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Sample records for Permian Basin

  1. Exploratory shaft facility preliminary designs - Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Preliminary Design Report, Permian Basin, is to provide a description of the preliminary design for an Exploratory Shaft Facility in the Permian Basin, Texas. This issue of the report describes the preliminary design for constructing the exploratory shaft using the Large Hole Drilling method of construction and outlines the preliminary design and estimates of probable construction cost. The Preliminary Design Report is prepared to complement and summarize other documents that comprise the design at the preliminary stage of completion, December 1982. Other design documents include drawings, cost estimates and schedules. The preliminary design drawing package, which includes the construction schedule drawing, depicts the descriptions in this report. For reference, a list of the drawing titles and corresponding numbers are included in the Appendix. The report is divided into three principal sections: Design Basis, Facility Description, and Construction Cost Estimate. 30 references, 13 tables

  2. Permian Basin location recommendation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candidate study areas are screened from the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basin areas using data obtained from studies to date and criteria and specifications that consider: rock geometry; rock characteristics; human intrusion potential; surface characteristics; and environmental and socioeconomic conditions. Two preferred locations are recommended from among these areas for additional characterization to identify potential National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) salt repository sites. One location, in northeastern Deaf Smith County and southeastern Oldham County, is underlain by two salt units that meet the adopted screening specifications. The other location, in northcentral Swisher County, is underlain by one salt unit that meets the adopted screening specifications. Both locations have several favorable features, relative to surrounding areas, and no obviously undesirable characteristics. Both lie wholly on the Southern High Plains surface, are in relatively sparsely populated areas, contain no unique land use conflicts, and comprise large enough geographic areas to provide flexibility in site selection. Data gathered to date indicate that these locations contain salt units sufficient in thickness and in depth for the safe construction and operation of the underground facilities under consideration. 93 references, 34 figures, 6 tables

  3. Structure of the Anayet Permian basin (Axial Zone, Central Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The Anayet Permian basin was generated by strike-slip tectonics that opened subsident basins with pull-apart geometries in the western Spanish Axial Zone (between the Aragon and Tena valleys). A continental succession of Permian age, that represents the first post-variscan deposits in the area, fills the basin and covers discordantly Devonian to Carboniferous limestones, sandstones and slates. Permian deposits have been classically divided in four main detrital groups, with three basic volcanic episodes interbedded (Gisbert, 1984, Bixel, 1987): the Grey Unit (50-120 m, Estefanian to Kungurian) with slates, conglomerates, tobaceous slates, coal and pyroclastic deposits, the Transition Unit (50 m maximum) showing grey and red sandstones and lutites with oolitic limestones intercalated, the Lower Red Unit (250 m) composed of cross-bedded red sandstones and andesitic volcanic rocks at the top, and finally the Upper Red Unit (400 m minimum, top eroded) formed by three fining up megasequences of carbonates, red sandstones and lutites with lacustrine carbonates intercalated and alkali basalts at the top. Increasingly older rocks are found towards the western part of the basin, where its depocenter is located. South-vergent angular folds deform the Permian sedimentary succession. Fold axes are N115 °E-trending, almost horizontal and are characterized by a remarkably constant orientation. Folds exhibit a long limb dipping slightly to the north and a short vertical limb, occasionally reversed. In the Anayet basin four main folds, with a wavelength of 400 m, can be distinguished, two anticlines and two synclines, with minor folds associated. Related to the angular folds an axial plane foliation, E-trending and dipping 40 to 60° to the north, is developed in the lutites. The more competent rocks, conglomerates and breccias, only locally show a spaced fracture cleavage. No main thrusts have been detected in Permian rocks. However, minor scale decollements, usually low angle to bedding-parallel, have been identified along low-dipping limbs of the folds. They can be recognized due to the high colour contrast between the red-coloured Permian beds and the concentration of calcite veins in the decollements. The development of the structures above described has to be linked to the Alpine compressional tectonics. This interpretation is supported by the good correlation in geometry and orientation between the structures observed in the Permian basin and in southernmost areas of the South Pyrenean Zone, where the deformation is imprinted in Cretaceous to Tertiary rocks. In this regard, the southern border of the Anayet basin, at least in the western part, can be interpreted as a normal fault reactivated as a high-angle reverse fault during the positive inversion tectonics induced by the Alpine Orogeny. Bixel, F., 1987. Le volcanisme stephano-permien des Pyrenees petrographie, mineralogie, geochimie. Cuadernos de Geología Ibérica 11, 41-55. Gisbert, J., 1984. Las molasas tardihercínicas del Pirineo, in: Geología de España. Libro Jubilar de J. M. Ríos, Comba, J.A. (Ed.), IGME, Madrid, 168-186.

  4. The Central European Permian Basins; Rheological and structural controls on basin history and on inter-basin connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jeroen; Van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-05-01

    We analyse the relative importance of the major crustal-scale fault zones and crustal architecture in controlling basin formation, deformation and the structural connections between basins. The North and South Permian Basins of Central Europe are usually defined by the extend of Rotliegend sedimentary and volcanic units and not by a common tectonic origin or development. Instead, the sub-basins that together form the Permian Basins are each controlled by different structural and/or rheological controls that are inherited from Early Paleozoïc and older geodynamic processes, they are even located in different crustal/lithospheric domains. The North Permian basin is located on Baltic crust that was thinned during Late Proterozoïc - Early Paleozoïc times. South of the Thor suture, the South Permian basin and its sub-basins are located on Avalonian crust (Southern North Sea and North German Basins) and on the transition of East European cratonic and Avalonian crust (Polish Through). The size of crustal domains and of the faults that govern basin formation requires a regional-scale to assess their impact on basins and sub-basins. In the case of the Permian Basins this encompasses East Avalonia and surroundings, roughly speaking the area north of the Variscan Rheïc suture, east of the Atlantic and southwest of the Teisseyre-Tornquist line. This approach sheds light on the effects of long lived differences in crustal fabric which are responsible for spatial heterogeneity in stress and strain magnitudes and zonations of fracturing, burial history and temperature history. The focus on understanding the geomechanical control of large crustal-scale fault structures will provide the constraints and geometrical and compositional input for local models of stress and strain. Considering their fundamentally different structural and rheological controls, the Permian (sub)basins have a remarkably common history of subsidence and inversion, suggesting a more or less continuous link between them. Post-Variscan, Late Carboniferous-Early Permian wrench tectonics is the oldest and main identified cause for regional basin formation in Central Europe. This relatively short-lived tectonic regime cannot explain the observed common history of subsidence of the Permian Basins during the 200 My that followed. Our analysis demonstrates that transfer faults that both follow and cross rheological transitions and inherited fault zones continued to be active after the early Permian. We therefore suggests that crustal-scale transfer faults may be the missing link that explains the common subsidence history of basins with a fundamentally different crustal architecture and structural history.

  5. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area

  6. Permian fauna of the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin (Bohemian Massif, Central Europe).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajíc, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 70, 3/4 (2014), s. 131-142. ISSN 0036-5343 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : faunal lists * palaeogeography * palaeoenvironment * stratigraphy * Early Permian * Krkonoše Piedmont Basin * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  7. Origin of the Permian-Triassic Iberian Basin, central-eastern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Arche, Alfredo; López Gómez, José

    1996-01-01

    The Iberian Basin was an intracratonic rift basin in central-eastern Spain developed since Early Permian times. The basin boundary faults were normal, listric faults controlling an asymmetric extension propagating northeast with time. Hercynian or older lineaments controlled the orientation of the Iberian Basin and extension was accommodated basically in the hanging wall block by the formation of secondary grabens and a central high. The basin was related with the coeval Ebro, Cat...

  8. Inversion tectonics in the Anayet Permian basin (Axial Zone, Central Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    During Permian times the Pyrenees were characterized by extensional tectonics that opened subsident basins with pull-apart geometries. The Anayet Permian basin crops out in the western Spanish Axial Zone between the Aragon and Tena valleys. It is WNW-trending and it is filled by a continental Permian succession that represents the first post-variscan deposits in the area. Permian deposits rest discordantly over Devonian to Carboniferous limestones, sandstones and slates. In the Anayet basin, Permian deposits have been classically divided in four main detrital groups, mainly composed of sandstones and conglomerates, with three basic volcanic episodes interbedded (Gisbert, 1984, Bixel, 1987). Due to the lithological characteristics of the Permian rocks in this region, there are almost no accurate age constraints for these units. A detailed structural study of the area, including mapping and balanced cross-sections, shows increasingly older rocks to the west of the Anayet basin. Moreover, it can be deduced a mean slope of around 11 % to the west for the basin. These data confirm that the basin depocenter was located to the west and that the Anayet basin was partitioned by N10 °E-trending normal faults. Although the contacts between the Permian and the Devono-Carboniferous rocks are covered by quaternary deposits in most of its extent, a fault contact can also be recognized. The fault contact is a 3 m thick shear zone oriented N120 ° E and dipping 60° to the North. It develops breccias, fault gouges and sigmoidal S-C tectonites indicating a reverse motion. The contact places Permian slates and sandstones over Carboniferous limestones and is almost parallel to the alpine cleavage deforming Permian rocks. The slope of the contact together with the presence of younger rocks in the hangingwall of the reverse fault points out that the original contact was a normal fault reactivated as a high-angle reverse fault during the positive inversion tectonics induced by the Alpine Orogeny. The high dip of the contact produced a buttressing effect during the alpine compression that concentrated the deformation near the fault zone and generated the cleavage of the hangingwall. Moreover, the higher abundance of fractures and calcite veins near the contact in the Carboniferous limestones of the footwall can be interpreted as an incipient stage to the formation of a short-cut-fault related with the buttressing effect. This process can explain the uncommon thickness of the fault zone, if we compare it with other alpine thrusts in this region. The structural features described above support the interpretation of the southern limit of the Anayet Permian basin as a normal fault originated during the Permian rifting and inverted during the compressional tectonics due to the Alpine Orogeny. Bixel, F., 1987. Le volcanisme stephano-permien des pyrenees petrographie, mineralogie, geochimie. Cuadernos de Geología Ibérica 11, 41-55. Gisbert, J., 1984. Las molasas tardihercínicas del Pirineo, in: Geología de España. Libro Jubilar de J. M. Ríos, Comba, J.A. (Ed.). IGME, Madrid, 168-186.

  9. 77 FR 49863 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC and Permian Basin Railways-Continuance in Control Exemption-Santa Cruz...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ...LLC, and Permian Basin Railways (IPH/PBR), noncarriers, have filed a verified...1\\ PBR and SCMB are wholly owned subsidiaries of...effective date of the exemption). IPH/PBR subsidiary railroads include: (1)...

  10. 78 FR 16569 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, Permian Basin Railways, and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Corporate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ...owned subsidiaries Permian Basin Railways (PBR) and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad (SLRG...applicants, IPH is a noncarrier that wholly owns PBR, which directly controls seven Class III railroads.\\1\\ PBR controls, indirectly through SLRG, an...

  11. Assessment of potential unconventional Carboniferous-Permian gas resources of the Liaohe Basin eastern uplift, Liaoning Province, China, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastro, Richard M.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 448 billion cubic feet of potential technically recoverable unconventional natural gas in Carboniferous and Permian coal-bearing strata in the eastern uplift of the Liaohe Basin, Liaoning Province, China.

  12. Carbon Capture and Storage in the Permian Basin, a Regional Technology Transfer and Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychel, Dwight

    2013-09-30

    The Permian Basin Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Training Center was one of seven regional centers formed in 2009 under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and managed by the Department of Energy. Based in the Permian Basin, it is focused on the utilization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects for the long term storage of CO2 while producing a domestic oil and revenue stream. It delivers training to students, oil and gas professionals, regulators, environmental and academia through a robust web site, newsletter, tech alerts, webinars, self-paced online courses, one day workshops, and two day high level forums. While course material prominently features all aspects of the capture, transportation and EOR utilization of CO2, the audience focus is represented by its high level forums where selected graduate students with an interest in CCUS interact with Industry experts and in-house workshops for the regulatory community.

  13. Evidence of a therapsid scavenger in the Late Permian Karoo Basin, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Fordyce; Roger Smith; Anusuya Chinsamy

    2012-01-01

    Dicynodonts are an extinct group of herbivorous non-mammalian therapsids (‘mammal-like’ reptiles) that are widely known from terrestrial Permo-Triassic strata throughout Pangaea. Dicynodont fossil remains are common within the Late Permian Beaufort Group of the Karoo Basin in South Africa. A large, partially articulated dicynodont skeleton recovered from the TropidostomaAssemblage Zone is taphonomically important in having an unusual disarticulation pattern, bone surface punctures and a broke...

  14. Uranium potential in outcropping Permian basins in France and their extensions beneath mesozoic and tertiary cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About a third of metropolitan France's uranium production is from Permian deposits located in the Lodeve and, to a lesser extent, Bourbon-l'Archambault basins. Of the Autun, west Vanoise, St-Affrique, Rodez, Brive and Var basins investigated in this study, only those of Rodez and Var have been shown to contain significant deposits. Some of the basins contain potentially interesting targets, often removed from the areas of known mineral occurrences, that have never been investigated. Geophysical exploration and drilling have shown that the Permian extends over a vast area beneath the cover of the large Mesozoic and Tertiary basins. However zones within reach of mineral exploration, ie. those less than 500 m deep, are only found in a few areas. To reach the distant targets down-dip in the outcropping basins or beneath the Mesozoic and Tertiary cover, a detailed study of the basin must be undertaken beforehand. To define and locate targets that are obviously more costly to investigate, direct methods of investigation need to be used such as drilling and geochemistry, and indirect methods such as remote sensing, geophysics and well-logging

  15. Strontium and sulfur isotope study of well-preserved Permian anhydrite, Palo Duro basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ?34S, 87Sr/86Sr ratio, and strontium concentrations for 50 well-preserved samples of Permian marine anhydrite have been determined. The samples were collected from two continuous cores drilled through cyclic Permian evaporites, The Department of Energy drilled the samples in its search for a permanent storage facility for high-level nuclear waste. Primary depositional fabrics (selenite pseudomorphs) and high strontium concentrations (average 1,850 ppm), in association with published bromide and fluid inclusion data from associated halite, suggest primary seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratios may be recorded in many of the samples. The general shape of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio curve through the Permian is in accord with previously published observations. However, the increased stratigraphic detail from this unique set of cores constrains the abrupt charge in 87Sr/86Sr during the Permian at a precision previously available only in Deep Sea Drilling Project material. Interpretation of the more complex portions of the curve is limited by poor biostratigraphic control, the specter of provincial early diagenetic effects, and interpretation of the time significance of hiatal surfaces in cyclic strata. Age relationships are constrained by a K-Ar date on an interbedded volcanic ash in the Ochoan strata, and fusulinid age determinations of a well-documented regional transgression during the earliest Guadalupe. Sulfur isotopes yield typical Permian values of 12 per-thousand during the marine portion of the basin fill phase, and abruptly shift to 10 per-thousand in those cycles with a significant component of siliciclastic sediment

  16. Fluvial architecture of Early Permian Barakar rocks of Korba Gondwana basin, eastern-central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ram Chandra; Hota, Rabindra Nath; Maejima, Wataru

    2012-06-01

    The Early Permian Barakar Formation of the Korba basin represents repeated deposition of fining upward sequences of coarse to medium grained sandstone, fine grained sandstone-shale, shale and coal. The sandstones are channel, sheet like, multistory, and profusely cross-bedded. The shale beds are lens as well sheet like and laminated; coal facies is thin to moderately thick and shows splitting. Paleocurrent analysis suggests a northwesterly paleoslope during Barakar sedimentation. However, the deflection of paleoslope towards northeast in the eastern part of the basin supports the existence of a watershed in the depositional area. The Barakar paleochannel were 4.05 m deep and 176 m wide (single channel) with an average sinuosity of 1.27. The average flow velocity and sediment load during flood stage are in the order of 1.77 m/s and 4.15. These results indicate bed-load (braided) to mixed load nature of the Barakar streams of the Korba basin. The study suggests that the Early Permian braided Barakar streams deposited the coal measure sequence subsequent to deglaciation in a northwesterly slopping paleovalley. The basin floor was highly uneven marked by the presence of a basement high in the northwestern part that bifurcates the paleostreams into northwestern and northeastern branches.

  17. Socioeconomic data base report for the Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the data base of socioeconomic characteristics of 14 counties and 13 key cities that surround the two locations in the Palo Duro Basin. The information describes the demographic features, economic base, community facilities and services, and governmental and fiscal structure. The land use patterns and zoning requirements for selected cities of varying sizes and complexities and the general social characteristics of the region as a whole are described also. Extensive references, 23 figures, 92 tables

  18. Regional summary and recommended study areas for the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the regional geologic and environmental characterizations that have been completed for the Permian region of study, and describes the procedure used to identify study areas for the next phase of investigation. The factors evaluated in the Permian region fall into three broad areas: health and safety, environmental and socioeconomic, and engineering and economic considerations. Health and safety considerations included salt depth and thickness, faults, seismic activity, groundwater, salt dissolution, energy and mineral resources, presence of boreholes, and interactive land uses. Salt depth and thickness was the key health and safety factor, and when mapped, provded to be a discriminator. The evaluation of environmental and socioeconomic conditions focused primarily on the presence of urban areas and on designated land uses such as parks, wildlife areas, and historic sites. Engineering and economic considerations centered primarily on salt depth, which was already evaluated in the health and safety area. The Palo Duro and Dalhart basins are recommended for future studies on the basis of geology. In these two basins, salt depth and thickness appear promising, and there is less likelihood of past or future oil and gas exploratory holes. Environmental and socioeconomic factors did not preclude any of the basins from further study. 66 references, 16 figures, 2 tables

  19. Fluvial sedimentology and basin analyses of the Permian Fairchild and Buckley formations, Beardmore Glacier region, and the Weller Coal Measures, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbell, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Beardmore Glacier region contains a 1-km-thick Permian fluvial sequence that was deposited in an elongate basin along the margin of the East Antarctica craton. Fluvial architecture, sandstone composition and paleocurrents within the basin record a change from an early Permian cratonic to a late Permian foreland basin. The Lower Permian Fairchild Formation consists entirely of overlapping channel-form sandstone bodies deposited by braided streams. Arkosic sandstone was deposited by SE flowing streams. Fairchild strata record slow subsidence within a broad cratonic basin. The Lower to Upper Permian Buckley Formation consists of an arkosic lower member and a volcaniclastic upper member. Paleocurrents which consist of transverse and longitudinal paleocurrents, suggest a cratonward migration of the basin axis through time. The Buckley Formation was deposited within a braided stream setting and is an important unit because it contains interstratified channel-sandstone sheets, shale and coal, along with evidence of channel-belt avulsions. Sandstone sheets predominate at the base of the formation, while flood-plain deposits thicken and increase in abundance upward. The interaction between fluvial processes and subsidence rates produced this alluvial stratigraphy. The Lower Permian Weller Coal Measures in southern Victoria Land were deposited within a narrow basin located cratonward of the foreland basin. Basin geometry and depositional patterns are similar to those of fault-bounded basins. Although basin formation is not constrained, deposition of the Weller was contemporaneous with the development of the foreland basin. This suggests a relationship between subsidence within the two basins.

  20. Isotope shifts in the late Permian of the Delaware Basin, Texas, precisely timed by varved sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closely spaced samples (285 in number) of varved sediments from the Upper Permian in Delaware Basin, Texas, have been analyzed for delta13Csub(carb), delta13Csub(org), delta18Osub(carb), Csub(org), Csub(carb) and calcite/dolomite. delta13C records a dramatic rise from -2.8 to + 5.7per mille in only 4400 years, detected in three sections across the basin, extrapolating smoothly through a 600-year interruption by a local (west side of the basin) fresh-water inflow evidenced by low delta18O. This continuity and low Csub(org) within the basin, both indicate that the excess net deposition of Csub(org), necessary to generate the rise in delta13C, took place in the ocean external to the Delaware Basin, Correlation with similar records from the Zechstein Basin suggest that the event was world-wide, although this poses obvious difficulties for the carbon cycle. The rate of rise of delta13C, and its sustained high level, must imply conversions of oxidized carbon to reduced carbon that are very large depending on which reservoirs were involved. (orig.)

  1. Generation and expulsion of oils from Permian coals of the Sydney Basin, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Volk, H.; George, S.C.; Faiz, M.; Stalker, L. [CSIRO Petrology, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2009-07-15

    Organic geochemical and petrological assessment of coals/coaly shales and fine grained sediments, coupled with organic geochemical analyses of oil samples, all from Permo-Triassic sections of the Southern Sydney Basin (Australia), have enabled identification of the source for the widely distributed oil shows and oil seeps in this region. The Permian coals have higher hydrogen indices, higher liptinite contents, and much higher total organic matter extract yields than the fine grained sediments. A variety of source specific parameters obtained from n-alkanes, regular isoprenoids, terpanes, steranes and diasteranes indicate that the oil shows and seeps were generated and expelled predominantly from higher plant derived organic matter deposited in oxic environments. The source and maturity related biomarkers and aromatic hydrocarbon distributions of the oils are similar to those of the coals. The oil-coal relationship also is demonstrated by similarities in the carbon isotopic composition of the total oils, coal extracts, and their individual n-alkanes. Extracts from the Permo-Triassic fine grained sediments, on the other hand, have organic geochemical signatures indicative of mixed terrestrial and prokaryotic organic matter deposited in suboxic environments, which are significantly different from both the oils and coal extracts. The molecular signatures indicating the presence of prokaryotic organic matter in some of the coal extracts and oils may be due to thin sections of possibly calcareous lithologies interbedded within the coal measures. The genetic relationship between the oils and coals provides new evidence for the generation and expulsion of oils from the Permian coals and raises the possibility for commercial oil accumulations in the Permian and Early Triassic sandstones, potentially in the deeper offshore part of the Sydney Basin.

  2. Getting to the source: aeolian influx to the Permian Delaware basin region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocurek, Gary; Kirkland, Brenda L.

    1998-05-01

    Although an aeolian origin for the siliciclastics of the Permian (Guadalupian) Delaware and adjacent basins and shelf has been recognized, their source has remained elusive. An Ancestral Rockies source to the west and northwest has been traditionally favored. We propose instead that these sediments were derived from aeolian systems to the northeast and represented by the Whitehorse Group in the Anadarko Basin. This hypothesis is based upon (1) recognition of the aeolian nature of the Whitehorse, (2) regional correlation of the Whitehorse Group with portions of the Artesia Group, (3) paleoclimatic model-predicted and measured southwestward sediment transport for the Whitehorse, and (4) a proposed transport corridor over emergent mudflats along the northern margins of basisins in the Texas Panhandle and onto the New Mexico shelf. Potentially, a Whitehorse-Artesia link could show the formation of this mixed carbonate/siliciclastic system as the result of the interactions of diverse and distant environmental systems under eustatic and climatic forcing factors.

  3. 77 FR 57188 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC and Permian Basin Railways-Continuance in Control Exemption-Rusk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ...owned subsidiary, Permian Basin Railways (PBR), have filed a verified notice of exemption...becoming a Class III rail carrier. IPH and PBR filed a corrected copy of that notice on...effective date of the exemption). IPH and PBR subsidiary railroads include: (1)...

  4. Assessment of remaining recoverable oil in selected major oil fields of the Permian Basin, Texas and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Klett, Timothy R.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Ryder, Robert T.; Attanasi, Emil D.; Freeman, Philip A.; Le, Phoung A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an estimate of technically recoverable, conventional oil in selected oil fields in the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. The mean total volume of potential additional oil resources that might be added using improved oil-recovery technologies was estimated to be about 2.7 billion barrels of oil.

  5. Climatic and biotic changes around the Carboniferous/Permian boundary recorded in the continental basins of the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opluštil, S.; Šim?nek, Z.; Zajíc, Jaroslav; Mencl, V.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 119, ?. 1 (2013), s. 114-151. ISSN 0166-5162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : biotic change * Bohemian Massif * Carboniferous-Permian transition * continental basin Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.313, year: 2013

  6. The origin and formation model of Permian dolostones on the northwestern margin of Junggar Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinchuan; Shi, Ji'an; Zhang, Shuncun; Zou, Niuniu; Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Shengyin

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of dolostone formation and establishes a dolomitization model in the Permian strata on the northwestern margin of Junggar Basin, China. Dolomitic rock samples are collected from the Permian Fengcheng Formation in Urho area and then characterized by petrological, mineralogical, carbon and oxygen isotope, and trace element geochemical analyses. Results show that the major types of dolomitic rocks include dolomitic mudstone, dolomitic siltstone, dolomitized tuffaceous siltstone, and dolomitized tuffaceous mudstone. The dolomitized rocks are dominated by euhedral or subhedral powder- and fine-crystal dolomites formed by replacement lacustrine argilla-calcareous and siliceous (tuffaceous) components and commonly filled with residual and late calcite cements. The parameters of dolomitic rocks show great variations, including the V/Ni ratio (1.02-4.88), Sr content (95.9-783.6 ?g/g), Mg/Ca ratio (0.68-5.13), degree of ordering (0.39-1.00), ?18OPDB (-14.8‰ to 3.2‰), and ?13CPDB (-1‰ to 5.2‰). The dolomitic rocks have multi-stage origins and were formed in a semi-closed continental brackish-saltwater bay with weak hydrodynamic processes, deep water bodies, and relatively quiet conditions. In the Permian depositional stage, a combination of complex tectonic activities, fault development, hot subtropical climate, and frequent volcanic activities provided not only Mg2+ source for dolomitization but also channels for rapid flow and seepage of Mg-rich fluids. The origins of dolostones in the study area include penecontemporaneous dolomitization, burial dolomitization, and hydrothermal dolomitization. This study lays a foundation for further studies on dolomite formation and dolomite reservoir, and provides effective methods for researching complex dolostone (tuffaceous, shale and silty dolomite) formation.

  7. U-Pb calcite age of the Late Permian Castile Formation, Delaware Basin: a constraint on the age of the Permian-Triassic boundary (?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M. L.; Rasbury, E. T.; Meyers, W. J.; Hanson, G. N.

    2002-10-01

    Organic-rich calcite laminated with gypsum in the evaporitic, non-fossiliferous Castile Formation of the Delaware Basin, southwest USA, yields a Total Pb/U isochron age of 251.5±2.8 Ma (MSWD=1.3). The Castile Formation is almost certainly Late Permian based on its 87Sr/ 86Sr value of 0.706923, identical to the distinct minimum in the late Permian Sr curve. In this paper we explore the potential for using U-Pb calcite ages to date traditionally undatable sections and show how this southern-midcontinent USA (far west Texas and southeast New Mexico) deposit can be correlated to the type section in China. We accept that diagenetic alteration can bias U-Pb results, but the data set we present shows no evidence for such alteration. Clearly with alteration the age we present would represent a minimum age for the Castile Formation. If the age actually dates the Castile Formation then it requires the Permian-Triassic boundary to be younger than 251.5±2.8 Ma.

  8. Geology and metallogeny of the uranium deposits in the Lodeve Permian basin (southern Massif Central, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Permian continental basin of Lodeve, in the southern part of the Massif Central, 60 km west of Montpellier contains a significant uranium potential by French mining standards. The orebodies can take the form of ribbon-shaped, massive or even stratiform bodies, but always associated with bituminous facies beds and strong brittle tectonics. The major faults are sites of hydrothermal activity and in places hydraulic fracturing. Most of the uraniferous mineralisation is thought to have been associated with acid volcanism, contemporaneous with sedimentation, which could also have facilitated syn- and diagenetic preconcentrations of uranium. Later, in the course of two phases of hydrothermal mobilisation during the Jurassic and Cretaceous, uranium was remobilised on a large scale along faults containing bituminous material and impregnated with sulphides

  9. Investigation of deep permeable strata in the permian basin for future geothermal energy reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.; Swift, Douglas B.

    1999-09-23

    This project will investigate a previously unidentified geothermal energy resource, opening broad new frontiers to geothermal development. Data collected by industry during oil and gas development demonstrate deep permeable strata with temperatures {ge} 150 C, within the optimum window for binary power plant operation. The project will delineate Deep Permeable Strata Geothermal Energy (DPSGE) assets in the Permian Basin of western Texas and southeastern New Mexico. Presently, geothermal electrical power generation is limited to proximity to shallow, high-temperature igneous heat sources. This geographically restricts geothermal development. Delineation of a new, less geographically constrained geothermal energy source will stimulate geothermal development, increasing available clean, renewable world energy reserves. This proposal will stimulate geothermal reservoir exploration by identifying untapped and unrealized reservoirs of geothermal energy. DPSGE is present in many regions of the United States not presently considered as geothermally prospective. Development of this new energy source will promote geothermal use throughout the nation.

  10. Geological environment of the uranium deposits in the Permian of Lodeve Basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Permian rocks of the Lodeve Basin are characterized by a biorhexistasic cycle which produced fine alternating sequences of organic-rich sedimentary deposits in a basin ranging from lacustrine to a confined briny lagoon. The erosion of the Hercynian massifs, source for the sediments, along with the constant arrival of volcanic ash, provided metallic ions, particularly uranium. A continual subsidence permitted a regular influx of sediments and a burial compatible with a genesis of hydrocarbons. Post-sedimentary tectonic extension as well as the fine bedding of certain layers, created permeable zones that facilitated the circulation of fluids: the oils migrated, concentrated in petroleum-type traps by fault zones and the finely bedded layers. The interstitial waters flushed by compaction were carriers of metallic ions in solution. They used the same permeable zones as the oil, and the uranium was precipitated in the hydrocarbon traps which were strong reducing agents. During diagenesis, an important physical and mineralogical evolution affected the surroundings and certainly played a role of prime importance in the ''recycling'' and precipitation of the uranium. In the meantime, oxidizing and carbonate-bearing meteoric water rose within the rock formations along the principal faults, flushing and transporting uranium to the traps, developing a complementary accretion process. Classified into three principal types, the mineralizations developed within the framework of a dynamic basin system in which several factors - sedimentary, tectonic and diagenetic - operated. (author)

  11. Identification of the Early Permian (Autunian) in the subsurface of the Ebro Basin, NE Spain, and its paleogeographic consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Arche, Alfredo; Diez Ferrer, José B.; López Gómez, José

    2007-01-01

    The Early Permian (Autunian) has not been identifi ed up to now in the subsurface of the Tertiary Ebro Basin because of the scarcity of oil well boreholes reaching the Variscan basement and the systematic attribution of a Carboniferous age, without any paleontological data, to the unmetamorfosed siliciclastic sediments found at the base of some of them, clearly above the Early Paleozoic basement. Grey and black shale samples recovered from cores preserved in the REPSOL-YPF archives o...

  12. Identification of the Early Permian (Autunian) in the subsurface of the Ebro Basin, NE Spain, and its paleogeographic consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Arche, A.; Díez, J.B.; López-Gómez, José

    2007-01-01

    [EN] The Early Permian (Autunian) has not been identifi ed up to now in the subsurface of the Tertiary Ebro Basin because of the scarcity of oil well boreholes reaching the Variscan basement and the systematic attribution of a Carboniferous age, without any paleontological data, to the unmetamorfosed siliciclastic sediments found at the base of some of them, clearly above the Early Paleozoic basement. Grey and black shale samples recovered from cores preserved in the REPSOL-YPF archi...

  13. Charcoal remains from a tonstein layer in the Faxinal Coalfield, Lower Permian, southern Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    André, Jasper; Dieter, Uhl; Margot, Guerra-Sommer; Abdalla M. B, Abu Hamad; Neli T. G, Machado.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Charcoal fóssil foi encontrado na Mina do Faxinal, Permiano Inferior, Formação Rio Bonito, na porção sul da Bacia do Paraná, Brasil. Foram descritos três tipos de lenhos gimnospérmicos picnoxílicos originários de um único nível de tonstein, o que confirma a ocorrência de paleoincêndios vegetacionais [...] nesta área. Uma redução da concentração de charcoal da base para o topo no nível de tonstein indica que a quantidade de combustível diminuiu durante a deposição, provavelmente devido ao consumo da vegetação existente pelo fogo. A presença de inertinita na camada de carvão, em níveis sobrepostos e sotopostos ao tonstein , indica que incêndios não estavam restritos ao intervalo de deposição da cinza vulcânica. A integração dos novos dados aqui apresentados com outros publicados anteriormente acerca da Mina do Faxinal, demonstra que eventos vulcânicos ocorridos nas áreas circunvizinhas podem ser identificados como potenciais fatores de ignição para os incêndios. A presença de chacoal em sedimentos associados a níveis de carvão em diferentes localidades no Permiano, demonstra que incêndios vegetacionais foram relativamente comuns nos ambientes formadores dos depósitos de carvão da Bacia do Paraná. Abstract in english Fossil charcoal has been discovered in the Faxinal Coalfield, Early Permian, Rio Bonito Formation, in the southernmost portion of the Paraná Basin, Brazil. Three types of pycnoxylic gymnosperm woods recovered from a single tonstein layer are described and confirm the occurrence of paleowildfire in t [...] his area. A decrease of the charcoal concentration from the base to the top within the tonstein layer indicates that the amount of fuel declined during the deposition probably due to the consumption of vegetation by the fire. The presence of inertinite in coals overlying and underlying the tonstein layer indicates that fire-events were not restricted to the ash fall interval. The integration of the new data presented in the current study with previously published data for the Faxinal Coalfield demonstrates that volcanic events that occurred in the surrounding areas can be identified as one potential source of ignition for the wildfires. The presence of charcoal in Permian sediments associated with coal levels at different localities demonstrates that wildfires have been relatively common events in the peat-forming environments in which the coal formation took place in the Paraná Basin.

  14. Why stratigraphy and sedimentology in shales are important : an example from the Woodford Shale, Permian Basin, west Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, N.B. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Colorado School of Mines, Boulder, CO (United States); Hemmesch, N.T.; Mnich, C.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Boulder, CO (United States). Geology and Geological Engineering; Aoudia, K.; Miskimins, J. [Colorado School of Mines, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This presentation explained why stratigraphy and sedimentology in shales are important. The presentation provided an example from the Woodford Shale, Permian Basin, located in western Texas. Several illustrations were presented to demonstrate a stratigraphic sequence in black shale. Other topics that were discussed included geologic settings; paleogeography; silled basins; motivation for rock properties research; and factor analysis results. It was concluded that sequence stratigraphic analyses in black shales requires an integrated, multidisciplinary approach. The presentation showed that third and fourth order stratigraphic cycles are indicated by the repetition of exotic beds whose composition vary regionally. tabs., figs.

  15. Permian salt dissolution, alkaline lake basins, and nuclear-waste storage, Southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areas of Permian salt dissolution associated with 15 large alkaline lake basins on and adjacent to the Southern High Plains of west Texas and eastern New Mexico suggest formation of the basins by collapse of strata over the dissolution cavities. However, data from 6 other alkaline basins reveal no evidence of underlying salt dissolution. Thus, whether the basins were initiated by subsidence over the salt dissolution areas or whether the salt dissolution was caused by infiltration of overlying lake water is conjectural. However, the fact that the lacustrine fill in Mound Lake greatly exceeds the amount of salt dissolution and subsidence of overlying beds indicates that at least Mound Lake basin was antecedent to the salt dissolution. The association of topography, structure, and dissolution in areas well removed from zones of shallow burial emphasizes the susceptibility of Permian salt-bed dissolution throughout the west Texas-eastern New Mexico area. Such evidence, combined with previous studies documenting salt-bed dissolution in areas surrounding a proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas, leads to serious questions about the rationale of using salt beds for nuclear-waste storage

  16. Evidence of a therapsid scavenger in the Late Permian Karoo Basin, South Africa

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Nicholas, Fordyce; Roger, Smith; Anusuya, Chinsamy.

    Full Text Available Dicynodonts are an extinct group of herbivorous non-mammalian therapsids ('mammal-like' reptiles) that are widely known from terrestrial Permo-Triassic strata throughout Pangaea. Dicynodont fossil remains are common within the Late Permian Beaufort Group of the Karoo Basin in South Africa. A large, [...] partially articulated dicynodont skeleton recovered from the Tropidostoma Assemblage Zone is taphonomically important in having an unusual disarticulation pattern, bone surface punctures and a broken tooth of an unidentified carnivore associated with it. Here we report on the nature of the bone damage, and the identity of the carnivore that lost a canine tooth whilst scavenging the dicynodont carcass. The morphological characteristics of the serrations on the unidentified tooth were compared with those of contemporaneous carnivores, the gorgonopsians and therocephalians. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of a silicone cast of the unidentified tooth revealed distinctive 0.5-mm square-shaped serrations. Our comparative assessment of the tooth size, curvature, cross-sectional shape and morphology of the serrations revealed that the unidentified canine most closely matched Aelurognathus, a gorgonopsian known from the same assemblage zone.

  17. Evidence of a therapsid scavenger in the Late Permian Karoo Basin, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Fordyce

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dicynodonts are an extinct group of herbivorous non-mammalian therapsids (‘mammal-like’ reptiles that are widely known from terrestrial Permo-Triassic strata throughout Pangaea. Dicynodont fossil remains are common within the Late Permian Beaufort Group of the Karoo Basin in South Africa. A large, partially articulated dicynodont skeleton recovered from the TropidostomaAssemblage Zone is taphonomically important in having an unusual disarticulation pattern, bone surface punctures and a broken tooth of an unidentified carnivore associated with it. Here we report on the nature of the bone damage, and the identity of the carnivore that lost a canine tooth whilst scavenging the dicynodont carcass. The morphological characteristics of the serrations on the unidentified tooth were compared with those of contemporaneous carnivores, the gorgonopsians and therocephalians. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of a silicone cast of the unidentified tooth revealed distinctive 0.5-mm square-shaped serrations. Our comparative assessment of the tooth size, curvature, cross-sectional shape and morphology of the serrations revealed that the unidentified canine most closely matched Aelurognathus,a gorgonopsian known from the same assemblage zone.

  18. Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Pumping test and fluid sampling report, Mansfield No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin: Report of the Geologic Project Manager, Permian Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Mansfield No. 1 well in Oldham County about 10 miles north of Vega, Texas. The well site was selected by TBEG and is located along the northern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution with the Permian salt sections. The objectives of the pumping test and fluid sampling program were to collect data to determine the hydrologic characteristics (formation pressure and permeability) of deep water bearing formations, and to obtain formation fluid samples for analyses (gas and fluid chemistry) in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Characterizing the Hydrogeology and Surface Waters of a Select Portion of the Permian Basin Using an Arc Hydro Groundwater Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, J. T.; McPhearson, B. J.; Land, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Atmospheric levels of anthropogenic CO2 have increased from a pre industrial level of 280 parts per million to a 1999 concentration of over 365 parts per million, largely due to expanding use of fossil fuels for human energy needs. Current levels are the highest observed in over 350,000 years. The desire to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 supports research on and development of technologies that will achieve this end. Sequestration of carbon in geologic formations is one such technology that is actively being pursued. Of particular interest is the Permian Basin of eastern Texas and southeastern New Mexico, a basin with substantial saline and brine aquifers that might be very suitable for carbon sequestration, and also a basin that has been producing oil and gas for well over 100 years, a process which utilizes CO2 injection for enhanced recovery. Understanding the interactions between those portions of the Permian Basin proposed for CO2 sequestration and those portions currently utilized as a water supply (i.e., Pecos River and freshwater aquifers) is a critical component of the R&D in this area because of the reliance of a large agricultural community and other delicate legal and environmental balances prevailing in this region. The main purpose of this study is to create a detailed hydrological model with emphasis on hydrogeology and surface waters of a select portion of the Permian Basin, delineated by the Sacramento Mountains to the west and the Delaware Basin to the east, with the long term goal that this study will be one component of a total basin characterization and evaluation. Arc Hydro groundwater data model framework is used to create a database of the study area. The construction of this database is an initial step in the integration of the plethora of oil, gas, and water databases (e.g., IHS Database, New Mexico Subsurface and Core Libraries, and WATERS Database), and provides a platform for the addition of hydrological and geological data (e.g., from the New Mexico Bureau of Geology's Sacramento Mountains Project). The database is then coupled with a numerical model used to explore groundwater surface water interactions and aquifer connectedness at both the regional and site scale, with particular emphasis placed on those phenomena elucidating the interdependencies between the Pecos Slope and the Delaware Basin. This application of the Arc Hydro groundwater data model will be expanded upon and its predictive capabilities further developed such that the effects of CO2 sequestration in the Capitan Reef aquifer can be evaluated.

  1. Thermal properties of Permian Basin evaporites to 493 K temperature and 30 MPa confining pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory measurements of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of four rock salts, two anhydrites, and two dolomites bordering Cycle 4 and Cycle 5 bedded salt formations in the Permian Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas, were made in conditions ranging from 303 to 473 K in temperature and 0.1 to 31.0 MPa in hydrostatic confining pressure. Within the +-5% measurement resolution neither conductivity nor diffusivity showed a dependence upon pressure in any of the rocks. Conductivity and diffusivity in all rocks had a negative temperature dependence. For the Cycle 4 salt samples, conductivity fell from 5.5 to 3.75 W/m . K, and diffusivity fell from about 2.7 to 1.7 x 10-6 m2/s. One Cycle 5 salt was a single crystal with anomalous results, but the other had a low conductivity with very weak temperature dependence and a high diffusivity. In the nonsalts, conductivity and diffusivity decreased 10 to 20% over the temperature range explored. In measurements of the coefficient of thermal linear expansion for Cycle 5 salt and nonsalts, the coefficient typically varied from about 12 x 10-6 K-1 at P = 3.0 MPa to 4 x 10-6 K-1 at P = 30 MPa for both nonsalt rocks. In anhydrite, it decreased with increasing temperature. In dolomite, the coefficient increased at roughly the same rate. Expansion of the salt ranged from 33 to 38 x 10-6 K-1 and was independent of pressure and temperature

  2. Natural gas qualities in the Southern Permian basin; Die Erdgasqualitaeten im suedlichen Permbecken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerling, P.; Kockel, F. [BGR, Hannover (Germany); Lokhorst, A.; Geluk, M.C. [TNO, Haarlem (Netherlands); Nicholson, R.A. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Laier, T. [Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, Kopenhagen (Denmark); Pokorski, J. [Panstwowy Instytut Geologiczny, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-12-31

    There is a substantial amount of molecular and isotopic gas data in the literature but mostly in the archives of companies and geological services. As the geological services of most European countries traditionally contain (confidential and non-confidential) data on geology and resources these institutions from Great Britain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Poland and Germany decided to compile molecular and isotopic natural gas data from the area of the Southern European Permian basin. The partially EU-subsidised project was carried out between 1994 and 1997 (LOKHORST ed. 1998) The atlas is based on existing data and also on newly determined molecular and isotopic gas parameters. Ring analyses of national and international standard gases ensure the quality and comparability of the data thus obtained. The aim of the ``stocktaking`` of natural gas was to describe the gas qualities from the Southern North Sea in the West to the Eastern borders of Poland, to characterise them genetically and to relate the to the geological environment. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein substantieller Anteil von molekularen und isotopischen Gasdaten existiert, teilweise in der Literatur, vor allem aber in den Archiven der Firmen und der geologischen Dienste. Da die geologischen Dienste der meisten europaeischen Laender traditionell (oeffentliche und vertrauliche) Daten ueber die Geologie und Rohstoffe vorhalten, haben sich diese Institutionen aus Grossbritanien, den Niederlanden, Daenemark, Polen und Deutschlands entschlossen, molekulare und isotopische Erdgasdaten aus dem Bereich des suedlichen europaeischen Permbeckens zu kompilieren. Das partiell von der EU gefoerderte Projekt wurde in den Jahren 1994 bis 1997 durchgefuehrt (LOKHORST ed. 1998). Ausser auf bereits vorhandenen Daten beruht der Atlas auf etwa 200 Neu-Bestimmungen molekularer und isotopischer Gasparameter. Ringanalysen nationaler und internationeler Standardgase gewaehrleisteten die Qualitaet und die Vergleichbarkeit der gewonnenen Daten. Ziele dieser `Erdgas-Inventur` waren, die Gasqualitaeten in ihrer raeumlichen Verteilung von der suedlichen Nordsee im Westen bis nahezu an die Ostgrenze Polens darzustellen, sie genetisch zu charakterisieren und eine Beziehung zu den geologischen Rahmenbedingungen herzustellen. (orig.)

  3. Late Permian to Late Triassic basin evolution of North Vietnam: geodynamic implications for the South China and Indochina blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Camille; Bourquin, Sylvie; Hallot, Erwan; Poujol, Marc; Roger, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    The core of South East Asia is composed of a mosaic of continental blocks, among which the Indochina and the South China blocks (present day northern Vietnam), amalgamated during the Permian and/or the Triassic. Late Permian to Late Triassic geodynamic evolution of these two blocks remains controversial. The main discussion points concern the existence and the closure of an oceanic domain separating the Indochina and the South China blocks during this period. Especially, the polarity and the timing of the subduction zone that led to the collision between the blocks as well as the present location of the suture delimiting them are a matter of debate. Despite the valuable information they can provide, the sedimentary basins from northern Vietnam have been neglected in the previous studies dealing with the geodynamic evolution of South East Asia. To determine the geodynamic evolution of the area, the basins of Sam Nua and Song Da, presently located in North Vietnam, have been investigated using a combined approach involving sedimentology, geochronology (U-Pb/zircon) and geochemistry (whole-rock major and trace elements composition of both volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks). The palaeoenvironment evolution, the main unconformities, their age and the tectonic affinities of the interbedded volcanic and volcaniclastics series have been characterized for these two basins. Our results demonstrate (i) that the Song Da Basin exhibits a palaeogeographic affinity with the South China block, (ii) the occurrence of extensive calk-alkaline volcanism and associated volcaniclastic deposits in the Sam Nua Basin, related to the existence of an active magmatic arc during the Early and the lower Middle Triassic, (iii) a South dipping (present day coordinate) oceanic lithosphere beneath the Indochina block, deduced from the location of the magmatic arc south of the potential suture zones, (iv) that an angular unconformity postdates the lower Middle Triassic volcaniclastic deposits in the Sam Nua basin. This unconformity, crosscutting the subduction related deposits, is interpreted as the result of the collision between the Indochina and the South China blocks.

  4. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1997-05-29

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

  5. Interpretation of the Last Chance thrust, Death Valley region, California, as an Early Permian décollement in a previously undeformed shale basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Stone, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The Last Chance thrust, discontinuously exposed over an area of at least 2500 km2 near the south end of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt in the Death Valley region of east-central California, is controversial because of its poorly constrained age and its uncertain original geometry and extent. We interpret this thrust to be Early Permian in age, to extend throughout a sedimentary basin in which deep-water Mississippian shale overlain by Pennsylvanian and earliest Permian limestone turbidites accumulated, to represent about 30 km of eastward displacement, and to be related to convergence on a northeast-trending segment of the Early Permian continental margin. Last Chance deformation occurred between the times of the Antler and Sonoma orogenies of Late Devonian–Early Mississippian and Late Permian ages, respectively, and followed Early to Middle Pennsylvanian truncation of the continental margin by transform faulting.

  6. Lower Permian stems as fluvial paleocurrent indicators of the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capretz, Robson Louiz; Rohn, Rosemarie

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive biostratinomic study was carried out with abundant stems from the Lower Permian Motuca Formation of the intracratonic Parnaíba Basin, central-north Brazil. The fossils represent a rare tropical to subtropical paleofloristic record in north Gondwana. Tree ferns dominate the assemblages (mainly Tietea, secondarily Psaronius), followed by gymnosperms, sphenophytes, other ferns and rare lycophytes. They are silica-permineralized, commonly reach 4 m length (exceptionally more than 10 m), lie loosely on the ground or are embedded in the original sandstone or siltstone matrix, and attract particular attention because of their frequent parallel attitudes. Many tree fern stems present the original straight cylindrical to slightly conical forms, other are somewhat flattened, and the gymnosperm stems are usually more irregular. Measurements of stem orientations and dimensions were made in three sites approximately aligned in a W-E direction in a distance of 27.3 km at the conservation unit "Tocantins Fossil Trees Natural Monument". In the eastern site, rose diagrams for 54 stems indicate a relatively narrow azimuthal range to SE. These stems commonly present attached basal bulbous root mantles and thin cylindrical sandstone envelopes, which sometimes hold, almost adjacent to the lateral stem surface, permineralized fern pinnae and other small plant fragments. In the more central site, 82 measured stems are preferentially oriented in the SW-NE direction, the proportion of gymnosperms is higher and cross-stratification sets of sandstones indicate paleocurrents mainly to NE and secondarily to SE. In the western site, most of the 42 measured stems lie in E-W positions. The predominantly sandy succession, where the fossil stems are best represented, evidences a braided fluvial system under semiarid conditions. The low plant diversity, some xeromorphic features and the supposedly almost syndepositional silica impregnation of the plants are coherent with marked dry seasons. Thick mudstones and some coquinites below and above the sandy interval may represent lacustrine facies formed in probably more humid conditions. The taphonomic history of the preserved plants began with exceptional storms that caused fast-flowing high water in channels and far into the floodplains. In the eastern site region, many tree ferns only fell, thus sometimes covering and protecting plant litter and leaves from further fragmentation. Assemblages of the central and western sites suggest that the trees were uprooted and transported in suspension (floating) parallel to the flow. Heavier ends of stems (according to their form or because of attached basal bulbous root mantle or large apical fronds) were oriented to upstream because of inertial forces. During falling water stage, the stems were stranded on riverbanks, usually maintaining the previous transport orientation, and were slightly buried. The perpendicular or oblique positions of some stems may have been caused by interference with other stems or shallow bars. Rare observed stems were apparently waterlogged before the final depositional process and transported as bedload. The differences of interpreted channel orientations between the three sites are expected in a braided fluvial system, considering the very low gradients of the basin and the work scale in the order of tens of kilometers. The mean direction of the drainage probably was to east and the flows apparently became weaker downstream. This study seems to provide reliable data for paleocurrent interpretations, especially considering areas with scarce preserved sedimentary structures.

  7. Integrated Synthesis of the Permian Basin: Data and Models for Recovering Existing and Undiscovered Oil Resources from the Largest Oil-Bearing Basin in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Katherine Jackson

    2008-09-30

    Large volumes of oil and gas remain in the mature basins of North America. This is nowhere more true than in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. A critical barrier to recovery of this vast remaining resource, however, is information. Access to accurate geological data and analyses of the controls of hydrocarbon distribution is the key to the knowledge base as well as the incentives needed by oil and gas companies. The goals of this project were to collect, analyze, synthesize, and deliver to industry and the public fundamental information and data on the geology of oil and gas systems in the Permian Basin. This was accomplished in two ways. First we gathered all available data, organized it, and placed it on the web for ready access. Data include core analysis data, lists of pertinent published reports, lists of available cores, type logs, and selected PowerPoint presentations. We also created interpretive data such as type logs, geological cross sections, and geological maps and placed them in a geospatially-registered framework in ARC/GIS. Second, we created new written syntheses of selected reservoir plays in the Permian basin. Although only 8 plays were targeted for detailed analysis in the project proposal to DOE, 14 were completed. These include Ellenburger, Simpson, Montoya, Fusselman, Wristen, Thirtyone, Mississippian, Morrow, Atoka, Strawn, Canyon/Cisco, Wolfcamp, Artesia Group, and Delaware Mountain Group. These fully illustrated reports include critical summaries of published literature integrated with new unpublished research conducted during the project. As such these reports provide the most up-to-date analysis of the geological controls on reservoir development available. All reports are available for download on the project website and are also included in this final report. As stated in our proposal, technology transfer is perhaps the most important component of the project. In addition to providing direct access to data and reports through the web, we published 29 papers dealing with aspects of Permian Basin and Fort Worth Basin Paleozoic geology, and gave 35 oral and poster presentations at professional society meetings, and 116 oral and poster presentations at 10 project workshops, field trips, and short courses. These events were attended by hundreds of scientists and engineers representing dozens of oil and gas companies. This project and the data and interpretations that have resulted from it will serve industry, academic, and public needs for decades to come. It will be especially valuable to oil and gas companies in helping to better identify opportunities for development and exploration and reducing risk. The website will be continually added to and updated as additional data and information become available making it a long term source of key information for all interested in better understanding the Permian Basin.

  8. Problems and challenges in detection of pre-Mesozoic maar volcanoes: example from the Principálek Volcano in the Permian Krkonoše Piedmont Basin.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valenta, Jan; Rapprich, V.; Stárková, M.; Skácelová, Z.; Fojtíková, Lucia; Stan?k, František; Balek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 59, ?. 3 (2014), s. 169-181. ISSN 1802-6222 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : diatreme * geophysics * volcanology * Permian * Krkonoše Piedmont Basin Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014 http://www.jgeosci.org/detail/jgeosci.170

  9. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  10. Paleoenvironmental Changes at the Carboniferous/Permian Boundary: Sedimentology and Paleontology of Lasturine Deposits, the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin (NE Bohemian Massif).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajíc, Jaroslav; Martínek, K.; Drábková, J.; Šim?nek, Z.

    Prague : Faculty of Science, Charles University, 2001. s. 48. [Coal Geology Conference /9./. 25.06.2001-29.06.2001, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA205/94/0692 Keywords : Carboniferous/Permian -boundary * Krkonoše Piedmont basin * Czech Republic Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  11. The main fish communities of the limnic Permian and Carboniferous basins of the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajíc, Jaroslav

    33-34, - (2006), s. 99-101. ISBN 80-210-4097-1. ISSN 1211-281X. [Paleontological Conference /7./. Brno, 19.10.2006-20.10.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : ichthyofaunae * Upper Carboniferous * Lower Permian Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  12. Ichnological analysis in San Gregorio deposits (Lower Permian) in the Guazunambi hills area Uruguayan north basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichnological analysis in deposits corresponding to San Gregorio Fm.(lower Permian) in the Guazunambi hills area (Cerro Largo Department, Uruguay) was made.Trace fossils in sandstones and mud stones outcrops were studied.The ichnofossil assemblage studied allows to propose a shallow marine environment. (author)

  13. Provenance study of Permian non-marine sandstones and conglomerates of the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin (Czech Republic): exotic marine limestone pebbles, heavy minerals and garnet composition

    OpenAIRE

    Martínek K; Štolfová K

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on identifying major source areas in several stratigraphic intervals in the Permian sediments of the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin and integrates it with existing sedimentological data. Pebbles in Cisuralian-Guadalupian conglomerates of alluvial fans, nearshore lacustrine and lacustrine fan-delta deposits that were deposited close to the northwestern and southeastern basin margin, respectively, correspond almost exclusively to local material from adjacent crystalline complexes. T...

  14. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  15. Environmental characterization of bedded salt formations and overlying areas of the Permian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report constitutes one input to the first stage of site qualification studies. It presents a general environmental characterization of the region that is underlain by the Permian bedded salt formation. The formation covers portions of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The Permian bedded salt formation is one of a number of deep, stable geologic formations being studied for potential locations for nuclear waste repositories. These studies will not necessarily lead to selection of a site. They are intended only to provide information necessary to evaluate the suitability of locations for repositories. The report is intended as a general characterization of the existing environmental setting of the Permian Region with emphasis on land, water, and air characteristics; resources; plant and animal life; and man's organizations and activities. The report provides background information about the role that this regional study will play in the overall plan for environmental impact assessments and statements deemed necessary as input to the decision-making process. Background information on the present concept of nuclear waste repository design and function is also included. The information presented in this report has been summarized from open literature readily accessible to the public. No field work was conducted nor new data used in developing the descriptions contained herein

  16. Paleoenvironmental reconstitution of Motuca and Sambaíba formations, Permian-Triassic of the Parnaíba Basin in southwest Maranhão state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Romério Abrantes Júnior

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The interval between the Late Paleozoic and Early Mesozoic was marked by paleogeographic and paleoclimatic global changes, partly attributed to catastrophic events. The intense continentalization of the supercontinent Pangaea of End-Permian propitiated the development of extensive deserts that succeeded the coastal and platform environments of Early Permian. The records of these events in northern Brazil are found in intracratonic basins, particularly in the Permo-triassic succession of the Parnaíba Basin. The facies and stratigraphic outcrops analysis of this succession allowed the individualization of 14 sedimentary facies grouped into four facies associations (FA: FA1 and FA2 related to deposits of Motuca Formation and, FA3 and FA4, representative of the base of Sambaíba Formation. The FA1 – Shallow lake/Mudflat consists of red laminated mudstone with lenses of gypsum, calcite and marl, besides lobes of sigmoidal sandstones. The FA2 – Saline pan consists of lenticular bodies of laminated gypsum, nodular gypsum and gypsarenite, overlapped by greenish mudstones with dolomite nodules and palygorskite. The FA3 – sand sheet and FA4 – dunes field are formed, respectively, for orange cream sandstones with even parallel stratification and medium- to large-scale cross-bedding. In the contact between Motuca and Sambaíba formations occurs a deformed interval, laterally continuous for hundreds of kilometers. Brecciated and contorted bedded siltstones and mudstone (Motuca Formation and sandstone with sinsedimentary faults/microfaults, convolute lamination and mud-filled injection dykes (Sambaíba Formation are interpreted as seismites triggered by high magnitude earthquakes (> 8 according Richter scale.

  17. Seismic valve as the main mechanism for sedimentary fluid entrapment within extensional basin: example of the Lodève Permian Basin (Hérault, South of France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, D.; Lopez, M.; Chauvet, A.; Imbert, P.; Sauvage, A. C.; Martine, B.; Thomas, M.

    2014-12-01

    During syn-sedimentary burial in basin, interstitial fluids initially trapped within the sedimentary pile are easily moving under overpressure gradient. Indeed, they have a significant role on deformation during basin evolution, particularly on fault reactivation. The Lodève Permian Basin (Hérault, France) is an exhumed half graben with exceptional outcrop conditions providing access to barite-sulfides mineralized systems and hydrocarbon trapped into rollover faults of the basin. Architectural studies shows a cyclic infilling of fault zone and associated S0-parallel veins according to three main fluid events during dextral/normal faulting. Contrasting fluid entrapment conditions are deduced from textural analysis, fluid inclusion microthermometry and sulfide isotope geothermometer: (i) the first stage is characterized by an implosion breccia cemented by silicifications and barite during abrupt pressure drop within fault zone; (ii) the second stage consists in succession of barite ribbons precipitated under overpressure fluctuations, derived from fault-valve action, with reactivation planes formed by sulphide-rich micro-shearing structures showing normal movement; and (iii) the third stage is associated to the formation of dextral strike-slip pull-apart infilling by large barite crystals and contemporary hydrocarbons under suprahydrostatic pressure values. Microthermometry, sulfide and strontium isotopic compositions of the barite-sulfides veins indicate that all stages were formed by mixing between deep basinal fluids at 230°C, derived from cinerite dewatering, and formation water from overlying sedimentary cover channelized trough fault planes. We conclude to a polyphase history of fluid trapping during Permian synrift formation of the basin: (i) a first event, associated with the dextral strike-slip motion on faults, leads to a first sealing of the fault zone; (ii) periodic reactivations of fault planes and bedding-controlled shearing form the main mineralized ore bodies by the single action of fluid overpressure fluctuations, undergoing changes in local stress distribution and (iii) a final tectonic activation of fault linked to last basinal fluid and hydrocarbon migration during which shear stress restoration on fault plane is faster than fluid pressure build-up.

  18. The geology petrology, palynology and geochemistry of Permian coal basins in Tanzania. 1. Namwele-Mkomolo, Muze and Galula coalfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkiwa, P.; Kalkreuth, W.; Utting, J.; Mayagilo, F.; Mpanju, F.; Hagemann, H. [Tanzania Ministry of Water, Energy and Minerals, Dodoma (Tanzania)

    1998-03-01

    Permian coal-bearing strata occur in a number of intracratonic rift basins in Tanzania. This study examines coals, shales and mudstones of the Namwele-Mkomolo, Muze and Galula coalfields (Rukwan basin) by coal petrological, palynological and rock eval techniques. For the coals the focus was on the establishment of coal seam characteristics and related quality and utilization potentials, whereas the shales and mudstones were examined for age relationships, flora and related palaeodepositional environments and source rock potential. The coal seams, which have a thickness of up to 2.95 m are high in ash and have calorific values ranging from 5344 to 18947 J/g. Many seams are detrital with a high content finely disseminated clay minerals, quartz and detrital macerals. Pyrite content is variable. Vitrinite reflectance ranges from 0.43 to 0.66% R{sub random}. Use of the coals in small-scale power generation and for domestic use would greatly reduce the dependency of rural Tanzania on wood and wood-derived charcoal. Palynomorph assemblages are characterized by the predominance of nontaeniate and taeniate pollen, and trilete spores in the Namwele-Mkomolo and Muze coalfields. At Galula coalfields the palynomorph assemblages were poor. On the basis of age correlations with Karoo basins to the south and the Collie Basin of western Australia, an Artinskian to Kungurian (?) age is suggested for the coal measures in the Rukwa basin. The diversity of palynomorph assemblages suggests a variety of floras and contemporary depositional environments. This is consistent with coal petrography indicating that peat accumulation occurred in upper delta plain, braided plan and lacustrine depositional environments. Rock eval parameters indicate koergen type III for all samples investigated and indicate very poor hydrocarbon source rock potential. 59 refs., 17 figs., 6 plates, 3 tabs.

  19. Variable eruptive styles in an ancient monogenetic volcanic field: examples from the Permian Levín Volcanic Field (Krkonoše Piedmont Basin, Bohemian Massif)

    OpenAIRE

    Stárková M; Rapprich V; Breitkreuz Ch

    2011-01-01

    The Permian pyroclastic deposits of the Levín Volcanic Field within the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin were studied in terms of volcanology. Pyroclastic rocks are exposed in two quarries and the study was supported with the 30 m deep borehole K1 penetrating these rocks. The pyroclastic rocks are altered but preserved textures enabled reconstruction of eruptive styles. The volcanic sequence exposed in the abandoned Hv?zda quarry starts with a phreato-Strombolian pyroclastic rocks rich in basaltic sco...

  20. Geology of permian basin in the northeast of Uruguay: Sedimentology exam about uranium trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium project was prepared from BRGM to DINAMIGE. Its has got three zones of investigation: zone 1 composed by precambrian basin in the N W; zone 2 the precambrian insular shelf and rocks belts; zone 3 wich include parts of the basin Cretaceous in Salto and Santa Lucia

  1. No Abrupt Changes in redox conditions associated with the end-Permian marine ecosystem collapse in the east Greenland basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper K.; Shen, Y; Piasecki, Stefan; Stemmerik, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Multiple observations have revealed that environmental disturbances may have been linked to the end-Permian mass extinction and delayed biotic recovery. Biogeochemical constraints on the temporal and spatial changes of oceanic redox chemistry during the Permian–Triassic interval are essential to evaluate global significance of previous hypotheses and to improve our understanding of extinction and recovery processes. To investigate redox ocean chemistry change associated with the end-Permian exti...

  2. Preliminary study of uranium in Pennsylvanian and lower Permian strata in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, and the Northern Great Plains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistent and widespread radiometric anomalies occur in Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian strata in the subsurface of the northern Great Plains and the Powder River Basin. The primary host lithology of these anomalies is shale interbedded with sandstone, dolomite, and dolomitic sandstone. Samples from the project area indicate that uranium is responsible for some anomalies. In some samples there seems to be a correlation between high uranium content and high organic-carbon content, which possibly indicates that carbonaceous material acted as a trapping mechanism in some strata. The Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks studied are predominantly marine carbonates and clastics, but there are rocks of fluvial origin in the basal Pennsylvanian of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota and in the Pennsylvanian and Permian deposits on the east flank of the Laramie Mountains. Fine-grained clastic rocks that flank the Chadron arch in western Nebraska are possibly of continental origin. The trend of the Chadron arch approximately parallels the trend of radiometric anomalies in the subsurface Permian-Pennsylvanian section. Possible source areas for uranium in the sediments studied were pre-Pennsylvanian strata of the Canadian Shield and Precambrian igneous rocks of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains

  3. The Permian basin geology in the north of Uruguay.Sedimentology exam about the uranium signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basin is located in the Precambrian insular shelf limited to the North. East and South. The North (Brazil) and south (Uruguay) edge are constituted by the insular shelf ancient nucleus which dates from 2000 million years.

  4. Post-Variscan (end Carboniferous-Early Permian) basin evolution in Western and Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    T. McCann; C. Pascal; M. J. Timmermann; P. Krzywiec; J. Lopez-Gomez; A. Wetzel; C.M. Krawczyk; H. Rieke; J. Lamarche

    2006-01-01

    The Variscan orogeny, resulting from the collision of Laurussia with Gondwana to form the supercontinent of Pangaea, was followed by a period of crustal instability and re-equilibration throughout Western and Central Europe. An extensive and significant phase of Permo-Carboniferous magmatism led to the extrusion of thick volcanic successions across the region (e.g. NE German Basin, NW part of the Polish Basin, Oslo Rift, northern Spain). Coeval transtensional activity led to the formation of ...

  5. Palynology of the Permian San Miguel Formation (Western Paraná Basin, Paraguay): Gondwanan biostratigraphic correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Loinaze, V.S.

    2010-01-01

    The palynological analysis of five samples from three levels in cores of the Mallorquín-1 well (Paraná Basin, eastern Paraguay) is presented here. The borehole penetrated the San Miguel Formation, the basal lithostratigraphic unit of the Independencia Group. This palynoflora represents the westernmost palynological record reported from Upper Paleozoic sequences along this basin margin at this latitude. This diverse spore-pollen flora includes several age marker taxa, viz. Verrucosisporites in...

  6. Sedimentology of the Madumabisa Mudstone Formation (Late Permian), Lower Karoo Group, mid-Zambezi Valley Basin, southern Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambe, Imasiku A.; Dixon, Owen

    2000-04-01

    Sediments of the Upper Carboniferous to Lower Jurassic Karoo Supergroup (˜ 4.5 km thick) were deposited in the mid-Zambezi Valley Basin, southern Zambia. The Upper Palæozoic Lower Karoo Group in this area ends with a Late Permian sedimentary unit called the Madumabisa Mudstone Formation. The formation is 700 m thick and comprises four lithofacies grouped into two facies assemblages, collectively interpreted as lacustrine deposits. Sediments of a massive mudrock facies assemblage were deposited from suspension, probably from sediment-laden rivers entering a lake. Concretionary calcilutite beds probably mark the positions of palæosediment-water interfaces where calcite was precipitated. A laminated mudrock facies assemblage is attributed to lacustrine deposition from inflowing rivers at the lake margins and shallow parts of the lake. Repeated thickening-upward cycles are evidence of upward shallowing, interrupted by events of more abrupt deepening. Sandstone interbeds are interpreted as fluvial deposits laid down during low lake stands, with cross-lamination and asymmetrical ripples indicating current rather than wave deposition. A fossil assemblage of ostracods, bivalves, gastropods, fish scales, the alga Botryococcus sp. and fossil burrows is consistent with a lacustrine origin for the formation.

  7. Evidence of lacustrine sedimentation in the Upper Permian Bijori Formation, Satpura Gondwana basin: Palaeogeographic and tectonic implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapan Chakraborty; Soumen Sarkar

    2005-06-01

    The Upper Permian Bijori Formation of the Satpura Gondwana basin comprising fine- to coarsegrained sandstone, carbonaceous shale/mudstone and thin coal bands was previously interpreted as the deposits of meandering rivers. The present study documents abundance of wave ripples, hummocky and swaley cross-stratification and combined flow bedforms in the Bijori Formation, suggesting that a significant part of the formation was deposited in a wave-agitated environment. Evidence of near-emergent depositional conditions provided by repeated occurrence of rootlet beds and hydromorphic paleosols, local flooding surfaces denoting rapid fluctuation of water level, occurrences of temnospondyl vertebrate fossils, and absence of tidal signatures and marine fossils suggest a lacustrine rather than marine depositional regime. Five facies associations recognised within the Bijori Formation are inferred to represent fluvial channels and associated floodplains (FA1), lake shorelines (FA2), subaqueous distributary channels and associated levees (FA3), wave- and storm-affected delta front (FA4), and open lacustrine/lower shoreface (FA5) deposits. The planoconcave fluvial channel-fill sandbodies with unidirectional cross-beds are clearly distinguishable from the delta front bars that show a convexo-plan or bi-convex sandbody geometry and dominance of wave and combined flow bedforms. Some of the distributary channels record interaction of fluvial and wave-dominated basinal processes. Major distributary sandbodies show a north to northwest flow direction while wave-affected delta front sandbodies show very complex flow patterns reflecting interaction between fluvial discharge and wave processes. Wave ripple crest trends show that the lake shoreline had an overall east–northeast to west–southwest orientation. The lack of documented contemporaneous lacustrine or marine sediments in the Satpura Gondwana basin posed a major problem of basin-scale palaeogeographic reconstruction. The existence of Bijori lake solves the problem and the lake is inferred to have acted as repository for the contemporaneous alluvial drainage. Development of the large Bijori lake body implies generation of accommodation space exceeding the rate of sediment supplied and thus represents locus of high tectonic subsidence. Transition of fluvial sediments with red mudstone and calcareous soil profile in the lower part of the succession to carbonaceous shale and coal-bearing lacustrine sediments in the upper part, denote a change from a warm semi-arid climate with seasonal rainfall to a more humid one.

  8. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  9. Ichnology of the non-marine deposits of the Boskovice Basin (Carboniferous-Permian, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuláš R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In the area of the Boskovice Basin, simple ichnoassemblages and ichnofabric patterns characterize a suite of lacustrine and fluvial deposits. The succession of ichnofabrics enables us to correlate several sections in the northern part of the basin, supporting the correlation of the previously recognized Ba?ov, Míchov and Obora horizons. The mostly finegrained lacustrine deposits below bituminous limestones contain Planolites beverleyensis, Planolites montanus, amphibian footprints, and rare Cruziana problematica. Reddish sandstones, which can be interpreted as alluvial plain deposits, contain Planolites, Scoyenia, 'star-like traces', and Diplocraterion. In the southern part of the basin, the coal-bearing strata are characterized by generally poor bioturbation, with isolated levels of 'root spots' and Planolites. The lowermost strata of the overlying red-bed unit show intensive and rhythmical Planolites ichnofabric, the intensity and uniformity of which decrease upwards.

  10. Facies pattern of the middle Permian Barren Measures Formation, Jharia basin, India: The sedimentary response to basin tectonics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabir Dasgupta

    2005-06-01

    In the Lower Gondwana succession of the Jharia basin of eastern India, the Barren Measures Formation is characterized by the cyclic disposition of fine-grained lacustrine deposits and relatively coarse-grained fluvial deposits. The cyclic variation in the rate of coarse clastic input is attributed to the sedimentary response to basin tectonics. The sandstone–shale alternations of the Barren Measures succession can be correlated with the tectonic cyclothems developed on the hangingwall dip-slope and adjoining trough in a continental half-graben setting. Enhancement of the gradient of the hangingwall dip-slope during reactivation of the basin margin faults led to progradation of the existing fluvial system towards the half-graben trough and deposition of the coarser clastics on the fine-grained lacustrine deposits of the trough. Peneplanation of the hangingwall slope and slow increase in the lake level caused lacustrine transgression and retrogration of the fluvial system on the hangingwall block. The fluvial sediments were onlapped by the fine-grained lacustrine deposits. Episodic rejuvenation of the basin margin faults thus caused development of tectonic cyclothem on the hangingwall block. The paleocurrent pattern indicates that a persistent northward paleoslope was maintained during Barren Measures sedimentation. The inferred depositional settings were much more extensive than the present limit of the outcrop. The faults, presently defining the northern limit of the Barren Measures Formation, were possibly emplaced after Barren Measures sedimentation. The final movement along these fault planes caused preservation of the downthrown hangingwall block and the Barren Measures sediments on the footwall block were eroded during subsequent denudation. The Southern Boundary Fault came into existence after the deposition of the Barren Measures sediments.

