. In particular, it provides access to Bell states that are different from the typical spin singlet state.

  17. Bunch Splitting Simulations for the JLEIC Ion Collider Ring

    Satogata, Todd J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Gamage, Randika [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We describe the bunch splitting strategies for the proposed JLEIC ion collider ring at Jefferson Lab. This complex requires an unprecedented 9:6832 bunch splitting, performed in several stages. We outline the problem and current results, optimized with ESME including general parameterization of 1:2 bunch splitting for JLEIC parameters.

  18. 7 CFR 51.2731 - U.S. Spanish Splits.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Spanish Splits. 51.2731 Section 51.2731... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Spanish Type Peanuts Grades § 51.2731 U.S. Spanish Splits. “U.S. Spanish Splits” consists of shelled Spanish type peanut kernels which are split or...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2125 - Split or broken kernels.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split or broken kernels. 51.2125 Section 51.2125... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2125 Split or broken kernels. Split or broken kernels means seven-eighths or less of complete whole kernels but which will...

  20. 16 CFR 802.10 - Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations.

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 EXEMPTION RULES § 802.10 Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations. (a) The acquisition of voting securities pursuant to a stock split or... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stock dividends and splits;...

  1. 12 CFR 7.2023 - Reverse stock splits.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reverse stock splits. 7.2023 Section 7.2023 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2023 Reverse stock splits. (a) Authority to engage in reverse stock splits. A national bank may engage in a reverse...

  2. Localization and characterization of gelsolin in nervous tissues: gelsolin is specifically enriched in myelin-forming cells.

    Tanaka, J; Sobue, K

    1994-03-01

    Gelsolin is a Ca(2+)-sensitive actin filament-severing protein. To elucidate the role of gelsolin in nervous tissues, we have investigated localization and expression of gelsolin in rat CNS and PNS using biochemical and morphological methods with a polyclonal antibody against the COOH-terminal fragment of plasma gelsolin. Immunohistochemical study showed that gelsolin was specifically enriched in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, and was also detected in myelin sheath, especially around the Ranvier's nodes. The immunohistochemical stainings using indirect immunofluorescence, avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex, and immunogold methods were carefully confirmed by immunoblotting against the tissue homogenates. The expressional changes of gelsolin in developing brain were investigated. The protein was detectable in newborn rat brain; however, it began to increase at 8-10 d after birth and reached maximal at 20-30 d when myelinogenesis actively occurred. After this period, the protein decreased gradually, although myelin basic protein was increasing until 6 months after birth. The immunostaining of gelsolin in Schwann cells was enhanced upon regeneration of injured sciatic nerves by freezing. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that gelsolin was present not only in the cytoplasm but also in compact myelin. Following solubilization by detergents, gelsolin in the myelin fraction could be purified using anion exchange and blue Sepharose column chromatographies. The purified protein possessed a Ca(2+)-dependent severing activity against actin filaments similar to that of cytoplasmic and plasma gelsolin. These data strongly suggest that gelsolin in nervous tissues might be involved in lamellipodial movement to wrap axons of myelin-forming cells by modulating actin polymerization. PMID:8120612

  3. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation.

    Giampiero Porcu

    Full Text Available One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases.

  4. Impact of morphometry, myelinization and synaptic current strength on spike conduction in human and cat spiral ganglion neurons.

    Frank Rattay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our knowledge about the neural code in the auditory nerve is based to a large extent on experiments on cats. Several anatomical differences between auditory neurons in human and cat are expected to lead to functional differences in speed and safety of spike conduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Confocal microscopy was used to systematically evaluate peripheral and central process diameters, commonness of myelination and morphology of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs along the cochlea of three human and three cats. Based on these morphometric data, model analysis reveales that spike conduction in SGNs is characterized by four phases: a postsynaptic delay, constant velocity in the peripheral process, a presomatic delay and constant velocity in the central process. The majority of SGNs are type I, connecting the inner hair cells with the brainstem. In contrast to those of humans, type I neurons of the cat are entirely myelinated. Biophysical model evaluation showed delayed and weak spikes in the human soma region as a consequence of a lack of myelin. The simulated spike conduction times are in accordance with normal interwave latencies from auditory brainstem response recordings from man and cat. Simulated 400 pA postsynaptic currents from inner hair cell ribbon synapses were 15 times above threshold. They enforced quick and synchronous spiking. Both of these properties were not present in type II cells as they receive fewer and much weaker (∼26 pA synaptic stimuli. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Wasting synaptic energy boosts spike initiation, which guarantees the rapid transmission of temporal fine structure of auditory signals. However, a lack of myelin in the soma regions of human type I neurons causes a large delay in spike conduction in comparison with cat neurons. The absent myelin, in combination with a longer peripheral process, causes quantitative differences of temporal parameters in the electrically stimulated human cochlea

  5. Uptake and presentation of myelin basic protein by normal human B cells

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed;

    2014-01-01

    were capable of binding the MS-associated self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) and of presenting the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99, as determined by staining with the mAb MK16 recognising the peptide presented by HLA-DR15-positive cells. In the presence of serum, however, the majority of B cells...... proportion of MBP85-99 presenting B cells expressed CD27, and showed increased expression of CD86 compared to non-presenting B cells. MBP-pulsed B cells induced a low frequency of IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells in 3 out of 6 donors, indicating an immunoregulatory role of B cells presenting MBP-derived peptides...

  6. Paving the way for adequate myelination: The contribution of galectin-3, transferrin and iron.

    Franco, Paula G; Pasquini, Laura A; Pérez, María J; Rosato-Siri, María V; Silvestroff, Lucas; Pasquini, Juana M

    2015-11-14

    Considering the worldwide incidence of well characterized demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and the increasing number of pathologies recently found to involve hypomyelinating factors such as micronutrient deficits, elucidating the molecular basis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, remyelination and hypomyelination becomes essential to the development of future neuroregenerative therapies. In this context, this review discusses novel findings on the contribution of galectin-3 (Gal-3), transferrin (Tf) and iron to the processes of myelination and remyelination and their potentially positive regulation of oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) differentiation. Studies were conducted in cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination and iron deficiency (ID)-induced hypomyelination, and the participation of glial and neural stem cells (NSC) in the remyelination process was evaluated by means of both in vivo and in vitro assays on primary cell cultures. PMID:26296311

  7. Deimination of the myelin basic protein decelerates its proteasome-mediated metabolism.

    Kuzina, E S; Kudriaeva, A A; Glagoleva, I S; Knorre, V D; Gabibov, A G; Belogurov, A A

    2016-07-01

    Deimination of myelin basic protein (MBP) by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) prevents its binding to the proteasome and decelerates its degradation by the proteasome in mammalian cells. Potential anticancer drug tetrazole analogue of chloramidine 2, at concentrations greater than 1 µM inhibits the enzymatic activity of PAD in vitro. The observed acceleration of proteasome hydrolysis of MBP to antigenic peptides in the presence of PAD inhibitor may increase the efficiency of lesion of the central nervous system by cytotoxic lymphocytes in multiple sclerosis. We therefore suggest that clinical trials and the introduction of PAD inhibitors in clinical practice for the treatment of malignant neoplasms should be performed only after a careful analysis of their potential effect on the induction of autoimmune neurodegeneration processes. PMID:27599511

  8. Reorganization of central terminals of myelinated primary afferents in the rat dorsal horn following peripheral axotomy.

    Woolf, C J; Shortland, P; Reynolds, M; Ridings, J; Doubell, T; Coggeshall, R E

    1995-09-11

    We have investigated the time course and extent to which peripheral nerve lesions cause a morphological reorganization of the central terminals of choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase (B-HRP)-labelled primary afferent fibers in the mammalian dorsal horn. Choleragenoid-horseradish peroxidase is retrogradely transported by myelinated (A) sensory axons to laminae I, III, IV and V of the normal dorsal horn of the spinal cord, leaving lamina II unlabelled. We previously showed that peripheral axotomy results in the sprouting of numerous B-HRP-labelled large myelinated sensory axons into lamina II. We show here that this spread of B-HRP-labelled axons into lamina II is detectable at 1 week, maximal by 2 weeks and persists for over 6 months postlesion. By 9 months, however, B-HRP fibers no longer appear in lamina II. The sprouting into lamina II occurs whether regeneration is allowed (crush) or prevented (section with ligation), and does not reverse at times when peripheral fibers reinnervate the periphery. We also show that 15 times more synaptic terminals in lamina II are labelled by B-HRP 2 weeks after axotomy than in the normal. We interpret this as indicating that the sprouting fibers are making synaptic contacts with postsynaptic targets. This implies that A-fiber terminal reorganization is a prominent and long-lasting but not permanent feature of peripheral axotomy. We also provide evidence that this sprouting is the consequence of a combination of an atrophic loss of central synaptic terminals and the conditioning of the sensory neurons by peripheral axotomy. The sprouting of large sensory fibers into the spinal territory where postsynaptic targets usually receive only small afferent fiber input may bear on the intractable touch-evoked pain that can follow nerve injury. PMID:7499558