  11. Radiometric dating of ochoan (permian) evaporites, WIPP site, Delaware basin, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have attempted radiometric dating of halide-sulfate salts and clay minerals from the Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA, as part of geochemical study of the stability of the evaporite sequence at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - a US DOE facility) site. They undertook this dating to determine: (1) primary age of evaporite genesis or time(s) of recrystallization, (2) if previously undated evaporite minerals (leonite, polyhalite, kieserite) give useful data, and (3) if the detrital clay minerals have been radiometrically reset at any time following their incorporation into the evaporite medium. They have shown earlier that polyhalites can indeed be successfully dated by the K-Ar method, and once corrections are applied for admixed halide minerals, dates of 210-230 Ma for the Delaware Basin are obtained. Rb-Sr isochrons from early stage sylvites-polyhalites-anhydrites yield 220 +/- 10 Ma, even when some sylvites yield lower K-Ar dates due to loss of 40Ar*. K-Ar dates on leonites and kieserites are also low due to 40Ar* loss, but their Rb-Sr dates are higher. Detrital clay minerals from the Delaware Basin collectively yield a highly scattered isochron (390 +/- 77 Ma), but samples from a local area, such as the WIPP Site, give a much better age of 428 +/- 7 Ma. These dates show that the interaction between the clay minerals and the evaporitic brines was insufficient to reset the clay minerals Rb-Sr systematics. In a related study, they note that a dike emplaced into the evaporite at 34 Ma had only very limited effect on the intruded rocks; contact phenomena were all within 2 m of the dike. All of their geochemical (radio-metric and trace element) studies of the WIPP site argue for preservation of the isotopic and chemical integrity of the major minerals for the past 200 Ma. 19 references, 1 figure, 5 tables

  12. Stratigraphy, structure, and lithofacies relationships of Devonian through Permian sedimentary rocks: Paradox Basin and adjacent areas - southeastern Utah. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical well log analysis, literature review, and field work were conducted to develop isopach, structure contour, outcrop, and facies maps and cross sections for the Devonian through Permian strata of a 14,586-km2 (5632-square-mile) area in southeastern Utah. The study area includes part of the Paradox Basin, the salt deposits of which are of interest in siting studies for a nuclear waste repository. For this reason hydrologic models of this area are needed. This study, part of which included the development of a three-dimensional stratigraphic computer model utilizing Geographic Information System software, can serve as a base for hydrologic or other models for this area. Within and adjacent to the study area, 730 wells were screened to select the 191 wells analyzed for the study. It was found that the Elbert through Molas formations did not exhibit noticeable facies changes within the study area. The Pinkerton Trail Formation exhibits moderate changes: anhydrite and shale become somewhat more abundant toward the northeast. Facies changes in the Paradox Formation are more dramatic. Thick saline facies deposits are present in the northeast, grading to thinner anhydrite and then to carbonate facies in the south and west. The lithology of the Honaker Trail Formation appears to be fairly uniform throughout the area. Facies changes in the Cutler Group are numerous and sometimes dramatic, and generally correspond to the named formations of the group. Other factors that could affect groundwater flow, such as stratigraphic cover of fine-grained rocks, area of formation outcrops, and fracturing and faulting are discussed and delineated on maps

  13. Permian bivalves of the Taciba Formation, Itararé Group, Paraná Basin, and their biostratigraphic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Guimarães Simões

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A small and poorly diversified bivalve fauna from Taciba Formation, Itararé Group, Paraná Basin (State of Santa Catarina,Mafra Municipality, is described in this paper for the first time, based on new findings. The fauna is recorded in a 30 cmthick interval of fine sandstone locally at the top of Taciba Formation, in the Butiá quarry. The studied fossil-bearing sandstonebed is a marine intercalation recording a brief eustatic rise in sea-level, probably following glacier retreat and climateamelioration at the end of a broad glacial scenario. The fauna is mainly dominated by productid brachiopods, which are notdescribed here, and rare mollusk shells (bivalves and gastropods. Two bivalve species were identified: Myonia argentinensis(Harrington, 1955, and Aviculopecten multiscalptus (Thomas, 1928. The presence of Myonia argentinensis is noteworthysince this species is also present in the Baitaca assemblage found in marine siltstones (Baitaca assemblage of theRio do Sul Formation, cropping out at the Teixeira Soares region, Paraná State. This species is also recorded in the bivalvefauna from the Bonete Formation, Pillahinco Group, Sauce Grande Basin, Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina. Hence, themarine bivalves of the Taciba Formation are associated with the transgressive event that characterizes the Eurydesma fauna,indicating a Late Asselian-Sakmarian age for the bivalve fauna. Presence of the Myonia argentinensis megadesmid speciesreinforces the Gondwanic nature of the studied fauna.

  14. Kinetics of evaporite mineral-brine interactions: mathematical modeling and experimental determination of the effect of gamma radiation and threshold crystallization inhibition on Permian Basin brine composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The San Andres and Salado bedded salt formations in the evaporitic Permian Basin contain fluid phases in equilibrium with the host rock. Anthropogenic perturbations such as emplacing heat-generating high level radioactive wastes (HLW) in a mined repository mobilize this brine. Kinetic factors are of extreme importance in the precipitation and dissolution of evaporites and may govern the diagenesis of phosphate, sulfate, and chloride phases in the type of environment occurring at both the time of the original deposition of the sediment and in the very nearfield of a HLW repository. Using the computer code XLRATE, newly-formulated geometric models incorporating critical aspects of mineralogical defects and dislocations describe a wide variety of kinetic data for the dissolution of apatite and irradiated Permian Basin rock salt. The lattice damage in rock salt caused by gamma radiation increases the halite dissolution rate. The escape of chlorine gas and the radiolysis of trace impurities moves the NaCl concentration of saturated brines made from irradiated salt to lower values with Cl- decreasing to a greater extent than Na+. A new model incorporating nucleation time best describes crystallization kinetics in the calcium sulfate system. The solubilities and saturation indices of irradiated Permian Basin rock salt and calcium sulfates in brines of different ionic strengths were numerically modeled. Seventy-five naturally-occurring and commercial crystallization inhibitors including carboxylic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, humic and tannic substances, and organic polyelectrolytes were tested for their effect on gypsum/anhydrite and rock salt precipitation and dissolution. Of these, 70% proved relative or very effective

  15. Paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic investigations of the whitehorse group/quartermaster (Dewey Lake) formation (upper permian-lowermost triassic) in the Palo Duro basin, northwest Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Dylan R.

    In northwest Texas, upper Permian to lowermost Triassic hematite-cemented detrital sedimentary rocks, which include a small number of regionally extensive ash beds, were deposited during the time interval of the greatest mass extinction event sequences in Earth history. The magnetic polarity stratigraphy, as well as key rock magnetic properties, of the upper Whitehorse Group (WH) and Quartermaster formations (QM) at selected sections in the Palo Duro Basin, have been determined using thermal, and chemical demagnetization approaches and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, acquisition of isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and backfield demagnetization, and thermal demagnetization of three component IRM methods. Demagnetization results show that the WH/QM contains a primary/near-primary characteristic remanent magnetization at each level sampled and thus the magnetic polarity stratigraphy for each section can be compared with existing polarity time scales across the Permian-Triassic boundary. Estimated site mean directions yield a paleomagnetic pole for the latest Permian for North America of 57.8°N, 130.6°E from 38 sampled sites.

  16. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

  17. Interregional correlation as exemplified by determining age of Permian suites of the Pechora coal basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorskii, V.P.; Guseva, E.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using several different methods, age was estimated of several suites of Pechora coals located on northern part of Pre-Ural basin where the strato-type of the Permski system is found. Results of correlation of upper parts of Talatinski suite and all of Lekvorkutski with stratotypical sections of Central Pre-Ural demonstrate the Kungurski age of this part of the section, and confirm the expediency of including the Saraninski horizon in the composition of the Kungurski age, without which the border between the Artinski and Kungurski stages cannot be found as an isochronic level for any significant distance. The examined example indicates that results of interregional correlation proved to be essential factors in determining the volume of stratigraphic divisions (in the given example of Artinski and Kungurski stages). Question whether it is necessary to transfer border between sections of the Permski system to the base of the Saraninski horizon, i.e., the base of the Kungurski stage, must be decided separately on the basis of broader factual material in the order of a general revision of the entire scale of the Permski system. On the basis of the example, it is possible to conclude that the definiteness and volume of stratotype of general stratigraphic division in process of stratigraphic correlation and dependence of this volume on results of interregional correlation are a dialectic unity of two contradictory tendencies which depending on circumstances appear now in the role of argument, now of function. 16 references.

  18. The Carboniferous-Permian boundary in the central western Argentinean basins: paleontological evidences / El límite Carbonífero-Pérmico en las cuencas del centro oeste de Argentina: evidencias paleontológicas

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gabriela A, Cisterna; Andrea F, Sterren; Pedro R, Gutiérrez.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Las cuencas del centro oeste de Argentina, Río Blanco, Calingasta-Uspallata y el sector oeste de la cuenca Paganzo, contienen las secuencias marinas más completas para el estudio del límite Carbonífero-Pérmico en Gondwana. Un estudio detallado de secciones estratigráficas claves ha permitido la iden [...] tificación de las asociaciones megaflo-rísticas NBG y de Intervalo, y de la palinozona DM (Raistrickia densa-Convolutispora muriornata), del Carbonífero Tardío, en la parte inferior de dichas secciones; en tanto, en la parte media superior de las secciones estudiadas, se han identificado la biozona de invertebrados T-S (Tivertonia jachalensis-Streptorhynchus inaequiornatus) y la palinozona FS (Pakhapites fusus-Vittatina subsaccata), ambas asignadas al Pérmico Temprano. El registro de estas asociaciones diagnósticas de mega/microflora e invertebrados marinos provee un esquema bioestratigráfico integrado que permite ubicar el límite Carbonífero-Pérmico en las cuencas del centro oeste de Argentina. Abstract in english The central western Argentinean basins of Río Blanco, Calingasta-Uspallata and western Paganzo, enclose the most complete marine successions used for examining the Carboniferous-Permian boundary in Gondwana. A detailed review of the key stratigraphical sections has allowed the identification of the [...] latest Carboniferous assemblages; NBG, Interval megafloristic Zone and DM (Raistrickia densa-Convolutispora muriornata) Palynological Zone in the lower part, and the earliest Permian T-S (Tivertonia jachalensis-Streptorhynchus inaequiornatus) invertebrate Zone and FS (Pakhapitesfusus-Vittatina subsaccata) Palynological Zone in the upper part. This diagnostic mega/microflora and marine invertebrate paleontological evidence provides a biostratigraphical framework for the definition of the Carboniferous-Permian boundary inside the basins of central western Argentina.

  19. Provenance study of Permian non-marine sandstones and conglomerates of the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin (Czech Republic: exotic marine limestone pebbles, heavy minerals and garnet composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínek K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on identifying major source areas in several stratigraphic intervals in the Permian sediments of the Krkonoše Piedmont Basin and integrates it with existing sedimentological data. Pebbles in Cisuralian-Guadalupian conglomerates of alluvial fans, nearshore lacustrine and lacustrine fan-delta deposits that were deposited close to the northwestern and southeastern basin margin, respectively, correspond almost exclusively to local material from adjacent crystalline complexes. The heavy mineral associations of the sandstone matrix of these conglomerates support this interpretation. Crystalline units of the south-western part of the Krkonoše-Jizera Crystalline Complex and Orlice-Sn?žník Crystalline Complex, respectively, are considered as the most favourable sources. Heavy mineral associations of fluvial sandstone facies are of complex composition pointing to repeated recycling of clastic material. However, heavy mineral indices reveal distinct source areas for the main lithostratigraphic units. Two main possible source areas for the fluvial Asselian deposits (Vrchlabí Formation of the south-western part of the basin were found. Pebbles of late Devonian- early Carboniferous marine limestones probably came from the central part of the hypothetical Jítrava-Hradec Basin. The garnet compositions in sand detrital material point to leucogranites and pegmatites of the north-eastern Moldanubian Zone, P?ibyslavice area, as the possible source rocks. Guadalupian fluvial deposits reveal a wide range of sources that can be attributed to the recycling of detrital material from Cisuralian and Carboniferous deposits. Garnet compositions indicate Moldanubian granulites, garnet clinopyroxenites, leucogranites and pegmatites as a possible sources. We infer that Moldanubian granulites and garnet clinopyroxenites were exposed to an erosion level in the Early Permian at the latest.

  20. Depositional setting, petrology and chemistry of Permian coals from the Paraná Basin: 2. South Santa Catarina Coalfield, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkreuth, W.; Holz, M.; Mexias, A.; Balbinot, M.; Levandowski, J.; Willett, J.; Finkelman, R.; Burger, H.

    2010-01-01

    In Brazil economically important coal deposits occur in the southern part of the Paran?? Basin, where coal seams occur in the Permian Rio Bonito Formation, with major coal development in the states of Rio Grande de Sul and Santa Catarina. The current paper presents results on sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the coal-bearing strata, and petrological and geochemical coal seam characterization from the South Santa Catarina Coalfield, Paran?? Basin.In terms of sequence stratigraphic interpretation the precursor mires of the Santa Catarina coal seams formed in an estuarine-barrier shoreface depositional environment, with major peat accumulation in a high stand systems tract (Pre-Bonito and Bonito seams), a lowstand systems tract (Ponta Alta seam, seam A, seam B) and a transgressive systems tract (Irapu??, Barro Branco and Treviso seams).Seam thicknesses range from 1.70 to 2.39. m, but high proportions of impure coal (coaly shale and shaley coal), carbonaceous shale and partings reduce the net coal thickness significantly. Coal lithoypes are variable, with banded coal predominant in the Barro Branco seam, and banded dull and dull coal predominantly in Bonito and Irapu?? seams, respectively. Results from petrographic analyses indicate a vitrinite reflectance range from 0.76 to 1.63 %Rrandom (HVB A to LVB coal). Maceral group distribution varies significantly, with the Barro Branco seam having the highest vitrinite content (mean 67.5 vol%), whereas the Irapu?? seam has the highest inertinite content (33.8. vol%). Liptinite mean values range from 7.8. vol% (Barro Branco seam) to 22.5. vol% (Irapu?? seam).Results from proximate analyses indicate for the three seams high ash yields (50.2 - 64.2wt.%). Considering the International Classification of in-Seam Coals, all samples are in fact classified as carbonaceous rocks (>50wt.% ash). Sulfur contents range from 3.4 to 7.7 wt.%, of which the major part occurs as pyritic sulfur. Results of X-ray diffraction indicate the predominance of quartz and kaolinite (also pyrite). Gypsum, gibbsite, jarosite and calcite were also identified in some samples. Feldspar was noted but is rare. The major element distribution in the three seams (coal basis) is dominated by SiO2 (31.3wt.%, mean value), Al2O3 (14.5wt.%, mean value) and Fe2O3 (6.9 wt.%, mean value). Considering the concentrations of trace elements that are of potential environmental hazards the Barro Branco, Bonito and Irapu?? seams (coal base) are significantly enriched in Co (15.7ppm), Cr (54.5ppm), Li (59.3ppm), Mn (150.4ppm), Pb (58.0ppm) and V (99.6ppm), when compared to average trace elements contents reported for U. S. coals.Hierarchical cluster analysis identified, based on similarity levels, three groups of major elements and seven groups of trace elements. Applying discriminant analyses using trace and major element distribution, it could be demonstrated that the three seams from Santa Catarina show distinct populations in the discriminant analyses plots, and also differ from the coals of Rio Grande do Sul analyzed in a previous study. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  1. The appearance of an oxygen-depleted condition on the Capitanian disphotic slope/basin in South China: Middle-Upper Permian stratigraphy at Chaotian in northern Sichuan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Isozaki, Yukio; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-06-01

    The global environmental changes related to the end-Guadalupian (Permian) extinction have been recently studied in various shallow-marine sections in the world; however, no previous stratigraphic research focused on the sequence deposited in a relatively deep disphotic zone. In order to investigate the environmental changes in the disphotic zone during that interval, lithostratigraphy and secular changes in the sedimentary environment were analyzed for the ca. 150 m thick Guadalupian-Lopingian (Middle-Upper Permian) carbonates at Chaotian in northern Sichuan, South China. The upper Guadalupian Maokou Formation and the Lower Lopingian Wujiaping Formation are mostly composed of bioclastic limestone of a euphotic shelf facies and contain abundant shallow marine fossils, such as algae, corals, and fusulines. The topmost Maokou Formation (ca. 11 m thick) is unique in this section because it is composed of thinly bedded black mudstone/chert of a disphotic slope/basin facies with abundant radiolarians and ammonoids. The stratigraphic changes in litho- and bio-facies suggest a two-stepped transgression in the Capitanian followed by a great regression around the Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary (G-LB). Moreover, the stratigraphic changes in bioturbation, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and occurrence of framboidal pyrite suggest that the redox of the sedimentary environment at Chaotian changed drastically in accordance with newly clarified rapid sea-level fluctuations. In association with the Capitanian sea-level rise, the sedimentary environment shifted from an oxic shelf to an oxygen-depleted slope/basin, and again returned to an oxic shelf during the following great regression. The appearance of the oxygen-depleted condition on the Capitanian disphotic slope/basin in northern Sichuan is particularly important because it occurred clearly before the end-Guadalupian extinction event. It is also noteworthy that the oxygen-depleted seawater appeared for the first time on a continental margin significantly before the well-known P-TB shallow-marine anoxia.

  2. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, Jerry F.; Kerans, Charles

    1997-05-19

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study. Subsurface Activities - We continue to prepare two final reports that summarize research results of the South Cowden Field study. One report summarizes results of the petrophysical characterization research, and one summarizes results of the fluid-flow modeling research. Outcrop Activities - We also continue to prepare the final report, which summarizes the research results of the Grayburg outcrop reservoir study.

  3. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, Jerry F.; Kerans, Charles

    1997-05-29

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study. Subsurface Activities - We continue to prepare two final reports that summarize research results of the South Cowden Field study. One report summarizes results of the petrophysical characterization research, and one summarizes results of the fluid-flow modeling research. Outcrop Activities - We also continue to prepare the final report, which summarizes the research results of the Grayburg outcrop reservoir study.

  4. États de contraintes et mécanismes d'ouverture et de fermeture des bassins permiens du Maroc hercynien. L'exemple des bassins des Jebilet et des RéhamnaStates of stresses and opening/closing mechanisms of the Permian basins in Hercynian Morocco. The example of the Jebilet and Réhamna Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Amal; Tahiri, Abdelfatah; Ait Brahim, Lahcen; Saidi, Maraim

    The fracturing analysis in the Permian basins of Jebilet and Rehamna (Hercynian Morocco) and the underlying terranes allowed us to suggest a model for their opening. Three tectonic episodes are distinguished: a transtensional episode NNE-SSW-trending (Permian I), occurring during the opening along sinistral wrench faults N70-110-trending, associated with synsedimentary normal faults; a transpressive episode ESE-WNW-trending (Permian II), initiating the closure, the normal faults playing back reverse faults and the N70 trending faults dextral wrench faults; a compressional episode NNW-SSE (post-Permian, ante-Triassic), accentuating the closure and the deformation and putting an end to the Tardi-Hercynian compressive movements. To cite this article: A. Saidi et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 221-226.

  5. Diagenesis of clay minerals and K-bentonites in Late Permian/Early Triassic sediments of the Sichuan Basin (Chaotian section, Central China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconinck, J. F.; Crasquin, S.; Bruneau, L.; Pellenard, P.; Baudin, F.; Feng, Q.

    2014-02-01

    Detailed clay mineralogical analyses were carried out on Late Permian/Early Triassic carbonate sediments exposed on the Chaotian section (Sichuan Basin, Central China). The clay assemblages are dominantly composed of illite in platform carbonates and clay seams, and illite-smectite mixed-layers (I/S) in tuff layers (K-bentonites) intercalated in the carbonate succession. Detrital and authigenic volcanogenic clay minerals have been partially replaced through illitisation processes during burial, raising questions about diagenetic effects. The precise determination of I/S occurring in K-bentonites shows that the sediments reached a temperature of about 180 °C, which is consistent with (1) previous estimates based on fluid-inclusion homogenisation temperature analysis, (2) the burial depth of the sedimentary series deduced from the post-Palaeozoic geological history of the Sichuan Basin and (3) the new data (Tmax) obtained on organic matter indicating the transition between oil and gas windows. The Wangpo Bed, located close to the Guadalupian-Lopingian Boundary, is interpreted either as a volcanic acidic tuff or as a clastic horizon. This controversial origin probably results from mixed volcanogenic and detrital influences. The Wangpo Bed is therefore interpreted as a reworked bentonite as revealed by the occurrence of I/S similar to those found in tuff layers, together with preserved detrital kaolinite.

  6. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Permian and Palo Duro Basins and Bend Arch-Fort Worth Basin: Chapter K in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Matthew D.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Roberts-Ashby, Tina L.; Warwick, Peter D.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, Philip A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed an assessment of the potential geologic carbon dioxide storage resource in the onshore areas of the United States. To provide geological context and input data sources for the resources numbers, framework documents are being prepared for all areas that were investigated as part of the national assessment. This report is the geologic framework document for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins, the combined Bend arch-Fort Worth Basin area, and subbasins therein of Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. In addition to a summarization of the geology and petroleum resources of studied basins, the individual storage assessment units (SAUs) within the basins are described and explanations for their selection are presented. Though appendixes in the national assessment publications include the input values used to calculate the available storage resource, this framework document provides only the context and source of inputs selected by the assessment geologists. Spatial files of boundaries for the SAUs herein, as well as maps of the density of known well bores that penetrate the SAU seal, are available for download with the release of this report.

  7. A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

    2006-10-12

    Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

  8. First record of petrified Permian pecopterids from the Paraná Basin, Brazil (Corumbataí Formation, Passa Dois Group, northeastern State of São Paulo): Morphology, anatomy and paleoecological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Tatiane M. V.; Rohn, Rosemarie

    2009-02-01

    Petrified pecopterids are described for the first time in the Paraná Basin. They were collected at an outcrop of the Corumbataí Formation (Passa Dois Group, Middle Permian) in the Municipality of Piracicaba (State of São Paulo, Brazil). The assemblage is composed of Pecopteris taguaiensis Rohn and Rösler, 1986, Pecopteris sp. 1, Pecopteris sp. 2 and Pecopteris sp. 3. An emendation to the diagnosis of P. taguaiensis is proposed on the basis of the characteristics shown by the preserved three-dimensional external leaf morphology and partially by the epidermis (not available in the previously described impressions). The small size of the pinnules, the thick, downward-rolled leaf lamina, the thick veins, the straight walls of the epidermal cells, and the trichomes of the four pecopterid taxa may be interpreted as xeromorphic features developed in response to relatively dry climatic conditions and/or direct incidence of the sunlight. The leaves were impregnated with silica before the final burial, considering that they are fragmented, not deformed and associated with angular breccia clasts.

  9. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico - petrophysical characterization of the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, F.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reservoir performance of the South Cowden Grayburg field suggests that only 21 percent of the original oil in place has been recovered. The purpose of this study is to construct a realistic reservoir model to be used to predict the location of the remaining mobile oil. Construction of reservoir models for fluid-flow simulation of carbonate reservoirs is difficult because they typically have complicated and unpredictable permeability patterns. Much of the difficulty results from the degree to which diagenetic overprinting masks depositional textures and patterns. For example, the task of constructing a reservoir model of a limestone reservoir that has undergone only cementation and compaction is easier than constructing a model of a karsted reservoir that has undergone cavern formation and collapse as well as cementation and compaction. The Permian-age carbonate-ramp reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico, are typically anhydritic dolomitized limestone. Because the dolomitization occurred soon after deposition, depositional fabrics and patterns are often retained, and a reservoir model can be constructed using depositional concepts. Recent studies of the San Andres outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and the Seminole San Andres reservoir in the Permian Basin illustrate how depositional fabrics and patterns can be used to construct a reservoir model when depositional features are retained.

  10. The Carboniferous - Permian basins of Central and Western Bohemia, the Krkonoše Mt. foreland and the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic : part I.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opluštil, S.; Martínek, K.; Lojka, R.; Rosenau, N.; Zajíc, Jaroslav; Šim?nek, Z.; Drábková, J.; Štamberg, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 46, ?. 1 (2014), s. 14-54. ISSN 1433-1284. [Field Meeting on Carboniferous and Permian Nonmarine – Marine Correlation. Freiberg, 21.07.2014-27.07.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Carboniferous * Permian * excursion guide Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  11. Shahejie-Shahejie/Guantao/Wumishan and Carboniferous/Permian Coal-Paleozoic Total Petroleum Systems in the Bohaiwan Basin, China (based on geologic studies for the 2000 World Energy Assessment Project of the U.S. Geological Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Robert T.; Qiang, Jin; McCabe, Peter J.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Persits, Felix

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses the geologic framework and petroleum geology used to assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the Bohaiwan basin province for the 2000 World Energy Assessment Project of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Bohaiwan basin in northeastern China is the largest petroleum-producing region in China. Two total petroleum systems have been identified in the basin. The first, the Shahejie&ndashShahejie/Guantao/Wumishan Total Petroleum System, involves oil and gas generated from mature pods of lacustrine source rock that are associated with six major rift-controlled subbasins. Two assessment units are defined in this total petroleum system: (1) a Tertiary lacustrine assessment unit consisting of sandstone reservoirs interbedded with lacustrine shale source rocks, and (2) a pre-Tertiary buried hills assessment unit consisting of carbonate reservoirs that are overlain unconformably by Tertiary lacustrine shale source rocks. The second total petroleum system identified in the Bohaiwan basin is the Carboniferous/Permian Coal–Paleozoic Total Petroleum System, a hypothetical total petroleum system involving natural gas generated from multiple pods of thermally mature coal beds. Low-permeability Permian sandstones and possibly Carboniferous coal beds are the reservoir rocks. Most of the natural gas is inferred to be trapped in continuous accumulations near the center of the subbasins. This total petroleum system is largely unexplored and has good potential for undiscovered gas accumulations. One assessment unit, coal-sourced gas, is defined in this total petroleum system.

  12. Late Paleozoic volcanism in the central part of the Southern Permian Basin (NE Germany, W Poland): facies distribution and volcano-topographic hiati

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Marion; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Kiersnowski, Hubert

    2008-09-01

    Based on facies analysis of more than 5,500 m cores of 45 deep wells, three large sub-provinces have been defined for the Lower Rotliegend volcanic rocks in the central Southern Permian Basin (SPB) in northeastern Germany and western Poland. Additional data came from unpublished descriptions of more than 200 wells. The three sub-provinces are: (a) the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Sub-Province (MVSP) dominated by silica-rich lava domes and subvolcanic intrusions, (b) the Eastern Brandenburg Sub-Province (EBSP) dominated by a Mg-andesite shield volcano complex, which extends into western Poland, and (c) the Flechtingen-Altmark Sub-Province (FASP) with prominent ignimbrite sheets punctuated by lava domes and flows. Whereas in NE Germany thickness of up to 2,300 m have been found in places, in western Poland ignimbrites and other pyroclastic deposits as well as andesitic and silica-rich lava complexes accumulated successions of a few hundreds of meters. A hiatus of up to 30 Ma occurs between the Lower Rotliegend volcanic and sedimentary rocks (Asselian-Sakmarian), and Upper Rotliegend II sediments (Upper Wordian-Capitanian). Upper Rotliegend I deposits are known from a few wells and outcrops, only. Previous studies postulated solely intrabasinal tectonics to account for this major unconformity. However, under semiarid to arid conditions as assumed for the Rotliegend of the SPB both SiO2-rich lava complexes and silica-poor shield volcanoes can be expected as being extremely resistant to weathering and erosion. Most probably these bodies “drowned” in a regolith formed by physical weathering, rarely removed by torrential rain. Thus, the silica-rich lava complexes and the shield volcanoes in the Central European Basin System (CEBS) can be viewed as long-living morphological highs, with intervolcanic depressions in between. In these intervolcanic depressions, syn- to postvolcanic successions of conglomeratic to sandy alluvial fan sediments and lake to mud flat deposits accumulated during the Upper Rotliegend I. They show numerous pedogenic horizons representing times of non-deposition. During the Upper Rotliegend II, the remaining volcano-topography was filled up with alluvial, eolian and playa deposits. In some places in western Poland, covering was not complete until the Zechstein (Latest Permian). At the same time, soil formation and/or erosion in the upper part of SiO2-rich complexes and shield volcanoes remained subordinate. Consequently, the volcano-topographic hiatus on top of the volcanic complexes comprises the maximum period of time, whereas in the intervolcanic depressions this time splits into periods of deposition and numerous minor intraformational hiati. Intrabasinal tectonic activity cannot be ruled out as one major control of the Rotliegend depositional evolution in the subsiding SPB. However, the presence of weathering-resistant volcanic edifices led to the formation of long-lasting depositional gaps in many regions of the central SPB.

  13. Radiometric dating of Ochoan (Permian) evaporites, WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] site, Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have attempted radiometric dating of halide-sulfate salts and clay minerals from the Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA, as part of geochemical study of the stability of the evaporite sequence at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - a US DOE facilty) site. We undertook this dating to determine: (1) primary age of evaporite genesis or time(s) of recrystallization; (2) if previously undated evaporite minerals (leonite, polyhalite, kieserite) give useful data; and (3) if the detrital clay minerals have been radiometrically reset at any time following their incorporation into the evaporite medium. We have shown earlier that polyhalites can indeed be successfully dated by the K-Ar method, and once corrections are applied for admixed halide minerals, dates of 210-230 Ma for the Delaware Basin are obtained. Rb-Sr isochrons from early stage sylvites-polyhalites- anhydrites yield 220 +- 10 Ma, even when some sylvites yield lower K-Ar dates due to loss of *40-Ar. K-Ar dates on leonites and kieserities are also low due to *40-Ar loss, but their Rb-Sr dates are higher. Detrital clay minerals from the Delaware Basin collectively yield a highly scattered isochron (390 +- 77 Ma), but samples from a local area, such as the WIPP Site, give a much better age of 428 +- 7 Ma. These dates show that the interaction between the clay minerals and the evaporitic brines was insufficient to reset the clay minerals Rb-Sr systematics. In a related study, we note that a dike emplaced into the evaporite at 34 Ma had only very limited effect on the intruded rocks; contact phenomena were all within 2 m of the dike. All of our geochemical (radio-metric and trace element) studies of the WIPP site argue for preservation of the isotopic and chemical integrity of the major minerals for the past 200 Ma

  14. Geochemical effects of CO2 injection on produced water chemistry at an enhanced oil recovery site in the Permian Basin of northwest Texas, USA: Preliminary geochemical and Li isotope results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, S.; Gardiner, J.; Phan, T. T.; Macpherson, G. L.; Diehl, J. R.; Lopano, C. L.; Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) presents an opportunity to evaluate the effects of CO2 on reservoir properties and formation waters during geologic carbon sequestration. Produced water from oil wells tapping a carbonate-hosted reservoir at an active EOR site in the Permian Basin of Texas both before and after injection were sampled to evaluate geochemical and isotopic changes associated with water-rock-CO2 interaction. Produced waters from the carbonate reservoir rock are Na-Cl brines with TDS levels of 16.5-34 g/L and detectable H2S. These brines are potentially diluted with shallow groundwater from earlier EOR water flooding. Initial lithium isotope data (?7Li) from pre-injection produced water in the EOR field fall within the range of Gulf of Mexico Coastal sedimentary basin and Appalachian basin values (Macpherson et al., 2014, Geofluids, doi: 10.1111/gfl.12084). Pre-injection produced water 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70788-0.70795) are consistent with mid-late Permian seawater/carbonate. CO2 injection took place in October 2013, and four of the wells sampled in May 2014 showed CO2 breakthrough. Preliminary comparison of pre- and post-injection produced waters indicates no significant changes in the major inorganic constituents following breakthrough, other than a possible drop in K concentration. Trace element and isotope data from pre- and post-breakthrough wells are currently being evaluated and will be presented.

  15. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico. Quarterly report, January 1--April 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1996-04-30

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low-permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

  16. Sr evolution in the Upper Permian and Lower Triassic carbonates, northeast Sichuan basin, China: Constraints from chemistry, isotope and fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrographic features, C, O and Sr isotopes, rare earth and trace elements were determined, and fluid inclusions were analyzed on various stages of interparticle cements and vug-fillings from the Upper Permian and Lower Triassic sour reservoirs in northeastern Sichuan basin. The aim was to assess the origin and evolution of palaeo-waters in the carbonates. The original water was contemporary seawater, from which marine cements precipitated with slightly high Sr contents (mean 1911 ppm), 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7067 to 0.7082 and nonluminescent CL. The palaeo-seawater was diluted by meteoric water, as indicated by bright cathodoluminescence (CL) and Sr-depletion (0–516 ppm) in low-temperature calcite. When buried to temperatures of about 60–90 °C during Middle to Late Triassic, the palaeo-water was enriched in Sr released from the transformation of precursor aragonite and calcite to dolomite, resulting in precipitation of substantial pre-bitumen Sr-rich minerals (SrSO4 and SrCO3). For un-dolomitized limestone sections, aragonite neomorphism may have contributed Sr to the precipitation of small amounts of Sr-bearing minerals and calcite crystals with elevated homogenization temperatures (HTs, mainly from 90 to 130 °C) and wide Sr contents (from 34 to 3825 ppm), as recorded in stage III calcite. Since the Middle Jurassic, almost all of the early stage celestite and significant amounts of solid CaSO4 have been consumed by reactions with hydrocarbons (i.e., TSR), resulting in water enriched in isotopically light CO2 and HCO3-,Sr2+,Ba2+ and Eu2+, as recorded in calcite with low ?13C values (down to ?18.9‰), 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7072 to 0.7076, high HTs (mainly 110–198 °C), positive Eu anomalies and high Sr and Ba contents. Subsequently, the water was uplifted and cooled down to about 115 °C, celestite and strontianite were precipitated with the occurrence of natural elemental S immiscible inclusions. TSR may have produced significant amounts of freshwater, which brought down Sr concentrations and salinities of the palaeo-waters to not more than about 6.0 wt.% NaCl equivalent.

  17. Early Permian post-glacial bivalve faunas of the Itararé Group, Paraná Basin, Brazil: Paleoecology and biocorrelations with South American intraplate basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Jacqueline Peixoto; Anelli, Luiz Eduardo; Simões, Marcello Guimarães

    2014-07-01

    The uppermost portion of the Taciba Formation, Itararé Group, Paraná Basin, Brazil, records a succession of depositional environments tied to the demise of late Paleozoic glaciation. In the study area, Teixeira Soares county, state of Paraná, the unit is dominated by massive to laminated diamictites with inclusions of sandstones and other coarse-grained lithotypes, representing re-sedimented material in proximal areas. These are succeeded by fine to medium-grained sandstones with tabular cross-stratification and pectinid-rich shell pavements, interpreted as nearshore deposits. Above this, laminated and intensely bioturbated siltstones with closed articulated bivalve shells are recorded, probably deposited in inner shelf settings. Fine to very fine sandstones/siltstones with hummocky cross-stratification and intercalated mudstones, including infaunal in situ shells, are interpreted as stacked storm deposits, generated in distal shoreface environments. These are succeeded by fossil-poor, massive to laminated siltstones/mudstones or gray shales (=Passinho shale) that are inferred to be outer shelf deposits, generated in organic-rich, oxygen-deficient muddy bottoms. In this sedimentary succession dropstones or ice-rafted debris are missing and locally the Passinho shale marks the maximum flooding surface of the Itararé succession. These are capped by the fluvio-deltaic deposits of the Rio Bonito Formation (Sakmarian-Artinskian). Six facies-controlled, bivalve-dominated assemblages are recognized, representing faunal associations that thrived in aerobic to extreme dysaerobic bottoms along a nearshore-offshore trend. Within these assemblages, nineteen bivalve species (three of them new) were recorded and described in detail. The presence of Myonia argentinensis (Harrington), Atomodesma (Aphanaia) orbirugata (Harrington) and Heteropecten paranaensis Neves et al. suggests correlation with bivalve assemblages of the Eurydesma-bearing Bonete Formation, Pillahuincó Group, Sauce Grande-Colorado Basin (Buenos Aires Province), Argentina, indicating a possible Asselian age for this diverse post-glacial bivalve fauna. Despite that, typical members of the icehouse-style Eurydesma-Trigonotreta biota (stricto sensu) have not yet been found in the studied bivalve assemblages.

  18. Problems and challenges in detection of pre-Mesozoic maar volcanoes: example from the Principálek Volcano in the Permian Krkonoše Piedmont Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Valenta J; Rapprich V; Stárková M; Skácelová Z; Fojtíková L; Stan?k F; Balek J

    2014-01-01

    The Permian pyroclastic deposits on the Principálek Hill SW of Vrchlabí (Czech Republic) were investigated by means of geological mapping and geophysics. The pyroclastic rocks are exposed in several small coherent outcrops, yet many interpretations are based on debris. The preserved textures enable reconstruction of eruptive styles. The volcanism started with phreatomagmatic eruptions documented by the fine-grained tuff with accretionary lapilli at the base. Subsequently, the activity changed...

  19. Permian and uranium metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Europe, many uranium deposits are of Permian age and the following models are discussed: (1) Formation of uranium deposits during the Permian. Many granite-associated uranium deposits in France, Portugal and Czechoslovakia are dated at between 290 and 260 Ma. Stable isotopic data have shown that sedimentary formation waters and meteoric waters are important in the mineralisation process. (2) Uranium preconcentration during the Permian. Sedimentation is favourable to uranium concentration, especially in organic-rich environments. The presence of zirconium in pitchblende indicates leaching of cinerites during the mineralisation process. (3) Formation of uranium deposits in the Permian host rocks. Two major periods (170-185 Ma and 100-110 Ma) were identified that correspond to phases of extension related to oceanic openings. For the 180 Ma mineralisation, the role of sedimentary brines has been demonstrated. Some mineralisation of Alpine age are also known. (4) Spatial association of uranium deposits with Permian formations. The Mullenbach uranium deposit (FRG) located in Upper Carboniferous sediments beneath sediments of Permian age has been dated at 240 Ma. This corresponds to the tectonic phase between the Permian and the Triassic periods. Fluid circulation along a vertical redox front (oxidised Permian - reduced Carboniferous) is responsible for the deposition of pitchblende

  20. SHRIMP chronology of the Magallanes Basin basement, Tierra del Fuego: Cambrian plutonism and Permian high-grade metamorphism / Geocronología SHRIMP del basamento de la Cuenca de Magallanes, Tierra del Fuego: plutonismo Cámbrico y metamorfismo Pérmico de alto grado

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Francisco, Hervé; Mauricio, Calderón; C. Mark, Fanning; Stefan, Kraus; Robert J, Pankhurst.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cinco nuevas edades radiométricas logradas mediante análisis U-Pb en circón utilizando el SHRIMP, fueron determinadas en gneises y rocas plutónicas foliadas obtenidas desde el fondo de pozos de sondajes en la Cuenca de Magallanes y pertenecientes al denominado Complejo ígneo y Metamór-fico de Tierra [...] del Fuego. En tres de las muestras fueron calculadas edades del Cámbrico Temprano (523±7 Ma, 522±6 Ma y 538±6 Ma), interpretadas como edades de cristalización ígnea de las rocas estudiadas. Un gneis migmatítico presenta 'peaks' de circones heredados de ca. 950-1.100 Ma y de 560-650 Ma además de dos granos de edades de 525 Ma, indicando la participación de material Grenviliano y Brasiliano en el protolito de la migmatita cámbrica. Un gneiss de cordierita-sillimanita-granate presenta una población de circones ígneos de edad cámbrica y otro grupo de circones metamórficos, ricos en U, de edad pérmica, indicando que en el Pérmico un evento metamórfico del alto grado acompañado de anatexis (P=2-3 kbar, T=730-770°C) afectó a rocas ígneas cámbricas y/o a rocas sedimentarias derivadas de ellas. Rocas plutónicas cámbricas/ediacaranas han sido descritas en el NW de Argentina, en los basamentos de la Sierra de la Ventana y del Cinturón Plegado del Cabo (en el sur de África), y en el Orógeno de Ross en Antartica. El evento metamórfico Pérmico es contemporáneo con la deformación y metamorfismo de bajo grado, registrado en las sucesiones sedimentarias que sobreyacen el basamento en muchas de estas areas. Siguiendo al episodio Pérmico de metamorfismo de alto grado, en Tierra del Fuego fueron removidos al menos 8 a 12 km de rocas de cobertura antes de la depositación de las rocas volcánicas de la Formación Tobífera en el Jurásico Medio y Superior. Las rocas erosionadas representan una fuente importante de material para las sucesiones conglomerádicas pérmicas y triásicas? ubicadas en las regiones vecinas de América del Sur, África y Antartica. Abstract in english Five new SHRTMP U-Pb zircon ages are reported for gneisses and foliated plutonic rocks belonging to the Tierra del Fuego igneous and metamorphic basement complex (TFIMC), obtained from the bottom of borehole cores through the Magallanes Basin. Three of the samples yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ag [...] es (523±7 Ma, 522±6 Ma and 538±6 Ma), interpreted as indicating Early Cambrian igneous crystallization of the host rocks. A migmatitic gneiss shows peaks at ca. 950-1,100 Ma and 560-650 Ma from inherited zircon grains in addition to two grains with ages of ca. 525 Ma, suggesting involvement of Grenvillian and Brasiliano material in the protolith of a Cambrian migmatite. A cordierite-sillimanite-garnet gneiss contains igneous zircons of Cambrian age and a population of U-rich metamorphic Permian zircons, indicating that a Permian high-grade metamorphic and anatectic (P=2-3 kbar, T=730-770°C) event affected the Cambrian igneous rocks or sedimentary rocks derived from them. Cambrian/Ediacaran plutonic rocks are known from the basement of NW Argentina, the Sierra de la Ventana, the Cape Fold Belt in South Africa, and the Ross Orogen in Antarctica. The Permian metamorphic event is coeval with the deformation and low-grade metamorphism of the sedimentary successions that overlie the basement in many of these areas. In Tierra del Fuego at least 8 to 12 km of cover rocks were removed following the high-grade Permian metamorphic episode and the unconformable deposition of the Tobífera Formation volcanic rocks in the Middle to Late Jurassic. This eroded cover could nave been an important source of detritus for the conglomeratic Permian and Triassic? Successions of neighboring regions in South America, Africa and Antarctica.

  1. A first record of late Middle Permian actinopterygian fish from Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho?gör, Izzet; Štamberg, Stanislav

    2014-06-01

    The Middle-Upper Permian of the Gomaniibrik Formation, of the Tanin Group, in south-east Anatolia, close to the Iraq border, yielded moderately preserved fish remains. Two species, Palaeoniscum freieslebeni and Pygopterus cf. nielseni, known so far only from the Upper Permian deposits of the Zechstein Basin in western Central Europe, were recognised. This late Middle Permian Anatolian record significantly widens the geographical range of these actinopterygians into the equatorial Palaeotethys Realm.

  2. News Palynology data of the basal section of Formacion San Gregorio located in Paso de las Bochas (I lower permian north basin, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples from outcrops and concretions of the locality of Paso de las Bochas on the Negro River, provided new palynologycal data to the basal section of the San Gregorio Formation. At least 10 new ta xa are added for San Gregorio concretions, and some of the cited palynomorphs are mentioned for the first time for Uruguay (Rattiganispora minor, Waltzispora pol ita). Moreover, some of the found ta xa have been mentioned for glacial deposits related to the Carboniferous-Permian boundary in other Gondwana regions (p.e. Psomospora detect a, Waltzispora pol ita). The preliminary results reached here allow to admit the hypothesis of the existence of carboniferous dee posits on the Uruguayan territory whose were eroded or not yet recognized. Keywords: San Gregorio Formation, Carboniferous

  3. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables

  4. Role of sea-level change in deep water deposition along a carbonate shelf margin, Early and Middle Permian, Delaware Basin: implications for reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunli; Yu, Xinghe; Li, Shengli; Giles, Katherine A.

    2015-04-01

    The architecture and sedimentary characteristics of deep water deposition can reflect influences of sea-level change on depositional processes on the shelf edge, slope, and basin floor. Outcrops of the northern slope and basin floor of the Delaware Basin in west Texas are progressively exposed due to canyon incision and road cutting. The outcrops in the Delaware Basin were measured to characterize gravity flow deposits in deep water of the basin. Subsurface data from the East Ford and Red Tank fields in the central and northeastern Delaware Basin were used to study reservoir architectures and properties. Depositional models of deep water gravity flows at different stages of sea-level change were constructed on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. In the falling-stage system tracts, sandy debris with collapses of reef carbonates are deposited on the slope, and high-density turbidites on the slope toe and basin floor. In the low-stand system tracts, deep water fans that consist of mixed sand/mud facies on the basin floor are comprised of high- to low-density turbidites. In the transgression and high-stand system tracts, channel-levee systems and elongate lobes of mud-rich calciturbidite deposits formed as a result of sea level rise and scarcity of sandy sediment supply. For the reservoir architecture, the fan-like debris and high-density turbidites show high net-to-gross ratio of 62 %, which indicates the sandiest reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation. Lobe-like deep water fans with net-to-gross ratio of 57 % facilitate the formation of high quality sandy reservoirs. The channel-levee systems with muddy calciturbidites have low net-to-gross ratio of 30 %.

  5. Palynostratigraphy of Permian succession in the Mand–Raigarh Coalfield, Chhattisgarh, India and phytogeographical provincialism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srikanta Murthy; Ram-Awatar; Saurabh Gautam

    2014-12-01

    Palynofloras have been recorded from the Barakar Formation in the Borehole MBKW-3, Barpali–Karmitikra Block, Mand–Raigarh Coalfield, Chhattisgarh. Three distinct palynoassemblages have been identified and referred to the following palynoassemblage zones – Gondisporites raniganjensis (Latest Permian); Faunipollenites varius (latest Early Permian), and Scheuringipollenites barakarensis (late Early Permian). It is inferred that these deposits contain the representative palynoassamblages of Early to Late Permian in age. The First Appearance Datum (FAD)s of Arcuatipollenites pellucidus, A. ovatus, Guttulapollenites hannonicus, Lundbladispora microconata, Alisporites opii, Klausipollenites sp., and Goubinispora indica (at 41.95, 45.90, 98.35 m depths), indicate the closing phase of Permian, as these elements are the key species that mark a transition from Permian to the Lower Triassic. An attempt has been made here to reconstruct the phytogeographical provincialism on the basis of Guttulapollenites recorded in this basin.

  6. Taphonomy of Condensed Shell Storm beds of the Teresina Formation in Rio Preto (State of Paraná, Middle Permian, Paraná Basin: Paleoenvironmental Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Peixoto Neves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The deposits of the Permian Teresina Formation are mainly characterized by fi ne-grained siliciclastic rocks and centimetricintercalations of tempestites (bioclastic sandstones and coquinas. Despite the relevance of the bivalve-rich carbonate bedsof the Teresina Formation to paleoenvironmental studies, their taphonomy is still poorly studied. The fossil concentrationstudied in this work was found in a quarry in the city of Irati, Rio Preto district, Paraná State. The fossil concentration is locatedin the middle/upper portion of the unit, far from the top. The studied bed is a bioclastic, intraclastic, peloidal, grainstone/packstone, with abundant bivalve shell fragments, pelitic and micritic intraclasts, peloids, rare ooids and oncoids, as well aspermineralized of Lycophyta microphylles and fi sh scales. The grains of this carbonate concentration show: high degree oftime-averaging, variable degree of packing (dense to disperse, no sorting and chaotic orientation. Notably, the concentrationincludes a mixture of elements which are indicative of: a restrictive, low energy, carbonate environment (peloids, ooidsand oncoids; b subaerial environment surrounding the main body of water (Lycophyta microphylles and c quiet-waterenvironment punctuated by storm events, where the suspension-feeding bivalves thrived. At least four depositional eventscaused by storm fl ows were recorded. The amalgamated nature of the bed is a result of storm events in an intracratonic basinwith very low seafl oor slope and low rates of sedimentation and subsidence.

  7. An accurate record of volcanic ash fall deposition as characterized by dispersed organic matter in a Lower Permian tonstein bed (Faxinal Coalfield, Paraná Basin, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Simas, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, the dispersed organic matter in the tonstein layer interbedded with a coal seam in the Faxinal Coalfield (Sakmarian, Southern Paraná Basin, Brazil) is characterized. The deposition of clusters of pollen grains was highly influenced by the intense ash fall process that probably occurred during seasonal dehiscence of reproductive structures. The well-preserved phytoclasts with their upper and lower leaf cuticles stuck together indicate that the rapid fall of ash on this mate...

  8. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  9. Sedimentary Response to Arc-Continent Collision, Permian, Southern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Amory, J.; Zinniker, D.; Lamb, M.; Graham, S.; Affolter, M.; Badarch, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Eurasian Tien Shan-Yin Shan suture is a ~3000 km-long boundary between Paleozoic arc and accretionary complexes (the Altaids) and Precambrian microcontinental blocks (Tarim and North China block). Stratigraphic data are presented from localities in southern Mongolia spanning more than 800 km along the northern margin of the suture. Facies descriptions, climatic indicators, sandstone provenance, and paleocurrent data help reconstruct Permian basin evolution during and following arc-continent collision, and results are integrated with previously published data to create a preliminary regional synthesis. Upper Permian strata of southern Mongolia comprise fluvial successions in the southwest, and marine turbidite deposits in the southeast. Floral assemblages show mixing of Siberian craton and North China block communities, indicating their close proximity to Mongolia by Permian time. There is a rapid transition from humid environments in the Late Permian to more arid conditions in the Early Triassic, which corresponds to the global Permian-Triassic boundary event, but may also reflect more local driving mechanisms such as rain shadow effects. Permian sandstones from Mongolia have undissected to dissected arc provenance, with little input from continental or recycled orogen sources. Timing of the nonmarine-marine facies transition and cessation of arc magmatism broadly supports earlier collision along the western part of the suture zone than the eastern part (e.g., Late Carboniferous-Late Permian). However when regional geologic constraints are integrated, a more complex model involving differential rotation of Tarim and the North China block is preferred. Late Paleozoic rocks of southern Mongolia have been subsequently dismembered along Mesozoic-Cenozoic strike-slip faults, and thus also represent the long-term record of intracontinental deformation within accreted, heterogeneous crust.

  10. A Formação Serra Alta, Permiano, no centro-leste do Estado de São Paulo, Bacia do Paraná, Brasil / The Serra Alta Formation, Permian, in the central-eastern portion of São Paulo State, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lucas Veríssimo, Warren; Mario Luis, Assine; Marcello Guimarães, Simões; Claudio, Riccomini; Luís Eduardo, Anelli.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A individualização e o mapeamento da Formação Serra Alta no Estado de São Paulo sempre foi motivo de controvérsia na comunidade geológica. Apesar de apresentar extensão comparável à Formação Irati em subsuperfície, a unidade ainda carece de estudos mais acurados acerca de seu posicionamento estratig [...] ráfico, conteúdo fossilífero, sistema deposicional e idade. Na região centro-leste do Estado de São Paulo, a Formação Serra Alta sucede estratigraficamente a Formação Irati, sendo constituída por depósitos pelíticos cinza escuros. A unidade é mapeada desde o limite sul do estado até o Domo de Gibóia, no Município de Rio das Pedras. Neste local, as formações Serra Alta e Teresina são substituídas pelos depósitos pelíticos da Formação Corumbataí, que se estende para norte, além do limite do Estado de São Paulo, e pode ser considerada unidade correlata a estas. Neste estudo, são apresentadas seções colunares e caracterizados os contatos da Formação Serra Alta com as formações permianas verticalmente contíguas. É apresentada também detalhada análise de fácies, com a finalidade de caracterizar o sistema deposicional. A análise de perfis de sondagem possibilitou também melhor compreensão dos padrões arquiteturais da Formação Serra Alta, auxiliando na determinação de sua real distribuição e posição estratigráfica na porção centro-sul do estado. A integração das informações obtidas permitiu identificar tendências de empilhamento transgressivo particulares, contribuindo para o detalhamento da sucessão predominantemente regressiva em que se depositaram as unidades permianas da Bacia do Paraná. Abstract in english The delimitation and mapping of the Serra Alta Formation in the São Paulo State, Brazil, has always been a focus of controversy in the Brazilian geological community. Despite its large extension in subsurface, which may be comparable to the Irati Formation, the Serra Alta Formation still needs more [...] detailed studies on its stratigraphic position, fossil content, depositional systems and age. In the east-central portion of the São Paulo State, the Serra Alta Formation overlies the Irati Formation and is predominantly composed of dark grey pelitic facies. The unit is mapped from the southern boundary of the São Paulo State to the Gibóia Dome, located in the county of Rio das Pedras. In this place, the Serra Alta and Teresina formations are replaced by the red colored pelites of the Corumbataí Formation, unit that extends to north beyond the state boundaries and may be considered correlated to these units. In this work, we present columnar sections and describe the contacts of the Serra Alta Formation with vertically adjacent Permian units. We also present the detailed facies analysis, in order to characterize the depositional system. The investigation of subsurface profiles also enabled a better understanding of the architectural patterns of the succession, helping to determine its real distribution and stratigraphic position in the central-south of São Paulo State. The integration of the data allowed identifying a particular transgressive stacking pattern, contributing to detail the late Permian regressive cycle in the Paraná Basin.

  11. Permian potentiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was requested to analyze potentiometric data from the Wolfcamp Formation of the Permian System to evaluate the recommendations by the University of Texas/Bureau of Economic Geology (UT/BEG) that additional geohydrologic boreholes be drilled into the Wolfcamp. The UT/BEG recommended that two stratigraphic and two geohydrologic borings be drilled into the Permian System during FY83 and that several shallow hydrologic tests be made in the Dockum Formation. A geostatistical technique known as kriging was applied to objectively evaluate these geohydrologic borehole recommendations. The Deaf Smith County location appears to be an excellent choice for a borehole. No high quality potentiometric data are available from Deaf Smith County and a borehole location immediately upgradient from the candidate repository site is needed. Adding this borehole location to the potentiometric data base will significantly reduce field data uncertainty near the location being studied. The Swisher County location does not appear to be the best choice. High quality data values H2206 and H2360 are located immediately upgradient from the proposed repository site. The best placement of additional geohydrological boreholes in the Wolfcamp Formation depends strongly upon the proposed repository location. The variability of the potentiometric data causes estimation errors to rapidly increase away from locations of field measurements. Suggested locations for additional boreholes for the Deaf Smith investigations are in northwest Randall or central Potter Counties. Ideal borehole locations for the Swisher county studies appear to be in southeast Randall and Armstrong Counties

  12. Interbasinal correlation between Jameson Land and Hold-with-Hope (Northeast Greenland) organic carbon isotope records during the latest Permian-earliest Triassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanson Barrera, Anna; Meier, Maximiliano; Hochuli, Peter A.; Bucher, Hugo; Weissert, Helmut; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2015-04-01

    Latest Permian-earliest Triassic sequences in Northeast Greenland were deposited during the main rift phase between the two margins of the Greenland-Norway Basin, and were influenced by several relative sea-level fluctuations. The associated crustal extension created several sub-basins that led to marked lateral thicknesses between the latest Permian and earliest Triassic formations. These formations outcrop along the Northeast Greenland coast and can be followed from Jameson Land around 71°N up to Wollaston Forland around 74.5°N. Due to a latest Permian relative sea-level fall, northern sub-basins show a sedimentary gap close to the Permian-Triassic boundary, while southern sub-basins show continuous sedimentation across the Permian-Triassic transition. Earlier studies focused just on the Permian-Triassic boundary from continuous sections from Jameson Land. This study presents the correlation between two new sections from Jameson Land, and one section of a northern sub-basin (Hold-with-Hope) merging terrestrial and marine geochemical and paleontological data. The combination of organic carbon isotopes, palynofacies and palynology analyses, few ammonoids belonging to the Ophiceratidae family found in the sections, and sedimentological observations provides a robust correlation between both sub-basins, and the first interbasinal organic carbon isotope correlation for Northeast Greenland during the latest Permian-earliest Triassic.

  13. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author)

  14. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico-stratigraphic hierarchy and cycle stacking facies distribution, and interwell-scale heterogeneity: Grayburg Formation, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, R.J.; Ward, W.B.; Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-06-01

    The Grayburg Formation (middle Guadalupian) is a major producing interval in the Permian Basin and has yielded more than 2.5 billion barrels of oil in West Texas. Grayburg reservoirs have produced, on average, less than 30 percent of their original oil in place and are undergoing secondary and tertiary recovery. Efficient design of such enhanced recovery programs dictates improved geological models to better understand and predict reservoir heterogeneity imposed by depositional and diagenetic controls. The Grayburg records mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation on shallow-water platforms that rimmed the Delaware and Midland Basins. Grayburg outcrops in the Guadalupe and Brokeoff Mountains region on the northwest margin of the Delaware Basin present an opportunity to construct a detailed, three-dimensional image of the stratigraphic and facies architecture. This model can be applied towards improved description and characterization of heterogeneity in analogous Grayburg reservoirs. Four orders of stratigraphic hierarchy are recognized in the Grayburg Formation. The Grayburg represents a long-term composite sequence composed of four high-frequency sequences (HFS 1-4). Each HFS contains several composite cycles comprising two or more cycles that define intermediate-scale transgressive-regressive successions. Cycles are the smallest scale upward-shoaling vertical facies successions that can be recognized and correlated across various facies tracts. Cycles thus form the basis for establishing the detailed chronostratigraphic correlations needed to delineate facies heterogeneity.

  15. Permian-Triassic maturation and multistage migration of hydrocarbons in the Assistência Formation (Irati Subgroup), Paraná Basin, Brazil: implications for the exploration model / Maturação permotriássica e os vários estágios de migração de hidrocarbonetos na Formação Assistência (Subgrupo Irati), Bacia do Paraná: implicações para os modelos exploratórios

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    António, Mateus; Claudio, Riccomini; Ezequiel J. E. C. B., Ferreira; Colombo C. G., Tassinari.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Novas linhas de evidências geológicas sugerem fortemente que o principal período de maturação de hidrocarbonetos na Formação Assistência teria ocorrido no Permotriássico, estimulado por um gradiente geotérmico elevado que também sustentou várias manifestações de atividade hidrotermal. Três fases pri [...] ncipais de migração de fluidos e hidrocarbonetos também podem ser inferidas a partir de observações em multiescala: fluxo confinado no final do Permiano ao Triássico, dependente do acúmulo local de pressões de fluidos; fluxo heterogêneo no Cretáceo Inferior, desencadeado por um gradiente de temperatura rejuvenescido, assistido pelas condições de permeabilidade antes desenvolvidas; e um fluxo tardio, possivelmente impulsionado por gradientes de pressão locais, posteriormente ao esfriamento dos diques e soleiras de diabásio. A maturação precoce e a existência de vários estágios de migração de hidrocarbonetos apresentam implicações significativas na concepção de modelos exploratórios a serem aplicados na Bacia do Paraná. Abstract in english New lines of geological evidence strongly suggest that the main period of hydrocarbon maturation within Assistência Formation should be Permian-Triassic, stimulated by a high geothermal gradient that also sustained various manifestations of hydrothermal activity. Three main stages of fluid/hydrocarb [...] on migration can also be inferred on the basis of multiscale observations: confined flow in late Permian to Triassic times, depending on the local build-up of fluid pressures; heterogeneous flow in Lower Cretaceous, triggered by a rejuvenated temperature gradient assisted by the early developed permeability conditions; and a late flow possibly driven by local pressure gradients, after complete cooling of dolerite dykes/sills. The early maturation and multistage migration of hydrocarbons have significant consequences in the design of exploration models to be applied in Paraná Basin.

  16. Early Permian intrusions in the Paleozoic sediments of the Eastern North Sea area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Andresen, Katrine Juul

    This study presents the geometry of Paleozoic intrusions in the Skagerrak area located at the northern flank of the Ringkøbing-Fyn High and suggests factors controlling the formation of the intrusions. The intrusions have here been mapped in detail using 3D seismic data. The study area is located in the Northern Permian Basin which in the eastern North Sea is separated from the Southern Permian Basin by the Ringkøbing-Fyn High. The Permian basins were initiated during thermal subsidence following a late Carboniferous- early Permian rifting phase associated with extensive igneous activity recorded across the entire North Sea Basin. The easternmost intrusions and extrusions have been associated to the “Skagerrak-Centered Large Igneous Province” that has an early Permian age of c. 297 Ma. Compared to the Southern Permian Basin which historically has been intensely investigated because of the known presence of hydrocarbons within the Paleozoic sediments, the Northern Permian Basin has gained much less interest outside the hydrocarbon producing Mesozoic graben systems. This is mainly due to an apparent lack of potential source rocks. A major E-W striking northward dipping fault system characterizes the study area and causes rotation of older probably Paleozoic sediments and creates syn-tectonic sediment wedges. The syn-tectonic wedges most probably contain volcaniclastic sediments of the Karl Formation or sandstones of the Auk Formation, but it cannot be excluded that the earliest late Permian Kupfershiefer which is a potential source rock, has local depositional maxima associated to the basement faults. Salt structures which have been periodically active during the post Paleozoic dominate the northern part of the study area. The Paleozoic intrusions observed in the hanging-wall segment of the E-W striking fault system are generally planar and strike parallel to the fault with a southward dip geometrically similar to antithetic faults. In contrast, the intrusions in the footwall segment show a much more complex pattern striking at a high angle to the E-W basement fault and outlining a sill complex, which in certain areas resembles a poorly outlined composite cone. The intrusions are not observed in the syn-tectonic sedimentary wedges and this combined with the general age of the intrusions suggests that the syn-tectonic wedges are of latest early Permian or earliest late Permian age. The study demonstrates Paleozoic intrusions with a systematic orientation and geometry that most likely was directly controlled by the basement faulting. Syn-tectonic hanging-wall deformation represented by antithetic fractures is suggested to be the most important controlling factor for the intrusions at the hanging-wall. At the footwall a more composite geometry of the intrusions is observed, resulting in a much more complex compartmentalization of the Paleozoic sediments due to intrusions compared to the hanging-wall segment. The intrusions and especially the compartmentalization must be taken into account during evaluation of the hydrocarbon potential of the Paleozoic.

  17. The paleoclimate of the Kazanian (early Late Permian) world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.T. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., La Habra, CA (USA)); Peoples, C.J. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The Kazanian (early Late Permian, 258-253 m.y.) marked the onset of a unique interval in the Phanerozoic, distinguished by a classic end-member case of continental assembly, the megacontinent Pangaea. Compilation of biostratigraphic and lithofacies data indicate a warm, extensively arid world, largely ice free, and characterized by the onset of atmospheric conditions that were exceedingly stressful to the biosphere, the worst of the eon. Using Chevron's version of the Community Climate model, the authors report here on two Kazanian paleoclimate seasonal simulations, one using 200 ppm CO{sub 2} and the other with 2,000 ppm CO{sub 2}. The authors consider the knowledge of plate assembly back to the Permian accurate enough to allow employment of a seasonal model. Simulation of a warmer Earth with an elevated greenhouse effect (modeled as CO{sub 2}) fits the observed geology and isotope signals. The increased CO{sub 2} experiment warmed the entire planet with the greatest increases north of 50{degree} latitude and least changes in the tropics. The warming caused the poleward retreat of sea ice in both hemispheres. Precipitation and evaporation increased, but runoff was confined to areas of very intense rainfall. Monsoons are limited to the southern hemisphere, associated with the western Tethys sea and the eastern equatorial Panthalassa ocean. Extreme southeastern Pangaea (northern Australia) was a focus of precipitation throughout the year. Precipitation occurred in the higher latitudes (50-55{degree}) on the western coast, of Pangaea where storm tracks make landfall. High evaporation rates characterized the restricted Permian (US), Zechstein, and Perm (Soviet Union) basins, a time of evaporite, deposition. Interior Pangaea at middle to high latitudes endured frigid winters ({minus}40{degree}C) and torrid summers (60{degree}C).

  18. Palynological records of Gondwana's mid-Permian climate amelioration: New insights from black shale deposits (Collingham Formation, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Annette E.

    2015-04-01

    Permian black shale deposits of the southern Karoo Basin were studied with respect to palynostratigraphy, palaeoenvironment, and palaeoclimate signatures recorded in palynomorph assemblages. The 28 m thick black shales of the Collingham Formation, exposed along road cuttings of the Ecca Pass north of Grahamstown (Eastern Cape Province, South Africa), are rich in sedimentary organic matter with a high content of amorphous organic matter and prasinophytes, characteristic of a deep, stratified marine basin. Moderately preserved pollen grains of the lower part of the formation reveal a mid-Permian (Roadian) age, corresponding to the stratigraphic position of the Collingham Formation in the Namibian part of the Karoo with an absolute age of 270 Ma obtained from a tuff (Stollhofen et al., 2000). The samples from the lower Collingham Formation show a very similar composition as samples from coal seams of the upper Vryheid Formation in the northeastern part of the Karoo Basin. Additionally, a similar stratigraphic trend in changes of palynomorph assemblages was detected, showing a striking increase in taeniate bissacate pollen grains up section. This signature points to a warm-temperate bisaccate-producing plant community in the hinterland, replacing cool-temperate floras of the underlying Whitehill Formation (Ruckwied et al., 2014). The detected palaeoclimate signatures document Gondwana's mid-Permian climate amelioration and have proved to be a powerful tool for high-resolution basin-wide correlation of marine and non-marine successions. References Ruckwied, K., Götz, A.E., Jones, P. 2014. Palynological records of the Permian Ecca Group (South Africa): Utilizing climatic icehouse-greenhouse signals for cross basin correlations. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 413, 167-172. Stollhofen, H., Stanistreet, I.G., Bangert, B., Grill, H. 2000. Tuffs, tectonism and glacially related sea-level changes, Carboniferous-Permian, southern Namibia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 161, 127-150.

  19. SHRIMP chronology of the Magallanes Basin basement, Tierra del Fuego: Cambrian plutonism and Permian high-grade metamorphism Geocronología SHRIMP del basamento de la Cuenca de Magallanes, Tierra del Fuego: plutonismo Cámbrico y metamorfismo Pérmico de alto grado

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Hervé; Mauricio Calderón; C. Mark Fanning; Stefan Kraus; Pankhurst, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Five new SHRTMP U-Pb zircon ages are reported for gneisses and foliated plutonic rocks belonging to the Tierra del Fuego igneous and metamorphic basement complex (TFIMC), obtained from the bottom of borehole cores through the Magallanes Basin. Three of the samples yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages (523±7 Ma, 522±6 Ma and 538±6 Ma), interpreted as indicating Early Cambrian igneous crystallization of the host rocks. A migmatitic gneiss shows peaks at ca. 950-1,100 Ma and 560-650 Ma from inh...

  20. Sedimentary evolution of Rio do Rastro formation (permian-triassic of the Parana Basin) at central south portion of Santa Catarina State, Brazil; Evolucao sedimentar da Formacao Rio do Rastro (Permo-Triassico da Bacia do Parana) na porcao centro sul do estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Lucas Verissimo; Roldan, Luis Fernando; Steiner, Samar dos Santos; Chamani, Marlei Antonio Carrari [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Geoquimica e Geotectonica]. E-mail: lvwarren@yahoo.com; Almeida, Renato Paes de; Hachiro, Jorge; Machado, Romulo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia Sedimentar e Ambiental

    2008-06-15

    Between the Late Carboniferous and the Early Triassic, the south portion of the Gondwana Supercontinent witnessed the development of intracratonic basins related with the coeval Sanrafaelic Orogeny. The continuous subsidence and consequent generation accommodation space resulted in the formation of a large confined water body and the accumulation of a transgressive regressive sequence between the Late Permian and the Early Triassic. The progradational nature of the upper portion of this sequence, represented by de Rio do Rasto e Piramboia formations, culminated with the complete filling of the water body. In the south-eastern portion of Santa Catarina State (Southern Brazil), the Rio do Rasto Formation overlies the Teresina formation and is overlain by the Piramboia formation, both contacts being characterized by lithological transition. The lower portion of the Rio do Rasto Formation is characterized by architectural elements deposited in offshore environments subject to storm action. A marked change of the color of the pelitic facies, from gray to red and purple occurs at the top of the unit. At this stratigraphic level, there is also a predominance of deltaic and eolian architectural elements. The intercalation of near shore and offshore architectural elements can be explained by the strong auto cyclic character expected in deltaic depositional systems and by the variation of relative rates of base-level rise. The occurrence of eolian architectural elements interbedded with subaquatically deposited sediments on the second third of the unit can be considered an evidence of continentalization to the top, materialized as the transition to the Piramboia desert system. (author)

  1. Mineralogical and isotopic data on two hydrothermal uranium deposits located in the Permian volcano-sedimentary basin of Collio Orobico (Bergamasc Alps): occurrence of a Cretaceous U mobilization phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U deposits of Novazza and Val Vedello are located close to the unconformity with the South-Alpine basement. The ignimbrites adjacent to the Novazza deposit have undergone a pervasive hydrothermal alteration. For this deposit, the study of the micas provides crystallization temperatures ranging from 5400C to 3500C. These micas do not show a zonal distribution with respect to the mineralized bodies. In the neighbouring barren basin, the mica crystallization temperatures at 2000C suggest a post-magmatic evolution very different. The U-Pb data on zircons were made for ignimbrites collected in the Novazza mine and in the barren basin. They allow to propose a multi-episodic evolution model taking into account a mixing of two populations of zircons: a small amount of Precambrian zircons located in basement xenoliths within the ignimbrites, and a large proportion of zircons having crystallized in the ignimbrites, which are supposed to have been emplaced about 280 My ago. The U-Pb data suggest a phase of U concentration, during Cretaceous times. For each deposit, this age does not seem to be related to the ages of fault motions. Different hypothesis concerning the genesis of Novazza and Val Vedello deposits are discussed which take into account the paleotemperature data on micas, the ore paragenesis and the U-Pb data obtained on U-mineralizations

  2. Mineralogical and isotopic data on two hydrothermal uranium deposits located in the Permian volcano-sedimentary basin of Collio Orobico (Bergamasc Alps): occurrence of a Cretaceous U mobilization phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, S.; Lancelot, J.R.; Girod, M.; Mercadier, H.; Villemaire, C.

    The U deposits of Novazza and Val Vedello are located close to the unconformity with the South-Alpine basement. The ignimbrites adjacent to the Novazza deposit have undergone a pervasive hydrothermal alteration. For this deposit, the study of the micas provides crystallization temperatures ranging from 540/sup 0/C to 350/sup 0/C. These micas do not show a zonal distribution with respect to the mineralized bodies. In the neighbouring barren basin, the mica crystallization temperatures at 200/sup 0/C suggest a post-magmatic evolution very different. The U-Pb data on zircons were made for ignimbrites collected in the Novazza mine and in the barren basin. They allow to propose a multi-episodic evolution model taking into account a mixing of two populations of zircons: a small amount of Precambrian zircons located in basement xenoliths within the ignimbrites, and a large proportion of zircons having crystallized in the ignimbrites, which are supposed to have been emplaced about 280 My ago. The U-Pb data suggest a phase of U concentration, during Cretaceous times. For each deposit, this age does not seem to be related to the ages of fault motions. Different hypothesis concerning the genesis of Novazza and Val Vedello deposits are discussed which take into account the paleotemperature data on micas, the ore paragenesis and the U-Pb data obtained on U-mineralizations.

  3. Amphibian and Paleoisciforms from the Lower Part of the Taquaral Member of the Permian Irati Formation, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Chahud

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the east-central region of the State of São Paulo, Brazil, good exposures of Permo-Carboniferous sequences of theParaná intracratonic basin are found. These sequences start with the Tubarão Supergroup deposits, the PermocarboniferousItararé Group, and the earliest Permian Guatá Group, of which the Tatuí Formation is the only unit occurring in the Stateof São Paulo. The Permian Passa Dois Group overlies the Tubarão Supergroup, with the Early Permian Irati Formation andthe Middle Permian Corumbataí Formation. Two members are recognized in the Irati Formation, Taquaral and Assistência.Most beds of the Taquaral Member are gray laminated siltic-argillaceous, but sandstone beds are present in lower outcropsof this member. One of these sandstones, 9.5 cm thick unconformably overlying sedimentos of the Tatuí Formation, exhibitsdiversifi ed vertebrate remains. The present paper deals with a Palaeonisciformes mandible fragment, one amphibianTemnospondyli tooth, and one Temnospondyli mandible fragment. These fossils are associated to Chondrichthyes andOsteichthyes. It is an open question whether the Parnaíba Basin Palaeonisciformes Brasilichthys macrognathus and theTemnospondyli Prionosuchus plummery belong to the same taxa of the Paraná Basin fossils. Only better preserved fossilsmight solve this question.

  4. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Late Triassic – Jurassic development of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone, southern Scandinavia

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The continental to marine Upper Triassic – Jurassic succession of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone is interpreted within a sequence stratigraphic framework, and the evolution of the depositional basin is discussed. The intracratonic Permian–Cenozoic Danish Basin was formed by Late Carboniferous – Early Permian crustal extension followed by subsidence governed primarily by thermal cooling and local faulting. The basin is separated from thestable Precambrian Baltic Shield by t...

  5. Radionuclides distribution in blooming of the permian sediments from the Irati Formation of the Parana Basin; Distribuicao de radionuclideos em um afloramento de sedimentos permianos da Formacao Irati na Bacia do Parana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ademar de Oliveira

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this work is to study natural radionuclides in sedimentary rocks. The concentration of them reflects the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment as well as some mineralogical characteristics of the rock matrix, and also more recent events as weathering and erosion. Using gamma ray high resolution spectrometry, the profile of activity concentration of the natural radionuclides was assessed for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U, {sup 32}Th and {sup 40}K in rocks of the Irati Formation belonging to Parana Sedimentary Basin. The samples were collected at a limestone abandoned mine, in the city of Sapopema, (PR). 24 samples were collected, eleven from the exposed vertical profile with approximately 5.50 m, whose stratigraphy is represented by an alternation among decimetrics layers of limestones, bituminous shales, and some rhythmits layers (milimetric sheets of limestone and bituminous shales), 9 repetitions of a sample to study the variability, and three rigolits samples in sequential apprenticeships of weathering. Each sample was dried in the sun during about 48 hours, broken, drizzled in a sieve of 4 mesh and put, in a cylindrical container. The measures were accomplished using a Germanium Hyper Pure detector (HPGe) with relative efficiency of 66%, connected to a standard spectrometry electronic chain. The measured concentrations of activity of {sup 238}U were smaller for the limestones (17.80 {+-}0.09 Bq.Kg{sup -1}), larger for the bituminous shales (125.5 {+-} 2.6 Bq.Kg{sup -1} with enrichment of uranium in the sample (200), 548 {+-} 16 Bq.Kg{sup -1}, upper part of the column), and intermediate for the rhythmits (23.0 {+-} 1,3 Bq.Kg{sup -1}. The ratio eTh/K obtained for the studied profiles has equivalent values, indicating similar mineralogical characteristics for the limestones, bituminous shales, rhythmits and studied rigolits. On the other hand, to the ratio eTh/eU showed that two of the three regolits samples belong to oxidizer atmospheres, favoring the leaching of uranium, what can be causing the enrichment of the sample (200), once these soils are above the column. The average measured doses were 16 nGy.h{sup -1} for the limestones and rhythmits, 79.5 nGy.h{sup -1} for the bituminous shales and 329.5 nGy.h{sup -1} for the enriched bituminous shales of the top of the column. These results supply data to estimate the contribution of these products for the radiation dose received by the public in general, besides of database for mineralogical and geophysical studies of the Parana Basin. (author)

  6. Atmospheric circulation in a Permian climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven; Tost, Holger

    2015-04-01

    At the beginning of the Permian (299-251 mya) the formation of the supercontinent Pangaea that comprised all of the present-day continents was completed. This configuration with a single landmass stretching from North to South Pole provides a special case of land-sea distribution for analysing its effect on climate and atmospheric circulation. This work uses a coupled system to represent Permian climate, including an explicit formulation for meridional heat transport in both atmosphere and ocean. The simulations are done with a topography of the early Late Permian (approx. 262 mya). During the Permian the Earth turned from an icehouse world with preindustrial carbon dioxide concentration to a hothouse world with an atmosphere containing up to ten times as much of carbon dioxide as before. Therefore centurial time-slice experiments with different carbon dioxide concentrations are performed, allowing for adjusted equilibrium climate states. Our simulation results are compared to alternative modelling studies, but also to sedimental and phytogeographic data. Analysing the Permian atmosphere, special interest is given on convectional processes to study atmospheric circulation in comparison with the present-day situation.