  9. Brain microsomal fatty acid elongation is increased in abcd1-deficient mouse during active myelination phase.

    Morita, Masashi; Kawamichi, Misato; Shimura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Watanabe, Shiro; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2015-12-01

    The dysfunction of ABCD1, a peroxisomal ABC protein, leads to the perturbation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism and is the cause of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Abcd1-deficient mice exhibit an accumulation of saturated VLCFAs, such as C26:0, in all tissues, especially the brain. The present study sought to measure microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain of wild-type (WT) and abcd1-deficient mice during the course of development. The fatty acid elongation activity in the microsomal fraction was measured by the incorporation of [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA into fatty acids in the presence of C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA. Cytosolic fatty acid synthesis activity was completely inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain was significantly high at 3 weeks after birth and decreased substantially at 3 months after birth. Furthermore, we detected two different types of microsomal fatty acid elongation activity by using C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA as the substrate and found the activity toward C20:0-CoA in abcd1-deficient mice was higher than the WT 3-week-old animals. These results suggest that during the active myelination phase the microsomal fatty acid elongation activity is stimulated in abcd1-deficient mice, which in turn perturbs the lipid composition in myelin. PMID:26108493

  10. THE MARKET REACTION TO STOCK SPLITS — EVIDENCE FROM INDIA

    Mishra, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    Stock splits are a relatively new phenomenon in the Indian context. This paper examines the market effect of stock splits on stock price, return, volatility, and trading volume around the split ex-dates for a sample of stock splits undertaken in the Indian stock market over the period 1999–2005.The traditional view of stock splits as cosmetic transactions that simply divide the same pie into more slices is inconsistent with the significant wealth effect associated with the announcement of a s...

  11. Splitting in dual-phase 590 high strength steel plates

    The influence of splitting on Charpy impact energy was investigated by analyzing the primary fracture (from the Charpy V-notch) and splitting (secondary fracture) surfaces at different test temperatures quantitatively. The morphology of splitting at the primary fracture surface of Charpy impact specimens made of dual-phase (DP) 590 hot-rolled steel in TL direction at +60 deg. C and -30 deg. C were surveyed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The broken Charpy impact specimens in both TL and LT directions at different test temperatures were studied by examining sliced images obtained from micro-radiography imaging system. Three-dimension (3D) and plane sliced images of specimens were analyzed using GEHC microview software. Results show that fracture appearance inside the splitting is cleavage. The length and depth of the splitting increased with decreasing test temperature. Splitting width decreased first then the trend becomes irregular when test temperature falls due to variation of steel ductility and reaction between splitting and the primary crack. The surface areas of splitting and primary crack changed with test temperature as well. Splitting area increased with decreasing test temperature, while the surface area of the primary crack decreased as the test temperature was lowered. Influence of splitting on the impact energy in upper shelf of DP590 hot-rolled steel is small. In the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) range, splitting tends to increase the Charpy impact energy and consequently reduced the DBTT of DP590 hot-rolled steel

  12. Evaluation of salt split technique of immunofluorescence in bullous pemphigoid

    Satyapal Seema

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that salt split skin is a more sensitive substrate than intact skin for immunofluorescence diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid. We undertook this study to define the role of salt split technique of immunofluorescence findings in 32 clinical and histopothology confirmed cases of bullous pemphigoid. Both direct and indirect immunofluorescences were performed using normal and split skin. Direct immunofluorescence positivity of 100% was noted with both routine and salt split method. Additional immunoreadont deposition was noted with direct method on split skin in 5 cases. Patterns of fluorescence in the latter were roof (40.60%, floor (9.4% and combined roof and floor (50%. On indirect immunofluorescence, positivity was almost doubled with salt split technique ( 68% as compared to routine method (36%. Thus, salt split technique was equivalent to routine on direct method in positivity with additional immunoreactant deposits noted in some and had double the sensitivity of the indirect method in detecting immunofluorescence in bullous pemphigoid.

  13. SplitRFLab: A MATLAB GUI toolbox for receiver function analysis based on SplitLab

    Xu, Mijian; Huang, Hui; Huang, Zhouchuan; Wang, Liangshu

    2016-02-01

    We add new modules for receiver function (RF) analysis in SplitLab toolbox, which includes the manual RF analysis module, automatic RF analysis and related quality control modules, and H- k stacking module. The updated toolbox (named SplitRFLab toolbox), especially its automatic RF analysis module, could calculate the RFs quickly and efficiently, which is very useful in RF analysis with huge amount of seismic data. China is now conducting the ChinArray project that plans to deploy thousands of portable stations across Chinese mainland. Our SplitRFLab toolbox may obtain reliable RF results quickly at the first time, which provide essentially new constraint to the crustal and mantle structures.

  14. Spinal cord dysmyelination caused by an anti-PLP IgM antibody: implications for the mechanism of CNS myelin formation

    Rosenbluth, J.; Schiff, R

    2009-01-01

    Antiglycolipid IgM antibodies are known to induce formation of ‘wide-spaced’ or ‘expanded’ myelin, a distinctive form of dysmylination characterized by a repeat period ~2X or 3X normal, seen also in diseases including multiple sclerosis. To determine whether an antibody directed against a myelin protein would cause equivalent pathology, we implanted O10 hybridoma cells into the spinal cord of adult or juvenile rats. O10 produces an IgM directed against PLP, the major protein of CNS myelin. Su...

  15. Major Isoform of Zebrafish P0 Is a 23.5 KDa Myelin Glycoprotein Expressed in Selected White Matter Tracts of the Central Nervous System

    Bai, Qing; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B.; Burton, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish mpz gene, encoding the ortholog of mammalian myelin protein zero, is expressed in oligodendrocytes of the zebrafish central nervous system (CNS). The putative gene product, P0, has been implicated in promoting axonal regeneration in addition to its proposed structural functions in compact myelin. We raised novel zebrafish P0-specific antibodies and established that P0 is a 23.5 kDa glycoprotein containing a 3 kDa N-linked carbohydrate moiety. P0 was localized to myelin sheaths s...

  16. Transverse momentum dependent splitting functions at work: quark-to-gluon splitting

    Hentschinski, M; Kutak, K

    2016-01-01

    Using the recently obtained Pgq splitting function we extend the low x evolution equation for gluons to account for contributions originating from quark-to-gluon splitting. In order to write down a consistent equation we resum virtual corrections coming from the gluon channel and demonstrate that this implies a suitable regularization of the Pgq singularity, corresponding to a soft emitted quark. We also note that the obtained equation is in a straightforward manner generalized to a nonlinear evolution equation which takes into account effects due to the presence of high gluon densities.

  17. Split Hubbard bands at low densities

    Hansen, Daniel; Perepelitsky, Edward; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2011-05-01

    We present a numerical scheme for the Hubbard model that throws light on the rather esoteric nature of the upper and lower Hubbard bands, which have been invoked often in literature. We present a self-consistent solution of the ladder-diagram equations for the Hubbard model, and show that these provide, at least in the limit of low densities of particles, a vivid picture of the Hubbard split bands. We also address the currently topical problem of decay of the doublon states that are measured in optical trap studies, using both the ladder scheme and also an exact two-particle calculation of a relevant Green’s function.

  18. Split ring resonator resonance assisted terahertz antennas

    Galal, Hossam; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the computational development of novel architectures of low impedance broadband antennas, for efficient detection of Terahertz (THz) frequency beams. The conceived Split Ring Resonator Resonance Assisted (SRR RA) antennas are based on both a capacitive and inductive scheme, exploiting a 200 Ohm and 400 Ohm impedance, respectively. Moreover, the impedance is tunable by varying the coupling parameters in the exploited geometry, allowing for better matching with the detector circuit for maximum power extraction. Our simulation results have been obtained by assuming a 1.5 THz operation frequency.

  19. Split neutrinos - leptogenesis, dark matter and inflation

    Mazumdar, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple framework to split neutrinos with a slight departure from tribimaximal mixing - where two of the neutrinos are Majorana type which provide thermal leptogenesis. The Dirac neutrino with a tiny Yukawa coupling explains primordial inflation and the cosmic microwave background radiation, where the inflaton is the gauge invariant flat direction. The observed baryon asymmetry, and the scale of inflation are intimately tied to the observed reactor angle, which can be further constrained by the LHC and the neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The model also provides the lightest right handed sneutrino as a part of the inflaton to be the dark matter candidate.

  20. Multibreed analysis by splitting the breeding values

    García-Cortés Luis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An equivalent model for multibreed variance covariance estimation is presented. It considers the additive case including or not the segregation variances. The model is based on splitting the additive genetic values in several independent parts depending on their genetic origin. For each part, it expresses the covariance between relatives as a partial numerator relationship matrix times the corresponding variance component. Estimation of fixed effects, random effects or variance components provided by the model are as simple as any model including several random factors. We present a small example describing the mixed model equations for genetic evaluations and two simulated examples to illustrate the Bayesian variance component estimation.

  1. Cohomology of Courant algebroids with split base

    Ginot, Gregory; Grutzmann, Melchior

    2008-01-01

    We study the (standard) cohomology $H^\\bullet_{st}(E)$ of a Courant algebroid $E$. We prove that if $E$ is transitive, the standard cohomology coincides with the naive cohomology $H_{naive}^\\bullet(E)$ as conjectured by Stienon and Xu. For a general Courant algebroid we define a spectral sequence converging to its standard cohomology. If $E$ is with split base, we prove that there exists a natural transgression homomorphism $T_3$ (with image in $H^3_{naive}(E)$) which, together with the naive...

  2. The second order pole over split quaternions

    Libine, Matvei

    2015-04-01

    This is an addition to a series of papers [1, 2, 3, 4], where we develop quaternionic analysis from the point of view of representation theory of the conformal Lie group and its Lie algebra. In this paper we develop split quaternionic analogues of certain results from [4]. Thus we introduce a space of functions Dh ⊕ Da with a natural action of the Lie algebra gl(2, HC) ≊ sl(4, C), decompose Dh ⊕ Da into irreducible components and find the gl(2, Hc)- equivariant projectors onto each of these irreducible components.

  3. Modelling the presence of myelin and oedema in the brain based on multi-parametric quantitative MRI

    Marcel eWarntjes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present a model that uses multi-parametric quantitative MRI to estimate the presence of myelin and oedema in the brain. The model relates simultaneous measurement of R1 and R2 relaxation rates and proton density to four partial volume compartments, consisting of myelin partial volume, cellular partial volume, free water partial volume and excess parenchymal water partial volume. The model parameters were obtained using spatially normalised brain images of a group of 20 healthy controls. The pathological brain was modelled in terms of the reduction of myelin content and presence of excess parenchymal water, which indicates the degree of oedema. The method was tested on spatially normalised brain images of a group of 20 age-matched multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Clear differences were observed with respect to the healthy controls: the MS group had a 79 mL smaller brain volume (1069 vs. 1148 mL, a 38 mL smaller myelin volume (119 vs. 157 mL and a 21 mL larger excess parenchymal water volume (78 vs. 57 mL. Template regions of interest of various brain structures indicated that the myelin partial volume in the MS group was 1.6±1.5% lower for grey matter (GM structures and 2.8±1.0% lower for white matter (WM structures. The excess parenchymal water partial volume was 9±10% larger for GM and 5±2% larger for WM. Manually placed ROIs indicated that the results using the template ROIs may have suffered from loss of anatomical detail due to the spatial normalization process. Examples of the application of the method on high-resolution images are provided for three individual subjects, a 45-year-old healthy subject, a 72-year-old healthy subject and a 45-year-old MS patient. The observed results agreed with the expected behaviour considering both age and disease. In conclusion, the proposed model may provide clinically important parameters such as the total brain volume, degree of myelination and degree of oedema, based on

  4. The Regularity of Functions on Dual Split Quaternions in Clifford Analysis

    Ji Eun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows some properties of dual split quaternion numbers and expressions of power series in dual split quaternions and provides differential operators in dual split quaternions and a dual split regular function on Ω⊂ℂ2×ℂ2 that has a dual split Cauchy-Riemann system in dual split quaternions.

  5. Mild-split SUSY with flavor

    Eliaz, Latif; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Tsuk, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of a gauge mediated quiver-like model, the standard model flavor texture can be naturally generated. The model - like the MSSM - has furthermore a region in parameter space where the lightest Higgs mass is fed by heavy stop loops, which in turn sets the average squark mass scale near 10-20 TeV. We perform a careful flavor analysis to check whether this type of mild-split SUSY passes all flavor constraints as easily as envisioned in the original type of split SUSY. Interestingly, it turns out to be on the border of several constraints, in particular, the branching ratio of mu -> e gamma and, if order one complex phases are assumed, also epsilon_K neutron and electron EDM. Furthermore, we consider unification as well as dark matter candidates, especially the gravitino. Finally, we provide a closed-form formula for the soft masses of matter in arbitrary representations of any of the gauge groups in a generic quiver-like model with a general messenger sector.

  6. Non-split and split deformations of AdS_5

    Hoare, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The eta-deformation of the AdS_5 x S^5 superstring depends on a non-split r matrix for the superalgebra psu(2,2|4). Much of the investigation into this model has considered one particular choice, however there are a number of inequivalent alternatives. This is also true for the bosonic sector of the theory with su(2,2), the isometry algebra of AdS_5, admitting one split and three non-split r matrices. In this article we explore these r matrices and the corresponding geometries. We investigate their contraction limits, comment on supergravity backgrounds and demonstrate their relation to gauged-WZW deformations. We then extend the three non-split cases to AdS_5 x S^5 and compute four separate bosonic two-particle tree-level S-matrices based on inequivalent BMN-type light-cone gauges. The resulting S-matrices, while different, are related by momentum-dependent one-particle changes of basis.

  7. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E;

    2001-01-01

    Although oligodendrocytes are vulnerable to focal cerebral ischemia, remyelination of denuded or regenerating axons in the peri-infarct area has been observed in the central nervous system. We studied the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a major component of central nervous system myelin......, in peri-infarct areas in adult rat brain after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and correlated it to the expression of the growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), a marker for axonal regeneration and sprouting, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques. Within the infarct......, MBP messenger RNA (mRNA) had disappeared by 24 h, whereas myelin protein, identified by MBP and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunohistochemistry, appeared structurally intact until day 3. Peri-infarct oligodendrocytes increased their expression of MBP mRNA from 24 h to maximal levels at...

  8. T cell reactivity to P0, P2, PMP-22, and myelin basic protein in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    Csurhes, P; Sullivan, A.; Green, K.; Pender, M.; McCombe, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: It has been suggested that autoimmunity to peripheral myelin proteins is involved in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). We aimed to compare reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to antigens of peripheral myelin proteins in patients with GBS and patients with CIDP with that of healthy controls and patients with other non-immune mediated neuropathies (ON).

  9. Na(v)1.8 channelopathy in mutant mice deficient for myelin protein zero is detrimental to motor axons

    Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Klein, Dennis;

    2011-01-01

    Myelin protein zero mutations were found to produce Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes with various degrees of myelin impairment and axonal loss, ranging from the mild 'demyelinating' adult form to severe and early onset forms. Protein zero deficient homozygous mice ( ) show a severe and...... conventional nerve conduction studies, behavioural studies using rotor-rod measurements, and histological measures to assess membrane dysfunction and its progression in protein zero deficient homozygous mutants as compared with age-matched wild-type controls. The involvement of Na(V)1.8 was investigated by...... pharmacologic block using the subtype-selective Na(V)1.8 blocker A-803467 and chronically in Na(V)1.8 knock-outs. We found that in the context of dysmyelination, abnormal potassium ion currents and membrane depolarization, the ectopic Na(V)1.8 channels further impair the motor axon excitability in protein zero...

  10. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  11. Quantitative analysis on electric dipole energy in Rashba band splitting

    Hong, Jisook; Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Changyoung; Ryong Park, Seung; Hoon Shim, Ji

    2015-09-01

    We report on quantitative comparison between the electric dipole energy and the Rashba band splitting in model systems of Bi and Sb triangular monolayers under a perpendicular electric field. We used both first-principles and tight binding calculations on p-orbitals with spin-orbit coupling. First-principles calculation shows Rashba band splitting in both systems. It also shows asymmetric charge distributions in the Rashba split bands which are induced by the orbital angular momentum. We calculated the electric dipole energies from coupling of the asymmetric charge distribution and external electric field, and compared it to the Rashba splitting. Remarkably, the total split energy is found to come mostly from the difference in the electric dipole energy for both Bi and Sb systems. A perturbative approach for long wave length limit starting from tight binding calculation also supports that the Rashba band splitting originates mostly from the electric dipole energy difference in the strong atomic spin-orbit coupling regime.

  12. Amplified Mechanically Gated Currents in Distinct Subsets of Myelinated Sensory Neurons following In Vivo Inflammation of Skin and Muscle

    Weyer, Andy D.; O'Hara, Crystal L.; Cheryl L Stucky

    2015-01-01

    Primary afferents are sensitized to mechanical stimuli following in vivo inflammation, but whether sensitization of mechanically gated ion channels contributes to this phenomenon is unknown. Here we identified two populations of murine A fiber-type sensory neurons that display markedly different responses to focal mechanical stimuli of the membrane based on their expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Following inflammation of the hindpaw, myelinated, CGRP-positive neurons proj...

  13. Normal centrolineal myelination of the callosal splenium reflects the development of the cortical origin and size of its commissural fibers

    Commissural white matter fibers comprising the callosal splenium are diverse. Subsections of the splenium myelinate at different times, in a centrolineal manner. The aims of this study are to depict the normal callosal splenium myelination pattern and to distinguish the transient age-related mid splenium hypointensity from pathology. We reviewed 131 consecutive brain MRIs in patients between ages 3 and 6 months from a single academic children's hospital. Patients that were preterm, hydrocephalic, and/or had volume loss were excluded. Fifty total MR exams that included T1-weighted MR imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted MR imaging (T2WI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were reviewed. Regions of callosal splenium myelination manifested by T1 and T2 shortening were evaluated. Tractography was performed with seeds placed over the posterior, mid, and anterior splenium to define the origin, destination, and course of traversing fibers. Splenium signal varied significantly from 3 to 6 months, with distinct age-related trends. On T1WI, the splenium was hypointense at 3 months (12/13), centrally hypointense/peripherally hyperintense at 4 months (15/16), and hyperintense at 6 months (10/11). Tractography revealed three distinct white matter tract populations: medial occipital (posterior); precuneus, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal (middle); and postcentral gyri (anterior). Specific commissural fiber components of the splenium myelinate at different times. The transient developmental mid splenium hypointensity on T1WI corresponds to tracts from the associative cortex, principally the precuneus. Heterogeneous splenium signal alteration in patients ages 3-6 months is a normal developmental phenomenon that should not be confused with pathologic lesions. (orig.)