  7. Inorganic chemistry, petrography and palaeobotany of Permian coals in the Prince Charles Mountains, East Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdgate, G.R. [School of Earth Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia); McLoughlin, S. [School of Natural Resource Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Drinnan, A.N. [School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia); Finkelman, R.B.; Willett, J.C.; Chiehowsky, L.A. [U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop 956, Reston, VA 20092 (United States)

    2005-07-20

    Sampled outcrops of Permian coal seams of the Bainmedart Coal Measures in the Lambert Graben, eastern Antarctica, have been analysed for their proximates, ultimates, ash constituents and trace elements. A similar series of samples has been analysed for their principle maceral and microlithotype components and vitrinite reflectance. The coals are sub-bituminous to high volatile bituminous in rank; maturity increases markedly in southern exposures around Radok Lake where the oldest part of the succession is exposed and some strata have been intruded by mafic dykes and ultramafic sills. The coal ash is mostly silica and aluminium oxides, indicating that the mineral ash component is mostly quartz and various clay minerals. The ratio of silica to aluminium oxides appears to increase in an upward stratigraphic direction. The coal macerals include a relatively high liptinite content (mainly sporinite) that is significantly higher than for typical Gondwana coals. Greater degrees of weathering within the floodbasin/peat mire environments associated with climatic drying towards the end of the Permian might account for both preferential sporopollenin preservation and increased silica:aluminium oxide ratios up-section. Correlation of the coal maceral components to adjacent peninsula India coals indicates the closest comparative coals of similar age and rank occur within the Godavari Basin, rather then the Mahanadi Basin, which is traditionally interpreted to have been contiguous with the Lambert Graben before Gondwanan breakup. The petrological characteristics suggest that either previous interpretations of Palaeozoic basin alignments between Antarctica and India are incorrect, or that environmental settings and post-Permian burial histories of these basins were strongly independent of their tectonic juxtaposition. A permineralized peat bed within the succession reveals that the coals predominantly comprise wood- and leaf-rich debris derived from low-diversity forest-mire communities dominated by glossopterid and noeggerathiopsid gymnosperms.

  8. The Late Permian Ocean: What's the Big Stink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K. M.; Ridgwell, A.; Kump, L. R.

    2006-12-01

    Since the ocean is (and has been) sulfate rich, the development of basinal to global anoxia is often associated with the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in anoxic waters. Bacterial sulfate reduction begins to dominate after oxygen and nitrate have been depleted, producing hydrogen sulfide. Hence, low atmospheric oxygen content, warm surface ocean temperatures, and high O2 demand reduce oceanic oxygen content and favor the establishment of euxinia. Biomarker evidence for photic zone sulfide and biogeochemical calculations suggest that the end-Permian mass extinction was one interval during which extreme anoxia may have led to H2S buildup. We hypothesize that H2S release to the atmosphere would be possible if the upward flux of sulfide from deep water in a largely euxinic ocean exceeded the oxygen flux into the surface ocean from wind mixing. In this scenario, destabilization of the chemocline (oxygen-sulfide interface) would cause sulfide poisoning in both the marine and terrestrial realms and contribute to the extinction. We used the end-Permian configuration of GENIE (www.genie.ac.uk), an energy-moisture-balance atmosphere model coupled to a 3-D, non-eddy-resolving, frictional geostrophic model to evaluate this hypothesis. This model includes marine biogeochemistry and capably simulates processes associated with the transition to oceanic anoxia. We performed a series of simulations designed to identify the conditions necessary for widespread euxinia and chemocline destabilization. We characterized the magnitude of hydrogen sulfide flux as a function of increasing oceanic phosphate content resulting from P release from sediments in anoxic environments. Significant ocean-atmosphere fluxes of H2S result from 6- to 10-fold increases in ocean phosphate at modern oxygen levels. These fluxes are focused in upwelling regions, although toxic H2S concentrations are also observed in the surface waters of nearshore equatorial regions. Our initial simulations support the hypothesis that extreme euxinia and episodic H2S eruptions can result from modest changes in the ocean's nutrient budget and may have contributed to the end-Permian mass extinction. Ongoing work addresses additional feedbacks involving sulfur utilization by sulfur-oxidizing phototrophs and the role of the nitrogen cycle during the transition to anoxia.

  9. A Review on Permian to Triassic Active or Convergent Margin in Southeasternmost Gondwanaland: Possibility of Exploration Target for Tin and Hydrocarbon Deposits in the Eastern Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiruddin Amiruddin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol4no1.20094An active convergence of continental margin is probably generated in Gondwanaland during Permian to Triassic period which is characterized by the presence of magmatic and volcanic belts and back-arc ba- sins occupied respectively by Permian to Triassic rocks. The magmatic belt is occupied by peraluminous granitic plutons showing characteristics of S- type granite and is considered as tin-bearing granites. The back-arc basins are occupied by the Southern Papua and Galille-Bowen-Gunnedah-Sydney Basins. Those large basins are respectivelly filled by fluvial, fluvio- deltaic to marine Permian-Triassic sediments, which are unconformably overlain by the Jurrassic-Cretaceous marine succession. The paleomagnetic data, confirmed by flora content found in Australia and Papua, indicate that those areas initially belong to the Gondwanaland before part of them were drifted and rotated into the present day position. Tectonically, the presence of those Permian-Triassic magmatic-volcanic belts and back-arc basins in behind, indicates that at the time there were huge compressive activities: convergence of paleo-oceanic Pasific Plate moving westward, collided and subducted into the Southeastern Gondwana Continental Plate, moved relatively eastwards. This phenomenon resembles to the formation of Sumatera Tertiary tectonic zones producing back-arc basins, i.e. South Sumatera, Central, and North Sumatera Basins including the Tertiary Magmatic Arc. Concerning the similarity of Permian-Triassic geological condition of the magmatic arc and back-arc basins in Eastern Indonesia and Eastern Australia including paleoposition, paleotectonic setting, strati- graphic succession, and lithologic composition, it is suggested to carry out an increase in a more intens- ive tin exploration in the Eastern Indonesia, e.g. Bird Head area and Banggai Sula Island, and also for hydrocarbon target (coal, coalbed methane, oil and gas, and oil shale in the Southern Papua Basin, East Indonesia. This suggestion is confirmed by cassiterite and hydrocarbon discoveries and exploitation activ- ity in the Eastern Australia and also a new seismic data of the Semai Basin a part of Southern Papua Basin. This seismic record shows a more complete stratigraphic sucession and a number of large structure traps of stratigraphic levels in which the Permian-Triassic units are included within the sequence.  

  10. Palaeogeographical significance of clay mineral assemblages in the Permian and Triassic sediments of the SE Iberian Ranges, eastern Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Azcárate, Jacinto; Arche, Alfredo; Fernández Barrenechea, José María; López Gómez, José; Luque del Villar, Francisco Javier; Rodas , Magdalena

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of the palaeogeography of the SE Iberian Basin during the Permian and Triassic represents a general evolution from continental to marine environments. It has been recently studied from the sedimentological, stratigraphical, tectonic and palaeontological points of view. In spite of these results, many aspects of this palaeogeography are still a matter of discussion. In this study, clay mineralogy analysis complements previous studies representing a new aspect for unde...

  11. A paleoclimatic simulation of the Late Permian greenhouse world and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.T.; Jacobson, S.R.; Hayashida, D.N. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., La Habra, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Sea-floor spreading assembled all the major cratonic blocks into a single supercontinent once in the Phanerozoic Eon. This unique Late Permian crustal tectonic event produced Pangaea and an enormous oceanic basin volume that dropped sea level to a global lowstand unrivaled in the Phanerozoic. Two paleoclimatic simulations using a numerical three-dimensional general circulation model tested changes in the greenhouse effect. The authors conclude that for a simulation to fit the Late Permian geologic record, the paleoatmosphere must contain an enhanced greenhouse gas effect. A third simulation tested changes of paleogeography in southern Pangaea (Gondwana) that did not appreciably alter the harsh continental paleoclimate. The simulated paleoclimatic changes provide extraordinarily warm ocean and atmosphere, and a significant reduction in continental rainfall and runoff. These conditions inevitably lead to more aridity and less vegetation on land, gradually reduce the delivery of vital nutrients from continental sources to marine margins, systematically liberate CO{sub 2} dissolved in ocean water, and incrementally increase stress on marine and terrestrial biotas. These consequences severely disrupted rates of oxygen and carbon cycling. Their quantitative paleoclimatic simulation is consistent with distributions of red beds, evaporites, coals, marine shelf areas, seawater isotope trends, and paleontologic originations and extinctions. Thus, the Pangaean plate assembly probably triggered an inexorable sequence of geophysical, geochemical, and biological events that forced an elevated greenhouse effect in the Late Permian, nearly annihilating the Phanerozoic biota.

  12. Provenance of Permian Malužiná Formation sandstones (Hronicum, Western Carpathians: evidence from monazite geochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vozárová Anna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian Malužiná Formation and the Pennsylvanian Nižná Boca Formation are Upper Paleozoic volcano- sedimentary complexes in the Hronicum nappe system. Sandstones, shales and conglomerates are the dominant lithological members of the Malužiná Formation sequence. Detrital monazites were analysed by electron microprobe, to obtain Th-U-Pb ages of the source areas. The majority of detrital monazites showed Devonian-Mississippian ages, ranging from 330 to 380 Ma with a weighted average of 351 ± 3.3 (2?, that correspond well with the main phase of arcrelated magmatic activity in the Western Carpathians. Only a small portion of detrital monazites displayed Permian ages in the range of 250-280 Ma, with a significant maximum around 255 Ma. The weighted average corresponds to 255 ± 6.2 Ma. These monazites may have been partially derived from the synsedimentary acid volcanism that was situated on the margins of the original depositional basin. However, some of the Triassic ages (230-240 Ma, reflect, most likely, the genetic relationship with the overheating connected with Permian and subsequent Triassic extensional regime. Detrital monazite ages document the Variscan age of the source area and also reflect a gradual development of the Hronicum terrestrial rift, accompanied by the heterogeneous cooling of the lithosphere.

  13. Acritarchs from the Number 5 Seam in the Permian Vryheid Formation, Witbank Coalfield, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venter, M.E.; Cairncross, B. [Rand Afrikaans University, Auckland Park (South Africa). Dept. of Geology

    1995-12-01

    Two species of marine acritarchs, Mehlisphaeridium fibratum and Mehlisphaeridium gondwanaensis, are described from a shale parting near the top of the No. 5 Seam at Greenside Colliery, Witbank Coalfield, Republic of South Africa. The sedimentary sequence containing this coal seam consists of fine- to very coarse-grained sandstone, siltstone, shale, and coal which constitute part of the Early Permian Vryheid Formation (Karoo Supergroup). The paleoenvironmental implications of the discovery of acritarchs imply that marine conditions prevailed in the basin at the time of deposition of this particular shale unit. 56 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Permian Basin, Texas: Volume 1, Text: Final preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a description of the preliminary design for an Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) at the proposed 49 acre site located 21 miles north of Hereford, Texas in Deaf Smith County. Department of Energy must conduct in situ testing at depth to ascertain the engineering and environmental suitability of the site for further consideration for nuclear waste repository development. The ESF includes the construction of two 12-ft diameter engineered shafts for accessing the bedded salt horizon to conduct in situ tests to ascertain if the site should be considered a candidate site for the first High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. This report includes pertinent engineering drawings for two shafts and all support facilities necessary for shaft construction and testing program operation. Shafts will be constructed by conventional drill-and-blast methods employing ground freezing prior to shaft construction to stabilize the existing groundwater and soil conditions at the site. A watertight liner and seal system will be employed to prevent intermingling of aquifers and provide a stable shaft throughout its design life. 38 refs., 37 figs., 14 tabs

  15. The Donets Basin (Ukraine/Russia). Coalification and thermal history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Rainer, T.; Shymanovskyy, V.A. [Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Strasse 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Privalov, V.A. [Donetsk State Technical University, Artem str., UA-84000 Donetsk (Ukraine); Zhykalyak, M.V. [Donetsk State Regional Geological Survey, Sybirtseva str. 17, UA-84500 Artemovsk (Ukraine); Bueker, C. [Institute of Geology, and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal, Aachen (Germany); Panova, E.A. [UkrNIMI, Tchelyuskintsev str. 291, UA-83121 Donetsk (Ukraine); Stephenson, R. [Research School of Sedimentary Geology, Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-02-01

    The Donets Basin (Donbas) is one of the major late Paleozoic coal basins in the world. The Donbas Foldbelt is an inverted part of the Donets Basin characterized by WNW-ESE-trending folds and faults. The age of basin inversion is under discussion. Large parts of the Donets Basin host anthracite and meta-anthracite. Low-rank coals are restricted to the western and northern basin margins. Vitrinite reflectance patterns along the Gorlovka Anticline indicate syn-deformational coalification. Vitrinite reflectance isolines are displaced along thrusts, clear evidence that main coalification predates late faulting. 1-D and 2-D numerical models were applied to elucidate the factors that control coalification in the western Donets Basin (Krasnoarmeisk Monocline, Kalmius-Torets Depression, South Syncline). The models indicate that the depth of the seams and the heat flow during maximum (Permian) burial are the most important parameters. The thickness of late Carboniferous and Permian rocks increased from the southwestern basin margin towards the basin center. Permian erosion along the Krasnoarmeisk Monocline and in the Kalmius-Torets Depression was on the order of 2-3 km. More rocks were eroded southeast of the Donetsk-Kadievka Fault Zone (4-5 km). Heat flow during maximum burial was in the range of 40-75 mW/m{sup 2}. Heat flow in the Krasnoarmeisk Monocline and the Kalmius-Torets Depression increased in a northeastward direction from 40 to 55 mW/m{sup 2}. Heat flow at the eastern edge of the Kalmius-Torets Depression and in the South Syncline was in the range of 60-75 mW/m{sup 2} and increased towards the southeast. The resulting coalification pattern in this area was overprinted by thermal events in the northern Krasnoarmeisk Monocline and the South Syncline. These are probably related to (Permian?) magmatic intrusions. Coked coal occurs at the contact to presumed Permian sills and dikes southwest of Donetsk.

  16. Pumping test and fluid sampling report - Mansfield No. 1 (PD-4) well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains pumping test and fluid sampling data collected at Mansfield No. 1 well, located in Oldham County, in the Permian Basin of Texas. These data were collected by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation to support studies of fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. The testing and sampling took place between October 1981 and October 1982. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated. 4 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  17. Preliminary numerical modelling of groundwater flow in the Dumfries basin

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. Jackson; A. G. Hughes; O Dochartaigh, B.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Dumfries Basin occupies the lower part of the River Nith catchment in south-west Scotland. The basin is a deep, partly fault bounded, outlier of Permian sandstone and breccia, with a partial superficial cover comprising a variety of lithologies which range from gravel to sandy clay. There is a complex interaction between the River Nith and the aquifer as the river and its various tributaries cross the basin. Piecemeal investigation of the aquifer had taken place since the f...

  18. Petroleum geology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Palo Duro Basin, Permian Basin, Texas is an asymmetric, relatively shallow, intracratonic basin in the southern Texas Panhandle filled mostly by Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, and Permian sedimentary rocks. Although deeper and prolific prolific petroleum-producing basins adjoin it on the north (Anadarko Basin), south (Midland Basin), and east (Hardeman Basin), the Palo Duro Basin has produced remarkably small amounts of oil and gas to date. This is all the more noteworthy because the sedimentary sequence and rock types of the basin are similar to those of the adjacent basins. Analyses of the stratigraphic succession and structural configuration of the Palo Duro Basin suggest that adequate reservoir rocks, top-seals, and geologic structures are present. Most of the structures formed early enough to have trapped hydrocarbons if they were migrating in the rock column. Although additional work is under way to properly address the question of the petroleum source rocks, generation, and migration, the general absence of production in the basin may relate to an overall deficiency in hydrocarbon generation within the basin. Geologic information in this report will form part of the basis for further analysis and conclusions on hydrocarbon potential in the Palo Duro Basin

  19. Triassic deformation of Permian Early Triassic arc-related sediments in the Beishan (NW China): Last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Sun, Jimin; Windley, Brian F.; Glen, Richard; Han, Chunming; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ji'en; Wan, Bo; Ao, Songjian; Song, Dongfang

    2015-11-01

    The Beishan orogenic collage (BOC) in the southernmost Altaids provides evidence of the final stage of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. However, the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in the BOC is controversial. From field mapping, and structural analysis of mesoscale, superposed folds in Early Triassic sediments in the Hongyanjing Basin in the central BOC, we define at least two phases of deformation, which we can bracket in age as end-Permian to Early-Late Triassic. The sandstones in the basin are poorly sorted with angular clasts, which indicates immaturity characteristic of proximal and rapid deposition. Geochemical data indicate that the Hongyanjing Basin probably developed in an arc-related setting near an active continental margin or mature island arc. Combined with published regional geological data, we interpret the Hongyanjing Basin as a Permian-Early Triassic inter-arc basin between the Carboniferous Mazongshan arc to the north and the Ordovician to Permian Huaniushan-Dundunshan arc to the south. In addition, the age distribution of our sediments shows that the active continental margin or continental arc on which the Hongyanjing arc-related basin sat was somehow independently distributed in the Paleo-Asian Ocean without any major contribution of provenance from the Tarim Craton and Dunhuang Block to the south and Southern Mongolia accretionary system to the north. Deformation of the superposed folds began in the end-Permian, continued in the Early Triassic, and ended before the middle Late Triassic (219 Ma). Therefore the accretionary orogenesis in the Beishan part of the southernmost Altaids was still ongoing in the early to middle Triassic, and it finished in the Late Triassic, which might have been the last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids. We correlate this terminal event with tectonic developments in the Kunlun and Qinling orogens in the Tethyan domain.

  20. Trace fossil evidence for late Permian shallow water condition in Guryul ravine, Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcha, Suraj; Horacek, Micha; Krystyn, Leopold; Pandey, Shivani

    2015-04-01

    The present study is focused on the Late Permian (Changhsingian) succession, present in the Guryul ravine, Kashmir Basin. The basin has a complete Cambro-Triassic sequence and thus contains a unique position in the geology of Himalaya. The Guryul Ravine Permian mainly comprises of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate sediments deposited in a shallow-shelf or ramp setting. The present assemblage of Ichnofossils is the first significant report of trace fossils in the Guryul ravine since early reports in the 1970s. The Ichnofossils reported from this section include: Diplichnites, Dimorphichnus, Monomorphichnus, Planolites, Skolithos along with burrow, scratch marks and annelid worm traces?. The ichnofossils are mainly preserved in medium grain sandstone-mudstone facies. The Ichnofossils are widely distributed throughout the section and are mostly belonging to arthropods and annelid origin, showing behavioral activity, mainly dwelling and feeding, and evidence the dominant presence of deposit feeders. The vertical to slightly inclined biogenic structures are commonly recognized from semi-consolidated substrate which are characteristic features of the near shore/foreshore marine environment, with moderate to high energy conditions. The topmost layer of silty shale contains trace fossils like Skolithos and poorly preserved burrows. The burrow material filled is same as that of host rock. The studied Zewan C and D sequence represents the early to late part of the Changhsingian stage, from 40 to 5 m below the top of Zewan D member with bioturbation still evident in some limestone layers till 2 metres above. No trace fossils could be recognized in the topmost 3 m beds of Zewan D due to their gliding related amalgamated structure. The widespread distribution of traces and their in situ nature will be useful for interpretation of the paleoecological and paleoenvironmental conditions during the late Permian in the Guryul ravine of Kashmir.

  1. Permian Mengkarang coal facies and environment, based on organic petrology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Suwarna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol1no1.20061aThe Permian Mengkarang Coal Measures is situated in the middle part of Sumatera Island. Some fresh outcrop samples of the Permian Mengkarang coals have been analyzed both macroscopically and microscopically, to asses their depositional environment. On the basis of organic-petrological analysis, the coal seams show variation in the predominance of some macerals, indicating successions of environmental changes. The dominant maceral group is vitrinite, present in very low to very high values; whilst the minor one is inertinite showing low amount. Environmental information derived from the organic facies study shows that the coals were deposited in wet zone of mire, ranges from wet limnic-telmatic zone to telmatic wet forest swamp under rapid burial condition, due to rapid basin subsidence. The organic facies concept is thus applicable in basin studies context and has potential to become an additional tool for interpretation of depositional environment.    

  2. Ocean anoxia did not cause the Latest Permian Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proemse, Bernadette C.; Grasby, Stephen E.; Wieser, Michael E.; Mayer, Bernhard; Beauchamp, Benoit

    2014-05-01

    The Latest Permian Extinction (LPE, ~252 million years ago) was a turning point in the history of life on Earth with a loss of ~96% of all marine species and ~70% of all terrestrial species. While, the event undoubtedly shaped the evolution of life its cause remains enigmatic. A leading hypothesis is that the global oceans became depleted in oxygen (anoxia). In order to test this hypothesis we investigated a proxy for marine oxygen levels (molybdenum isotopic composition) in shale across the LPE horizon located on the subtropical northwest margin of Pangea at that time. We studied two sedimentary records in the Sverdrup basin, Canadian High Arctic: Buchanan Lake (eastern Axel Heiberg Island; 79° 26.1'N, 87° 12.6'W), representing a distal deep-water slope environment, and West Blind Fiord (southwest Ellesmere Island; 78° 23.9'N, 85° 57.2'W), representing a deep outer shelf environment (below storm wave base). The molybdenum isotopic composition (?98/95Mo) of sediments has recently become a powerful tool as a paleo-oceanographic proxy of marine oxygen levels. Sample preparation was carried out in a metal-free clean room facility in the isotope laboratory of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Canada, that is supplied by HEPA-filtered air. Molybdenum isotope ratios were determined on a Thermo Scientific multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) with an uncertainty better than ±0.10o for ?98/95Mo values. Results from the Buchanan Lake section show a large shift in ?98/95Mo values from 2.02o to +2.23o at the extinction horizon, consistent with onset of euxinic conditions. In contrast, West Blind Fiord shales, representing the sub-storm wave base shelf environment, show little change in the molybdenum isotopic composition (1.34o to +0.05), indicating ongoing oxic conditions across the LPE (Proemse et al., 2013). Our results suggest that areas of the Pangea continental shelf (North West Pangea) experienced oxic conditions throughout the LPE event, while anoxic conditions developed in the deep ocean. Hence, anoxic marine waters did not extend globally onto shelf environments and as such ocean anoxia cannot have been the main driver of the extinction event. While global systems were stressed by anoxia, the anoxic conditions may better represent a symptom of Siberian Trap eruptions that had catastrophic impact on the environment, potentially through nutrient loading and deposition of toxic substances into marine and terrestrial systems. Proemse et al., 2013: Molybdenum isotopic evidence for oxic marine conditions during the latest Permian extinction. Geology 41, 967-970.

  3. Permian polar forests: deciduousness and environmental variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbranson, E L; Isbell, J L; Taylor, E L; Ryberg, P E; Taylor, T N; Flaig, P P

    2012-11-01

    Forests are expected to expand into northern polar latitudes in the next century. However, the impact of forests at high latitudes on climate and terrestrial biogeochemical cycling is poorly understood because such forests cannot be studied in the modern. This study presents forestry and geochemical analyses of three in situ fossil forests from Late Permian strata of Antarctica, which grew at polar latitudes. Stem size measurements and stump spacing measurements indicate significant differences in forest density and canopy structure that are related to the local depositional setting. For forests closest to fluvial systems, tree density appears to decrease as the forests mature, which is the opposite trend of self-thinning observed in modern forests. We speculate that a combination of tree mortality and high disturbance created low-density mature forests without understory vegetation near Late Permian river systems. Stable carbon isotopes measured from permineralized wood in these forests demonstrate two important points: (i) recently developed techniques of high-resolution carbon isotope studies of wood and mummified wood can be applied to permineralized wood, for which much of the original organic matter has been lost and (ii) that the fossil trees maintained a deciduous habit at polar latitudes during the Late Permian. The combination of paleobotanical, sedimentologic, and paleoforestry techniques provides an unrivaled examination of the function of polar forests in deep time; and the carbon isotope geochemistry supplements this work with subannual records of carbon fixation that allows for the quantitative analysis of deciduous versus evergreen habits and environmental parameters, for example, relative humidity. PMID:22845834

  4. The carbon and sulfur cycles and atmospheric oxygen from middle Permian to middle Triassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Robert A.

    2005-07-01

    The results of a theoretical isotope mass balance model are presented for the time dependence of burial and weathering-plus-degassing fluxes within the combined long-term carbon and sulfur cycles. Averaged data for oceanic ? 13C and ? 34S were entered for every million years from 270 to 240 Ma (middle Permian to middle Triassic) to study general trends across the Permian-Triassic boundary. Results show a drop in the rate of global organic matter burial during the late Permian and a predominance of low values during the early-to-middle Triassic. This overall decrease with time is ascribed mainly to epochs of conversion of high biomass forests to low biomass herbaceous vegetation resulting in a decrease in the production of terrestrially derived organic debris. Additional contributions to lessened terrestrial carbon burial were increased aridity and a drop in sea level during the late Permian which led to smaller areas of low-lying coastal wetlands suitable for coal and peat deposition. Mirroring the drop in organic matter deposition was an increase in the burial of sedimentary pyrite, and a dramatic increase in the calculated global mean ratio of pyrite-S to organic-C. High S/C values resulted from an increase of deposition in marine euxinic basins combined with a decrease in the burial of low-pyrite associated terrestrial organic matter. The prediction of increased oceanic anoxia during the late Permian and early Triassic agrees with independent studies of the composition of sedimentary rocks. Weathering plus burial fluxes for organic carbon and pyrite sulfur were used to calculate changes in atmospheric oxygen. The striking result is a continuous drop in O 2 concentration from ˜30% to ˜13% over a twenty million year period. This drop was brought about mainly by a decrease in the burial of terrestrially derived organic matter. but with a possible contribution from the weathering of older organic matter on land. It must have exerted a considerable influence on animal evolution because of the role of O 2 in respiration. Some examples are the extinction of many vertebrates, loss of giant insects and amphibians, and the restriction of animals to low elevations. It is concluded that the extinction of plants may have contributed to the extinction of animals.

  5. Basin fill evolution and paleotectonic patterns along the Samfrau geosyncline: the Sauce Grande basin-Ventana foldbelt (Argentina) and Karoo basin-Cape foldbelt (South Africa) revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gamundí, O. R.; Rossello, E. A.

    As integral parts of du Toit's (1927) ``Samfrau Geosyncline'', the Sauce Grande basin-Ventana foldbelt (Argentina) and Karoo basin-Cape foldbelt (South Africa) share similar paleoclimatic, paleogeographic, and paleotectonic aspects related to the Late Paleozoic tectono-magmatic activity along the Panthalassan continental margin of Gondwanaland. Late Carboniferou-earliest Permian glacial deposits were deposited in the Sauce Grande (Sauce Grande Formation) and Karoo (Dwyka Formation) basins and Falkland-Malvinas Islands (Lafonia Formation) during an initial (sag) phase of extension. The pre-breakup position of the Falkland (Malvinas) Islands on the easternmost part of the Karoo basin (immediately east of the coast of South Africa) is supported by recent paleomagnetic data, lithofacies associations, paleoice flow directions and age similarities between the Dwyka and the Lafonia glacial sequences. The desintegration of the Gondwanan Ice Sheet (GIS) triggered widespread transgressions, reflected in the stratigraphic record by the presence of inter-basinally correlatable, open marine, fine-grained deposits (Piedra Azul Formation in the Sauce Grande basin, Prince Albert Formation in the Karoo basin and Port Sussex Formation in the Falkland Islands) capping glacial marine sediments. These early postglacial transgressive deposits, characterised by fossils of the Eurydesma fauna and Glossopteris flora, represent the maximum flooding of the basins. Cratonward foreland subsidence was triggered by the San Rafael orogeny (ca. 270 Ma) in Argentina and propogated along the Gondwanan margin. This subsidence phase generated sufficient space to accommodate thick synorogenic sequences derived from the orogenic flanks of the Sauce Grande and Karoo basins. Compositionally, the initial extensional phase of these basins was characterized by quartz-rich, craton-derived detritus and was followed by a compressional (foreland) phase characterized by a paleocurrent reversal and dominance of arc/foldbelt-derived material. In the Sauce Grande basin, tuffs are interbedded in the upper half of the synorogenic, foldbelt-derived Tunas Formation (Early-early Late? Permian). Likewise, the first widespread appearance of tuffs in the Karoo basin is in the Whitehill Formation, of late Early Permian (260 Ma) age. Silicic volcanism along the Andes and Patagonia (Choiyoi magmatic province) peaked between the late Early Permian and Late Permian. A link between these volcanics and the consanguineous airborne tuffs present in the Sauce Grande and Karoo basins is suggested on the basis of their similar compositions and ages.

  6. Gas hydrate contribution to Late Permian global warming.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majorowicz, J.; Grasby, S. E.; Šafanda, Jan; Beauchamp, B.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 393, May (2014), s. 243-253. ISSN 0012-821X Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Latest Permian extinction * gas hydrates * carbon isotope shift Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 4.734, year: 2014

  7. Life in the end-Permian dead zone

    OpenAIRE

    Looy, Cindy V.; Twitchett, Richard J; Dilcher, David L.; Van Konijnenburg-Van Cittert, Johanna H. A.; Visscher, Henk

    2001-01-01

    The fossil record of land plants is an obvious source of information on the dynamics of mass extinctions in the geological past. In conjunction with the end-Permian ecological crisis, ?250 million years ago, palynological data from East Greenland reveal some unanticipated patterns. We document the significant time lag between terrestrial ecosystem collapse and selective extinction among characteristic Late Permian plants. Furthermore, ecological crisis resulted in an initial increase in plant...

  8. Biostratigraphic correlation in the Karoo: The case of the Middle Permian parareptile Eunotosaurus

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mike, Day; Bruce, Rubidge; John, Almond; Sifelani, Jirah.

    Full Text Available The richness of fossil tetrapods from the Beaufort Group of South Africa has enabled biostratigraphic subdivision of this Permo-Triassic succession, with global applicability. Despite being the thickest of the seven biozones recognised, attempts at further subdivision of the Middle Permian Tapinocep [...] halus Assemblage Zone (Abrahamskraal Formation) have not been successful, largely because the exact stratigraphic ranges of fossil taxa are unknown. This gap in knowledge has limited stratigraphic correlation of the Abrahamskraal Formation and hindered understanding of Middle Permian Karoo basin development. Currently, the lowermost Beaufort Group is split between an eastern and a western stratigraphic scheme and, because of poor outcrop and the relative paucity of fossils in the east, stratigraphic correlation between the two areas has been uncertain. Recent fossil discoveries of the parareptile Eunotosaurus africanus in the Eastern Cape and Free State provinces have extended its known geographic range in the east. An additional specimen from the lower Middleton Formation in the Eastern Cape has, for the first time, enabled the biostratigraphic correlation of this unit with the Poortjie Member of the Teekloof Formation in the west. These finds confirm the diachroneity of the boundary between the marine Ecca Group and the terrestrial Beaufort Group.

  9. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift

  10. Anomalous carbonate precipitates: is the Precambrian the key to the Permian?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotzinger, J. P.; Knoll, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    Late Permian reefs of the Capitan complex, west Texas; the Magnesian Limestone, England; Chuenmuping reef, south China; and elsewhere contain anomalously large volumes of aragonite and calcite marine cements and sea-floor crusts, as well as abundant microbial precipitates. These components strongly influenced reef growth and may have been responsible for the construction of rigid, open reefal frames in which bryozoans and sponges became encrusted and structurally reinforced. In some cases, such as the upper biostrome of the Magnesian Limestone, precipitated microbialites and inorganic crusts were the primary constituents of the reef core. These microbial and inorganic reefs do not have modern marine counterparts; on the contrary, their textures and genesis are best understood through comparison with the older rock record, particularly that of the early Precambrian. Early Precambrian reefal facies are interpreted to have formed in a stratified ocean with anoxic deep waters enriched in carbonate alkalinity. Upwelling mixed deep and surface waters, resulting in massive seafloor precipitation of aragonite and calcite. During Mesoproterozoic and early Neoproterozoic time, the ocean became more fully oxidized, and seafloor carbonate precipitation was significantly reduced. However, during the late Neoproterozoic, sizeable volumes of deep ocean water once again became anoxic for protracted intervals; the distinctive "cap carbonates" found above Neoproterozoic tillites attest to renewed upwelling of anoxic bottom water enriched in carbonate alkalinity and 12C. Anomalous late Permian seafloor precipitates are interpreted as the product, at least in part, of similar processes. Massive carbonate precipitation was favored by: 1) reduced shelf space for carbonate precipitation, 2) increased flux of Ca to the oceans during increased continental erosion, 3) deep basinal anoxia that generated upwelling waters with elevated alkalinities, and 4) further evolution of ocean water in the restricted Delaware, Zechstein, and other basins. Temporal coincidence of these processes resulted in surface seawater that was greatly supersaturated by Phanerozoic standards and whose only precedents occurred in Precambrian oceans.

  11. Spectral gamma-ray signature of fluvial deposits: a case study from the Late Permian Rio do Rasto Formation, Parana Basin, Brazil; Assinatura gamaespectrometrica de depositos fluviais: estudo de caso na Formacao do Rio do Rasto, Permiano Superior da Bacia do Parana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowek, Guilherme Arruda, E-mail: arruda@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geologia; Ferreira, Francisco Jose Fonseca; Vesely, Fernando Farias, E-mail: francisco.ferreira@ufpr.br, E-mail: vesely@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Setor de Ciencias da Terra; Berton, Fabio, E-mail: fabioberton1@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Fluvial channel-fill deposits form highly heterogeneous hydrocarbon reservoirs. The study of outcrop analogs can help in the characterization of these heterogeneities, which are usually not detected by subsurface geophysical methods. The aim of this research is to compare outcrop log signatures with grain size trends and depositional elements of the fluvial deposits of the Late Permian Rio do Rasto Formation. A series of vertical gamma-ray logs were assembled in two outcrops in order to: 1) characterize log-facies in a succession composed of alternated flood plain, channel fill and eolian strata; 2) define within-channel spectral gamma-ray variability of a mixed-load composite point bar deposit and its relationship with grain size trends and lithofacies; 3) correlate log signatures observed in the outcrop sections with deep exploratory wells drilled several tens of kilometers from the study area. The results of this study show that gamma-ray logs have good correlation with grain size trends and that different depositional elements have distinct signatures. On the other hand, point bar deposits exhibit strong lateral changes in log signature due variations in grain size and mud content within lateral accretion strata. Although frequent, the classic bell-shaped log motif was not always detected, which means that the amount of fluvial channel-fill deposits recognized in subsurface can be underestimated. Similar log signatures were detected in the boreholes, at least in the closest ones, helping in paleoenvironmental interpretation in the subsurface. (author)

  12. Palynostratigraphy and age correlation of subsurface strata within the sub-basins in Singrauli Gondwana Basin, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijaya; Archana Tripathi; A Roy; Saibal Mitra

    2012-08-01

    In the study area, changes in the facies of sediments and spores-pollen content appear to be all causally linked with the depositional set-up. Here, the qualitative and quantitative changes observed in the spores-pollen assemblages have led to recognize 10 Assemblage-zones representing from that earliest Permian in the Talchir Formation to that latest Late Triassic in the Parsora Formation. These sporespollen assemblages are obtained from the wider parts in the Singrauli Gondwana Basin that includes (i) Moher sub-basin (boreholes SSM-1 and 2), and (ii) Singrauli main sub-basin (boreholes SMJS-2, 3 and SMBS-1). The progressively changing spores-pollen content infer the hiatuses of varied magnitude in the sedimentary sequences during the extended time interval of Permian and Triassic.

  13. The Permian mega floras of Uruguay.A synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Permian megafloras of Uruguay. A synthesis. An analysis of the impression and fossil wood floras from the Permian of Uruguay is given through a series of Tables. These show : (1) the list of taxa, (2) anatomical characters of the woods, (3) data on the microfloral associations, (4) paleoenvironmental information and (5) comparisons with contemporaneous Gondwana floras. The evolutionary degree of the woods is briefly analyzed where they correspond to the so-called ''transition xilotaphofloras'' as they present typical Paleozoic anatomical characters but with secondary xylem of more advanced characteristics. (author)

  14. Hydrocarbon accumulations in the Tarim basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Desheng [Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Beijing (China); Liang Digang; Jia Chengzao; Wang Gang [Tarim Petroleum Exploration and Development Bureau, Korle (China)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The Tarim basin is the largest and least explored inland basin in China. The areal extent of the basin reaches 560,000 km{sup 2}. The interior of the basin is mostly covered by the Takla Mekan Desert, which is about 330,000 km{sup 2} in areal extent. The basin has become the object of special attention since China set aside first- and third-round onshore bidding blocks in the Tarim basin for foreign oil firms to explore. The Tarim basin is a polyhistory superimposed basin that has experienced seven evolutionary stages: (1) Sinian-Cambrian-Ordovician aulacogen stage, (2) Silurian-Devonian intracratonic depression stage, (3) Carboniferous marginal sea stage, (4) Permian rift basin stage, (5) Triassic-Jurassic foreland basin stage, (6) Cretaceous-Paleogene NeoTethys bay stage, and (7) Neogene-Pleistocene foreland and inland basin stage. Both the basin`s Paleozoic marine platform sequences and the Mesozoic-Cenozoic terrestrial fills are believed to contain substantial volumes of hydrocarbons. After recent years of exploration, nine oil and gas fields have been proven and 23 discoveries have been made in the Tabei, Tazhong, and Southwest areas. Kekeya, Lunnan, Sangtamu, Jiefangqudong, Donghetang, and Tazhong 4 oil fields have been put into production. Output of crude oil was 2.6 million t (metric tons) (52,000 BOPD) in 1995. The production will increase to 5 million t (100,000 BOPD) in 1997. Giant oil and gas traps probably will be discovered in the Tarim basin. The prospect is promising.

  15. A Late Permian coral reef complex, South Kitakami Terrane, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Toshio; Machiyama, Hideaki

    1995-11-01

    The early Late Permian (Kubergandian to Midian) Iwaizaki Limestone of the South Kitakami Terrane, situated in Northeast Japan, represents a coral reef complex which was formed on a faulted-bank in an active continental margin. The reef-building organisms include cerioid and dendroid rugose corals, a fasciculate tabulate coral and solenoporacean algae as constructors, calcisponges, bryozoans and crinoids as bafflers, and Tubiphytes, Archaeolithoporella and cyanobacteria as binders. The biotic composition is more diverse than the other coeval reefs. Characterized by the existence of an obvious framework, this reef is similar to the Recent coral reefs and unique among Late Permian reefs, most of which are mainly formed by calcisponges and calcareous algae. The distribution of Late Permian reefs is closely related to the palaeoclimate. Coral reefs were developed mainly around the South China and Indochina continental masses between the Tethys Sea and the Panthalassa Ocean, in the tropics. While, calcisponge reefs and Tubiphytes-algal crust reefs were common in tropical to subtropical regions, and stromatolite-bryozoan reefs developed in arid areas. The gradational distribution of Late Permian organic reefs including localized development of coral reefs were probably caused by decreasing of the glaciers and changing of the ocean current systems.

  16. Magnetostratigraphy and high-resolution lithostratigraphy of the Permian-Triassic boundary interval in Central Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szurlies, Michael; Bachmann, Gerhard H.; Menning, Manfred; Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Käding, Karl-C.

    2003-07-01

    A comprehensive lithostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic study was carried out in order to provide a magnetic polarity scale for the Lower Buntsandstein of the classic Germanic Trias. In its type area of Central Germany the ˜300 m thick Lower Buntsandstein consists of 20 small-scale fining-upward cycles. They can be correlated over large parts of the Central European Basin using a combination of high-resolution cyclic stratigraphy and gamma-ray logging. On the basis of this robust lithostratigraphic framework a very precise positioning and correlation of paleomagnetic results has been realized. Eight outcrops and one completely cored well were collected, yielding a total of ˜900 paleomagnetic samples. From about 80% of them a characteristic remanence was obtained. The consistent correlation of lithostratigraphic units and magnetozones supports an early acquisition of the characteristic magnetizations in both the magnetite-bearing gray lithologies as well as the hematite-bearing red-brown lithologies. The inter-section correlation of all investigated profiles allows the creation of a well-defined composite magnetic polarity scale. The uppermost Zechstein comprises one normal (znz) and two reversed (zry, zrz) magnetozones. In the overlying Lower Buntsandstein are delineated three normal (sn1 to sn3) and three reversed (sr1 to sr3) well-documented magnetozones, which can be correlated with magnetic records from the Boreal and Tethyan realms. The combination of magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data suggests the base of the Oolite Alpha 2 within the beds of the so-called 'Graubankbereich' (Lower Buntsandstein) as the position of the Hindeodus parvus calibrated Permian-Triassic boundary within the Germanic Trias. It is situated within the lowermost part of a remarkable thick normal magnetozone (sn1), which is a distinctive feature occurring in virtually all magnetic records across the Permian-Triassic boundary.

  17. Permian Triassic palynofloral transition in Chintalapudi area, Godavari Graben, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neerja Jha; M Basava Chary; Neha Aggarwal

    2012-10-01

    The entire 606 m-thick sedimentary sequence in borecore MCP-7 from Chintalapudi area, Chintalapudi sub-basin has been lithologically designated as Kamthi Formation. However, the palynological investigation revealed five distinct palynoassemblages, which essentially fall under two groups, one group (Palynoassemblage-I, II and III) having dominance of striate disaccates along with presence of some stratigraphically significant taxa, belongs to Late Permian (Raniganj) palynoflora, while the other group (Palynoassemblages IV and V) shows sharp decline in percentage of characteristic taxa of first group, i.e., striate disaccates, and consequent rise or dominance of taeniate and cingulate cavate spores, belongs to Early Triassic (Panchet) palynoflora. Palynoassemblage-I, II and III (Group I) are characterized by dominance of striate disaccates chiefly, Striatopodocarpites spp. and Faunipollenites spp. Along with presence of rare but stratigraphically significant taxa, viz., Gondisporites raniganjensis, Falcisporites nuthaliensis, Klausipollenites schaubergeri, Chordasporites sp., Striomonosaccites, ovatus, Crescentipollenites multistriatus, Verticipollenites debiles, Strotersporites crassiletus, Guttulapollenites hannonicus, G. gondwanensis, Hamiapollenites insolitus, Corisaccites alutus, Lunatisporites ovatus, Weylandites spp. and Vitreisporites pallidus. Palynoassemblage-I is distinguished by significant presence of Densipollenites spp. while Palynoassemblage-II shows significant presence of Crescentipollenites spp. and Palynoassemblage-III differs from the above two assemblages in having significant presence of Guttulapollenites hannonicus. Palynoassemblage-IV (Group II) is characterized by high percentage of taeniate disaccates chiefly Lunatisporites spp., while Palynoassemblage-V (Group II) is characterized by cingulate-cavate trilete spores chiefly, Lundbladispora spp. and Densoisporites spp. Striate disaccates show a sharp decline in these two assemblages. In Chintalapudi area Late Permian and Early Triassic palynoflora has been recorded for the first time indicating existence of Raniganj and Panchet sediments as well. The study further supports the earlier studies of Jha and Srivastava (1996) that Kamthi Formation represents Early Triassic (=Panchet Formation) overlying Raniganj equivalent sediments with a gradational contact.

  18. Paleotectonic reconstruction of the central Tethys domain since the Late Permian: the DARIUS Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier, Eric; Vrielynck, Bruno; Brunet, Marie-Françoise; Robertson, Alastair; Sosson, Marc; Zanchi, Andrea; Brouillet, Jean-françois; Kaveh, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    The DARIUS Programme is a 4-years consortium sponsored by Major Oil Companies and Research Organizations. DARIUS drive together a group of academic scientific teams whose expertise includes several domains of tectonics (structural analysis, paleotectonic reconstructions, basin analysis, subsidence modeling), stratigraphy (paleontology, sequence stratigraphy, organic matter analysis), modeling, kinematics, and geophysics. The main objective is characterizing the tecto-stratigraphic evolution of a vast domain around Central Tethys extending from Black-Sea Anatolia in the west to western Central Asia in the east. One of the final products of the DARIUS Programme is a set of 20 paleotectonic maps of the DARIUS domain ranging in age from the Late Permian to Pliocene. In these maps we propose paleotectonic reconstructions of the south-central Eurasian and north African-Arabian plates starting after the Late Paleozoic Hercynian orogeny. These palinspastic maps are based on an up-to-date kinematics reconstruction of the African, Indian and Arabian plates with respect to Eurasia. For each map we depict the major tectonic-geodynamic features (i.e. the rifts, different types of basins, major orogens and fold belts, main transcurrent faults, subduction zones, accretionary prisms...) as well as the main paleofacies. Our reconstructions are based on an accurate timing of the tectonic events that have succeeded in the central Tethyan margins since the Late Paleozoic. These events include both the main orogenies resulting from collisions of major plates and blocks and the series of openings and inversions of basins that developed in the northern and southern Tethyan margins between the main collisions. Following the Variscian orogeny that ended in the Early Permian, the Mid to Late Triassic Eo- and Mid-Cimmerian orogenies are related to the collision of Gondwanian blocs with the Pangea margin after closure of the Paleo-Tethys oceanic domain. Then, for the rest of the Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic mainly developed: (1) a northward subduction of the Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere beneath the southern Eurasian margin, and (2) a passive margin bordering the African-Arabian plate to the North. In this latter plate, riftings and basins developed until Late Cretaceous when the Neo-tethys ophiolites were obducted onto the Arabian passive margin. On the contrary, the North Tethys active margin recorded a complex tectonic evolution characterized by: (1) the opening of back-arc and marginal basins during the Triassic to Early-Mid Cretaceous times (e.g. Black Sea, Great Caucasus, South Caspian, Central Iran, Amu-Darya and Tadjik basins), and (2) regional compressions associated with the inversions and/or closure of these basins. The main inversions are Mid-Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, and uppermost Cretaceous-Paleogene in age. The first collision between major plates began in the Early Eocene when the northern Indian and southern Eurasian margins collided. The second one is the Arabia-Eurasia collision, which initiated in the Late Eocene. Both developed until Present, originating the Himalaya and Tien-Shan ranges and the Alpine chains respectively. After the complete closure of the remnant Tethyan oceanic domain, at the beginning of Neogene, the continent-continent collisions were developing all along the southern Eurasian active margin.

  19. Numerical modelling of the thermal evolution of the northwestern Dniepr-Donets Basin (Ukraine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shymanovskyy, V. A.; Sachsenhofer, R. F.; Izart, A.; Li, Y.

    2004-03-01

    The Dniepr-Donets Basin (DDB) is a Late Devonian rift structure located within the East-European Craton. Numerical heat flow models for 13 wells calibrated with new maturity data were used to evaluate temporal and lateral heat flow variations in the northwestern part of the basin. The numerical models suggest that heat flow was relatively high during Late Carboniferous and/or Permian times. The relatively high heat flow is probably related to an Early Permian re-activation of tectonic activity. Reconstructed Early Permian heat flow values along the axial zone of the rift are about 60 mW/m 2 and increase to 90 mW/m 2 along the northern basin margin. These values are higher than those expected from tectonic models considering a single Late Devonian rifting phase. The calibration data are not sensitive to variations in the Devonian/Carboniferous heat flow. Therefore, the models do not allow deciding whether heat flows remained high after the Devonian rifting, or whether the reconstructed Permian heat flows represent a separate heating event. Analysis of the vitrinite reflectance data suggest that the northeastern Dniepr-Donets Basin is characterised by a low Mesozoic heat flow (30-35 mW/m 2), whereas the present-day heat flow is about 45 mW/m 2.

  20. Coal clasts in the carboniferous sediments of the Upper Silesian basin.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožušníková, Alena; Martinec, Petr; Pešek, J.; Valterová, P.

    Calgary : Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, 2002 - (Hills, L.), s. 895-901 - (Memoir. 19). [Carboniferous and permian of the world/14./. Calgary (CA), 17.08.1999-21.08.1999] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA205/97/0307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : carboniferous sediments * Upper Silesian basin Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  1. The formation of Serra Alta, Teresina and Rio do Rasto, Brazil, in the SP-23-PR (Permian, Passa Dois group, and the eastern border of the Parana basin) borehole; As Formacoes Serra Alta, Teresina e Rio do Rasto no furo de sondagem SP-23-PR (Permiano, Grupo Passa Dois, Borda Leste da Bacia do Parana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohn, Rosemarie; Lourenco, Augusto Tortolero Araujo [UNESP, Rio Claro (Brazil)]. E-mail: rohn@rc.unesp.br; atal20@bol.com.br; Meglhioratti, Thiago [UNESP, Rio Claro (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: madmaxth@yahoo.com.br

    2003-07-01

    The borehole SP-23-PR of the CPRM company, located in Congonhinhas-PR (UTM coord. 7374.863N/545.384E at an altitude of 953,64m), has the longest cored interval of the Passa Dois Group, in the eastern border of the Parana Basin. The Serra Alta and the Teresina formations and the Serrinha Member of the Rio do Rasto Formation, in an approximately 600 m long vertical succession, were analysed with emphasis to the lithofaciology and to the lithostratigraphic boundaries. Almost the whole interval is siliciclastic, but there are many carbonatic intercalations, which were studied in detail. The borehole shows a gradual contact between the Serra Alta and Teresina formations, suggesting a transition from distal and low energy environments to shallow or coastal settings of an interior sea, dominated by storm waves, in an intracratonic large basin. The carbonates of the Teresina Formation are decimetric, mainly micritic and oosparitic, frequently impure and amalgamated, with abundant ostracodes and endemic bivalves, correlationable for long distances (according to the interpreted other borehole wireline logs), and they were probably originated during drier climatic intervals. The boundary between the Teresina and the Rio do Rasto formations is abrupt, probably discordant, characterized by the appearance of thick sandstones, but still occurring micritic and coquine intercalations. There also appear abundant fossil conchostracans, which indicate continental aquatic environments. (author)

  2. Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources

  3. Upper Cisuralian palynology and palaeoclimate of Manuguru area Godavari basin, India and their global correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Pauline Sabina; Jha, Neerja

    2014-10-01

    The Permian system of the Palaeozoic Erathem is divided into three series, the Early Permian Cisuralian Series, the Middle Permian Guadalupian Series, and the Late Permian Lopingian Series. The Cisuralian Series encompasses the Asselian to Kungurian stages which constitute the basal part of the Gondwana supersequence I. In India, they are represented lithostratigraphically by the Talchir, Karharbari, and Barakar formations. This paper presents the palynological results from the Barakar Formation of the Upper Cisuralian Series from Manuguru which lies in the southeastern part of the Godavari basin. The succession studied comprises 35 subsurface samples from bore hole 1007 represented by clay, shale, sandstone, and coal. The palynofloras in this sequence have a homogenous composition demonstrating that not many significant floral changes took place through the considered stratigraphic range. The entire sequence is characterized by the dominance of nonstriate bisaccate genus Scheuringipollenites and sub-dominance of striate bisaccate genus Faunipollenites(= Protohaploxypinus). The other pollen genera among the nonstriate bisaccates are Rhizomaspora, Primuspollenites, Ibisporites, and Platysaccus. The striate bisaccates include Striatites, Striatopodocarpites, and Stroterosporites. The taeniate taxa are represented by Lueckisporites and Lunatisporites. The common monosaccate genera include Caheniasaccites, Potoniesporites, and Barakarites. Spores are less common and include Latosporites, Brevitriletes, Horriditriletes, Microbaculispora, and Callumispora. They characterize the palynofloral composition of the Lower Barakar Formation. The correlation of this assemblage with some of the biostratigraphic palynozones proposed previously for the Cisuralian sequences of the Paraná Basin of South America, Kalahari Karoo Basin of South Africa, Ruhuhu Basin of Tanzania, East Africa as well as palynoassemblages from South Victoria Land and Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica and Collie Basin of west Australia point out to their Early Permian (Late Sakmarian-Early Artinskian) age. Palynomorphs such as Botryococcus sp., Tetraporinia sp., Balmeela sp. and Leiosphaeridia sp. are also recorded which suggest that these sediments were deposited during post-glacial near shore, cool and humid environment.

  4. Upper Cisuralian palynology and palaeoclimate of Manuguru area Godavari basin, and their global correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pauline Sabina K; Neerja Jha

    2014-10-01

    The Permian system of the Palaeozoic Erathem is divided into three series, the Early Permian Cisuralian Series, the Middle Permian Guadalupian Series, and the Late Permian Lopingian Series. The Cisuralian Series encompasses the Asselian to Kungurian stages which constitute the basal part of the Gondwana supersequence I. In India, they are represented lithostratigraphically by the Talchir, Karharbari, and Barakar formations. This paper presents the palynological results from the Barakar Formation of the Upper Cisuralian Series from Manuguru which lies in the southeastern part of the Godavari basin. The succession studied comprises 35 subsurface samples from bore hole 1007 represented by clay, shale, sandstone, and coal. The palynofloras in this sequence have a homogenous composition demonstrating that not many significant floral changes took place through the considered stratigraphic range. The entire sequence is characterized by the dominance of nonstriate bisaccate genus Scheuringipollenites and subdominance of striate bisaccate genus Faunipollenites (=Protohaploxypinus). The other pollen genera among the nonstriate bisaccates are Rhizomaspora, Primuspollenites, Ibisporites, and Platysaccus. The striate bisaccates include Striatites, Striatopodocarpites, and Stroterosporites. The taeniate taxa are represented by Lueckisporites and Lunatisporites. The common monosaccate genera include Caheniasaccites, Potoniesporites, and Barakarites. Spores are less common and include Latosporites, Brevitriletes, Horriditriletes, Microbaculispora, and Callumispora. They characterize the palynofloral composition of the Lower Barakar Formation. The correlation of this assemblage with some of the biostratigraphic palynozones proposed previously for the Cisuralian sequences of the Paraná Basin of South America, Kalahari Karoo Basin of South Africa, Ruhuhu Basin of Tanzania, East Africa as well as palynoassemblages from South Victoria Land and Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica and Collie Basin of west Australia point out to their Early Permian (Late Sakmarian–Early Artinskian) age. Palynomorphs such as Botryococcus sp., Tetraporinia sp., Balmeela sp. and Leiosphaeridia sp. are also recorded which suggest that these sediments were deposited during post-glacial near shore, cool and humid environment.

  5. Carnivorous dinocephalian from the Middle Permian of Brazil and tetrapod dispersal in Pangaea

    OpenAIRE

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Abdala, Fernando; Atayman-Güven, Saniye; Rubidge, Bruce S.; ?engör, A. M. Celâl; Schultz, Cesar L

    2012-01-01

    The medial Permian (?270–260 Ma: Guadalupian) was a time of important tetrapod faunal changes, in particular reflecting a turnover from pelycosaurian- to therapsid-grade synapsids. Until now, most knowledge on tetrapod distribution during the medial Permian has come from fossils found in the South African Karoo and the Russian Platform, whereas other areas of Pangaea are still poorly known. We present evidence for the presence of a terrestrial carnivorous vertebrate from the Middle Permian of...

  6. Permian and Triassic Fluvial System in Central Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Sopeña, A.; Ramos, A.; Pérez-Arlucea, M.

    1989-01-01

    Permian and Triassic sedimentation in the Iberian Ranges, took place in a cratonic area inside the Iberian Plate. This Plate was undergoing an extensional regime because of its location between two broad rifting areas, the Tethys and the Protoatlantic. The evolution of these two major geotectonic realms resulted in the development of a complex multidirectional system of grabens and troughs, which transected the Variscan fold belt and its European foreland (Ziegler, 1988)....

  7. Petrified peat from a permian coal bed in antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J M

    1970-07-17

    Petrified plant remains that composed a Permian peat deposit occur at a coal horizon in a local area of Mount Augusta near the Beardmore Glacier in Antarctica. This discovery is the first in the entire Gondwana area that yields plant materials as exquisitely preserved as the materials of the well-known coal-ball localities of the Northern Hemisphere. A sampling of anatomical details is illustrated. PMID:17752538

  8. Petrified peat from a permian coal bed in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Petrified plant remains that composed a Permian peat deposit occur at a coal horizon in a local area of Mount Augusta near the Beardmore Glacier in Antarctica. This discovery is the first in the entire Gondwana area that yields plant materials as exquisitely preserved as the materials of the well-known coal-ball localities of the Northern Hemisphere. A sampling of anatomical details is illustrated.

  9. Repository site data and information in bedded salt: Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of data from the literature on the Palo Duro Basin. The Palo Duro Basin is a structural basin, about 150 miles long and 80 miles wide, that is a part of the much larger Permian Basin. The US Department of Energy is investigating the Palo Duro Basin as a potentially suitable area for the site of a repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Sediments overlying the Precambrian basement range from about 5000 to about 11,000 ft in thickness and from Cambrian to Holocene in age. The strata in the Palo Duro Basin that are of primary interest to the Department of Energy are the bedded salts of the Permian San Andres Formation. The total thickness of the bedded salts is about 2000 ft. The geology of the Palo Duro Basin is well understood. A great deal of information exists on the properties of salt, although much of the available information was not collected in the Palo Duro Basin. Mineral resources are not currently being exploited from the center of the Palo Duro Basin at depth, although the possibility of exploration for and development of such resources can not be ruled out. The continued existence of salts of Permian age indicates a lack of any large amount of circulating ground water. The hydrology of the pre-Tertiary rocks, however, is currently too poorly understood to carry out detailed, site-specific hydrologic modeling with a high degree of confidence. In general, ground water flows from west to east in the Basin. There is little or no hydraulic connection between aquifers above and below the salt sequences. Potable water is pumped from the Ogallala aquifer. Most of the other aquifers yield only nonpotable water. More extensive hydrological data are needed for detailed future modeling in support of risk assessment for a possible repository for high-level waste in the Palo Duro Basin. 464 references

  10. Numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow in the deep-basin brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedded Permian-age evaporite sequences in the Palo Duro Basin are being considered for a permanent nuclear waste repository by the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this modeling study is to provide an understanding of regional ground-water flow in the formations beneath the Permian evaporite section. From this understanding, more detailed, smaller scale studies can be designed. This study is also intended to provide a better understanding of the boundary conditions and permeabilities of the aquifer and aquitard system as well as provide estimates of ground-water travel times across the basin. Numerical simulations were made of the Wolfcamp aquifer modeled as a single layer and of the entire Deep-Basin Brine aquifer system, including the Wolfcamp aquifer, modeled as a single layer

  11. Study of an Uplift of Sargodha High by Stratigraphical and Structural Interpretation of an East-West Seismic Profile in Central Indus Basin, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Shazia Asim; Shahid Nadeem Qureshi; Nasir Khan

    2014-01-01

    Research Area comprises of Punjab Monocline, Sulaiman Foredeep and Eastern Part of Sulaiman Fold Belt (from east to west) in Central Indus Basin, Pakistan. Sargodha High is located in northeast of a Seismic Profile AB. Time and Depth models show the subsurface crustal variations near Sargodha High, which separates Upper Indus Basin from Central Indus Basin. The deposition of Pre-Cambrian sediments is uniform in area and Paleozoic sediments (Permian & Cambrian) are th...

  12. Permian ultrafelsic A-type granite from Besar Islands group, Johor, peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The granitic rocks of the peninsula have traditionally been divided into two provinces, i.e., Western and Eastern provinces, corresponding to S- and I-type granite respectively. The Western Province granite is characterised by megacrystic and coarse-grained biotite, tin-mineralised, continental collision granite, whereas, the Eastern Province granite is bimodal I-type dominated by granodiorite and associated gabbroic of arc type granite. This paper reports the occurrence of an A-type granite from peninsular Malaysia. The rocks occur in the Besar, Tengah, and Hujung islands located in the southeastern part of the peninsula. The granite is highly felsic with SiO2 ranging from 75.70% to 77.90% (differentiation index = 94.2-97.04). It is weakly peraluminous (average ACNK =1.02), has normative hypersthene (0.09-2.19%) and high alkali content (8.32-8.60%). The granites have many A-type characteristics, among them are shallow level of emplacement, high Ga, FeT/MgO and low P, Sr, Ti, CaO and Nb. Calculated zircon saturation temperatures for the Besar magma ranging from 793° to 806? is consistent with high temperature partial melting of a felsic infracrustal source which is taken as one of the mechanisms to produce A-type magma. The occurrence of the A-type granite can be related to the extensional back arc basin in the Indo-China terrane during the earliest Permian. (author)

  13. Organic richness and gas generation potential of Permian Barren Measures from Raniganj field, West Bengal, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, Annapurna; Ganapathi, S.

    2015-07-01

    The organic geochemistry of shales in terms of its organic richness, hydrocarbon source potential, thermal maturity, depositional environment, etc., are essential stipulations for shale gas resources assessment. In this study, a total of 32 core samples of Permian Barren Measures from four boreholes in Raniganj field of Damodar Basin were analysed to evaluate their gas generation potential using Rock-Eval pyrolysis techniques. Petrographic analysis brings out the lithofacies of Barren Measures as carbonaceous silty shale, iron rich claystone and sand-shale intercalation. The total organic content (TOC) of the shale units of Barren Measures ranges from 3.75 to 20.9 wt%, whereas hydrogen index (HI) ranges from 58.45 to 125.34 mg HC/g TOC. Present study suggests early to late maturated (0.6-1%) organic matters in Barren Measures with gas prone type III kerogen. The study analysed the effect of burial history on the preservation and maturation of organic matters. The organic richness, kerogen type, thermal maturity and petrographic properties of Barren Measures signify fair to excellent gas generation potential.

  14. Permian ultrafelsic A-type granite from Besar Islands group, Johor, peninsular Malaysia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Azman A Ghani; Fatin Izzani Hazad; Azmiah Jamil; Quek Long Xiang; Wan Nur Atiqah Wan Ismail; Sun-Lin Chung; Yu-Ming Lai; Muhammad Hatta Roselee; Nur Islami; Kyaw Kyaw Nyein; Meor Hakif Amir Hassan; Mohd Farid Abu Bakar; Mohd Rozi Umor

    2014-12-01

    The granitic rocks of the peninsula have traditionally been divided into two provinces, i.e., Western and Eastern provinces, corresponding to S- and I-type granite respectively. The Western Province granite is characterised by megacrystic and coarse-grained biotite, tin-mineralised, continental collision granite, whereas, the Eastern Province granite is bimodal I-type dominated by granodiorite and associated gabbroic of arc type granite. This paper reports the occurrence of an A-type granite from peninsular Malaysia. The rocks occur in the Besar, Tengah, and Hujung islands located in the southeastern part of the peninsula. The granite is highly felsic with SiO2 ranging from 75.70% to 77.90% (differentiation index = 94.2–97.04). It is weakly peraluminous (average ACNK=1.02), has normative hypersthene (0.09–2.19%) and high alkali content (8.32–8.60%). The granites have many A-type characteristics, among them are shallow level of emplacement, high Ga, FeT/MgO and low P, Sr, Ti, CaO and Nb. Calculated zircon saturation temperatures for the Besar magma ranging from 793° to 806°C is consistent with high temperature partial melting of a felsic infracrustal source which is taken as one of the mechanisms to produce A-type magma. The occurrence of the A-type granite can be related to the extensional back arc basin in the Indo-China terrane during the earliest Permian.

  15. Organic richness and gas generation potential of Permian Barren Measures from Raniganj field, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annapurna Boruah; S Ganapathi

    2015-07-01

    The organic geochemistry of shales in terms of its organic richness, hydrocarbon source potential, thermal maturity, depositional environment, etc., are essential stipulations for shale gas resources assessment. In this study, a total of 32 core samples of Permian Barren Measures from four boreholes in Raniganj field of Damodar Basin were analysed to evaluate their gas generation potential using Rock–Eval pyrolysis techniques. Petrographic analysis brings out the lithofacies of Barren Measures as carbonaceous silty shale, iron rich claystone and sand-shale intercalation. The total organic content (TOC) of the shale units of Barren Measures ranges from 3.75 to 20.9 wt%, whereas hydrogen index (HI) ranges from 58.45 to 125.34 mg HC/g TOC. Present study suggests early to late maturated (0.6–1%) organic matters in Barren Measures with gas prone type III kerogen. The study analysed the effect of burial history on the preservation and maturation of organic matters. The organic richness, kerogen type, thermal maturity and petrographic properties of Barren Measures signify fair to excellent gas generation potential.

  16. Gondwana basins and their coal resources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault bounded five Gondwana basins have been discovered in the north western Bangladesh. Among these basins show considerable amount of coal deposits. The Gondwana rocks are highly formed during the Permo-carboniferous diastrophism and later on acquired dynamic characters. In almost all basins, the Permian rocks overlie the Precambrian basement and underlie either the Tertiary or the Cretaceous sediments, structural, stratigraphic, and depositional history of these basins is more or less similar. The sedimentary sequences are composed of light to dark gray, fine to very coarse grained, sub angular to sub rounded felspathic sandstone, dark grey carbonaceous shale and sandstone, variegated conglomerate and thick coal seams (single seam max. 42.38m). The rocks are often alternated and bear the characteristics of cyclic sedimentation. The depositional environments varied from restricted drainage to open fluvial dominated low to moderate sinuous drainage system. The coal bearing basins were flanked by vegetated and swampy over bank. Age of these coals is suggested to be the late permian. Proved and probable reserves of coal in Jamalganj-Paharpur basin are 670 and 1,460 million metric tons, in Barapukuria basin 303 and 3899 million metric tons; in Barapukuria basin 303 and 389 million metric tons; and in Khalaspir basin 143 and 685 million metric tons respectively. The coal is high volatile, low sulphur, bituminous type. It can be used for different forms of thermal converssed for different forms of thermal conversion. (author)Fault bounded five Gondwana basins have been discovered in the north western Bangladesh. Among these basins show considerable amount of coal deposits. The Gondwana rocks are highly formed during the Permo-carboniferous diastrophism and later on acquired dynamic characters. In almost all basins, the Permian rocks overlie the Precambrian basement and underlie either the Tertiary or the Cretaceous sediments, structural, stratigraphic, and depositional history of these basins is more or less similar. The sedimentary sequences are composed of light to dark gray, fine to very coarse grained, sub angular to sub rounded felspathic sandstone, dark grey carbonaceous shale and sandstone, variegated conglomerate and thick coal seams (single seam max. 42.38m). The rocks are often alternated and bear the characteristics of cyclic sedimentation. The depositional environments varied from restricted drainage to open fluvial dominated low to moderate sinuous drainage system. The coal bearing basins were flanked by vegetated and swampy over bank. Age of these coals is suggested to be the late permian. Proved and probable reserves of coal in Jamalganj-Paharpur basin are 670 and 1,460 million metric tons, in Barapukuria basin 303 and 3899 million metric tons; in Barapukuria basin 303 and 389 million metric tons; and in Khalaspir basin 143 and 685 million metric tons respectively. The coal is high volatile, low sulphur, bituminous type. It can be used for different forms of thermal conver

  17. Ocean redox change at the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    Earth’s history is marked by multiple events of ocean anoxia developing along continental margins and po¬tentially into the open ocean realm. These events of¬ten coincide with the emplacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) on continents, major perturbations of global geochemical cycles and marine (mass) ex¬tinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic con¬ditions is, however, strongly debated and not well constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth’s physical, chemical and bi¬ological processes. We studied ocean redox change over the largest mass extinction event in Earth history, at the Permian-Tri¬assic boundary (at ~252 Ma). This event is marked by a major perturbation in the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon outgassing from the Siberian Traps. We measured redox-sensitive trace element concentrations (e.g. Mo, Cu, U) and the speciation of iron [Fe-HR/Fe-T and Fe-PY/ Fe- HR] in marine sediments from Svalbard (Festningen). We compare these data to additional, new, high-lati-tude data from eastern Greenland and the equatorial Tethys realm in Iran. We show that the Permian-Tri¬assic boundary at Svalbard is marked by 2 phases of euxinic (sulfidic) ocean conditions. An initial short phase at the onset of atmospheric carbon release is separated from a subsequent longer phase by a re¬turn to ferruginous ocean conditions (anoxic but not euxinic) coinciding with the main extinction event. Molybdenum enrichments, often indicative for freely available sulfide in the water-column, only occur dur¬ing the second phase of euxinia. This pattern of ocean redox-change in Svalbard direct¬ly reflects similar trends in Greenland and Iran. It sug¬gests a strongly decreased global ocean molybdenum (and possibly also ocean sulfate) inventory by massive molybdenum drawdown (and possibly pyrite buri¬al) at the onset of end-Permian atmospheric carbon release and leading up to the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. We compare these oceanographic changes to similar observations for the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction and discuss environmental forcing, poten¬tially inherent to major volcanic events and leading to global environmental change and extinction

  18. The Permian post-orogenic collapse in the Alps: insights from the Campo unit (Austroalpine nappes, N-Italy, SE-Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Benoît; Mohn, Geoffroy; Štípská, Pavla; Manatschal, Gianreto; Schulmann, Karel

    2014-05-01

    The final stage of the Variscan orogeny (310-270 Ma) is characterized by an intense tectonic, magmatic and metamorphic event. During the Permian, acid and mafic intrusions were emplaced at all crustal levels and are associated to high-temperature contact metamorphism. While most of the studies focus either on the formation of Permian basins or on the lower crustal magmatic and metamorphic evolution, the characterization of the middle crust is lacking. Therefore, this study aims to unravel the processes active at mid-crustal levels during the Permian. We investigate the contact aureole of the Sondalo gabbro emplaced in a mid-crustal position during the Permian, exposed in the Austroalpine Campo unit (N-Italy). This work is based on a multidisciplinary approach linking structural geology, metamorphic petrology and geochronology. The country rock of the gabbroic intrusion is composed of Grt-St micaschists and paragneisses indicating a prograde path in the amphibolite facies associated with the formation of a N-W steeply dipping S2 foliation. This foliation is pervasively reworked by a N-E trending sub-vertical S3 fabric made of Ms-Bt metasediments. This S3 fabric is also found in metapelitic septa in the core of the mafic intrusion, whereas in the narrow contact aureole a moderately dipping S4 fabric roughly parallel to the margins of the pluton is developed. From host-rock to the center of the intrusion, the metapelites show destabilization of muscovite, appearance of sillimanite, spinel, cordierite, crystallization of a large amount of garnet and finally disappearance of biotite and potassic feldspar. As a consequence, the kinzigitic restites of the contact aureole are replaced by Grt-Sil-Crd-Spl granulites in an intra-plutonic position. Qualitative P-T estimates indicate a barrovian prograde path during D2, similar to P-T evolutions found in other Austroalpine units (e.g. Ulten zone). Thermodynamic modelling of the high-grade granulites due to the thermal effect of the ~290 Ma (U-Pb on zircon) mafic intrusion give conditions of ~6 kbar and > 900°C. Our results bring constrains on the thermal and mechanical relation between the pluton and the host rock in the middle crust and confirm the mid-crustal position of the Campo unit during the Permian. Furthermore, this study highlights the contrasted evolution of mid-crustal levels compared to lower-crustal systems such as the Ivrea zone. Eventually at a larger scale, these results provide insights on the tectonic and magmatic processes and thermal conditions of the continental crust during Variscan post-orogenic evolution.