  14. Normal centrolineal myelination of the callosal splenium reflects the development of the cortical origin and size of its commissural fibers

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Raju, Anand; Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Commissural white matter fibers comprising the callosal splenium are diverse. Subsections of the splenium myelinate at different times, in a centrolineal manner. The aims of this study are to depict the normal callosal splenium myelination pattern and to distinguish the transient age-related mid splenium hypointensity from pathology. We reviewed 131 consecutive brain MRIs in patients between ages 3 and 6 months from a single academic children's hospital. Patients that were preterm, hydrocephalic, and/or had volume loss were excluded. Fifty total MR exams that included T1-weighted MR imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted MR imaging (T2WI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were reviewed. Regions of callosal splenium myelination manifested by T1 and T2 shortening were evaluated. Tractography was performed with seeds placed over the posterior, mid, and anterior splenium to define the origin, destination, and course of traversing fibers. Splenium signal varied significantly from 3 to 6 months, with distinct age-related trends. On T1WI, the splenium was hypointense at 3 months (12/13), centrally hypointense/peripherally hyperintense at 4 months (15/16), and hyperintense at 6 months (10/11). Tractography revealed three distinct white matter tract populations: medial occipital (posterior); precuneus, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal (middle); and postcentral gyri (anterior). Specific commissural fiber components of the splenium myelinate at different times. The transient developmental mid splenium hypointensity on T1WI corresponds to tracts from the associative cortex, principally the precuneus. Heterogeneous splenium signal alteration in patients ages 3-6 months is a normal developmental phenomenon that should not be confused with pathologic lesions. (orig.)

  15. MYELIN BASIC PROTEIN-PRIMED T CELLS INDUCE NEUROTROPHINS IN GLIAL CELLS VIA α5β3 INTEGRIN

    Roy, Avik; Liu, Xiaojuan; Pahan, Kalipada

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the level of neurotrophins within the CNS may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with various neurological diseases. Earlier we have demonstrated that myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells induce the expression of various proinflammatory molecules in glial cells via cell-to-cell contact. Here we describe that after Th2 polarization by gemfibrozil or other drugs, MBP-primed T cells induced the expression of neurotrophic molecules such as, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BD...

  16. Investigation of Sequential Growth Factor Delivery during Cuprizone Challenge in Mice Aimed to Enhance Oligodendrogliogenesis and Myelin Repair

    Sabo, Jennifer K.; Aumann, Tim D; Trevor J Kilpatrick; Holly S. Cate

    2013-01-01

    Repair in multiple sclerosis involves remyelination, a process in which axons are provided with a new myelin sheath by new oligodendrocytes. Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are a family of growth factors that have been shown to influence the response of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in vivo during demyelination and remyelination in the adult brain. We have previously shown that BMP4 infusion increases numbers of OPCs during cuprizone-induced demyelination, while infusion of Noggin,...

  17. IFN-γ inhibits central nervous system myelination through both STAT1-dependent and STAT1-independent pathways

    Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Yifeng

    2010-01-01

    Immune cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays a crucial role in immune-mediated demyelination diseases such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our previous studies have shown that enforced expression of IFN-γ in the central nervous system (CNS) inhibits developmental myelination or remyelination in EAE demyelinated lesions. While many of the cellular actions of IFN-γ result from its activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT...

  18. Myocilin Is Involved in NgR1/Lingo-1-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination of the Optic Nerve

    Kwon, Heung Sun; NAKAYA, NAOKI; Abu-Asab, Mones; Kim, Hong Sug; Tomarev, Stanislav I.

    2014-01-01

    Myocilin is a secreted glycoprotein that belongs to a family of olfactomedin domain-containing proteins. Although myocilin is detected in several ocular and nonocular tissues, the only reported human pathology related to mutations in the MYOCILIN gene is primary open-angle glaucoma. Functions of myocilin are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that myocilin is a mediator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and is involved in the myelination of the optic nerve in mice. Myocilin is expressed ...

  19. Investigation of sequential growth factor delivery during cuprizone challenge in mice aimed to enhance oligodendrogliogenesis and myelin repair.

    Jennifer K Sabo

    Full Text Available Repair in multiple sclerosis involves remyelination, a process in which axons are provided with a new myelin sheath by new oligodendrocytes. Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs are a family of growth factors that have been shown to influence the response of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs in vivo during demyelination and remyelination in the adult brain. We have previously shown that BMP4 infusion increases numbers of OPCs during cuprizone-induced demyelination, while infusion of Noggin, an endogenous antagonist of BMP4 increases numbers of mature oligodendrocytes and remyelinated axons following recovery. Additional studies have shown that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 promotes the survival of OPCs during cuprizone-induced demyelination. Based on these data, we investigated whether myelin repair could be further enhanced by sequential infusion of these agents firstly, BMP4 to increase OPC numbers, followed by either Noggin or IGF-1 to increase the differentiation and survival of the newly generated OPCs. We identified that sequential delivery of BMP4 and IGF-1 during cuprizone challenge increased the number of mature oligodendrocytes and decreased astrocyte numbers following recovery compared with vehicle infused mice, but did not alter remyelination. However, sequential delivery of BMP4 and Noggin during cuprizone challenge did not alter numbers of oligodendrocytes or astrocytes in the corpus callosum compared with vehicle infused mice. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis revealed no change in average myelin thickness in the corpus callosum between vehicle infused and BMP4-Noggin infused mice. Our results suggest that while single delivery of Noggin or IGF-1 increased the production of mature oligodendrocytes in vivo in the context of demyelination, only Noggin infusion promoted remyelination. Thus, sequential delivery of BMP4 and Noggin or IGF-1 does not further enhance myelin repair above what occurs with delivery of Noggin

  20. Myelin repair in vivo is increased by targeting oligodendrocyte precursor cells with nanoparticles encapsulating leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF)

    Rittchen, Sonja; Boyd, Amanda; Burns, Alasdair; Park, Jason; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Metcalfe, Su; Williams, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Many nerve axons are insulated by a myelin sheath and their demyelination not only prevents saltatory electrical signal conduction along the axons but also removes their metabolic support leading to irreversible neurodegeneration, which currently is untreatable. There is much interest in potential therapeutics that promote remyelination and here we explore use of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LI...

  1. Proteomics-level analysis of myelin formation and regeneration in a mouse model for Vanishing White Matter disease.

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Geiger, Tamar; Barbi, Mali; Raini, Gali; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2015-08-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is a recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in translation initiation factor eIF2B and leading to progressive brain myelin deterioration, secondary axonal damage, and death in early adolescence. Eif2b5(R132H/R132H) mice exhibit delayed developmental myelination, mild early neurodegeneration and a robust remyelination defect in response to cuprizone-induced demyelination. In the current study we used Eif2b5(R132H/R132H) mice for mass-spectrometry analyses, to follow the changes in brain protein abundance in normal- versus cuprizone-diet fed mice during the remyelination recovery phase. Analysis of proteome profiles suggested that dysregulation of mitochondrial functions, altered proteasomal activity and impaired balance between protein synthesis and degradation play a role in VWM pathology. Consistent with these findings, we detected elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in mutant-derived primary fibroblasts and reduced 20S proteasome activity in mutant brain homogenates. These observations highlight the importance of tight translational control to precise coordination of processes involved in myelin formation and regeneration and point at cellular functions that may contribute to VWM pathology. Eif2b5(R132H/R132H) mouse model for vanishing white matter (VWM) disease was used for mass spectrometry of brain proteins at two time points under normal conditions and along recovery from cuprizone-induced demyelination. Comparisons of proteome profiles revealed the importance of mitochondrial function and tight coordination between protein synthesis and degradation to myelination formation and regeneration, pointing at cellular functions that contribute to VWM pathology. PMID:25920008

  2. Early postnatal myelin content estimate of white matter via T1w/T2w ratio

    Lee, Kevin; Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Gilmore, John; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Jerod; Wadhwa, Pathik D.; Entringer, Sonja; Glasser, Matthew F.; Van Essen, David C.; Buss, Claudia; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    To develop and evaluate a novel processing framework for the relative quantification of myelin content in cerebral white matter (WM) regions from brain MRI data via a computed ratio of T1 to T2 weighted intensity values. We employed high resolution (1mm3 isotropic) T1 and T2 weighted MRI from 46 (28 male, 18 female) neonate subjects (typically developing controls) scanned on a Siemens Tim Trio 3T at UC Irvine. We developed a novel, yet relatively straightforward image processing framework for WM myelin content estimation based on earlier work by Glasser, et al. We first co-register the structural MRI data to correct for motion. Then, background areas are masked out via a joint T1w and T2 foreground mask computed. Raw T1w/T2w-ratios images are computed next. For purpose of calibration across subjects, we first coarsely segment the fat-rich facial regions via an atlas co-registration. Linear intensity rescaling based on median T1w/T2w-ratio values in those facial regions yields calibrated T1w/T2wratio images. Mean values in lobar regions are evaluated using standard statistical analysis to investigate their interaction with age at scan. Several lobes have strongly positive significant interactions of age at scan with the computed T1w/T2w-ratio. Most regions do not show sex effects. A few regions show no measurable effects of change in myelin content change within the first few weeks of postnatal development, such as cingulate and CC areas, which we attribute to sample size and measurement variability. We developed and evaluated a novel way to estimate white matter myelin content for use in studies of brain white matter development.

  3. Splitting Neutrino masses and Showering into Sky

    Neutrino masses might be as light as a few time the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. The relic cosmic neutrinos may cluster in wide Dark Hot Local Group Halo. High Energy ZeV cosmic neutrinos (in Z-Showering model) might hit relic ones at each mass in different resonance energies in our nearby Universe. This non-degenerated density and energy must split UHE Z-boson secondaries (in Z-Burst model) leading to multi injection of UHECR nucleons within future extreme AUGER energy. Secondaries of Z-Burst as neutral gamma, below a few tens EeV are better surviving local GZK cut-off and they might explain recent Hires BL-Lac UHECR correlations at small angles. A different high energy resonance must lead to Glashow's anti-neutrino showers while hitting electrons in matter. In water and ice it leads to isotropic light explosions. In air, Glashow's anti-neutrino showers lead to collimated and directional air-showers offering a new Neutrino Astronomy. Because of neutrino flavor mixing, astrophysical energetic tau neutrino above tens GeV must arise over atmospheric background. At TeV range is difficult to disentangle tau neutrinos from other atmospheric flavors. At greater energy around PeV, Tau escaping mountains and Earth and decaying in flight are effectively showering in air sky. These Horizontal showering is splitting by geomagnetic field in forked shapes. Such air-showers secondaries release amplified and beamed gamma bursts (like observed TGF), made also by muon and electron pair bundles, with their accompanying rich Cherenkov flashes. Also planet's largest (Saturn, Jupiter) atmosphere limbs offer an ideal screen for UHE GZK and Z-burst tau neutrino, because their largest sizes. Titan thick atmosphere and small radius are optimal for discovering up-going resonant Glashow resonant anti-neutrino electron showers. Detection from Earth of Tau, anti-Tau, anti-electron neutrino induced Air-showers by twin Magic Telescopes on top mountains, or space based detection on

  4. Split Architecture for Large Scale Wide Area Networks

    John, Wolfgang; Devlic, Alisa; Ding, Zhemin; Jocha, David; Kern, Andras; Kind, Mario; Köpsel, Andreas; Nordell, Viktor; Sharma, Sachin; Sköldström, Pontus; Staessens, Dimitri; Takacs, Attila; Topp, Steffen; Westphal, F. -Joachim; Woesner, Hagen

    2014-01-01

    This report defines a carrier-grade split architecture based on requirements identified during the SPARC project. It presents the SplitArchitecture proposal, the SPARC concept for Software Defined Networking (SDN) introduced for large-scale wide area networks such as access/aggregation networks, and evaluates technical issues against architectural trade-offs. First we present the control and management architecture of the proposed SplitArchitecture. Here, we discuss a recursive control archit...

  5. Quantum tunneling splittings from path-integral molecular dynamics.

    Mátyus, Edit; Wales, David J; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-21

    We illustrate how path-integral molecular dynamics can be used to calculate ground-state tunnelling splittings in molecules or clusters. The method obtains the splittings from ratios of density matrix elements between the degenerate wells connected by the tunnelling. We propose a simple thermodynamic integration scheme for evaluating these elements. Numerical tests on fully dimensional malonaldehyde yield tunnelling splittings in good overall agreement with the results of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:27004863

  6. Correlations of splitting and phobic anxiety with dreaming.

    Kroth, J; Jensen, L; Haraldsson, M

    1997-08-01

    Dream characteristics of 28 women from a graduate counseling program were correlated with measures of phobic anxiety, splitting, and sleepiness. Significant correlations between splitting and recurrent nightmares (.68), agoraphobia and dreams about death (.44), and global phobia and recurrent nightmares (.56) were obtained. Results are discussed in terms of how phobic anxieties and splitting may relate to traumatic content and the dream process. PMID:9293596

  7. Double-peak Splitting in High-order Harmonics Generation

    WANG Yingsong; LIU Yaqing; YANG Xiaodong; XU Zhizhan

    2000-01-01

    When the intensity of the driving pulse is much higher than the saturation intensity of the media involved, the double-peak splitting in frequency domain emerges in the generated high-order harmonic spectra. The possible origins of this splitting are carefully investigated. The ionization of the gas media and the propagation effect of harmonic field are the main reason for the double-peak splitting observed.

  8. Evaluation of salt split technique of immunofluorescence in bullous pemphigoid

    Satyapal Seema; Amladi Sangeeta; Jerajani H

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that salt split skin is a more sensitive substrate than intact skin for immunofluorescence diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid. We undertook this study to define the role of salt split technique of immunofluorescence findings in 32 clinical and histopothology confirmed cases of bullous pemphigoid. Both direct and indirect immunofluorescences were performed using normal and split skin. Direct immunofluorescence positivity of 100% was noted with both routine and salt s...

  9. Splitting Magnetoelastic Shifting Waves in Screening Magnetic Field

    Martirosyan E. V.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a system of elastic perfectly conducting semi – space and straightforward layer which separated by vacuum split. There is external constant magnetic field acting in a plane that perpendicular to the boundary of semi – space. It shown that the interaction between indignant electromagnetic field and fields of elastic displacements of semi – space and split becomes to existence of splitting surface shifting wave.

  10. Splitting Magnetoelastic Shifting Waves in Screening Magnetic Field

    Martirosyan E. V.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a system of elastic perfectly conducting semi – space and straightforward layer which separated by vacuum split. There is external constant magnetic field acting in a plane that perpendicular to the boundary of semi – space. It shown that the interaction between indignant electromagnetic field and fields of elastic displacements of semi – space and split becomes to existence of splitting surface shifting wave.

  11. A Separated Splitting Technique for Disconnected Rare Event Sets

    Wadman, Wander J.; Crommelin, D.T.; Frank, Jason

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge for an efficient splitting technique is defining the importance function. If the rare event set consists of multiple separated subsets this challenge becomes bigger since the most likely path to the rare event set may be very different from the most likely path to an intermediate level. We propose to mitigate this problem of path deviation by estimating the subset probabilities separately using a modified splitting technique. We compare the proposed separated splitting techniq...

  12. Splitting of any initial field distribution in GRIN media

    Moya-Cessa, H M; Arrizon, V; Zúñiga-Segundo, A

    2015-01-01

    We show the splitting effect of an electromagnetic field assuming non paraxial propagation in a quadratic GRIN medium. The field distribution at the splitting distance is given by fractional Fourier transforms of the initial field and of a reflected version of it. We apply this result to an initial field given by a Bessel function and show that it splits into two generalized Bessel functions.

  13. Quantitative analysis on electric dipole energy in Rashba band splitting

    Jisook Hong; Jun-Won Rhim; Changyoung Kim; Seung Ryong Park; Ji Hoon Shim

    2015-01-01

    We report on quantitative comparison between the electric dipole energy and the Rashba band splitting in model systems of Bi and Sb triangular monolayers under a perpendicular electric field. We used both first-principles and tight binding calculations on p-orbitals with spin-orbit coupling. First-principles calculation shows Rashba band splitting in both systems. It also shows asymmetric charge distributions in the Rashba split bands which are induced by the orbital angular momentum. We calc...

  14. Accounting variables, stock splits and when-issued trading

    Kemerer, Kevin L.

    1990-01-01

    When-issued trading, the contractual agreement for the sale and purchase of shares to be issued in the future (when-issued securities), typically occurs after stock split announcements. Curiously, when-issued trading does not always exist for a stock-splitting firm's shares even though the shares are eligible for when-issued trading. Although stock splits have been the subject of a large number of studies, intriguing questions concerning these events remain unanswered. In parti...