  19. Petroleum geology and resources of the Dnieper-Donets Basin, Ukraine and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmishek, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    The Dnieper-Donets basin is almost entirely in Ukraine, and it is the principal producer of hydrocarbons in that country. A small southeastern part of the basin is in Russia. The basin is bounded by the Voronezh high of the Russian craton to the northeast and by the Ukrainian shield to the southwest. The basin is principally a Late Devonian rift that is overlain by a Carboniferous to Early Permian postrift sag. The Devonian rift structure extends northwestward into the Pripyat basin of Belarus; the two basins are separated by the Bragin-Loev uplift, which is a Devonian volcanic center. Southeastward, the Dnieper-Donets basin has a gradational boundary with the Donbas foldbelt, which is a structurally inverted and deformed part of the basin. The sedimentary succession of the basin consists of four tectono-stratigraphic sequences. The prerift platform sequence includes Middle Devonian to lower Frasnian, mainly clastic, rocks that were deposited in an extensive intracratonic basin. 1 The Upper Devonian synrift sequence probably is as thick as 4?5 kilometers. It is composed of marine carbonate, clastic, and volcanic rocks and two salt formations, of Frasnian and Famennian age, that are deformed into salt domes and plugs. The postrift sag sequence consists of Carboniferous and Lower Permian clastic marine and alluvial deltaic rocks that are as thick as 11 kilometers in the southeastern part of the basin. The Lower Permian interval includes a salt formation that is an important regional seal for oil and gas fields. The basin was affected by strong compression in Artinskian (Early Permian) time, when southeastern basin areas were uplifted and deeply eroded and the Donbas foldbelt was formed. The postrift platform sequence includes Triassic through Tertiary rocks that were deposited in a shallow platform depression that extended far beyond the Dnieper-Donets basin boundaries. A single total petroleum system encompassing the entire sedimentary succession is identified in the Dnieper-Donets basin. Discovered reserves of the system are 1.6 billion barrels of oil and 59 trillion cubic feet of gas. More than one-half of the reserves are in Lower Permian rocks below the salt seal. Most of remaining reserves are in upper Visean-Serpukhovian (Lower Carboniferous) strata. The majority of discovered fields are in salt-cored anticlines or in drapes over Devonian horst blocks; little exploration has been conducted for stratigraphic traps. Synrift Upper Devonian carbonate reservoirs are almost unexplored. Two identified source-rock intervals are the black anoxic shales and carbonates in the lower Visean and Devonian sections. However, additional source rocks possibly are present in the deep central area of the basin. The role of Carboniferous coals as a source rock for gas is uncertain; no coal-related gas has been identified by the limited geochemical studies. The source rocks are in the gas-generation window over most of the basin area; consequently gas dominates over oil in the reserves. Three assessment units were identified in the Dnieper-Donets Paleozoic total petroleum system. The assessment unit that contains all discovered reserves embraces postrift Carboniferous and younger rocks. This unit also contains the largest portion of undiscovered resources, especially gas. Stratigraphic and combination structural and stratigraphic traps probably will be the prime targets for future exploration. The second assessment unit includes poorly known synrift Devonian rocks. Carbonate reef reservoirs along the basin margins probably will contain most of the undiscovered resources. The third assessment unit is an unconventional, continuous, basin-centered gas accumulation in Carboniferous low-permeability clastic rocks. The entire extent of this accumulation is unknown, but it occupies much of the basin area. Resources of this assessment unit were not estimated quantitatively.

  20. Evolution of a complex behavior: the origin and initial diversification of foliar galling by Permian insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachat, Sandra R.; Labandeira, Conrad C.

    2015-04-01

    A central notion of the early evolution of insect galling is that this unique behavior was uncommon to rare before the diversification of angiosperms 135 to 125 m.yr. ago. However, evidence accumulated during recent years shows that foliar galls were diverse and locally abundant as early as the Permian Period, 299 to 252 m.yr. ago. In particular, a diversity of leaf galling during the Early Permian has recently been documented by the plant-damage record of foliar galls and, now, our interpretation of the body-fossil record of culprit insect gallers. Small size is a prerequisite for gallers. Wing-length measurements of Permian insects indicate that several small-bodied hemipteroid lineages originated early during the Permian, some descendant lineages of which gall the leaves of seed plants to the present day. The earliest foliar gallers likely were Protopsyllidiidae (Hemiptera) and Lophioneuridae (Thripida). Much of the Early Permian was a xeric interval, and modern galls are most common in dry, extra-tropical habitats such as scrubland and deserts. Plant-damage, insect body fossils, and the paleoclimate record collectively support the ecological expansion of foliar galling during the Early Permian and its continued expansion through the Late Permian.

  1. The Permian volcanism of Sardinia revisited: new geochronological and geochemical data as a key for geodynamic evolution of the western Peri-Tethian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Gretter, Nicola; Lago, Marceliano; Langone, Antonio; Oggiano, Giacomo; Ronchi, Ausonio

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have confirmed the important role played by magmatism affecting Sardinian basins during the latest Carboniferous and Permian age (Cortesogno et al. 1998; Buzzi et al., 2008; Casini et al., 2012). To-date, most of the geochronological analysis performed on the Permian volcanic events in the island are methodologically overcome and frequently not in tune with the stratigraphy. In the north-western and central-southeastern Sardinian basins (Nurra, Perdasdefogu, Seui-Seulo and Escalaplano), the late-post Variscan tectonic collapse favored the emplacement of a calc-alkaline products not only in the form of generally shallow intrusions but also volcanism within intramontane strike-slip basins. This magmatism is expressed both as pyroclastic rocks-lava flows filling small half-graben basins and hypabyssal intrusions (lava-domes and dykes). These volcano-sedimentary troughs generally include both external and internal igneous eruptions as well as the detrital products eroded from the surrounding structural highs. Rhyolites, andesites and dacites are the main rock types while trachydacites and trachyandesites are less represented. Our goal is to couple the petrographic and geochemical features of 17 selected samples stratigraphically constrained and new U-Pb ages data on zircons from the post-Variscan effusive rocks in Sardinia. The whole-rock and REE geochemical features confirm a progressive evolution in the post-Variscan extensional, trans-tensile regime in with and fits an origin in a stacking of nappes associated with thermal re-equilibration of lithospheric mantle and telescopic partial melting of the thickened crust. The process is dominated by AFC. As far as the geochronological analysis is concerned, a preliminary cathodoluminescence study has been performed on all mounted crystals in order to select the precise location of the shot points. Each crystal has been analyzed for U, Th and Pb in the epoxy mount by laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA ICP-MS) at the Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources IGG-CNR of Pavia. The time lag of Permian ages recorded along the Sardinia cross section is significant in the modeling of the post- Variscan tectonic, sedimentary evolution and in the perspective of the geodynamic evolution of Southern Variscides. REFERENCES Casini L., Cuccuru S., Maino M., Oggiano G., Tiepolo M 2012. Emplacement of the Arzachena Pluton (Corsica-Sardinia Batholith) and the geodynamics of incoming Pangaea. Tectonophysics 544-545 (2012) 31-49. Buzzi L., Gaggero L., Oggiano G. 2008. The Santa Giusta ignimbrite (NW Sardinia): a clue for the magmatic, structural and sedimentary evolution of a Variscan segment between Early Permian and Triassic. Italian Journal of Geoscience 127(3), 683-695. Cortesogno L., Cassinis G., Dallagiovanna G., Gaggero L., Oggiano G., Ronchi A., Seno S., Vanossi M. 1998. The Variscan post-collisional volcanism in Late Carboniferous-Permian sequences of Ligurian Alps, Southern Alps and Sardinia (Italy): a synthesis. Lithos 45, 305-328.

  2. Youngest dinocephalian fossils extend the Tapinocephalus Zone, Karoo Basin, South Africa

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Michael O., Day; Saniye, Güven; Fernando, Abdala; Sifelani, Jirah; Bruce, Rubidge; John, Almond.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The dinocephalians (Synapsida, Therapsida) were one of the dominant tetrapod groups of the Middle Permian (Guadalupian Epoch, ~270-260 million years ago) and are most abundantly recorded in the Tapinocephalus Assemblage Zone (AZ) of the Main Karoo Basin, South Africa. Dinocephalians are thought to h [...] ave become extinct near the top of the Abrahamskraal Formation of the Beaufort Group and their disappearance is one criterion used to define the base of the overlying Pristerognathus AZ. Because of the abundance of fossils in the Karoo, the Beaufort Group biozones form the biostratigraphic standard for later Permian terrestrial tetrapod ecosystems, so their stratigraphic delineation is of great importance to Permian palaeobiology. We report two new specimens of the rare tapinocephalid dinocephalian Criocephalosaurus from the lowermost Poortjie Member, which makes them the youngest dinocephalians known from the Main Karoo Basin and extends the Tapinocephalus AZ from the Abrahamskraal Formation up into the Teekloof Formation. The extension of the Tapinocephalus AZ relative to the lithostratigraphy potentially affects the biozone or biozones to which a fossil species can be attributed; this extension has implications for biostratigraphic correlations within the Main Karoo Basin as well as with other basins across Gondwana. These discoveries also indicate that a population of herbivorous tapinocephalids survived as rare constituents of the tetrapod fauna after most generic richness within the clade had already been lost.

  3. Deep-seated salt dissolution in the Delaware basin, Texas and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterns of salt dissolution in the Delaware Basin are related to the bedrock geometry and hydrology that developed following uplift, tilting, and erosion in the late Cenozoic, and the greatest volume of salt has been removed since that time. During the Permian, some salt was dissolved from the top of the Castile Formation before deposition of the Salado Formation and from the top of the Salado before deposition of the Rustler Formation. In addition, some salt dissolution occurred after the Permian and before the Cretaceous. Post-uplift surface dissolution has progressed across the Delaware Basin from south to north and west to east and generally down the regional dip. Deep-seated dissolution has occurred around the margin of the basin where the Capitan Limestone aquifer is in contact with the Permian evaporites and within the basin where selective dissolution in the lower Salado has undercut the overlying salt beds of the middle and upper Salado. Dissolution has not advanced down regional dip uniformly but has left outliers of salt and has progressed selectively into structurally predisposed areas. This selective advance has significance for the stability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site

  4. Geochemical evidence from Lower Permian volcanic rocks of northeast New South Wales for asthenospheric upwelling following slab breakoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ca 280 Ma Alum Mountain Volcanics and Werrie Basalt were erupted in northeast New South Wales, Australia, during Early Permian lithospheric extension that separated discrete episodes of subduction of Carboniferous and Late Permian - Triassic age. The Alum Mountain rocks, which are preserved in two major synclines in the southeast Tamworth Belt, are mostly basalt, but andesite and rhyolite are also present. The Werrie Basalt found further north in the Tamworth Belt and in the floor of the Gunnedah Basin is composed mainly of basalt, but includes more evolved rocks in the vicinity of several eruptive centres. The Alum Mountain rocks have REE abundances similar to N-MORB, with flat REE patterns, (La/Sm)N ratios ranging from 0.54 to 1.07, and (La/Yb)N ratios from 0.94 to 2.78, suggesting an origin by large degrees of partial melting of asthenosphere at a depth Nd values, ranging from +2.05 to +6.00, suggesting an asthenospheric origin for these rocks. Spider diagrams show a clear negative Nb anomaly, typical of subduction zones, but LREE/HREE [(La/Sm)N = 1.61 to 2.20; (La/Yb)N = 5.07 to 8.81], Ti/Zr, and Ti/P ratios are close to OIB values. The enriched character of the Werrie Basalt has resulted from either asthenospheric melts being progressively modified during ascent of fractionating magmas through the lithosphere, or by partial melting of a mantle metasomatised by subduction. The presence of a significant depleted-mantle component in the signature of the Lower Permian volcanic rocks indicates rise of the local mantle geotherm to allow extensive melting. We therefore propose a model of asthenospheric upwelling and lateral flow following breakoff of the Carboniferous subducting slab. Our model of asthenospheric convection as derived from eastern Australia suggests a major role for the asthenosphere in subduction zones: not only is the asthenosphere the reservoir from which magmatic arc melts originate, but we surmise that the behaviour of asthenospheric mantle at subduction zones may have far-reaching implications for the overall thermal state of the planet. Copyright (2001) Geological Society of Australia

  5. The salt that wasn't there: Mudflat facies equivalents to halite of the Permian Rustler Formation, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four halite beds of the Permian Restler Formation in southeastern New Mexico thin dramatically over horst lateral distances to correlative classic (mudstone) beds. The mudstones have long been considered residues after post-burial dissolution (subrosion) of halite, assumed to have been deposited continuously across the area. Hydraulic properties of the Culebra Dolomite Member have often been related to Rustler subrosion. In cores and three shafts at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), however, these mudstones display flat bedding, graded bedding, cross-bedding, erosional contacts, and channels filled with intraformational conglomerates. Cutans indicate early stages of soil development during subaerial exposure. Smeared intraclasts developed locally as halite was removed syndepositionally during subaerial exposure. The authors interpret these beds as facies formed in salt-pan or hypersaline-lagoon, transitional, and mudflat environments. Halite is distributed approximately as it was deposited. Breccia in limited areas along one halite margin indicates post-burial dissolution, and these breccials are key to identifying areas of subrosion. A depositional model accounts for observed sedimentary features of Restler mudstones. Marked facies and thickness changes are consistent with influence by subsidence boundaries, as found in some modern continental evaporites. A subrosion model accounts for limited brecciated zones along (depositional)halite margins, but bedding observed in the mudstones would not survive 90% reduction in rock volume. Depositional margins for these halite beds will be useful in reconstructing detailed subsidence history of the Late Permian in the northern Delaware Basin, It also no longer is tenable to attribute large variations in Culebra transmissivity to Rustler subrosion

  6. Characterization of an upper Permian tight gas reservoir. A multidisciplinary, multiscale analysis from the rotliegend, northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antrett, Philipp [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Energy and Mineral Resources Group

    2013-06-01

    Outstanding Ph.D. thesis nominated for a Springer Theses Prize by the RWTH Aachen University, Germany. Uses various approaches and covers a broad range of disciplines. Integrated study, carried out on multiple scales with state of the art technical equipment, that only few laboratories can offer worldwide. ''The thesis of Philipp Antrett is focused on reservoir properties, petrography, lithofacies and sedimentology, core analysis and nanoporosity studies. It will be of major interest for colleagues involved in the exploration and production of tight gas reservoirs in Northern Europe and elsewhere.'' - Francois Roure, August 2012 This thesis describes a multidisciplinary, multiscale approach to the analysis of tight gas reservoirs. It focused initially on the facies architecture of a Permian tight gas field in the Southern Permian Basin (SPB), East Frisia, northern Germany. To improve field development, 3D seismic data, wireline and core data were compared to a reservoir analogue in the Panamint Valley, California, United States. In addition to the large scale approach, a work flow that investigates microporosity by combining Scanning Electron Microscopy-Broad Ion Beam (SEM-BIB) and optical microscopy was developed. For a better understanding of the depositional environment and reservoir rock distribution in the SPB, a sedimentary facies analysis of four cores from the tight gas field in East Frisia was compared to a second study area in northern central Germany. This study demonstrates that tight gas exploration and production requires multidisciplinary, multiscale approaches beyond standard seismic interpretation work flows to better understand the temporal and spatial evolution of these complex reservoirs.

  7. Namurian and Westphalian coal tonsteins and K-bentonites in the Upper Silesian basin, Czech Republic - major elements,trace elements chemistry and magmatic affinities.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinec, Petr; Jakubec, M.

    Calgary : Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, 2002 - (Hills, L.), s. 910-923 - (Memoir. 19). [Carboniferous and permian of the world/14./. Calgary (CA), 17.08.1999-21.08.1999] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA3013903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : coal tonsteins * Upper Silesian basin Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  8. Pumping test and fluid sampling report - Sawyer No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Texas: unanalyzed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes pumping test and fluid sampling activities performed at the Sawyer No. 1 well, Donley County, Texas. Sawyer No. 1 well is located along the eastern margin of the Palo Duro Basin in an area of active dissolution within the Permian salt section. These data were collected by Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation working in conjunction with the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology as part of a nationwide program to identify potential locations for a nuclear waste repository. These data support studies to determine the hydrologic characteristics of deep water-bearing formations. Formation fluid studies samples were analyzed in order to evaluate fluid migration and age relationships in the Permian Basin. These data were collected from June until October, 1981. Zone isolation for pump testing was accomplished in November, 1981. These data are preliminary. They have been neither analyzed nor evaluated

  9. Fungal event and palynological record of ecological crisis and recovery across the Permian-Triassic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshet, Yoram; Rampino, Michael R.; Visscher, Henk

    1995-11-01

    The end of the Permian Period was marked by the most severe mass extinction in the geologic record. Detailed quantitative study of pollen and spores from shallow-marine deposits spanning the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary in Israel reveals a sequence of palynological-ecological stages reflecting a major crisis among land plants. The disappearance of the gymnosperm-dominated palynoflora of the Late Permian Lueckisporites virkkiae Zone is recorded at a claystone horizon containing almost exclusively abundant fungal remains and carbonized terrestrial plant debris. This “fungal spike” is followed by a zone dominated by marine acritarchs and a succession showing ecological recovery with abundant lycopod spores and eventual reappearance of bisaccate gymnosperm pollen in the Early Triassic. The latest Permian proliferation of fungi is recognizable worldwide and can be correlated with other paleontological and geochemical markers of a global ecological disaster.

  10. A well-defined Permian biogeographic unit: Peninsular Thailand and northwest Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Henri; Chonglakmani, Chongpan; bin Amnan, Ibrahim; Piyasin, Sangat

    A great quantity of new data has been gathered on the Ratburi Limestone of Peninsular Thailand and the Chuping Limestone of northwest Peninsular Malaysia. These two limestones are not restricted to the Permian as was thought in the past; they include Triassic outcrops which are apparently less widespread than the Permian limestone which displays conspicuous palaeontological peculiarities. A well-defined biogeographic unit is derived from the new data.

  11. Geochemical changes at the Permian–Triassic transition in Southern Alps and adjacent area: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Aymon Baud

    2005-01-01

    Compilation of the recent literature from the Southern Alps and adjacent area confirms the geochemical variations of unusual amplitudes during the Permian-Triassic boundary interval (PTBI). A great attention has been given to the negative ?13C anomaly within the Tesero Member close to the Permian-Triassic boundary. Very detailed geochemical works have been done on the scientific Gartnerkofel core (Gk-1) and on the Slovenian sections. Major minor and rare earth elements (REE) data are reported...

  12. Palaeotethys seawater temperature rise and an intensified hydrological cycle following the end-Permian mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schobben, Martin; Joachimski, Michael M.; Korn, Dieter; Leda, Lucyna; Korte, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction has been associated with severe global warming. Main stage volcanism of the Siberian Traps occurred at or near the extinction interval and has been proposed as a likely greenhouse catalyst. In this study, a high-resolution ?18O record is established using diagenetically resistant apatite of conodonts and low-Mg calcite of brachiopods from stratigraphically well-constrained Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary successions in northwestern Iran. A new evaluation is made ...

  13. Palaeogeographic implications of differential inclination shallowing in permo-carboniferous sediments from the donets basin, Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Iosifidi, Alexandr G.; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Khramov, Alexei N.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Popov, Viktor V.

    2010-01-01

    We present new palaeomagnetic data from Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian grey and red sediments from the Donets Basin, Ukraine, part of the Palaeozoic East European Platform. Detailed demagnetization of these units reveals two ancient components of magnetization: component "B", which is carried by magnetite and pigmentary haematite, and a high unblocking temperature component "C", present only in the red beds, carried by detrital haematite. The "B" and "C" components both pass fold tests...

  14. Oxidoreduction processus in a uranium deposit (Aumance - Cerilly Permian basin, Allier (France))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratigraphic and tectonic data are briefly reviewed. Then a method giving the oxidoreducing properties of elements and using the chemical oxygen demand is exposed. The study of secondary textures shows the effects of the oxidoreducing process. Three pyrite textures were identified at Cerilly by petrographic observations. They are always bound to a secondary enrichment in uranium and they can be used as an exploration guide. Application of factor analysis confirms the studied phenomenon

  15. Borehole televiewer improves completion results in a permian basin San Andres reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerke, E.A.; Van Akkeren, T.J.

    1988-02-01

    The borehole televiewer (BHTV) is an acoustic logging tool that has a fine vertical resolution (1/3 in. (8.5 mm)) that is extremely useful for detecting bedding orientation, thin high-permeability zones, lithology changes, and zones of secondary or vuggy porosity. BHTV logs were acquired from 10 wells during the recent infill drilling of the North Hobbs (Grayburg/San Andres) Unit. These logs, when correlated with conventional logs and core data, have improved completion strategies, resulting in higher oil and lower water production in new infill wells.

  16. Molecular and organic petrological characteristics of Permian bituminous coals in the Boskovice Basin, eastern Bohemian Massif.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franc?, E.; Franc?, J.; Sýkorová, Ivana

    Oviedo : Instituto Nacionál del Carbón, 2008. s. 101. ISBN 978-84-691-6213-2. [International Conference on Coal and organic Petrology , ICCP – TSOP Joint Meeting. 21.09.2008-27.09.2008, Oviedo] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA300460804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : bituminous coal * hydrocarbons * macerals Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  17. Petroleum source rock potential and thermal maturity, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Samples collected from 20 geographically widespread wells in the sparsely drilled Palo Duro Basin were analyzed for total organic carbon content (TOC). Highest values of TOC, up to 6.9%, occur in Upper Permian San Andres dolomite in the southern part of the basin. Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) basinal shales contain up to 2.4% TOC and are fair to very good source rocks. Kerogen color and vitrinite reflectance, which indicate maximum paleotemperatures, were analyzed in all samples containing greater than 0.5% TOC. Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian kerogen is yellow orange to orange, an indication that temperatures were sufficiently high to begin to generate hydrocarbons from lipid-rich organic material. Palo Duro Basin samples have a broad range of vitrinite reflectance values, but populations with the lowest reflectance probably indicate the true temperatures that were reached in the basin. Average reflectance in representative Pennsylvanian vitrinite is 0.52%; in Wolfcampian samples the average reflectance is 0.48%. These values are consistent with kerogen color and suggest that basinal source rocks may have begun to generate hydrocarbons.

  18. Late Permian global coal hiatus linked to {sup 13}C depleted CO{sub 2} flux into the atmosphere during the final consolidation of Pangea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, K.; Dewit, M.J.; Willis, J.P. [University of Cape Town, Rondesbosch (South Africa). Dept. of Geological sciences

    1995-06-01

    At a time when all continents were finally arrayed in their Pangea supercontinental configuration (250 {+-} 50 Ma), Earth`s stratigraphy records a global and very abrupt coal discontinuity. From the Tartarian stage of the Late Permian to the Middle Triassic, reduced coal productivity and/or preservation overlaps with a period of anomalous oceanic and atmospheric decrease in {sup 13}C, as recorded in marine carbonates and organic matter, and terrestrial plant and animal fossils from the Northern and Southern hemispheres. During the same short period, the peripheral margin of the entire supercontinent Pangea, except for the southern shores of Tethys, was effectively under compressive stress. This unique tectonic state caused deformation and uplift of coal-bearing foreland basins and oxidation of Pangea`s vast peat deposits. The latter resulted in a rapid, massive {sup 13}C-depleted CO{sub 2} flux into the atmosphere, which in turn may have forced global warming.

  19. Application of Markov chain and entropy analysis to lithologic succession – an example from the early Permian Barakar Formation, Bellampalli coalfield, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Chandra Tewari; D P Singh; Z A Khan

    2009-10-01

    A statistical approach by a modi?ed Markov process model and entropy function is used to prove that the early Permian Barakar Formation of the Bellampalli coal ?eld developed distinct cyclicities during deposition.From results,the transition path of lithological states typical for the Bellampalli basin is as:coarse to medium-grained sandstone $\\longrightarrow $ interbedded ?ne-grained sandstone/shale $\\longrightarrow $ shale $\\longrightarrow $ coal and again shale.The majority of cycles are symmetrical but asymmetrical cycles are present as well.The chi-square stationarity test implies that these cycles are stationary in space and time.The cycles are interpreted in terms of in-channel,point bar and overbank facies association in a ?uvial system.The randomness in the occurrence of facies within a cycle is evaluated in terms of entropy,which can be calculated from the Markov matrices.Two types of entropies are calculated for every facies state;entropy after deposition (post)and entropy before deposition (pre),which together form entropy set;the entropy for the whole system is also calculated.These values are plotted and compared with Hattori ’s idealized plots,which indicate that the sequence is essentially a symmetrical cycle (type-B of Hattroi). The symmetrical cyclical deposition of early Permian Barakar Formation is explained by the lateral migration of stream channels in response to varying discharge and rate of deposition across the alluvial plain.In addition,the ?ning upward cycles in the upper part enclosing thick beds of ?ne clastics,as well as coal may represent differential subsidence of depositional basin.

  20. An Early Permian fusuline fauna from southernmost Peninsular Thailand: Discovery of Early Permian warming spikes in the peri-Gondwanan Sibumasu Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Katsumi; Arita, Michiko; Meno, Satomi; Sardsud, Apsorn; Saesaengseerung, Doungrutai

    2015-05-01

    An Early Permian fusuline fauna is reported from the Tarn To Formation of the Yala area in southernmost Peninsular Thailand, which geotectonically belongs to the peri-Gondwanan Sibumasu Block. The fauna consists of Pseudofusulina and Praeskinnerella? species, including forms closely resembling Tethyan and Panthalassan Pseudofusulina fusiformis and Pseudofusulina ex gr. kraffti. A Yakhtashian-Bolorian age is estimated for this fauna. In Sibumasu, shallow-marine biotas showing similar Tethyan affinities, such as the fusulines Misellina and alatoconchid bivalves, also occur in the Early Permian succession of the Kinta Valley area in western Peninsular Malaysia. These unusual Tethyan faunas within Early Permian peri-Gondwanan fossil records suggest episodic influences from paleo-tropical Tethyan biotas. They are here interpreted as showing short-term warming spikes during the late Yakhtashian-Bolorian transgression, which would facilitate sporadic migration and temporal inhabitation of warm-water dwellers into the eastern Cimmerian areas. The Yala and Kinta Valley fusuline and other invertebrate faunas would give us a new insight for the Permian geohistory and environmental change of the peri-Gondwanan Sibumasu Block.

  1. 300 million years of basin evolution - the thermotectonic history of the Ukrainian Donbas Foldbelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, C.; Danisik, M.; Sachsenhofer, R.; Frisch, W.; Privalov, V.

    2009-04-01

    The Ukrainian-Russian Pripyat-Dniepr-Donets Basin is a large intracratonic rift structure formed during the Late Devonian. It is situated at the southern margin of the Precambrian East European Craton, adjacent to the Hercynian Tethyan belt in the Black Sea area and the Alpine Caucasus orogen. With a sediment thickness of more than 20 km, it is one of the deepest sedimentary basins on earth. The eastern part of the Pripyat-Dniepr-Donets Basin - called Donbas foldbelt - is strongly folded and inverted. Proposed models of basin evolution are often controversial and numerous issues are still a matter of speculation, particularly the erosion history and the timing of basin inversion. Basin inversion may have taken place during the Permian related to the Uralian orogeny, or in response to Alpine tectonics during the Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary. We investigated the low-temperature thermal history of the Donbas Foldbelt and the adjacent Ukrainian shield by a combination of zircon fission track, apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology. Although apatite fission track ages of all sedimentary samples were reset shortly after deposition during the Carboniferous, we took advantage of the fact that samples contained kinetically variable apatites, which are sensitive to different temperatures. By using statistic-based component analysis incorporating physical properties of individual grains we identified several distinct age population, ranging from late Permian (~265 Ma) to the Late Cretaceous (70 Ma). We could thus constrain the thermal history of the Donbas Foldbelt and the adjacent basement during a ~300 Myr long time period. The Precambrian crystalline basement of the Ukrainian shield was affected by a Permo-Triassic thermal event associated with magmatic activity, which also strongly heated the sediments of the Donbas Foldbelt. The basement rocks cooled to near-surface conditions during the Early to Middle Triassic and since then was thermally stable. The basin margins started to cool during the Permo-Triassic whereas the central parts were residing or slowly cooling through the apatite partial annealing zone during the Jurassic and most of the Cretaceous and eventually cooled to near-surface conditions around the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Our data show that Permian erosion was lower and Mesozoic erosion larger than generally assumed. Inversion and pop-up of the Donbas Foldbelt occurred in the Cretaceous and not in the Permian as previously thought. This is indicated by overall Cretaceous apatite fission track ages in the central parts of the basin.

  2. The nature and geochemical role of density convection in the East European evaporite basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V. G.; Abdrakhmanov, R. F.; Puchkov, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    The role of the gravitation factor in the formation of the hydrostratisphere in the East European evaporate basin is considered. The features of Paleozoic sedimentation are characterized, as are the mechanism and litho-hydrogeochemical effects of the density concentration convection of mother brines of the Low-Permian salt-bearing basin to the underlying terrigenous-carbonate Paleozoic and Proterozoic layers. It is shown that the convection processes resulted in the formation of multicomponent calcium chloride brines prevailing in the sedimentary layer of the basis; they also caused the metasomatic dolomitization of limestones with growth of their filtration capacity.

  3. Late Permian brachiopoda fauna in north-western Iran

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yousefirad, Mostafa; Khamooshi, Touran; Shaabanian, Rahim.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La secuencia marina del Pérmico superior en el noroeste de Irán y el este de Azerbaiyán, sección estatigráfica de Zal, fue seleccionada para este estudio de braquiópodos. Las muestras fueron tomadas en las formaciones Ali Bashi y Jolfa. Se reconocieron 27 especies de 13 géneros de braquiópodos en es [...] te análisis. Las muestras recolectadas fueron comparadas con sus similares de otras regiones de Irán y de la región del Tetis, lo que sugirió el período de tardío de Dzhulfan como la proveniencia de estos depósitos. Los braquiópodos reconocidos en este trabajo pertenecen a las familias de Athyris, Rhynconellida, Productida y Strophomenida. Abstract in english The Late Permian marine sequence in the north- west of Iran, in eastern Azerbaijan province in the Zal stratigraphic section, was selected for studying brachiopods. Samples were collected from the Ali Bashi and Jolfa Formation.S. Twenty-seven species from 13 brachiopoda genera were recognised in thi [...] s study.The recognised fossil community was compared to brachiopod communities in some regions of Iran and the Tethyan region, suggesting the Late Dzhulfian period as the age for the deposits being studied. Recognized brachiopods belonge to the orders Athyris, Rhynconellida, Productida and Strophomenida.

  4. Simulated warm polar currents during the middle Permian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winguth, A.M.E.; Kutzbach, J.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Center for Climatic Research; Heinze, C.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Mikolajewicz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Rowley, D.; Rees, A.; Ziegler, A.M. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Geophysical Sciences

    2001-05-01

    During Permian Stage 6 (Wordian, Kazanian) the Pangaean supercontinent was surrounded by a superocean - Panthalassa. An ocean general circulation model has been coupled to an atmospheric energy balance model to simulate the sensitivity of the Wordian climate ({proportional_to}265 million years ago) to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, high latitude geography, and Earth orbital configurations. The model shows a high sensitivity of the ocean circulation to changes in the greenhouse gas forcing, ranging from a forceful southern circulation at low CO{sub 2} concentration (present level) to a more symmetric circulation cell with deep water formation in both hemispheres at high CO{sub 2} concentration (8 x present level). The simulated climate with 4 x present level CO{sub 2} concentration agrees generally well with climate-sensitive sediments and phytogeographic patterns. In this experiment, the model simulates strong subtropical gyres with similarities to the modern South Pacific circulation and moderate surface temperatures on the southern continent Gondwana, resulting from a strong poleward heat transport in the ocean. An even more moderate climate can be generated if high latitude land is removed so that ocean currents can penetrate into the polar regions or if orbital configurations favor high summer insolation over Gondwana. (orig.)

  5. The Alashan Terrane did not amalgamate with North China block by the Late Permian: Evidence from Carboniferous and Permian paleomagnetic results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei; Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-05-01

    Rock magnetic and paleomagnetic studies have been carried out on the early Carboniferous limestones and the Late Permian purple sandstones sampled in the eastern Alashan Terrane (ALT), northwest of China. Two components were isolated from the Early Carboniferous limestone by thermal progressive demagnetisation: a low unblocking temperature component (LTC) of recent origin; a pre-folding medium temperature component (MTC) (the paleomagnetic pole is ? = 13.1°N, ? = 11.0°E, A95 = 7.0°) that is probably the result of the hydrothermal fluids from the Qilian Orgenic Belt acquired during the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian. Also, two components were separated from the Late Permian purple sandstone by thermal progressive demagnetisation: the LTC with the recent viscous remanent magnetisation, and the higher temperature component (HTC) revealed from three sections which has passed a regional fold test at the 95% probability level and reversal test, suggesting a primary characteristic magnetisation. The corresponding paleomagnetic pole is ? = 27.2° N, ? = 18.8° E, A95 = 12.0°. The apparent polar wander path (including early Carboniferous, late Carboniferous-Early Permian, Late Permian and Early-middle Triassic poles) of the ALT is significantly different with those of the NCB. Comparison of the APWPs between the ALT and NCB shows a strong similarity. If the APWP of Hexi Corridor-Alashan rotated counterclockwise around an Euler pole at 44°N, 84°E by 32°, then the coeval APW path of the ALT overlaps to that of the NCB. This result indicates that the ALT migrated to the NCB after the Early-Middle Triassic along a tectonic boundary located between Helanshan Mountain and Zhuozishan Mountain, and finally amalgamated to the NCB before the Early Cretaceous.

  6. Raining lead around 250mya a smoking gun for an Australian impact origin of the Permian Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Standard, J C

    2003-01-01

    Recent documentation of extreme atmospheric sulfur and methane contents at the time of the vast Permo-Triassic (P-T) extinction makes it possible to interpret an observation that has lain unnoticed in the geological literature for 40 years. This is the finding of microscopic metallic lead tear drops in the fluvial strata of the early Triassic sandstones that overlie Permian coal beds and other sedimentary deposits in the Sydney basin of Australia. Elemental lead is almost unknown in nature, so its occurrence in these graphite-loaded sandstones is a provocative finding. While climate change and vulcanism could explain the carbon and sulfur anomalies, the only way to account for metallic lead aerodynamic droplets is by massive impact and vaporization of lead mineral-containing formations. Since lead occurs geologically as the sulfide and since lead is an easily reduced element, its occurrence in conjunction with sulfur and carbon count anomalies suggests a bolide impact on carbon-loaded strata in a sulfide mine...

  7. Paratingia wudensis sp. nov., a whole noeggerathialean plant preserved in an earliest Permian air fall tuff in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, J.; Pfefferkorn, H. W.; Bek, Ji?í

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 96, ?. 9 (2009), s. 1676-1689. ISSN 0002-9122 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA301110701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : noeggerathiales * whole plant reconstruction * in situ spores * Permian * Permian (China) Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.684, year: 2009

  8. Late Palaeozoic palynomorph assemblages from the Karoo Supergroup and their potential for biostratigraphic correlation, Kalahari Karoo Basin, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Modie B N; Le Hérissé A

    2009-01-01

    Late Carbonifeous to Permian core samples from two borehole sections, STRAT 1 and CKP 6, that penetrate the glacial to postglacial and coal-bearing Lower Karoo sequence, Kalahari Karoo Basin, Botswana, contain well preserved pollen and spore palynomorphs. The palynomorph assemblages comprise 165 species of spores and pollen, and few acritarchs and chlorophycean algae. This paper presents a local biozonation of three succeeding assemblage zones, recognisable in each borehole section. The assem...

  9. Crustal architecture of the Donets Basin: tectonic implications for diamond and mercury-antimony mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boorder, H.; van Beek, A. J. J.; Dijkstra, A. H.; Galetsky, L. S.; Koldewe, G.; Panov, B. S.

    1996-12-01

    Kimberlite-like rocks and minor diamond finds are reported in the Precambrian Ukrainian Shield south of the Donets Basin. Prolific mercury-antimony mineralization occurs in Carboniferous quartz arenites within the Basin. The tectonic setting is examined on the basis of recent data compilations and ongoing research in the Ukraine and Voronezh shield areas and the Pripyat-Dnieper-Donets palaeorift. In the Donets region, a straightforward analogy of any diamond district with the Archangelsk province is not likely in the absence of a Proterozoic shear comparable with the White Sea-Belomorian Mobile Belt. A deep-reaching, NNW-striking lithosphere lineament is identified here as the Kharkov-Donetsk lineament. It transects the rift between the Donets and Dnieper basins. The structures involved in this lineament have controlled Palaeozoic sedimentation and the extent of Late Permian inversion of the Donets basin. During the inversion, the lineament and associated deep-reaching longitudinal structures provided pathways for the migration of mineralizing fluids from deep levels in the lower crust and upper mantle. The intersection, in the Kharkov area, of this lineament with a northeasterly striking lithosphere root should focus diamond exploration towards the northern shoulders of the rift. The extreme attenuation of the crust beneath the Donets Basin, relative to the western basins of the rift, is associated with crustal detachment and subsidence during and possibly after inversion, concomitant with emplacement of asthenospheric materials at higher levels. Together with the continued subsidence in the western Donets Basin, during the Late Permian inversion, this invokes a tectonic setting for the Hg sbnd Sb mineralization not unlike the orogenic-collapse-associated settings of Hg sbnd Sb deposits in western Europe. Further investigation of the geodynamics of the Donets Basin would benefit from deep reflection seismics, petrogenetic studies of magmatic products and their xenoliths, and satellite remote sensing analysis.

  10. Faulting in the northern Palo Duro Basin, Texas: Revision 1, Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Location, vertical displacement, and latest detectable movement have been determined for 90 faults identified in the northern Palo Duro Basin of Texas. The interpretations are based on lithostratigraphic correlations, using geophysical logs and sample logs from 905 wells across 12 counties, and seismic surveys conducted in portions of six counties. The stratigraphic interval studied extends from crystalline basement (Precambrian) to the Alibates Formation (Upper Permian). Most of the faults strike northwest, have near vertical dips, and are associated with the Amarillo Uplift, Oldham Nose, and/or the saddle separating them. Horizontal displacements were not determined. The maximum vertical displacement observed is nearly 6300 ft (1920 m), with maximum offsets on individual faults commonly in the 1000-to 3000-ft (300-to 910-m) range. About half of the faults extend onto the Lower Permian section, and at least 12 of those offset the Alibates Formation. 62 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs

  11. The Donbas Foldbelt: its relationships with the uninverted Donets segment of the Dniepr Donets Basin, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovba, S. M.; Stephenson, R. A.

    1999-11-01

    The Donbas Foldbelt (DF) is a thrust-faulted and folded, inverted, segment of the Dniepr-Donets Basin (DDB). It lies between the Scythian and East European platforms north of the Black Sea and is conventionally thought to have formed in the Early Permian as part of the late Palaeozoic Hercynian-Uralian orogenic frame of cratonic Europe. The DDB itself formed as a result of Late Devonian intracratonic rifting and contains a thick, up to 22 km, late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary succession. The deformed strata preserved at the erosional surface of the DF are mainly Carboniferous. The Donets segment of the DDB displays mild inversion structures that are transitional to those in the DF. Recently acquired regional seismic reflection data in the Donets part of the DDB allow these structures to be imaged in the subsurface for the first time. A widespread Early Permian unconformity occurring throughout the DDB is much more pronounced on its southern margin than on its northern one and appears to be related to profound uplift of the southern flank of the basin and the neighbouring Ukrainian Shield rather than to crustal shortening. Faults associated with the Early Permian unconformity are extensional in style. Gentle folds and other local structures in the southern flank and axis of the Donets segment are mainly located in areas associated with Early Permian salt movements. No significant development of compressional structures of Early Permian age can be seen in the seismic data where it is available. In contrast, there is ample evidence of latest Cretaceous-earliest Tertiary compressional deformation in the DDB, including the subsurface expression of structures along strike of the main folds of the DF. A review of geological evidence in the DF also indicates that the main period of shortening that can be definitely constrained in time is latest Cretaceous-earliest Tertiary. The eastern part of the DF records intense Late Triassic-aged (Cimmerian) deformation but none of clearly Permian age. It is tentatively concluded that the main phases of (trans)compressional tectonics forming the DF were Cimmerian and, especially, Alpine rather than Hercynian-Uralian.

  12. Anatomy of a Permian Erg sequence: the De La Cuesta Formation (northwestern Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the Permian red beds of the La Cuesta Formation (Sierra de Narvaez, northwestern Argentina) which is composed of sandstones associated with mud stones and subordinate conglomerates. The sediments obtained from the interaction between aeolian and ephemeral fluvial systems, are represented by aeolian dune, dry aeolian inter dune and aeolian sand sheet, mud flat, wet aeolian inter dune, and fluvial deposits

  13. Carnivorous dinocephalian from the Middle Permian of Brazil and tetrapod dispersal in Pangaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Juan Carlos; Abdala, Fernando; Atayman-Güven, Saniye; Rubidge, Bruce S; ?engörc, A M Celâl; Schultz, Cesar L

    2012-01-31

    The medial Permian (~270-260 Ma: Guadalupian) was a time of important tetrapod faunal changes, in particular reflecting a turnover from pelycosaurian- to therapsid-grade synapsids. Until now, most knowledge on tetrapod distribution during the medial Permian has come from fossils found in the South African Karoo and the Russian Platform, whereas other areas of Pangaea are still poorly known. We present evidence for the presence of a terrestrial carnivorous vertebrate from the Middle Permian of South America based on a complete skull. Pampaphoneus biccai gen. et sp. nov. was a dinocephalian "mammal-like reptile" member of the Anteosauridae, an early therapsid predator clade known only from the Middle Permian of Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and South Africa. The genus is characterized, among other features, by postorbital bosses, short, bulbous postcanines, and strongly recurved canines. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the Brazilian dinocephalian occupies a middle position within the Anteosauridae, reinforcing the model of a global distribution for therapsids as early as the Guadalupian. The close phylogenetic relationship of the Brazilian species to dinocephalians from South Africa and the Russian Platform suggests a closer faunistic relationship between South America and eastern Europe than previously thought, lending support to a Pangaea B-type continental reconstruction. PMID:22307615

  14. Stratigraphy and palynostratigraphy, Karoo Supergroup (Permian and Triassic), mid-Zambezi Valley, southern Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambe, Imasiku A.; Utting, John

    1997-05-01

    The Karoo Supergroup outcropst in the mid-Zambezi Valley, southern Zambia. It is underlain by the Sinakumbe Group of Ordovician to Devonian age. The Lower Karoo Group (Late Carboniferous to Permian age) consists of the basal Siankondobo Sandstone Formation, which comprises three facies, overlain by the Gwembe Coal Formation with its economically important coal deposits, in turn overlain by the Madumabisa Mudstone Formation which consists of lacustrine mudstone, calcilutite, sandstone, and concretionary calcareous beds. The Upper Karoo Group (Triassic to Early Jurassic) is sub-divided into the coarsely arenaceous Escarpment Grit, overlain by the fining upwards Interbedded Sandstone and Mudstone, Red Sandstone; and Batoka Basalt Formations. Palynomorph assemblages suggest that the Siankondobo Sandstone Formation is Late Carboniferous (Gzhelian) to Early Permian (Asselian to Early Sakmarian) in age, the Gwembe Coal Formation Early Permian (Artinskian to Kungurian), the Madumabisa Mudstone Late Permian (Tatarian), and the Interbedded Sandstone and Mudstone Early or Middle Triassic (Late Scythian or Anisian). The marked quantitative variations in the assemblages are due partly to age differences, but they also reflect vegetational differences resulting from different paleoclimates and different facies. The low thermal maturity of the formations (Thermal Alteration Index 2) suggests that the rocks are oil prone. However, the general scarcity of amorphous kerogen, such as the alga Botryococcus sp., and the low proportion of exinous material, indicates a low potential for liquid hydrocarbons. Gas may have been generated, particularly in the coal seams of the Gwembe Coal Formation, that are more deeply buried.

  15. Water-rock-CO2 interactions in saline aquifers aimed for carbon dioxide storage: Experimental and numerical modeling studies of the Rio Bonito Formation (Permian), southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineral trapping is one of the safest ways to store CO2 underground as C will be immobilized in a solid phase. Carbon dioxide will be, therefore, sequestered for geological periods of time, helping to diminish greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate global warming. Although mineral trapping is considered a fairly long process, owing to the existence of kinetic barriers for mineral precipitation, it has been demonstrated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. Here the results of experimental and numerical modeling studies performed in sandstones of the saline aquifer of the Rio Bonito Formation, Parana Basin, are presented. The Rio Bonito Formation consists of paralic sandstones deposited in the intracratonic Parana Basin, southern Brazil, during the Permian (Artinskian-Kungurian). These rocks have the largest potential for CO2 storage because of their appropriated reservoir quality, depth and proximity to the most important stationary CO2 sources in Brazil. Here it is suggested that CO2 can be permanently stored as carbonates as CO2 reacts with rocks of the Rio Bonito Formation and forms CaCO3 at temperatures and pressures similar to those encountered for CO2 storage in geological formations. Results of this work will be useful for studies of partitioning mechanisms for C trapping in CO2 storage programs.

  16. Water-rock-CO{sub 2} interactions in saline aquifers aimed for carbon dioxide storage: Experimental and numerical modeling studies of the Rio Bonito Formation (Permian), southern Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketzer, J.M. [Brazilian Carbon Storage Research Center, Pontifical Catholic University, Av. Ipiranga 6681, Building 96J, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Iglesias, R., E-mail: rsiglesias@gmail.com [Brazilian Carbon Storage Research Center, Pontifical Catholic University, Av. Ipiranga 6681, Building 96J, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Einloft, S.; Dullius, J.; Ligabue, R.; Lima, V. de [Brazilian Carbon Storage Research Center, Pontifical Catholic University, Av. Ipiranga 6681, Building 96J, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2009-05-15

    Mineral trapping is one of the safest ways to store CO{sub 2} underground as C will be immobilized in a solid phase. Carbon dioxide will be, therefore, sequestered for geological periods of time, helping to diminish greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate global warming. Although mineral trapping is considered a fairly long process, owing to the existence of kinetic barriers for mineral precipitation, it has been demonstrated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. Here the results of experimental and numerical modeling studies performed in sandstones of the saline aquifer of the Rio Bonito Formation, Parana Basin, are presented. The Rio Bonito Formation consists of paralic sandstones deposited in the intracratonic Parana Basin, southern Brazil, during the Permian (Artinskian-Kungurian). These rocks have the largest potential for CO{sub 2} storage because of their appropriated reservoir quality, depth and proximity to the most important stationary CO{sub 2} sources in Brazil. Here it is suggested that CO{sub 2} can be permanently stored as carbonates as CO{sub 2} reacts with rocks of the Rio Bonito Formation and forms CaCO{sub 3} at temperatures and pressures similar to those encountered for CO{sub 2} storage in geological formations. Results of this work will be useful for studies of partitioning mechanisms for C trapping in CO{sub 2} storage programs.

  17. The Saint Martin de Belleville syncline and its uraniferous permian sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation (these de specialite) is a study of the geology of the St.Martin d.B. syncline and the uranium prospect 'le Cochet' in the Carboniferous Brianconnais Zone of Savoy. Stratigraphy and sedimentology: This syncline presents continental detrital sediments ranging from U.Carboniferous to L.Triassic. In the U.Carboniferous, magmatic activity begins with the Moriaz Layers acid volcanics that are considered as a lateral equivalent of the Stephanian Courchevel Conglomerates. In Permian times, parts of an alluvial fan seem to occupy the north of the study area (gray and green conglomeratic sandstone). Southwards these inter-finger with flood plain sediments (red slate) including a locally oolitic limestone. Volcanic detritus is important in the Permian. Tourmalinite pebbles are frequent and seem to be related to the regional Permian magmatism. Albitization of feldspars is general in the Carboniferous and the Permian. The Permo-triassic typically shows microcline bearing dolomitic sandstones. In the Scythian quartzites orthoclase is the dominant feldspar. The quartzites are overlain by L.Triassic evaporites identified by the sulfur isotope ratio of their gypsum. The morphology of the zircons in the sandstones has been investigated using the typological method of J.P. Pupin. Regional Permian magmatism apparently produces volcanics of the calc-alkalic and tholeiitic series as well as a high level granitic intrusion of anatectic origin. The uranium occurrences are strata-bound on a kilometric and hecto-metric scale. They are developed almost exclusively in the gray variety of the Permian sandstones whose gray and red varieties are always barren. Within this unit, the mineralization impregnates irregularly distributed lenses and pods of coal material. Uranium is accompanied by vanadium occurring as roscoelite. The association U-V, of bio-philic character, reflects the concentration in the sedimentary environment and argues for a quite indirect relation with the source rocks. The mineralization is regarded as syn-genetic or more probably early epigenetic of Permian age, related to surface or groundwater flow that precipitated its metal content on wooden debris ('trash piles') in the host rocks. Alpine deformation resulted in folds and strong schistosity striking N2O that almost obliterate north verging transverse folds. The deformation caused plastic flow of the mineralized carbonaceous material on a metric scale. This material is now commonly found in lenses parallel to schistosity. Metamorphism is at the epizone/anchizone limit with a barrovian to high pressure gradient. It had practically no effect on the mineralization. (author)

  18. Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tverdokhlebov, Valentin P.; Tverdokhlebova, Galina I.; Minikh, Alla V.; Surkov, Mikhail V.; Benton, Michael J.

    2005-02-01

    Fossil fishes and tetrapods (amphibians and reptiles) have been discovered at 81 localities in the Upper Permian of the Southern Urals area of European Russia. The first sites were found in the 1940s, and subsequent surveys have revealed many more. Broad-scale stratigraphic schemes have been published, but full documentation of the rich tetrapod faunas has not been presented before. The area of richest deposits covers some 900,000 km 2 of territory between Samara on the River Volga in the NW, and Orenburg and Sakmara in the SW. A continental succession, some 3 km thick, of mudstones, siltstones, and sandstones, deposited on mudflats and in small rivers flowing off the Ural Mountain chain, span the last two stages of the Permian (Kazanian, Tatarian). The succession is divided into seven successive units of Kazanian (Kalinovskaya, Osinovskaya, and Belebey svitas, in succession) and Tatarian age, which is further subdivided into the early Tatatian Urzhumian Gorizont (Bolshekinelskaya and Amanakskaya svitas, in succession), and the late Tatarian Severodvinian (Vyazovskaya and Malokinelskaya svitas, of equivalent age) and Vyatkian gorizonts (Kulchumovskaya and Kutulukskaya svitas, of equivalent age). This succession documents major climatic changes, with increasing aridity through the Late Permian. The climate changes are manifested in changing sedimentation and the spread of dryland plants, and peak aridity was achieved right at the Permo-Triassic (PTr) boundary, coincident with global warming. Uplift of the Urals and extinction of land plants led to stripping of soils and massive run-off from the mountains; these phenomena have been identified at the PTr boundary elsewhere (South Africa, Australia) and this may be a key part of the end-Permian mass extinction. The succession of Late Permian fish and tetrapod faunas in Russia documents their richness and diversity before the mass extinction. The terminal Permian Kulchomovskaya and Kutulukskaya svitas have yielded respectively some 6 and 13 species of fishes (sharks, bony fishes, lungfishes) and 11 and 14 species of tetrapods (aquatic amphibians, herbivorous and carnivorous reptiles of all sizes up to the hippo-sized pareiasaurs and sabre-toothed gorgonopsians). Immediately following the end-Permian environmental catastrophe, earliest Triassic faunas consisted only of a few fish taxa and small, aquatic tetrapods, in low-diversity, low-abundance assemblages.

  19. Structural features and evolution of the Dniepr-Donets Basin, Ukraine, from regional seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovba, S.; Stephenson, R. A.; Kivshik, M.

    1996-12-01

    A set of regional multichannel seismic reflection profiles crossing the Dniepr-Donets (DD) Basin in Ukraine, 100-200 km long and with a spacing of 10-15 km along strike illuminates the structure of the whole sedimentary cover. The rift, filled with pre- and syn-rift Devonian sequences and overlain with post-rift Carboniferous, Permian, Mesozoic and Palaeogene fill, is clearly seen on all sections. A 'basement' layer, previously identified as a Riphean rift succession by refraction seismic studies constitutes, in the main, strata of the Devonian and Early Carboniferous successions. The structure of the rift is characterised by large-scale rotational fault blocks and half-grabens, carried by basin-parallel to normal marginal faults or by major horst blocks. The total thickness of the Devonian and younger succession is up to 19 km in the study area. Post-rift Carboniferous and Mesozoic sediments cover the rift flanks and increase in thickness towards the rift axis and to the southeast. The cumulative thickness of the Carboniferous succession alone reaches 11 km, with the maximum depth of their base at about 15 km. Major post-rift tectonic events took place at the end of early Visean, in the middle of Serpukhovian, in Permian times, and between the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Tectonic reactivations during Carboniferous and Early Permian times were most pronounced in the southeastern part of the DD Basin, while they were least pronounced in the northwestern part of the basin merging with the Pripyat Trough where they are barely observed. The most active development of salt structures and stocks corresponds with the periods of tectonic reactivation.

  20. Ostracods (Crustacea associated with microbialites across the Permian-Triassic boundary in Dajiang (Guizhou Province, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Beatrice FOREL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available 26 samples were processed for a taxonomic study of ostracods from the Upper Permian (Changhsingian - Lower Triassic (Griesbachian interval of the Dajiang section, Guizhou Province, South China. 112 species belonging to 27 genera are recognized. Five new species are described: Acratia candyae sp. nov, Bairdia adelineae sp. nov., Bairdia? huberti sp. nov., Bairdia jeromei sp. nov., Orthobairdia jeanlouisi sp. nov. The unexpected survival faunas associated with microbial formations in the aftermath of the end-Permian extinction are documented for the first time. Ostracod biodiversity variations and palaeo-environmental modifications associated with microbial growth through the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB are discussed.

  1. Species of the medullosan ovule Stephanospermum from the Lopingian (late Permian) floras of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Alan R. T.; Wang, Shi-Jun; Dunn, Michael T.; Hilton, Jason

    2013-10-01

    The medullosan pteridosperm ovule Stephanospermum Brongniart is a well-known component of Carboniferous aged coal-ball and siderite nodule floras from North America and Europe but also occurs in the Permian floras of Cathaysia where it is represented by the Lopingian (late Permian) aged species Stephanospermum trunctatum (Li) Wang et al. (2009) from coal-balls in the Wangjiazhai Formation in Southern China. We provide a detailed emendation of S. trunctatum and illustrate it comprehensively for the first time, and document an additional specimen from the Wangjiazhai Formation coal-ball assemblage that we assign to Stephanospermum shuichengensis sp. nov. S. shuichengensis is distinguished from S. trunctatum by the absence of apical teeth in the sclerotesta and non-obovate base. The two species of Stephanospermum from the Wangjiazhai Formation are important as they extend the stratigraphic and geographical range of the genus from the Pennsylvanian of Euramerica into the Lopingian of Southern China, and demonstrate that the genus persisted in wetland, peat forming environments in the run up to the end-Permian mass extinction event. The 44 MY stratigraphic discontinuity between the Euramerican and the Cathaysian species, here named the Stephanospermum gap, leads us to infer that the genus was likely to have occurred in the Pennsylvanian-Permian successions of southern Russia and northern China that are geographically and stratigraphically intermediate to the known occurrences but from which the genus has yet to be discovered. Medullosan pteridosperms appear to have become extinct at or immediately prior to the Permian-Triassic boundary that coincides with the Permo-Trias mass extinction event; although the exact causes of this loss in plant diversity remains unknown, a response to regional climatic drying is likely to have been a contributing factor.

  2. Using conodont elements to distinguish Permian-Triassic boundary disconformity near Haftad Gholleh, central Iran

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mostafa, Yousefirad; Somayeh, Ghanbari; Mahnaz, Parvanehnejad Shirazi.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio se enfoca en la estatigrafía del Límite Pérmico-Triásico en el área de Haftad Gholleh, al este de Arak y al norte de Mahallat, centro de Irán. Este límite de discordancia erosiva, al igual que en otras secuencias iraníes relacionadas al período Pérmico, contiene calizas dolomías, [...] esquistos y areniscas discordantes localizadas debajo de la secuencia Triásica. En una medida estratigráfica detallada del área de estudio se encontraron conodontas del Límite Pérmico-Triásico (PTB, por sus siglas en inglés). Se reconocieron tres áreas de conodontas, lo que ubica esta sección del PTB como bioestatigráfica precisa. Una de las secuencias superiores del Pérmico pertenece al período Guadalupiense. La secuencia Triásica consiste en calizas con capas vermiculitas coloreadas de esquisto que pertenecen al período Triásico temprano. La discordancia del Límite Pérmico Triásico, entonces, representa un lapso cercano a los 10 millones de años. Abstract in english The present study focuses on the stratigraphy of the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Haftad Gholleh area in eastern Arak and north of Mahallat,located in central Iran. This boundary of erosional unconformity or disconformity and as in other Iranian sequences related to the Permian period, contains [...] dolomitic limestone and shale and sandstone disconformably located below the Triassic sequence. A detailed measured stratigraphic section has provided conodonts from the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) sequences in the area being studied. Three conodont areas have been recognied which place the PTB in this section by precise biostratigraphy. One of the most upper Permian sequences belongs to the Guadalupian period. The Triassic sequence consists of vermiculate limestone layers with coloured shale inter beds belonging to the Early Triassic period; unconformity at the Permian-Triassic boundary therefore represents a hiatus of about 10 million years.

  3. Stratigraphic and palaeoenvironmental framework of the Early Permian sequence in the Salt Range, Pakistan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shahid Ghazi; Nigel P Mountney; Aftab Ahmad Butt; Sadaf Sharif

    2012-10-01

    The Early Permian Gondwana regime succession of the Nilawahan Group is exposed only in the Salt Range of Pakistan. After a prolonged episode of non-deposition that spanned much of the Palaeozoic, the 350 m thick predominantly clastic sequence of the Nilawahan Group records a late glacial and post-glacial episode in which a range of glacio-fluvial, marine and fluvial environments evolved and accumulated. The Early Permian succession of the Salt Range has been classified into four formations, which together indicates a changing climatic regime during the Early Permian in the Salt Range region. The lower-most, Tobra Formation unconformably overlies a Cambrian sequence and is composed of tillite, diamictite and fresh water facies, which contain a floral assemblage (Gangamopteris and Glossopteris) that confirms an Asselian age. The Tobra Formation is overlain by marginal marine deposits of the Dandot Formation (Sakmarian), which contain an abundant brachiopods assemblage (Eurydesma and Conularia). Accumulation of the Dandot Formation was terminated by a regional sea-level fall and a change to the deposition of the fluvial deposits of the Warchha Sandstone (Artinskian). The Warchha Sandstone was deposited by high sinuosity meandering, avulsion prone river with well developed floodplains. This episode of fluvial sedimentation was terminated by a widespread marine transgression, as represented by the abrupt upward transition to the overlying shallow marine Sardhai Formation (Kungurian). The Early Permian Gondwana sequence represented by the Nilawahan Group is capped by predominantly shallow shelf carbonate deposits of the Tethyan realm. The sedimentologic and stratigraphic relationship of these four lithostratigraphic units in the Salt Range reveals a complex stratigraphic history for the Early Permian, which is mainly controlled by eustatic sea-level change due to climatic variation associated with climatic amelioration at the end of the major Gondwana glacial episode, and the gradual regional northward drift to a lower latitude of the Indian plate.

  4. Microbialites and global environmental change across the Permian-Triassic boundary: a synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, S; Crasquin, S; Li, Y; Collin, P-Y; Forel, M-B; Mu, X; Baud, A; Wang, Y; Xie, S; Maurer, F; Guo, L

    2012-01-01

    Permian-Triassic boundary microbialites (PTBMs) are thin (0.05-15 m) carbonates formed after the end-Permian mass extinction. They comprise Renalcis-group calcimicrobes, microbially mediated micrite, presumed inorganic micrite, calcite cement (some may be microbially influenced) and shelly faunas. PTBMs are abundant in low-latitude shallow-marine carbonate shelves in central Tethyan continents but are rare in higher latitudes, likely inhibited by clastic supply on Pangaea margins. PTBMs occupied broadly similar environments to Late Permian reefs in Tethys, but extended into deeper waters. Late Permian reefs are also rich in microbes (and cements), so post-extinction seawater carbonate saturation was likely similar to the Late Permian. However, PTBMs lack widespread abundant inorganic carbonate cement fans, so a previous interpretation that anoxic bicarbonate-rich water upwelled to rapidly increase carbonate saturation of shallow seawater, post-extinction, is problematic. Preliminary pyrite framboid evidence shows anoxia in PTBM facies, but interbedded shelly faunas indicate oxygenated water, perhaps there was short-term pulsing of normally saturated anoxic water from the oxygen-minimum zone to surface waters. In Tethys, PTBMs show geographic variations: (i) in south China, PTBMs are mostly thrombolites in open shelf settings, largely recrystallised, with remnant structure of Renalcis-group calcimicrobes; (ii) in south Turkey, in shallow waters, stromatolites and thrombolites, lacking calcimicrobes, are interbedded, likely depth-controlled; and (iii) in the Middle East, especially Iran, stromatolites and thrombolites (calcimicrobes uncommon) occur in different sites on open shelves, where controls are unclear. Thus, PTBMs were under more complex control than previously portrayed, with local facies control playing a significant role in their structure and composition. PMID:22077322

  5. Vinna Basin.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hon?k, J.; Franc?, J.; Mikuláš, Radek; Pešek, J.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Tomanová-Petrová, P.

    Prague : Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 223-241 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. Stratigraphic review of the Parecis Basin, Amazonian Region; Revisao estratigrafica da Bacia dos Parecis - Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahia, Ruy B.C. [Companhia de Pesquisa de Recursos Minerais (CPRM/REPO), Porto Velho, RO (Brazil). Servico Geologico do Brasil. Residencia de Porto Velho], email: ruybahia@pv.cprm.gov.br; Martins-Neto, Marcelo A.; Barbosa, Maria Silvia C. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (DEGEO/UFOP), MG (Brazil). Escola de Minas. Dept. de Geologia], emails: marcelo@nupetro.com.br, silvia@nupetro.com.br; Pedreira, Augusto J. [Companhia de Pesquisa de Recursos Minerais (CPRM/Sureg-SA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Servico Geologico do Brasil. Superintendencia de Salvador], email: ajpedreira@terra.com.br

    2006-12-15

    The Parecis basin is located in central-western Brazil, on the southwestern part of the Amazon Craton, between the Rondonia and Guapore fold belts. From west to east, the Parecis basin can be divided into three tectonic-sedimentary domains: a tectonic low to the west, a central compartment characterized by a negative gravimetric anomaly, and a interior sag to the east. During the Paleozoic (Ordovician to Early Permian), the Amazon region was affected by an extensional event, when the Cacoal, Furnas, Ponta Grossa, Pimenta Bueno e Fazenda da Casa Branca formations were deposited in the Parecis basin. The Cacoal Formation is composed of conglomerates, wackes, shales and dolomites, interpreted as deposited in alluvial fans, deltas and lakes. The pebbly sandstones and shales of the Furnas and Ponta Grossa formations are interpreted as deposited, respectively, in tidal flats and marine environments. Glacial or glacial-influenced environments are suggested for the conglomerates, sandstones and shales of the Pimenta Bueno and Fazenda da Casa Branca formations. The sedimentary record of Parecis basin shows a stratigraphic gap from Permian to Triassic. Mesozoic volcanic and sedimentary successions record another extensional event in the Amazon region. This event is represented in the Parecis basin by the eolian sandstones of the Jurassic Rio Avila Formation and the basalts of the Anari and Tapirapua formations. The sandstones of the Parecis Group have been deposited during the Cretaceous in fluvial and eolian environments. Cretaceous kimberlite bodies cut the sediments in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the Parecis basin. Cenozoic sandstones and mud stones cover unconformably the deposits of the Parecis basin. (author)

  7. Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L.S.; Kelley, S.A.; Blackwell, D.D.; Naeser, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    New heat-flow values for seven sites in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, were determined using high-precision temperature logs and thermal conductivity measurements from nearly 300 core plugs. Three of the sites are on the northern shelf, three sites are in the deep basin, and one site is in the frontal fault zone of the northern Wichita Mountains. The heat flow decreased from 55 to 64 mW/m2 in the north, and from 39 to 54 mW/m2 in the south, due to a decrease in heat generation in the underlying basement rock toward the south. Lateral lithologic changes in the basin, combined with the change in heat flow across the basin, resulted in an unusual pattern of thermal maturity. The vitrinite reflectance values of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford formation are highest 30-40 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. The offset in highest reflectance values is due to the contrast in thermal conductivity between the Pennsylvanian "granite wash" section adjacent to the Wichita uplift and the Pennsylvanian shale section to the north. The geothermal gradient in the low-conductivity shale section is elevated relative to the geothermal gradient in the high-conductivity "granite wash" section, thus displacing the highest temperatures to the north of the deepest part of the basin. Apatite fission-track, vitrinite reflectance, and heat-flow data were used to constrain regional aspects of the burial history of the Anadarko basin. By combining these data sets, we infer that at least 1.5 km of denudation has occurred at two sites in the deep Anadarko basin since the early to middle Cenozoic (40 ?? 10 m.y.). The timing of the onset of denudation in the southern Anadarko basin coincides with the period of late Eocene erosion observed in the southern Rocky Mountains and in the northern Great Plains. Burial history models for two wells from the deep Anadarko basin predict that shales of the Woodford formation passed through the hydrocarbon maturity window by the end of the Permian section in the deep basin moved into the hydrocarbon maturity window during Mesozoic burial of the region. Presently, the depth interval of the main zone of oil maturation (% Ro = 0.7-0.9) is approximately 2800-3800 m in the eastern deep basin basin and 2200-3000 m in the western deep basin. The greater depth to the top of the oil maturity zone and larger depth range of the zone in the eastern part of the deep basin are due to the lower heat flow associated with more mafic basement toward the east. The burial history model for the northern shelf indicates that the Woodford formation has been in the early oil maturity zone since the Early Permian.

  8. Late Palaeozoic palynomorph assemblages from the Karoo Supergroup and their potential for biostratigraphic correlation, Kalahari Karoo Basin, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modie B N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Late Carbonifeous to Permian core samples from two borehole sections, STRAT 1 and CKP 6, that penetrate the glacial to postglacial and coal-bearing Lower Karoo sequence, Kalahari Karoo Basin, Botswana, contain well preserved pollen and spore palynomorphs. The palynomorph assemblages comprise 165 species of spores and pollen, and few acritarchs and chlorophycean algae. This paper presents a local biozonation of three succeeding assemblage zones, recognisable in each borehole section. The assemblage zones are named: the Hamiapollenites bullaeformis Biozone, the Cyclogranisporites gondwanensis Biozone and the Platysaccus papilionis-Striatopodocarpites fusus Biozone, in ascending order of stratigraphy. Assemblages are compared and correlated with assemblages described from other Gondwana areas of Africa, Australia, Arabia, South America and Antarctica. A general analysis of taxa from the Kalahari Karoo Basin indicates a distinct similarity with assemblages from the Paraná Basin of South America. The Hamiapollenites bullaeformis Biozone is comparable with the Vittatina costabilis Interval Zone of the Paraná Basin. Assemblages from the Cyclogranisporites gondwanensis and the Platysaccus papilionis-Striatopodocarpites fusus zones are comparable with the Lueckisporites virkkiae Interval Zone. Age determination for the assemblages in the Kalahari Karoo Basin is inferred from comparison with similar assemblages from previous Gondwana studies, and ranges from the Late Carboniferous (Kasimovian-Gzhelian to latest Early or possibly earliest Middle Permian (Late Cisularian to Early Guadalupian.

  9. Sedimentary facies reconstruction and kinematic restoration of an Upper Permian Tight Gas Field, north-western Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Vackiner, Anna Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    This study of a tight gas reservoir, located at ~4200 metres depth in the Upper Rotliegend II (Upper Permian) of north-western Germany, includes a geological framework model for the sedimentary facies distribution, which is strongly influenced by the structural grain. Research focused on unravelling the structural and sedimentary complexity of Permian (Rotliegend) tight gas fields in Central Europe requires multidisciplinary studies combining tectonic-stratigraphic interpretation of three-dim...

  10. Bituminous coal of the Upper Silesian basin, Czech Republic - relationship between mean vitrinite reflectance Ro, volatile matter Vdaf and content of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinec, Petr; Hon?k, J.; Stan?k, F.

    Calgary : Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, 2002 - (Hills, L.), s. 902-909 - (Memoir. 19). [Carboniferous and permian of the world/14./. Calgary (CA), 17.08.1999-21.08.1999] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA3013903; GA ?R GA205/97/0307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : Upper Silesian basin * bituminous coal Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  11. Internal anatomy of an erg sequence from the aeolian-fluvial system of the De La Cuesta Formation (Paganzo Basin, northwestern Argentina)

    OpenAIRE

    Spallett, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Permian red beds of the De La Cuesta Formation in the Sierra de Narváez (Paganzo Basin, northwestern Argentina) are essentially composed of sandstones associated with mudstones and subordinate conglomerates. Facies distributions and stacking patterns indicate that these sediments resulted from the interaction between aeolian and ephemeral fluvial systems, and are represented by aeolian dune, dry aeolian interdune and Aeolian sand sheet, mudflat, wet aeolian interdune, and fluvial deposits. Th...

  12. Return to Coalsack Bluff and the Permian Triassic boundary in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retallack, Gregory J.; Greaver, Tara; Jahren, A. Hope

    2007-01-01

    Coalsack Bluff was the first discovery site in Antarctica for the latest Permian to earliest Triassic reptile Lystrosaurus. This together with discovery of Permian Glossopteris leaves during the heroic age of Antarctic exploration, indicated not only that Antarctica was part of Gondwanaland, but also that Antarctic rocks recorded faunas from the greatest of all mass extinctions at the Permian-Triassic boundary. Pinpointing the exact stratigraphic level of this life crisis has recently become possible using ? 13C values in terrestrial organic matter. Multiple, short-lived events of 13C depletion may reflect carbon cycle crises, with the isotopic change a measure of terrestrial and atmospheric disequilibrium. Additional evidence for ecosystem reorganization came from changes in paleosol types and their root traces. Such studies previously completed at the Antarctic localities of Graphite Peak, Mount Crean, Portal Mountain, Shapeless Mountain and Allan Hills, are here extended to Coalsack Bluff. Carbon isotopic values in Permian rocks at Coalsack Bluff average - 23.08 ± 0.25‰, but begin to decline within the last coal with leaves ( Glossopteris), roots ( Vertebraria) and permineralized stumps ( Araucarioxylon) of glossopterids. The low point in ä 13C values is - 27.19‰ at 5.6 m above the last coal, which is capped by unusually abundant pyrite, and a claystone breccia with common clasts of redeposited clayey soils. Above this are massive quartz-rich sandstones of braided streams, considered a geomorphic response to deforestation and soil erosion following the mass extinction. Distinctive berthierine-bearing paleosols (Dolores pedotype) within these sandstones have unoxidized iron taken as evidence of severe groundwater hypoxia. Other paleosols at this stratigraphic level are like those in other Early Triassic rocks of Antarctica, which indicate unusually warm and humid conditions for such high paleolatitude lowlands. Waterlogging is also indicated by newly discovered kinds of paleosol (Ernest pedotype) with groundwater calcretes. The lack of peat accumulation in such waterlogged lowlands, berthierine in paleosols and large negative carbon isotopic shift at Coalsack Bluff support the idea of atmospheric pollution with methane from submarine and permafrost clathrates as a cause for the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Hypoxic soils would have killed lowland plants by preventing root respiration and hypoxic air would have challenged vertebrates with pulmonary edema. Causes for catastrophic methane release remain unclear. Flood basalt eruptions, dolerite intrusions into coal measures, submarine landslides, tectonic faulting, and bolide impact suggested for episodes of methane release at other times are also plausible for the Permian-Triassic boundary.

  13. Life crises on land across the Permian-Triassic boundary in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanqiao; Shi, G. R.

    2009-02-01

    The western Guizhou and eastern Yunnan area of southwest China commands a unique and significant position globally in the study of Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) events as it contains well and continuously exposed PTB sections of marine, non-marine and marginal-marine origin in the same area. By using a range of high-resolution stratigraphic methods including biostratigraphy, eventostratigraphy, chronostratigraphy and chemostratigraphy, not only are the non-marine PTB sections correlated with their marine counterparts in the study area with high-resolution, the non-marine PTB sections of the study area can also be aligned with the PTB Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) at Meishan in eastern China. Plant megafossils ("megaplants") in the study area indicate a major loss in abundance and diversity across the PTB, and no coal beds and/or seams have been found in the non-marine Lower Triassic although they are very common in the non-marine Upper Permian. The megaplants, however, did not disappear consistently across the whole area, with some elements of the Late Permian Cathaysian Gigantopteris flora surviving the PTB mass extinction and locally even extending up to the Lower Triassic. Palynomorphs exhibit a similar temporal pattern characterized by a protracted stepwise decrease from fern-dominated spores in the Late Permian to pteridosperm and gymnosperm-dominated pollen in the Early Triassic, which was however punctuated by an accelerated loss in both abundance and diversity across the PTB. Contemporaneous with the PTB crisis in the study area was the peculiar prevalence and dominance of some fungi and/or algae species. The temporal patterns of megaplants and palynomorphs across the PTB in the study area are consistent with the regional trends of plant changes in South China, which also show a long-term decrease in species diversity from the Late Permian Wuchiapingian through the Changhsingian to the earliest Triassic, with about 48% and 77% losses of species occurring respectively in the end-Wuchiapingian and end-Changhsingian. Such consistent patterns, at both local and regional scales, contradict the hypothesis of a regional isochronous extinction of vegetation across the PTB, and hence call into question the notion that the end-Permian mass extinction was a one-hit disaster. Instead, the data from the study area and South China appears more consistent with a scenario that invokes climate change as the main driver for the observed land vegetation changes across the PTB in South China.