  15. The influence of glutamatergic receptor antagonists on biochemical and ultrastructural changes in myelin membranes of rats subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Strużyńska, Lidia; Chalimoniuk, Małgorzata; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Sulkowski, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Elevated extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft causes overactivation of glutamate receptors and kills neurons by an excitotoxic mechanism. Recent studies have shown that glutamate can also lead to toxic injury of white matter oligodendrocytes in myelin sheaths and consequently to axon demyelination. The present study was performed using the rodent model of multiple sclerosis known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The aim of the study was to test the effects of the glutamatergic receptor antagonists amantadine and memantine (antagonists of NMDA receptors), LY 367384 (an antagonist of mGluR1), and MPEP (an mGluR5 antagonist) on the development of neurological symptoms in immunized animals, morphological changes in cerebral myelin, and expression of mRNA of the principal myelin proteins PLP, MBP, MOG, MAG, and CNPase. Pharmacological inhibition of NMDA receptors by amantadine and memantine was found to suppress neurological symptoms in EAE rats, whereas antagonists of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs G I) did not function positively. In the symptomatic phase of the disease we observed destruction of myelin sheaths via electron microscopy and decreased levels of mRNA for all of the principal myelin proteins. The results reveal that glutamate receptor antagonists have a positive effect on the expression of mRNA MBP and glycoproteins MAG and MOG but not on myelin ultrastructure. PMID:26785366

  16. Mice with conditional inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 signaling in oligodendrocytes have normal myelin but display dramatic hyperactivity when combined with Cnp1 inactivation.

    Kaga, Y; Shoemaker, W J; Furusho, M; Bryant, M; Rosenbluth, J; Pfeiffer, S E; Oh, L; Rasband, M; Lappe-Siefke, C; Yu, K; Ornitz, D M; Nave, K-A; Bansal, R

    2006-11-22

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfr) comprise a widely expressed family of developmental regulators implicated in oligodendrocyte (OL) maturation of the CNS. Fgfr2 is expressed by OLs in myelinated fiber tracks. In vitro, Fgfr2 is highly upregulated during OL terminal differentiation, and its activation leads to enhanced growth of OL processes and the formation of myelin-like membranes. To investigate the in vivo function of Fgfr2 signaling by myelinating glial cells, we inactivated the floxed Fgfr2 gene in mice that coexpress Cre recombinase (cre) as a knock-in gene into the OL-specific 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (Cnp1) locus. Surprisingly, no obvious defects were detected in brain development of these conditional mutants, including the number of OLs, the onset and extent of myelination, the ultrastructure of myelin, and the expression level of myelin proteins. However, unexpectedly, a subset of these conditional Fgfr2 knock-out mice that are homozygous for cre and therefore are also Cnp1 null, displayed a dramatic hyperactive behavior starting at approximately 2 weeks of age. This hyperactivity was abolished by treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists or catecholamine biosynthesis inhibitors, suggesting that the symptoms involve a dysregulation of the dopaminergic system. Although the molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, this novel mouse model of hyperactivity demonstrates the potential involvement of OLs in neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as the nonpredictable role of genetic interactions in the behavioral phenotype of mice. PMID:17122059

  17. Production and crystallization of a panel of structure-based mutants of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    The myelin protein P2 is a peripheral membrane protein functional in lipid bilayer binding and stacking. In order to study the fine details of P2 structure and function, 14 point mutants of human P2 were generated and crystallized; a total of eight different crystal forms were obtained, some of which diffracted to atomic resolution. The myelin sheath is a multilayered membrane that surrounds and insulates axons in the nervous system. One of the proteins specific to the peripheral nerve myelin is P2, a protein that is able to stack lipid bilayers. With the goal of obtaining detailed information on the structure–function relationship of P2, 14 structure-based mutated variants of human P2 were generated and produced. The mutants were designed to potentially affect the binding of lipid bilayers by P2. All mutated variants were also crystallized and preliminary crystallographic data are presented. The structural data from the mutants will be combined with diverse functional assays in order to elucidate the fine details of P2 function at the molecular level

  18. The Deterioration Seen in Myelin Related Morphophysiology in Vanadium Exposed Rats is Partially Protected by Concurrent Iron Deficiency.

    Usende, Ifukibot Levi; Leitner, Dominque F; Neely, Elizabeth; Connor, James R; Olopade, James O

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte development and myelination occurs vigorously during the early post natal period which coincides with the period of peak mobilization of iron. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are easily disturbed by any agent that affects iron homeostasis and its assimilation into these cells. Environmental exposure to vanadium, a transition metal can disrupt this iron homeostasis. We investigated the interaction of iron deficiency and vanadium exposure on the myelination infrastructure and its related neurobehavioural phenotypes, and neurocellular profiles in developing rat brains. Control group (C) dams were fed normal diet while Group 2 (V) dams were fed normal diet and pups were injected with 3mg/kg body weight of sodium metavanadate daily from postnatal day (PND) 1-21. Group 3 (I+V) dams were fed iron deficient diet after delivery and pups injected with 3mg/kg body weight sodium metavanadate from PND1-21. Body and brain weights deteriorated in I+V relative to C and V while neurobehavioral deficit occurred more in V. Whereas immunohistochemical staining shows more astrogliosis and microgliosis indicative of neuroinflammation in I+V, more intense OPCs depletion and hypomyelination were seen in the V, and this was partially protected in I+V. In in vitro studies, vanadium induced glial cells toxicity was partially protected only at the LD 50 dose with the iron chelator, desferroxamine. The data indicate that vanadium promotes myelin damage and iron deficiency in combination with vanadium partially protects this neurotoxicological effects of vanadium. PMID:27574759

  19. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived oligodendrocyte precursor-like cells for axon and myelin sheath regeneration

    Hong Chen; Yan Zhang; Zhijun Yang; Hongtian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursor-like cells in vitro. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells were transplanted into contused rat spinal cords. Immunofluorescence double staining indicated that transplanted cells survived in injured spinal cord, and differentiated into mature and immature oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Biotinylated dextran amine tracing results showed that cell transplantation promoted a higher density of the corticospinal tract in the central and caudal parts of the injured spinal cord. Luxol fast blue and toluidine blue staining showed that the volume of residual myelin was significantly increased at 1 and 2 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion epicenter after cell transplantation. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining verified that the newly regenerated myelin sheath was derived from the central nervous system. Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan testing showed an evident behavioral recovery. These results suggest that human umbilical mesenchymal stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells promote the regeneration of spinal axons and myelin sheaths.

  20. On Heegaard splittings of knot exteriors with tunnel number degenerations

    Morimoto, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Let $K_1, K_2$ be two knots with $t(K_1)+t(K_2)>2$ and $t(K_1 # K_2)=2$. Then, in the present paper, we will show that any genus three Heegaard splittings of $E(K_1 # K_2)$ is strongly irreducible and that $E(K_1 # K_2)$ has at most four genus three Heegaard splittings up to homeomorphism. Moreover, we will give a complete classification of those four genus three Heegaard splittings and show unknotting tunnel systems of knots $K_1 # K_2$ corresponding to those Heegaard splittings.

  1. On fixed-parameter algorithms for Split Vertex Deletion

    CYGAN, Marek; Pilipczuk, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    In the Split Vertex Deletion problem, given a graph G and an integer k, we ask whether one can delete k vertices from the graph G to obtain a split graph (i.e., a graph, whose vertex set can be partitioned into two sets: one inducing a clique and the second one inducing an independent set). In this paper we study fixed-parameter algorithms for Split Vertex Deletion parameterized by k: we show that, up to a factor quasipolynomial in k and polynomial in n, the Split Vertex Deletion problem can ...

  2. Vector Control of Induction Motor with Split Phase Stator Windings

    Gopakumar, K.; Ranganathan, VT; Bhat, SR

    1994-01-01

    A vector controlled scheme is described for induction motor with split phase windings. Such a motor is obtained by splitting the phase windings of a conventional three phase motor with an angular seperation of 30 electrical degrees between the axes of the two halves. In the proposed scheme the motor is run as a three phase machine by connecting the split phase windings in series. However the winding taps are utilized for making voltage measurements. Based on a space phasor model of the split ...

  3. (Split-)octonions, generalized supersymmetries and M-theory

    In this talk I discuss the results of a joint paper with Z. Kuznetsova, where the split-division algebras are introduced to construct generalized supersymmetries in different space-time signatures. In particular, in D=11 dimensions, it is shown that split-octonions allow to introduce a split-octonionic M-algebra which extends to the (6,5) signature the properties of the 11-dimensional octonionic M-algebras, only existing in (10,1) and (2,9) signatures. The three space-times above form a triality-related set of (split-)octonionic, eleven dimensional, spacetimes. (author)

  4. Noncommutative instantons via dressing and splitting approaches

    Almost all known instanton solutions in noncommutative Yang-Mills theory have been obtained in the modified ADHM scheme. In this paper we employ two alternative methods for the construction of the self-dual U(2) BPST instanton on a noncommutative euclidean four-dimensional space with self-dual noncommutativity tensor. Firstly, we use the method of dressing transformations, an iterative procedure for generating solutions from a given seed solution, and thereby generalize Belavin's and Zakharov's work to the noncommutative setup. Secondly, we relate the dressing approach with Ward's splitting method based on the twistor construction and rederive the solution in this context. It seems feasible to produce nonsingular noncommutative multi-instantons with these techniques. (author)

  5. Splitting scheme for poroelasticity and thermoelasticity problems

    Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasil'eva, M. V.; Kolesov, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    Boundary value problems in thermoelasticity and poroelasticity (filtration consolidation) are solved numerically. The underlying system of equations consists of the Lamé stationary equations for displacements and nonstationary equations for temperature or pressure in the porous medium. The numerical algorithm is based on a finite-element approximation in space. Standard stability conditions are formulated for two-level schemes with weights. Such schemes are numerically implemented by solving a system of coupled equations for displacements and temperature (pressure). Splitting schemes with respect to physical processes are constructed, in which the transition to a new time level is associated with solving separate elliptic problems for the desired displacements and temperature (pressure). Unconditionally stable additive schemes are constructed by choosing a weight of a three-level scheme.

  6. Non-Uniformity and Generalised Sacks Splitting

    COOPER S.Barry; LI Ang Sheng

    2002-01-01

    We show that there do not exist computable functions f1(e, i), f2 (e, i), g1(e, i), g2(e, i) such that for all e, i ∈ω,(1) (Wf1(e,i) - Wf2(e,i)) ≤T (We - Wi);(2) (Wg1(e,i) - Wg2(e,i))≤T (We - Wi);(3) (We - Wi) ≤T (Wf1(e,i) - Wf2(e,i)) (Wg1(e,i) - Wg2(e,i));(4) (We - Wi) T (Wf1(e,i) - Wf2(e,i)) unless (We - Wi) ≤T ; and (5) (We - Wi) T (Wg1(e,i) - Wg2(e,i)) unless (We - Wi) ≤T .It follows that the splitting theorems of Sacks and Cooper cannot be combined uniformly.

  7. All-electrostatic split LEBT test results

    An all-electrostatic LEBT for an RFQ has been assembled and tested with beam. The LEBT includes two quasi-einzel lenses, allowing a wider range of Twiss parameters to be accommodated, and the lenses are split into quadrants, allowing electrical steering of the beam. Moreover, mechanical steering by moving the entire LEBT with a special low-friction vacuum joint was also demonstrated. The LEBT was tested with unanalyzed protons from an RF-driven bucket source by measuring the beam directly and by measuring the transmission through a subsequent RFQ as a function of LEBT electrode parameters. Agreement between calculated LEBT beam characteristics and actual measured values is excellent. This LEBT offers fully unneutralized beam transport with steering and two-knob control of exit Twiss parameters, and can be applied to negative hydrogen as well as proton beams. (author)

  8. Graduate Program in Astrophysics in Split

    Krajnovic, D

    2006-01-01

    Beginning in autumn 2008 the first generation of astronomy master students will start a 2 year course in Astrophysics offered by the Physics department of the University of Split, Croatia (http://fizika.pmfst.hr/astro/english/index.html). This unique master course in South-Eastern Europe, following the Bologna convention and given by astronomers from international institutions, offers a series of comprehensive lectures designed to greatly enhance students' knowledge and skills in astrophysics, and prepare them for a scientific career. An equally important aim of the course is to recognise the areas in which astronomy and astrophysics can serve as a national asset and to use them to prepare young people for real life challenges, enabling graduates to enter the modern society as a skilled and attractive work-force. In this contribution, I present an example of a successful organisation of international astrophysics studies in a developing country, which aims to become a leading graduate program in astrophysics ...

  9. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the Galapagos Archipelago

    Fontaine, F. R.; Burkett, P. G.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Silver, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We report measurements of teleseismic shear wave splitting in the Galápagos Archipelago. The inferred lateral variations in azimuthal anisotropy allow us to examine the dynamics of an evolving hotspot-ridge system. The data are from SKS and SKKS phases, as well as S waves from deep sources, recorded by a relatively dense network of 10 portable broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA (Imaging Galápagos Upwelling and Neotectonics of the Archipelago) experiment and from the GSN broadband station in Santa Cruz (PAYG). We find a delay time between fast and slow shear waves of 0.4 to 0.9 s and fast polarization directions of N85-90° E beneath five stations at the leading and southern edge of the archipelago. Despite clear seismic signals, we did not find any anisotropy at the six stations located in the interior of the archipelago. For those stations that show shear wave splitting, there is an increase in the delay time toward the expected location of the Galápagos hotspot at the western edge of the archipelago. With the exception of Española, fast polarization directions (N85-90° E) are close to the current direction of absolute plate motion of the overlying Nazca plate (N91° E). The lack of azimuthal anisotropy in the interior of the archipelago is interpreted as an absence of strongly oriented mantle fabric beneath these stations. The apparent isotropy in this dynamic region, where we expect considerable mantle strain, is surprising. It is not likely that the olivine a-axis is oriented vertically beneath the interior of the archipelago as the Galápagos plume is thought to lie at the western edge. It is also unlikely that there are two layers of perpendicularly-oriented anisotropy which are solely confined to the center of the archipelago. However, there appears to be some correlation between the region of apparent isotropy and a zone of anomalously low upper mantle velocities imaged beneath Santiago and Marchena from surface waves by

  10. Miniaturized Planar Split-Ring Resonator Antenna

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized planar antenna based on a broadside-coupled split ring resonator excited by an arc-shaped dipole is presented. The excitation dipole acts as a small tuning capacitor in series with a parallel RLC circuit represented by the SRR. The antenna resonance frequency and dimensions a...... essentially determined by the SRR, while by varying the dipole arm length the input resistance is changed in a wide range, thus matching the antenna to a feed line and compensating for simulation and manufacturing inaccuracies. No additional matching network is required. Theoretically, there is no limit on...... subsequently tuned to 50 ohms simply by cutting out the excessive arm length. This tuning technique is especially useful in practical applications, since it allows the antenna to be tuned in-place and thereby compensate for various inaccuracies as well as for an antenna environment....

  11. Radiative seesaw: a case for split supersymmetry

    We revive Witten's mechanism for the radiative seesaw induced neutrino masses in SO(10) grand unified theory. We propose its extension to charged fermion masses as a possible cure for wrong tree level mass relations. We offer two simple realizations that can produce a realistic fermionic spectrum. The first one requires two 10-dimensional Higgses in the Yukawa sector and utilizes radiative effects for charged fermion masses. The second one trades one 10- for a 120-dimensional Higgs and leads to the SO(10) theory with less parameters in the Yukawa sector. The mechanism works only if supersymmetry is broken at the GUT scale while gauginos and higgsinos remain at TeV. This provides a strong rationale for the so-called split supersymmetry

  12. Molecular concepts of water splitting. Nature's approach

    Based on studies of natural systems, much has also been learned concerning the design principles required for biomimetic catalysis of water splitting and hydrogen evolution. In summary, these include use of abundant and inexpensive metals, the effective protection of the active sites in functional environments, repair/replacement of active components in case of damage, and the optimization of reaction rates. Biomimetic chemistry aims to mimic all these features; many labs are working toward this goal by developing new approaches in the design and synthesis of such systems, encompassing not only the catalytic center, but also smart matrices and assembly via self-organization. More stable catalysts that do not require self-repair may be obtained from fully artificial (inorganic) catalytic systems that are totally different from the biological ones and only apply some basic principles learned from nature. Metals other than Mn/Ca, Fe, and Ni could be used (e.g. Co) in new ligand spheres and other matrices. For light harvesting, charge separation/stabilization, and the effective coupling of the oxidizing/reducing equivalents to the redox catalysts, different methods have been proposed - for example, covalently linked molecular donor-acceptor systems, photo-voltaic devices, semiconductor-based systems, and photoactive metal complexes. The aim of all these approaches is to develop catalytic systems that split water with sunlight into hydrogen and oxygen while displaying high efficiency and long-term stability. Such a system - either biological, biomimetic, or bioinspired - has the potential to be used on a large scale to produce 'solar fuels' (e.g. hydrogen or secondary products thereof). (orig.)

  13. 大脑白质有髓神经纤维髓鞘超微结构定量研究的体视学方法%Stereological methods for quantitative investigation in myelin sheath ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in white matter of brain

    李琛; 杨姝; 张伟; 唐勇

    2009-01-01

    目的:运用新的体视学方法研究大鼠白质有髓神经纤维髓鞘超微结构,以期为以后各种有关髓鞘超微结构的相关研究提供可靠的方法学依据.方法:6~8月龄雌性Long-Evans大鼠.运用电镜技术及相应的体视学方法计算白质内有髓神经纤维的总长度、有髓神经纤维髓鞘总体积、有髓神经纤维及轴突直径、髓鞘断面面积、髓鞘内外周长、髓鞘平均厚度.结果:获得了正常6~8月龄雌性Long-Evans大鼠有髓神经纤维总长度及髓鞘超微结构的各项数据,两种不同方法得到的髓鞘平均厚度并没有显著性差异.结论:把新的体视学方法和电子显微镜结合起来定量研究了大鼠大脑白质有髓神经纤维髓鞘超微结构,所描述的方法为以后进行髓鞘超微结构的定量研究提供了有用的工具.%Objective:To investigate the myelin sheath ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in rat white matter of brain and to provide methods for the future related quantitative studies on the myelin sheath ultrastructure. Methods: 5 adult (6-8 months) Long-Evans rats were used. The total length of myelin fibers, the total volume of myelin sheathes of myelinated fibers, the mean area of myelin sheath profiles, the mean perimeter of myelinated fiber profiles and axon profiles, mean diameter of myelinated fibers and axons of myelinated fibers and thickness of myelin sheaths in the white matter were investigated with transmission electron microscopy and stereological techniques. Results:The present study obtained data of both the total length of myelinated fibers and the myelin sheath ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in the white matter of 6-8 month old female rats. Conclusion:The present study combined the new stereological techniques and transmission electron microscopy to quantitatively study the myelin sheath ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in rat white matter. The stereological techniques described in this study proved to be