  14. Episodic euxinia in the Changhsingian (late Permian) of South China: Evidence from framboidal pyrite and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengye; Algeo, Thomas J.; Yu, Hao; Wang, Jiangguo; Guo, Chuan; Shi, Guo

    2015-04-01

    A multiproxy study of a new Upper Permian-Lower Triassic section (Xiaojiaba) in Sichuan Province, China, documents large changes in marine productivity, redox conditions and detrital input prior to the latest Permian mass extinction. Marine productivity, as proxied by total organic carbon content (TOC), biogenic SiO2, and excess barium, displays a long-term decline through most of the Changhsingian stage (late late Permian), culminating in very low values around the Permian-Triassic boundary. Concurrently, redox proxies including pyrite framboid, ?34Spy, Moauth and Uauth, and Corg/P document a shift from suboxic to dysoxic/oxic conditions that was interrupted by several episodes of benthic euxinia, and detrital siliciclastic proxies (Al, Hf, Nb, and REEs) suggest an increased flux of weathered material from land areas. The long-term changes in productivity, redox conditions, and terrigenous detrital fluxes were probably caused by a regional sea-level fall across the South China Craton. On the other hand, the brief euxinic episodes occurring during the late Permian had oceanographic causes, probably related to the transient upward expansion of the chemocline at the top of the oceanic oxygen-minimum zone. These euxinic episodes may have been harbingers of the more widespread anoxia that developed concurrently with the latest Permian mass extinction and that may have played a major role in triggering the largest biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic.

  15. Petroleum potential and stratigraphy of Holitna basin, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.N.; Clough, J.G.; Meyer, J.F.; Blodgett, R.B.

    1985-02-01

    The Holitna basin, an interior Alaskan basin, is flanked by Cambrian to cretaceous sedimentary rocks that have been highly folded and faulted. Gravity mapping and modeling indicate up to 15,000 ft of sedimentary section is present within the basin. Cambrian rocks consist of trilobite-hash lime mudstone, red siltstone, and basinal chert. Ordovician through Devonian basinal facies rocks consist of platy limestone to graptolitic shale with minor interbeds of limestone turbidites and turbidite-channel debris flows. Ordovician through Middle Devonian shallow-water platform carbonate rocks prograde over the basinal rocks and are composed of algal boundstone buildups with associated inboard lagoonal, oolitic shoal, and tidal-channel deposits. Toward the interior of the platform, restricted subtidal and intertidal to supratidal carbonate rocks were deposited. Upper Devonian to Permian platform carbonate deposition occurred to the east of the older platform rocks and conformably(.) over basinal rocks. Minor mixed carbonate-clastic deposition occurred into Triassic time. The Cretaceous Kuskokwim Group is in fault contact with and/or unconformably overlies the Paleozoic carbonates. This unit varies from lithic-rich conglomerates to marine turbidite deposits. Maturation values for Cretaceous and Paleozoic rocks are within the oil window, with most of the shales showing a thermal alteration index (TAI) from 2 to 3. Organic carbon content exceeds 3% in some samples, however, deep surface weathering has resulted in low hydrocarbon values. The lithic-rich Cretaceous sandstones are well indurated, poorly sorted, and are considered to have low reservoir potential. Partly dolomitized, shallow-water Ordovician to Devonian carbonate rocks are the best potential reservoir rocks exhibiting vuggy porosities greater than 10% and good intergranular porosity.

  16. Palinología de la Formación Tasa Cuna (Pérmico Inferior), Córdoba, Argentina: sistemática y consideraciones bioestratigráficas / Palynology of the Tasa Cuna formation (Lower Permian), Córdoba, Argentina: systematics and biostratigraphic considerations

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    María Lucía, Balarino; Pedro Raúl, Gutiérrez.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describe una asociación microflorística proveniente de la Formación Tasa Cuna, noroeste de la provincia de Córdoba, dentro del ámbito de la cuenca Paganzo. La misma es referida a la Biozona de Intervalo Pakhapites fusus-Vittatina subsaccata del Pérmico Inferior y se correlaciona con la Biozona Cr [...] istatisporitesde la cuenca Chacoparaná. La presencia de Striatopodocarpites communis (Wilson) Hart, Vittatina sp cf. V. fasciolata (Balme y Hennelly) Bharadwaj, V. subsaccata Samoilovich emend. Jansonius, Vittatina sp. cf. V. vittifera (Luber) Samoilovich, Hamiapollenites sp. cf. H. bullaeformis (Samoilovich) Jansonius, H. fusiformis Marques-Toigo emend. Archangelsky y Gamerro, Pakhapites fusus (Bose y Kar) Menéndez, Lunatisporites sp. cf. L. variesectus Archangelsky y Gamerro y Scheuringipollenites medius (Burjack) Dias-Fabrício, apoya la edad de la asociación. Se indentifica por primera vez para la Argentina Hamiapollenitessp. cf. H. bullaeformis, Striatopodocarpites sp. cf. S. crassus Singh, S. sp. cf. S. rarus (Bharadwaj y Salujha) Balme, S. communis (Wilson) Hart y Protohaploxypinus hagii Foster. La asociación representaría a una comunidad vegetal de ambientes lénticos caracterizada por la abundancia de Licofitas, a su vez, influenciada por el aporte de comunidades gimnospérmicas (en particular, Coniferales y Cordaitales), quienes a pesar de tener requerimientos meso-xerofíticos, se habrían desarrollado cerca del cuerpo de agua donde se depositó la asociación. Abstract in english A palynological association belonging to the Tasa Cuna Formation, northwest of Córdoba Province, Paganzo Basin, is described. This assemblage is referred to the Pakhapites fusus-Vittatina subsaccata Biozone, Early Permian, and it is correlated with the Cristatisporites Biozone, Chacoparaná Basin. Th [...] e ocurrences of Striatopodocarpites communis (Wilson) Hart, Vittatina sp. cf. V. fasciolata (Balme and Hennelly) Bharadwaj, V. subsaccata Samoilovich emend. Jansonius, Vittatina sp. cf. V. vittifera (Luber) Samoilovich, Hamiapollenites sp. cf. H. bullaeformis (Samoilovich) Jansonius, H. fusiformis Marques-Toigo emend. Archangelsky and Gamerro, Pakhapites fusus (Bose and Kar) Menéndez, Lunatisporites sp. cf. L. variesectus Archangelsky and Gamerro, and Scheuringipollenites medius (Burjack) Dias-Fabrício, support the inclusion of this palynological association in the Early Permian. Some species such as Hamiapollenites sp. cf. H. bullaeformis (Samoilovich) Jansonius, Striatopodocarpites sp. cf. S. crassus Singh, S. sp. cf. S. rarus (Bharadwaj and Salujha) Balme, S. communis (Wilson) Hart, and Protohaploxypinus hagii Foster, are identified in Argentina for the first time. This assemblage would represent a community related to lacustrine paleoenvironment characterized by abundant Lycophytes and influenced by a gymnospermic community (particularly Coniferales and Cordaitales) that, in spite of having meso-xerophytic requirements, would have been developed close to a fresh water body, where the assemblage was deposited.

  17. Las sucesiones carbonáticas marinas del Pérmico Temprano en Antofagasta, norte de Chile / Early Permian marine carbonate sequences in Antofagasta, northern Chile

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gabriela A, Cisterna; Andrea F, Sterren; Hans R, Niemeyer.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Se analizan las sucesiones carbonáticas de las formaciones Cerro El Árbol y Cerros de Cuevitas, en la depresión central de Antofagasta, norte de Chile. Ellas están caracterizadas por una asociación de invertebrados marinos compuesta, en general, por braquiópodos, bivalvos, gastrópodos, crinoideos y [...] briozoos, en el que el braquiópodo Kochiproductus Dunbar es el elemento dominante. La presencia de este género, de amplia distribución mundial en secuencias pérmicas, sería clave para encontrar la posible vinculación de esta región con las cuencas clásticas del centro oeste de Argentina. Si bien la fauna del norte de Chile presenta claras afinidades con aquellas de las cuencas de Bolivia y Perú, su composición no es exactamente equivalente y es, además, marcadamente menos diversa. El conocimiento taxonómico aquí alcanzado indica que esta fauna, particularmente braquiópodos y bivalvos, representaría una asociación de mezcla. En términos bioestratigráficos, esta podría ser considerada intermedia entre las faunas más antiguas del Carbonífero tardío-Pérmico temprano del centro oeste de Argentina y las más jóvenes del Pérmico de Bolivia y Perú. Abstract in english The carbonate successions of the Cerro El Árbol and Cerros de Cuevitas formations in the central region of Antofagasta are herein studied. These stratigraphic units are characterized by an invertebrate marine fossil assemblage integrated by brachiopods, bivalves, gastropods, crinoids and bryozoans, [...] in which the brachiopod Kochiproductus Dunbar is the dominant component. This genus, widely known in the Permian sequences of the world, can be considered a key to understand the possible connection between northern Chile and the central western Argentinean basins. Although the fauna studied shows clear affinities with those from Bolivia and Perú, it is notably less diverse and its composition appears to be not exactly equivalent. The taxonomic knowledge reached, indicates that this fauna, particularly brachiopods and bivalves, would represent a mixed-assemblage. From a biostratigraphic perspective, the fauna of northern Chile could be considered intermediate between the oldest Late Carboniferous-Early Permian faunas of central western Argentinian basins and the younger ones from Bolivia and Perú.

  18. A natural analogue for copper waste canisters: The copper-uranium mineralised concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Styles, M.T.; Hards, V.L. [Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom). British Geological Survey

    2000-08-01

    This report presents the results of a small-scale pilot study of the mineralogy and alteration characteristics of unusual sheet-like native copper occurring together with uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions in mudstones and siltstones of the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation, at Littleham Cove, south Devon, England. The host mudstones and siltstones are smectitic and have been compacted through deep Mesozoic burial. The occurrence of native copper within these rocks represents a natural analogue for the long-term behaviour of copper canisters, sealed in a compacted clay (bentonite) backfill, that will be used for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste by the SKB. The study was undertaken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB between November 1999 and June 2000. The study was based primarily on archived reference material collected by the BGS during regional geological and mineralogical surveys of the area in the 1970's and 1980's. However, a brief visit was made to Littleham Cove in January 2000 to try to examine the native copper in situ and to collect additional material. Unfortunately, recent landslips and mudflows obscured much of the outcrop, and only one new sample of native copper could be collected. The native copper occurs as thin plates, up to 160 mm in diameter, which occur parallel to bedding in the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation at Littleham Cove (near Budleigh Salterton) in south Devon. Each plate is made up of composite stacks of individual thin copper sheets each 1-2 mm thick. The copper is very pure (>99.4% Cu) but is accompanied by minor amounts of native silver (also pure - >99%) which occurs as small inclusions within the native copper. Detailed mineralogical and petrological studies of the native copper sheets, using optical petrography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalytical techniques, reveal a complex history of mineralisation and alteration that can be related to the burial and diagenetic history of the Permian strata. The native copper mineralisation exhibits close temporal association with the formation of uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions (known as 'fish-eyes') in the same rocks. Petrographical relationships indicate that both the copper and the 'fish-eye' concretions formed during burial diagenesis but before the maximum compaction of the host mudstone and siltstone. The regional burial history Wessex Basin, indicates that the maximum compaction of the Permian strata would have been achieved by at least the end of the Lower Jurassic (possibly even in the Triassic). Therefore, the native copper mineralisation is older than 176 Ma. The native copper sheets display a complex sequence of alteration and subsequent mineral growth of minerals on their surfaces. The earliest alteration was to copper oxides - principally cuprite with minor tenorite, indicating a change to more oxidising groundwater conditions. The dissolution of native silver and the growth of fringes of copper arsenides followed this. Nickel arsenides and chalcocite, associated with the precipitation of uranium silicates occurred in the later stages of alteration. This suggests a return to a more reducing pore water environment. Again, petrographical relationships indicate that this alteration and subsequent mineralisation is geologically old (i.e. Lower Jurassic or older). Secondary malachite, intimately intergrown copper sulphate and copper oxides, copper chloride, copper-uranium arsenate and uranium vanadates have formed as late-stage alteration products of the native copper and earlier diagenetic cuprite, chalcocite, copper-nickel arsenide and uranium silicate alteration and mineralisation. This latest stage alteration is most probably attributable to near-surface weathering processes. Although the native copper is affected by corrosion, the study has shown that a significant proportion (30-80% of the original thickness) of the copper sheets has been preserved in the s

  19. A natural analogue for copper waste canisters: The copper-uranium mineralised concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a small-scale pilot study of the mineralogy and alteration characteristics of unusual sheet-like native copper occurring together with uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions in mudstones and siltstones of the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation, at Littleham Cove, south Devon, England. The host mudstones and siltstones are smectitic and have been compacted through deep Mesozoic burial. The occurrence of native copper within these rocks represents a natural analogue for the long-term behaviour of copper canisters, sealed in a compacted clay (bentonite) backfill, that will be used for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste by the SKB. The study was undertaken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB between November 1999 and June 2000. The study was based primarily on archived reference material collected by the BGS during regional geological and mineralogical surveys of the area in the 1970's and 1980's. However, a brief visit was made to Littleham Cove in January 2000 to try to examine the native copper in situ and to collect additional material. Unfortunately, recent landslips and mudflows obscured much of the outcrop, and only one new sample of native copper could be collected. The native copper occurs as thin plates, up to 160 mm in diameter, which occur parallel to bedding in the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation at Littleham Cove (near Budleigh Salterton) in south Devon. Each plate is made up of composite stacks of individual thin copper sheets each 1-2 mm thick. The copper is very pure (>99.4% Cu) but is accompanied by minor amounts of native silver (also pure - >99%) which occurs as small inclusions within the native copper. Detailed mineralogical and petrological studies of the native copper sheets, using optical petrography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalytical techniques, reveal a complex history of mineralisation and alteration that can be related to the burial and diagenetic history of the Permian strata. The native copper mineralisation exhibits close temporal association with the formation of uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions (known as 'fish-eyes') in the same rocks. Petrographical relationships indicate that both the copper and the 'fish-eye' concretions formed during burial diagenesis but before the maximum compaction of the host mudstone and siltstone. The regional burial history Wessex Basin, indicates that the maximum compaction of the Permian strata would have been achieved by at least the end of the Lower Jurassic (possibly even in the Triassic). Therefore, the native copper mineralisation is older than 176 Ma. The native copper sheets display a complex sequence of alteration and subsequent mineral growth of minerals on their surfaces. The earliest alteration was to copper oxides - principally cuprite with minor tenorite, indicating a change to more oxidising groundwater conditions. The dissolution of native silver and the growth of fringes of copper arsenides followed this. Nickel arsenides and chalcocite, associated with the precipitation of uranium silicates occurred in the later stages of alteration. This suggests a return to a more reducing pore water environment. Again, petrographical relationships indicate that this alteration and subsequent mineralisation is geologically old (i.e. Lower Jurassic or older). Secondary malachite, intimately intergrown copper sulphate and copper oxides, copper chloride, copper-uranium arsenate and uranium vanadates have formed as late-stage alteration products of the native copper and earlier diagenetic cuprite, chalcocite, copper-nickel arsenide and uranium silicate alteration and mineralisation. This latest stage alteration is most probably attributable to near-surface weathering processes. Although the native copper is affected by corrosion, the study has shown that a significant proportion (30-80% of the original thickness) of the copper sheets has been preserved in the saturated compacted clay environment

  20. Physiological implications of the abnormal absence of the parietal foramen in a late Permian cynodont (Therapsida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Julien; Abdala, Fernando; Van den Brandt, Marc J.; Manger, Paul R.; Rubidge, Bruce S.

    2015-12-01

    The third eye (pineal eye), an organ responsible for regulating exposure to sunlight in extant ectotherms, is located in an opening on the dorsal surface of the skull, the parietal foramen. The parietal foramen is absent in extant mammals but often observed in basal therapsids, the stem-group to true mammals. Here, we report the absence of the parietal foramen in a specimen of Cynosaurus suppostus, a Late Permian cynodont from South Africa (SA). Comparison with Procynosuchus delaharpeae, a contemporaneous non-mammalian cynodont from SA, demonstrates that the absence of this foramen is an abnormal condition for such a basal species. Because seasonality was marked during the Late Permian in SA, it is proposed that the third eye was functionally redundant in Cynosaurus, possibly due to the acquisition of better thermoregulation or the evolution of specialized cells in the lateral eyes to compensate for the role of the third eye.

  1. Geochemical changes at the Permian–Triassic transition in Southern Alps and adjacent area: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymon Baud

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Compilation of the recent literature from the Southern Alps and adjacent area confirms the geochemical variations of unusual amplitudes during the Permian-Triassic boundary interval (PTBI. A great attention has been given to the negative ?13C anomaly within the Tesero Member close to the Permian-Triassic boundary. Very detailed geochemical works have been done on the scientific Gartnerkofel core (Gk-1 and on the Slovenian sections. Major minor and rare earth elements (REE data are reported and show a marked enrichment in alkaline metals and REE of some levels of the boundary interval. But recent studies show that the low Iridium anomalies and the Osmium and Helium isotopes anomalies lack the characteristics of a large extraterrestrial impact.

  2. Geohydrology surrounding a potential high level nuclear waste repository in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle is being investigated as a potential high level nuclear waste repository site. As groundwater is the most likely mechanism for radionuclide movement, it is desirable to locate a repository in a hydrologic regime which is favorable for waste isolation and containment. The Palo Duro Basin consists of deep brine aquifers of low regional permeability underlying a thick Permian age evaporite section. The overlying Permian age evaporites are the Dockum and Ogallala fresh water aquifiers. Observed potentiometric data in the principal aquifers indicate a potential for downward flow from the surficial aquifiers to the deep brine aquifers. Groundwater movement in these deep aquifers is very slow. Modeling efforts indicate flow times of hundreds of thousands to over a million years for groundwater to reach the basin margins. Investigative methods have included drill-stem testing similar to oil field methodology, modified drill-stem testing with tools developed for low-permeability formations and long term production tests similar to conventional water well pumping tests. Testing has generally indicated permeability of .1-10 millidarcies in the water transmitting units

  3. Dissolution of evaporites in and around the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico and west Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    permian evaporites in the Ochoan Castile, Salado, and Rustler Formations in the Delaware Basin of southeast New Mexico and west Texas have been subjected to various degrees of dissolution (notably of halite and gypsum) through geologic time. Eastward tilting of the Delaware Basin has resulted in the exhumation and erosion of Ochoan rocks in the western part of the basin. Waters in the Capitan, Rustler, Castile, and Bell Canyon Formations have previously been proposed as agents or consequences of evaporite dissolution according to four principal models: solution-and-fill, phreatic dissolution, brine density flow, and stratabound dissolutin (along bedding planes). Several geomorphological features of positive and negative relief have previously been cited as indicators of evaporite dissolution. Brine density flow has been used to explain the selective dissolution of certain evaporite horizons during the late Cenozoic. A review of available geological data has revealed that: Halite deposition was probably not so extensive as formerly believed. Waters with potential to dissolve evaporites are in the Rustler and Capitan, but not in the Bell Canyon, Salado mine seeps, or the Castile brine reservoirs. Brine density flow has not been active in removing most of the missing halite, nor are point-source dissolution features likely to have their roots at the Bell Canyon. Major evaporite dissolution has not been confined to the late Cenozoic, but much of it took place during the Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, and Tertiary periods. The Bell Canyon Formation has been a sink for dissolution-derived brine

  4. Sedimentology of a Permian playa lake: the Boda Claystone Formation, Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Konrád, Gyula; Sebe, Krisztina; Halász, Amadé; Babinszki, Edit

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Permian Boda Claystone Formation (BCF) in SW Hungary has been previously been identified as a saline lake deposit. A country-wide screening found this 800–1000 m thick succession the most suitable for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Hungary, and research into this formation has consequently been intensified since. The investigations included a detailed study of the sedimentological characteristics. Data obtained by mapping of the 25 km2 outcrop area of the formation ...

  5. Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Ogden, Darcy E.; Sleep, Norman H.

    2011-01-01

    The end-Permian extinction decimated up to 95% of carbonate shell-bearing marine species and 80% of land animals. Isotopic excursions, dissolution of shallow marine carbonates, and the demise of carbonate shell-bearing organisms suggest global warming and ocean acidification. The temporal association of the extinction with the Siberia flood basalts at approximately 250 Ma is well known, and recent evidence suggests these flood basalts may have mobilized carbon in thick deposits of organic-ric...

  6. A new Early Permian reptile and its significance in early diapsid evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Reisz, Robert R; Modesto, Sean P; Scott, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    The initial stages of evolution of Diapsida (the large clade that includes not only snakes, lizards, crocodiles and birds, but also dinosaurs and numerous other extinct taxa) is clouded by an exceedingly poor Palaeozoic fossil record. Previous studies had indicated a 38 Myr gap between the first appearance of the oldest diapsid clade (Araeoscelidia), ca 304 million years ago (Ma), and that of its sister group in the Middle Permian (ca 266 Ma). Two new reptile skulls from the Richards Spur loc...

  7. Permian non-marine bivalves of the Falkland Islands and their palaeoenvironmental significance

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello G. Simões; Quaglio, Fernanda; Warren, Lucas V.; Anelli, Luiz E.; Stone, Philip; Riccomini, Claudio; Grohmann, Carlos H.; Chamani, Marlei A.C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the occurrence of non-marine bivalves in exposures of the Middle Permian (Capitanian) Brenton Loch Formation on the southern shore of Choiseul Sound, East Falklands. The bivalves are associated with ichnofossils and were collected from a bed in the upper part of the formation, within a 25 cm thick interval of dark siltstones and mudstones with planar lamination, overlain by massive sandstones. The shells are articulated, with the valves either splayed open or closed. At the top of...

  8. Depositional environment of Upper Carboniferous – Lower Permian beds in the Karavanke Mountains (Southern Alps, Slovenia)

    OpenAIRE

    Matevž Novak

    2007-01-01

    Late Paleozoic rocks were studied in detail in the Dovžanova soteska section. The Upper Carboniferous sedimentary succession, correlated with upper part of Auernig and SchulterkofelFm. in the Carnic Alps, indicates cyclic clastic-carbonate deposition in a coastal to shallow marine ramp setting with strong influenceofcoarse-grainedfluvial-deltaicsilici-clastics from the hinterland, storm dominated regime of nearshore sediments, and offshore algal buildups. The Lower Permian sequence is develop...

  9. Evidence for a western extension of the Angaran phytogeographic province in the Early Permian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderlin, David [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A newly described Early Permian fossil plant assemblage in the Mt. Dall conglomerate in the Farewell terrane (Alaska Range, USA) is analyzed from a paleobiogeographic perspective. These data constitute the youngest paleontological dataset yet discovered in this terrane, represent the terrane's only predominantly terrestrial fossil assemblage, and are the only plant macrofossil remains of Early Permian age within a > 1500 km radius today. A suite of multivariate statistical analyses comparing the Mt. Dall paleoflora to similar age (Asselian-Artinskian) collections from the Angaran, Euramerican, and Cathaysian Permian phytogeographic provinces reveals that the Mt. Dall paleoflora has a paleobiogeographic affinity with Sub-Angaran plant fossil assemblages collected from Mongolia and the Primorye region of southeastern Russia. The paleoflora has dual importance in the construction and testing of hypotheses for which there are geographically and temporally few controls. First, these data may be used in association with other faunal and floral remains to test models of the assembly of Alaska, which seek, in part, an understanding of the paleogeographic and lithological origins of accreted terranes. That the Mt. Dall paleoflora indicates mixed Eurasia-North America paleobiogeographic affinity among individual taxa and plots in multivariate space with mid-latitude assemblages on northern Pangea may suggest deposition in that latitudinal belt. Second, contrary to the well-sampled fossil plant-bearing Permo-Carboniferous of the paleotropics and the northeastern temperate Pangean regions (Angaraland), terrestrial biome structure and vegetation type of northwestern Pangea are poorly known. This lack of understanding is due to the paucity of paleofloral collections from this region in this time period and the paleogeographic uncertainty of their position along the ancient active margin of Laurentia. The Mt. Dall paleoflora's phytogeographic affinity to paleobotanical collections from the northeastern Pangea therefore suggests that the Angaran province extended meridionally westward in the Early Permian into what is now northern North America. (author)

  10. Early Triassic recovery from the end-Permian extinction of benthic ecosystems in the palaeotropics

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction is widely accepted to have been the greatest biotic crises in the history of meatzoan life. The understanding of the subsequent recovery during the Early Triassic is of utmost importance to address fundamental question in earth system science: (i) how do ecosystems respond to large-scale environmental stress, (ii) how quickly do ecosystems recover, and (iii) how do evolutionary processes operate under the unusual conditions of vacated ecospace? The first studie...

  11. Palynostratigraphy of Permian succession from Binja Block, South Karanpura Coalfield, Jharkhand, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srikanta Murthy; Archana Tripathi; B Chakraborti; U P Singh

    2014-12-01

    Palynological investigations are carried out on approximately 538.00-m thick Gondwana strata from borehole SKB-1, Binja Block, South Karanpura Coalfield in Jharkhand. Based on the distribution pattern of age marker palynotaxa, two distinct palynoassemblages are identified. Palynoassemblage-I in the lithologically designated Barren Measures and Barakar formations, between 552.00 and 53.20 m depth show dominance of striate bisaccate (Striatopodocarpites, Crescentipollenites, and Faunipollenites) and abundance of nonstriate bisaccate (Scheuringipollenites). Upward the Palynoassemblage-II (39.50–13.80 m depth) is rich in striate bisaccate (Striatopodocarpites and Crescentipollenites) and significant enveloping monosaccate Densipollenites magnicorpus pollen. These strata have been equated with Raniganj Formation of Latest Permian age. The First Appearance Datum (FAD) of Arcuatipollenites pellucidus, Playfordiaspora cancellosa, Alisporites sp., Falcisporites sp. and Krempipollenites indicus observed at 13.80 and 39.50 m depth, mark the transition of Permian into the Lower Triassic. The FADs of Guttulapollenites spp. at 49.10 and 504.70 m, Goubinispora morondavensis at 415.90 m, Alisporites ovalis and Arcuatipollenites sp. at 526.70 m is observed and suggest that these sediments are equivalent to Raniganj Formation, Late Permian in age.

  12. Relationship of present saline fluid with paleomigration of basinal brines at the basement/sediment interface (Southeast basin – France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the isotopic composition (O, D, Sr, OSO4, SSO4, Cl, He) of a present saline fluid sample collected at the sediment/basement interface in the Permian continental formation at 634 m depth in the SE margin of the Massif Central shield (Ardèche margin of the Southeast basin of France). The fluid sample shows clear water–rock interaction processes, such as feldspar dissolution and kaolinite precipitation, which have led to high Na concentrations and water stable isotopes above the local meteoric water line. The geological formations of the SE margin of the Massif Central shield show that intensive fluid circulation phases occurred across the margin from the late Triassic to the middle Jurassic. The fluids most probably originated from fluid expulsion during burial of the thick Permo-Carboniferous sedimentary succession. These circulation phases were responsible for cementation of the margin and for the solutes in the matrix microporosity which were extracted by leaching core samples. The chemical and isotopic composition of the saline fluid sample at 634 m in the Permian rock is very similar to that of fluids in the microporosity of the rock matrix. Their SSO4, OSO4 and Sr isotopic compositions are close to those of cements investigated in fracture fillings in the same geological formations. Simple diffusion computations and comparison of the chemical composition of the present free fluid sample with matrix porosity fluids indicate that the solutes in the present free fluid sample are related to solutes originating from fluid circulation events which occurred 160–200 Ma ago through their diffusion from the matrix microporosity. A two-stage fluid flow regime is proposed to interpret the chemistry of present and paleo-fluids. (1) During the extensional context (Permian to Cretaceous), basinal brines migrated along the basement/sediment interface after expulsion from the subsiding basin. This fluid migration would be responsible for the solutes in the rock matrix microporosity and the solutes in the present free fluid sample. (2) Following the Alpine and Pyrenean compressive phases, gravity-driven meteoritic fluids slowly migrated from the surface down to the basement along major faults. This fluid regime would be responsible for the meteoric water collected in the present free fluid sample. Several investigations in Europe have shown that the existence of other saline fluids sampled elsewhere could be explained by these phases of fluid circulation related to specific geodynamic events.

  13. Palynodating of subsurface sediments, Raniganj Coalfield, Damodar Basin, West Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srikanta Murthy; B Chakraborti; M D Roy

    2010-10-01

    The Gondwana sediments comprising ?ne-grained shales,carbonaceous shales,sandstones and the coal horizon in borecore RT-4 (approximately 547.00 m thick)from Tamra block,Raniganj Coal ?eld,Damodar Basin,are analyzed palynologically.Based on the distribution pattern of marker palynotaxa,two assemblage zones are identi ?ed.In the Barren Measures Formation,dominance of enveloping monosaccate (Densipollenites) along with striate bisaccate (Striatopodocarpites,Fauni- pollenites) pollen taxa,and the FAD ’s of Kamthisaccites and Arcuatipollenites observed at 30.75, have equated this strata (30.75 –227.80 m thick)with the Raniganj Formation of Late Permian in age.Downwards in the Barakar Formation,between 423.80 –577.70 m depths,an abundance of non-striate (Scheuringipollenites )and striate(Faunipollenites and Striatopodocarpites )bisaccate pollen taxa is observed,that dates late Early Permian in age. Fair occurrences of hyaline,distorted and blackish-brown plant matter is observed within 231.00 –408.40 m depths.Present study infers the existence of the Raniganj Formation in the lithologically delimited Barren Measures Formation in the study area,and the underlying unproductive strata (approx.177.40 m)might represent the part of the Barren Measures Formation.

  14. Subsidence of the West Siberian Basin: Geophysical evidence for eclogitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina M.

    2013-04-01

    The West Siberian basin is the world's largest intracratonic sedimentary basin. The basin basement consists of complexes of island arcs, terranes, micro-continents, and relict ocean basins which amalgamated during late Proterozoic-Paleozoic orogenic events up to the formation of the Pangea super-continent. The basin was affected by rifting and flood basalt eruption in the Permian-early Triassic (ca 250 Ma), which was floowed by rapid late Triassic (190 Ma) subsidence, as observed in borehole data from the axial part of the Ob rift (Saunders, 2005). Widely distributed subsidence of the north and central parts of the basin took place in the Jurassic with accumulation of 1,5- 3 km sediments. Two other subsidence episodes in the early Cretaceous and in the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic led to deposition of 2-3 km of sediment in the north-eastern and axial parts. (Rudkevich, 1976). Most of the present-day West Siberian basin lacks surface topography, whereas the reliefs of the Moho and the top of the basement have amplitudes of ca. 20 km and 15 km, respectively (Cherepanova et al., 2012). Modeling suggests that the thermal lithosphere is 130km thick in the West Siberian basin, up-to 260 km in the Siberian craton further east, and 90 km in the axial part of the basin under the Ob rift (Artemieva and Mooney, 2001). Assuming local isostatic equilibrium and no effect of dynamic topography (which probably is a valid approximation for most of the region, except for the southern margin and the Urals), we examine the relative contributions of the crust and the lithospheric mantle to maintaining the surface topography. Lithosphere buoyancy is controlled by thicknesses and densities of the crust and the lithospheric mantle, and therefore by composition, metamorphic state, and temperature. Crustal thickness and density are constrained by our new regional crustal model, which is based on a quality-controlled compilation of all seismic models published in international and Russian literature, theses and reports since the 1970s (Cherepanova et al., 2012). Lithosphere thickness and temperature (which are interrelated parameters) are constrained by the thermal model. Our results indicate the presence of a large high-density anomaly in the upper mantle below the axial part of the basin. This result is supported by the seismic velocity variation in the mantle along two ultra-deep Soviet PNE reflection/refraction profiles and with the regional subsidence history and stretching factors. We suggest that this density anomaly is caused by eclogitization, and that the density increase from this process may explain a substantial part of the subsidence of the West Siberian Basin.

  15. Dissolution of the Upper Seven Rivers and Salado salt in the interior Palo Duro Basin, Texas: Revision: Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Upper Seven Rivers and Salado Formations contain the uppermost salts within the interior Palo Duro Basin, Stratigraphic and structural evidence based on geophysical well logs indicate that both dissolution and facies change have influenced the thickness of these uppermost salts. The magnitude of vertical salt loss due to dissolution is interminable at this time because original salt thickness is unknown. Gradual thinning of the Upper Seven Rivers Formation is recognized from south to north across the Palo Duro Basin. Anhydrites within the formation pinch out toward the basin margins, indicating that section loss is in part depositionally controlled. Additionally, informal subdivision of the Upper Seven Rivers Formation suggests that salt dissolution has occurred in the uppermost salt. A northeast-trending zone of thin Upper Seven Rivers Formation in portions of Deaf Smith, Randall, Castro, and Parmer Counties is possibly related to Tertiary dissolution. In New Mexico, local thinning of the Upper Seven Rivers Formation may be associated with faulting. Triassic erosion on uplifted fault blocks has affected the Upper Permian section. The Salado salt margin is located within the interior Palo Duro Basin. Geophysical well logs and core evidence indicate that the salt margin has migrated basinward as a result of dissolution. Permian dissolution probably contributed to some salt loss. 106 refs., 31 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Late Permian Tsunamites in Guryul Ravine (Kashmir, India) - revisited and rejected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystyn, Leopold; Horacek, Micha; Brandner, Rainer; Parcha, Suraj

    2014-05-01

    Recent claims for tsunami-related event beds induced by the Siberian Trap basalts in this section (Brookfield et al., 2013) have to be questioned. Identical storm generated carbonate beds occur not only during a short interval close to the Permian-Triassic (P-T) boundary but through a major part of the late Permian (Changhsingian) succession there - as low as 26 m below the so-called tsunami beds. Moreover, during our recent study in a closely neighbouring place called Mandakpal (less than 10 km to the southeast), no signs of tsunamites have been detected in time-correlative finegrained sediments. Based on sedimentary and trace fossil evidence we interpret the late Permian of Guryul as relatively shallow, neritic and delta-influenced. The so-called tsunamites are shelly-enriched discontinuous carbonate lenses fed downslope through local channels. Judging from the distinct facies change from the storm related "tsunamites" to thinly bedded mud turbidites above, the sudden deepening may be explained by local and still rift-related tectonics along the NIM (North-Indian Gondwana Margin) which led to episodic seismic induced sediment redeposition in the area of Guryul. Synsedimentary tectonic activity with tilting and eventual Horst and Graben structure building along the large NIM is indicated by margin inversion during the P-T boundary interval leading to sedimentary breaks and 20 times thinner, condensed limestone deposits far offshore from Guryul in Spiti (Krystyn et al., 2004) and Tibet (Orchard et al., 1994). Thus, local seismic activity seems to be a far more logic explanation of the Guryul "tsunamites" than the eruption of the Siberian Traps more than 6000 km away. References Brookfield, M. E., Algeo, T. J., Hannigan, R., Williams, J and Bhat, G. M., 2013: Shaken and Stirred: Seismites and Tsunamites at the Permian-Triassic boundary, Guryul Ravine, Kashmir, India. Palaios, v. 28, 568-582. Krystyn, L., Balini, M. and Nicora, A., 2004: Lower and Middle Triassic stage boundaries in Spiti. Albertiana, v. 30, 40-53. Orchard, M.J., Nassichuk, W.W., Rui Lin, 1994: Conodonts from the lower Griesbachian Otoceras latilobatum Bed of Selong, Tibet and the position of the Permian-Triassic boundary. In: Pangea: Global Environments and Resources, Memoirs of the Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, vol. 17, 823-843.

  17. Illawarra Reversal: the onset of the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozaki, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Permian magnetostratigraphic records demonstrate that a remarkable change occurred in geomagnetism in the Late Guadalupian (Middle Permian; ca. 265 Ma) from the long-term stable Kiaman Reverse Superchron (throughout the Late Carboniferous and Early-Middle Permian) to the Permian-Triassic Mixed Superchron with frequent polarity change (in the Late Permian and Triassic). This unique episode called the Illawarra Reversal probably reflects a significant mode change in geodynamo in the outer core of the planet after a 50 million year-long stable geomagnetism. The Illawarra Reversal was likely led by the appearance of thermal instability at the 2,900 km-deep core-mantle boundary in connection with mantle superplume activity. The Illawarra Reversal and the Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary event recorded the significant transition from the Paleozoic to Mesozoic-Modern world. Major global environmental changes in the Phanerozoic occurred almost simultaneously in the latest Guadalupian, e.g., 1) mass extinction, 2) ocean redox change, 3) sharp isotopic excursions (C and Sr), 4) sea-level drop, and 5) plume-related volcanism. In addition to the claimed possible link between the above-listed various environmental changes and mantle superplume activity, here I propose an extra explanation that a change in the core's geodynamo may have played another important role in determining the surface climate of the planet and the course of biotic evolution. When a superplume is launched from the core-mantle boundary, resultant thermal instability makes the geodynamo's dipole of the outer core unstable, and lowers the geomagnetic intensity. Being modulated by geo- and heliomagnetism, cosmic ray flux from the outer space into the Earth's atmosphere changes along time. The more cosmic ray penetrates through the atmosphere, the more cloud develops to increase albedo, thus enhances cooling the Earth's surface. The Illawarra Reversal, the Kamura cooling event, and other unique geologic phenomena in the Late Guadalupian were all likely caused by the superplume activity that initially triggered the breakup of Pangea. The secular change of cosmic radiation may explain not only the extinction-related global climatic changes in the end-Guadalupian but also the long- term global warming/cooling trend in Earth"fs history in terms of cloud coverage over the planet.

  18. Hydrocarbon habitat of San Martin and Cashiriari gas/condensate discoveries, southern Ucayali basin of Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohler, H.P.

    1989-03-01

    Fifteen trillion ft/sup 3/ of wet gas in place containing some 800 million bbl of associated liquids have been discovered in the San Martin and Cashiriari anticlines, which are located in the Subandean thrusted foldbelt of the Southern Ucayali basin of Peru. Ultimate recoverable volumes are estimated at 10 trillion ft/sup 3/ of gas and 500 million bbl of liquids including condensate (C5+) and LPG (C3/C4). Most of these potentially recoverable reserves are located in the Cashiriari structure (80% of the gas and 70% of the liquids). They were encountered in fair-excellent sandstone reservoirs of Early Permian and Late Cretaceous age and are thought to be derived from Carboniferous coaly shale source rocks. The Paleozoic (pre-Andean) sedimentary megacycle is represented by deeper shallow marine clastics of Ordovician to Early Carboniferous age (5000 m maximum), including Silurian glaciomarine deposits, overlain by up to 1200 m of Permian-Carboniferous platform carbonates and 600-1000( ) m of Lower Permian-lower Upper Permian coastal-continental clastics. The Mesozoic-Tertiary (Andean) megacycle is represented by a Campanian-Maastrichtian transgressive marine clastic/carbonate and overlying regressive clastic sequence (450 m maximum), followed by several thousand meters of Molasse-type continental infill of the Tertiary foredeep, which was created by the crustal loading in the wake of the compressional Andean orogeny (Peru, Inca, and Quechua phases). Late Tertiary folding and thrusting of the sub-Andean belt was superseded by regional Pleistocene uplift, and parts of the foreland continue to subside.

  19. Paleogeography of the upper Paleozoic basins of southern South America: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limarino, Carlos O.; Spalletti, Luis A.

    2006-12-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of Late Paleozoic basins located in southern South America is addressed. Three major types of basins are recognized: infracratonic or intraplate, arc-related, and retroarc. Intraplate basins (i.e., Paraná, Chaco-Paraná, Sauce Grande-Colorado, and La Golondrina) are floored by continental or quasi-continental crust, with low or moderate subsidence rates and limited magmatic and tectonic activity. Arc-related basins (northern and central Chile, Navidad-Arizaro, Río Blanco, and Calingasta-Uspallata basins and depocenters along Chilean Patagonia) show a very complex tectonic history, widespread magmatic activity, high subsidence rates, and in some cases metamorphism of Late Paleozoic sediments. An intermediate situation corresponds to the retroarc basins (eastern Madre de Dios, Tarija, Paganzo, and Tepuel-Genoa), which lack extensive magmatism and metamorphism but in which coeval tectonism and sedimentation rates were likely more important than those in the intraplate region. According to the stratigraphic distribution of Late Paleozoic sediments, regional-scale discontinuities, and sedimentation pattern changes, five major paleogeographic stages are proposed. The lowermost is restricted to the proto-Pacific and retroarc basins, corresponds to the Mississippian (stage 1), and is characterized by shallow marine and transitional siliciclastic sediments. During stage 2 (Early Pennsylvanian), glacial-postglacial sequences dominated the infracratonic (or intraplate) and retroarc basins, and terrigenous shallow marine sediments prevailed in arc-related basins. Stage 3 (Late Pennsylvanian-Early Cisuralian) shows the maximum extension of glacial-postglacial sediments in the Paraná and Sauce Grande-Colorado basins (intraplate region), whereas fluvial deposits interfingering with thin intervals of shallow marine sediments prevailed in the retroarc basins. To the west, arc-related basins were dominated by coastal to deep marine conditions (including turbiditic successions). In the Late Cisuralian (stage 4), important differences in sedimentation patterns are registered for the western arc-related basins and eastern intraplate basins. The former were locally dominated by volcaniclastic sediments or marine deposits, and the intraplate basins are characterized by shallow marine conditions punctuated by several episodes of deltaic progradation. Finally, in the Late Permian (stage 5), volcanism and volcaniclastic sedimentation dominated in basins located along the western South American margin. The intraplate basins in turn were characterized by T-R cycles composed of shallow marine, deltaic, and fluvial siliciclastic deposits.

  20. Evidence for an Alleghanian (Early Carboniferous to Late Permian) tectonothermal event in the New Jersey Coastal Plain basement from 40Ar/39Ar biotite data, geochemistry and gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, T.J.; Volkert, R.A.; Swisher, C. C., III; Sheridan, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of biotite from felsic orthogneiss recovered from the -3890-foot level of the Island Beach State Park (IBSP) well beneath the outer New Jersey Coastal Plain was accomplished using CO2 laser incremental-heating techniques. Over 75% of the Ar released from the incremental-heating experiment form a well-behaved plateau with a calculated age of 243.98 ?? 0.10 Ma. The new 244 Ma biotite age reported here is a cooling age younger than the metamorphic event that crystallized or reheated the biotite. We consider reheating of older biotite to be unlikely because the concordant 40Ar/39Ar spectrum upon repeated incremental laser heating showed a well-developed plateau. Thus, biotites from the IBSP gneiss are interpreted as having crystallized during a single thermal event, followed by cooling to below 300 ??C. The IBSP well falls on a structural and geophysical anomaly trend that is along strike with rocks of the Bronson Hill anticlinorium to the north of the IBSP gneiss. Locally graphitic metasedimentary schists and gneisses recovered from New Jersey wells inboard of the IBSP well gneiss correlate to similar lithologies of the Connecticut Valley synclinorium west of the Hartford basin. Our reinterpretation of the IBSP gneiss as metamorphosed dacite or dacitic tuff is consistent with a correlation to some rocks of the Bronson Hill magmatic arc east of the Hartford basin. If correct, this would imply a Late Ordovician age for the protolith of the IBSP gneiss. Reported 40Ar/39Ar biotite ages of 235-253 Ma from southwestern Rhode Island, and of 238-247 Ma from southeastern Connecticut, are interpreted as cooling ages following a tectonothermal event associated with the Alleghanian orogeny (Early Carboniferous to Late Permian). Cooling ages of Alleghanian age (Early Carboniferous to Late Permian) are not recognized west of the Bronson Hill volcanic arc in either central Connecticut or in Massachusetts. Therefore, the 244 Ma cooling age presented here, and the geochemical affinity of the IBSP gneiss to some orthogneisses of the Bronson Hill arc, support an interpretation of the IBSP well as representing the southern continuation of the Bronson Hill arc into New Jersey. Moreover, it documents the presence of rocks beneath the outer New Jersey Coastal Plain that experienced a Permian Alleghanian metamorphism. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pteridophytes from Lower Gondwana formations of the Ib River Coalfield, Orissa and their diversity and distribution in the Permian of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, S.; Singh, K.J.; Chandra, S. [Fakir Mohan University, Balasore (India). PG Dept. of Environmental Science

    2006-12-15

    Recent extensive investigations carried out in the Ib River Coalfield, Mahanadi Master Basin, Orissa, identified numerous fossiliferous beds in the lower Gondwana deposits. Six exposures of the Barakar and lower Kamthi formations yielded diverse and abundant plant remains. The flora includes twenty-three genera representing nine groups viz., Lycopodiales, Equisetales, Sphenophyllales, Filicales, Cordaitales, Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Cycadales and Glossopteridales. Systematic descriptions of the pteridophyte taxa namely Cyclodendron (Lycopodiales), Schizoneura, Raniganjia, Bengalia, equisetaceous stems (Equisetales), Trizygia, Benlightfootia (Sphenophyllales), Neomariopteris, and Dichotomopteris (Filicales) are presented in this paper. Pteridophytic leaves comprising nine taxa viz., Cyclodendron leslii, Schizoneura gondwanensis, Raniganjia bengalensis, Bengalia raniganjensis, Trizygia speciosa, Benlightfootia indica, Neomariopteris hughesii, N. talchirensis, and Dichotomopteris sp. together with equisetaceous stems constitute about 7.88% (72 specimens) of the total plant assemblage collected from this coalfield. Among the pteridophytes, equisetaceous stems are most abundant (40.3%; 29 specimens) followed by Schizoneura gondwanensis (20.8%, 15 specimens) and Trizygia speciosa (13.9%, 10 specimens). A summary of the known diversity of pteridophytes in the Indian Permian as a whole is provided.

  2. Nuevos gastrópodos del Pérmico inferior de la Formación Mojón de Hierro, provincia del Chubut, Argentina / New Lower Permian gastropods from the Mojón de Hierro Formation, Chubut Province, Argentina

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Karina, Pinilla; Nora, Sabattini; Julio, Hlebszevitsch.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describen nuevos gastrópodos del Pérmico inferior (Zona de Euphemites chubutensis-Palaeoneilo aff. concentrica) de la cuenca Tepuel-Genoa. El material corresponde a las localidades de Quebrada Honda y El Molle de la Formación Mojón de Hierro. El género Borestus Thomas (Pleurotomarioidea) es regis [...] trado por primera vez para Argentina con la nueva especie Borestus lunatus. También se propone un nuevo subgénero y nueva especie, Sinuitina (Spirilira) tenuis. El nuevo subgénero se caracteriza por la presencia de ornamentación espiral, perfil de las vueltas subcordado y debilitamiento de la ornamentación colabral de la mitad exterior del flanco hacia el dorso. Abstract in english New gastropods from the Lower Permian (Euphemites chubutensis-Palaeoneilo aff. concentrica Zone) of the Tepuel-Genoa Basin are described. The material was recovered from the Mojón de Hierro Formation, at the Quebrada Honda and El Molle localities. The genus Borestus Thomas (Pleuroto-marioidea) is re [...] ported for the first time in Argentina with the new species Borestus lunatus. In addition, Sinuitina (Spirilira) tenuis nov. subgen. nov. sp. ( Bellerophontoidea) is proposed. The new subgenus is characterized by spiral ornamentation, subcordate whorls in section, and a reduced collabral ornamentation on outer flanks and dorsum.

  3. Biostratigraphy and event stratigraphy in Iran around the Permian Triassic Boundary (PTB): Implications for the causes of the PTB biotic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozur, H. W.

    2007-01-01

    The conodont succession and stratigraphic events around the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) have been investigated in detail in the open sea deposits of Iran (Abadeh and Shahreza in central Iran, and Jolfa and Zal in northwestern Iran). This investigation produced a very detailed conodont zonation from the Clarkina nodosa Zone up to the Isarcicella isarcica Zone. All significant events have been accurately located and dated within this zonation, and the duration of most of these conodont zones has been calculated by cross-correlation with continental lake deposits that display obvious Milankovitch cyclicity. The unusually short duration of all conodont zones in the interval from the C. nodosa up to the Hindeodus parvus Zone indicates that there was persistent high ecological stress during this time interval. Most of the conodont zones can be accurately correlated with South China. In the interval from the C. hauschkei Zone to the H. parvus Zone, even correlation with the Arctic is possible. Within three thin stratigraphic intervals, the Changhsingian (Dorashamian) warm water conodont fauna of the C. subcarinata lineage is replaced by a cool water fauna with small H. typicalis, rare Merrillina sp., and cool water Clarkina that have very widely spaced denticles. The uppermost cool water fauna horizon comprises the lower C. zhangi Zone and can be accurately correlated with continental beds by recognition of a short reversed magnetozone below the long uppermost Permian-lowermost Triassic normal magnetozone. In Iran and Transcaucasia, this short reversed zone comprises the upper C. changxingensis- C. deflecta Zone and most of the C. zhangi Zone. Its top lies 50 cm below the top of the Paratirolites Limestone (s.s.) in the Dorasham 2 section, which is at the beginning of the upper quarter of the C. zhangi Zone. In the Germanic Basin, this short palaeomagnetic interval comprises the lower and the basal part of the upper Fulda Formation. On the Russian Platform, the Nedubrovo Formation belongs to this short reversed magnetic interval. In its upper part (corresponding to the top of the lower C. zhangi Zone, see above) there is a fallout of mafic tuffs from the Siberian Trap event that originated about 3000 km away in eruption centres in the Siberian Tungusska Basin. In the Germanic Basin and in Iran, this horizon contains volcanic microsphaerules. Thus, a direct correlation can be made between the immigration of a cool water fauna into the tropical realm and an exceptionally strong interval of explosive activity during the Siberian Trap volcanic episode. These faunal changes are the same as those found at the base of the Boundary Clay, suggesting that a short cooling event at this horizon also was due to intense volcanism. Additional influence by a bolide impact cannot be excluded. Most of the events in the interval from the C. nodosa up to the I. isarcica Zone (upper Changhsingian to middle Gangetian) in the Iranian sections can be also observed in other marine sections (e.g., in Meishan) and even in continental sections of the Germanic Basin. Of particular significance is the fact that, in the investigated Iranian sections, the PTB lies either in red sediments or in light grey sediments (as in Abadeh) that contain an ostracod fauna indicative of highly oxygenated bottom waters. Therefore, anoxia cannot be the reason for the PTB extinction event in this region, even though anoxia does cause locally or regionally elsewhere an overprint on the extinction event.

  4. Role of Permo-Carboniferous and Mesozoic fault reactivation in the basin evolution of southeastern France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enfield, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    The Sud-Est basin of France consists of a structural mosaic of Permo-Carboniferous, Mesozoic, and Tertiary subbasins. The complex tectonic evolution of these basins has involved alternating strike-slip, contractional, and extensional episodes. By and large, the prospective late Paleozoic-Mesozoic subbasins and the structures that have influenced their development are buried beneath nonpropsective Tertiary basin fill. The architecture of the younger basins, which is strongly controlled by reactivation of the structures bounding the older basins, provides clues to the structure and evolution of the pre-Tertiary subbasins. In particular, localized basins associated with Eocene (Pyrenean) contraction and Oligocene extension delineate reactivated structures bounding the older subbasins. Regionally significant middle Cretaceous left-lateral strike-slip movement along Mesozoic growth faults resulted in reactivation of Permian-Carboniferous faults having an antithetic trend, right-lateral sense of movement, and associated anticlines. This method of analysis has been used to determine the location, structure, and dynamic evolution of the buried late Paleozoic and Mesozoic subbasins of southeastern France external to the Alps.

  5. Permian clockwise rotations of the Ebro and Corso-Sardinian blocks during Iberian-Armorican oroclinal bending: Preliminary paleomagnetic data from the Catalan Coastal Range (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edel, Jean-Bernard; Schulmann, Karel; Lexa, Ondrej; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves

    2015-08-01

    Paleomagnetic investigations of Early Permian and Triassic magmatic rocks from Catalan Coastal Ranges provide three magnetic directions which are interpreted as primary magnetizations and partly as overprints. The succession of magnetic directions is interpreted in terms of a succession of large-scale clockwise rotations, which bring the whole assembly of Pyrenees, Catalonia, Corsica-Sardinia and Maures-Esterel massifs from the southeast of the Massif Central to the west during Permian. This major movement is associated with clockwise rotation of northern limb of the Iberian orocline during Latest Carboniferous and Early Permian (~ 305-290 Ma). Subsequently, Permian large-scale dextral transtensional-extensional shearing operated along Aquitanian Shear Belt between the Massif Central in the northeast and the Iberian Variscan massifs in the southwest. The latest phase of the rotation in the Late Permian-Early Triassic is associated with alkaline magmatism probably linked to Neo-Tethys opening activity in Western Europe.

  6. Permian bimodal volcanism in the Zhangguangcai Range of eastern Heilongjiang Province, NE China: Zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopes and geochemical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, En; Xu, Wen-Liang; Pei, Fu-Ping; Yang, De-Bin; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Xing-Zhou

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we report on zircon U-Pb dating, Hf isotopes, major and trace elements, and Sr-Nd isotope data, with the aim of constraining the petrogenesis and regional tectonic evolution of late Paleozoic volcanic rocks in the Zhangguangcai Range of eastern Heilongjiang Province, NE China. Located in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), between the Siberian and North China cratons, the late Paleozoic volcanic rocks in the Zhangguangcai Range are composed mainly of basalt, basaltic andesite, rhyolite, and minor dacite. The results of LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating for two basaltic rocks, three rhyolites, and one dacite indicate that they formed in the early Permian (ca. 292 Ma). The mafic rocks have SiO 2 = 50.13-53.80 wt.%, K 2O = 0.98-2.28 wt.%, Mg# = 0.51-0.71, Cr = 144-541 ppm, Ni = 74-260 ppm, ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) i = 0.7044, and ?Nd ( t) = +4.28, whereas the felsic rocks have SiO 2 = 69.12-77.98 wt.%, K 2O = 3.09-5.33 wt.%, Mg# = 0.17-0.36, ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) i = 0.7032, and ?Nd ( t) = +4.32. These data are typical of bimodal volcanism. The mafic volcanic rocks are characterized by a strong enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) such as Rb, Ba, Sr, and Pb, depletion in high field-strength elements (HFSEs) such as Nb, Ta, and Ti, depletion in heavy rare-earth elements (HREEs), and weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu * = 0.88-0.94). On the other hand, the felsic rocks show a strong depletion in Nb, Ta, Sr, P, and Ti, enrichment in Th, U, and K, and relatively large negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu * = 0.28-0.95). Taken together, these data suggest that the mafic magma was derived from the partial melting of a depleted lithospheric mantle, modified by subducted slab-derived fluids, and that the felsic magma originated by partial melting of newly accreted crust. The early Permian bimodal volcanic rocks, together with the coeval A-type granites, indicate an extensional environment, similar to a back-arc basin. Such a setting was possibly related to subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate beneath the Jiamusi and Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range massifs.

  7. Crustal and basin evolution of the southwestern Barents Sea: from the Caledonian orogeny to continental breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernigon, Laurent; Brönner, Marco; Roberts, David; Olesen, Odleiv

    2013-04-01

    A new generation of aeromagnetic data documents the post-Caledonian tectonic evolution of the southwestern Barents Sea (SBS) up to the continent-ocean transition. Clear evidence of reactivation of Caledonian structures controlling both, Late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic basins can be observed at the edge of the Hammerfest and Nordkapp basins where reactivated low-angle detachments are observed on seismics. Our new aeromagnetic surveys confirm most of the previous structural elements, but new features appear and illustrate the complexity of the pre-Permian tectonic and the basement architecture in the SBS. We propose an updated tectonic scenario of the SBS where the Caledonian nappes and thrust sheets, well constrained onshore, swing anticlockwise from a NE-SW trend close to the Varanger Peninsula to NW-SE across the Nordkapp Basin and the Bjarmeland Platform. On the Bjarmeland Platform, the dominant magnetic grain is clearly NNW-SSE. We show that this pattern reflects a regional pre-Permian system involving several Caledonian thrust sheets that possibly collapsed and controlled the post-Caledonian late Palaeozoic rift development of the SBS. We also consider that this model can explain the later development of the SBS. One specific case is the Bjørnøya Basin, located between the Loppa and Stappen highs which are interpreted as a series of rigid and poorly thinned continental blocks (ribbons) flanked by the Hammerfest and Bjørnøya basins and the basins of the Vestbakken volcanic province. As part of this extensive complex system, the Bjørnøya Basin is interpreted as a extensively thinned and propagating system that aborted in Late Mesozoic time. This thick, Cretaceous sag basin is characterised by a deep high-density body, interpreted as a combination of exhumed lower crust and/or potential serpentinised mantle as suggested by potential field modelling. The abortion of this propagating basin may be partly explained by its trend, which is oblique to the inherited regional structural grain, as revealed by the new aeromagnetic compilation. This abortion coincides with a migration and complete reorganisation of the crustal extension towards the western volcanic sheared margin and proto-breakup axis.

  8. Report of liquid permeability measurements on rock core samples from Detten No. 1 Well, Permian Basin Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the measurements on specimens from the Detten No. 1 Well. It also describes in some detail the apparatus and procedure used for the measurements to assist in understanding how they were made. Laboratory measurements of permeability to the flow of saturated brine were made on specimens of rack core from several depths in the Detten No. 1 Well. Brine was used for the permeant to preclude the dissolution of any crystalline salt in the rock. The cylindrical specimens were prepared with axes both vertical and horizontal at each depth wherever this was possible. Measurements were made in a special rock permeameter by confining the specimen under pressure within a membrane consisting of a length of rubber tubing. A pressure difference was then created across the length of the specimen, thus causing permeant to flow through the pores of the specimen. Permeabilities were determined by either measuring the rate of flow under the constant pressure difference (constant-head method) or closing the inflow of permeant to one end of the specimen (with continued outflow of permeant from the other end) and measuring the rate of decrease of the pressure difference (falling-head method). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  9. Report of liquid permeability measurements on rock core samples from Mansfield No. 1 Well, Permian Basin project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the measurements on specimens from the Mansfield No. 1 Well, and it describes in some detail the apparatus and procedure used for the measurements to assist the reader in understanding how they were made. Where unusual specimen responses were encountered, the data reflecting the responses are presented and explanations offered. Finally, evaluations are made of both the results and the apparatus and procedure. 4 refs., 13 figs

  10. Diachronous Growth of Normal Fault Systems in Multiphase Rift Basins: Structural Evolution of the East Shetland Basin, Northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claringbould, Johan S.; Bell, Rebecca E.; A-L. Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Odinsen, Tore

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to determine the structural evolution and interaction of fault systems (kinematically linked group of faults that are in the km to 10s of km scale) within a rift basin is typically limited by the spatial extent and temporal resolution of the available data and methods used. Physical and numerical models provide predictions on how fault systems nucleate, grow and interact, but these models need to be tested with natural examples. Although field studies and individual 3D seismic surveys can provide a detailed structural evolution of individual fault systems, they are often spatially limited and cannot be used examine the interaction of fault systems throughout the entire basin. In contrast, regional subsurface studies, commonly conducted on widely spaced 2D seismic surveys, are able to capture the general structural evolution of a rift basin, but lack the spatial and temporal detail. Moreover, these studies typically describe the structural evolution of rifts as comprising multiple discrete tectonic stages (i.e. pre-, syn- and post-rift). This simplified approach does not, however, consider that the timing of activity can be strongly diachronous along and between faults that form part of a kinematically linked system within a rift basin. This study focuses on the East Shetland Basin (ESB), a multiphase rift basin located on the western margin of the North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Most previous studies suggest the basin evolved in response to two discrete phases of extension in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-Late Jurassic, with the overall geometry of the latter rift to be the result of selective reactivation of faults associated with the former rift. Gradually eastwards thickening intra-rift strata (deposited between two rift phases) that form wedges between and within fault blocks have led to two strongly contrasting tectonic interpretations: (i) Early-Middle Jurassic differential thermal subsidence after Permian-Triassic rifting; or (ii) Triassic syn-rift activity on west-dipping faults. Our analysis of regional 2D and basin-wide 3D 'mega-merge' seismic reflection data calibrated by wells allow us to re-evaluate the pre-Triassic-to-Cretaceous structural evolution of the ESB. Our results suggest that pre-Triassic extension was accommodated by diachronous growth of NW-SE-to-NE-SW-striking faults that dipped either to the east or the west. In the NW of the ESB, Triassic syn-rift deposits are observed along large (>20 km long), NE-SW-striking faults. Elsewhere in the basin, post-rift deposits gradually thicken eastward, suggesting differential Triassic post-rift thermal subsidence with its axis to the east of the ESB. Subsequent Early-to-Middle Jurassic deposits thicken eastward across large N-S striking faults, suggesting syn-depositional fault growth. Our observations suggest that, rather than forming in response to discrete periods of extension separated by periods of tectonic quiescence, the ESB witnessed diachronous fault system evolution with faults showing polyphase activity, cross-cutting relationships, and protracted growth from the pre-Triassic to Middle-Late Jurassic. The results of this work reveal the complex structural evolution of rifts, highlight the power of 3D mega-merge seismic reflection data, and demonstrate that the conventional rift package nomenclature of pre-, syn-, and post-rift is difficult to apply at the basin-scale.

  11. Glacier-fed(?) Sandstone sheets in the Weller Coal Measures (Permian), Allan Hills, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, N.D.; Barrett, P.J.; Woolfe, K.J. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences

    1998-08-01

    The upper member of the Weller Coal Measures (Permian) at Allan Hills, Victoria Land, Antarctica, consists of repetitive coal layers separated by sheetlike bodies of predominantly sandstone and subordinate siltstone and conglomerate, all of fluvial origin. Investigation of the lowermost inter-coal sheet (WC1) reveals abrupt planar basal contacts, persistent upward fining, and a strong westward palaeocurrent trend. Three Lithofacies are recognized in the WC1 sheet; these are discussed. The Allan Hills exposures are believed to represent a succession of low-lying mire complexes interrupted by abrupt but infrequent incursions of coarse sediment, possibly by extreme meltwater floods.

  12. Community stability and selective extinction during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, Peter D.; Angielczyk, Kenneth D.

    2015-10-01

    The fossil record contains exemplars of extreme biodiversity crises. Here, we examined the stability of terrestrial paleocommunities from South Africa during Earth's most severe mass extinction, the Permian-Triassic. We show that stability depended critically on functional diversity and patterns of guild interaction, regardless of species richness. Paleocommunities exhibited less transient instability—relative to model communities with alternative community organization—and significantly greater probabilities of being locally stable during the mass extinction. Functional patterns that have evolved during an ecosystem's history support significantly more stable communities than hypothetical alternatives.

  13. End-Permian mass extinction and palaeoenvironmental changes in Neotethys: Evidence from an oceanic carbonate section in southwestern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shu-zhong; Cao, Chang-qun; Zhang, Yi-chun; Li, Wen-zhong; Shi, G. R.; Wang, Yue; Wu, Ya-sheng; Ueno, K.; Henderson, C. M.; Wang, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiao-juan; Chen, Jun

    2010-08-01

    This paper documents a new Permian-Triassic carbonate sequence which recorded the end-Permian mass extinction in the isolated oceanic setting of Neotethys in southwestern Tibet, China. The sequence is over 350 m thick and consists of the Gyanyima and the Lower Lanchengquxia formations in ascending order. The Lopingian (Late Permian) Gyanyima Formation is composed of fossiliferous reddish carbonates dominated by Colaniella grainstone and reef facies including fenestrate/sponge/coral framestone and bafflestone. 156 species are recognized from the Lopingian Gyanyima Formation. Composite ranges of brachiopods, ostracods, rugose corals and foraminifers at the Gyanyima Section suggest that evolution and diversification of Permian marine organisms continued to the end-Permian preceding a major faunal extinction close to the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB), coincident with a 2-3‰ negative shift of ?13C carb. The timing and accelerating extinction pattern and the negative ?13C carb excursion are largely comparable with those reported from many previously-documented sections on continental shelf environments. Based on a detailed lithofacies analysis, the latest Permian reefal facies is sharply replaced by ostracod/crinoid packstone/grainstone with abrupt abundant occurrences of Early Triassic conodonts at the Gyanyima Section. This is then followed by thrombolitic microbialite, stromatolite, packstone containing abundant spherical microbes, and bivalve/ammonoid packstone of tidal and intertidal facies. This distinct lithofacies and biofacies shift would, therefore, suggest a dramatic faunal community and environmental change across the PTB. Distinct palaeoclimate fluctuations through the P- T interval are also indicated by the alternation of warm- and cool-water faunas through the uppermost part of the succession. The lower part of the Gyanyima Formation is characterized by a warm condition as indicated by Cathaysian-dominated fossils. This was then followed by a mild cooling event as suggested by the occurrence of many distinct peri-Gondwanan elements and absence of compound corals. The latest Changhsingian is characterized exclusively by warm-water faunal elements of Cathaysian affinities, together with the negative shift of ?13C carb, suggesting a rapid warming event at the very end of Permian in association with much more widespread volcanic activities than we thought before.

  14. Modelling conductive and convective processes for the area of Brandenburg (NE German Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Cacace, Mauro; Cherubini, Yvonne; Onno Kaiser, Björn; Noack, Vera

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the internal heat transfer in sedimentary basins requires an assessment of the different physical processes that control heat transport in the subsurface. As faults may provide permeable pathways to fluids or hydraulic barriers they may additionally influence the geothermal field. We present 3D finite element simulations based on a regional structural model for the area of Brandenburg (Northeast German Basin) to quantify the relative influence of different heat transport processes and to assess the role of faults on the geothermal field. Ranging from the Permian to Cenozoic, the sediment fill resolved in the model is characterized by several aquifer complexes and a layer of mobilized Zechstein salt (Noack et al. 2010; Scheck and Bayer, 1999). The distribution of the salt plays a special role for both the thermal and fluid regime due to its high thermal conductivity and its function as a hydraulic barrier in the sedimentary succession. The southern basin margin is dissected by two major fault zones, which vertically offset the pre-Permian basement against the Permian to Cenozoic sediments by several km (Scheck et al. 2002). 3D conductive, coupled fluid and heat transport and full thermohaline models are carried out and compared to each other to assess the impact of moving fluids and to analyze to which degree variations in aquifer thickness and permeability control the regional thermal field. In a next step, fault zones are integrated into the numerical model and different scenarios are tested by varying the permeability of the fault zones. We conclude that conduction is the dominant heat transport mechanism in the study area, whereas the thermal field in the shallow 2 km is additionally influenced by forced convective heat transfer and related advective cooling. Free convective thermal anomalies occur only locally (where the pressure forces are weak) and are controlled by the thickness and permeability of the respective layers. The fault model outcomes reveal a pronounced local influence of permeable fault zones. By contrast, impermeable faults resemble the thermal state of the regional model without faults. References: Noack, V., Cherubini Y., Scheck-Wenderoth M., Lewerenz B., Höding T., Simon A., Moeck I., 2010. Assessment of the present-day thermal field (NE German Basin) - Inferences from 3D modelling. Chemie der Erde 70 (S3), 47-62. Scheck, M., Bayer, U., 1999. Evolution of the Northeast German Basin — inferences from a 3D structural model and subsidence analysis.Tectonophysics 313, 145-169. Scheck, M., Bayer, U., Otto, V., Lamarche, J., Banka, D., Pharaoh, T., 2002. The Elbe Fault System in North Central Europe—a basement controlled zone of crustal weakness. Tectonophysics 360, 281-299.

  15. Correlation of structural lineaments with oil discoveries in Potwar sub-basin, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Potwar sub-basin is located in the foothills of western Himalayas. It is developed as a result of continent collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. This sub-basin is one of the major oil and gas producing-region of the country. Clastics of Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, Paleocene, and carbonates of Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene are producing reservoir. Fractured and eocene carbonate reservoirs (Sakesar and Chorgali) are the main producing horizons in the region. Shale of infra-Cambrian-Cambrian and Paleocene are the main source rocks in the area. Interpretation of satellite data for lineament analysis coupled with stress models indicate that 63% of oil and gas fields fall along and 37% within 2-5 km radius of extensional lineaments and their corresponding open fractured zones developed due to various stress regimes. It is therefore suggested that exploration for hydrocarbon may be targeted in the strike extension of the mentioned lineaments in areas where optimum conditions for hydrocarbon generation exist. (author)

  16. Evolution of Early Triassic outer platform paleoenvironments in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China) and their significance for the biotic recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfetti, Thomas; Bucher, Hugo; Martini, Rossana; Hochuli, Peter A.; Weissert, Helmut; Crasquin-Soleau, Sylvie; Brayard, Arnaud; Goudemand, Nicolas; Brühwiler, Thomas; Guodun, Kuang

    2008-02-01

    Detailed microfacies and paleoenvironmental analyses were conducted through the Early Triassic interval of the outer platform ammonoid-rich series of the Nanpanjiang Basin (Luolou Formation, Guangxi Province, South China). Extensive investigations on outcrops and on thin sections reveal that the widely reported well-diversified latest Permian fauna, dominated by abundant corals, calcareous algae, calcareous sponges, crinoids, brachiopods, gastropods, ostracods and foraminifera, is abruptly replaced by decimated Early Triassic communities essentially composed of low-diversity bivalves, microgastropods, ostracods, and rare foraminifera. Along with this drastic change in faunal assemblages, the recolonization of devastated habitats by calcimicrobial frameworks is observed in the aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction. Calcimicrobialites of Griesbachian age are followed by mixed, ammonoid- and conodont-rich carbonate-siliciclastic series consisting of dark, suboxic, laminated mudstones intercalated with organic-rich shales of Dienerian to late Smithian age. The carbonate-siliciclastic series are interrupted by a brief carbonate episode during the early-middle Smithian. Massive carbonate production resumes only from the early Spathian onward and persists throughout the Spathian. The initial deposition of both carbonate episodes is coeval with (i) re-establishment of well-oxygenated conditions, (ii) a marked (early Smithian) to extreme (early Spathian) ammonoid/conodont diversification, (iii) a significant increase in the skeletal grain diversity and abundance and, (iv) peak carbon isotope values. A short interval of black, organic-rich shales precedes the onset of these two distinct carbonate events, which are both marked by a positive carbonate carbon isotope excursion known from other Tethyan marine localities. The comparison between the Early Triassic stratigraphic evolution of Tethyan outer platform paleoenvironments and platform/basin margin settings of the Nanpanjiang Basin suggests a causal connection between large fluctuations of the global carbon cycle, climate shifts, sea-level changes, oxygen availability in the oceans and the biological rediversification in the wake of the end-Permian biotic crisis.

  17. Sedimentary and tectonic environments for uranium mineralization on the Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Parana Basin is an isolated intracratonic basin in Southeastern South America and is characterized by Paleozoic and Mesozoic clastic sediments and by the location of one of the world's largest lava flows. Uranium mineralization occurs mainly in lower Devonian epineritic feldsphatic sandstones and in fluvio-deltaic channels developed in middle Permian mudstones and sandstones. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic conditions plus tectonic barriers in association with underground water controlled the mineralization. Two uranium deposits with 4250 and 6800 tonnes U of RAR plus EAR were found containing primary (pitchblende and coffinite) and secondary (autunite, sabugalite, uranocircite) minerals. A paleochannel model for the Permo-carboniferous mineralization is quite well established whereas many questions are still open for the confirmation of a model for the Devonian occurrences. Host rock sedimentary environment, ore-forming conditions and source rocks are discussed. (author)

  18. Geology and uranium mineralization of the Collio basin (central Southern Alps, Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continental, Lower Permian Collio basin is a complex post-Variscan structure which derives from the superimposition of a multi-stage volcanic cauldron and a narrow elongated clastics-filled graben. The Collio volcanic apparata erupted at least 150 km3 of mainly acidic magma (rhyolites and minor andesites) of crustal anatectic origin, during two major periods of activity separated by partial resurgent doming. The largest uranium mineralizations in the basin (two of which are economic) have been found both in the volcanics and in the younger late Collio sediments. They show broad similarities in mineralogy, elemental associations and wall-rock alteration. Furthermore, both economic deposits and the major showing so far discovered exhibit U-Zr and U-Nb positive correlations, rather shallow depth of emplacement and definite structural controls. (Auth.)

  19. Regional well-log correlation in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although well logs provide the most complete record of stratigraphy and structure in the northern Delaware Basin, regional interpretations of these logs generate problems of ambiguous lithologic signatures and on-hole anomalies. Interpretation must therefore be based on log-to-log correlation rather than on inferences from single logs. In this report, logs from 276 wells were used to make stratigraphic picks of Ochoan horizons (the Rustler, Salado, and Castile Formations) in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin. Current log correlation suggests that: (1) the Castile is characterized by lateral thickening and thinning; (2) some Castile thinnings are of Permian age; (3) irregular topography in the Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation may produce apparent structures in the overlying Ochoan units; and (4) extensive dissolution of the Salado is not apparent in the area of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) site. 13 refs., 37 figs

  20. Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

    2000-06-13

    The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

  1. Estudios sedimentológicos en los depósitos carboníferos y pérmicos del borde occidental de la puna Sedimentological study of Carboniferous and Permian deposits on the western edge of the Puna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Inés Galli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó el estudio de los depósitos carboníferos y pérmicos expuestos al sudoeste del Salar del Rincón, en el borde occidental de la Puna argentina; éstos comprenden a las capas rojas continentales de la Formación Cerro Oscuro (Carbonífero Superior y a las calizas marinas de la Formación Arizaro (Pérmico Inferior. La columna estratigráfica analizada consta de 480 m de rocas clásticas y carbonáticas, con niveles volcaniclásticos intercalados. Los depósitos integran una estructura sinclinal de rumbo NNO, que se hunde hacia el NO. Los depósitos carbonífero-pérmicos fueron relevados en ambos flancos del sinclinal. En base a las características estratigráficas y sedimentológicas analizadas en las Formaciones Cerro Oscuro y Arizaro, se brindan nuevas interpretaciones paleoambientales: i. La secuencia grano y estratodecreciente que documenta la Formación Cerro Oscuro comprende, de base a techo, flujos de detritos acumulados en un sistema de abanico aluvial y tres ciclos o secuencias positivas, correspondientes a un sistema fluvial gravoso a arenoso tipo braided. ii. En las secciones analizadas, la relación entre las Formaciones Cerro Oscuro y Arizaro es una paraconformidad. iii. La Formación Arizaro comprende tres ciclos desarrollados en paleoambientes de plataforma marina silicoclástico - carbonática. Se describen características mineralógicas y petrográficas de las facies reconocidas y se incorpora un análisis de proveniencia, que sugiere la existencia de diferentes áreas de aporte. Se analiza la transgresión que documenta la Formación Arizaro y se la vincula con el evento de inundación global que provocaron los fenómenos de deglaciación ocurridos durante el Artinskiano-Kunguriano. Se discute la injerencia de procesos tectónicos y volcánicos que habrían afectado la cuenca durante su evolución.The study of Carboniferous - Permian deposits exposed in the south-west of Salar del Rincón, on the western edge of the Argentine Puna has been carried out. These deposits include the continental red beds of the Cerro Oscuro Formation (Upper Carboniferous and the marine limestones of the Arizaro Formation (Lower to Middle Permian. The stratigraphic column analyzed consists of 480 m of clastic and carbonate rocks with interbedded volcaniclastic levels. The deposits integrate a synclinal structure of NNW-SSE trend, which pitches to the NW. The carboniferous-permian deposits were analized in both flanks of the syncline. Based on the stratigraphic and sedimentologic characteristics analyzed in the Cerro Oscuro and Arizaro Formations, new paleoenvironmental interpretations are given: i. The thinning and fining sequence that documents the Cerro Oscuro Formation includes, from base to top, debris flows accumulated in an alluvial fan system, and three cycles or minor positive sequences, corresponding to a sand-gravel braided fluvial system. ii. In the analyzed sections, the relationship between the Cerro Oscuro and Arizaro formations is a paraconformity. iii. The Arizaro Formation includes three cycles developed in a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic marine shelf paleoenvironment. Mineralogic and petrographic characteristics of the recognized facies are described and a provenance analysis wich suggests the existence of different source areas is included. The transgression that documents the Arizaro Formation is analyzed and it has been related with the global sea level rise event caused by deglaciation phenomena during the Artinskian-Kungurian time. The effect of tectonic and volcanic processes that would have affected the basin during their evolution is discussed.

  2. Estudios sedimentológicos en los depósitos carboníferos y pérmicos del borde occidental de la puna / Sedimentological study of Carboniferous and Permian deposits on the western edge of the Puna

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Claudia Inés, Galli; María Cristina, Moya; Marcelo, Arnosio.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó el estudio de los depósitos carboníferos y pérmicos expuestos al sudoeste del Salar del Rincón, en el borde occidental de la Puna argentina; éstos comprenden a las capas rojas continentales de la Formación Cerro Oscuro (Carbonífero Superior) y a las calizas marinas de la Formación Arizaro [...] (Pérmico Inferior). La columna estratigráfica analizada consta de 480 m de rocas clásticas y carbonáticas, con niveles volcaniclásticos intercalados. Los depósitos integran una estructura sinclinal de rumbo NNO, que se hunde hacia el NO. Los depósitos carbonífero-pérmicos fueron relevados en ambos flancos del sinclinal. En base a las características estratigráficas y sedimentológicas analizadas en las Formaciones Cerro Oscuro y Arizaro, se brindan nuevas interpretaciones paleoambientales: i. La secuencia grano y estratodecreciente que documenta la Formación Cerro Oscuro comprende, de base a techo, flujos de detritos acumulados en un sistema de abanico aluvial y tres ciclos o secuencias positivas, correspondientes a un sistema fluvial gravoso a arenoso tipo braided. ii. En las secciones analizadas, la relación entre las Formaciones Cerro Oscuro y Arizaro es una paraconformidad. iii. La Formación Arizaro comprende tres ciclos desarrollados en paleoambientes de plataforma marina silicoclástico - carbonática. Se describen características mineralógicas y petrográficas de las facies reconocidas y se incorpora un análisis de proveniencia, que sugiere la existencia de diferentes áreas de aporte. Se analiza la transgresión que documenta la Formación Arizaro y se la vincula con el evento de inundación global que provocaron los fenómenos de deglaciación ocurridos durante el Artinskiano-Kunguriano. Se discute la injerencia de procesos tectónicos y volcánicos que habrían afectado la cuenca durante su evolución. Abstract in english The study of Carboniferous - Permian deposits exposed in the south-west of Salar del Rincón, on the western edge of the Argentine Puna has been carried out. These deposits include the continental red beds of the Cerro Oscuro Formation (Upper Carboniferous) and the marine limestones of the Arizaro Fo [...] rmation (Lower to Middle Permian). The stratigraphic column analyzed consists of 480 m of clastic and carbonate rocks with interbedded volcaniclastic levels. The deposits integrate a synclinal structure of NNW-SSE trend, which pitches to the NW. The carboniferous-permian deposits were analized in both flanks of the syncline. Based on the stratigraphic and sedimentologic characteristics analyzed in the Cerro Oscuro and Arizaro Formations, new paleoenvironmental interpretations are given: i. The thinning and fining sequence that documents the Cerro Oscuro Formation includes, from base to top, debris flows accumulated in an alluvial fan system, and three cycles or minor positive sequences, corresponding to a sand-gravel braided fluvial system. ii. In the analyzed sections, the relationship between the Cerro Oscuro and Arizaro formations is a paraconformity. iii. The Arizaro Formation includes three cycles developed in a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic marine shelf paleoenvironment. Mineralogic and petrographic characteristics of the recognized facies are described and a provenance analysis wich suggests the existence of different source areas is included. The transgression that documents the Arizaro Formation is analyzed and it has been related with the global sea level rise event caused by deglaciation phenomena during the Artinskian-Kungurian time. The effect of tectonic and volcanic processes that would have affected the basin during their evolution is discussed.

  3. Overpressure generation and episodic dewatering in the Delaware basin, western Texas: The dual nature of a fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansom, J.; Lee, M.; Wolf, L. W.; Kosuwan, T.

    2005-05-01

    This study combines numerical modeling techniques with field data to investigate overpressure development and episodic dewatering processes in the Delaware Basin and the Central Basin Platform (CBP). Low-permeability shales in the eastern Delaware Basin are characterized by elevated pore fluid pressures that are much greater than hydrostatic pressures. Observed geophysical anomalies such as low resistivity, high conductivity, and high seismic transit time are consistent with the presence of fluid-filled, fractured and mechanically weak rocks in the eastern Delaware Basin. Our new geophysical analyses also indicate that the overpressures likely extend further into the shallower western basin in Culberson County near the sulfur mineralization area. The predicted present-day gas window is located within the overpressure zone, suggesting that overpressure may be maintained by active oil-to-gas conversion. A basin hydrology model Basin2 is modified to evaluate the pore pressure increases by oil-gas conversion from the equation of state (EOS) for the CH4-CO2-H2O system. Our modeling shows that source beds in CBP have been rather shallowly buried and did not become thermally mature to generate gas directly. Overpressure and episodic dewatering processes appear to be the most plausible mechanism to move deep-basin hydrocarbons eastward into the CBP and westward into the shallow margin of the Delaware Basin. The model of long-distance fluid migration from the eastern Delaware across the fault zone into the CBP is supported by the geochemical similarities of oils from the two basins. A model that invokes episodic release of overpressured fluids by hydrofracturing processes can simultaneously provide mechanisms for achieving transient overpressure preservation and substantial, episodic fluid movement. The episodic dewatering through hydrofracturing processes thus can better explain the observed overpressure preservation, long-distance fluid migration, and related mineralization and alteration of evaporitic strata in the Permian Basin.

  4. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2002-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  5. Palaeotethys seawater temperature rise and an intensified hydrological cycle following the end-Permian mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schobben, Martin; Joachimski, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction has been associated with severe global warming. Main stage volcanism of the Siberian Traps occurred at or near the extinction interval and has been proposed as a likely greenhouse catalyst. In this study, a high-resolution ?18O record is established using diagenetically resistant apatite of conodonts and low-Mg calcite of brachiopods from stratigraphically well-constrained Permian–Triassic (P–Tr) boundary successions in northwestern Iran. A new evaluation is made for previously published conodont ?18O values from South China and revised palaeotemperatures are presented together with new data from Wuchiapingian to Griesbachian sections in Iran. ?18O data from P–Tr sections in Iran document tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) of 27–33 °C during the Changhsingian with a negative shift in ?18O starting at the extinction horizon, translating into a warming of SSTs to over 35 °C. The results are consistent with re-calculated SSTs of the South Chinese sections. Warming was associated with an enhanced hydrological cycle involving increased tropical precipitation and monsoonal activity in the Tethys Sea. Global warming, intensification of the hydrological cycle and associated processes, vertical water column stratification, eutrophication and subsequent local anoxia may all have facilitated an extinction event.

  6. The oldest post-palaeozoic crinoid and permian-triassic origins of the articulata (echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Tatsuo; Twitchett, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    The Crinoidea are the most primitive class of living echinoderms, and suffered a severe crisis during the Late Permian mass extinction event. All post-Palaeozoic crinoids, including living species, belong to the Articulata, and morphological and recent molecular studies demonstrate that they form a monophyletic clade. The Articulata originated from Palaeozoic cladid crinoids, but the nature and timing of their origination remains obscure. Problems with understanding the origin and early evolution of the Articulata have arisen because the Permian-Triassic crinoid fossil record is particularly poor. We report on a new genus and species from the earliest Triassic, which is the oldest known post-Palaeozoic articulate crinoid and fundamentally alters our understanding of the early evolution of the Articulata. Prior to this study, the most primitive post-Palaeozoic articulate was thought to be Holocrinus of the order Isocrinida. Unexpectedly, the new taxon belongs to the order Encrinida, which reveals a previously hidden diversity of crinoids in the earliest Triassic. Its discovery implies either a dramatic radiation of crinoids in the immediate post-extinction aftermath, when environmental conditions were at their most severe, or a pre-extinction origin of the crown group articulates and survival of multiple lineages. PMID:25826072

  7. No link between the Panjal Traps (Kashmir) and the Late Permian mass extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Bhat, G. M.; Brookfield, M. E.; Jahn, B.-M.

    2011-10-01

    Voluminous Late Permian flood basalt eruptions are contemporaneous with the mid-Capitanian (260 Ma) and end-Permian (251 Ma) mass extinction events. The Panjal Traps of Kashmir are thought to be correlative to the mid-Capitanian mass extinction however no radiometric age has been determined. We report a single zircon U-Pb laser ablation ICP-MS date of a rhyolite from the lower-middle part of the volcanic sequence. Twenty-four individual zircon crystals yield a mean 206U/238Pb age of 289 ± 3 Ma. The results show that the Panjal Traps are considerably older than previously interpreted and not correlative to post-Neo-Tethys rifting of the Gondwanan margin or the mid-Capitanian mass extinction and are, in fact, correlative to the opening of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. In contrast to other similarly size large igneous provinces, the Panjal Traps are not coincident with a mass extinction event and therefore casts doubt on the direct relationship between continental flood basalt volcanism and ecosystem collapse.

  8. Microbial response to limited nutrients in shallow water immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C; Huang, J; Kershaw, S; Luo, G; Farabegoli, E; Perri, M C; Chen, L; Bai, X; Xie, S

    2012-01-01

    Previous work indicates that a variety of microbes bloomed in the oceans after the end-Permian faunal mass extinction, but evidence is sporadically documented. Thus, the nature and geographic distribution of such microbes and their associations are unclear, addressed in this study using a series of biomarker groups. On the basis of microbial biomarker records of the 2-methylhopane index, evidence is presented for cyanobacterial blooms in both the western and eastern Tethys Sea and in both shallow and deep waters, after the mass extinction. The enhanced relative abundance of C(28) (expressed by the C(28) /C(29) ratio of) regular steranes suggests a bloom of prasinophyte algae occurred immediately after the end-Permian faunal extinction, comparable with those observed in some other mass extinctions in Phanerozoic. Significantly, cyanobacteria and prasinophyte algae show a synchronized onset of bloom in the shallow water Bulla section, north Italy, inferring for the first time their coupled response to the biotic crisis and the associated environmental conditions. However, in Meishan of Zhejiang Province in south China, the bloom declined earlier than in Bulla. The association of increased 2-methylhopane index with a negative shift in the nitrogen isotope composition infers a scenario of enhanced nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria immediately after the faunal mass extinction. N(2) fixation by cyanobacteria is here interpreted to have provided prasinophyte algae with ammonium in nutrient-limited shallow waters, and thus caused their associated blooms. PMID:22168223

  9. Changhsingian (Late Permian) conodonts from Son La, northwest Vietnam and their stratigraphic and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, I.

    2012-05-01

    Late Permian conodonts are for the first time reported from Vietnam. Pa, Sa, Sb, Sc and M elements of the Changhsingian conodont species Hindeodus julfensis (Sweet) are reported from a 40 cm thick limestone in the middle part of the Yenduyet Formation near Son La, NW Vietnam. The occurrence of H. julfensis indicates a Changhsingian age that is consistent with an interpreted early Changhsingian age for a brachiopod fauna slightly higher in the sampled section. The Son La section is located in the Song Da Rift Zone and overlies basaltic volcanics considered equivalent to the Emeishan large igneous province basalts that are plume related. The Permian-Triassic boundary in Vietnam is yet to be precisely located biostratigraphically but proxy chemostratigraphic data indicate its likely position in sections at Nhi Tao and Lung Cam, N. Vietnam and correlation with the Global Stratotype Section and Point at Meishan, South China. The recovered conodonts have a Conodont Colour Alteration Index of 5 and have been heated to c. 600 °C but they do not show any evidence of textural alteration due to regional metamorphism such as micro-folding or stretching that would indicate any direct effects of the compressional Indosinian Orogeny.

  10. Research on genesis of pyrite near the Permian-Triassic boundary in meishan, Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.-F.; Tang, Y.-G.; Chou, C.-L.

    2006-01-01

    The content and crystal forms of pyrite and sulfur isotope composition of pyrite sulfur as well as its vertical distribution near the Permian-Triassic (P/T) boundary in the Meishan section, Changxing county, Zhejiang province, China were studied using geological, petrological, mineralogical and geochemical methods (techniques). The result showed that the genesis of abundant pyrites in bed 24e2 at the uppermost part of the Changxing Formation in the Meishan section may be related to volcanic activity. In bed 24e2 of the Meishan section, pyrite has its highest content of 1.84% and the sulfur isotope composition has the highest ??34S value at + 2.2??? which is very similar to that of the average value of volcanic gas. There are some volcanic products such as ??-quartz, siliceous cylinders and siliceous spherules which coexisted with pyrites in beds 24e2 and 24f. It can be concluded that a large quantity of volcanic ash fell into the South China Sea and was incorporated into marine sediments during the formation of limestone at the uppermost part of the Changxing Formation. The volcanic eruption with massive amounts of H2S and S02 gas at the end of the Permian period resulted in the enrichment of H2S in the South China Sea areas. The reaction of H2S with reactive iron minerals formed the mass of abundant pyrites.

  11. Permian–Triassic palynostratigraphy in Mailaram area, Godavari Graben, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neerja Jha; Neha Aggarwal

    2012-10-01

    Palynological investigations of five borecores, viz., GAM-3, GAM-6, GAM-7, GAM-8 and GAM-10 from Mailaram area have suggested the occurrence of complete Lower Gondwana succession in Mailaram area. Total nine palynozones have been identified on the basis of dominance, sub-dominance and appearance of various palynotaxa. These palynozones belong to Talchir, Upper Karharbari and Barakar (Early Permian), Raniganj (Late Permian) and Panchet (Early Triassic) palynofloras of Indian Gondwana. The oldest Palynozone-1 demonstrated in borecore GAM-6 (331.4–500 m) and borecore GAM-10 (505.66–581.55 m), is characterized by the dominance of Parasaccites and sub-dominance of Plicatipollenites belongs to Talchir Palynoflora; Palynozone-2 identified in borecore GAM-7 (667–749 m) and borecore GAM-8 (89.75 m) is characterized by the dominance of Parasaccites and sub-dominance of Scheuringipollenites which belongs to Upper Karharbari Palynoflora. Palynozone-3, identified in borecore GAM-6 (149.7–240.05 m) and borecore GAM-8 (84.95 m), is characterized by the dominance of Scheuringipollenites akin to Scheuringipollenites zone of Barakar palynoflora; Palynozone-4, recorded in borecores GAM-3 (294–437.98 m), GAM-7 (453–640.5 m) and GAM-8 (35.35 m) is characterized by the dominance of Faunipollenites and sub-dominance of Striatopodocarpites along with certain stratigraphically significant taxa, viz., Weylandites, Guttulapollenites, Corisaccites, Aurangapollenites and Osmundacidites. Palynozone-5, demarcated in borecore GAM-3 (144.86–221.3 m) and borecore GAM-10 (35.35 m), is distinguished by the dominance of striate disaccates along with at least 30% pollen assigned to Striasulcites; Palynozone-6, identified in borecore GAM-3 (35.1–73.08 m) and borecore GAM-7 (231–423 m), is characterized by the dominance of striate disaccates along with 20–30% of Densipollenites; Palynozone-7, recorded in borecore GAM-7 (206 m), is distinguished by the dominance of Crescentipollenites along with striate disaccates; Palynozone-8, identified in borecore GAM-7 (178.4 m), is characterized by the distinguished presence of taeniate pollen Guttulapollenites. Palynozones 4–8 belong to Raniganj Palynoflora. Palynozone-9, identified in borecore GAM-7 (166 m), is discriminated by the dominance of trilete spore Verrucosisporites and sub-dominance of taeniate pollen Lunatisporites which belongs to Triassic palynoflora. On the basis of palynological data Palynozone-1 (= Talchir palynoflora), Palynozone-2 and Palynozone-3 have been assigned to Early Permian age; Palynozones 4–8 (= Raniganj palynoflora) have been assigned to Late Permian age and Palynozone-9 (= Triassic palynoflora) has been assigned to Early Triassic age. With the aim of correlating the Permian and Triassic sediments of Mailaram area palynological investigations of five borecores were carried out.

  12. Deposition and alteration of carbonaceous series within a Neotethyan rift at the western boundary of the Arabian plate: The late Permian Um Irna Formation, NW Jordan, a petroleum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 51 01 53 D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Bechtel, A.; Gratzer, R. [Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, University of Leoben, Peter Tunner Strasse 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Abu Hamad, A.M.B. [Geology Department, University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2010-01-07

    During the late Permian (Kungurian to Kazanian) a Neotethyan rift basin evolved at the western boundary of the Arabian Plate, in what is called today the Dead Sea Valley of western Jordan. The break-up of Pangaea was accompanied by low-sinuosity sandy braided- to meandering-fluvial drainage systems which were fed by the uplift of the Arabian Shield and by poorly aerated swamps and ponds that concentrated plant debris of the Cathaysian floral province in the Um Irna Formation. These proximal wet fan sediments are overlain by a dry fan characterized by extensive reddish floodplain deposits, anastomosing channel systems and paleosols. The wet fan is underlain by Cambrian sandstones. These units serve as the top and bottom seals of the OM-bearing system of the Um Irna Formation. The sedimentary rocks of the OM-bearing Um Irna Formation underwent supergene, diagenetic and epigenetic hydrothermal alteration under an elevated geothermal gradient. The temperature increased from the time of deposition of the wet to the time of deposition of the dry fan and caused remobilization of manganese already pre-concentrated in the Cambrian footwall rocks of the rift basin. The anomalous heat regime may be accounted for as a predecessor stage of the Dead Sea Rift which is still active today. Oil seeps are found along faults and fractures near this deep-seated lineamentary fault zone. The deposition and alteration of the organic matter in this late Permian rift are of great consequence for oil generation in the region. Organic petrographic investigations revealed that organic-rich terrestrial carbonaceous and coal rich sediments of mainly of type III kerogen are dominant in the Um Irna Formation. In addition, aquatic liptinite rich sedimentary input (fresh water lake and/or lacustrine swamp) of type I kerogen is also noted. Coal derived organic matter occurs in the form of coaly particles with ranks from subbituminous A to high volatile bituminous C. Higher plant-derived macerals as sporinite and cutinite with an oil generation potential typical of type II kerogen contribute to the source rock potential of the Um Irna Formation which is equivalent to the Khuff Formation in the oil provinces of Iraq, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia (thermal maturity of dispersed OM ranges between 0.48 and 0.55% R{sub r} giving rise to the mature stage of oil generation). Additionally, Botryococcus-type algae point towards the presence of type I kerogen. Moreover the presence of solid bitumen and oil droplets (petroleum fluid expulsions) in the sediments of the Um Irna Formation indicates formation of hydrocarbons. Organic chemistry not only supported the coal petrographic findings but also indicated inhospitable aquatic conditions near the P/Tr boundary evidenced by PAHs present in the sample and by lots of charcoal. The tropical areas were affected by vast wildfires raging in the forest and swamps during the late Permian. They contributed to a highly toxic atmosphere, a decrease of the oxygen contents speeded up by dead OM spilled into the water and creating anoxia approaching the P/Tr boundary. The elevated geothermal gradient sparking hydrothermal alteration in the OM-bearing Um Irna Formation during the Late Permian may be accounted for as related to a precursor stage of the Dead Sea Rift, which is still active today in terms of migration of hot brines and hydrocarbons. (author)

  13. The south Celtic Sea/Bristol Channel Basin: origin, deformation and inversion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorn, B.

    1987-06-01

    The South Celtic Sea/Bristol Channel Basin is a relatively narrow and elongated sedimentary trough, located within the northern part of the Hercynian fold belt and filled with ?Permo-Triassic redbeds to Jurassic marine sediments. Its present configuration is the result of a three-fold sequence of tectonic phases initiated during the late Palaeozoic. The origin of the basin appears to be related to localised extensional reactivation of Hercynian thrust zones during the ?Permian and Early Triassic, followed by regional subsidence during the Late Triassic and Jurassic. Uplift of the basin margins, together with dextral strike-slip movements in an east-west sense and large-scale erosion during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, resulted in the present elongated configuration of the Lower Mesozoic basin. Regional subsidence from Aptian time onwards resulted in widespread deposition of a relatively thin section of Wealden elastics and Upper Cretaceous chalk, unconformably overlying folded pre-Cretaceous strata. Sedimentation was interrupted during the Early Tertiary by a series of tectonic events that included emplacement of the Lundy igneous mass during the Early Eocene and mild basin inversion during the Oligo-Miocene. Inversion was accompanied by dextral reactivation of the NW-SE oriented Sticklepath fault zone. The total amount of uplift, probably not exceeding 350 m, reflects the rather stable configuration of the underlying lithospheric crust as indicated by seismic reflection and refraction data.

  14. Structure of Charnockitic basement in a part of the Krishna–Godavari basin, Andhra Pradesh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I V Radhakrishna Murthy; S Bangaru Babu

    2006-08-01

    A regional magnetic survey was carried out over an area of 8000 km2 in Godavari districts of Andhra Pradesh,India,which is covered by the rocks of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) viz., the Khondalitic series and Charnockites in the northern half and Permian to Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments in the southern half,and forms a part of the Krishna –Godavari (K –G)basin. The survey brought out a strong NE –SW trending anomaly in the area covered by the rocks of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB),and a mild ENE –WSW trending anomaly in the area covered by the sediments of the Krishna –Godavari (K –G)basin.The NE –SW trending anomaly in the northern half could be attributed to the exposed/near surface Charnockite basement that has come closer to the surface as a result of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB)tectonics.Explanation of the mild ENE –WSW trending anomaly over the sediments of the Krishna –Godavari (K –G)basin required a faulted magnetic basement at depth downthrown towards the south.It is therefore concluded that the Charnockitic basement together with the Khondalite group of rocks which are folded and faulted during the different phases of tectonics of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) extend into the Krishna –Godavari (K –G)basin and further,were involved in faulting during the phases of formation and sedimentation in the Krishna –Godavari (K –G)basin.

  15. Nobloedischia rasnitsyni, a new genus and species of Oedischiidae (Orthoptera) from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Oklahoma, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Beckemeyer

    2011-01-01

    Nobloedischia rasnitsyni gen. et sp. n. (Oedischiidae) is described from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Noble County, Oklahoma. The genus is similar to both Petrelcana (Oedischiidae: Mezenoedischiinae) and Oedischia (Oedischiidae: Oedischiinae) and is left unplaced at the subfamily level. The new species is the twelfth Orthoptera species and the fourth species of Oedischiidae from these deposits.

  16. Nobloedischia rasnitsyni, a new genus and species of Oedischiidae (Orthoptera) from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Oklahoma, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckemeyer, Roy J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nobloedischia rasnitsyni gen. et sp. n. (Oedischiidae) is described from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Noble County, Oklahoma. The genus is similar to both Petrelcana (Oedischiidae: Mezenoedischiinae) and Oedischia (Oedischiidae: Oedischiinae) and is left unplaced at the subfamily level. The new species is the twelfth Orthoptera species and the fourth species of Oedischiidae from these deposits. PMID:22259269

  17. Is there a remnant Variscan subducted slab in the mantle beneath the Paris basin? Implications for the late Variscan lithospheric delamination process and the Paris basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbuch, O.; Piromallo, C.

    2012-08-01

    The Paris basin (northern France) is a Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic intracratonic basin that settled upon the collapsed Variscan collisional belt. The lithospheric roots of the Variscan orogenic system, below the Paris basin, have been investigated using a European-scale P-wave velocity tomographic model. Tomography points out the existence of a significant high velocity anomaly in the upper mantle below the western part of the basin. At ~ 150-200 km depth, the anomaly extends with a NW-SE trend along the buried Northern France trace of the Northern Variscan Suture Zone i.e. the Bray segment of the Upper Carboniferous Lizard-Rhenohercynian (LRH) suture. Moreover, the high-velocity anomaly is spatially correlated with the prominent Paris Basin Magnetic Anomaly. Its downdip extent reaches depths greater than 200 km below the southern margin of the Paris basin. As suggested in previous tomographic studies below ancient suture zones, these data argue for such anomaly being the remnant of a Variscan subducted slab that escaped the extensive late orogenic delamination process affecting the lithospheric roots by Late Carboniferous-Early Permian times and that was preserved stable over 300 Ma at the base of the lithosphere. On a general geodynamical perspective, these results provide a new insight into the long-term evolution of subducted lithosphere into the mantle. In the case of the Western European Variscan orogenic belt, they suggest that the subduction of the LRH slab below the previously thickened Variscan crust, and its final detachment from the orogenic root, have played an important role in the collapse of the belt, inducing thermal erosion and extension of the overriding lithosphere. The spatial evolution of late orogenic extension across the belt and of subsequent thermal subsidence in the Paris basin is suggested to result from the heterogeneous delamination of the lithospheric roots along strike and from the resultant pattern of asthenospheric rise.

  18. Uplifting of the Jiamusi Block in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NE China: evidence from basin provenance and geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjiang; Wen, Quanbo; Han, Guoqing; Li, Wei

    2010-05-01

    The main part of Jiamusi Block, named as Huanan-Uplift, is located in the northeastern Heilongjiang, China. The Huanan-Uplift is surrounded by many relatively small Mesozoic-Cenozoic basins, e.g. Sanjiang Basin, Hulin Basin, Boli Basin, Jixi Basin, Shuangyashan Basin and Shuanghua Basin. However previous research works were mainly focused on stratigraphy and palaeontology of the basins, therefore, the coupling relation between the uplift and the surrounding basins have not been clear. Based on the field investigations, conglomerate provenance studies of the Houshigou Formation in Boli Basin, geochronology of the Huanan-Uplift basement, we have been studied the relationships between Huanan-Uplift and the surrounding basins. The regional stratigraphic correlations indicates that the isolated basins in the area experienced the same evolution during the period of the Chengzihe and the Muling Formations (the Early Cretaceous). The paleogeography reconstructions suggest that the area had been a large-scale basin as a whole during the Early Cretaceous. The Huanan-Uplift did not exist. The paleocurrent directions, sandstone and conglomerate provenance analyses show that the Huanan-Uplift started to be the source area of the surrounding basins during the period of Houshigou Formation (early Late Cretaceous), therefore, it suggests that the Jiamusi Block commenced uplift in the early Late Cretaceous. The granitic gneisses in Huanan-Uplift give 494-415 Ma monazite U-Th-total Pb ages, 262-259 Ma biotite and 246-241 Ma K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages. The cooling rates of 1-2 ?/Ma from 500-260 Ma and 10-11 ?/Ma from 260-240 Ma have been calculated based on the ages. This suggests that the Jiamusi Block had a rapid exhumation during late Permian, which should be related to the closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean between the Siberian and North China continents. It is concluded that during the late Paleozoic the Jiamusi Block was stable with a very slow uplifting. With the closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean the Jiamusi Block underwent a very rapid exhumation in the late Permian. In the early Mesozoic the area went into a basin developing stage and formed a large basin as a whole during the Early Cretaceous. In the Late Cretaceous the Jiamusi Block started uplifting and the basin was broken into isolate small basins. References: Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources of Heilongjiang Province. Regional geology of Heilongjiang Province. Beijing: Geological Publishing House, 1993.578-581. Cao Chengrun, Zheng Qingdao. Structural evolution feature and its significance of hydrocarbon exploration in relict basin formation, Eastern Heilongjiang province. Journal of Jilin university (Earth Science Edition), 2003, 33(2):167-172. Lang Xiansheng. Biologic Assemblage features of Coal-bearing Strata in Shuangyashan-Jixian coal-field. Coal geology of China, 2002, 14(2):7-12. Piao Taiyuan , Cai Huawei , Jiang Baoyu. On the Cretaceous coal-bearing Strata in Eastern Heilongjiang. Journal Of Stratigraphy, 2005, 29:489-496. Wang Jie , He Zhonghua , Liu Zhaojun , Du Jiangfeng , Wang Weitao. Geochemical characteristics of Cretaceous detrital rocks and their constraint on provenance in Jixi Basin. Global Geology?2006, 25(4):341-348. DickinsonW R and Christopher A. Suczek. Plate Tectonics and Sandstone Composition. AAPG B. 1979,63(12 ):2164-2182. DickinsonW R, Beard L S, Brakenridge G R, et al. Provenance of North American Phanerozoic sandstones in relation to tectonic setting. Bull Geo-Soc Amer, 1983, 94: 222-235. Maruyama S, Seno T. Orogeny and relative plate motions: Example of the Japanese Islands. Tectonophysics, 1986?127(3-4):305-329. Maruyama S, Isozaki Y, Kimura Gand Terabayashi M C.Paleogeographic maps of the Japanese Islands: plate tectonic systhesis from 750 Ma to the present. Island Arc, 1997,6:121-142.

  19. High-Precision Marine Sr Isotope Geochronology in Deep Time: Permian Tuffs and Conodonts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M. D.; Davydov, V. I.; Snyder, W. S.

    2007-12-01

    Stratigraphic sections of the Southern Urals containing abundant and well-preserved fauna for precise biostratigraphic correlation and common instratified volcanic ash beds dated by U-Pb zircon geochronology offer a unique opportunity to constrain a temporally accurate Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian seawater Sr curve. The 87Sr/86Sr compositions of conodonts (biogenic apatite) were measured by high-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry following rigorous pretreatment protocols, and plotted within an age model calibrated by 13 high-precision U-Pb zircon ash bed ages. The resulting seawater Sr curve shows a significant reduction in data scatter by comparison to earlier curves (Denison et al., 1994; Veizer et al., 1999; Bruckschen et al., 1999; Korte et al., 2006), suggesting that our conodont pre-dissolution treatment was highly effective for retrieving the original seawater Sr signal. The relatively flat Late Moscovian through mid-Ghzelian seawater Sr curve of this study is generally consistent with that of Bruckschen et al. (1999). Beginning in the mid-Ghzelian, our data define a decreasing trend in 87Sr/86Sr through the mid-Sakmarian, consistent with the data of Korte et al. (2006). By combining our high precision 87Sr/86Sr measurements and U-Pb age calibration, the resolution of Sr isotope geochronology approaches 0.5 Ma in this interval. This highly resolved seawater 87Sr/86Sr record obtained for the Late Moscovian through mid-Sakmarian will aid in global carbonate chemostratigraphic correlation and contribute to our understanding of the timing of Late Paleozoic glacial and tectonic events. References: Bruckschen, P., Oesmann, S., Veizer, J., 1999. Isotope stratigraphy of the European Carboniferous: proxy signals for ocean chemistry, climate and tectonics. Chemical Geology 161, p. 127-163. Denison, R.E., Koepnick, R.B., Burke, W.H., Hetherington, E.A., Fletcher, A., 1994. Construction of the Mississippian, Pennsylvanian and Permian seawater 87Sr/86Sr curve. Chemical Geology 112, p.145-167. Veizer, J., Ala, D., Azmy, K., Bruckschen, P., Buhl, D., Bruhn, J., Carden, G.A.F., Diener, A., Ebneth, S., Godderis, Y., Jasper, T., Korte, C., Pawellek, F., Podlaha, O.G., Strauss, H., 1999. 87Sr/86Sr, ´13C and ?18O evolution of Phanerozoic seawater. Chemical Geology 161, p. 59-88. Korte, C., Jasper, T., Kozur, H.W., Veizer, J., 2006. 87Sr/86Sr record of Permian seawater. Palaeogeography, Pala3eoclimatology, Palaeoecology 240, p. 89-107.

  20. Gradients in seasonality and seawater oxygen isotopic composition along the early Permian Gondwanan coast, SE Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, J. Andrew; Ivany, Linda C.; Runnegar, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of marine carbonates are commonly employed for understanding ancient temperatures, but this approach is complicated in the very distant past due to uncertainties about the effects of diagenesis and the isotopic composition of seawater, both locally and globally. Microsampled accretionary calcite from two species of the fossil bivalve Eurydesma Sowerby and Morris 1845 collected from sediments of Cisuralian age in high latitude marine sediments along the SE coast of Australia records cyclic seasonal fluctuations in shell ?18O values during growth, demonstrating the primary nature of the isotope signal and thus allowing investigation of early Permian seawater isotopic composition and water temperature in the high southern latitudes. The mean and seasonal range of ?18Ocarb decreases poleward across about 10° of paleolatitude (?67°S-77°S). The presence of co-occurring dropstones and stratigraphically associated glendonites constrains winter temperatures across the region to near-freezing, thus permitting calculation of realistic estimates of water composition and summer temperatures. Summer ?18Ocarb values indicate water temperatures between 5 °C and 12 °C, with warmer values at lower latitudes. The decrease in both mean sea surface temperature and seasonal amplitude with increasing latitude on the Gondwanan coast is much like that observed along high-latitude coastlines today. Calculated ?18Owater decreases toward the pole, likely associated with an increasing contribution of isotopically light fresh water derived from summer snow-melt. The gradient in ?18Owater is similar to that documented over a similar span of latitude on the modern SE Greenland coast. We infer the presence of a north-flowing coastal current of cold, O18-depleted water that entrains progressively greater amounts of more typical seawater as it moves away from the pole. ?18O values in SE Australia, however, are about 3‰ lower than those off Greenland, suggesting comparatively lower salinity water or more O18-depleted glacial ice/runoff in the Permian Gondwanan high latitudes, perhaps augmented by more depleted (negative) global average seawater. Conditions in southeastern Australia during the largest of the Permian deglaciations were warmer than present-day Antarctica at similar latitudes, but may approximate those of early-mid Miocene Antarctica, with frozen winters but summers closer to 10 °C.

  1. Provenance of Permian-Triassic Gondwana Sequence Units Accreted to the Banda Arc: Constraints from U/Pb and Hf Analysis of Zircons and Igneous Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. A.; Spencer, C. J.; Harris, R. A.; Hoiland, C.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of zircons from Australian affinity Permo-Triassic units of the Timor region yield age distributions with large peaks at 230-400 Ma and 1750-1900 Ma (n=435). Similar zircon age peaks are also found in rocks from NE Australia and the eastern Cimmerian block. It is likely that these terranes, which are now widely separated, were once part of the northern edge of Gondwana near what is now the NW margin of Australia. The Cimmerian Block was removed from Gondwana during Early Permian rifting and initiation of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. Hf analysis of zircon from the Aileu Complex in Timor and Kisar shows bimodal (juvenial and evolved) magmatism in the Gondwana Sequence of NW Australia at ~300 Ma. The magmatic event produced basalt with rift valley and ocean floor geochemical affinities, and rhyolite. Similar rock types and isotopic signatures are also found in Permo-Triassic igneous units throughout the Cimmerian continental block. The part of the Cimmerian Block with zircon distributions most like the Gondwana Sequence of NW Australia is the terranes of northern Tibet and Malaysia. The large 1750-1900 Ma zircon peak is much more wide spread, and appears in terranes from Baoshan (SW China) to Borneo. The Permo-Triassic rocks of the Timor region fill syn-rift intracratonic basins that successfully rifted in the Jurassic to form the NW margin of Australia. This passive continental margin first entered the Sunda Trench in the Timor region at around 8 Ma causing the Permo-Triassic rocks to accrete to the edge of the Asian Plate and emerge as a series of mountainous islands in the young collision zone. Eventually, the Australian continental margin will collide with the southern edge of the Asian plate and these Gondwana terranes will rejoin. However, it may be difficult to reconstruct the various ventures of they made over the past 300 Ma.

  2. Restoration of marine ecosystems following the end-Permian mass extinction: pattern and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Life came closest to complete annihilation during the end-Permian mass extinction (EPME). Pattern and cause of this great dying have long been disputed. Similarly, there is also some debate on the recovery rate and pattern of marine organisms in the aftermath of the EPME. Some clades recovered rapidly, within the first 1-3 Myr of the Triassic. For instance, foraminiferal recovery began 1 Myr into the Triassic and was not much affected by Early Triassic crises. Further, some earliest Triassic body and trace fossil assemblages are also more diverse than predicted. Others, ie. Brachiopods, corals etc., however, did not rebound until the Middle Triassic. In addition, although ammonoids recovered fast, reaching a higher diversity by the Smithian than in the Late Permian, much of this Early Triassic radiation was within a single group, the Ceratitina, and their morphological disparity did not expand until the end-Spathian. Here, I like to broaden the modern ecologic network model to explore the complete trophic structure of fossilized ecosystems during the Permian-Triassic transition as a means of assessing the recovery. During the Late Permian and Early Triassic, primary producers, forming the lowest trophic level, were microbes. The middle part of the food web comprises primary and meso-consumer trophic levels, the former dominated by microorganisms such as foraminifers, the latter by opportunistic communities (i.e. disaster taxa), benthic shelly communities, and reef-builders. They were often consumed by invertebrate and vertebrate predators, the top trophic level. Fossil record from South China shows that the post-extinction ecosystems were degraded to a low level and typified by primary producers or opportunistic consumers, which are represented by widespread microbialites or high-abundance, low-diversity communities. Except for some opportunists, primary consumers, namely foraminifers, rebounded in Smithian. Trace-makers recovered in Spathian, which also saw biodiversity increases of some clades. However, benthic communities were still of low diversity and high abundance and did not recover until middle-late Anisian when reef ecosystems have also constructed. The mid-Anisian ecosystems were characterized by the diverse reptile and fish faunas such as the Luoping biota from Yunnan, Southwest China, in which marine reptiles diversified as top predators. Thus, ecosystems were constructed step by step from low level to top trophic level through the Griesbachian to late Anisian, some 8-9 Myr after the crisis. Moreover, although some top predators also rebounded spoarically in Early Triassic, they constructed incomplete and unstable ecosystems, which could not develop sustainably and thus did not occur repetitedly in younger strata. The contrast between the extrinsic and intrinsic models exemplifies a wider debate about macroevolution -- whether the key driver is the physical environment or biotic interactions. Case studies on microbe-metazoan interactions in matground ecosystems reveal that microbial bloom seems to have set an agenda for metazoan diversification in Early Triassic, implying that intrinsic dynamics may have played a crucial role driving ecosystem's restoration following the EPME.

  3. Depositional environment of Upper Carboniferous – Lower Permian beds in the Karavanke Mountains (Southern Alps, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matevž Novak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Late Paleozoic rocks were studied in detail in the Dovžanova soteska section. The Upper Carboniferous sedimentary succession, correlated with upper part of Auernig and SchulterkofelFm. in the Carnic Alps, indicates cyclic clastic-carbonate deposition in a coastal to shallow marine ramp setting with strong influenceofcoarse-grainedfluvial-deltaicsilici-clastics from the hinterland, storm dominated regime of nearshore sediments, and offshore algal buildups. The Lower Permian sequence is developed differently from its time equivalentGrenzland Fm. and is subdivided into Dovžanova soteska Fm., Born Fm., and Rigelj beds. It is marked by the formation of a reef mound on the platform margin. Open-marine inner platform close to the marginal shoals represented the depositional environment of the mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sediments. Thus, a platform evolution from a ramp into a rimmed shelf is suggested.

  4. Occurrence, behavior and distribution of high levels of uranium in shallow groundwater at Datong basin, northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn; Xie, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    Geochemical investigations of uranium (U) occurrence in the environments were conducted at Datong basin of northern China. The results suggest that U contents were generally < 1 mg/kg for the igneous and metamorphic rocks, typically 2–5 mg/kg for the Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks and around 3 mg/kg for sediments and topsoil, respectively. U in the Quaternary aquifer sediments may be primarily associated with carnotite from the Carboniferous and Permian coal-bearing clastic rocks around the basin. Shallow groundwater had U concentrations of < 0.02–288 ?g/L (average 24 ?g/L), with 24% of the investigated boreholes above the WHO provisional guideline of 30 ?g/L for U in drinking water. Average U concentration for surface water was 5.8 ?g/L. In oxidizing waters, uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) species is dominant and strongly adsorbed onto iron (hydro)xides, while it would be preferentially complexed with carbonate in the alkaline groundwater, forming highly soluble uranyl-carbonate complexes at Datong. Under reducing conditions, uranous (U(IV)) species is ready to precipitate or bind to organic matter, therefore having a low mobility. At the study area, high U groundwater (> 30 ?g/L) occurs at the alluvial plains due to intermediate redox and enhanced alkaline conditions. The abnormally high levels of U in groundwater (> 100 ?g/L) are locally found at the west alluvial plains. By contrast, U co-precipitation with secondary carbonate minerals like Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} in the dominant Ca–Mg–Na–HCO{sub 3} type groundwater may prevail at the east alluvial plains. Besides, bedrocks such as Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks, especially the coal-bearing strata which have higher U contents at the west mountain areas may also account for the abnormally high levels of U in groundwater. - Highlights: • High U groundwater occurs at the alluvial plains of Datong basin. • Redox state, complexation and adsorption are responsible for U enrichment. • Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks have higher U contents at Datong. • Uranyl is preferentially complexed with carbonate in groundwater. • U in the aquifer sediments may be primarily associated with carnotite.

  5. The Permian-Triassic transition: Historical review of the most important ecological crises with special emphasis on the Iberian Peninsula and Western-Central Europe.

    OpenAIRE

    Virgili, C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important climatic and biological crises of the history of the Earth occurred 250 m.a. ago, during the transition from the Permian to the Triassic. During the Permian, all of the continental blocks were covering one hemisphere forming the Pangea supercontinent, while the other was covered by the Panthalasa ocean. General conditions for living on land were very precarious. The exuberant vegetation of the Carboniferous period had disappeared almost completely, as well as the ...

  6. The Permian-Triassic transition: Historical review of the most important ecological crises with special emphasis on the Iberian Peninsula and Western-Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Virgili, Carmina

    2008-01-01

    [EN] One of the most important climatic and biological crises of the history of the Earth occurred 250 m.a. ago, during the transition from the Permian to the Triassic. During the Permian, all of the continental blocks were covering one hemisphere forming the Pangea supercontinent, while the other was covered by the Panthalasa ocean. General conditions for living on land were very precarious. The exuberant vegetation of the Carboniferous period had disappeared almost completely, as w...

  7. Septarian carbonate concretions in the Permian Rio do Rasto Formation: Birth, growth and implications for the early diagenetic history of southwestern Gondwana succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandretti, Luciano; Warren, Lucas Veríssimo; Machado, Rômulo; Novello, Valdir Felipe; Sayeg, Isaac Jamil

    2015-08-01

    Between the Late Carboniferous and Early Triassic, the southwestern Gondwana supercontinent was characterized by the development of a huge intracratonic basin. A large confined epeiric sea and the accumulation of a transgressive-regressive sequence were formed by continuous subsidence related to tectonic effects caused by the Sanrafaelic Orogeny and the consequent generation of accommodation space. The Permian Rio do Rasto Formation documents the last progradational cycle related to the complete continentalization of this epeiric sea. The basal member of the Rio do Rasto Formation (Serrinha) is believed to have been deposited in a shallow epicontinental water body subjected to storms and influenced by episodic deltaic incursions. One of the most remarkable characteristics of the Serrinha Member is the presence of carbonate concretions hosted in mudstones and very fine sandstones. Here, we combine sedimentological and petrographic descriptions coupled with geochemical and stable carbon and oxygen isotopic data to elucidate the nature of these carbonate concretions. The non-deformed internal structure, decreasing proportion of carbonate cements relative to detrital grains toward the concretion edges, core-to-rim isotopic variations, and perhaps most importantly, the preservation of a well-developed cardhouse fabric support an early diagenetic origin for these structures at shallow burial depths of tens of meters. Stable isotope analyses of micritic calcite cements and calcites filling the septarian fractures reveal major negative excursions in both ?18O and ?13C values. Oxygen isotope ratios obtained for the micritic calcite cements vary between - 12.1 and - 2.6‰. The calcite filling septarian fractures also exhibit negative values of ?18O (- 14.2 to - 13.8‰), with an average of - 14‰. The ?13C values of micritic calcite cements range from - 5.0-0.2‰. The carbon isotopic data from the calcite-filling septarian fractures are also negative (- 4.4 to - 3.3‰). The ?18O signatures suggest that the early diagenetic carbonate concretions precipitated in a shallow freshwater environment rather than in a marine setting. The ?13C values suggest that the carbon isotopes were derived from a source with slightly depleted 13C, supporting at least a partial organogenic contribution with weak sulfate reduction rates typical of freshwater systems. Sedimentological analysis shows that the epicontinental water body in which the Serrinha Member was deposited was constantly supplied by rivers and meteoric waters, which suggests that an enormous freshwater basin with restricted marine connections to the Panthalassa Ocean once existed.

  8. Occurrence, behavior and distribution of high levels of uranium in shallow groundwater at Datong basin, northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical investigations of uranium (U) occurrence in the environments were conducted at Datong basin of northern China. The results suggest that U contents were generally 22+) species is dominant and strongly adsorbed onto iron (hydro)xides, while it would be preferentially complexed with carbonate in the alkaline groundwater, forming highly soluble uranyl-carbonate complexes at Datong. Under reducing conditions, uranous (U(IV)) species is ready to precipitate or bind to organic matter, therefore having a low mobility. At the study area, high U groundwater (> 30 ?g/L) occurs at the alluvial plains due to intermediate redox and enhanced alkaline conditions. The abnormally high levels of U in groundwater (> 100 ?g/L) are locally found at the west alluvial plains. By contrast, U co-precipitation with secondary carbonate minerals like Ca2UO2(CO3)3 in the dominant Ca–Mg–Na–HCO3 type groundwater may prevail at the east alluvial plains. Besides, bedrocks such as Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks, especially the coal-bearing strata which have higher U contents at the west mountain areas may also account for the abnormally high levels of U in groundwater. - Highlights: • High U groundwater occurs at the alluvial plains of Datong basin. • Redox state, complexation and adsorption are responsible for U enrichment. • Carboniferous and Permian sedimentary rocks have higher U contents at Datong. • Uranyl is preferentially complexed with carbonate in groundwater. • U in the aquifer sediments may be primarily associated with carnotite

  9. Stable-isotope geochemistry of groundwaters in the Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18O/16O and D/H ratio measurements have been made on groundwaters sampled from the Rustler Formation (Ochoan, Permian) and related rocks in the northern Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. Most confined Rustler waters at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and to the west in Nash Draw and confined waters from the Capitan limestone constitute one population in ?D/?18O space, while unconfined groundwaters inferred to originate as modern surface recharge to alluvium, sandstones in the Ogallala Formation, the near-surface Rustler in southwestern Nash Draw, and the Capitan vadose zone in the Guadalupe Mountains (Carlsbad Caverns) constitute a distinctly different population; the two do not overlap. A likely explanation for this distinction is that meteoric recharge to most of the Rustler and Capitan took place in the geologic past under climatic conditions significantly different from the present. Available tritium and radiocarbon data are consistent with this hypothesis, and the apparent age of confined groundwaters is in excess of 12,000 radiocarbon years, suggesting that recharge took place under wetter conditions in the late Pleistocene. Processes governing recharge in the Delaware Basin are significantly different from those in the nearby Roswell Artesian Basin, but may be similar to those previously described for the Albuquerque (New Mexico) and Murray (South Australia) Basins. 133 refs

  10. Waterford Formation in the south-eastern Karoo: Implications for basin development

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Bruce S, Rubidge; P. John, Hancox; Richard, Mason.

    Full Text Available Extensive research on the rocks of the Karoo Supergroup has shown that this sequence, which contains an unsurpassed record of Permian-Jurassic tetrapods, records a largely unbroken stratigraphic succession from 300 Ma to 180 Ma. This Gondwanan succession was deposited in a changing environmental set [...] ting reflecting glacial marine through deltaic to fluvial and aeolian desert conditions. The contact between the Ecca and Beaufort Groups (at the top of the Waterford Formation of the Ecca Group) in the southern and western Karoo represents a change in depositional environment from a subaqueous to a subaerial delta plain. By contrast, the Waterford Formation has not yet been recognised in the south-eastern Karoo Basin, which might imply that a major unconformity is present between the Fort Brown Formation of the Ecca Group, deposited in a prodelta environment, and the overlying fluvially deposited Koonap Formation of the Beaufort Group. From careful documentation of lithofacies and sedimentological data, it can be demonstrated that the Waterford Formation is indeed present in the south-eastern part of the basin and that no major unconformity is present - a fact that has implications for the mapping of Karoo rocks in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, for understanding the depositional environment of 'reptilian' fossils from the lowermost Beaufort in this part of the Karoo basin, and for basin development models.

  11. The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project — basin analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, David C.; Martini, Nicole; Buness, Hermann; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2010-05-01

    Within the context of the Heidelberg Basin Project (Gabriel et al. 2008), we present the first results of three-dimensional structural modelling of the basin, based on interpretation of reflection seismics and decompaction using porosity data measured from core material. Firstly, we interpreted six horizons (Base Quaternary, Internal and Base Pliocene, Base Upper Miocene, Internal and Base Mid Miocene Hydrobien beds) from all available industrial (ca. 100 km) and our own reflection seismic sections (ca. 15 km), which lie within a 8 km radius around the Heidelberg UniNord 1/2 boreholes. This data was used to construct a three-dimensional geometrical model of the Heidelberg Basin. Using 300 core samples, we determined the porosity of the Quaternary sediments and constructed an exponential porosity/depth relationship for these rocks, which were then attributed to the model. Lower strata were given values from the literature. The model shows that the Heidelberg basin has a N-S and E-W areal extent of only 10 × 6 km, directly abutting the eastern fault boundary of the Upper Rhine Graben. The strongest synsedimentary tectonic subsidence occurred during the Upper Miocene, Upper Pliocene, and Quarternary. Faults are not seen within the basin at this level, but a NW-SE striking strike-slip structure is recorded to the west of the basin. Furthermore, the sedimentary depocentre shifted 2 km northwards over time to the present location, directly below the city of Heidelberg. We determined that Quaternary sediments have porosities of over 60% at the surface, but at the Base Quaternary porosity is less than 35%. This strong decrease means that 740 m of sediments were compacted to produce the present ca. 500 m thickness of Quaternary strata. Gabriel, G., Ellwanger, D., Hoselmann, C. & Weidenfeller, M. (2008): The Heidelberg Basin Drilling Project. -- Quaternary Science Journal, 57, 3-4, 253-260.

  12. Organic maturation levels, thermal history and hydrocarbon source rock potential of the Namurian rocks of the Clare Basin, Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodhue, Robbie; Clayton, Geoffrey [Trinity Coll., Dept. of Geology, Dublin (Ireland)

    1999-11-01

    Vitrinite reflectance data from two inland cored boreholes confirm high maturation levels throughout the onshore part of the Irish Clare Basin and suggest erosion of 2 to 4 km of late Carboniferous cover and elevated palaeogeothermal gradients in the Carboniferous section. The observed maturation gradients are fully consistent with the published hypothesis of a late Carboniferous/Permian 'superplume' beneath Pangaea but local vertical reversals in gradients also suggest a complex thermal regime probably involving advective heating. The uppermost Visean--lower Namurian Clare Shale is laterally extensive and up to 300 m thick. Although this unit is post-mature, TOC values of up to 15% suggest that it could have considerable hydrocarbon source rock potential in any less mature offshore parts of the basin. (Author)

  13. Evaporite-hosted native sulfur in Trans-Pecos Texas: Relation to late-phase basin and range deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major deposits of biogenic native sulfur are associated with narrow, northeast-trending grabens and normal faults that disrupt the gently tilted, east-dipping Upper Permian evaporite succession of the western Delaware Basin in Trans-Pecos Texas. Orebodies are restricted to geologic traps in the fractured and dissolution-modified downfaulted blocks of the grabens. Other parallel, regionally distributed grabens and normal faults are commonly the sites of noncommercial sulfur deposits and genetically related secondary-replacement (diagenetic) limestone bodies. The sulfur-bearing structures probably formed during the later of two episodes of Basin and Range extension that have not previously been differentiated in Texas but are well defined elsewhere in the western United States. In Texas several lines of evidence collectively support the existence of late-phase, northwest-directed extension that was initiated in the middle Miocene

  14. Permian depositional age of metaturbidites of the Duque de York Complex, southern Chile: U-Pb SHRIMP data and palynology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Duque de York Complex (DYC) is part of the low grade metamorphic accretionary complexes of the pre-Andean Patagonian 'basement'. It is a sedimentary succession exposed along the western margin of southernmost South America. New U-Pb zircon ages and palynological data restrict the maximum depositional age of the DYC to the limit between the early Permian (Kungurian) and the middle Permian (Roadian). The palynological association recorded in the DYC, characterized mainly by Gymnospermopsida pollen, indicates a humid environment of forest with an under-growth of ferns. Regional paleogeographic correlations point out that an interpretation of DYC as an autochthonous terrane cannot be discarded, contrasting with previous hypotheses which suggest an allochthonous character for this complex

  15. Novel Bacterial Isolate from Permian Groundwater, Capable of Aggregating Potential Biofuel-Producing Microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Laughinghouse, Haywood D.; Matthew A. Anderson; CHEN, Feng; Willliams, Ernest; Place, Allen R; Zmora, Odi; Zohar, Yonathan; Zheng, Tianling; Hill, Russell T.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing petroleum costs and climate change have resulted in microalgae receiving attention as potential biofuel producers. Little information is available on the diversity and functions of bacterial communities associated with biofuel-producing algae. A potential biofuel-producing microalgal strain, Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1, was grown in Permian groundwater. Changes in the bacterial community structure at three temperatures were monitored by two culture-independent methods, and cultu...

  16. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Late Triassic – Jurassic development of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone, southern Scandinavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The continental to marine Upper Triassic – Jurassic succession of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone is interpreted within a sequence stratigraphic framework, and the evolution of the depositional basin is discussed. The intracratonic Permian–Cenozoic Danish Basin was formed by Late Carboniferous – Early Permian crustal extension followed by subsidence governed primarily by thermal cooling and local faulting. The basin is separated from thestable Precambrian Baltic Shield by the Fennoscandian Border Zone, and is bounded by basement blocks of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High towards the south. In Late Triassic – Jurassic times, the basin was part of the epeiric shallow sea that covered most of northern Europe. The Upper Triassic – Jurassic basin-fill is subdivided into two tectono-stratigraphic units by a basinwide intra-Aalenian unconformity. The Norian – Lower Aalenian succession was formed under relative tectonic tranquillity and shows an overall layer-cake geometry, except for areas with local faults and salt movements.Deposition was initiated by a Norian transgression that led to shallow marine deposition and was accompanied by a gradual climatic change to more humid conditions. Extensive sheets of shoreface sand and associated paralic sediments were deposited during short-lived forced regressions in Rhaetian time. A stepwise deepening and development of fully marine conditions followed in the Hettangian – Early Sinemurian. Thick uniform basinwide mud blankets weredeposited on an open storm-influenced shelf, while sand was trapped at the basin margins. This depositional pattern continued until Late Toarcian – Early Aalenian times when the basin became restricted due to renewed uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High. In Middle Aalenian – Bathonian times, the former basin area was subjected to deep erosion, and deposition became restricted to the fault-bounded Sorgenfrei–Tornquist Zone. Eventually the fault margins were overstepped,and paralic–marine deposition gradually resumed in most of the basin in Late Jurassic time. Thus, the facies architecture of the Norian – Lower Aalenian succession reflects eustatic or large-scale regional sea-level changes, whereas the Middle Aalenian – Volgian succession reflects a strong tectonic control that gradually gave way to more widespread and sea-level controlled sedimentation.The uplift of the Ringkøbing–Fyn High and most of the Danish Basin occurred concurrently with the uplift of the North Sea and a wide irregular uplifted area was formed, which differs significantly from the postulated domal pattern.

  17. The youngest trigonotarbid Permotarbus schuberti n. gen., n. sp. from the Permian Petrified Forest of Chemnitz in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Dunlop

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new trigonotarbid (Arachnida: Trigonotarbida is described as Permotarbus schuberti n. gen., n. sp. from the Early Permian Petrified Forest (Rotliegend of Chemnitz in Saxony (Germany. At ca. 290 Ma it represents the youngest record of this extinct arachnid order discovered to date. Its familial affinities are uncertain, but may lie close to the Aphantomartidae. The distribution of the trigonotarbid genera through time is summarised, together with a list of their seventy-seven fossil-yielding localities. Together they offer a broad overview of the group's fossil record, which is heavily biased towards the Moscovian Stage (ca. 307–312 Ma of the Late Carboniferous in Europe and North America. This is due in no small part to numerous localities associated with coal mining districts, and trigonotarbids are found less frequently after this stage. While it is tempting to associate this with biological events – such as a putative "Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse" dating to ca. 305 Ma – it is difficult to differentiate the effects of genuine extinction patterns from artefacts caused by fewer appropriate localities in the economically less relevant latest Carboniferous and Early Permian strata. Nevertheless, trigonotarbids became extinct at some point after the Early Permian and loss of the Coal Measures forests remains one of the most likely possible causes. doi:10.1002/mmng.201300012

  18. Kerogen morphology and geochemistry at the Permian-Triassic transition in the Meishan section, South China: Implication for paleoenvironmental variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Ken; Kaiho, Kunio; Okano, Kazuki

    2012-08-01

    Detailed fluorescent microscopic observations and organic geochemical analyses for insoluble sedimentary organic matter (kerogens) are conducted on the end-Permian to earliest Triassic sediments in the Meishan section A of South China. The main objectives of the present study are to reconstruct variations of marine and terrestrial environments, and to evaluate bulk characteristics of terrestrial input in the palaeo-Tethys ocean for the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB). Most of kerogens in the Meishan section are mainly composed of marine algae-derived amorphous organic matter, while terrestrial plant-derived amorphous organic matter is remarkably dominant in the mass extinction horizon reported previously. The relative abundances of marine organic matter may vary depending on marine production rather than terrestrial input in the palaeo-Tethys associated with changing terrestrial vegetation. We also identified aromatic furans as major compounds in kerogen pyrolysate of all layers. It is possible that sources of aromatic furans with alkyl group, fungi and lichen, proliferated as disaster biota in terrestrial ecosystem through the PTB. Higher abundances of herbaceous organic matter are observed in the layers above the mass extinction horizon. However, the conifer biomarker retene can be identified in kerogen pyrolysates of all layers. These results imply that the productions of herbaceous plants increased as dominant pioneer biota in early stage of recovery for terrestrial ecosystem after its collapse, but also that woody plant potentially continued to be produced in land area throughout the end-Permian and earliest-Triassic.

  19. Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Late Permian Coals from the Mahe Mine, Zhaotong Coalfield, Northeastern Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the mineralogical and geochemical compositions of the Late Permian C2, C5a, C5b, C6a, and C6b semianthracite coals from the Mahe mine, northeastern Yunnan, China. Minerals in the coals are mainly made up of quartz, chamosite, kaolinite, mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S, pyrite, and calcite; followed by anatase, dolomite, siderite, illite and marcasite. Similar to the Late Permian coals from eastern Yunnan, the authigenic quartz and chamosite were precipitated from the weathering solution of Emeishan basalt, while kaolinite and mixed-layer I/S occurring as lenses or thin beds were related to the weathering residual detrital of Emeishan basalt. However, the euhedral quartz and apatite particles in the Mahe coals were attributed to silicic-rock detrital input. It further indicates that there has been silicic igneous eruption in the northeastern Yunnan. Due to the silicic rock detrital input, the Eu/Eu* value of the Mahe coals is lower than that of the Late Permian coals from eastern Yunnan, where the detrital particles were mainly derived from the basalt. The high contents of Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, and Sn in the Mahe coals were mainly derived from the Kangdian Upland.

  20. Melo carboniferous basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is about of the Melo carboniferous basin which limits are: in the South the large and high Tupambae hill, in the west the Paraiso hill and the river mountains, in the North Yaguaron river basin to Candidata in Rio Grande del Sur in Brazil.

  1. K Basin safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall

  2. High-resolution seismic imaging of the Sohagpur Gondwana basin, central India: Evidence for syn-sedimentary subsidence and faulting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Dhanam; P Senthil Kumar; D Mysaiah; P Prabhakara Prasad; T Seshunarayana

    2013-12-01

    Gondwana sedimentary basins in the Indian Shield preserve a rich record of tectonic, sedimentary and volcanic processes that affected Gondwanaland. The Gondwana rocks were deposited in the linear rift basins that were formed during Permian–Cretaceous time, similar to their neighbours in Australia, Africa and Antarctica. In this study, we illustrate how Gondwana tectonics affected the Sohagpur Gondwana basin that occurs at the junction of the Mahanadi and Son–Narmada rift systems in the central India, through a high-resolution seismic reflection study along six profiles, covering the central part of the Sohagpur basin. The study reveals (1) ?1000 m thick, gently dipping Barakar Formation, (2) thick coal seams at a depth of 350–550 m, and (3) NNW–SSE to NW–SE striking steeply dipping normal faults defining rift geometry. These results indicate that the Sohagpur basin contains a thick Lower Gondwana sedimentary succession with a high potential of coal resources and were affected by extensional tectonics. The rift structure in the study area is a syn- to post-sedimentary deformational structure that was formed arguably in response to tectonics that pervasively affected Gondwanaland.

  3. Unusual carbon isotope compositions of biomarker hydrocarbons in a Permian tasmanite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Schoell, Martin; Dias, Robert F.; de Aquino Neto, F. Radler

    1993-09-01

    The Permian oil shale sample of this study is from a deposit in Tasmania in which the only recognizable structures are large, thick-walled, unicellular specimens of the green alga Tasmanites. The fossils are so densely packed that this shale is termed tasmanite. The carbon isotopic composition of bulk kerogen carbon ( ?C13Corg = -16.6%., vs. PDB) is unusually enriched in 13C compared to marine Permian organic carbon (-25 to -30%.). This 13C enrichment suggests specific environmental conditions (CO 2 draw down) and/or physiological specialties (cell size and growth rate) of Tasmanites which, in modern environments, are known to cause 13C enrichment in marine phytoplankton. Isotope signatures of extractable organic species, unlike in normal immature oil shales, are considerably enriched in 13C compared to the kerogen. The bitumen (-10.9%.) is composed predominantly of extended saturated C 18-C 25 tricyclic terpane hydrocarbons (-9.9 to -12.2%. total range, with an average of -10.8%.). These tricyclics are not only found as free lipids in the extract but also in pyrolysates with similar isotopic signatures and are therefore likely biosynthesis products of Tasmanites. The monoaromatic and diaromatic tricyclic terpane hydrocarbons (C 17-C 19) have similar isotopic signatures (-9.3 to -12.8%. total range, with an average of -10.6%.). Two monoaromatic tetracyclic hydrocarbons (C 23 and C 24), a quantitatively minor but biogenetically interesting group, average at -10.2%.. In contrast, pristane and phytane, as well as n-alkanes (-18 to -22%.), are depleted in 13C compared to kerogen carbon. The isotopic similarity of all the cyclic terpanes in this sample, together with their occurrence in the free lipids and kerogen, suggests that they have a common origin and are biosynthesis products of the marine unicellular green algae Tasmanites. The tetracyclic terpanes, therefore, are not des-A-oleananes derived from land plants but are possibly monoaromatic des-A-gammaceranes or other des-A-triterpenoids derived from marine sources. The unusual enrichment in 13C in the cyclic hydrocarbons is hypothesized to result from the special growth conditions of the algae. Isoprenoids and n-alkanes are also likely biosynthesis products of Tasmanites, possibly during the spore formation stage when physiological and environmental conditions were different than during planktonic biosynthesis.

  4. The Permian-Triassic granitoids in Bayan Obo, North China Craton: A geochemical and geochronological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ming-Xing; Zhang, Hong; Li, He; Liu, Yu-Long; Liu, Jian; Li, Lin-Qing; Li, Cong-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yong; Sun, Weidong

    2014-03-01

    Granitoids near the Bayan Obo giant rare earth element (REE) deposit at the north margin of the North China Craton (NCC), the world's largest light REE (LREE) deposit, have been taken by some authors as the key factors that controlled the mineralization. In contrast, others proposed that the REE deposit has been partially destructed by these granitoids. Here we report systematic studies on geochronology and geochemical characteristics of granitoids of different distances from the orebodies, to investigate the genesis and their relationship to the giant Bayan Obo deposit. Granitoids studied here, including granites and quartz monzonites, are peraluminous with A/CNK = 0.99-1.11, LREE enriched and heavy REE (HREE) depleted, with variable REE concentrations (total REE = 54-330 ppm) and large negative Eu anomaly (?Eu = 0.19-0.70). The REE patterns are distinct from those of ore-bearing dolomites. Some samples have slightly higher LREE concentrations, which may have been contaminated by the orebodies during intrusion. Trace elements of the granitoids are characterized by positive Pb anomaly, strong negative Ti anomaly and Nb, Ta and Sr anomalies. The granites exhibit negative Ba anomaly. The granitoids plot within the post-collision granite field in the Pearce diagram, which is consistent with the tectonic regime. The quartz monzonites and one granite have A-type granite characteristics and belong to the A2 subgroup. Zircons in these granitoids have high Th/U values, which are typical for magmatic zircons. High precision U-Pb dating for these zircons by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) yields Permian-Triassic 206Pb/238U ages ranging from 243.2 to 293.8 Ma. The formation of the granitoids is > 55 Ma later than the latest ore forming age. The zircons have low La concentrations (0.02-12 ppm), high (Sm/La)N (0.8-685) and Ce/Ce* (1.4-80). The Ti-in-zircon temperature of the granitoids ranges from 590 to 770 °C. All these evidences suggest that the granitoids have no contribution to the formation of the Bayan Obo deposit. Granitoids that are close to the orebodies had limited interaction with it and gained some LREE-enriched characteristics during magmatisms. Nevertheless, their effects to the orebodies are subtle. All the granitoids formed in a post-collisional tectonic regime at convergent margins, which is consistent with plate subduction during the closure of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean, which started in the Neoproterozoic and lasted until the Carboniferous/Permian.

  5. Thermal structure of the Paris Basin from tectonic-Heat Flow modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonté, Damien; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-04-01

    Located on the inner part of the Variscan Orogen, the Paris Basin has evolved from the Permo-Carboniferous as an intracratonic basin. The usual description of the sediments in the Paris Basin involves imbricated bowl shaped layers, starting from the Triassic. Due to their discontinuity, depth and complexity the Permian and Carboniferous layers have been commonly left aside. Fortunately, recent studies have been completed to looks specifically at these deeper sedimentary layers. With the development of geothermal energy and the widely use shallow medium enthalpy geothermal resources in the Paris Basin (Dogger) these pre-Mesozoic sediments are of a lot of interest. In this work, we use a tectonic-heat flow modelling methodology to model the present day thermal structure of the Paris Basin. The modelling takes into account the geometry of the layering and the petrophysical parameters (i.e., thermal conductivity, the radiogenic heat production of the sedimentary layers in relation with their facies). In addition, the upper part of the basement is closely considered to allow the description of magmatic intrusions that could have a major impact on the present day temperature (i.e., the variation of the radiogenic heat production). To assess the result of our thermal modelling, the obtained temperature is compared to BHT's (Bottom Hole Temperature) and DST's (Drill Stem Test) values when available. As a result of this modelling, we are able to present present-day temperature within the basin as well as in the shallower part of the basement. The aim of this work is identify the sources of the temperature perturbation. The impact of the sediment's thermal conductivity has already been assed on a previous work, in this work the deeper source of perturbation are of great interest (thermal conductivity and heat production of the pre-Mesozoic sedimentary layers, heat production of magmatic intrusion in the basement, and regional faults in the sediments and basement).

  6. Discussion on the exploration & development prospect of shale gas in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dazhong Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sichuan Basin, a hotspot and one of the most successful areas for shale gas exploration and development, can largely reflect and have a big say in the future prospect of shale gas in China. Through an overall review on the progress in shale gas exploration and development in the Sichuan Basin, we obtained the following findings: (1 the Sichuan Basin has experienced the marine and terrestrial depositional evolution, resulting in the deposition of three types of organic-matter-rich shales (i.e. marine, transitional, and terrestrial, and the occurrence of six sets of favorable shale gas enrichment strata (i.e. the Sinian Doushantuo Fm, the Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm, the Ordovician Wufeng–Silurian Longmaxi Fm, the Permian Longtan Fm, the Triassic Xujiahe Fm, and the Jurassic Zhiliujing Fm; (2 the five key elements for shale gas accumulation in the Wufeng-Longmaxi Fm are deep-water shelf facies, greater thickness of organic-rich shales, moderate thermal evolution, abundant structural fractures, reservoir overpressure; and (3 the exploration and development of shale gas in this basin still confronts two major challenges, namely, uncertain sweet spots and potential prospect of shale gas, and the immature technologies in the development of shale gas resources at a depth of more than 3500 m. In conclusion, shale gas has been discovered in the Jurassic, Triassic and Cambrian, and preliminary industrial-scale gas has been produced in the Ordovician-Silurian Fm in the Sichuan Basin, indicating a promising prospect there; commercial shale gas can be produced there with an estimated annual gas output of 30–60 billion m3; and shale gas exploration and production experiences in this basin will provide valuable theoretical and technical support for commercial shale gas development in China.

  7. UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, PRELIMINARY BASIN EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a process and a plan by which the Environmental Protection Agency can insure that water quality goals established in the Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 are met in the waters of the Upper Snake Basin (17040201, 17040206, 170...

  8. Reserves in western basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W. [Scotia Group, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  9. Eolian dune types preserved in the Tensleep Sandstone (Pennsylvanian-Permian), north-central Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Dennis R.; Dott, Robert H.

    1988-04-01

    The Tensleep Sandstone is one component of an erg system that prograded southward out of north-central Wyoming from Middle Pennsylvanian to Early Permian time. Each erg advance was temporarily interrupted by regional marine transgression. Interpretation of dune types deposited in these ergs is developed from an analysis of the relative proportions of eolian stratification types comprising foreset strata, geometry and relationships of bounding surfaces, and paleodispersal patterns. Two basic morphologic dune types are inferred: simple dunes and compound crescentic dunes. The simple dunes are dominant and are subdivided into 1-2 km wavelength and 1.0 km saddle-spacing slightly crescentic, and 0.1-0.2 km wavelength straight-crested subtypes based on their first-order bounding surface geometries. Foresets are composed of grainfall and wind-ripple strata; avalanche strata are rare. The compound crescentic dunes had wavelengths of 0.5-1 km and saddle spacings of 0.8 km. Foresets are dominated by avalanche and wind-ripple strata. A morphodynamic classification of the dune types is inferred from considerations deduced from paleodispersal patterns and comparison with paleocirculation models. The simple dunes were demonstrably oblique to some elements of the wind field and less oblique to others. The compound crescentic dunes had a predominantly transverse configuration.

  10. Anoxia/high temperature double whammy during the Permian-Triassic marine crisis and its aftermath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haijun; Wignall, Paul B.; Chu, Daoliang; Tong, Jinnan; Sun, Yadong; Song, Huyue; He, Weihong; Tian, Li

    2014-02-01

    The Permian-Triassic mass extinction was the most severe biotic crisis in the past 500 million years. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the crisis, but few account for the spectrum of extinction selectivity and subsequent recovery. Here we show that selective losses are best accounted for by a combination of lethally warm, shallow waters and anoxic deep waters that acted to severely restrict the habitable area to a narrow mid-water refuge zone. The relative tolerance of groups to this double whammy provides the first clear explanation for the selective extinction losses during this double-pulsed crisis and also the fitful recovery. Thus, high temperature intolerant shallow-water dwellers, such as corals, large foraminifers and radiolarians were eliminated first whilst high temperature tolerant ostracods thrived except in anoxic deeper-waters. In contrast, hypoxia tolerant but temperature intolerant small foraminifers were driven from shallow-waters but thrived on dysoxic slopes margins. Only those mollusc groups, which are tolerant of both hypoxia and high temperatures, were able to thrive in the immediate aftermath of the extinction. Limited Early Triassic benthic recovery was restricted to mid-water depths and coincided with intervals of cooling and deepening of water column anoxia that expanded the habitable mid-water refuge zone.

  11. Triassic actinopterygian fishes: the recovery after the end-Permian crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintori, Andrea; Hitij, Tomaž; Jiang, Dayong; Lombardo, Cristina; Sun, Zuoyu

    2014-08-01

    In the last 15 years, the discovery of several new actinopterygian fish faunas from the Early and Middle Triassic of the Tethys, cast new light on the timing, speed and range of their recovery after the end-Permian crisis. In addition to several new taxa having been described, the stratigraphical and geographical record of many others have been greatly extended. In fact, most of the new fossiliferous sites are in southern China, thus at the Eastern end of the Tethys, and furthermore a few are somewhat older (Chaohu, Panxian, Luoping) than the major classical Western Tethys sites (Monte San Giorgio). Following these new finds, it is possible to have a better definition of the Triassic recovery stages. Indeed, after a quite short phase till the end of the Smithian (Olenekian, Early Triassic) in which a rather consistent fauna was present all around the Pangea coasts, a major radiation occurred in the Early-Middle Anisian after the new Middle Triassic fish fauna already appeared in the late Early Triassic, thus occuring well before what was previously supposed from the Alps localities. Furthermore, the new assemblages from southern China point to an early broader differentiation among the basal neopterygians rather than in the 'subholosteans', the group that was then dominant in the Western Tethys since the Late Anisian. It stands that during the Norian a new basal neopterygian radiation gave rise to several new branches that dominated the remaining part of the Mesozoic. PMID:24148549

  12. Ocean Acidification and the End-Permian Mass Extinction: To What Extent does Evidence Support Hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Béatrice Forel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification in modern oceans is linked to rapid increase in atmospheric CO2, raising concern about marine diversity, food security and ecosystem services. Proxy evidence for acidification during past crises may help predict future change, but three issues limit confidence of comparisons between modern and ancient ocean acidification, illustrated from the end-Permian extinction, 252 million years ago: (1 problems with evidence for ocean acidification preserved in sedimentary rocks, where proposed marine dissolution surfaces may be subaerial. Sedimentary evidence that the extinction was partly due to ocean acidification is therefore inconclusive; (2 Fossils of marine animals potentially affected by ocean acidification are imperfect records of past conditions; selective extinction of hypercalcifying organisms is uncertain evidence for acidification; (3 The current high rates of acidification may not reflect past rates, which cannot be measured directly, and whose temporal resolution decreases in older rocks. Thus large increases in CO2 in the past may have occurred over a long enough time to have allowed assimilation into the oceans, and acidification may not have stressed ocean biota to the present extent. Although we acknowledge the very likely occurrence of past ocean acidification, obtaining support presents a continuing challenge for the Earth science community.

  13. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  14. Early Mesozoic basin aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Early Mesozoic basin aquifers in the states of Massachusettes, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland,...

  15. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062/Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  16. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  17. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  18. Conodont color alteration index and upper Paleozoic thermal history of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Cassiane Negreiros; Sanz-López, Javier; Blanco-Ferrera, Silvia; Lemos, Valesca Brasil; Scomazzon, Ana Karina

    2015-12-01

    The conodont color alteration index (CAI) was determined in elements from core samples of the Frasnian Barreirinha Formation (one well) and of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Tapajós Group (twenty three wells and one limestone quarry) in the Amazonas Basin. The thermal history of the basin is analyzed using the CAI value distribution represented in maps and stratigraphic sections through correlation schemes, and in conjunction with previously published data. The pattern of palaeotemperatures for CAI values of 1.5-3 is coincident with organic matter maturation under a sedimentary overburden providing diagenetic conditions in the oil/gas window. Locally, conodonts show metamorphism (CAI value of 6-7) in relation to the intrusion of diabase bodies in beds including high geothermal gradient evaporites. Microtextural alteration on the surface conodonts commonly shows several types of overgrowth microtextures developed in diagenetic conditions. Locally, recrystallization in conodonts with a high CAI value is congruent with contact metamorphism in relation to Mesozoic intrusions. The CAI values of 1.5 or 2 observed close to the surface in several areas of the basin may be interpreted in relation to a high thermal palaeogradient derived from the magmatic episode or/and to the local denudation of the upper part of the Paleozoic succession prior to this thermal event.

  19. Unraveling the hydrocarbon charge potential of the Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea: An integrated approach to reduce exploration risk in complex salt basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Oliver; Shtukert, Olga; Bishop, Andrew; Kornpihl, Kristijan; Milne, Graham

    2014-05-01

    The Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea, is an intra-continental syn-rift basin containing many complex salt structures. The salt is late-Carboniferous to Early Permian in age, with regional extension in the Triassic initiating the salt movement resulting in formation of sub- and mini-basins with significant subsidence (especially in the northeastern part of the basin). Subsequent tectonic phases allowed growth and distortion of salt diapirs that were later affected by uplift and erosion during Tertiary resulting in the formation of salt-related traps in Triassic and Lower Jurassic strata. During Plio-Pleistocene, glacial erosion removed additional Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata. This basin is regarded as a frontier salt province. A small hydrocarbon discovery (Pandora well) in the southwestern part of the basin points to the presence several functioning petroleum systems. The primary play type is related to salt traps below overhangs. Such structures are however, very difficult to image with conventional seismic techniques due to i) generation of multiples from sea floor and top of shallow salt bodies and ii) seismic shadow zones within the salt (possibly resulting from shale and carbonate stringers) which cause severe diffractions so that prospective areas adjacent to the salt remain elusive. Arctic exploration is expensive and the ability to focus on the highest potential targets is essential. A unique solution to this challenging subsurface Arctic environment was developed by integrating petroleum system modeling with full azimuth broadband seismic acquisition and processing. This integrated approach allows intelligent location of seismic surveys over structures which have the maximum chance of success of hydrocarbon charge. Petroleum system modeling was conducted for four seismic sections. Salt was reconstructed according to the diapiric evolution presented in Nilsen et al. (1995) and Koyi et al. (1995). Episodes of major erosion were assigned to Tertiary (tectonic) and Pleistocene (glacial). The models have been thermally calibrated. Consideration of Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles was required for thermal calibration as well as to better understand and predict the hydrocarbon phase behavior. References: Koyi, H., Talbot, C.J., Tørudbakken, B.O., 1993, Salt diapirs of the southwest Nordkapp Basin: analogue modelling, Tectonophysics, Volume 228, Issues 3-4, Pages 167-187. Nilsen, K.T., Vendeville, B.C., Johansen, J.-T., 1995, Influence of regional tectonics on halokinesis in the Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea. In: Jackson, M.P.A., Roberts, D.G., Snelson, S. (eds), Salt tectonics, a global perspective, AAPG Memoir 65, 413-436.

  20. Petrogenesis of the flood basalts from the Early Permian Panjal Traps, Kashmir, India: Geochemical evidence for shallow melting of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Bhat, Ghulam M.; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Brookfield, Michael E.; Jahn, Bor-Ming; Dostal, Jaroslav

    2014-09-01

    The Early Permian Panjal Traps of northern India represent a significant eruption of volcanic rocks which occurred during the opening of the Neotethys Ocean. Basaltic, basaltic-andesites, dacitic and rhyolitic rocks collected from Guryal Ravine and Pahalgam show evidence for subaerial and subaqueous eruptions indicating that they are contemporaneous with the formation of a shallow marine basin. The major and trace element geochemistry of the basalts is consistent with a within-plate setting and there are basalts which have high-Ti (TiO2 > 2.0 wt.%) and low-Ti (TiO2 < 1.8 wt.%) compositions. The ‘high-Ti’ basalts are similar to OIB whereas the ‘low-Ti’ basalts are similar to continental tholeiites. The identification of ‘high- and low-Ti’ basalts within the Panjal Traps is analogous to other large igneous provinces (e.g. Karoo, Deccan, Parana, Emeishan). The Sr-Nd isotopic values (?Nd(T) = - 5.3 to + 1.3; ISr = 0.70432 to 0.71168) of both types of basalts overlap indicating that the rocks may have originated from the same ancient subcontinental lithospheric (i.e. EMII-like) mantle source (TDM = ~ 2000 Ma). The two groups of basalts can be modeled by using a primitive mantle source and different degrees of partial melting where the high-Ti rocks are produced by ~ 1% partial melting of a spinel peridotite source whereas the low-Ti rocks are produced by ~ 8% partial melting. Trace elemental and isotope modeling indicates that some of the basalts assimilated ? 10% crustal material. In contrast, the basaltic-andesites are likely formed by mixing between basaltic magmas and crustal melts which produced rocks with higher SiO2 (~ 55 wt.%) content and enriched isotopic signatures (?Nd(T) = - 6.1; ISr = 0.70992). The Panjal Trap volcanism was likely due to partial melting of the SCLM within a passive extensional setting related to the rifting of Cimmeria from Gondwana. Contemporaneous volcanic and plutonic granitic rocks throughout the Himalaya are probably not petrogenetically related but are likely part of the same regional tectonic regime.

  1. Authigenic carbonate precipitation at the end-Guadalupian (Middle Permian) in China: Implications for the carbon cycle in ancient anoxic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Isozaki, Yukio; Shibuya, Takazo; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate precipitation is a major process in the global carbon cycle. It was recently proposed that authigenic carbonate (carbonate precipitated in situ at the sediment-water interface and/or within the sediment) played a major role in the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history. The carbon isotopic composition of authigenic carbonates in ancient oceans have been assumed to be significantly lower than that of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater, as is observed in the modern oceans. However, the ?13Ccarb values of authigenic carbonates in the past has not been analyzed in detail. Here, we report authigenic carbonates in the uppermost Guadalupian (Middle Permian) rocks at Chaotian, Sichuan, South China. Monocrystalline calcite crystals black mudstone/chert sequence that was deposited on a relatively deep anoxic slope/basin along the continental margin. Textures of the crystals indicate in situ precipitation on the seafloor and/or within the sediments. The calcite precipitation corresponds stratigraphically with denitrification and sulfate reduction in the anoxic deep-water mass, as indicated by previously reported nitrogen and sulfur isotope records, respectively. Relatively high ?13Ccarb values of the authigenic carbonates (largely -1 ‰) compared with those of organic matter in the rocks (ca. -26 ‰) suggest that the main carbon source of the carbonates was DIC in the water column. The calcite crystals precipitated in an open system with respect to carbonate, possibly near the sediment-water interface rather than deep within the sediments. The ?13Ccarb values of the carbonates were close to the ?13CDIC value of seawater due to mixing of 13C-depleted remineralized organic carbon (that was released into the water column by the water-mass anaerobic respiration) with the large DIC pool in the oceans. Our results imply that ?13Ccarb values of authigenic carbonates in the anoxic oceans might have been systematically different from the values in the oxic oceans in Earth's history, controlled by the depth of the redoxcline in the water column and sediments. If our model is correct, authigenic carbonates with relatively high ?13Ccarb values in the ancient anoxic oceans may have had a less substantial influence on the bulk ?13Ccarb values in geologic records than has been previously suggested.

  2. Deep suture zone in the North Barents Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsenko, Viktor; Kireev, Artem; Piskarev, Alexey; Savin, Vasily; Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Study of sedimentary basin evolution is a part of research for the forecast of oil and gas capacity of the North Barents shelf. Maps of potential fields anomalies are compiled on the basis of the latest geophysical databases, structural maps of the seismic horizons are analyzed, the location of sources of potential fields anomalies are calculated, 3D density and magnetic models of Earth's crust are constructed. Six seismic complexes are allocated in sedimentary cover structure: Devonian - Lower Carboniferous, Upper Carboniferous - Lower Permian, Mid Permian - Lower Triassic, Triassic - Lower Jurassic, Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous, Lower Cretaceous - Quaternary. The research of lateral changes of allocated layers thickness gives an idea of sedimentation in the region on various time intervals. The structural and tectonic scheme of the region is made after analysis of new geologic-geophysical materials. Contact zones of heterogeneous blocks of the crystalline basement are marked, disjunctive dislocations in a sedimentary cover and the upper crust, and also zones of increase of sediments thickness in various seismic complexes are designated. The deep suture zone delimiting Mesozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary basins has the most important geological value among disjunctive zones of the region. This zone stretches along the Admiralty Arch in East part of the North Barents shelf and is marked by negative magnetic anomaly 30-50 km wide. In view of special tectonic value of the suture zone marked by this anomaly we have calculated the 3D magnetic crust model. The sedimentary layers of a model section is based on seismic data. As a result of modeling the studied anomaly of a magnetic field can be approximated by the block of basement rocks of the lowered magnetization (1.2 A/m). The surface of this block is located in a zone of anomaly at a depth of 12-14 km. The asymmetry of anomaly is accounted by an inclination to East of the borders of the block with low magnetization. Calculated basement magnetization is 1.9 A/m to the West from an anomaly zone that is a characteristic for many igneous and metamorphic rocks of the diorite composition. Magnetization of the basement formations sharply increases to 3.6 A/m to the East. Similar values of magnetization are characterized basalts and dolerites, and also many metamorphic rocks of the basic and ultrabasic composition. Thus, the simulated magnetic field anomaly not only corresponds to limits of the heterochronous sedimentary basins, but also shows the border between two heterogeneous basement blocks. "Bright spot" anomalies are marked out on seismic sections. Bright spots are mainly located near the zone of negative magnetic anomaly along the East part of the North Barents Basin. The AVO analysis of the anomalies of the seismic recording has allowed to allocate possible hydrocarbon reservoirs and to subdivide them into the gas-saturated and oil-gas-saturated.

  3. Differential severity of Permian Triassic environmental changes on Tethyan shallow-water carbonate platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Oliver; Bernecker, Michaela

    2007-01-01

    Significantly different Guadalupian-Late Triassic patterns are observed in the evolution of attached and isolated carbonate platforms of the southwestern Tethys (Oman Mountains). Close to the rim of the attached Arabian platform, carbonates of the Saiq and Mahil Formations reveal an almost complete Permian-Triassic sedimentary record. Guadalupian-Changhsingian 3rd order sequences consist of fossiliferous transgressive systems tracts and monotonous highstand systems tracts with mud/wackestone and coral bafflestone. The youngest Changhsingian beds are bioturbated floatstone with crinoids, sponges and bryozoans. All sediments indicate a healthy, tropical carbonate production. Above, a unique facies change begins with a pyrite-encrusted omission surface. Greenish mudstone rich in authigenic pyrite infills the relief of the unconformity and is overlain by clastic sediment and by laminated, microbialite-bearing carbonate. Unfossiliferous sediments and seafloor cements indicate a change in carbonate production towards abiotic processes. Prevailing anoxic conditions were interrupted by seven oxic event beds, as indicated either by low-diversity and small-sized ichnotaxa or by shell beds with low-diversity bivalve and crinoid assemblages. By comparison with published data, the described sedimentary sequence can be assigned to the Changhsingian-earliest Griesbachian. Beginning probably with the Anisian, bioturbated Griesbachian-Dienerian recovery period and the unconformity below to the latest grain-supported sediment textures mark the return to biogenic tropical carbonate production under oxic conditions. The Middle-Late Triassic carbonate platform consists of stacked high-frequency shallowing upward cycles. By contrast, carbonate production of Neo-Tethyan isolated platforms was discontinuous and interrupted by a large gap. Guadalupian deposits of the Al Jil Formation consist of bioclastic limestone typical of a tropical carbonate production. The uppermost bed, an impoverished bioclastic packstone capped by an unconformity, marks the onset of platform drowning which resulted from the end-Guadalupian mass extinction. Above, a polymict breccia witnessed rift pulses of the Neo-Tethys. The overlying pelagic mud- and packstone contains radiolarians and rare foraminifera of Lopingian age, and overlying microbialites. In the Carnian, tropical shallow-water carbonate production restarted with a low-relief platform and culminated in a Norian-Rhaetian reef-rimmed platform. Stacked Lofer cycles dominated the inner platform of Jebel Kawr (Misfah Formation). We here propose a differential onset and severity of the Late Permian mass extinctions for carbonate platforms. On the Arabian Plate, tropical carbonate production collapsed after the end-Lopingian mass extinction and was replaced by microbialites and sea-floor cements during the earliest Triassic. After approximately six million years, tropical shallow-water carbonate production resumed in the Middle Triassic. Neo-Tethyan isolated platforms drowned shortly after the end-Guadalupian mass extinction and did not recover before the Late Triassic. Absence of shallow-water limestone suggests that carbonate production of isolated platforms ceased for about 30 million years, a period exceeding the recovery of most marine ecosystems.

  4. The Permian Dongfanghong island-arc gabbro of the Wandashan Orogen, NE China: Implications for Paleo-Pacific subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wilde, Simon A.; Chen, Han-Lin; Yang, Shu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    The Dongfanghong hornblende gabbro is located in the western part of the Wandashan Orogen and to the east of the Jiamusi Block in NE China. It was emplaced into Early Paleozoic oceanic crust (i.e. Dongfanghong ophiolite) at ~ 275 Ma and both later collided with the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block. The Dongfanghong gabbro is sub-alkaline with high Na2O contents and is characterized by enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), large ion lithosphile elements (LILE), Sr, Eu, and Ba, and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE). The enriched isotopic signatures (87Sr/86Sri = ~ 0.7065, ?Nd(t) = ~- 0.5, 208Pb/204Pbi = ~ 38.05, 207Pb/204Pbi = ~ 15.56, 206Pb/204Pbi = ~ 18.20 and zircon ?Hf(t) = ~+ 5.8) indicate an enriched mantle (EM2) source, with some addition of continental material. It has arc geochemical affinities similar to Permian arc igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block, the Yakuno Ophiolite in SW Japan, arc rocks along the western margin of the North America Craton, and also the Gympie Group in eastern Australia. All these features, together with information from tectonic discrimination diagrams, suggest that the Dongfanghong gabbro formed in an immature island arc. The spatial configuration of ~ 290 Ma immature continental arc rocks in the eastern part of the Jiamusi Block and the ~ 275 Ma immature island arc Dongfanghong gabbro in the Wandashan Orogen to the east is best explained by eastward arc retreat and slab roll-back of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. This model is also supported by the Carboniferous-Permian stratigraphic transition in the Jiamusi Block from oceanic carbonate rocks to coal-bearing terrestrial clastic rocks and andesites. We thus suggest that both Paleo-Pacific subduction and roll-back occurred in the Early Permian along the eastern margin of Asia.

  5. Importance of carbon isotopic data of the Permian-Triassic boundary layers in the Verkhoyansk region for the global correlation of the basal Triassic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Yu. D.; Biakov, A. S.; Richoz, S.; Horacek, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to a global correlation of marine Permian-Triassic boundary layers on the basis of partially published and original data on the ?13Corg and ?13Ccarb values of the Suol section (Setorym River, South Verkhoyansk region). The section consists of six carbon isotopic intervals, which are easily distinguishable in the carbon isotopic curves for a series of Permian-Triassic reference sections of Eurasia and Northern America, including paleontologically described sections of Central Iran, Kashmir, and Southern China. This suggests that the Permian-Triassic boundary in the Suol section is close to the carbon isotopic minimum of interval IV. In light of new data, we suggest considering the upper part of the Late Permian Changhsingian Stage and the lower substage of the Early Triassic Induan Stage of Siberia in the volumes of the rank Otoceras concavum zone and the Tompophiceras pascoei and Wordieoceras decipiens zones, respectively. The O. concavum zone of the Verkhoyansk region probably corresponds to the Late Changhsingian Hypophiceras triviale zone of Greenland. The carbon isotopic intervals II, III, IV, and V in the Permian-Triassic boundary layers of the Verkhoyansk region traced in a series of the reference sections of Eurasia correspond, most likely, to intensification of volcanic activity at the end of the Late Changhsingian and to the first massive eruptions of Siberian traps at the end of the Changhsingian and the beginning of the Induan Stages. New data indicate the possible survival of ammonoids of the Otoceratoidea superfamily at the species level after mass extinction of organisms at the end of the Permian.

  6. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in Permian coals from the Huaibei Coalfield, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liugen; Liu, Guijian; Chou, Chen-Lin; Qi, Cuicui; Zhang, Ying

    2007-10-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) in coals are important because of: (a) REE patterns can be an indicator of the nature of source rocks of the mineral matter as well as sedimentary environments; (b) REEs abundance in coal may have industrial-significance. In this study, a total of thirty-four samples of Permian coal, partings, roof, and floor were collected from the Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui Province, China. Abundances of rare earth elements (REEs) and other elements in the samples were determined by inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the REEs are enriched in coals in the Huaibei Coalfield as compared with Chinese and U.S. coals and the world coal average. Coals in the Lower Shihezi Formation (No. 7, 5, and 4 Coals) and Upper Shihezi Formation (No. 3) have higher REE abundances than the coals in Shanxi Formation (No. 10). Magmatic intrusion resulted in high enrichment of REEs concentrations in No. 5 and 7 Coals. The REE abundances are positively correlated with the ash content. The mineral matter in these coals is mainly made up of clay minerals and carbonates. The REEs are positively correlated with lithophile elements including Si, Al, Ti, Fe, and Na, which are mainly distributed in clay minerals, indicating that REEs are contained mainly in clay minerals. The REE abundances in coals normalized by the ash are higher than that in partings. REEs abundances of coals cannot be accounted for by the REE content in the mineral matter, and some REEs associated with organic matter in coals.

  7. New palaeomagnetic results from the Oslo Graben, a Permian Superchron lava province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldan, M. M.; Meijers, M. J. M.; Langereis, C. G.; Larsen, B. T.; Heyer, H.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed an extended palaeomagnetic study of the Oslo Graben volcanics, compared to the study of half a century ago by van Everdingen, using modern techniques and a four times larger amount of sites, plus additional rock magnetic experiments. We conclude that the average direction (D = 204.0, I = -37.9, k = 46.9, ?95 = 2.0) and associated palaeomagnetic pole (? = 48.3, ? = 155.5, K = 52.2, A95 = 1.9) of the Krokskogen and Vestfold volcanics together are statistically identical to those of the earlier study. This gives confidence in the fact that older palaeomagnetic studies can be reliable and robust, even though methods have improved. Our larger number of samples, and better age constraints, enable us to separate the data into two major intervals: the younger, on average, Krokskogen area and the older Vestfold area. The results show firstly that palaeolatitudes are slightly higher than predicted by the latest apparent polar wander path (APWP) for Eurasia by Torsvik et al. These data support an early Permian Pangaea A configuration and do not necessitate a Pangaea B configuration. The larger data set also allows us to assess the distribution of the characteristic remanent magnetization directions of the Oslo Graben in terms of geomagnetic field behaviour, which were acquired during a long period of dominantly single polarity the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron (PCRS). The distributions show a significantly lower virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) scatter at the observed (low) latitudes than expected from a compilation from lavas of the last 5 Myr. The data do however show excellent agreement with the scatter observed both during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron and the PCRS. A comparison of the directional distributions in terms of elongation is less discriminating, since the large errors in all cases allow a fit to the predicted elongation/inclination behaviour of the TK03.GAD model.

  8. Geochemistry of the Upper Permian Ca-2 deposits of the Loegumkloster-1 well, South Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock samples of the Upper Permian Ca-2 unit of the Loegumkloster-1 well have been subjected to chemical analysis. The Ca-2 interval was undoubtedly originally an aragonite which have undergone several episodes of diagenesis including a dolomitization and a heavy anhydrite mineralization. Two original facies types are recognized, an oolitic shoal facies, and a lagoonal carbonate facies. The samples have been characterized by neutron activation, atomic absorption, X-ray diffraction, palaeomagnetism, optical and electron microscopical examination. Samples of the drilling mud has been analyzed as well, and it is found that contamination of the samples included in the present study from the drilling mud is unlikely to have happened. Imprints of both the original facies and the diagenetic events are found in the present work. The Sr and Ba abundances reflect the original facies-bound distribution, which is also reflected in the normalized REE distribution patterns. A low-Sr anhydrite component is clearly distinguishable in several parameter cross plots. Iron, Sc, REE and several other elements are found to be situated in the EDTA-insoluble residue, which has been identified primarily as a muscovite or clay mineral phase. Pyrite is present, although of small relative volume it is thought to be responsible for the occurrence of As, Sb, and possibly Se. A small fraction of the Cr, As, and Sb may originate from the heavy part of the crude oil, the introduction of which was the last process of alteration the rock experienced. A geomagnetically reversed period is encountered in the middle of the Ca-2 interval, and is tentatively identified as one of the Tatarian reversed events. (author) 87 refs

  9. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in Permian coals from the Huaibei Coalfield, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L.; Liu, Gaisheng; Chou, C.-L.; Qi, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REEs) in coals are important because of: (a) REE patterns can be an indicator of the nature of source rocks of the mineral matter as well as sedimentary environments; (b) REEs abundance in coal may have industrial-significance. In this study, a total of thirty-four samples of Permian coal, partings, roof, and floor were collected from the Huaibei Coalfield, Anhui Province, China. Abundances of rare earth elements (REEs) and other elements in the samples were determined by inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that the REEs are enriched in coals in the Huaibei Coalfield as compared with Chinese and U.S. coals and the world coal average. Coals in the Lower Shihezi Formation (No. 7, 5, and 4 Coals) and Upper Shihezi Formation (No. 3) have higher REE abundances than the coals in Shanxi Formation (No. 10). Magmatic intrusion resulted in high enrichment of REEs concentrations in No. 5 and 7 Coals. The REE abundances are positively correlated with the ash content. The mineral matter in these coals is mainly made up of clay minerals and carbonates. The REEs are positively correlated with lithophile elements including Si, Al, Ti, Fe, and Na, which are mainly distributed in clay minerals, indicating that REEs are contained mainly in clay minerals. The REE abundances in coals normalized by the ash are higher than that in partings. REEs abundances of coals cannot be accounted for by the REE content in the mineral matter, and some REEs associated with organic matter in coals. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bone-conduction hearing and seismic sensitivity of the Late Permian anomodont Kawingasaurus fossilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaß, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An investigation of the internal cranial anatomy of the anomodont Kawingasaurus from the Upper Permian Usili Formation in Tanzania by means of neutron tomography revealed an unusual inner and middle ear anatomy such as extraordinarily inflated vestibules, lateroventrally orientated stapes with large footplates, and a small angle between the planes of the anterior and lateral semicircular canals. The vestibule has a volume, which is about 25 times larger than the human vestibule, although Kawingasaurus has only a skull length of approximately 40 mm. Vestibule inflation and enlarged stapes footplates are thought to be functionally correlated with bone-conduction hearing; both morphologies have been observed in fossorial vertebrates using seismic signals for communication. The firmly fused triangular head with spatulate snout was probably used for digging and preadapted to seismic signal detection. The quadrate-quadratojugal complex was able to transmit sound from the articular to the stapes by small vibrations of the quadrate process, which formed a ball and socket joint with the squamosal. Mechanical considerations suggest that the ventrolaterally orientated stapes of Kawingasaurus was mechanically better suited to transmit seismic sound from the ground to the fenestra vestibuli than a horizontal orientated stapes. The low sound pressure level transformer ratio of 2-3 in Kawingasaurus points to a seismic sensitivity of the middle ear and a vestigial or reduced sensitivity to airborne sound. Three hypothetical pathways of bone conduction in Kawingasaurus are discussed: 1) sound transmission via the spatulate snout and skull roof to the otic capsules, 2) relative movements resulting from the inertia of the mandible if sound is percepted with the skull, and 3) bone conduction from the substrate via mandible, jaw articulation, and stapes to the inner ear. PMID:25284624

  11. Progress in the Gondwanan Carboniferous–Permian palynology and correlation of the Nilawahan Group of the Salt Range, Pakistan: A brief review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Irfan U Jan

    2014-02-01

    This paper comprises of two sections. The first section describes challenges in the Carboniferous–Permian Gondwanan stratigraphic palynology, and progress in techniques such as presence of the ‘rare-marine intervals’, and ‘radiometric dating’ in some Gondwanan successions, e.g., South Africa, Australia and South America, as tools to confidently calibrate these palynozones. The second section describes developments in the palynological work on the Carboniferous–Permian Nilawahan Group of the Salt Range, Pakistan, and summarises their correlation with the coeval succession of the Gondwana continents and with the Russian/International stages.

  12. Coal forming conditions for coal seams and coal measures of the Heshan Group Upper Permian Series in Guangxi Province (part 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.

    1980-10-01

    Coal forming conditions for the coal measures of the Heshan Group are discussed based on the analysis of the historical background and paleogeographical environment of the Permian in Guangxi Province. The roof, floor, and partings of the seams are composed of algal micritic limestone, therefore affirming that the central part of Guangxi Province in the late Permian was a typical epi-continental sea. The compensative deposit of algea on the carbonate platform in very shallow water created the conditions for the occurrence of the peat swamp and established the supra-tidal swampy facies. The environment for the accumulation of the major coal seams are analyzed. (In Chinese)

  13. A unique carbon isotope record across the Guadalupian Lopingian (Middle Upper Permian) boundary in mid-oceanic paleo-atoll carbonates: The high-productivity “Kamura event” and its collapse in Panthalassa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozaki, Yukio; Kawahata, Hodaka; Ota, Ayano

    2007-01-01

    Middle to Upper Permian shallow marine carbonates in the Kamura area, Kyushu (SW Japan), were derived from a paleo-atoll complex developed on an ancient seamount in mid-Panthalassa. The Capitanian (Upper Guadalupian) Iwato Formation (19 m-thick dark gray limestone) and the conformably overlying Wuchiapingian (Lower Lopingian) Mitai Formation (17 m-thick light gray dolomitic limestone) are composed of bioclastic limestone of subtidal facies, yielding abundant fusulines. A secular change in stable carbon isotope ratio of carbonate carbon ( ?13C carb) was analyzed in the Kamura section in order to document the oceanographic change in the superocean Panthalassa with respect to the mass extinction across the Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary (G-LB). The Iwato Formation is characterized mostly by unusually high positive ?13C carb values of + 4.9 to + 6.2‰, whereas the Mitai Formation by low positive values from + 1.9 to + 3.5‰. The negative excursion occurred in three steps around the G-LB and the total amount of the negative shifts reached over 4‰. A remarkably sharp drop in ?13C carb values, for 2.4‰ from 5.3 down to 2.9‰, occurs in a 2 m-thick interval of the topmost Iwato Formation, after all large-shelled fusulines and bivalves disappeared abruptly. Such a prominent high positive ?13C carb plateau interval in the end-Guadalupian followed by a large negative shift across the G-LB was detected for the first time, and this trend in the mid-superoceanic sequence is correlated chemostratigraphically in part with the GSSP (Global Stratotype Section and Point) candidate for the G-LB in S. China. The present results prove that the end-Guadalupian event was doubtlessly global in context, affecting circum-Pangean basins, Tethys, and Panthalassa. The end-Guadalupian interval of a high positive plateau in ?13C carb values over + 5‰ is particularly noteworthy because it recorded an unusually high bio-productivity period that has not been known in the Permian. This end-Guadalupian high-productivity event, newly named "Kamura event", suggests burial of a huge amount of organic carbon, draw-down of atmospheric CO 2 and resultant global cooling at the end of Guadalupian, considerably after the Gondwana glaciation. The low temperatures during the Kamura event may have caused the end-Guadalupian extinction of large-shelled Tethyan fusulines and bivalves adapted to warm climate. On the other hand, the following event of ca. 4‰ negative shift in ?13C carb values across the G-LB indicates a global warming in the early Lopingian. This may have allowed radiation of the new Wuchiapingian fauna, and this trend appears to have continued into the Mesozoic. These observations are in good agreement with the global sea-level curve in the Middle-Late Permian. The smooth and gradual pattern of the negative shift suggests that the causal mechanism was not of catastrophic nature (e.g. bolide impact, sudden melting of methane hydrate) but was long and continuous.

  14. Canada Basin revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, David C.; Shimeld, John; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Chian, D; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    More than 15,000 line-km of new regional seismic reflection and refraction data in the western Arctic Ocean provide insights into the tectonic and sedimentologic history of Canada Basin, permitting development of new geologic understanding in one of Earth's last frontiers. These new data support a rotational opening model for southern Canada Basin. There is a central basement ridge possibly representing an extinct spreading center with oceanic crustal velocities and blocky basement morphology characteristic of spreading centre crust surrounding this ridge. Basement elevation is lower in the south, mostly due to sediment loading subsidence. The sedimentary succession is thickest in the southern Beaufort Sea region, reaching more than 15 km, and generally thins to the north and west. In the north, grabens and half-grabens are indicative of extension. Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge is a large igneous province in northern Amerasia Basin, presumably emplaced synchronously with basin formation. It overprints most of northern Canada Basin structure. The seafloor and sedimentary succession of Canada Basin is remarkably flat-lying in its central region, with little bathymetric change over most of its extent. Reflections that correlate over 100s of kms comprise most of the succession and on-lap bathymetric and basement highs. They are interpreted as representing deposits from unconfined turbidity current flows. Sediment distribution patterns reflect changing source directions during the basin’s history. Initially, probably late Cretaceous to Paleocene synrift sediments sourced from the Alaska and Mackenzie-Beaufort margins. This unit shows a progressive series of onlap unconformities with a younging trend towards Alpha and Northwind ridges, likely a response to contemporaneous subsidence. Sediment source direction appeared to shift to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago margin for the Eocene and Oligocene, likely due to uplift of Arctic islands during the Eurekan Orogeny. The final stage of sedimentation appears to be from the Mackenzie-Beaufort region for the Miocene and Pliocene when drainage patterns shifted in the Yukon and Alaska to the Mackenzie valley. Upturned reflections at onlap positions may indicate syn-depositional subsidence. There is little evidence, at least at a regional seismic data scale, of contemporaneous or post-depositional sediment reworking, suggesting little large-scale geostrophic or thermohaline-driven bottom current activity.

  15. AUthigenic feldspar as an indicator of paleo-rock/water interactions in Permian carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotl, C.; Kralik, M.; Kunk, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Dolostones interbedded with Upper Permian evaporites at the base of the Northern Calcareous Alps contain abundant authigenic K-feldspar. Two petrographically, structurally, and isotopically distinct generations of K-feldspar can be distinguished: crystals composed of an inclusion-rich core and a clear rim, and optically unzoned, transparent crystals. Both feldspar types have essentially identical K-feldspar end-member compositions with ??? 99.5 mole % Or component. Low oxygen isotope ratios (+16.1??? to +18.1??? SMOW) suggest precipitation from 18O-enriched, saline fluids at temperatures in excess of ??? 140??C. 40Ar/39Ar plateau-age spectra of five samples range from 145 ?? 1 to 144 ?? 1 Ma (Early Berriasian) and suggest that both types of feldspar were formed within an interval that did not exceed ??? 2 m.y. Rb/Sr model ages range from 152 to 140 Ma, assuming that the burial diagenetic regime was buffered with respect to strontium by the associated marine Permian evaporites. Authigenic K-feldspar records two distinct events of hot brine flow, most likely triggered by tectonic movements (detachment) and by an increase in the subsurface temperature in response to thrust loading.

  16. Early Permian supra-subduction assemblage of the South Island terrane, Percy Isles, New England Fold Belt, Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultramafic-intermediate rocks exposed on the South Island of the Percy Isles have been previously grouped into the ophiolitic Marlborough terrane of the northern New England Fold Belt. However, petrological, geochemical and geochronological data all suggest a different origin for the South Island rocks and a new terrane, the South Island terrane, is proposed. The South Island terrane rocks differ from ultramafic-mafic rocks of the Marlborough terrane not only in lithological association, but also in geochemical features and age. These data demonstrate that the South Island terrane is genetically unrelated to the Marlborough terrane but developed in a supra-subduction zone environment probably associated with an Early Permian oceanic arc. There is, however, a correlation between the South Island terrane rocks and intrusive units of the Marlborough ophiolite. This indicates that the two terranes were in relative proximity to one another during Early Permian times. A K/Ar age of 277 ± 7 Ma on a cumulative amphibole-rich diorite from the South Island terrane suggests possible affinities with the Gympie and Berserker terranes of the northern New England Fold Belt. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  17. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewan, M.D.; Kotarba, M.J.; Wieclaw, D.; Piestrzynski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977–984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. ?13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation in these experiments is attributed to the metals not occurring in the proper form or the poisoning of potential catalytic microcosms by polar-rich bitumen, which impregnates the rock matrix during the early stages of petroleum formation.

  18. Chemical signature of two Permian volcanic ash deposits within a bentonite bed from Melo, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane M. Calarge

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A Permian bentonite deposit at Melo, Uruguay is composed of a calcite-cemented sandstone containing clay pseudomorphs of glass shards (0-0.50 m overlying a pink massive clay deposit (0.50-2.10m. The massive bed is composed of two layers containing quartz and smectite or pure smectite respectively. The smectite is remarkably homogeneous throughout the profile: it is a complex mixed layer composed of three layer types whose expandability with ethylene glycol (2EG 1EG or 0EG sheets in the interlayer zone which correspond to low-, medium- and high-charge layers respectively varies with the cation saturating the interlayer zone. The smectite homogeneity through the profile is the signature of an early alteration process in a lagoonal water which was over saturated with respect to calcite. Compaction during burial has made the bentonite bed a K-depleted closed system in which diagenetic illitization was inhibited. Variations in major, REE and minor element abundances throughout the massive clay deposit suggest that it originated from two successive ash falls. The incompatible element abundances are consistent with that of a volcanic glass fractionated from a rhyolite magma formed in a subduction/collision geological context.Um depósito Permiano de bentonita em Melo, Uruguai,é composto por um arenito com cimento calcítico contendo pseudomorfos de argila sobre detritos vítreos(0-0.50 m superpostos a um deposito maciço de argila rosado (0.50-2.10 m. A camada maciça é composta por dois níveis contendo quartzo e esmectita ou esmectita pura, respectivamente. A homogeneidade de esmectita ao longo do perfil é notável: trata-se de um interestratificado composto de três tipos de camadas, cuja expansibilidade com etileno-glicol (folhas 2EG, 1EG ou 0EG na zona interfoliar correspondentes a camadas com baixa, média e alta carga, respectivamente variam com o tipo de cátion que satura a zona interfoliar. A homogeneidade da esmectita ao longo do perfil é a assinatura de um processo de alteração precoce em uma água lagunar supersaturada em calcita. A compactação durante o soterramento tornou a camada de bentonita um sistema fechado empobrecido em K no qual a ilitização diagenética foi inibida. Variações nas abundâncias de elementos maiores, menores e ETR no depósito maciço de argila sugere que este foi originado a partir de duas quedas sucessivas de cinza. A abundância de elementos incompatíveis é consistente com a de um vidro vulcânico fracionado a partir de um magma riolitico formado em um ambiente geológico de subducção/colisão.

  19. Petrography and provenance of the Early Permian Fluvial Warchha Sandstone, Salt Range, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Shahid; Mountney, Nigel P.

    The Warchha Sandstone of the Salt Range of Pakistan is a continental succession that accumulated as part of a meandering, fluvial system during Early Permian times. Several fining-upward depositional cycles are developed, each of which is composed of conglomerate, cross-bedded sandstone and, in their upper parts, bioturbated siltstone and claystone units with distinctive desiccation cracks and carbonate concretions. Clast lithologies are mainly of plutonic and low-grade metamorphic origin, with an additional minor sedimentary component. Textural properties of the sandstone are fine- to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately sorted, sub-angular to sub-rounded, and with generally loose packing. Based on modal analyses, the sandstone is dominantly a feldspathoquartzose (arkose to sub-arkose). Detrital constituents are mainly composed of monocrystalline quartz, feldspars (more K-feldspar than plagioclase) and various types of lithic clasts. XRD and SEM studies indicate that kaolinite is the dominant clay mineral and that it occurs as both allogenic and authigenic forms. However, illite, illite-smectite mixed layer, smectite and chlorite are also recognised in both pores and fractures. Much of the kaolinite was likely derived by the severe chemical weathering of previously deposited basement rocks under the influence of a hot and humid climate. Transported residual clays deposited as part of the matrix of the Warchha Sandstone show coherent links with the sandstone petrofacies, thereby indicating the same likely origin. Illite, smectite and chlorite mainly occur as detrital minerals and as alteration products of weathered acidic igneous and metamorphic rocks. Based primarily on fabric relationship, the sequence of cement formation in the Warchha Sandstone is clay (generally kaolinite), iron oxide, calcareous and siliceous material, before iron-rich illite and occasional mixed layer smectite-illite and rare chlorite. Both petrographic analysis and field characteristics of the sandstone indicate that the source areas were characterised by uplift of a moderate to high relief continental block that was weathered under the influence of hot and humid climatic conditions. The rocks weathered from the source areas included primary granites and gneisses, together with metamorphic basement rocks and minor amounts of sedimentary rocks. Regional palaeogeographic reconstructions indicate that much of the Warchha Sandstone detritus was derived from the Aravalli and Malani ranges and surrounding areas of the Indian Craton to the south and southeast, before being transported to and deposited within the Salt Range region under the influence of a semi-arid to arid climatic regime.

  20. Chemical signature of two Permian volcanic ash deposits within a bentonite bed from Melo, Uruguay

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Liane M., Calarge; Alain, Meunier; Bruno, Lanson; Milton L.L., Formoso.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Um depósito Permiano de bentonita em Melo, Uruguai,é composto por um arenito com cimento calcítico contendo pseudomorfos de argila sobre detritos vítreos(0-0.50 m) superpostos a um deposito maciço de argila rosado (0.50-2.10 m). A camada maciça é composta por dois níveis contendo quartzo e esmectita [...] ou esmectita pura, respectivamente. A homogeneidade de esmectita ao longo do perfil é notável: trata-se de um interestratificado composto de três tipos de camadas, cuja expansibilidade com etileno-glicol (folhas 2EG, 1EG ou 0EG na zona interfoliar correspondentes a camadas com baixa, média e alta carga, respectivamente) variam com o tipo de cátion que satura a zona interfoliar. A homogeneidade da esmectita ao longo do perfil é a assinatura de um processo de alteração precoce em uma água lagunar supersaturada em calcita. A compactação durante o soterramento tornou a camada de bentonita um sistema fechado empobrecido em K no qual a ilitização diagenética foi inibida. Variações nas abundâncias de elementos maiores, menores e ETR no depósito maciço de argila sugere que este foi originado a partir de duas quedas sucessivas de cinza. A abundância de elementos incompatíveis é consistente com a de um vidro vulcânico fracionado a partir de um magma riolitico formado em um ambiente geológico de subducção/colisão. Abstract in english A Permian bentonite deposit at Melo, Uruguay is composed of a calcite-cemented sandstone containing clay pseudomorphs of glass shards (0-0.50 m) overlying a pink massive clay deposit (0.50-2.10m). The massive bed is composed of two layers containing quartz and smectite or pure smectite respectively. [...] The smectite is remarkably homogeneous throughout the profile: it is a complex mixed layer composed of three layer types whose expandability with ethylene glycol (2EG 1EG or 0EG sheets in the interlayer zone which correspond to low-, medium- and high-charge layers respectively) varies with the cation saturating the interlayer zone. The smectite homogeneity through the profile is the signature of an early alteration process in a lagoonal water which was over saturated with respect to calcite. Compaction during burial has made the bentonite bed a K-depleted closed system in which diagenetic illitization was inhibited. Variations in major, REE and minor element abundances throughout the massive clay deposit suggest that it originated from two successive ash falls. The incompatible element abundances are consistent with that of a volcanic glass fractionated from a rhyolite magma formed in a subduction/collision geological context.

  1. Carbon isotopic shift and its cause at the Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian boundary in the Upper Permian at the Zhaojiaba section, South China: Evidences from multiple geochemical proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengye; Yu, Hao; Wang, Jianguo; Qiu, Zhen; Xiang, Lei; Shi, Guo

    2015-06-01

    The Late Permian environmental change, connecting the Guadalupian-Lopingian (G-L) (Middle-Upper Permian) boundary mass extinction and the Permain-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary mass extinction, has attracted more and more attentions. A significant negative shift for carbon isotope had been found at the Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian (W-C) boundary in the Upper Permian recently. However, the cause(s) of this negative excursion is still unknown. To resolve this problem, we analyzed the bulk organic carbon isotope, total organic carbon (TOC) content, pyritic sulfur (Spy) content, major element concentrations, and molecular organic biomarkers in the Wujiaping and Dalong formations in the Upper Permian from the Zhaojiaba section in western Hubei province, South China. Our results show that (1) there was a significant negative excursion in organic carbon isotopes at the W-C boundary and again a negative excursion at the top of Changhsingian stage; (2) the significant negative excursion at the W-C boundary was probably a global signal and mainly caused by the low primary productivity; and (3) the negative carbon isotope excursion at the top of Changhsingian was probably caused by the Siberian Traps eruptions. A decline in oceanic primary productivity at the W-C boundary probably represents a disturbance of the marine food web, leading to a vulnerable ecosystem prior to the P-Tr boundary mass extinction.

  2. London Basin Forum

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas, Michael; Royse, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Michael de Freitas1 and Katherine Royse2 say geologists and engineers from all backgrounds can now contribute to revealing the nature of the ground beneath London, its geological history, and predicting ground conditions within the Basin. Geoscientist 19.10 October 2009

  3. South Bohemian basins.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spudil, J.; Brož, B.; Dašková, Ji?ina; Holcová, K.; Kva?ek, Z.; Pešek, J.; Svobodová, Marcela; Sýkorová, Ivana; Teodoridis, V.

    Prague : Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 190-206 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  4. Serenitatis multi-ringed basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New topographic data allow a reassessment of the ring structure of the Serenitatis basin and correlation with the younger Orientale basin. The northern Serenitatis basin is smaller and less well preserved than the southern Serenitatis basin. Three major rings of the main (southern) Serenitatis basin are mapped: ring 1, Linne ring, outlined by mare ridges, average diameter 420 km; ring 2, Haemus ring, outlined by basin-facing scarps and massifs with crenulated borders, 610 km; ring 3, Vitruvius ring, outlined by basin-facing linear scarps and massifs, 880 km. Ring 1 corresponds to the inner Rook Mountain ring of Orientale, ring 2 with the outer Rook ring, and ring 3 with the Cordillera Mountain ring. The ring identifications and assignments indicate that the Serenitatis basin is essentially the same size as the Orientale basin, rather than much larger, as previously proposed. The Apollo 17 site lies near the second ring, which is interpreted as the rim of the transient cavity. Apollo 15 lies at the junction of the Serenitatis and Imbrium third rings; Serenitatis ejecta should be present in significant amounts at the Apollo 15 site. The new reconstruction indicates that portions of the Serenitatis basin are better preserved than previously thought, consistent with recent stratigraphic and sample studies that suggest an age for Serenitatis which is older than, but close to, the time of formation of the Imbrium basin. (Auth.)

  5. Vein mineralizations - record of paleo-fluid systems in the Thuringian basin (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Petra; Viereck, Lothar; Abratis, Michael; Fritsch, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Vein-related mineralizations within the Mesozoic sediments of the Thuringian basin (Germany) are investigated in analytical detail (petrography, XRD, XRF, EPMA, LA-ICP-MS, and isotope studies: O, C, S, Sr) in order to characterize paleo-fluid systems that intruded the basin and circulated within it millions of years ago. Samples from 55 outcrops, 34 quarries and 21 drill cores comprise mainly carbonates (calcite, dolomite, siderite, ankerite), additional sulfates (gypsum, celestine, barite,), and rarely sulfides. The mineralizations are almost exclusively restricted to WNW-ESE trending fault systems. First ?13C and ?18O isotope analyses of calcite mineralizations reveal differences between veins within Triassic sediments (Lower Muschelkalk: ?13C: 1.8 to 2.9 o, mean 2.3 o, ?18O: -7.3 to -10.4 o, mean -8.2 o) and Jurassic sediments (?13C: -0.7 to -2.1 o, mean -1.4 o, ?18O: -9.3 to -10.6 o, mean -9.9 o), indicating intra-formational and extra-formational paleo-fluid transport. Also first ?34S and ?18O isotope analyses of gypsum mineralizations display differences between veins within Triassic and Permian sediments, respectively. These initial data are comparable with isotope analyses of vein-related host rocks and hydrochemical signatures of recent well waters in the Thuringian basin indicating intra-formational in addition to extra-formational paleo-fluid transport. Further isotope studies are in progress including high resolution in situ-Sr- isotope analysis. The present study is part of INFLUINS, a BMBF-funded project bundle, which is dedicated to the comprehensive description and understanding of the fluid systems within the Thuringian basin in time and space.

  6. Inversion of the Broad Fourteens Basin (offshore Netherlands), a small-scale model investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalpas, T.; Le Douaran, S.; Brun, J.-P.; Unternehr, P.; Richert, J.-P.

    1995-03-01

    The southern North Sea exhibits spectacular examples of graben inversion which have been extensively documented by oil industry exploration. The Broad Fourteens Basin, which is located at the southern limit of the Southern Permian Salt Basin, displays numerous structural patterns of positive inversion, which are related to the inversion, which are related to the presence and thickness of Zechstein salts. In the northern part of the Broad Fourteens Basin, the Zechstein salt is rather thick (> 500 m), allowing decollement of the Mesozoic series during both extension and compression. Salt is missing to the southern part of this graben, and both Mesozoic series and Palaeozoic 'basement' display similar patterns of deformatiqn. The mechanical significance of inversion patterns was investigated through laboratory experiments on brittleductile models. Models were built with sand and silicone putty that represent, respectively, the frictional behaviour of the Mesozoic cover as well as the Palaeozoic basement, and the viscous behaviour of a decollement layer, mainly composed of Zechstein salts, which is intercalated between them. The models were scaled to fit natural configurations observed in the Broad Fourteens Basin. All small-scale experiments were carried out in two steps: (1) graben formation with synkinematic sedimentation, and (2) compression at various angles of obliquity to the graben. Experimental results show that the structures generated by or reactivated during inversion are strongly dependent on: (a) the strength of the decollement layer, which is a function of the layer thickness and of the displacement velocity applied at the model boundaries; and (b) the strength of the sedimentary overburden, which is a function only of its thickness (for a given lithology). Reactivation of normal faults occurs when the angle between the compression and the direction of the normal faults is smaller than 45. The ductile layer, which can be a source for diapirs during extension, plays during compression an important rô1e in the thrusting of the graben fill onto the adjacent platforms.

  7. Lopatin Analysis of maturation and petroleum generation in the Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluff, R.M. (Discovery Group, Denver, CO (United States)); Byrnes, A.P. (Geocore, Loveland, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01

    A modified Lopatin approach was used to evaluate the present-day maturity of Paleozoic source rock units across the Illinois basin, timing of generation, regional porosity trends, and basin paleostructure during major generative events. Ten cases were modeled at 100 locations to test assumed paleogeothermal gradients, post-Pennsylvanian overburden thicknesses, and rates of erosional stripping. Lopatin predicted maturities for the Herrin ({number sign}6) Coal and the New Albany Shale are in good agreement ({plus minus}0.02% R{sub O}) with measured maturities if 500-3,000 ft of post-Middle Pennsylvanian strata and were deposited and subsequently eroded between the Permian and mid-Cretaceous and if paleogeothermal gradients were within a few {degree}C/km of present-day gradients. Predicted mean reflectance levels range from 1.0 to 4.0% R{sub O} at the base of the Potsdam Megagroup, 0.7 to 3.5% at the base of the Know Megagroup, and 0.6 to 1.3% at the base of the Maquoketa Shale, excluding only a small high-maturity area in southeastern Illinois. The Knox and Potsdam section attained oil generation 475-300 Ma, while the Maquoketa and the younger New Albany Shale reached the oil window much later: 300-250 Ma. Because most significant structures in the basin formed after 300 Ma, any pre-Maquoketa source rocks were already within the gas zone and may have been largely spent by the time known structures formed. Any Know or deeper traps in the basin will probably contain gas, be restricted to old structures (earlier than 300 Ma) or stratigraphic traps, and will hold pre-300 Ma generated hydrocarbons which subsequently cracked to gas.

  8. Natural frequency of regular basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjandra, Sugih S.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    Similar to the vibration of a guitar string or an elastic membrane, water waves in an enclosed basin undergo standing oscillatory waves, also known as seiches. The resonant (eigen) periods of seiches are determined by water depth and geometry of the basin. For regular basins, explicit formulas are available. Resonance occurs when the dominant frequency of external force matches the eigen frequency of the basin. In this paper, we implement the conservative finite volume scheme to 2D shallow water equation to simulate resonance in closed basins. Further, we would like to use this scheme and utilizing energy spectra of the recorded signal to extract resonant periods of arbitrary basins. But here we first test the procedure for getting resonant periods of a square closed basin. The numerical resonant periods that we obtain are comparable with those from analytical formulas.

  9. Satellite magnetic anomalies of the Antarctic Wilkes Land impact basin inferred from regional gravity and terrain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Frese, R. R. B.; Kim, H. R.; Leftwich, T. E.; Kim, J. W.; Golynsky, A. V.

    2013-02-01

    The GRACE gravity and subglacial terrain data of Wilkes Land are consistent with the presence of a mascon produced by giant impact perhaps at the end of the Permian. In contrast to the relatively extensive ice probing radar coverage, aeromagnetic data coverage is limited across the basin. However, Magsat, Ørsted, and CHAMP satellite magnetic observations reveal the thinned crust of the impact site to be associated with the largest satellite altitude crustal magnetic anomaly of Antarctica. The underlying region of enhanced magnetization is consistent with the GRACE gravity and BEDMAP terrain data and extends into south-central Australia in a reconstructed Gondwana. The strongly magnetized crust can reflect the impact's thermal enhancement of lower crustal viscous remanent magnetization as well as the production of positively magnetized melt rocks within the fractured crust.

  10. The magnetic anomaly on the Permian Alcaparrosa porphyry (Argentina). A case of pyrrhotite-remanence-dominated anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The Permian Alcaparrosa porphyry is a small (600 meters in diameter) rhyodacite stock outcropping in the Precordillera geological province, San Juan, Argentina. It developed a 3-kilometers-long, NW-SE-trending alteration halo ('Faja Amarilla', yellow belt) in the host rocks, which is a sequence of Ordovician marine mudstones with interbedded basaltic flows included in the Alcaparrosa Fm. The porphyry-related alteration overprinted a previous low-grade-metamorphic alteration assemblage characteristic of an oceanic floor environment. The aeromagnetic survey revealed a bipolar anomaly in the total magnetic intensity (TMI) coinciding with the outcropping alteration halo. The surrounding Alcaparrosa Fm is non-magnetic and therefore the anomaly is clearly defined in a quiet magnetic zone, showing a minimum to the north, centred on the porphyry, and a semi lunar maximum to the south. The shape of the anomaly is opposed to the expected shape of induced magnetic anomalies in mid latitudes of the southern hemisphere. Available data show that both the Permian porphyry and its alteration halo carry a magnetic remanence with positive inclination (i.e. reversed polarity), probably acquired during the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron. The Koenigsberger ratio (Q) for the porphyry resulted lower than 1, which means that remanence is not intense enough to control the shape of the magnetic anomaly. On the other side, outcropping rocks of the alteration halo show intense supergene alteration and are non-magnetic. However, relics of phyllic alteration where found relatively preserved of supergene alteration, and they showed monoclinic pyrrhotite as magnetic carrier, and a Q ratio higher than 1. We used those data to model a body carrying a reversed magnetic remanence. The shape and extension of the modelled body seems a good approximation to the possible shape of the sulphide-bearing alteration halo around the rhyodacite porphyry. The presence of monoclinic pyrrhotite carrying reversed-polarity, high-Q remanence in the Permian porphyry systems of Precordillera should be assessed, as its related inverted anomalies could be used as an exploration guide in aeromagnetic surveys.

  11. Mass movement processes at the Motozintla Basin, Chiapas, Southern Mexico

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Manuel, Sánchez-Núñez; José Luis, Macias; José Juan, Zamorano-Orozco; Ricardo, Saucedo; José Ramón, Torres; David, Novelo.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los principales desafíos que presentan las zonas montañosas es la identificación y predicción de áreas susceptibles a procesos de remoción en masa (PRM). Éste es el caso de la cuenca de Motozintla, localizada en el sureste de México, sobre la traza del sistema de fallas Polochic-Motagua en el [...] estado de Chiapas. En la zona predominan rocas del Pérmico y Terciario, severamente afectadas por fallas, fracturas y un intenso intemperismo y erosión. Motozintla ha sido gravemente afectado por dos fenómenos hidrometeorológicos en 1998 y 2005. Para determinar las zonas peligrosas, propensas a sufrir procesos gravitacionales de remoción de masas en la cuenca, se realizó un mapeo geológico-estructural (1:30,000) mediante fotointerpretación y técnicas de SIG. El inventario obtenido mostró 88 procesos cartografiables de remoción en masa, representados por avalanchas, caídas de roca, deslizamientos y flujos de escombros. Los procesos más peligrosos para la ciudad de Motozintla son los flujos de escombros, ya que éstos la han impactado negativamente y ponen en riesgo a 23,755 habitantes. La zona noroeste de la cuenca es considerada como la más vulnerable a sufrir procesos de remoción en masa, debido a que afloran rocas sumamente alteradas del Macizo de Chiapas y la Formación Todos Santos. Abstract in english Prediction of prone areas for mass movement processes (MMP) is one of the major challenges in mountainous areas. This is the case of the Motozintla basin that is located along the Motagua-Polochic fault system in the Chiapas State southeastern Mexico. The area is dominated by Permian to Tertiary roc [...] ks extremely affected by faults, weathering and intense erosion. Motozintla has been seriously disrupted by two hydrometeorological phenomena in 1998 and 2005. In this paper, geological and structural mapping (1:30 000), photointerpretation and GIS techniques were applied to determine the hazard areas that may go off by mass movement processes driven by gravity in the basin. The inventory shows 88 mapable mass movement processes ocurred during the past 25 ky represented by debris avalanches, rock falls, slides and debris flows. Debris flows are the most dangerous phenomena that may directly impact the city of Motozintla posing at risk 23,755 people. Future mass movement processes may happen mainly in the NW part of the basin where highly altered rocks of the Chiapas massif and Todos Santos Formation are exposed.

  12. The Amaranth Formation of the Williston Basin: Paleomagnetic, Petrologic and Geochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, E.; Cioppa, M. T.; Al-Aasm, I.

    2008-12-01

    Major debate continues to exist concerning the time of deposition of the Amaranth Formation in the Williston Basin of North America, with postulated ages of Pennsylvanian, Permian, Triassic, Lower and Middle Jurassic. A multidisciplinary study of the lower member of the Amaranth Formation was conducted in six wells in Manitoba. The lower Amaranth red beds are composed of red carbonate-rich and carbonate-poor interbedded sandstones/siltstones/shales containing dolomite and anhydrite and lacking diagnostic fossils. Preliminary analysis of the oxygen and carbon isotope values measured for replacive and cement dolomite show variations related to particular lithologies that can be correlated to the types of dolomite present in the rocks. The siliciclastic sections are dominated by detrital, zoned dolomite that has recrystallized rims, whereas in the more carbonate-rich and evaporitic samples with little to no clastic content, replacive matrix dolomite is the dominant phase. Dolomite samples from the siliciclastic sections are characterized by relatively depleted carbon and oxygen isotope values, the dolomite matrix samples have relatively enriched oxygen and carbon isotope values and a few samples containing replacement matrix dolomite with minor clastic input have intermediate isotope values. These variations reflect primary and diagenetic overprints. Hematite is the major magnetization carrier, with occasional softer magnetic minerals such as magnetite. Optical microscopy revealed the existence of two types of hematite: detrital specular hematite and very fine red pigment hematite. The paleomagnetic data reveals at least three episodes of magnetization. The most pervasive magnetization, B, was formed during the Permian-Carboniferous Kiaman Reverse Superchron. An isolated magnetization in a couple of wells, C, suggests a remagnetization event that happened sometime between mid-Jurassic and Neogene, possibly resulting from a localized oxidizing fluid flow event. The oldest magnetization, D, was acquired sometime between mid-Devonian and Pennsylvanian, but it is usually poorly defined and is not common within the studied samples. B and D are both carried in both specular and pigmentary hematite and are candidates for a primary magnetization preserved in the lower Amaranth samples. The paleomagnetic data presented in this study indicate that the lower Amaranth member red beds are certainly older than early- to mid-Jurassic, and probably even older than Triassic. Our results suggest that these sediments were deposited either in Pennsylvanian or during the Permian-Carboniferous Kiaman Reverse Superchron.

  13. Geometrical model of the Baltic artesian basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikovs, J.; Virbulis, J.; Bethers, U.

    2012-04-01

    Baltic artesian basin (BAB) is a multi-layer sedimentary basin spanning around 480'000 km2. BAB is located in the territory of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, parts of Poland, Russia, Belarus and large area of the Baltic Sea, including island of Gotland. The thickness of sedimentary cover is about 5000 m in the south-western part. Crystalline bedding reaches the surface in the northern and north-western parts. The aim of the present work is development of the model of geometric structure and three dimensional finite element mesh for the hydrogeological model of the whole BAB. The information that is used to build the geometrical structure includes: (1) Stratigraphic information from boreholes in Latvia and Estonia (2) Maps of height isolines of geological layers for Latvia and Lithuania (3) Maps of sub-quaternary deposits in Latvia and Lithuania (4) Maps of fault lines on the crystalline basement surface in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia (5) Buried valley data from Latvia and Estonia (6) Earth topography data (7) Baltic sea depth data (8) Data from published geological cross-sections, information from books and other sources. Unification of the heterogeneous information from different sources, which are employed for building of the geometrical structure of the model are performed. Special algorithms are developed for this purpose considering the priority, importance and plausibility of each of the data sources. Pre-processing of the borehole information to screen out the outlying borehole data has been performed. Model of geological structure contains 42 layers. It includes aquifers and aquitards from Cambrian up to the Quaternary deposits. Fault displacements are incorporated into the model taking into account data from the published structural maps. Four reconstructed regional erosion surfaces (upper Ordovician, Devonian, Permian and Quaternary) are included into the model Three dimensional mesh of the geological structure is constructed layer-wise. The triangular mesh in horizontal plane is constructed including characteristic lines such as rivers, borders of countries and areas of presence of geological layers. Mesh consists of triangular prisms, pyramids and tetrahedrons. The construction of the geometric mesh is implemented by specially developed script in Python. Such approach has several advantages: (1) flexibility in choosing ways to build the structure; (2) parallelization of workload in developing/updating of different structure elements; (3) documentation and maintenance of repeatable structure building path; (4) opportunity to rebuild the structure with slight or significant modifications at any time; (5) possibility to build, and maintain several structures of different complexity simultaneously. Acknowledgement The present work has been funded by the European Social Fund project "Establishment of interdisciplinary scientist group and modelling system for groundwater research" (Project Nr. 2009/0212/1DP/1.1.1.2.0/09/APIA/VIAA/060)

  14. Deformation-dissolution potential of bedded salt, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, Delaware Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly discusses evidence for deep-seated dissolution considers teh realtionship between deformation, dissolution, and brine, and examines the potential for dissolution at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site with respect to stages in the deformation-dissolution process. The Delaware Basin, which contains the Upper Permian Castile and Salado evaporites, was uplifted, faulted on the western margin and tilted 19m/km to the east-northeast during the latter part of the Cenozoic, probably 4 to 6 my ago. This event exposed the tilted limestone (reef) and sandstone aquifers beneath the overlying anhydrite and salt beds. Meteoric waters entered the exposed aquifers in the uplifted western and southern margins of the basin. The aquifers became charged and pressurized, with the pressure surface high within the evaporites; almost at the surface. Salt has been removed from beneath and within the evaporite body, apparently by means not related to ordinary near-surface groundwater flow. This report considers how this may have happened

  15. Impact basin relaxation at Iapetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robuchon, Guillaume; Nimmo, Francis; Roberts, James; Kirchoff, Michelle

    2011-07-01

    We investigate impact basin relaxation on Iapetus by combining a 3D thermal evolution model (Robuchon, G., Choblet, G., Tobie, G., Cadek, O., Sotin, C., Grasset, O. [2010]. Icarus 207, 959-971) with a spherical axisymmetric viscoelastic relaxation code (Zhong, S., Paulson, A., Wahr, J. [2003]. Geophys. J. Int. 155, 679-695). Due to the progressive cooling of Iapetus, younger basins relax less than older basins. For an ice reference viscosity of 10 14 Pa s, an 800 km diameter basin relaxes by 30% if it formed in the first 50 Myr but by 10% if it formed at 1.2 Gyr. Bigger basins relax more rapidly than smaller ones, because the inferred thickness of the ice shell exceeds the diameter of all but the largest basins considered. Stereo topography shows that all basins 600 km in diameter or smaller are relaxed by 25% or less. Our model can match the relaxation of all the basins considered, within error, by assuming a single basin formation age (4.36 Ga for our nominal viscosity). This result is consistent with crater counts, which show no detectable age variation between the basins examined.

  16. Late Variscan tectonothermal history of the Holy Cross Mts. (central Poland) as revealed by integrated palaeomagnetic and 1-D basin modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, J.; Narkiewicz, M.; Szaniawski, R.; Resak, M.; Littke, R.

    2009-04-01

    Classical outcrops of the Holy Cross Mountains (HCM) in Poland are among a few areas in Central Europe exposing a complete succession of Phanerozoic strata. The long-studied Palaeozoic sections are of a key importance to understand a complex Phanerozoic development in the region bordering the East European Craton from the south-west. The Palaeozoic core of HCM consists of two tectonostratigraphic units: southern (Kielce) and northern (?ysogóry), separated by a Holy Cross Fault. Different organic maturity data (conodont CAI, vitrinite reflectance - VR, biomarkers) consistently indicate an important difference in thermal alteration pattern between the pre-Permian Palaeozoic and the Permian-Mesozoic cover in the Kielce region. In its northern part, adjoining the Holy Cross Fault, the Devonian carbonates are characterized by VR?0.7 % and CAI 1.5-3.5, while in the south they are less altered thermally, displaying VR?0.65 % and CAI 1.0-1.5. On the other hand, Permian-Mesozoic cover reveals a uniformly low degree of thermal alteration (VR close to 0.6 % and CAI 1). Palaeomagnetic studies and thermal modelling were performed in outcrops and borehole sections of the Middle - Upper Devonian carbonates, situated in the areas of contrasting thermal histories. Rocks with a higher degree of thermal alteration revealed presence of secondary, most-probably post-folding magnetization residing in magnetite (component A). The age of this remagnetization might be estimated as Early Permian (ca. 290 - 260 Ma). The remagnetization is absent in the less thermally altered areas, where a pre- or early synfolding magnetization was preserved (component B). As presence of the component A correlates with thermal indexes, it might be concluded that its acquisition was controlled mostly by post-orogenic uplift and cooling. Radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios in carbonates do not coincide with occurrence of component A which means that chemical remagnetization due to influence of deeper basinal and/or juvenile fluids is rather unlikely. The results of burial-thermal modelling of borehole sections are in a good agreement with palaeomagnetic data. The results from Janczyce I borehole, situated in the northern part of Kielce region, indicate a significant role of elevated Variscan (Early to Late Carboniferous) heat flow, followed by cooling from ca. 130 to 70 degrees Celsius between 330 and 260 Ma. This is consistent with a concept attributing the Early Permian remagnetization to post-Variscan (i.e. Late Carboniferous) uplift and related cooling. The secondary magnetization could have been facilitated by oxidation of pyrite during a circulation of meteoric fluids. The absence of elevated heat flow and ensuing cooling in the southern part of the HCM corresponds to a lack of the Early Permian remagnetization. Our study seems to demonstrate that, under special circumstances, the palaeomagnetic data may represent a useful complementary tool in deciphering tectonothermal dynamics of a sedimentary basin.

  17. Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

  18. Architecture and evolution of an Early Permian carbonate complex on a tectonically active island in east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Magginetti, Robert T.; Stone, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The newly named Upland Valley Limestone represents a carbonate complex that developed on and adjacent to a tectonically active island in east-central California during a brief interval of Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. This lithologically unique, relatively thin limestone unit lies within a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic rocks and is characterized by its high concentration of crinoidal debris, pronounced lateral changes in thickness and lithofacies, and a largely endemic fusulinid fauna. Most outcrops represent a carbonate platform and debris derived from it and shed downslope, but another group of outcrops represents one or possibly more isolated carbonate buildups that developed offshore from the platform. Tectonic activity in the area occurred before, probably during, and after deposition of this short-lived carbonate complex.

  19. A new captorhinid reptile from the Lower Permian of Oklahoma showing remarkable dental and mandibular convergence with microsaurian tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, R. R.; LeBlanc, Aaron R. H.; Sidor, Christian A.; Scott, Diane; May, William

    2015-10-01

    The Lower Permian fossiliferous infills of the Dolese Brothers Limestone Quarry, near Richards Spur, Oklahoma, have preserved the most diverse assemblage of Paleozoic terrestrial vertebrates, including small-bodied reptiles and lepospondyl anamniotes. Many of these taxa were previously known only from fragmentary remains, predominantly dentigerous jaw elements and numerous isolated skeletal elements. The recent discovery of articulated skulls and skeletons of small reptiles permits the recognition that dentigerous elements, previously assigned at this locality to the anamniote lepospondyl Euryodus primus, belong to a new captorhinid eureptile, Opisthodontosaurus carrolli gen. et sp. nov. This mistaken identity points to a dramatic level of convergence in mandibular and dental anatomy in two distantly related and disparate clades of terrestrial tetrapods and sheds light on the earliest instance of durophagy in eureptiles.

  20. Some Preliminary Results of Detailed Paleomagnetic Investigations of the Siberian Permian-Triassic Traps in the Kotuy River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latyshev, A.; Fetisova, A.; Veselovskiy, R.

    2009-04-01

    Now essential part of geological investigations is dedicated to revealing of reasons and time relation between the mass extinction on the Paleozoic-Mesozoic boundary and pulses of magmatic activity expressed in forming of the largest Permian-Triassic trap province on the Siberian platform. Thus revealing of the dynamic of the magmatic activity caused formation of the Siberian traps will allow to obtain an important information for establishing of its relation with Permian-Triassic extinction. Recent years several reliable paleomagnetic results from the Siberian traps were obtained, but there is a problem of correlation of Maimecha-Kotuy traps with other trap sequences. Especially this problem is actual in a case of traps of Norilsk and Maimecha-Kotuy regions (Gurevich et al., 2004), because an absence of clearly magnetostratigraphic scheme of the Maimecha-Kotuy region traps. This problem doesn't allow to estimate volume of traps explosion of the Northern part of the Siberian platform. In this work preliminary results of detailed paleomagnetic investigations of Maimecha-Kotuy traps are represented. The most complete and representative sequence of lava flows of Arydzhangsky suite (P2-T1) was exposed to the detailed paleomagnetic sampling. This sequence is situated on the left bank of the Kotuy river. Arydzhangsky suite overlays subhorizontally the eroded surface of the Permian sandstones (Fedorenko et al., 2000) and represents the sequence of lava flows of alkaline basaltic rocks, among which limburgites, augitites, melilite basalts, picrites and nephelinites are the most widely spread. Layers of tuffs are subordinated. Summary thickness of the Arydzhangsky suite in this outcrop is 240 m, and about 27 flows are distinguished there (section 1 in Fedorenko et al., 2000). 23 lava flows were sampled during our researches. 8-10 oriented samples were taken from each lava flow; all samples were obtained from the lower and middle parts in order to decrease the probability of remagnetization by overlayed flow. Orientation of samples was made with geological compass controlling absence of influence of the high-magnetic rocks. In the outcrop on the right bank of the Kotuy river were investigated 4 subhorizontal layers of alkaline mixed tuffs. These tuffs are underlayed by Permian sandstones and they are situated lower then lava flows in relief. Resemblance of these tuffs and alkaline-ultramafic tuffs of Khardakhsky suite (Egorov, 1995) allows to correlate them. Khardakhsky suite is correlated with the Pravoboyarsky suite (P2-T1) (Egorov, 1995). Paleomagnetic investigation revealed rather good paleomagnetic record in the studied samples. The quantity of steps of the thermal cleaning reached 20. Magnetization of tuff layers, correlated with Khardakhskaya suite, includes one or two (contemporary and characteristic) components, the second of them has only reversal polarity. Directions of distinguished characteristic components of magnetization tightly concentrated around their average meaning. Thermal demagnetization of the samples from all 23 sampled lava flows of Arydzhangsky suite showed that these rocks are magnetized in normal polarity. The quality of paleomagnetic record varies, but its interpretation is possible in almost flows: the average direction of magnetization and the corresponding paleomagnetic pole are calculated. Also measurements of the magnetic anisotropy were made. Obtained paleomagnetic pole of the Arydzhangsky suite lies in the area of other trap poles of the Siberian platform: this fact can be considered as evidence of absence of the essential tectonic movements. It indicates the perspective of this suite for detailed paleomagnetic investigations. An essential difference in paleomagnetic poles from the tuffs of the Khardakhsky suite and the lavas of Arydzhangsky suite is explained by absence of averaging of secular variations of the geomagnetic field. In the study (Gurevich et al., 2004) two variants of correlation of the Norilsk and Maimecha-Kotuy outcrops are offered. According to the first variant lower parts of

  1. Basin Hopping Graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharik, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo; Stadler, Peter; Qin, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Motivation RNA folding is a complicated kinetic process. The minimum free energy structure provides only a static view of the most stable conformational state of the system. It is insufficient to give detailed insights into the dynamic behavior of RNAs. A sufficiently sophisticated analysis of the folding free energy landscape, however, can provide the relevant information. Results We introduce the basin hopping graph (BHG) as a novel coarse-grained model of folding landscapes. Each vertex of th...

  2. Donbas Foldbelt: An Exceptional Example O F Basin Invers Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystrenko, Y.; Stovba, S.; Bayer, U.; Stephenson, R.; Tolkunov, A.; Dobreflection Working Group

    The Donbas Foldbelt (DF) is the strongly inverted and compressionally deformed part of the Dniep r-Donets Basin (DDB), which is a Late Devonian rift basin located on the south-western part of the East-European Craton (EEC) in eastern Ukraine and in southern Russia. The study of the DF deep structure was done in 2000 and 2001 by lithospheric-scale regi onal reflection seismic investigations along the DOBRE line with length of 250 km in the framework of a joint project of Ukrainian institutes (Ukrgeofizika and Institute of Geophysics, Nat. Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) and an international European consortium. DOBREflection has been developed to investigate the interplay of geological and geodynamic processes that have controled the evolution of these basin. The major post-rift tectonic events affected the DF are: extensional reactivation in Early Carboniferous and at the end of Carboniferous; Early Permian uplift; Triassic and Late Cretaceus compressions. Many syn-rift faults reactivated during post-rift extentional phases of the evolution DF. The evidences of the Late Devonian rift procceses are small grabens in the southern part of the Dobre-section within transition zone from Ukrainian Shield (Uks) to DF. In this zone the postrift sediments were eroded and rift sediments are outcropped. The basin inversion (compressional deformation) is mainly displayed as folding within the (mainly Carboniferous) sedimentary succession, while the basement is disrupted by syn-rift and post-rift faults with offsets up to 3 km and more. Shortering of the basin occurred from south to north along the extensive shearing zone looking like a slightly inclined lystrical thrust, which cuts the entire crust. It runs from the crust base beneath the Uks through Devonian pre-rift/syn-rift and Carboniferous post-rift successions in the northern part of the DF and ends within the well-known area of thrusts with vertical offsets up to a few km. The shearing zone caused a doubling of the Moho beneath the UkS. In addition to the main shearing zone, a pronounced back-thrust affecting the whole sedimentary succession as well as upper crust is clearly evident on the southern part of the DOBRE line. It has horizontal and vertical offsets of some 4-km and 2-km respectively. Thrust is easy recognised due to presence of high amplitude reflection packets refered to Tournesian limestones. The age (Triassic and Late Cretaceus) of the compression has been recognised in the marginal parts of the DF by deep boreholes. On the whole, the structure of the DF along the DOBRE line may testify to an outstanding example of mechanisms that caused inversion of sedimentary basins and reorganization of their crust/mantle structure.

  3. Permian fusulinid biostratigraphy of the Baoshan Block in western Yunnan, China with constraints on paleogeography and paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Shi, Yukun; Jin, Xiaochi

    2015-05-01

    Newly obtained fossil materials together with published data enable a review on the Permian fusulinids of the Gondwana-derived Baoshan Block in western Yunnan, China. The Baoshan Block yields rather impoverish Sakmarian-Yakhtashian fusulinids with just Eoparafusulina and Pseudofusulina in its northern and southern parts. These fusulinids biogeographically demonstrate the feature of peri-Gondwana province and signify a temperate-water condition. Further comparison suggests the Baoshan Block was located distant from the tropical region and even with higher latitude than Central Iran and Central Pamir during the Sakmarian-Yakhtashian. In contrast, Murgabian-Midian fusulinids are more diversified. In the southern Baoshan Block, the Schwagerina assemblage, the Eopolydiexodina assemblage, the Sumatrina assemblage and the Verbeekina assemblage could be recognized in the Xiaoxinzhai area, and the Yangchienia-Nankinella assemblage and the Chusenella-Rugosofusulina assemblage in the Bawei area, in ascending order. Contemporaneously, the Neofusulinella assemblage occurs in the northern and the Eopolydiexodina assemblage in the southwestern Baoshan Block respectively. These Murgabian-Midian fusulinids show affinity of western Tethyan province and suggest a warm-water environment. Interestingly, the Midian Verbeekina assemblage is characterized by relatively low diversity and rather abundance of just one genus. Such compositional feature most likely signifies warm but still not optimal sea-surface water for the diversification of fusulinids. Also taking into account of the presence of Verbeekinids and Neoschwagerinids and the moderate total diversity, the Middle Permian fusulinids indicate that the Baoshan Block, during the Murgabian-Midian, was probably located between equatorial region with warm water to the north and the majority of Sibumasu areas lacking Verbeekinids and Neoschwagerinids with temperate water to the south.

  4. PROSPECTIVIDAD DE HIDROCARBUROS EN LA CUENCA VAUPÉS-AMAZONAS, COLOMBIA / HYDROCARBON PROSPECTIVITY IN THE VAUPES-AMAZONAS BASIN, COLOMBIA

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mario, García-González; Luis Enrique, Cruz-Guevara; Ricardo, Mier-Umaña.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available La evaluación de la prospectividad de hidrocarburos en la Cuenca frontera Vaupés-Amazonas con un área de 155.000 km² indica que la región con mejor potencial de gas está situada en la región sur de la cuenca y está también relacionada con la Cuenca de Solimöes, la cual es productora de petróleo y ga [...] s en Brasil. Los potenciales yacimientos de hidrocarburos están relacionados a estructuras compresivas formadas durante la Orogenia Herciniana, las cuales se observan en las líneas sísmicas de la cuenca. Los modelos geoquímicos indican que los hidrocarburos fueron generados a finales del Pérmico y migraron durante el Mesozoico temprano. Los niveles altos de carbono orgánico total, así como los altos niveles de maduración termal de los shales del Devónico en la Cuenca de Solimöes indican que la Cuenca Vaupés-Amazonas también puede presentar un potencial de yacimientos no convencionales de gas tipo shale gas. Abstract in english The assessment of hydrocarbon prospectivity in the Vaupés-Amazon Basin frontier with an area of 155,000 km² indicates that the southern area presents the highest gas potential, and that is also related with the oil and gas potential in the Solimöes Basin in Brazil. The potential hydrocarbon reservoi [...] rs are related to compressive structures, which were identified in seismic lines of the Vaupes-Amazonas Basin, and formed during the Hercinian orogeny. The Geochemical models indicate that hydrocarbons were generated in the organic-rich Devonian shales in the late Permian and migrated later in the early Mesozoic. High TOC contents and high maturity maturation levels found in the Devonian organic-rich shales in the Solimöes Basin, indicate that the Vaupés-Amazon Basin may also have a potential for unconventional deposits of shale gas type.

  5. Palinología del Pérmico Inferior en la perforación CLS-24 (Cerro Largo Sur), departamento de Cerro Largo, Uruguay: Parte II: granos de polen / Palynology of the Lower Permian in the CLS-24 borehole (Cerro Largo Sur), Cerro Largo Department, Uruguay: Part II: pollen grains

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Pedro R., Gutiérrez; Ángeles, Beri; María Lucía, Balarino; Federico, Cernuschi.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el análisis paleopalinológico de cuatro testigos laterales del pozo Cerro Largo Sur- 24 (14,9, 14,8, 7,8 y 3,5 mbpp), referibles a la Formación San Gregorio (Melo, departamento de Cerro Largo, Uruguay). Las asociaciones estudiadas incluyen esporas, prasinofitas y acritarcas (publicados e [...] n la Parte I), y granos de polen. En esta contribución se presentan los granos de polen monosacados, bisacados, estriados y plicados. Las asociaciones palinológicas son referidas al Pérmico Temprano, basado en el registro previo de sus componentes, y en parte correlacionadas con las Biozonas de Cristatisporites (cuenca Chacoparanense), Pakhapites fusus-Vittatina subsaccata (cuencas Paganzo, Calingasta-Uspallata, Río Blanco y San Rafael) y Vittatina costabilis (cuenca Paraná). Las pelitas, portadoras de los palinomorfos, integran la parte superior de la Formación San Gregorio y serían equiparables con el evento transgresivo postglacial identificado en Brasil (Grupo Itararé) y Argentina (formaciones Sachayoj-Charata y Ordóñez-Victoriano Rodríguez). Abstract in english The systematic description of pollen grains from four sidewell cores of Cerro Largo Sur-24 borehole (14.9, 14.8, 7.8, and 3.5 mbs), referred to the upper part of the San Gregorio Formation (Melo, Cerro Largo Department, Uruguay) is presented. The assemblages are represented by spores, prasinophytes, [...] and acritarchs (described in Part I), and pollen grains. The pollen species comprise monosaccate, bisaccate, striate, and colpate grains. The assemblages are datable as Early Permian based on previous records of selected miospore taxa, and are partially correlated to the Cristatisporites Biozone (Chacoparanense Basin), the Pakhapites fusus-Vittatina subsaccata Biozone (Paganzo, Calingasta-Uspallata, Río Blanco, and San Rafael basins), and the Vittatina costabilis Biozone (Paraná Basin). The mudstones yielding the palynomorphs belong to the upper part of the San Gregorio Formation and would correlate with the post-glacial transgression recorded in Brazil (Itararé Group) and Argentina (Sachayoj-Charata and Ordóñez-Victoriano Rodríguez formations).

  6. The distribution pattern of trace elements in Pedra do Fogo formation, permian of Maranhao Basin and it application as an environment indicator of sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation consisted of a geochemical study of the medium and upper layers of the Pedra do Fogo Formation aiming at correlating its elemental distribution pattern with the sedimentary environment where that formation was deposited. Pelitic material with carbonate content below 30% was sampled in the three different outcrops of the Pedra do Fogo Formation for mineralogical and chemical analyses. Illite and dolomite, with subordinate amounts of smectite, calcite, quartz and K-feldspar were determined by X-ray diffraction techniques as the constituents of the mineral assemblages. Trace element (B, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Li, Mn, Ni, P, V, Pb, Sr, Rb and Zn), CO sub(2) and K concentrations were determined by emission spectrography, atomic absorption spectrometry and colorimetry. The interpretation of the chemical data based on B-V, Ga-B, B-K sub(2) O and B-Ga-Rb diagrams and on B content indicates a wite range of variation for the medium salinity during the deposition of the Pedra do Fogo rocks. Accordingly, the observed sequence is composed of intercalations of marine and fresh water sediments, the latter being dominant. The marine intercalations are more frequent in the bottom of the sampled stratigraphic section and become progressively rarer towards the top layers which were deposited in a typically fresh water environment. (author)

  7. Stephanian-Early Permian basaltic trachyandesites from the S?awków and Nieporaz-Brod?a Grabens near Kraków, Southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna LEWANDOWSKA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Kraków-Lubliniec section of the major Hamburg-Kraków-Dobrogea Fault Zone (HKDFZ, the Stephanian-Early Permian magmatic activity was simultaneous with subsidence/uplift of formed blocks. In the proximity of the uplifted areas the sedimentation started with fanglomerates, distally passing into playa siltstone and was accompanied by volcanism. In the Nieporaz-Brod?a graben, basaltic trachyandesite a-a lava flows with autoclastic breccias reach ca. 150 m in thickness. The weathering recorded as adhesive rims around breccia clasts reflects palaeosoil formation during quiescence periods between the eruptions. The eruptions were effusive although scoriaceous lava indicates high volatile content of the magma. The water content before eruption had to be over 2 wt. percent. Only then the crystallisation model predicts accurately the type, composition and order of the crystallising phases. Thus, the basaltic trachyandesite magma originated from a source containing hydrous phase (i.e., amphibole or phlogopite. All the studied basaltic trachyandesites had fayalitic olivine on their liquidus reflecting the crystallisation stage in a magma chamber at crustal depths. During final decompression on the magma ascent due to water exsolution, the olivine was followed by plagioclase, spinel, augite, ilmenite, apatite, K-feldspar and residual high-K rhyolitic glass. The high potassium content of these volcanics was thus a primary feature reflecting the source geochemistry and differentiation trend, and its consequence was potassium metaso- matism. Due to water exsolution the glass was altered, however, homogenous interstitial glass survived in some rocks. The glass is strongly enriched in incompatible trace elements, showing that it is a highly fractionated residual melt fraction of the basaltic trachyandesite magma. Thus, the glass geochemistry reflects the trend of fractional crystallisation indicating that co-occurring K-rich felsic rocks were not derived from the same magma. All the basaltic trachyandesites studied have calc-alkaline to alkaline affinity. They contain fayalitic olivine and are low in MgO 0.5-0.80 and small Eu/Eu* > 0.9-1.0 anomalies suggesting fractionation of plagioclase. The Eu/Eu* anomaly is probably compensated by amphibole retaining in the source. Negative Nb, Ti anomalies suggest Fe-Ti oxide fractionation characteristic for calc-alkaline evolution trend. A significant enrichment in LREE relatively to HREE (La/Yb > 10 indicates subduction-related metasomatism. However, the described tectonic context is inconsistent with subduction related characteristics. Concluding, the observed geochemical characteristics indicate remarkable role of water in magma evolution. The volcanism was related to strike-slip dextral movement along the Kraków-Lubliniec section of HKDFZ, transformed into crustal extension and subsidence, the features typical for the formation of pull-apart basins, in the late stages of the Variscan orogen evolution.

  8. 3-D gravity analysis of the Dniepr Donets Basin and Donbas Foldbelt, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorova, T. P.; Stephenson, R. A.; Kozlenko, V. G.; Starostenko, V. I.; Legostaeva, O. V.

    1999-11-01

    The Dniepr-Donets Basin (DDB) is a linear, NW-SE trending, late Palaeozoic and younger sedimentary basin on the East European Platform separating the Ukrainian Shield from the Voronezh Massif. Its northwestern (Dniepr) segment has the characteristics of a typical rift basin. To the southeast, through a transition zone of approximately 200 km length, the DDB is progressively uplifted and compressionally deformed into the correlatable Donbas Foldbelt (DF). Along the axis of the Dniepr segment a series of gravity highs has been previously explained by high-density crystalline crust beneath the axis of the basin caused by intrusion of mafic and ultramafic rocks. In this paper, the results of a 3-D gravity analysis, using a gravity backstripping technique, is described that investigates the crustal and upper mantle structure in the region of the DDB-DF transition zone and DF. A residual gravity field I, obtained by subtracting the gravity influence of the sedimentary succession of the DDB from the observed field, reveals a distinct positive anomaly along the axis of the rift basin increasing in amplitude to the southeast in concert with increasing sedimentary thickness. A residual gravity field II, derived by removing the gravity effects of a modelled homogeneous crystalline crust from residual field I, reaches 200 and 100 mGal amplitude in the DF for two respective Moho models based on different interpretations of the published crust and upper mantle seismic velocity models. The first of these (model A) assumes crustal thickening beneath the transition zone and DF (to a Moho depth up to 50 km) whereas the second (model B) assumes a Moho shallowing (to depths in the range 35-37 km) along the whole basin axis. For each residual anomaly II, the best-fitting 3-D distribution of average density in the crystalline crust has been computed. Both models indicate the existence of a high-density body in the crystalline crust along the DDB axis, increasing in density from the Dniepr segment to the DF, with higher average crustal density required in the case of Moho model A (3.17×10 3 kg m -3 versus 3.06×10 3 kg m -3 for model B). The preferred interpretation of the density models is one in which the denser crystalline crust underlying the DDB-DF transition zone and DF is explained by intrusion of mafic and ultramafic rocks during late Palaeozoic rifting processes. Invocation of processes related to the uplift and inversion in the DF are not required to explain the observed gravity field although reworking of the crust during Permian and younger tectonism in the DF cannot be ruled out.

  9. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.

    2008-01-01

    The conditions and timing of carbonate cementation in Cambrian sandstones of the Baltic sedimentary basin were determined by oxygen and carbon stable isotope and chemical data in combination with optical and cathodoluminescence petrographic studies. Studied samples represent a range in present burial depth from 340 to 2150 m. The carbonate cement is dominantly ferroan dolomite that occurs as dispersed patches of poikilotopic crystals. Temperatures of dolomite precipitation, based on delta O-18 values, range from 27 degrees C in the shallow buried to 95 degrees C in the deep buried sandstones. The burial history modelling points to development of most of the dolomite cement during rapid Silurian-Devonian subsidence and Carboniferous-early Permian uplift. A wide range of precipitation temperatures indicate that temperature was not a major factor in triggering the carbonate cementation. Dolomite precipitation is related to early stages of organic matter maturation and thus to the oil generation history in the basin. delta C-13 values vary from +0.03% to -6.2%( PDB), suggesting limited addition of carbon from an organic source, with the major part derived from marine bicarbonate. The sourcing of carbon from the organic-rich Cambrian shales is identified from the distribution of delta C-13 values in the dolomite cement within the Cambrian section. The chemical composition of the dolomite cement shows a depth-controlled trend that is coincident with the present-day hydrochemical zonation of the Cambrian aquifer. The increase in the Fe content of the dolomite towards the deeper buried part of the Baltic basin is related to increasing sourcing of ions ( Fe and Mg) from adjacent shales.

  10. Triassic alkaline magmatism of the Hawasina Nappes: Post-breakup melting of the Oman lithospheric mantle modified by the Permian Neotethyan Plume

    OpenAIRE

    Chauvet, François; Lapierre, Henriette; Maury, René C.; Bosch, Delphine; Basile, Christophe; Cotten, Joseph; Brunet, Pierre; Campillo, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    Middle to Late Triassic lavas were sampled within three tectonostratigraphic groups of the Hawasina Nappes in the Oman Mountains. They are predominantly alkali basalts and trachybasalts, associated with minor sub-alkaline basalts, trachyandesites, trachytes and rhyolites. Their major, trace elements and Nd-Pb isotopic compositions are very similar to those of the Permian plume-related high-Ti basalts which also occur in the Hawasina Nappes. The Triassic lavas derive from low-degree melting of...

  11. First report of a Middle-Upper Permian magmatism in the SE Iberian Ranges: characterisation and comparison with coeval magmatisms in the western Tethys

    OpenAIRE

    Lago, M.; Horra, Raúl de la; Ubide, T.; Galé, C.; Galán, A. B.; Barrenechea, J.F.; López-Gómez, José; Benito, M. I.; Arche, A.; Alonso-Azcárate, J.; Luque, F J; Timmerman, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    [EN] A multiple basic to intermediate sill is reported for the fi rst time in the south-eastern Iberian Ranges. It is composed of several tabular to irregular levels intercalated within the fl uvial sediments of the Alcotas Formation (Middle-Upper Permian). The sill could represent the youngest Paleozoic subvolcanic intrusion in the Iberian Ranges. The igneous rocks are classifi ed as basaltic andesites. They show a subophitic microstructure constituted by plagioclase (An62 – An6)...

  12. Australian provenance for Upper Permian to Cretaceous rocks forming accretionary complexes on the New Zealand sector of the Gondwana land margin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-Pb (SHRIMP) detrital zircon age patterns are reported for 12 samples of Permian to Cretaceous turbiditic quartzo-feldspathic sandstone from the Torlesse and Waipapa suspect terranes of New Zealand. Their major Permian to Triassic, and minor Early Palaeozoic and Mesoproterozoic, age components indicate that most sediment was probably derived from the Carboniferous to Triassic New England Orogen in northeastern Australia. Rapid deposition of voluminous Torlesse/Waipapa turbidite fans during the Late Permian to Late Triassic appears to have been directly linked to uplift and exhumation of the magmatically active orogen during the 265-230 Ma Hunter-Bowen event. This period of cordilleran-type orogeny allowed transport of large volumes of quartzo-feldspathic sediment across the convergent Gondwana land margin. Post-Triassic depocentres also received (recycled?) sediment from the relict orogen as well as from Jurassic and Cretaceous volcanic provinces now offshore from southern Queensland and northern New South Wales. The detailed provenance-age fingerprints provided by the detrital zircon data are also consistent with progressive southward derivation of sediment: from northeastern Queensland during the Permian, southeastern Queensland during the Triassic, and northeastern New South Wales - Lord Howe Rise - Norfolk Ridge during the Jurassic to Cretaceous. Although the dextral sense of displacement is consistent with the tectonic regime during this period, detailed characterisation of source terranes at this scale is hindered by the scarcity of published zircon age data for igneous and sedimentary rocks in Queensland and northern New South Wales. Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic age components cannot be adequately matched with likely source terranes in the Australian-Antarctic Precambrian craton, and it is possible they originated in the Proterozoic cores of the Cathaysia and Yangtze Blocks of southeast China. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  13. Preservation of Permian allanite within an Alpine eclogite facies shear zone at Mt Mucrone, Italy: Mechanical and chemical behaviour of allanite during mylonitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenki-Tok, Benedicte; Oliot, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the mechanical and cehmical behavior of allanite during shear zone formation under high-pressure metamorphism. Understanding physico-chemical processes related to the retention or resetting of Pb isotopes in allanite during geological processes is essential for robust petrochronology. Dating of allanite in meta-granodiorite showing variable amounts of strain (from an undeformed protolith to mylonite) at Monte Mucrone (Sesia Zone, NW Italy) gave surprising results. Based on structural and petrographic observations the shear zones at Mt Mucrone are Alpine, yet allanite located within an eclogite facies mylonite yielded Permian ages (208Pb/232Th average age: 287±7 Ma). These mm-sized allanite grains are rimmed by an aggregate of coarse-grained garnet+phengite, thought to derive from former epidote. These aggregates were immersed in a weak matrix that experienced granular flow, and they were thus chemically and mechanically shielded during Alpine mylonitization. In undeformed samples (8a and 8b), two populations of epidote group minerals were found. Allanite forms either coronas around Permianmonazite or individual grains with patchy zoning. Both types yield Permian ages (208Pb/232Th age: 291±5 Ma). On the other hand, grains of REE-rich clinozoisite of Cretaceous age are found in undeformed rocks. These grains appear as small fragments with embayed surface outlines and minute satellites or rims around Permian allanite. These (re)crystallized grains are Sr-rich and show mosaic zoning. These results indicate that allanite crystals retained their chemical and isotopic characteristics, and thus their Permian age, as a result of strong strain partitioning between the epidote group porphyroclasts and the eclogite facies matrix in HP-mylonites. The observed partial mobilization of Pb isotopes, which lead to the Cretaceous-aged rims or grains in undeformed samples was facilitated by (re)crystallization of allanite and not by mere Pb diffusion alone under the HP conditions.

  14. Climatic - biotic continuum - a few examples from the Pennsylvanian - Early Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossovaya, O.

    2012-04-01

    The subdivision of the Pennsylvanian Epoch based on the great difference in the biota composition and evolution. Extensive grows of the continental ice sheets near the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian (mid-Carboniferous) boundary expanded a large area comparative with Pleistocene (106 km2) (Crowley and Baum, 1991). One of the possible models is the restructuring of the oceanic circulation patterns (Saltzman, 2003). The Mid-Carboniferous boundary in the Urals demonstrates regional inconformity trigged by strong fall of the basin depth. Possibly following circulation was the reason of the positive carbon and isotope shift documented in the one of the Askyn key section of the South Urals. Renovated biota appeared far above the unconformity (Brand, Bruckschen, 2002, Kossovaya, 2009, 2010). The next level of biota replacement was found near by Mid-Pennsylvanian boundary. The isotope and microfacies fluctuations are traced in the Late Myachkovian -Kasimovian transitional in the "Kasimov quarry. The top of the Domodedovo Fm. is marked by double paleosoil profile emphasized by Microcodium crust (Leontiev, Kossovaya, 2011) and is characterized by ? 13C negative shift from +2,2 ‰ (sample Ks-23) up to - 4,4‰ (sample Ks -24) and possibly is reinforce by the presence of Microcodium. The extinction of the most of colonial rugosa (Petalaxidae) at this level in the Moscow Basin together with strong restriction of diversity of the other warm -water organisms is considered as biotic event which abiotic affinities are still not clear. The basin level fall is documented by a few erosion surfaces both in the Domodedovo and Peski Fms (Uppermost Myachkovian). Diachronic extinction embraced Perski interval. Data on stable isotope allows to propose the El-Nino scenario fro the first phase of the fauna replacement. Following diminishing of the carbon is indirectly relevant by change of carbonate to clay sedimentation at the beginning of the Voskresensk Fm. It is confirmed by low value of ?13C 0,5-1,0 ‰ in the overlay limestone. The taxonomic diversity is very low. The recovery of bentic biota is characteristic for the Asselian -Lower Artinskian and ended by abrupt extinction at the Late Artinskian or Kungurian. The paleoclimatic affinities of this event are rather controversial. In the Southern hemisphere the restriction of the glacial cover is supported by the appearance first temperate biota - forams, small solitary rugosa, bryozoan, rare bivalves and brachiopods, that are characteristic for the temperate water. This level coincides with colonial corals flourishing in the subtropical area. The average value within Asselian - Lower Artinskian in the Most section (Central Urals) is ? 13C 4- 5‰. The end of Early Artinskian coincides with the minimum value both ?13C and 18O probably mirroring Late Sakmarian deglaciation (Kossovaya et al., 2011). The obtained data in spite of the difference in the absolute value show the similar trend with published data (Korte et al., 2005). Following "small biotic event" fixed in the Northern Hemisphere is characterized by disappearance of Kleopatrinidae and Durhamihidae (Rugosa), other reef-building organisms, diversification of ostracods and replacement of the brachiopod genera composition. Possible trigger could be collision processes in the Eastern part of Pangea challenged the circulation change.

  15. Estancia Basin dynamic water budget.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Richard P.

    2004-09-01

    The Estancia Basin lies about 30 miles to the east of Albuquerque, NM. It is a closed basin in terms of surface water and is somewhat isolated in terms of groundwater. Historically, the primary natural outlet for both surface water and groundwater has been evaporation from the salt lakes in the southeastern portion of the basin. There are no significant watercourses that flow into this basin and groundwater recharge is minimal. During the 20th Century, agriculture grew to become the major user of groundwater in the basin. Significant declines in groundwater levels have accompanied this agricultural use. Domestic and municipal use of the basin groundwater is increasing as Albuquerque population continues to spill eastward into the basin, but this use is projected to be less than 1% of agricultural use well into the 21st Century. This Water Budget model keeps track of the water balance within the basin. The model considers the amount of water entering the basin and leaving the basin. Since there is no significant surface water component within this basin, the balance of water in the groundwater aquifer constitutes the primary component of this balance. Inflow is based on assumptions for recharge made by earlier researchers. Outflow from the basin is the summation of the depletion from all basin water uses. The model user can control future water use within the basin via slider bars that set values for population growth, water system per-capita use, agricultural acreage, and the types of agricultural diversion. The user can also adjust recharge and natural discharge within the limits of uncertainty for those parameters. The model runs for 100 years beginning in 1940 and ending in 2040. During the first 55 years model results can be compared to historical data and estimates of groundwater use. The last 45 years are predictive. The model was calibrated to match to New Mexico Office of State Engineer (NMOSE) estimates of aquifer storage during the historical period by making adjustments to recharge and outflow that were within the parameters uncertainties. Although results of this calibrated model imply that there may be more water remaining in the aquifer than the Estancia Water Plan estimates, this answer is only another possible result in a range of answers that are based on large parameter uncertainties.

  16. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  17. Clockwise rotation of the Santa Marta massif and simultaneous Paleogene to Neogene deformation of the Plato-San Jorge and Cesar-Ranchería basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Camilo; Guzman, Georgina; Bayona, German; Cardona, Agustin; Valencia, Victor; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    A moderate amount of vertical-axis clockwise rotation of the Santa Marta massif (30°) explains as much as 115 km of extension (stretching of 1.75) along its trailing edge (Plato-San Jorge basin) and up to 56 km of simultaneous shortening with an angular shear of 0.57 along its leading edge (Perijá range). Extensional deformation is recorded in the 260 km-wide, fan-shaped Plato-San Jorge basin by a 2-8 km thick, shallowing-upward and almost entirely fine-grained, upper Eocene and younger sedimentary sequence. The simultaneous initiation of shortening in the Cesar-Ranchería basin is documented by Mesozoic strata placed on to lower Eocene syntectonic strata (Tabaco Formation and equivalents) along the northwest-verging, shallow dipping (9-12° to the southeast) and discrete Cerrejón thrust. First-order subsidence analysis in the Plato-San Jorge basin is consistent with crustal stretching values between 1.5 and 2, also predicted by the rigid-body rotation of the Santa Marta massif. The model predicts about 100 km of right-lateral displacement along the Oca fault and 45 km of left-lateral displacement along the Santa Marta-Bucaramanga fault. Clockwise rotation of a rigid Santa Marta massif, and simultaneous Paleogene opening of the Plato-San Jorge basin and emplacement of the Cerrejón thrust sheet would have resulted in the fragmentation of the Cordillera Central-Santa Marta massif province. New U/Pb ages (241 ± 3 Ma) on granitoid rocks from industry boreholes in the Plato-San Jorge basin confirm the presence of fragments of a now segmented, Late Permian to Early Triassic age, two-mica, granitic province that once spanned the Santa Marta massif to the northernmost Cordillera Central.

  18. Concentraciones bioclásticas del Carbonífero - Pérmico Inferior en la Precordillera argentina: Variaciones temporales y relación con las tendencias propuestas para el Fanerozoico / Carboniferous and lower Permian shell beds in Precordillera Argentina: Temporal variations and relationships with the trends proposed for the Fanerozoic

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Andrea F., Sterren.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta el estudio tafonómico de concentraciones fosilíferas del Carbonífero y Pérmico Temprano provenientes de ocho unidades de las cuencas de Río Blanco-Paganzo y Calingasta- Uspallata. Se analizaron dos parámetros de las acumulaciones bioclásticas: la composición taxonómica y [...] el espesor. El análisis de la composición taxonómica permitió reconocer un predominio de acumulaciones moluscodominadas en ambos períodos, siendo las concentraciones dominadas por rhynchonelliformes más abundantes en el Carbonífero que en el Pérmico Temprano. La distribución de espesores evidenció un aumento relativo de los mismos a través del intervalo, aunque nunca superan los 30 cm. Los depósitos bioclásticos estudiados, constituidos por elementos distintivos de la Fauna Moderna y por espesores relativamente delgados y típicamente arcaicos, podrían denominarse de estilo "mixto". Según la composición taxonómica, la transición de estilos en las acumulaciones bioclásticas tendría lugar hacia fines del Paleozoico, lo que respondería a una causa biótica relacionada con la diversificación relativamente temprana de bivalvos infaunales. El incremento de espesores observado en el intervalo estudiado sería resultado de la dinámica sedimentaria en los distintos sectores de las cuencas. La biodiversidad de moluscos y braquiópodos documentados es significativamente mayor en el Pérmico que en el Carbonífero, rasgo que se manifiesta también en la composición de las concentraciones fosilíferas analizadas. La presencia de esta superposición de estilos sugiere a estos períodos como intervalos clave donde focalizar este tipo de estudios, con el fin de testear la expresión local de los modelos globales. Abstract in english Taphonomic and biodiversity studies of Carboniferous and Permian shell beds recorded in several sections from the Río Blanco-Paganzo and Calingasta- Uspallata basins are carried out. Two parameters of bioclastic accumulations are analyzed: taxonomic composition and thickness. The analysis of the tax [...] onomic composition revealed that molluscan-dominated concentrations predominate in both periods, being rhynchonelliform-dominated ones more abundant during the Carboniferous than during the Early Permian. The distribution of thickness ranges exhibits a relative increase through the studied interval, reaching a maximum of 30 cm. Studied bioclastic deposits, are relatively thin and are composed of distinctive elements of the Modern Fauna; hence they could be included in a "mixed" style. On taxonomic grounds the transition between styles appeared to take place toward the ending of the Paleozoic, and might have been driven by a biotic factor related to the relatively early diversification of infaunal bivalves. The increase in thickness documented in the studied interval is the result of the sedimentary dynamics in different areas of the basins. Patterns of biodiversity among mollusks and brachiopods show significantly higher levels of richness in the Permian than in the Carboniferous, a feature that is also evident in the composition of fossiliferous concentrations. The superposition of styles herein documented suggests that the Neopaleozoic is a key interval to test the local expressions of global models.

  19. K-Basins design guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines

  20. K-Basins design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  1. Preliminary study of favorability for uranium of the Sangre de Cristo Formation in the Las Vegas basin, northeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium favorability of the Sangre de Cristo Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) in the Las Vegas basin has been evaluated. The Las Vegas basin project area, located in Colfax, Mora, and San Miguel Counties, New Mexico, comprises about 3,489 sq mi. The formation contains sedimentologic and stratigraphic characteristics that are considered favorable for uranium deposition. Field investigations consisted of section measuring, rock sampling, and ground radiometric reconnaissance. North-south and east-west cross sections of the basin were prepared from well logs and measured sections. Petrographic, chemical, and spectrographic analyses were conducted on selected samples. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic information were used to determine depositional environments. The most favorable potential host rocks include red to pink, coarse-grained, poorly sorted, feldspathic to arkosic lenticular sandstones with stacked sandstone thicknesses of more than 20 ft and sandstone-to-shale ratios between 1:1 and 2:1. The sandstone is interbedded with mudstone and contains carbonaceous debris and anomalous concentrations of uranium locally. Areas of maximum favorability are found in a braided-stream, alluvial-plain depositional environment in the north-central part of the Las Vegas basin. There, carbonaceous material is well preserved, probably due to rapid subsidence and burial. Furthermore, uranium favorability is highest in the lower half of the formation because carbonaceous wood and plant fragments, as well as known uranium deposits, are concentrated in this zone. Piedmont deposits in the north and east, and meander-belt, alluvial-plain deposits in the south, are not considered favorable because of the paucity of uranium deposits and a minimum of carbonaceous material

  2. Aleutian basin oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeson, Gail L.; Barth, Ginger A.

    2015-01-01

    We present two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along two wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer profiles from the Aleutian basin in the Bering Sea. The basement here is commonly considered to be trapped oceanic crust, yet there is a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features within the basin that might reflect later processes. Line 1 extends ?225 km from southwest to northeast, while Line 2 extends ?225 km from northwest to southeast and crosses the observed change in magnetic lineation orientation. Velocities of the sediment layer increase from 2.0 km/s at the seafloor to 3.0–3.4 km/s just above basement, crustal velocities increase from 5.1–5.6 km/s at the top of basement to 7.0–7.1 km/s at the base of the crust, and upper mantle velocities are 8.1–8.2 km/s. Average sediment thickness is 3.8–3.9 km for both profiles. Crustal thickness varies from 6.2 to 9.6 km, with average thickness of 7.2 km on Line 1 and 8.8 km on Line 2. There is no clear change in crustal structure associated with a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features. The velocity structure is consistent with that of normal or thickened oceanic crust. The observed increase in crustal thickness from west to east is interpreted as reflecting an increase in melt supply during crustal formation.

  3. Western Canada Sedimentary Basin competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent dramatic expansion of the natural gas industry in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin provided ample proof of the potential of this area for further development of natural gas supply. However, the inherent competitive advantages provided by the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin were said to have been offset by low netback prices resulting in poor producer economics when competitiveness is measured by availability of opportunities to find and develop gas supply at costs low enough to ensure attractive returns. Technology was identified as one of the key elements in improving basin competitiveness, but the greatest potential lies in reduced transportation costs and increased access to North American market centres. 8 figs

  4. Evaluation of uranium potential in selected Pennsylvanian and Permian units and igneous rocks in southwestern and southern Oklahoma. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precambrian and Cambrian igneous rocks and Pennsylvanian-Permian sedimentary rocks in southwestern and southern Oklahoma are related genetically in that the former, by means of tectonism, was the dominant source material for sediments composing a substantial part of the latter. Petrological and geochemical evidence indicate that granite and rhyolite are potential sources of uranium in southwestern Oklahoma. Riebeckite-aegirine pegmatite dikes contain 38 to 108 ppM uranium. Most of the uranium anomalies in sedimentary rocks are present in association with structural features. Local reducing conditions favoring precipitation from ground water were due to seepage of hydrocarbons along faults, concentration of carbonaceous material (in one case), and deposition of cornstone (caliche). In the Vanoss Formation, the anomalous uranium content in ground water is associated with coarse-grained, arkosic facies. The structural configuration appears to have been relatively unimportant in localization of the anomalies. Some of the disseminated uranium in framework grains and clay in arkoses and subarkoses in southwestern Oklahoma was leached by ground water and transported both parallel to and across bedding (by means of fractures and capillary pressure) to local areas favorable for precipitation

  5. Succession of Permian and Mesozoic metasomatic events in the eastern Pyrenees with emphasis on the Trimouns talc-chlorite deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Alexandre; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Poujol, Marc; Boulvais, Philippe; de Parseval, Philippe; Rouleau, Caroline; Robert, Jean-François

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies proposing pre-orogenic mantle exhumation models have helped renew the interest of the geosciences community in the Pyrenees, which should be now interpreted as a hyper-extended passive margin before the convergence between Iberia and Eurasia occurred. Unresolved questions of the Pyrenean geology, as well as the understanding of the formation of hyper-extended passive margins, are how the crust was thinned, and when, where and how the crustal breakoff occurred. The study of the Variscan and pre-Variscan Pyrenean basement is thus critical to document and understand this Cretaceous crustal thinning. In order to specify the timing of Mesozoic metasomatism and the associated deformation in the pre-Mesozoic basement of the Pyrenees, we carried out a U-Th-Pb laser ablation ICP-MS study on a large panel of REE and titanium-rich minerals (titanite and rutile) from talc-chlorite ores from the eastern Pyrenees, with a special emphasis on the Trimouns deposit, the world's largest talc quarry. Our results suggest that the Trimouns talc formation was restricted to the upper Aptian-Cenomanian time, while the talc and chlorite formation in the eastern Pyrenees occurred during several distinct Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous episodes. These results give strong constraints on the tectonic setting of the Pyrenean domain during the transition between the Variscan and Alpine orogenic cycles, and particularly on when and how the upper crust was thinned before the crustal breakoff and the final mantle exhumation.

  6. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Raton Basin Project. The Raton and Santa Fe Quadrangles of New Mexico. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Santa Fe quadrangle in central New Mexico lies principally within the Southern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains Provinces. The west is dominated by the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The eastern and southern regions contain portions of the Sierra Grande Arch and the Las Vegas and Tucumcari Basins. These structures primarily contain Permian, Triassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary sediments. Many areas of the quadrangle are covered by Cretaceous through Quaternary igneous rocks of a variety of types. Magnetic data reflect both deep and shallow sources. The basins show as regions of low frequency/low amplitude wavelengths except where significant amounts of igneous rocks are exposed. The Santa Fe quadrangle has been unproductive in terms of uranium. All known uranium occurrences to date have proven uneconomic. A total of 219 uranium anomalies are valid according to the criteria set forth in Volume I. Two groups of anomalies in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains appear to be most significant in terms of their peak count rates

  7. The paleozoic of Amazonas basin south edge: Tapajos river, Para state; O paleozoico da borda sul da bacia do Amazonas: rio Tapajos, estado do Para

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Nilo Siguehiko [Petrobras E e P, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao. Estratigrafia e Sedimentologia Geologia Aplicada a Exploracao], E-mail: nilo@petrobras.com.br; Winter, Wilson Rubem [Petrobras, Campoas dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao. Sedimentologia e Estratigrafia], E-mail: winter@petrobras.com.br; Wanderley Filho, Joaquim Ribeiro; Cacela, Alessandra Suzely Moda [Petrobras, Manaus, AM (Brazil). Exploracao. Unidade de Operacoes de Exploracao e Producao da Amazonia], Emails: jwand@petrobras.com.br, alessandra.suzely@petrobras.com.br

    2009-11-15

    The intracratonic Amazonas Basin covers an area close to 500.000km{sup 2} shared between the Amazonas and Para states. The phanerozoic stratigraphic framework is up to 6.000m thick and may be subdivided into two, first order depositional sequences: the Paleozoic sequence, intruded by diabase dikes and sills and the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sequence. Analyzing the stratigraphic framework, the great tectonic influence on the basin development can be appreciated. The mainly NW-SE structural directions of the basement, which mark the boundaries of the geochronological provinces of the Amazonas, are clearly identified along the Tapajos River. The Paleozoic sequence outcrops on the southern border of the Amazonas Basin embraces potential source rocks, reservoirs and seal rocks. They can be subdivided in three, second order sequences, limited by regional unconformities, as: the Ordovician/Devonian, which corresponds to the Pitinga lithostratigraphic formation; the Devonian-Tournaisian, which corresponds to the Maecuru, Erere, Barreirinha and Curiri formations and, the Pensylvanian-Permian that are represented by the Monte Alegre and Itaituba formations. This field trip guide presents these classic lithostratigraphic outcrop units, together with a brief sedimentological description and an analysis of their positioning related to sequence stratigraphical concepts. (author)

  8. Report of the panel on evaluation of ground-water flow in fractures at the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: Unanalyzed data: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A peer review group of hydrologists assessed the importance and availability of data on fracture-controlled ground-water flow at the Palo Duro Basin sites in the Permian Basin in Texas. After hearing presentations by US Department of Energy staff and consultants, and reviewing existing literature, they formed a conceptual model of basin flow that is downward across the salt facies and downdip in permeable formation in the lower hydrostratigraphic unit. Flow volumes and rates are very low. The panel examined several possible fracture-flow scenarios and concluded that flow within the salt section is probably porous-media-dominated with some fracture-flow influence in brittle zones. Fracture flow in the salt itself is rejected as a possibility based on current evidence. However, the panel recommended that fracture flow in the system should be included as a low-probability variable in any hydrogeologic modeling. They also concluded that many more data on lineament features and subsurface structures are needed to accurately characterize the system and to refine the modeling effort. 9 refs., 2 figs

  9. Tectonic variation in the Dniepr-Donets Basin from automated modelling of backstripped subsidence curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wees, J. D.; Stephenson, R. A.; Stovba, S. M.; Shymanovskyi, V. A.

    1996-12-01

    The multiphase rift evolution of the Dniepr-Donets (DD) Basin is analysed by 1D backstripping and tectonic modelling of 66 stratigraphic sections, mostly from well data, distributed throughout the basin. The backstripping results illustrate strong temporal and lateral variations in tectonic subsidence. It is minor during an 'inceptive' pre-rift phase (Givetian-early Frasnian; 380.8-370 Ma) and does not show clear spatial correlations within the DD Basin framework. The main rift phase (Frasnian-Famennian; 370-362.5 Ma) corresponds to an acceleration in subsidence rates with tectonic subsidence up to 1500 m along the basin axis, displaying a slight increase from the northwest to the southeast. Strong lateral variations perpendicular to the basin axis reflect the effects of major basin border faults. A rift phase in the Visean (345-340 Ma) is characterised by relatively minor subsidence (up to about 500 m, except for some wells in the southeast), following a stage of extremely low rates of deposition in the earliest Carboniferous. The end of this rift phase can be taken to mark the onset of convex subsidence patterns in the later Carboniferous and Permian, typical in shape of post-rift thermal subsidence, but significantly increasing in magnitude from northwest to southeast in the basin. This trend shows no one-to-one relationship with Late Devonian syn-rift subsidence. The tectonic subsidence curves have been modelled using lithospheric stretching assumptions allowing different stretching factors for the crustal and sub-crustal lithosphere and the incorporation of finite and multiple stretching phases. A numerical technique was developed that automatically finds best fit stretching parameters for part or all of the tectonic subsidence data, given the specification of onset and duration of the various rifting events. Maps of the 1D modelling results display intrabasinal variations in terms of timing and magnitude of rifting. The results indicate that the observed spatial and temporal variations of tectonic subsidence in the DD Basin, specifically the increasing ratio of Carboniferous to Late Devonian subsidence from northwest to southeast, cannot be explained by either a uniform or depth-dependent stretching model adopting only a single Frasnian-Famennian rift phase. A two-phase model, in which a significant part of Carboniferous tectonic subsidence is related to Visean rift activity, strongly dominated by sub-crustal lithospheric attenuation, provides a satisfactory fit to the data although the tectonic implications of such a model are not easily reconcilable by independent constraints. A semi-quantitative investigation of the possible role of withdrawal of underlying Devonian salt during the Carboniferous to produce additional post-Devonian rift phase sediment accommodation space suggests that the effects of such a mechanism could be significant but that they are unlikely to preclude the necessity of the Visean rifting event to explain the Carboniferous basin evolution.

  10. Provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation: implications for distr ibution and architecture of aeolian versus alluvial-fluvial reservoir s in the Nor th German Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    Zircon U–Pb geochronometry, heavy mineral analyses and conventional seismic reflection data were used to interpret the provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation. The succession was sampled in five Danish wells in the northern part of the North German Basin. The zircon ages found in the Bunter Sandstone show that sediment supply was mainly derived from the Ringkøbing-Fyn High and the Variscan belt and not from the Fennoscandian Shield as previously believed. Seismic reflection data document that the Ringkøbing-Fyn High was a local barrier for sediment transport. Provenance analysis is an invaluable tool of correlation and subdivision of the Bunter Sandstone in this marginal basin setting. This is because the succession includes many hiatuses so the cyclo-, magneto-, and bio-stratigraphic frameworks established elsewhere in the basin cannot readily be applied here. Zircon ages in the Volpriehausen Member (lower Bunter Sandstone) indicate derivation from source areas located to the south of the North German Basin that are of late Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous age. The dominant age population with a peak age of 337 Ma corresponds to the culmination of Variscan high-grade metamorphism, whereas a secondary age population with a peak at 300 Ma matches the timing of volcanism and magmatism at the Carboniferous/Permian boundary in the northern Variscan belt. The Ringkøbing-Fyn High also supplied some sediment tothe Volpriehausen Member. The zircon ages obtained from the Solling Member (upper Bunter Sandstone) match basement ages from the Ringkøbing-Fyn High and show that sediment contributions came mainly from the north. The age distributions are dominated by Mesoproterozoic zircon grains with a Sveconorwegian metamorphic overprint. The heavy mineral assemblage of the Solling Member is uniform and has a high garnet content compared to the contemporaneous sediments in the southern part of the North German Basin. This finding confirms that a local source supplied most of the sediment in the northern part of the basin. The most promising reservoir in the basin area is the aeolian Volpriehausen Member since the sandstone constitutes a lateral continuous unit. This is because sediment from the Variscan belt was transported by wind activity across the North German Basin when it was dried out. The alluvial to ephemeral fluvial Solling Member may be a good reservoir in the platform areas and marginal basin areas, but the variable sand content makes it difficult to predict the reservoir quality.

  11. Cross-fault pressure depletion, Zechstein carbonate reservoir, Weser-Ems area, Northern German Gas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, F.V.; Brauckmann, F.; Beckmann, H.; Gobi, A.; Grassmann, S.; Neble, J.; Roettgen, K. [ExxonMobil Production Deutschland GmbH (EMPG), Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    A cross-fault pressure depletion study in Upper Permian Zechstein Ca2 carbonate reservoir was undertaken in the Weser-Ems area of the Northern German Gas Basin. The primary objectives are to develop a practical workflow to define cross-fault pressures scenarios for Zechstein Ca2 reservoir drillwells, to determine the key factors of cross-fault pressure behavior in this platform carbonate reservoir, and to translate the observed cross-fault pressure depletion to fault transmissibility for reservoir simulation models. Analysis of Zechstein Ca2 cross-fault pressures indicates that most Zechstein-cutting faults appear to act as fluid-flow baffles with some local occurrences of fault seal. Moreover, there appears to be distinct cross-fault baffling or pressure depletion trends that may be related to the extent of the separating fault or fault system, degree of reservoir flow-path tortuosity, and quality of reservoir juxtaposition. Based on the above observations, a three-part workflow was developed consisting of (1) careful interpretation and mapping of faults and fault networks, (2) analysis of reservoir juxtaposition and reservoir juxtaposition quality, and (3) application of the observed cross-fault pressure depletion trends. This approach is field-analog based, is practical, and is being used currently to provide reliable and supportable pressure prediction scenarios for subsequent Zechstein fault-bounded drill-well opportunities.

  12. Palaeogeographic implications of differential inclination shallowing in permo-carboniferous sediments from the donets basin, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosifidi, Alexandr G.; Mac Niocaill, Conall; Khramov, Alexei N.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Popov, Viktor V.

    2010-07-01

    We present new palaeomagnetic data from Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian grey and red sediments from the Donets Basin, Ukraine, part of the Palaeozoic East European Platform. Detailed demagnetization of these units reveals two ancient components of magnetization: component "B", which is carried by magnetite and pigmentary haematite, and a high unblocking temperature component "C", present only in the red beds, carried by detrital haematite. The "B" and "C" components both pass fold tests indicating a primary or a near primary-origin for magnetizations. The "C" component, however, yields palaeolatiudes that are consistently lower (by up to ˜ 12° of latitude or ˜ 1330 km) than those derived from the "B" component, and we argue that this is due to significant inclination-shallowing of the "C"-component. A comparison with European reference palaeomagnetic data reveals that the reference data also span a large spread of palaeolatitudes for this time, and we argue that unrecognized shallowing may have crept into the reference data when based on sedimentary units. A more rigorous approach to selecting reference palaeomagnetic data may well be key to resolving palaeogeographic controversies at this time.

  13. Biostratigraphy, sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the northern Danube Basin: Ratkovce 1 well case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybár Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ratkovce 1 well, drilled in the Blatné depocenter of the northern Danube Basin penetrated the Miocene sedimentary record with a total thickness of 2000 m. Biostratigraphically, the NN4, NN5 and NN6 Zones of calcareous nannoplankton were documented; CPN7 and CPN8 foraminifer Zones (N9, 10, 11 of the global foraminiferal zonation; and MMi4a; MMi5 and MMi6 of the Mediterranean foraminiferal zonation were recognized. Sedimentology was based on description of well core material, and together with SP and RT logs, used to characterize paleoenvironmental conditions of the deposition. Five sedimentary facies were reconstructed: (1 fan-delta to onshore environment which developed during the Lower Badenian; (2 followed by the Lower Badenian proximal slope gravity currents sediments; (3 distal slope turbidites were deposited in the Lower and Upper Badenian; (4 at the very end of the Upper Badenian and during the Sarmatian a coastal plain of normal marine to brackish environment developed; (5 sedimentation finished with the Pannonian-Pliocene shallow lacustrine to alluvial plain deposits. The provenance analysis records that the sediment of the well-cores was derived from crystalline basement granitoides and gneisses and from the Permian to Lower Cretaceous sedimentary cover and nappe units of the Western Carpathians and the Eastern Alps. Moreover, the Lower Badenian volcanism was an important source of sediments in the lower part of the sequence.

  14. Fossil meteoric groundwaters in the Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    180/160 and D/H ratio measurements have been made on groundwaters sampled from the Rustler Formation (Ochoan, Permian) and related rocks in the northern Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. Most confined Rustler waters at the WIPP site and to the west in Nash Draw and confined waters, from the Capitan Limestone constitute one population in ?D/?18O space, while unconfined groundwaters inferred to originate as modern surface recharge waters. A likely explanation for this distinction is that meteoric recharge to most of the Rustler and Capitan units took place in the geologic past under climatic conditions significantly different from those of the present. Available tritium and radiocarbon data are consistent with this hypothesis, and the apparent age of confined groundwaters is in excess of 12,000 radiocarbon years, suggesting that recharge took place under wetter conditions in the late Pleistocene. Water at the Rustler/Salado contact a t the WIPP site is of meteoric origin but has experienced isotopic alteration that increases with decreasing permeability. Rustler dolomites have not recrystallized in isotopic equilibrium with Rustler Formation water. The absence of modern meteoric recharge to the Rustler Formation at and near the WIPP site indicates that the hydrologic system there is not at steady state. Instead, the system is responding to the cessation of local recharge, this cessation occurring more than 10,000 years ago

  15. Shale Gas characteristics of Permian black shales (Ecca group, Eastern Cape, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geel, Claire; Booth, Peter; Schulz, Hans-Martin; Horsfield, Brian; de Wit, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    This study involves a comprehensive and detailed lithological, sedimentalogical, structural and geochemical description of the lower Ecca Group in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. The Ecca group hosts a ~ 245 million year old organic-rich black shale, which has recently been the focus of interest of petroleum companies worldwide. The shale was deposited under anoxic conditions in a setting which formed as a consequence of retro-arc foreland basin development related to the Cape Fold Belt. This sedimentary/tectonic environment provided the conditions for deeply buried black shales to reach maturity levels for development in the gas window. The investigation site is called the Greystone Area and is situated north of Wolwefontein en route to Jansenville. The area has outcrops of the Dwyka, the Ecca and the lower Beaufort Groups. The outcrops were mapped extensively and the data was used in conjunction with GIS software to produce a detailed geological map. North-south cross sections were drawn to give indication of bed thicknesses and formation depths. Using the field work, data two boreholes were accurately sited on the northern limb of a shallow easterly plunging syncline. The first borehole reached 100m and the second was drilled to 292m depth (100m percussion and 192m core). The second borehole was drilled 200m south of the first, to penetrate the formations at a greater depth and to avoid surface weathering. Fresh core from the upper Dwyka Group, the Prince Albert Formation, the Whitehill Formation, Collingham Formation and part of the Ripon Formation were successfully extracted and a detailed stratigraphic log has been drawn up. The core was sampled during extraction and the samples were immediately sent to the GFZ in Potsdam, Germany, for geochemical analyses. As suspected the black shales of the the Whitehill Formation are high in organic carbon and have an average TOC value of 4.5%, whereas the Prince Albert and Collingham Formation are below 1%. Tmax values and the evolution of organic material to bitumen characterise these sediments as overmature. The HI and OI results reveal that the Collingham and Whitehill sediments are type II kerogen and the Prince Albert is type III kerogen sediment. XRD data shows major rock forming minerals of the black shales to be quartz, illite, muscovite and chlorite with some plagioclase and large amounts of accessory pyrite. Average meso-and macro-porosity of these black shales is 1.5% and SEM images confirm that these sediments are tightly packed. The samples are highly affected by the Cape Fold Belt due to its location so far south and is unlikely to hold gas at this position, however this ongoing investigation will give greater insight to the gas potential of these black shales which are found more north of the region. At the GFZ open system pyrolyses and thermovaporization analyses are still underway.

  16. Permian to Triassic I to S-type magmatic switch in the northeast Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and adjacent regions, Colombian Caribbean: Tectonic setting and implications within Pangea paleogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Garzón, A.; Montes, C.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Late Paleozoic to Triassic tectonics of northwestern South America have major implications for the understanding of Laurentia-Gondwana interactions that formed Pangea, and the origin of several tectonostratigraphic terranes dispersed by the break-up of this supercontinent during the formation of the Caribbean. Two mylonitic and orthogneissic granitoid suites have been recognized in the northeastern segment of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, the lower Magdalena basin and the Guajira Serranias, within the Caribbean region of Colombia. For the Santa Marta region U/Pb LAM-ICP-MS analysis yielded zircon crystallization ages of 288.1 ± 4.5 Ma, 276.5 ± 5,1 Ma and 264.9 ± 4.0 Ma, related to the magmatic intrusion. Geochemical and modal variations show a compositional spectrum between diorite and granite, whereas LREE enrichment, Ti and Nb anomalies and geochemical discrimination suggest that this granitoid suite was formed within a magmatic arc setting. Inherited zircons suggest that this Early Permian plutonism was formed with the participation of Neoproterozoic and Grenvillian basement proximal to the South American continent. Evidence of a superimposed Early Triassic (ca. 250 Ma) deformational event in Santa Marta, together with a well defined S-type magmatism in the basement rocks from the adjacent lower Magdalena Valley and Guajira Peninsula regions are related to a major shift in the regional tectonic evolution. It's envisioned that this event records either terrane accretion or strong plate coupling during the final stages of Pangea agglutination. Connections with the main Alleghanian-Ouachitan Pangean orogen are precluded due to their timing differences. The plutons temporally and compositionally correlate with an arc found in the northern Andes and Mexican Gondwana terranes, and represent a broader magmatic event formed at the proto-Pacific margin, outside the nucleus of the Laurentia-Gondwana Alleghanian-Oachitan orogens. Evidence of lower temperature recrystallization is probably linked to a younger Late Cretaceous deformational event that reworked the margin during the accretion of the Caribbean arc to the northwest of South America.

  17. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  18. Dextral Strike-Slip Faulting Along the Early Permian Margin of Pangaea (Eastern Australia) and Implications for Oroclinal Bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Uysal, I. T.; Babaahmadi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of the Pangaean supercontinent was one of the most significant events that affected Phanerozoic global tectonics. Heralding this process, and following the Carboniferous maximum stage of continental assembly, was a period in which the southern part of Pangaea (Gondwana) was subjected to a counterclockwise rotation relative to Laurasia. According to tectonic reconstructions, dextral wrench faulting and oroclinal bending in Varsican Europe and eastern Gondwana accompanied this rotation, but direct evidence for dextral strike-slip faulting in the eastern Gondwanan margin has hitherto not been reported. Here we show evidence from a well-preserved fault zone in eastern Australia (Red Rock fault zone), which occurs along the eastern limb of the Z-shaped Texas/Coffs Harbour orocline. Structural observations show evidence for dextral strike-slip faulting, with a reverse kinematic component, along a sub-vertical fault plane oriented NNE-SSW. Direct geochronological data (Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar) from fault gouge samples associated with this fault zone indicate that brittle faulting occurred in the early-mid Permian (288-264 Ma). In addition, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope geochemistry indicates that the origin of fluids that circulated in the fault zone was associated with a deep crustal source. These results are consistent with independent constraints on the timing of oroclinal bending, supporting the idea that dextral wrench faulting has directly contributed to the formation of the oroclines. We propose a kinematic model for the formation of the oroclines, attributing the early stage of oroclinal bending to subduction rollback and slab segmentation (at ~300-288 Ma) followed by a period of dextral wrench faulting at 288-264 Ma. In the context of Pangaea, our model suggests that the origin of oroclines along the rim of Gondwana was likely associated with bending in response to migrating plate boundaries, and a subsequent tightening of pre-existing curvatures by dextral wrench faulting.

  19. Anatomy and branching of Arthropitys bistriata (Cotta) Goeppert - New observations from the Permian petrified forest of Chemnitz, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, Ronny [DAStietz, Museum fuer Naturkunde, Moritzstrasse 20, D - 09111 Chemnitz (Germany); Noll, Robert

    2010-08-01

    Sizable permineralized calamitean trunks from the Permian petrified forest of Chemnitz, Germany, enabled us to recognize two different branching patterns and wood anatomies for material currently classified as Arthropitys bistriata. This resulted in re-evaluation of the generitype of the widely distributed organ genus Arthropitys Goeppert 1864. As a result, a mosaic of anatomical and morphological characteristics has been recognized that permit A. bistriata to be characterized in much more detail than previously possible. The first type of calamite previously included in A. bistriata is characterized by whorls of branches at every 5th to 9th node and simple scalariform thickenings in tracheid walls of the secondary xylem. Additionally it shows irregularly positioned woody adventitious shoots that also carried whorls of leafy branches. The second type shows reticulated thickenings and multiseriate pitting in secondary xylem tracheid walls and regular branching at every node. Branches alternate in successive nodes and, therefore, lie on the top of each other at every second node. Comparison with the type material suggests the two calamite forms need to be split taxonomically as follows. The first type of calamite is regarded as A. bistriata and emended herein, the second type is separated and introduced as Arthropitys sterzelii sp. nov. The secondary tissues of both species are characterized by a high portion of parenchyma (around 45%). Sometimes irregular growth rings were recognized that may reflect some kind of seasonality and/or environmental influence. We suspect the leafy branches, which were free of any secondary growth in both species, were probably grown and abscised seasonally. Comparisons are made with both different calamitean species and other preservational forms. (author)

  20. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  1. Testing for Basins of Wada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Alvar; Wagemakers, Alexandre; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Yorke, James A

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear systems often give rise to fractal boundaries in phase space, hindering predictability. When a single boundary separates three or more different basins of attraction, we say that the set of basins has theWada property and initial conditions near that boundary are even more unpredictable. Many physical systems of interest with this topological property appear in the literature. However, so far the only approach to study Wada basins has been restricted to two-dimensional phase spaces. Here we report a simple algorithm whose purpose is to look for the Wada property in a given dynamical system. Another benefit of this procedure is the possibility to classify and study intermediate situations known as partially Wada boundaries. PMID:26553444

  2. Hydrologic Sub-basins of Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hydrologic Sub-basins of Greenland data set contains Geographic Information System (GIS) polygon shapefiles that include 293 hydrologic sub-basins of the...

  3. WATSTORE Stream Flow Basin Characteristics File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Stream Flow Basin Characteristics file contains information about the drainage basins of selected USGS gaging stations. Data elements of this file were...

  4. Capture basin approximation using interval analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lhommeau, Mehdi; Jaulin, Luc; Hardouin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach for computing the capture basin C of a target T. The capture basin corresponds to the set of initial state vectors such that the target could be reached in finite time via an appropriate control input, before possibly leaving the target. Whereas classical capture basin characterization does not provide any guarantee on the set of state vectors that belong to the capture basin, interval analysis and guaranteed numerical integration allow us to avoid any indet...

  5. Krušné hory Piedmont basins. Sokolov Basin.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rojík, P.; Dašková, Ji?ina; Kva?ek, Z.; Pešek, J.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Teodoridis, V.

    Prague : Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 90-142 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period

  7. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  8. Distribution and Diversity of Carboniferous and Permian Colonial Rugose Coral Faunas in Western North America: Clues for Placement of Allochthonous Terranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin H. Stevens

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Colonial rugose corals are common in western cratonal North America and in some of the allochthonous terranes, now amalgamated against its western margin. Throughout the Late Paleozoic, the coral faunas in these two different settings were significantly different. Comparisons of these faunas suggest that during the Mississippian the Alexander terrane probably was southwest of Arctic Alaska and the Stikine terrane probably lay west of the southern part of the North American craton. The Cache Creek terrane lay far out in the Paleopacific Ocean. The Pennsylvanian faunas suggest that the Quesnellia and Eastern Klamath terranes were situated southwest of Arctic Alaska and the Alexander terrane was somewhat farther southwest and farther from cratonal North America. The Stikine terrane continued to be positioned west of the southern part of the North American craton. During the Early Permian, terranes with a cratonal faunal aspect may have lain 2000–3000 km west of cratonal North America and latitudinally generally southwest of their present positions. In the Middle Permian these terranes were carried southward relative to the North American craton. Simultaneously the Tethyan Realm expanded eastward.

  9. A new species of the marattialean fern Scolecopteris (Zenker) Millay from the uppermost Permian of Guizhou Province, south-western China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X.-Y. He; S.-J. Wang; J. Hilton; Y.-L. Zhou [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Botany

    2006-06-15

    Several isolated marattialean synangia and sporangia are reported from coal balls collected from Coal Seam No.1 (C605) in the uppermost Permian Wangjiazhai Formation in Guizhou Province, south-western China. The synangia are radially symmetrical with diameters between 0.8 and 1.2 mm and are 1.7 mm long, consisting of 3-4 elongate sporangia that are fused basally, free distally and possess a pointed apex. The outer-facing sporangial wall is 4-5 cells thick and conspicuously differentiated. Spores are trilete, have a granular ornamentation and are nearly round equatorially with a diameter of 55-60 {mu}m. Comparisons with other anatomically preserved Palaeozoic marattialean synangia from the Euramerican and Cathaysian floras permit their assignment to the genus of Scolecopteris (Zenker) Millay. In this species the thick, outer-facing sporangial walls and large trilete spores are features consistent with those of the Oliveri Group within Scolecopteris, a group that has previously been considered primitive within this genus. Distinctions from all other previously recognized species within the Oliveri Group lead to the creation of a new species, S. guizhouensis sp. nov. This species is the youngest of the reported species of Scolecopteris recognized from the Euramerican and Cathaysian floras, and provides important evidence on the organization of marattialean ferns from the Upper Permian strata of south China.

  10. Stratigraphic significance of carbon isotope variations in the shallow-marine Seis/Siusi Permian–Triassic boundary section (Southern Alps, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Kraus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate carbon-isotope values from the Permian–Triassic (P–T boundary section at Seis/Siusi (Southern Alps, Italy show a trend similar to that in numerous other P–T boundary sections worldwide. Values decrease from 3.2‰ (V-PDB in the upper Bellerophon Limestone Formation (Late Permian to a minimum of –1.7‰ in the lower Mazzin Member. This minimum may represent the P–T boundary. The overall declining carbon-isotope trend is interrupted by a ca. 1‰ positive excursion in the higher Tesero Oolite Horizon. This positive peak is located at a higher lithostratigraphic level than a comparable peak in the adjacent Pufels section, which suggests that the Tesero Oolite Horizon in the Seis section is stratigraphically slightly older than in the Pufels section, and this is also suggested by palaeomagnetic correlation. It is therefore concluded that the base of the Tesero Oolite Horizon does not reflect a synchronous "current event" but is slightly diachronous, a result that was previously shown by biostratigraphic correlation. Nevertheless, this suggestion should be verified by further detailed litho-, magneto- and chemostratigraphic analysis of other P–T sections in the Southern Alps. doi:10.1002/mmng.200900007

  11. 87Sr/86Sr, 18O, 2H and 3H as tracers for genesis and saturation history of intruding groundwater in evaporitic deposits of the German Zechstein basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Salt mines in evaporitic deposits of the Permian Zechstein basin might be subject to flooding if formation water seeps into the mine openings through fore instance tectonically induced fractures.We apply several isotopic tracers to localize the sources of intrusions and to reconstruct the genesis and evolution of such brines. The evolution from formation water to brine comprises several starting points for isotopic tracers. Once the water infiltrates the salt rock, it starts to solute and concentrate various constituents and extractives of the drained deposits, and later on precipitations could occur. This non-linear solution and partly undersaturation poses a problem to the regular tracing methods. The element content might provide only limited indications on the source, which can be an aquifer or a large brine occurrence within the deposits. An aggravating factor is that such inclusions must not be of Permian age. The draining fractures can be closed in direction of the aquifer while enclosing liquids in different sized caverns or jointed rocks. However, these confined volumes of fluids pose only a limited risk for flooding. A combination of isotopic tracers, which provide indications on meteoric water, mixed water, connate water and a mixture of all, has to be contemplated: The cosmogenic radionuclide tritium 3H (? = 12.35 yr) indicates -if present- a direct connection to the earths surface. The stable isotopes 18O and 2H can give clues to the type of water when related to older data. We have applied 87Sr/86Sr isotopes as an additional tool to further define the source. Recent 87Sr/86Sr analyzes of one brine inflow in a potash mine in the upper Permian Zechstein series suggest that the Sr isotope composition is rather affected by salt clay detritus than by halite or anhydrite. Other data show variations according to several isotopic seawater curves of Permian age. A combination of different isotopic tools may help to further delimit the source regions of intruding formation water in salt mines. (author)

  12. Bivalvos guadalupianos (Pérmico medio) de la Formación Olinalá, Guerrero, México / Guadalupian bivalva (middle Permian) of the Olinalá Formation, Guerrero, Mexico

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Miguel, Guerrero-Sánchez; Sara A., Quiroz-Barroso.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El material estudiado proviene de rocas que afloran al noreste del poblado Olinalá, en el estado de Guerrero. Las facies marinas de la Formación Olinalá están incluidas en lutita gris claro a oscuro con fósiles de braquiópodos, gasterópodos, bivalvos, cefalópodos, tallos de crinoideos, madera y otro [...] s restos de plantas, localmente alojados en concreciones. Entre la diversidad de los bivalvos se encuentran las especies infaunales Nuculavus levatiformis, Palaeoneilo mcchesneyana, Edmondia phosphatica y ?Cardiomorpha sp.; las especies epifaunales que vivían adheridas a diferentes sustratos Posidoniella sp., Septimyalina burmai y Leptodesma (Leptodesma) sp.; así como la especie semi-infaunal Bakevellia sp. Los hábitos de vida de los bivalvos y las características de su preservación indican que fueron poco transportados antes de su depósito final, lo cual ocurrió en una plataforma de aguas poco profundas. Las especies de bivalvos estudiadas concuerdan con la edad pérmica de esta formación, establecida previamente por otros autores con base en el estudio de amonites y foraminíferos, y apoyan la idea de su relación con faunas contemporáneas de América del Norte. Abstract in english The study material comes from rocks that outcrop northeast of the town Olinalá, in Guerrero state. The marine facies of Olinalá Formation are included in light to dark gray shale with fossils of brachiopods, gastropods, bivalves, cephalopods, crinoids stems, wood and other plant remains, locally inc [...] luded in concretions. The diversity of bivalves is represented by the infaunal species Nuculavus levatiformis, Palaeoneilo mcchesneyana, Edmondia phosphatica, and ?Cardiomorpha sp.; the epifaunal species, adhered to different substrates Posidoniella sp., Septimyalina burmai, and Leptodesma (Leptodesma) sp.; and the semi-infaunal species Bakevellia sp. The lifestyle and preservation characteristics of bivalves indicate that they were shortly transported before its final deposition, which occurred on a platform, in shallow water. The studied bivalve species are consistent with the permian age of this formation, considered previously by other authors based on the study of ammonites and foraminifera, and support the idea of their relationship with contemporary faunas of North America.

  13. Golovkinskii law for prediction of distribution of rock lithotypes of Permian deposits (east part of Russian plate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitdikova, Lyalya; Izotov, Victor; Berthault, Gi; Lalomov, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Zone of development of upper-permian-kazanian deposits in Volga-Kama petroleum province is the region of facies interrelations law identification. This law is known as the rule of Golovkinskii-Valter. Many details of geological formations relationship in change zones are still discussed. Efforts of analytic expression of Golovkinskii rule for specific regions of its development are very important. We analyzed width of horizons of the Kazanian Stage. They are in zone of facies change of marine gray and red formations of the east part of Russian plate. Results of this analysis were principle for analytic expression of Golovkinskii rule. Percent proportion of main lithological types of these rock formations was also used. We used profile which was based on data from 75 wells. This profile crosses region of development of kazanian deposits from the river Volga to Urals territory. It overpasses main structural and tectonic units of the region: Kazan-Kirov downfold, system of lifted blocks of Tatar Arch and Upper-Kama depression. Kazanian deposits of Kazan-Kirov downfold are represented by typical marine gray carbonate-terrigenous formation. Red formation is deposed within Upper-Kama depression. Zone of these formations relationship is limited to central parts of Tatar Arch. Abrupt fluctuations of content of one rock type in insignificant distance are common. Every rock type has unique features in its distribution on profile. That's why it is possible to study function of dependence of certain rock type content from distance as a sum of regular and chance components. Intensively rising change of proportions of different rock types is presented in the zone of transition from typical marine deposits to red deposits. So trends of variation of percent content (y) of main rock lithotypes depending on distance (x) can be described by simple difference equations: dy = -kdx, for rocks of marine gray formation. dy = k(M-y)dx, for rocks of red formation. M - mathematical expectation of rock type content. k - constant of proportionality. Definition of constants of these functions allowed to express Golovkinskii law in terms of exponential equations system for Kazanian deposits of studing region. There were established principles of facies transition in marine gray and red formations interrelations zone. So fields of development of rocks-collectors of hydrocarbons and impermeable layers of the region can be predicted.

  14. BASIN: Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesperini, Enrico; Goldberg, David M.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Dura, James; Jones, Douglas

    2013-08-01

    BASIN (Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface) is a flexible, integrated suite of tools for multiuser parallel data analysis and visualization that allows researchers to harness the power of Beowulf PC clusters and multi-processor machines without necessarily being experts in parallel programming. It also includes general tools for data distribution and parallel operations on distributed data for developing libraries for specific tasks.

  15. Great Basin paleoenvironmental studies project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project goals, project tasks, progress on tasks, and problems encountered are described and discussed for each of the studies that make up the Great Basin Paleoenvironmental Studies Project for Yucca Mountain. These studies are: Paleobotany, Paleofauna, Geomorphology, and Transportation. Budget summaries are also given for each of the studies and for the overall project

  16. Permian Circulipuncturites discinisporis Labaindera, Wang, Zhang, Bek et Pfefferkorn gen. et spec. nov. (formerly Discinispora) from Cina, an ichnotaxon of a punch-and-sucking insect on Noeggerathialean spores.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, J.; Labandeira, C. C.; Zhang, G.; Bek, Ji?í; Pfefferkorn, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 156, 3/4 (2009), s. 277-282. ISSN 0034-6667 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA301110701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : noeggerathiales * in situ spores * insect damage * ichnotaxon * Permian Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.145, year: 2009

  17. Geochemistry of post-extinction microbialites as a powerful tool to assess the oxygenation of shallow marine water in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, P. Y.; Kershaw, S.; Tribovillard, N.; Forel, M. B.; Crasquin, S.

    2015-06-01

    Rapid and profound changes in earth surface environments and biota across the Permian-Triassic boundary are well known and relate to the end-Permian mass extinction event. This major crisis is demonstrated by abrupt facies change and the development of microbialite carbonates on the shallow marine shelves around Palaeo-Tethys and western Panthalassa. Microbialites have been described from a range of sites in end-Permian and basal Triassic marine sedimentary rocks, immediately following the end-Permian mass extinction. Here, we present geochemical data primarily focused on microbialites. Our geochemical analysis shows that U, V, Mo and REE (Ce anomaly) may be used as robust redox proxies so that the microbialites record the chemistry of the ancient ambient sea water. Among the three trace metals reputed to be reliable redox proxies, one (V) is correlated here with terrigenous supply, the other two elements (U and Mo) do not show any significant authigenic enrichment, thereby indicating that oxic conditions prevailed during the growth of microbialites. REE profiles show a prominent negative Ce anomaly, also showing that the shallow marine waters were oxic. Our geochemical data are consistent with the presence of some benthic organisms (ostracods, scattered microgastropods, microbrachiopods and foraminifers) in shallow marine waters that survived the mass extinction event.

  18. Groundwater geochemical modeling and simulation of a breached high-level radioactive waste repository in the northern Tularosa Basin, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The northern Tularosa Basin in south-central New Mexico was ranked favorably as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository by a US Geological Survey pilo