  14. Myelin basic protein determination in cerebro-spinal fluid of children with tuberculous meningitis

    Myelin basic protein (MBP), an indicator of neural tissue damage in cerebro-spinal fluid, was studied in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). MBP levels were elevated in 62% of the cases of TBM, the levels being 13.3+-18.8 ng/mL, compared with control levels of 1.34+-0.55 ng/mL(p<0.001). MBP level was related to certain clinical features of the disease, such as level of consciousness, neurological characteristics associated with signs of raised intracranial tension and the presence of arteritis associated with hydrocephalus. However, its greatest significance was its correlation with the progress of disease. Persistence of high levels of MBP over a period of a few weeks was associated with little or no improvement in the clinical state of the patient or a higher mortality rate. Return to normal levels of MBP indicated a more favourable outcome of disease. Hence MBP estimation gave not only an indicator of the degree of neurological damage but also an important marker to evaluate patients' progress and response to treatment. (author)

  15. Knockdown of Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 Inhibits the Progression of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Liu, Hui; Cao, Hui-qin; Ta, Jin-bao; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Yu-hong

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The level of PMP22 expression in CD34(+) cells isolated from CML patients' bone marrow samples (BMMCs) and peripheral blood samples (PBMCs) was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, PMP22-siRNA and scrambled control siRNA were transfected into human CML cell line K562 with Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. Cell viability and apoptosis were, respectively, determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Besides, the level of caspase 3 and Bcl-xL was then detected using Western blot. The level of PMP22 expression in CML patients' CD34(+) cells isolated from both PBMCs and BMMCs was significantly higher than the control group. PMP22 expression in K562 cells was successfully knocked down by siRNA. MTT analysis showed that knockdown of PMP22 inhibited the proliferation of CML cells. Flow cytometry showed that knockdown of PMP22 promoted the apoptosis of CML cells. Besides, Bcl-xL expression markedly decreased, while the expression of caspase 3 in CML cells significantly increased after knockdown of PMP22 expression. Our findings indicate that high expression of PMP22 may promote cell proliferation and inhibit cell apoptosis via upregulation of Bcl-xL or inhibition of caspase 3 activation, and thus may contribute to the development of CML. PMP22 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of CML. PMID:26629937

  16. Chd7 cooperates with Sox10 and regulates the onset of CNS myelination and remyelination.

    He, Danyang; Marie, Corentine; Zhao, Chuntao; Kim, Bongwoo; Wang, Jincheng; Deng, Yaqi; Clavairoly, Adrien; Frah, Magali; Wang, Haibo; He, Xuelian; Hmidan, Hatem; Jones, Blaise V; Witte, David; Zalc, Bernard; Zhou, Xin; Choo, Daniel I; Martin, Donna M; Parras, Carlos; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in CHD7, encoding ATP-dependent chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7, in CHARGE syndrome lead to multiple congenital anomalies, including craniofacial malformations, neurological dysfunction and growth delay. Mechanisms underlying the CNS phenotypes remain poorly understood. We found that Chd7 is a direct transcriptional target of oligodendrogenesis-promoting factors Olig2 and Smarca4/Brg1 and is required for proper onset of CNS myelination and remyelination. Genome-occupancy analyses in mice, coupled with transcriptome profiling, revealed that Chd7 interacted with Sox10 and targeted the enhancers of key myelinogenic genes. These analyses identified previously unknown Chd7 targets, including bone formation regulators Osterix (also known as Sp7) and Creb3l2, which are also critical for oligodendrocyte maturation. Thus, Chd7 coordinates with Sox10 to regulate the initiation of myelinogenesis and acts as a molecular nexus of regulatory networks that account for the development of a seemingly diverse array of lineages, including oligodendrocytes and osteoblasts, pointing to previously uncharacterized Chd7 functions in white matter pathogenesis in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:26928066

  17. Association of myelin peptide with vitamin D prevents autoimmune encephalomyelitis development.

    Mimura, L A N; Chiuso-Minicucci, F; Fraga-Silva, T F C; Zorzella-Pezavento, S F G; França, T G D; Ishikawa, L L W; Penitenti, M; Ikoma, M R V; Sartori, A

    2016-03-11

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). As there is no cure for this disease, new therapeutic strategies and prophylactic measures are necessary. We recently described the therapeutic activity of the association between myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG) and active vitamin D3 (VitD) against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The objective of this work was to evaluate the prophylactic potential of this association in EAE. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MOG in the presence of VitD and then subjected to EAE induction. Animals were euthanized 7 and 19days after disease induction and the following parameters were evaluated: body weight, clinical score, inflammatory process in the CNS, amount of dendritic cells (DCs) and regulatory T cells in the spleen and cytokine production by spleen and CNS cell cultures. Vaccination with MOG associated with VitD determined a drastic reduction in clinical score, body weight loss, CNS inflammation, DCs maturation and also in the production of cytokines by CNS and spleen cell cultures. Collectively, our data indicate that this association prevents EAE development. A similar effect from specific self-antigens associated with VitD is expected in other autoimmune conditions and deserves to be experimentally appraised. PMID:26762804

  18. Diffusion-weighted MRI of myelination in the rat brain following treatment with gonadal hormones

    Prayer, D. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Roberts, T. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Barkovich, A.J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Prayer, L. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Kucharczyk, J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Moseley, M. [Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States); Arieff, A. [Department of Medicine, Geriatrics Section, Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center and University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI to show maturation of white-matter structures in the developing rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gonadal steroid hormones on the rate of this development. Starting from their second postnatal day, 16 rat-pups of either sex were repeatedly treated with subcutaneous implants containing 17-beta estradiol or delta-androstene 3,17 dione, respectively. Serial T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI was performed weekly for 8 weeks using a 4.7 T unit. Maturation of anterior optic pathways and hemisphere commissures was assessed. Diffusion-weighted images were processed to produce ``anisotropy index maps``, previously shown to be sensitive to white-matter maturation. Compared with untreated rat-pups, estrogen-treated animals showed accelerated, and testosterone-treated animals delayed maturation on anisotropy index maps and histological sections. In all animals, maturational changes appeared earlie on anisotropy index maps than on other MRI sequences or on myelin-sensitive stained sections. Diffusion-weighted imaging, and the construction of spatial maps sensitive to diffusion anisotropy, seem to be the most sensitive approach for the detection of maturational white-matter changes, and thus may hold potential for early diagnosis of temporary delay or permanent disturbances of white-matter development. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. X-ray scattering studies of a model complex of lipid and basic protein of myelin.

    Murthy, N S; Wood, D D; Moscarello, M A

    1984-01-25

    Low-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering data from phosphatidylglycerol complexed with myelin basic protein, poly(L-lysine) and calcium ions are analyzed. The results confirm our earlier report (Brady, G.W., Murthy, N.S., Fein, D.B., Wood, D.D. and Moscarello, M.A. (1981) Biophys. J. 34, 345-350) that the basic protein interacts primarily with the polar headgroups of the lipid; and that at high protein concentrations (greater than 35%) the bilayers aggregate to form multilayers with a repeat period of 68 A, the single bilayer to multilayer transition being a cooperative process. Polylysine and Ca2+ produce multilayers with a smaller repeat of approx. 55 A. Basic protein and polylysine do not change the fluid-like arrangement of the hydrocarbon chains (diffuse 4.6 A peak in the wide-angle pattern), whereas Ca2+ probably induces a two-dimensional order (4.3 A and 3.9 A peak in the wide-angle pattern). Electron density profiles of the lipid and lipid-basic protein vesicles indicate that the basic protein penetrates into the bilayer. PMID:6199042

  20. Diffusion-weighted MRI of myelination in the rat brain following treatment with gonadal hormones

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of high-resolution diffusion-weighted MRI to show maturation of white-matter structures in the developing rat brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gonadal steroid hormones on the rate of this development. Starting from their second postnatal day, 16 rat-pups of either sex were repeatedly treated with subcutaneous implants containing 17-beta estradiol or delta-androstene 3,17 dione, respectively. Serial T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted MRI was performed weekly for 8 weeks using a 4.7 T unit. Maturation of anterior optic pathways and hemisphere commissures was assessed. Diffusion-weighted images were processed to produce ''anisotropy index maps'', previously shown to be sensitive to white-matter maturation. Compared with untreated rat-pups, estrogen-treated animals showed accelerated, and testosterone-treated animals delayed maturation on anisotropy index maps and histological sections. In all animals, maturational changes appeared earlie on anisotropy index maps than on other MRI sequences or on myelin-sensitive stained sections. Diffusion-weighted imaging, and the construction of spatial maps sensitive to diffusion anisotropy, seem to be the most sensitive approach for the detection of maturational white-matter changes, and thus may hold potential for early diagnosis of temporary delay or permanent disturbances of white-matter development. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab