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Sample records for nerve cell activity

  1. Nerve growth factor: a neurotrophin with activity on cells of the immune system.

    Aloe, L; Simone, M D; Properzi, F

    Numerous studies published in the last two decades provide evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF), a polypeptide originally discovered because of its neurotrophic activity, acts on a variety of cells of the immune system, including mast cells, eosinophils, and B and T lymphocytes. NGF has been shown to increase during inflammatory responses, autoimmune disorders, parasitic infections, and allergic diseases. Moreover, stress, which is characterized also by activation of a variety of immune cells, causes a significant increase in basal plasma NGF levels. Recently published studies reveal that hematopoietic progenitor cells seem to be able to produce and/or respond to NGF. We report these data and discuss the hypothesis of the possible implication of NGF on the functional activities of immune cells. PMID:10383121

  2. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  3. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes nerve regeneration by activating the JAK/STAT pathway in Schwann cells

    Lin, Guiting; Zhang, Haiyang; Sun, Fionna; Lu, Zhihua; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Lee, Yung-Chin; Wang, Guifang; Banie, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Background Radical prostatectomy (RP) carries the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) due to cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Schwann cells are essential for the maintenance of integrity and function of peripheral nerves such as the CNs. We hypothesize that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates the Janus kinase (JAK)/(signal transducer and activator of transcription) STAT pathway in Schwann cells, not in neuronal axonal fibers, with the resultant secretion of cytokines from Schwann cells to facilitate nerve recovery. Methods Using four different cell lines—human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C and SH-SY5Y, human Schwann cell (HSC), and rat Schwann cell (RSC) RT4-D6P2T—we assessed the effect of BDNF application on the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. We also assessed the time response of JAK/STAT pathway activation in RSCs and HSCs after BDNF treatment. We then assayed cytokine release from HSCs as a response to BDNF treatment using oncostatin M and IL6 as markers. Results We showed extensive phosphorylation of STAT3/STAT1 by BDNF at high dose (100 pM) in RSCs, with no JAK/STAT pathway activation in human neuroblastoma cell lines. The time response of JAK/STAT pathway activation in RSCs and HSCs after BDNF treatment showed an initial peak at shortly after treatment and then a second higher peak at 24–48 hours. Cytokine release from HSCs increased progressively after BDNF application, reaching statistical significance for IL6. Conclusions We demonstrated for the first time the indirect mechanism of BDNF enhancement of nerve regeneration through the activation of JAK/STAT pathway in Schwann cells, rather than directly on neurons. As a result of BDNF application, Schwann cells produce cytokines that promote nerve regeneration.

  5. Axonal outgrowth is associated with increased ERK 1/2 activation but decreased caspase 3 linked cell death in Schwann cells after immediate nerve repair in rats

    Kanje Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2 is activated by nerve damage and its activation precedes survival and proliferation of Schwann cells. In contrast, activation of caspase 3, a cysteine protease, is considered as a marker for apoptosis in Schwann cells. In the present study, axonal outgrowth, activation of ERK1/2 by phosphorylation (p-ERK 1/2 and immunoreactivity of cleaved caspase 3 were examined after immediate, delayed, or no repair of transected rat sciatic nerves. Results Axonal outgrowth, detected by neurofilament staining, was longer after immediate repair than after either the delayed or no repair conditions. Immediate repair also showed a higher expression of p-ERK 1/2 and a lower number of cleaved caspase 3 stained Schwann cells than after delayed nerve repair. If the transected nerve was not repaired a lower level of p-ERK 1/2 was found than in either the immediate or delayed repair conditions. Axonal outgrowth correlated to p-ERK 1/2, but not clearly with cleaved caspase 3. Contact with regenerating axons affected Schwann cells with respect to p-ERK 1/2 and cleaved caspase 3 after immediate nerve repair only. Conclusion The decreased regenerative capacity that has historically been observed after delayed nerve repair may be related to impaired activation of Schwann cells and increased Schwann cell death. Outgrowing axons influence ERK 1/2 activation and apoptosis of Schwann cells.

  6. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. PMID:27128150

  7. Adipose derived stem cells and nerve regeneration

    Alessandro Faroni; Richard JP Smith; Adam J Reid

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are common and cause life-changing problems for patients along-side high social and health care costs for society. Current clinical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries predominantly relies on sacriifcing a section of nerve from elsewhere in the body to pro-vide a graft at the injury site. Much work has been done to develop a bioengineered nerve graft, precluding sacriifce of a functional nerve. Stem cells are prime candidates as accelerators of re-generation in these nerve grafts. This review examines the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve repair assisted by bioengineered nerve grafts.

  8. Nerve compression activates selective nociceptive pathways and upregulates peripheral sodium channel expression in Schwann cells.

    Frieboes, Laura Rummler; Palispis, Winnie Anne; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are common musculoskeletal conditions that affect patients with debilitating loss of sensory function and pain. Although early detection and treatment are important, our understanding of pain-related molecular mechanisms remains largely unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using an animal model for CNC injury. To confirm that CNC injury induces pain, we assessed expression of c-fos, a gene that is rapidly expressed in spinal sensory afferents in response to painful peripheral stimuli, and TNF-alpha and IL-6, two proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial to development of inflammatory-mediated pain. Results show c-fos upregulation 1-2 weeks postinjury in the absence of TNF-alpha or IL-6 expression, indicating increased neural sensitivity without an inflammatory response. This is consistent with previous studies that showed no morphologic evidence of inflammation in the CNC model. Surprisingly, we also found de novo expression of Na(V)1.8, a sodium channel linked to the development of neuropathic pain, in endoneurial Schwann cells following injury. Until now, Na(V)1.8 expression was thought to be restricted to sensory neurons. CNC injury appears to be a unique model of noninflammatory neuropathic pain. Further investigation of the underlying molecular basis could yield promising targets for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20014316

  9. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  10. Histological observation on acellular nerve grafts co-cultured with Schwann cells for repairing defects of the sciatic nerve

    Xiaohong Sun; Jiangyi Tian; Xiaojie Tong; Xu Zhang; Zheng He

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal experiments and clinical studies about tissue engineering method applied to repair nerve injury mainly focus on seeking ideal artificial nerve grafts, nerve conduit and seed cells. Autologous nerve, allogeneic nerve and xenogeneic nerve are used to bridge nerve defects, it is one of the methods to promote the repair of nerve injury by culturing and growing Schwann cells, which can secrete various neurotrophic factor activities, in the grafts.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of acellular nerve grafts co-cultured with Schwann cells in repairing defects of sciatic nerve.DESIGN: An observational comparative study.SETTING: Tissue Engineering Laboratory of China Medical University.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Tissue Engineering Laboratory of China Medical University between April 2004 and April 2005. Forty neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats of 5-8 days (either males or females) and 24 male Wistar rats of 180-220 g were provided by the experimental animal center of China Medical University.METHODS: ① Culture of Schwann cells: The bilateral sciatic nerves and branchial plexus were isolated from the 40 neonatal SD rats. The sciatic nerves were enzymatically digested with collagenase and dispase, isolatd, purified and cultured with the method of speed-difference adhersion, and identified with the SABC immunohistochemical method. ② Model establishment: In vitro Schwann cells were microinjected into 10-mm long acellular nerve grafts repairing a surgically created gap in the rat sciatic nerve.According to the different grafted methods, the animals were randomly divided into three groups: autografts (n=8), acellular nerve grafts (n=8), or acellular nerve grafts with Schwann cells (n=8). ③ The regenerated nerve fiber number and average diameter of myeline sheath after culture were statistically anlayzed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① The regenerated nerve ultrastructure, total number and density of myelinated nerve fibers, and the thickness of

  11. Combination of Acellular Nerve Graft and Schwann Cells-Like Cells for Rat Sciatic Nerve Regeneration

    Songtao Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of tissue engineering nerve on repair of rat sciatic nerve defect. Methods. Forty-five rats with defective sciatic nerve were randomly divided into three groups. Rats in group A were repaired by acellular nerve grafts only. Rats in group B were repaired by tissue engineering nerve. In group C, rats were repaired by autogenous nerve grafts. After six and twelve weeks, sciatic nerve functional index (SFI, neural electrophysiology (NEP, histological and transmission electron microscope observation, recovery ratio of wet weight of gastrocnemius muscle, regenerated myelinated nerve fibers number, nerve fiber diameter, and thickness of the myelin sheath were measured to assess the effect. Results. After six and twelve weeks, the recovery ratio of SFI and wet weight of gastrocnemius muscle, NEP, and the result of regenerated myelinated nerve fibers in groups B and C were superior to that of group A (P0.05. Conclusion. The tissue engineering nerve composed of acellular allogenic nerve scaffold and Schwann cells-like cells can effectively repair the nerve defect in rats and its effect was similar to that of the autogenous nerve grafts.

  12. Activation of Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Bα by Methylene-Substituted Diindolylmethanes in Bladder Cancer Cells Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor GrowthS⃞

    Dae Cho, Sung; Lee, Syng-Ook; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Abdelrahim, Maen; Khan, Shaheen; Yoon, Kyungsil; Kamat, Ashish M.; Safe, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) genes are orphan nuclear receptors, and NGFI-Bα (Nur77, TR3) is overexpressed in bladder tumors and bladder cancer cells compared with nontumorous bladder tissue. 1,1-Bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-methoxyphenyl)-methane (DIM-C-pPhOCH3) and 1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-phenyl)methane have previously been identified as activators of Nur77, and both compound...

  13. Glucose, other secretagogues, and nerve growth factor stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line, INS-1

    Frödin, M; Sekine, N; Roche, E; Filloux, C; Prentki, M; Wollheim, C B; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-01-01

    of this kinase is not sufficient for secretion. In the presence of glucose, however, nerve growth factor potentiated insulin secretion. In INS-1 cells, activation of 44-kDa MAP kinase was partially correlated with the induction of early response genes junB, nur77, and zif268 but not with stimulation......The signaling pathways whereby glucose and hormonal secretagogues regulate insulin-secretory function, gene transcription, and proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells are not well defined. We show that in the glucose-responsive beta-cell line INS-1, major secretagogue-stimulated signaling pathways...... glucagon-like peptide-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide. Activation of 44-kDa MAP kinase by glucose was dependent on Ca2+ influx and may in part be mediated by MEK-1, a MAP kinase kinase. Stimulation of Ca2+ influx by KCl was in itself sufficient to activate 44-kDa MAP kinase and MEK...

  14. Genetic instability in nerve sheath cell tumors

    Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rainho, Claudia Aparecida; Barbieri Neto, J

    1995-01-01

    After in vitro culture, we analyzed cytogenetically four acoustic nerve neurinomas, one intraspinal neurinoma and one neurofibroma obtainedfrom unrelated patients. Monosomy of chromosomes 22 and 16 was an abnormality common to all cases, followed in frequency by loss of chromosomes 18 (three cases......, reflected by the presence of polyploid cells with inconsistent abnormalities, endoreduplications and telomeric associations resulting in dicentric chromosomes. It is probable that these cytogenetic abnormalities represent some kind of evolutionary advantage for the in vitro progression of nerve sheath...

  15. Putative intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway in hydra have properties of multipotent stem cells

    Holstein, T.W.; David, C.N. (Univ. of Munich (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated the properties of nerve cell precursors in hydra by analyzing the differentiation and proliferation capacity of interstitial cells in the peduncle of Hydra oligactis, which is a region of active nerve cell differentiation. Our results indicate that about 50% of the interstitial cells in the peduncle can grow rapidly and also give rise to nematocyte precursors when transplanted into a gastric environment. If these cells were committed nerve cell precursors, one would not expect them to differentiate into nematocytes nor to proliferate apparently without limit. Therefore we conclude that cycling interstitial cells in peduncles are not intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway but are stem cells. The remaining interstitial cells in the peduncle are in G1 and have the properties of committed nerve cell precursors. Thus, the interstitial cell population in the peduncle contains both stem cells and noncycling nerve precursors. The presence of stem cells in this region makes it likely that these cells are the immediate targets of signals which give rise to nerve cells.

  16. Putative intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway in hydra have properties of multipotent stem cells

    We have investigated the properties of nerve cell precursors in hydra by analyzing the differentiation and proliferation capacity of interstitial cells in the peduncle of Hydra oligactis, which is a region of active nerve cell differentiation. Our results indicate that about 50% of the interstitial cells in the peduncle can grow rapidly and also give rise to nematocyte precursors when transplanted into a gastric environment. If these cells were committed nerve cell precursors, one would not expect them to differentiate into nematocytes nor to proliferate apparently without limit. Therefore we conclude that cycling interstitial cells in peduncles are not intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway but are stem cells. The remaining interstitial cells in the peduncle are in G1 and have the properties of committed nerve cell precursors. Thus, the interstitial cell population in the peduncle contains both stem cells and noncycling nerve precursors. The presence of stem cells in this region makes it likely that these cells are the immediate targets of signals which give rise to nerve cells

  17. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  18. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    Wei Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods:Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group, sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3 and macrophages (CD68 in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly  decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  19. Peripheral nerve injury induces glial activation in primary motor cortex

    Julieta Troncoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence suggests that peripheral facial nerve injuries are associated with sensorimotor cortex reorganization. We have characterized facial nerve lesion-induced structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with glial cell density using a rodent facial paralysis model. First, we used adult transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in pyramidal neurons which were subjected to either unilateral lesion of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Pyramidal cells’ dendritic arborization underwent overall shrinkage and transient spine pruning. Moreover, microglial cell density surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons was significantly increased with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. Additionally, we induced facial nerve lesion in Wistar rats to evaluate the degree and extension of facial nerve lesion-induced reorganization processes in central nervous system using neuronal and glial markers. Immunoreactivity to NeuN (neuronal nuclei antigen, GAP-43 (growth-associated protein 43, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Iba 1 (Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 were evaluated 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 35 days after either unilateral facial nerve lesion or sham surgery. Patches of decreased NeuN immunoreactivity were found bilaterally in vM1 as well as in primary somatosensory cortex (CxS1. Significantly increased GAP-43 immunoreactivity was found bilaterally after the lesion in hippocampus, striatum, and sensorimotor cortex. One day after lesion GFAP immunoreactivity increased bilaterally in hippocampus, subcortical white

  20. Sericin protects against diabetes-induced injuries in sciatic nerve and related nerve cells

    Chengjun Song; Zhenjun Yang; Meirong Zhong; Zhihong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Sericin from discarded silkworm cocoons of silk reeling has been used in different fields, such as cosmetology, skin care, nutrition, and oncology. The present study established a rat model of type 2 diabetes by consecutive intraperitoneal injections of low-dose (25 mg/kg) streptozotocin. After intragastrical perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly declined, and the expression of neurofilament protein in the sciatic nerve and nerve growth factor in L4–6 spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells significantly increased. However, the expression of neuropeptide Y in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells significantly decreased in model rats. These findings indicate that sericin protected the sciatic nerve and related nerve cells against injury in a rat type 2 diabetic model by upregulating the expression of neurofilament protein in the sciatic nerve and nerve growth factor in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells, and downregulating the expression of neuropeptide Y in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells.

  1. [Clinical application of skin sympathetic nerve activity].

    Iwase, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) is microneurographically recorded from the skin nerve fascicle in the peripheral nerves. It is characterized by the following features: 1) irregular, pulse asynchronous, burst activity with respiratory variation, 2) burst activity followed by vasoconstriction and/or sweating, 3) elicited by mental stress and arousal stimuli, e.g., sound, pain, electric stimulation, 4) burst with longer duration as compared with sympathetic outflow to muscles, and 5) burst activity following sudden inspiratory action. It comprises vasoconstrictor (VC) and sudomotor(SM) activity, as well as vasodilator (VD) activity. VC and SM discharge independently, whereas VD is the same activity with different neurotransmission. The VC and SM are differentiated by effector response, e.g., laser Doppler flowmetry and skin potential changes. SSNA function in thermoregulation in the human body; however it is also elicited by mental stress. SSNA is the lowest at thermoneutral ambient temperature (approximately 27 degrees C), and is enhanced in the pressence of ambient warm and cool air. The burst amplitude is well-correlated to both skin blood flow reduction rate or sweat rate change. The clinical application of SSNA comprises the following: 1) clarification of sweating phenomenon, 2) clarification and diagnosis of anhidrosis, 3) clarification and diagnosis of hyperhidrosis, 4) clarification of thermoregulatory function and diagnosis of thermoregulatory disorder, 5) clarification of pathophysiology and diagnosis of vascular diseases, e.g., Raynaud and Buerger diseases. 6) clarification of the relation between cognitive function and SSNA and 7) determination of pharmacological effect attributable to change in neuroeffector responses. PMID:19301594

  2. Sensory Nerve Terminal Mitochondrial Dysfunction Activates Airway Sensory Nerves via Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels

    Nesuashvili, Lika; Hadley, Stephen H; Parmvir K Bahia; Taylor-Clark, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent oxidative stress has been reported for a variety of cell types in inflammatory diseases. Given the abundance of mitochondria at the peripheral terminals of sensory nerves and the sensitivity of transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (A1) and TRP vanilloid 1 (V1) to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their downstream products of lipid peroxidation, we investigated the effect of nerve terminal mitochondrial dysfunction on airway sensory nerve excita...

  3. Dixdc1 targets CyclinD1 and p21 via PI3K pathway activation to promote Schwann cell proliferation after sciatic nerve crush.

    Wu, Weijie; Liu, Qingqing; Liu, Yuxi; Yu, Zhaohui; Wang, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Dixdc1 (DIX domain containing-1), the mammalian homolog of Ccd1 (Coiled-coil-Dishevelled-Axin1), is a protein containing a coiled-coil domain and a Dishevelled-Axin (DIX) domain. As a novel component of the Wnt pathway, Dixdc1 has been reported to be able to promote neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. But there still remains something unknown about Dixdc1 distribution and functions in the lesion and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), so we tried to investigate dynamic changes of Dixdc1 expression in a rat sciatic nerve crush (SNC) model in this study. First of all, we detected SNC-induced increased levels of Dixdc1 in Schwann cells and interestingly identified parallel expression of PCNA (proliferation cell nuclear antigen) with Dixdc1. Besides, we observed up-regulated Dixdc1 during the process of TNF-α-induced Schwann cell proliferation. Also, we discovered that Dixdc1 could promote G1-S phase transition accompanied with the up-regulation of CyclinD1 and down-regulation of p21. More importantly, enhanced effects of Dixdc1 on cell proliferation were confirmed to be associated with PI3K activation. Not only blocking of the PI3K but Dixdc1 knockdown led to significantly decreased ability for proliferation, as well as down-regulation of CyclinD1 and up-regulation of p21. In summary, these data demonstrated that Dixdc1 might participate in Schwann cell proliferation by targeting CyclinD1 and p21 at least partially through the PI3K/AKT activation. PMID:27521891

  4. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  5. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult troutOncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    Evgeniya V Pushchina; Sachin Shukla; Anatoly A Varaksin; Dmitry K Obukhov

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve ifbers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult troutOncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantita-tive assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal con-centration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury.In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present ifndings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration.

  6. Reflex effects of aerosolized histamine on phrenic nerve activity.

    Pack, A I; Hertz, B C; Ledlie, J F; Fishman, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were conducted in anesthetized, paralyzed dogs on the effect of aerosolized histamine on phrenic nerve activity. The paralyzed dogs were ventilated in phase with their recorded phrenic nerve activity at a constant inspiratory flow-rate, using a cycle-triggered ventilator. Phrenic nerve activity was measured before and during administration of aerosolized histamine while the inspiratory flow-rate and arterial blood gases were kept constant. In addition, before and after histamine, phre...

  7. Cervical Vagal Nerve Stimulation Activates the Stellate Ganglion in Ambulatory Dogs

    Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Hsueh, Chia-Hsiang; Hellyer, Jessica A.; Park, Hyung Wook; Lee, Young Soo; Garlie, Jason; Onkka, Patrick; Doytchinova, Anisiia T.; Garner, John B.; Patel, Jheel; Chen, Lan S.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Everett, Thomas; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Recent studies showed that, in addition to parasympathetic nerves, cervical vagal nerves contained significant sympathetic nerves. We hypothesized that cervical vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) may capture the sympathetic nerves within the vagal nerve and activate the stellate ganglion. Materials and Methods We recorded left stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA), left thoracic vagal nerve activity (VNA), and subcutaneous electrocardiogram in seven dogs during left cer...

  8. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury

    Li, Bohan; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were al...

  9. Combination of Acellular Nerve Graft and Schwann Cells-Like Cells for Rat Sciatic Nerve Regeneration

    Songtao Gao; Yan Zheng; Qiqing Cai; Zhansheng Deng; Weitao Yao; Jiaqiang Wang; Xin Wang; Peng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of tissue engineering nerve on repair of rat sciatic nerve defect. Methods. Forty-five rats with defective sciatic nerve were randomly divided into three groups. Rats in group A were repaired by acellular nerve grafts only. Rats in group B were repaired by tissue engineering nerve. In group C, rats were repaired by autogenous nerve grafts. After six and twelve weeks, sciatic nerve functional index (SFI), neural electrophysiology (NEP), histological and tra...

  10. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26296589

  11. Platelet-rich plasma-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus autologous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve repair

    Changsuo Xia; Yajuan Li; Wen Cao; Zhaohua Yu

    2010-01-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the gold standard of peripheral nerve repair.We previously showed that autologous platelet-rich plasma(PRP)contains high concentrations of growth factors and can induce in vitro cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BMSCs)to differentiate into Schwann cells.Here we used PRP-induced BMSCs combined with chemically extracted acellular nerves to repair sciatic nerve defects and compared the effect with autologous nerve grafting.The BMSCs and chemically extracted acellular nerve promoted target muscle wet weight restoration,motor nerve conduction velocity,and axonal and myelin sheath regeneration,with similar effectiveness to autologous nerve grafting.This finding suggests that PRP induced BMSCs can be used to repair peripheral nerve defects.

  12. [Research Progress in Seeding Cells of Peripheral Nerve].

    Shi, Gengqiang; Hu, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Seeding cells play an important role in the peripheral nerve damage repair. Seeding cells studied conse- quently in peripheral nerve are Schwann cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. Schwann cells, the first seeding cells, are various unique glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, which can form the myelin sheath for insulation and package of the neuron projecting axons in the peripheral nervous system so that the conduction velocity of the nerve signal was accelerated. It can be proved that Schwann cells played an important role in the maintenance of peripheral nerve function and in the regeneration process after peripheral nerve injury. The second, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are the various mesenchymal stem cells mainly exist in the systemic connective tissues and organs. These functional stem cells are often studied at present, and it has been found that they have exuberant proliferation and differentiation potentials. Neural stem cells, mentioned the third in sequence, are the kind of pluripotent cells with multi-directional differentiation, which could conduct the self-renewal function, and generate and differentiate neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes through asymmetric cell division. These three types of seed cells are discussed in this paper. PMID:26211274

  13. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  14. Mesencephalic stimulation elicits inhibition of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    Gallman, E A; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1991-05-01

    1. Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that the mesencephalon is the anatomical substrate for a mechanism capable of inhibiting central respiratory drive in glomectomized cats for periods of up to 1 h or more following brief exposure to systemic hypoxia; phrenic nerve activity was used as an index of central respiratory drive. 2. The present study was undertaken to further localize the region responsible for the observed post-hypoxic inhibition of respiratory drive. We studied the phrenic nerve response to stimulations of the mesencephalon in anaesthetized, paralysed peripherally chemo-denervated cats with end-expired PCO2 and body temperature servo-controlled. 3. Stimulations of two types were employed. Electrical stimulation allowed rapid determination of sites from which phrenic inhibition could be elicited. Microinjections of excitatory amino acids were used subsequently in order to confine excitation to neuronal cell bodies and not axons of passage. 4. Stimulation of discrete regions of the ventromedial aspect of the mesencephalon in the vicinity of the red nucleus produced substantial inhibition of phrenic activity which lasted up to 45 min. Stimulation of other areas of the mesencephalon either produced no phrenic inhibition or resulted in a slight stimulation of phrenic activity. 5. The results are discussed in the context of the central respiratory response to hypoxia. PMID:1676420

  15. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    Fang Liu; Haiwei Zhang; Kaiming Zhang; Xinyu Wang; Shipu Li; Yixia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Sc hwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more signiifcantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not signiifcantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy.

  16. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Hua Jin; Qi Yang; Feng Ji; Ya-jie Zhang; Yan Zhao; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avul...

  17. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  18. Identified nerve cells and insect behavior.

    Comer, C M; Robertson, R M

    2001-03-01

    Studies of insect identified neurons over the past 25 years have provided some of the very best data on sensorimotor integration; tracing information flow from sensory to motor networks. General principles have emerged that have increased the sophistication with which we now understand both sensory processing and motor control. Two overarching themes have emerged from studies of identified sensory interneurons. First, within a species, there are profound differences in neuronal organization associated with both the sex and the social experience of the individual. Second, single neurons exhibit some surprisingly rich examples of computational sophistication in terms of (a) temporal dynamics (coding superimposed upon circadian and shorter-term rhythms), and also (b) what Kenneth Roeder called "neural parsimony": that optimal information can be encoded, and complex acts of sensorimotor coordination can be mediated, by small ensembles of cells. Insect motor systems have proven to be relatively complex, and so studies of their organization typically have not yielded completely defined circuits as are known from some other invertebrates. However, several important findings have emerged. Analysis of neuronal oscillators for rhythmic behavior have delineated a profound influence of sensory feedback on interneuronal circuits: they are not only modulated by feedback, but may be substantially reconfigured. Additionally, insect motor circuits provide potent examples of neuronal restructuring during an organism's lifetime, as well as insights on how circuits have been modified across evolutionary time. Several areas where future advances seem likely to occur include: molecular genetic analyses, neuroecological syntheses, and neuroinformatics--the use of digital resources to organize databases with information on identified nerve cells and behavior. PMID:11163685

  19. Choline Acetyltransferase Activity in Striatum of Neonatal Rats Increased by Nerve Growth Factor

    Mobley, William C.; Rutkowski, J. Lynn; Tennekoon, Gihan I.; Buchanan, Karen; Johnston, Michael V.

    1985-07-01

    Some neurodegenerative disorders may be caused by abnormal synthesis or utilization of trophic molecules required to support neuronal survival. A test of this hypothesis requires that trophic agents specific for the affected neurons be identified. Cholinergic neurons in the corpus striatum of neonatal rats were found to respond to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor with prominent, dose-dependent, selective increases in choline acetyltransferase activity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain also respond to nerve growth factor in this way. These actions of nerve growth factor may indicate its involvement in the normal function of forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as in neurodegenerative disorders involving such cells.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model

    Cooney, Damon S.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M.; Brat, Gabriel A.; Wu, Lehao W.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  1. Receptor-mediated regional sympathetic nerve activation by leptin.

    Haynes, W G; Morgan, D A; Walsh, S A; Mark, A L; Sivitz, W I

    1997-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue which acts centrally to decrease appetite and increase energy expenditure. Although leptin increases norepinephrine turnover in thermogenic tissues, the effects of leptin on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity to thermogenic and other tissues are not known. We examined the effects of intravenous leptin and vehicle on sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue, kidney, hindlimb, and adrenal gland in anesthetized Sprague-Da...

  2. Centrally administered glucagon stimulates sympathetic nerve activity in rat.

    Krzeski, R; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A; Millhorn, D E

    1989-12-18

    The effect of pancreatic glucagon given intravenously, intracerebroventricularly and microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract on sympathetic activity in the cervical trunk and adrenal nerve was examined in rat. In each case glucagon caused a relatively long-lasting substantial increase in discharge of both nerves. This finding shows that glucagon can act centrally to stimulate sympathetic activity. The most probable site for the sympathoexcitatory effect of glucagon is the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:2598031

  3. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury*

    Bohan Li; Hun-Jong Jung; Soung-Min Kim; Myung-Jin Kim; Jeong Won Jahng; Jong-Ho Lee

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was sig-nificantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after in-jection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury.

  4. Motor neuron activation in peripheral nerves using infrared neural stimulation

    Peterson, E. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach. The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results. 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7 ± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2-9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance. The observed selectivity of INS indicates that it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS.

  5. Variable Patterned Pudendal Nerve Stimuli Improves Reflex Bladder Activation

    Bruns, Tim M.; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated variable patterns of pudendal nerve (PN) stimuli for reflex bladder excitation. Reflex activation of the bladder has been demonstrated previously with 20–33 Hz continuous stimulation of PN afferents. Neuronal circuits accessed by afferent mediated pathways may respond better to physiological patterned stimuli than continuous stimulation. Unilateral PN nerve cuffs were placed in neurologically intact male cats. PN stimulation (0.5–100 Hz) was performed under isovolumetric conditio...

  6. Study of stimulators of DNA synthesis in nerve tissue cells

    Changes in proliferative activity in different regions of the brain during ontogenesis are connected with changes in the composition and properties of regulators of cell proliferation. Extracts of regions of the brain in which active cell division takes place in a given stage of development (cortex of 15- to 17-day-old embryos or cerebellum of 8- to 10-day-old rats) can stimulate the incorporation of labeled precursors into the brain cell DNA of both newborn and adult rats. Salting out at increasing ammonium sulfate concentrations, gel filtration on Sephadex, and isoelectric focusing led to the isolation of three fractions of stimulators of DNA synthesis: in acid, neutral, and alkaline pH regions. A method is described for obtaining purified preparations and for determining some physicochemical properties of the acid activator, which is a low-molecular-weight peptide capable of noticeably stimulating the incorporation of labeled precursors into the DNA of nerve tissue cells when added to an in vitro system in a concentration of the order of 1 μg/ml

  7. Combining acellular nerve allografts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells restores sciatic nerve injury better than either intervention alone

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Gechen; Ka, Ka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts from bilateral sciatic nerves, and repaired 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats using these grafts and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Experiments were performed in three groups: the acellular nerve allograft bridging group, acellular nerve allograft + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and the acellular nerve allograft + brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone...

  8. Preferential and comprehensive reconstitution of severely damaged sciatic nerve using murine skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Tetsuro Tamaki

    Full Text Available Loss of vital functions in the somatic motor and sensory nervous systems can be induced by severe peripheral nerve transection with a long gap following trauma. In such cases, autologous nerve grafts have been used as the gold standard, with the expectation of activation and proliferation of graft-concomitant Schwann cells associated with their paracrine effects. However, there are a limited number of suitable sites available for harvesting of nerve autografts due to the unavoidable sacrifice of other healthy functions. To overcome this problem, the potential of skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs was examined as a novel alternative cell source for peripheral nerve regeneration. Cultured/expanded Sk-MSCs were injected into severely crushed sciatic nerve corresponding to serious neurotmesis. After 4 weeks, engrafted Sk-MSCs preferentially differentiated into not only Schwann cells, but also perineurial/endoneurial cells, and formed myelin sheath and perineurium/endoneurium, encircling the regenerated axons. Increased vascular formation was also observed, leading to a favorable blood supply and waste product excretion. In addition, engrafted cells expressed key neurotrophic and nerve/vascular growth factor mRNAs; thus, endocrine/paracrine effects for the donor/recipient cells were also expected. Interestingly, skeletal myogenic capacity of expanded Sk-MSCs was clearly diminished in peripheral nerve niche. The same differentiation and tissue reconstitution capacity of Sk-MSCs was sufficiently exerted in the long nerve gap bridging the acellular conduit, which facilitated nerve regeneration/reconnection. These effects represent favorable functional recovery in Sk-MSC-treated mice, as demonstrated by good corduroy walking. We also demonstrated that these differentiation characteristics of the Sk-MSCs were comparable to native peripheral nerve-derived cells, whereas the therapeutic capacities were largely superior in Sk

  9. Malignant granular cell tumour of the sciatic nerve

    A case of malignant granular cell tumour of the sciatic nerve is presented. Computed tomography demonstrated isodensity with muscle and minimal enhancement. Magnetic resonance demonstrated T1 isointensity with muscle with marked enhancement, and isointensity with fat on proton and T2 images. Pathological evidence is presented for its probable Schwann cell histogenesis. 9 refs., 3 figs

  10. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75NTR, a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75NTR. For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75NTR. This latter signaling through p75NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  11. In vivo MRI monitoring nerve regeneration of acute peripheral nerve traction injury following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Duan, Xiao-Hui, E-mail: duanxiaohui-128@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Cheng, Li-Na, E-mail: kobe10716@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: xinxin110007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: docliujun@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Guo, Ruo-Mi, E-mail: guoruomi-521@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhong, Xiao-Mei, E-mail: enough300@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Wen, Xue-Hua, E-mail: xuehuasuqian@126.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Shen, Jun, E-mail: junshenjun@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess the continuous process of nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation using MRI. Materials and methods: 1 week after acute nerve traction injury was established in the sciatic nerve of 48 New Zealand white rabbits, 5 × 10{sup 5} MSCs and vehicle alone were grafted to the acutely distracted sciatic nerves each in 24 animals. Serial MRI and T1 and T2 measurements of the injured nerves were performed with a 1.5-T scanner and functional recovery was recorded over a 10-week follow-up period, with histological assessments performed at regular intervals. Results: Compared with vehicle control, nerves grafted with MSCs had better functional recovery and showed improved nerve regeneration, with a sustained increase of T1 and T2 values during the phase of regeneration. Conclusion: MRI could be used to monitor the enhanced nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with MSC transplantation, reflected by a prolonged increase in T1 and T2 values of the injured nerves.

  12. In vivo MRI monitoring nerve regeneration of acute peripheral nerve traction injury following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Objective: To assess the continuous process of nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation using MRI. Materials and methods: 1 week after acute nerve traction injury was established in the sciatic nerve of 48 New Zealand white rabbits, 5 × 105 MSCs and vehicle alone were grafted to the acutely distracted sciatic nerves each in 24 animals. Serial MRI and T1 and T2 measurements of the injured nerves were performed with a 1.5-T scanner and functional recovery was recorded over a 10-week follow-up period, with histological assessments performed at regular intervals. Results: Compared with vehicle control, nerves grafted with MSCs had better functional recovery and showed improved nerve regeneration, with a sustained increase of T1 and T2 values during the phase of regeneration. Conclusion: MRI could be used to monitor the enhanced nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with MSC transplantation, reflected by a prolonged increase in T1 and T2 values of the injured nerves

  13. Light-Activated Sealing of Acellular Nerve Allografts following Nerve Gap Injury.

    Fairbairn, Neil G; Ng-Glazier, Joanna; Meppelink, Amanda M; Randolph, Mark A; Valerio, Ian L; Fleming, Mark E; Kochevar, Irene E; Winograd, Jonathan M; Redmond, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) uses visible light to create sutureless, watertight bonds between two apposed tissue surfaces stained with photoactive dye. In phase 1 of this two-phase study, nerve gaps repaired with bonded isografts were superior to sutured isografts. When autograft demand exceeds supply, acellular nerve allograft (ANA) is an alternative although outcomes are typically inferior. This study assesses the efficacy of PTB when used with ANA. Methods Overall 20 male Lewis rats had 15-mm left sciatic nerve gaps repaired using ANA. ANAs were secured using epineurial suture (group 1) or PTB (group 2). Outcomes were assessed using sciatic function index (SFI), gastrocnemius muscle mass retention, and nerve histomorphometry. Historical controls from phase 1 were used to compare the performance of ANA with isograft. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Bonferroni all-pairs comparison. Results All ANAs had signs of successful regeneration. Mean values for SFI, muscle mass retention, nerve fiber diameter, axon diameter, and myelin thickness were not significantly different between ANA + suture and ANA + PTB. On comparative analysis, ANA + suture performed significantly worse than isograft + suture from phase 1. However, ANA + PTB was statistically comparable to isograft + suture, the current standard of care. Conclusion Previously reported advantages of PTB versus suture appear to be reduced when applied to ANA. The lack of Schwann cells and neurotrophic factors may be responsible. PTB may improve ANA performance to an extent, where they are equivalent to autograft. This may have important clinical implications when injuries preclude the use of autograft. PMID:26878685

  14. Observations on proliferating sheath cells in the regenerating nerves of lizard

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    1996-01-01

    The proliferation of sheath cells (Schwann and endoneurium) of growing nerves has been studied by autoradiography after 3~-thymidinead ministration to lizards (Anolis carolinensis and Lampropholis delicata) with regenerating tails. Schwann cells of regenerating nerves derive from the multiplication of resident cells within the growing nerves, but labelled Schwann cells derived from the regenerative blastema also appear to ensheath the new axons. Endoneurium cel...

  15. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    Ryoichi Tashima; Satsuki Mikuriya; Daisuke Tomiyama; Miho Shiratori-Hayashi; Tomohiro Yamashita; Yuta Kohro; Hidetoshi Tozaki-Saitoh; Kazuhide Inoue; Makoto Tsuda

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controver...

  16. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  17. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve:evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Hua Jin; Qi Yang; Feng Ji; Ya-jie Zhang; Yan Zhao; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as em-bryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also signiifcantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effec-tively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  18. Physical activity: its influence on nerve conduction velocity.

    Halar, E M; Hammond, M C; Dirks, S

    1985-09-01

    In a group of 40 healthy subjects, distal and proximal latencies of the median, tibial, and peroneal motor, and sural sensory nerves and their respective skin surface temperatures (Tsk) were measured before and after walking or bicycling. The baseline tests were performed 30 minutes after resting in a constant room temperature of 24C. The ambulation or bicycling task was continued for 30 minutes at a constant rate. Postactivity tests were performed within 30 minutes and between 45 to 60 minutes after termination of activity. Another test was done 75 to 90 minutes after bicycle exercise. After walking, there was a significant increase in Tsk in all lower extremity nerves tested (p less than 0.01). The increases were accompanied by faster distal and proximal latencies in both testing periods (p less than 0.01). Median nerve Tsk, distal and proximal latencies did not differ significantly from baseline values initially, but 45 minutes after walking Tsk was elevated and proximal latency had become faster (p less than 0.01). Following bicycling, lower extremity Tsk was significantly reduced over tibial, peroneal, and sural nerves by the third testing period (p less than 0.01) but only sural latencies were significantly prolonged (p less than 0.05) by this time. In the upper extremities median Tsk was significantly elevated and distal latency had become significantly faster 45 minutes after bicycling. Our data suggest that activity significantly influences nerve conduction latency results due to tissue temperature alteration. In addition, 30 minutes of rest after activity may not be sufficient time for the lower extremity temperatures to become stable. PMID:4038026

  19. Transient brown adipocyte-like cells derive from peripheral nerve progenitors in response to bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    Salisbury, Elizabeth A; Lazard, Zawaunyka W; Ubogu, Eroboghene E; Davis, Alan R; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A

    2012-12-01

    Perineurial-associated brown adipocyte-like cells were rapidly generated during bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)-induced sciatic nerve remodeling in the mouse. Two days after intramuscular injection of transduced mouse fibroblast cells expressing BMP2 into wild-type mice, there was replication of beta-3 adrenergic receptor(+) (ADRB3(+)) cells within the sciatic nerve perineurium. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting and analysis of cells isolated from these nerves confirmed ADRB3(+) cell expansion and their expression of the neural migration marker HNK1. Similar analysis performed 4 days after BMP2 delivery revealed a significant decrease in ADRB3(+) cells from isolated sciatic nerves, with their concurrent appearance within the adjacent soft tissue, suggesting migration away from the nerve. These soft tissue-derived cells also expressed the brown adipose marker uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). Quantification of ADRB3-specific RNA in total hind limb tissue revealed a 3-fold increase 2 days after delivery of BMP2, followed by a 70-fold increase in UCP1-specific RNA after 3 days. Expression levels then rapidly returned to baseline by 4 days. Interestingly, these ADRB3(+) UCP1(+) cells also expressed the neural guidance factor reelin. Reelin(+) cells demonstrated distinct patterns within the injected muscle, concentrated toward the area of BMP2 release. Blocking mast cell degranulation-induced nerve remodeling resulted in the complete abrogation of UCP1-specific RNA and protein expression within the hind limbs following BMP2 injection. The data collectively suggest that local BMP2 administration initiates a cascade of events leading to the expansion, migration, and differentiation of progenitors from the peripheral nerve perineurium to brown adipose-like cells in the mouse, a necessary prerequisite for associated nerve remodeling. PMID:23283549

  20. Bridging sciatic nerve gap using tissue-engineered nerves constructed with neural tissue-committed stem cells derived from bone marrow

    Zhiying Zhang; Congli Ren; Chuansen Zhang; Fang Liu; Liang Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schwann cells are the most commonly used cells for tissue-engineered nerves. However, autologous Schwann cells are of limited use in a clinical context, and allogeneic Schwann cells induce immunological rejections. Cells that do not induce immunological rejections and that are relatively easy to acquire are urgently needed for transplantation.OBJECTIVE: To bridge sciatic nerve defects using tissue engineered nerves constructed with neural tissue-committed stem cells (NTCSCs) derived from bone marrow; to observe morphology and function of rat nerves following bridging; to determine the effect of autologous nerve transplantation, which serves as the gold standard for evaluating efficacy of tissue-engineered nerves.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed in the Anatomical laboratory and Biomedical Institute of the Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between September 2004 and April 2006.MATERIALS: Five Sprague Dawley rats, aged 1 month and weighing 100-150 g, were used for cell culture. Sixty Sprague Dawiey rats aged 3 months and weighing 220-250 g, were used to establish neurological defect models. Nestin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and S-100 antibodies were provided by Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc., USA. Acellular nerve grafts were derived from dogs.METHODS: All rats, each with 1-cm gap created in the right sciatic nerve, were randomly assigned to three groups. Each group comprised 20 rats. Autograft nerve transplantation group: the severed 1-cm length nerve segment was reverted, but with the two ends exchanged; the proximal segment was sutured to the distal sciatic nerve stump and the distal segment to the proximal stump. Blank nerve scaffold transplantation group: a 1-cm length acellular nerve graft was used to bridge the sciatic nerve gap. NTCSC engineered nerve transplantation group: a 1-cm length acellular nerve graft, in which NTCSCs were

  1. Laryngeal Nerve Activity During Pulse Emission in the CF-FM Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. II. The Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve

    Rübsamen, R.; Schuller, Gerd

    1981-01-01

    The activity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) was recorded in the greater horseshoe bat,Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. Respiration, vocalization and nerve discharges were monitored while vocalizations were elicted by stimulation of the central gray matter. This stimulation evoked either expiration or expiration plus vocalization depending on the stimulus strength. When vocalization occurred it always took place during expiration. Recordings from the RLN during respiration showed activity...

  2. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice

    Morgan, Donald A.; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumente...

  3. An Optic Nerve Crush Injury Murine Model to Study Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    Tang, Zhongshu; Zhang, Shuihua; Lee, Chunsik; Kumar, Anil; Arjunan, Pachiappan; LI Yang; Zhang, Fan; Li, Xuri

    2011-01-01

    Injury to the optic nerve can lead to axonal degeneration, followed by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which results in irreversible vision loss. Examples of such diseases in human include traumatic optic neuropathy and optic nerve degeneration in glaucoma. It is characterized by typical changes in the optic nerve head, progressive optic nerve degeneration, and loss of retinal ganglion cells, if uncontrolled, leading to vision loss and blindness.

  4. Perineural alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor activation inhibits spinal cord neuroplasticity and tactile allodynia after nerve injury.

    Lavand'homme, Patricia; Ma, Weiya; Kock, Marc De; Eisenach, James C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nerve injury in animals increases alpha(2)-adrenoceptor expression in dorsal root ganglion cells and results in novel excitatory responses to their activation, perhaps leading to the phenomenon of sympathetically maintained pain. In contrast to this notion, peripheral alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation fails to induce pain in patients with chronic pain. We hypothesized that alpha(2) adrenoceptors at the site of nerve injury play an inhibitory, not excitatory role. METHODS: Partial ...

  5. Intrathecally Transplanting Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Activates ERK1/2 in Spinal Cords of Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Rats and Improves Nerve Function.

    Wang, Yonghong; Liu, He; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated whether an intrathecal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) activates extracellular adjusting protein kinase1 and 2(ERK1/2) in the spinal cords of rats following an ischemia-reperfusion injury, resulting in improved spinal cord function and inhibition of apoptosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We observed the relationship between the activation of ERK1/2 in the rat spinal cord and intrathecal transplantation of MSCs, as well as the effect of U0126, a MEK1/2 (upstream protein of ERK1/2) inhibitor, on a spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury model in rats using Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) scoring, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. RESULTS After transplantation of MSCs, the lower limb motor function score increased, and the incubation period of SSEPs and amplitude were improved. Moreover, following transplantation of MSCs, Bcl2 expression increased, whereas Bax expression decreased after reperfusion. Transplantation of MSCs significantly enhanced pERK1/2 expression in the spinal cord, as well as pERK1/2 in immunoreactive cells located in the grey matter of the L4/5 levels of the spinal cord, following ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The effective dose of U0126 required to inhibit pERK1/2 expression was 200 µg/kg. Bcl-2 decreased and the level of Bax expression increased in the spinal cord after ischemia reperfusion injury, and the protective effects of MSCs were attenuated. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that intrathecal transplantation of MSCs activates ERK1/2 in the spinal cord following ischemia reperfusion injury, partially improves spinal cord function, and inhibits apoptosis in rats. PMID:27135658

  6. AUTOCRINE/PARACRINE MODULATION OF BARORECEPTOR ACTIVITY AFTER ANTIDROMIC STIMULATION OF AORTIC DEPRESSOR NERVE IN VIVO

    Valter J. Santana-Filho; Davis, Greg J.; Castania, Jaci A.; Ma, Xiuying; Salgado, Helio C; Abboud, Francois M.; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the sensory nerve endings of nonmyelinated C-fiber afferents evokes release of autocrine/paracrine factors that cause localized vasodilation, neurogenic inflammation, and modulation of sensory nerve activity. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of antidromic electrical stimulation on afferent baroreceptor activity in vivo, and investigate the role of endogenous prostanoids and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating changes in nerve activity. Baroreceptor activity ...

  7. Joining microelectronics and microionics: Nerve cells and brain tissue on semiconductor chips

    Fromherz, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The direct electrical interfacing of semiconductor chips with individual nerve cells and with brain tissue is considered. At first, the structure of the cell-chip contact is described and then the electrical coupling is characterized between ion channels, the electrical elements of nerve cells, and transistors and capacitors of silicon chips. On that basis, the signal transmission between microelectronics and microionics is implemented in both directions. Simple hybrid systems are assembled with neuron pairs and with small neuronal networks. Finally, the interfacing with capacitors and transistors is extended to brain tissue on silicon. The application of CMOS chips with capacitively coupled recording sites allows an imaging of neuronal activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Goal of the work is an integration of neuronal network dynamics and digital electronics on a microscopic level for applications in brain research, medical prosthetics and information technology.

  8. Role of sympathetic nerve activity in the process of fainting

    Satoshi eIwase

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery, and the process of syncope progression will be described with two types of sympathetic change. Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically recorded MSNA and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement have disclose what is going on in the course of progression of the syncope. Vasovagal or neurally mediated syncope, three stages are identified in the course of syncope onset, oscillation, imbalance, and catastrophe phases. The vasovagal syncope is characterized by the sympathoexcitation, followed by vagal overcome via the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Orthostatic syncope is caused by the response failure or lack of sympathetic nerve activity toward the orthostatic challenge followed by the fluid shift, and subsequent cerebral low perfusion. Four causes are considered for the compensatory failure, which triggers the orthostatic syncope; hypovolemia, increased pooling in the lower body, failure to activate the sympathetic activity, and failure of vasoconstriction against sympathetic vasoconstrictive stimulation. Many pathophysiological conditions were described in the viewpoint of 1 exaggerated sympathoexcitation and 2 failure to activate the sympathetic nerve. We conclude that the sympathetic nervous system can control the cardiovascular function, and its failure resulted syncope, however, responses of the system by microneurographically recorded MSNA would determine the pathophysiology of the onset and progression of syncope, explaining the treatment effect that could be achieved by the analysis of this mechanism.

  9. JNK3 involvement in nerve cell apoptosis and neurofunctional recovery after traumatic brain injury☆

    Jiang Long; Li Cai; Jintao Li; Lei Zhang; Haiyang Yang; Tinghua Wang

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that the activation of the JNK pathway participates in apoptosis of nerve cells and neurological function recovery after traumatic brain injury. However, which genes in the JNK family are activated and their role in traumatic brain injury remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, in situ end labeling, reverse transcription-PCR and neurological function assessment were adopted to investigate the alteration of JNK1, JNK2 and JNK3 gene expression in cerebral injured rats, and their role in cell apoptosis and neurological function restoration. Results showed that JNK3 expression significantly decreased at 1 and 6 hours and 1 and 7 days post injury, but that JNK1 and JNK2 expression remained unchanged. In addition, the number of apoptotic nerve cells surrounding the injured cerebral cortex gradually reduced over time post injury. The Neurological Severity Scores gradually decreased over 1, 3, 5, 14 and 28 days post injury. These findings suggested that JNK3 expression was downregulated at early stages of brain injury, which may be associated with apoptosis of nerve cells. Downregulation of JNK3 expression may promote the recovery of neurological function following traumatic brain injury.

  10. In vitro evaluation of cell-seeded chitosan films for peripheral nerve tissue engineering

    Wrobel, Sandra; Serra, Sofia Cristina; Samy, S. M.; Sousa, Nuno; Heimann, Claudia; Barwig, Christina; Grothe, Claudia; Salgado, A. J.; Talini, Kirsten Haastert

    2014-01-01

    Natural biomaterials have attracted an increasing interest in the field of tissue-engineered nerve grafts, representing a possible alternative to autologous nerve transplantation. With the prospect of developing a novel entubulation strategy for transected nerves with cell-seeded chitosan films, we examined the biocompatibility of such films in vitro. Different types of rat Schwann cells (SCs)—immortalized, neonatal, and adult—as well as rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC...

  11. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  12. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    Liu-lin Xiong; Zhi-wei Chen; Ting-hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promotein vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, lfuorescence mi-croscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These ifndings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews.

  13. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. PMID:26516696

  14. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice.

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. PMID:25912998

  15. Semiconductor chips with ion channels, nerve cells and brain

    Fromherz, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The electrical interfacing of individual nerve cells and semiconductor microstructures as well as the assembly of neuronal networks and microelectronic circuits, is considered. At first the planar core-coat conductor of a neuron-silicon junction is studied as it determines the coupling of ion-conducting neurons and electron-conducting silicon. The width of the cleft between cell and chip, the resistance of cleft and voltage-gate ion channels in the junction are investigated. On that basis, a subsequent section describes the electronic interfacing of individual cultured neurons with silicon microstructures as well as the integration of microelectronics with small neuronal networks grown in culture. In a final part, the electronic interfacing of cultured brain slices is addressed. The goal of this approach is an integration of neuronal network dynamics and digital computation on a microscopic level for studies in brain research, biosensorics, information technology and medical prosthetics.

  16. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  17. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    Luo, Lihua [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Hubei University of Arts and Sciences, Xiangyang 441053 (China); Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine [Ingénierie Moléculaire et Physiopathologie Articulaire (IMoPA), UMR 7365 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, Biopôle, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Yun, E-mail: yunchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  18. Effect of nerve activity on transport of nerve growth factor and dopamine β-hydroxylase antibodies in sympathetic neurones

    The effect of nerve activity on the uptake and retrograde transport of nerve growth factor (NGF) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) antibodies was studied by injecting 125I-labelled NGF and anti-DBH into the anterior eye chamber of guinea-pigs. Decentralization of the ipsilateral superior cervical ganglion (SCG) had no significant effect on the retrograde transport of either NGF or anti-DBH. Phenoxybenzamine produced a 50% increase in anti-DBH but not NGF accumulation and this effect was prevented by prior decentralization. This demonstrates that NGF is taken up independently of the retrieval of synaptic vesicle components. (Auth.)

  19. Implication of Nerve Growth Factor in intestinal mucosal mast cell activity and colonic motor alterations in a model of ovalbumin-induced gut dysfunction in rats

    Jardí Pujol, Ferran

    2011-01-01

    We determined NGF involvement in MMCs and colonic motor alterations in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced gut dysfunction model in rats. Animals received OVA (6 weeks), with/without simultaneous K252a (TrkA antagonist) treatment. MMCs, rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII) levels and colonic contractility in vitro were assessed. OVA increased MMC density and RMCPII concentration. Spontaneous contractility was similar in both groups and inhibited by K252a. Carbachol responses were increased by OVA in a K...

  20. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    Takaku, Yasuharu

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  1. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps.

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Hwang, Jung Shan; Wolf, Alexander; Böttger, Angelika; Shimizu, Hiroshi; David, Charles N; Gojobori, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia. PMID:24394722

  2. A rapid and versatile method for the isolation, purification and cryogenic storage of Schwann cells from adult rodent nerves

    Andersen, Natalia D.; Srinivas, Shruthi; Piñero, Gonzalo; Monje, Paula V.

    2016-01-01

    We herein developed a protocol for the rapid procurement of adult nerve-derived Schwann cells (SCs) that was optimized to implement an immediate enzymatic dissociation of fresh nerve tissue while maintaining high cell viability, improving yields and minimizing fibroblast and myelin contamination. This protocol introduces: (1) an efficient method for enzymatic cell release immediately after removal of the epineurium and extensive teasing of the nerve fibers; (2) an adaptable drop-plating method for selective cell attachment, removal of myelin debris, and expansion of the initial SC population in chemically defined medium; (3) a magnetic-activated cell sorting purification protocol for rapid and effective fibroblast elimination; and (4) an optional step of cryopreservation for the storage of the excess of cells. Highly proliferative SC cultures devoid of myelin and fibroblast growth were obtained within three days of nerve processing. Characterization of the initial, expanded, and cryopreserved cell products confirmed maintenance of SC identity, viability and growth rates throughout the process. Most importantly, SCs retained their sensitivity to mitogens and potential for differentiation even after cryopreservation. To conclude, this easy-to-implement and clinically relevant protocol allows for the preparation of expandable homogeneous SC cultures while minimizing time, manipulation of the cells, and exposure to culture variables. PMID:27549422

  3. Identification of a Peripheral Nerve Neurite Growth-Promoting Activity by Development and Use of an in vitro Bioassay

    Sandrock, Alfred W.; Matthew, William D.

    1987-10-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay.

  4. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury.

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  5. Laser-activated protein solder for peripheral nerve repair

    Trickett, Rodney I.; Lauto, Antonio; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1995-05-01

    A 100 micrometers core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the albumin based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 +/- 5 min. (n equals 20) compared to 23 +/- 9 min. (n equals 10) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 +/- 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 +/- 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study is under way comparing laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. At the time of submission 15 laser soldered nerves and 7 sutured nerves were characterized at 3 months and showed successful regeneration with compound muscle action potentials of 27 +/- 8 mV and 29 +/- 8 mW respectively. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  6. Observations on the migratory behaviour of Schwann cells from adult peripheral nerve explant cultures.

    Crang, A J; Blakemore, W F

    1987-06-01

    The migration of Schwann cells from adult sciatic nerve explant cultures has been examined by time-lapse photomicrography. Analysis of Schwann cell migratory behaviour indicates that the initial outwandering by individual Schwann cells was random. Although chance cell-cell contacts resulted in temporary immobilization of pairs of cells, stable multicellular structures did not form during this initial phase. As local cell densities increased, Schwann cells assembled networks within which Schwann cell movement continued to be observed. A second form of Schwann cell outgrowth was observed from degenerating fibres in which arrays of highly oriented Schwann cells migrated away from their basal lamina tubes onto the culture dish. These observations of Schwann cell random migration, network self-assembly and coordinated extratubal migration are considered to highlight aspects of Schwann cell behaviour, independent of axonal influences, which may have relevance to their role in peripheral nerve repair following nerve section. PMID:3612187

  7. Involvement of Hypothalamic AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation

    Mamoru Tanida; Naoki Yamamoto; Toshishige Shibamoto; Kamal Rahmouni

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effec...

  8. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  9. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension. PMID:24609799

  10. Signals regulating myelination in peripheral nerves and the Schwann cell response to injury

    Glenn, Thomas D.; William S Talbot

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cells form myelin, which facilitates the rapid conduction of action potentials along axons in the vertebrate nervous system. Myelinating Schwann cells are derived from neural crest progenitors in a step-wise process that is regulated by extracellular signals and transcription factors. In addition to forming the myelin sheath, Schwann cells orchestrate much of the regenerative response that occurs after injury to peripheral nerves. In response to injury, myelinati...

  11. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive i...

  12. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Kshitija Garde; Barry Botterman; Pedro Galvan

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive i...

  13. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice.

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-09-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum-iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia. PMID:26381017

  14. Effect of morphine on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    Carter, Jason R.; Sauder, Charity L.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports for the role of endogenous opioids on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercise in humans. A number of studies have utilized naloxone (an opioid-receptor antagonist) to investigate the effect of opioids during exercise. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine (an opioid-receptor agonist) on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses at rest and during isometric handgrip (IHG). Eleven subjects performed 2 min of IHG (30% maximum) followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) before and after systemic infusion of morphine (0.075 mg/kg loading dose + 1 mg/h maintenance) or placebo (saline) in double-blinded experiments on separate days. Morphine increased resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; 17 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 2 bursts/min; P < 0.01) and increased mean arterial pressure (MAP; 87 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.02), but it decreased heart rate (HR; 61 +/- 4 to 59 +/- 3; P < 0.01). However, IHG elicited similar increases for MSNA, MAP, and HR between the control and morphine trial (drug x exercise interaction = not significant). Moreover, responses to PEMI were not different. Placebo had no effect on resting, IHG, and PEMI responses. We conclude that morphine modulates cardiovascular and sympathetic responses at rest but not during isometric exercise.

  15. Physiological properties of vertebrate nerve cells in tissue culture.

    Dichter, M A

    1975-01-01

    Vertebrate neurons in tissue culture are providing us with a new model system for studying the complex events which occur during neuronal differentiation, synaptogenesis, and neural network formation. It is already apparent that dissociated embryo neurons are capable of differentiating both morphologically and physiologically along predetermined lines in the absence of external influences. These neurons can form new connections with one another but retain some specificity in their selections. Both simple and complex neural networks can be seen. At the present time, the development of the invitro model system is just being explored. The potential value of a system of this kind at a variety of investigative levels should be appreciated. Questions of a fundamental nature in neurobiology, such as how synapses form, what rules govern such interaction, how cells recognize one another, and the nature of the basic two-, three-, or four-cell circuits that comprise the more complex neurons tissue can be approached with this system. Studies of the neurons and synapses themselves can lead to a more basic understanding of vertebrate nervous system functioning. The development of certain pathophysiological processes and the effects of neuroactive drugs on vertebrate neurons may be studied at the cellular level. Finally, the basic mechanism of some genetic abnormalities which produce abnormal nervous structure and function may be more easily determined in a simplified in vitro model than in the intact central nervous system. The value of any model is not inherent in the elegance of the model itseld, but only in its ability to suggest answers to fundamental questions about the system being modeled. Many fundamental questions about brain mechanisms in mental retardation remain unanswered. Perhaps some day the model of nerve cells in tissue culture will bring us closer to the answers to these questions. PMID:173059

  16. A comparison between complete immobilisation and protected active mobilisation in sensory nerve recovery following isolated digital nerve injury.

    Henry, F P

    2012-06-01

    Post-operative immobilisation following isolated digital nerve repair remains a controversial issue amongst the microsurgical community. Protocols differ from unit to unit and even, as evidenced in our unit, may differ from consultant to consultant. We undertook a retrospective review of 46 patients who underwent isolated digital nerve repair over a 6-month period. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 18 months. Twenty-four were managed with protected active mobilisation over a 4-week period while 22 were immobilised over the same period. Outcomes such as return to work, cold intolerance, two-point discrimination and temperature differentiation were used as indicators of clinical recovery. Our results showed that there was no significant difference noted in either clinical assessment of recovery or return to work following either post-operative protocol, suggesting that either regime may be adopted, tailored to the patient\\'s needs and resources of the unit.

  17. Effects of nerve growth factor on X-irradiated reaggregation cultures of rat brain cells

    Dimberg, Y. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)); Aspberg, A.; Tottmar, O. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoophysiology)

    1993-12-01

    The effects of exogenously added nerve growth factor (NGF) on reaggregation cultures of foetal rat brain cells after X-irradiation with 2 Gy were studied. Irradiation caused decreased protein and DNA levels, which was not prevented by NGF. The activities of the cholinergic marker enzymes choline acetyl transferase and acetylcholine esterase were increased in irradiated cultures. However, no difference in the activities of these enzymes was found between irradiated and unirradiated NGF-treated cultures. Irradiation did not affect the activity of the marker enzyme for oligodendrocytes (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase), but caused an increase in the astrocyte marker (glutamine synthetase) activity. This effect on astrocytes was prevented by NGF. (Author).

  18. Study of synergistic role of allogenic skin-derived precursor differentiated Schwann cells and heregulin-1β in nerve regeneration with an acellular nerve allograft.

    Wang, Houlei; Wu, Jingping; Zhang, Xinchao; Ding, Lei; Zeng, Qingmin

    2016-07-01

    Development of tissue structure and three-dimensional microenvironment is crucial for regeneration of axons in the peripheral nerve repair. In this study we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of nerve regeneration by using an acellular nerve allograft (ANA) injected with allogenic skin-derived precursor differentiated Schwann cells (SKP-SCs) and heregulin-1β. Skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) were generated from dermis of newborn (postnatal day 2) Wistar rats. In a rat model, nerve regeneration was determined across a 15 mm lesion in the sciatic nerve by using an ANA injected with allogenic SKP-SCs and heregulin-1β. The electrophysiological analysis, histological examination and electron microscopy were involved in this study. Cultured SKPs expressed nestin and fibronectin, and differentiated into cells with phenotype of SCs that presented characteristic markers of p75NGFR and S100-β. Implantation of SKP-SCs into the rat models by using ANA and allogenic skin-derived precursor differentiated Schwann cells (SKP-SCs) increases sciatic nerve functional index (SFI), peak amplitudes, nerve conduction velocities, number of myelinated fibers within the graft, while reduces incubation period, sciatic nerve injury-induced weight and contractions loss. Using ANA injected with SKP-SCs combined with heregulin-1β greatly promote peripheral nerve repair in a rat model. Our results suggest that SKP-SCs transplantation with heregulin-1β represents a powerful therapeutic approach, and facilitates the efficacy of acellular nerve allograft in peripheral nerve injury, though the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. PMID:27063890

  19. Regeneration of the auditory nerve - a cell transplantation study

    Palmgren, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Since in mammals, the hair cells or the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear do not regenerate, damage to these cells is an irreversible process. Presently the only aid for patients with severe to profound hearing impairment due to damaged hair cells is a cochlear implant (CI). A CI converts sound to electrical signals that stimulate the SGNs via an electrode that is implanted into the cochlea. Hence, for a successful outcome the CI is dependant on the activation ...

  20. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  1. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment

  2. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions x three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions x five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Platelet-rich plasma gel in combination with Schwann cells for repair of sciatic nerve injury☆

    Ye, Fagang; Li, Haiyan; Qiao, Guangxi; Chen, Feng; Tao, Hao; Ji, Aiyu; Hu, Yanling

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from New Zealand white rabbits, culture-expanded and differentiated into Schwann cell-like cells. Autologous platelet-rich plasma and Schwann cell-like cells were mixed in suspension at a density of 1 × 106 cells/mL, prior to introduction into a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit. Fabricated tissue-engineered nerves were implanted into rabbits to bridge 10 mm sciatic nerve defects (platelet-rich plasma group). Controls were established usin...

  4. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity and hemodynamic alterations in middle-aged obese women

    Ribeiro M.M.; Trombetta I.C.; Batalha L.T.; Rondon M.U.P.B.; Forjaz C.L.M.; Barretto A.C.P.; Villares S.M.F.; Negrão C.E.

    2001-01-01

    To study the relationship between the sympathetic nerve activity and hemodynamic alterations in obesity, we simultaneously measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and forearm blood flow (FBF) in obese and lean individuals. Fifteen normotensive obese women (BMI = 32.5 ± 0.5 kg/m²) and 11 age-matched normotensive lean women (BMI = 22.7 ± 1.0 kg/m²) were studied. MSNA was evaluated directly from the peroneal nerve by microneurography, FBF was measured by venous occlusi...

  5. Uptake of Retrograde Tracers by Intact Optic Nerve Axons: A New Way to Label Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Ti-Fei; So, Kwok-Fai

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde labelling of retinal ganglion cells with optic nerve transection often leads to degeneration of ganglion cells in prolonged experiments. Here we report that an intact optic nerve could uptake retrograde tracers applied onto the surface of the nerve, leading to high efficiency labelling of ganglion cells in the retina with long-term survival of cells. This method labelled a similar number of ganglion cells (2289±174 at 2 days) as the retrograde labeling technique from the superior c...

  6. Comparison of sympathetic nerve activity normalization procedures in conscious rabbits.

    Burke, Sandra L; Lim, Kyungjoon; Moretti, John-Luis; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main constraints associated with recording sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in both humans and experimental animals is that microvolt values reflect characteristics of the recording conditions and limit comparisons between different experimental groups. The nasopharyngeal response has been validated for normalizing renal SNA (RSNA) in conscious rabbits, and in humans muscle SNA is normalized to the maximum burst in the resting period. We compared these two methods of normalization to determine whether either could detect elevated RSNA in hypertensive rabbits compared with normotensive controls. We also tested whether either method eliminated differences based only on different recording conditions by separating RSNA of control (sham) rabbits into two groups with low or high microvolts. Hypertension was induced by 5 wk of renal clipping (2K1C), 3 wk of high-fat diet (HFD), or 3 mo infusion of a low dose of angiotensin (ANG II). Normalization to the nasopharyngeal response revealed RSNA that was 88, 51, and 34% greater in 2K1C, HFD, and ANG II rabbits, respectively, than shams (P < 0.05), but normalization to the maximum burst showed no differences. The RSNA baroreflex followed a similar pattern whether RSNA was expressed in microvolts or normalized. Both methods abolished the difference between low and high microvolt RSNA. These results suggest that maximum burst amplitude is a useful technique for minimizing differences between recording conditions but is unable to detect real differences between groups. We conclude that the nasopharyngeal reflex is the superior method for normalizing sympathetic recordings in conscious rabbits. PMID:26921439

  7. Synergistic effects of low-level laser and mesenchymal stem cells on functional recovery in rats with crushed sciatic nerves.

    Yang, Chen-Chia; Wang, John; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed to exert beneficial effects on peripheral nerve regeneration after a peripheral nerve injury, but the functional recovery in the denervated limb is still limited. In this study, we used low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct therapy for MSC transplantation on the functional recovery of crushed sciatic nerve in rats. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 48 Sprague-Dawley rats by crushing the unilateral sciatic nerve, using a vessel clamp. The animals with crushed injury were randomly divided into four groups: control group, with no treatment; MSC group, treated with MSC alone; LLLT group, treated with LLLT alone; and MSCLLLT group, treated with a combination of MSC and LLLT. The sciatic function index (SFI), vertical activity of locomotion (VA) and ankle angle (AA) of rats were examined for functional assessments after treatment. Electrophysiological, morphological and S100 immunohistochemical studies were also conducted. The MSCLLLT group showed a greater recovery in SFI, VA and AA, with significant difference from MSC, LLLT and control groups (p crush injury in the MSCLLLT group when compared with the groups receiving a single treatment (p crush injury. PMID:23468370

  8. Patterns of motor activity in the isolated nerve cord of the octopus arm.

    Gutfreund, Yoram; Matzner, Henry; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2006-12-01

    The extremely flexible octopus arm provides a unique opportunity for studying movement control in a highly redundant motor system. We describe a novel preparation that allows analysis of the peripheral nervous system of the octopus arm and its interaction with the muscular and mechanosensory elements of the arm's intrinsic muscular system. First we examined the synaptic responses in muscle fibers to identify the motor pathways from the axial nerve cord of the arm to the surrounding musculature. We show that the motor axons project to the muscles via nerve roots originating laterally from the arm nerve cord. The motor field of each nerve is limited to the region where the nerve enters the arm musculature. The same roots also carry afferent mechanosensory information from the intrinsic muscle to the axial nerve cord. Next, we characterized the pattern of activity generated in the dorsal roots by electrically stimulating the axial nerve cord. The evoked activity, although far reaching and long lasting, cannot alone account for the arm extension movements generated by similar electrical stimulation. The mismatch between patterns of activity in the isolated cord and in an intact arm may stem from the involvement of mechanosensory feedback in natural arm extension. PMID:17179381

  9. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Mamoru Tanida

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb. We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  10. Dark rearing maintains tyrosine hydroxylase expression in retinal amacrine cells following optic nerve transection

    Wei Wan; Zhenghai Liu; Xiaosheng Wang; Xuegang Luo

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined changes in retinal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in rats having undergone optic nerve transection and housed under a normal day/night cycle or in the dark. The aim was to investigate the effects of amacrine cells on axonal regeneration in retinal ganglion cells and on the synapses that transmit visual signals. The results revealed that retinal TH expression gradually decreased following optic nerve transection in rats housed under a normal day/night cycle, reaching a minimum at 5 days. In contrast, retinal TH expression decreased to a minimum at 1 day following optic nerve transection in dark reared rats, gradually increasing afterward and reaching a normal level at 5-7 days. The number of TH-positive synaptic particles correlated with the TH levels, indicating that dark rearing can help maintain TH expression during the synaptic degeneration stage (5-7 days after optic nerve injury) in retinal amacrine cells.

  11. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury:do Schwann cells play a role?

    Jo Anne Stratton; Prajay T Shah

    2016-01-01

    In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inlfammatory response is almost entirely comprised of inifltrat-ing macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efifcient regen-eration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function –most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior.

  12. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na+-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma gel in combination with Schwann cells for repair of sciatic nerve injury

    Fagang Ye; Haiyan Li; Guangxi Qiao; Feng Chen; Hao Tao; Aiyu Ji; Yanling Hu

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from New Zealand white rabbits,culture-expanded and differentiated into Schwann cell-like cells.Autologous platelet-rich plasma and Schwann cell-like cells were mixed in suspension at a density of 1 × 106 cells/mL,prior to introduction into a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit.Fabricated tissue-engineered nerves were implanted into rabbits to bridge 10 mm sciatic nerve defects (platelet-rich plasma group).Controls were established using fibrin as the seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells at identical density to construct tissue-engineered nerves (fibrin group).Twelve weeks after implantation,toluidine blue staining and scanning electron microscopy were used to demonstrate an increase in the number of regenerating nerve fibers and thickness of the myelin sheath in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group.Fluoro-gold retrograde labeling revealed that the number of Fluoro-gold-positive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and the spinal cord anterior horn was greater in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the fibrin group.Electrophysiological examination confirmed that compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity were superior in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group.These results indicate that autologous platelet-rich plasma gel can effectively serve as a seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells to construct tissue-engineered nerves to promote peripheral nerve regeneration.

  14. Autophagy is involved in the reduction of myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm during myelin maturation of the peripheral nerve.

    So Young Jang

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve myelination involves dynamic changes in Schwann cell morphology and membrane structure. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy regulates organelle biogenesis and plasma membrane dynamics. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in the development and differentiation of myelinating Schwann cells during sciatic nerve myelination. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays have shown that Schwann cells remove excess cytoplasmic organelles during myelination through macroautophagy. Inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific removal of ATG7, an essential molecule for macroautophagy, using a conditional knockout strategy, resulted in abnormally enlarged abaxonal cytoplasm in myelinating Schwann cells that contained a large number of ribosomes and an atypically expanded endoplasmic reticulum. Small fiber hypermyelination and minor anomalous peripheral nerve functions are observed in this mutant. Rapamycin-induced suppression of mTOR activity during the early postnatal period enhanced not only autophagy but also developmental reduction of myelinating Schwann cells cytoplasm in vivo. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is a regulatory mechanism of Schwann cells structural plasticity during myelination.

  15. Stem cells and related factors involved in facial nerve function regeneration.

    Nelke, Kamil H; Łuczak, Klaudiusz; Pawlak, Wojciech; Łysenko, Lidia; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    The facial nerve (VII) is one of the most important cranial nerves for head and neck surgeons. Its function is closely related to facial expressions that are individual for every person. After its injury or palsy, its functions can be either impaired or absent. Because of the presence of motor, sensory and parasympathetic fibers, the biology of its repair and function restoration depends on many factors. In order to achieve good outcome, many different therapies can be performed in order to restore as much of the nerve function as possible. When rehabilitation and physiotherapy are not sufficient, additional surgical procedures and therapies are taken into serious consideration. The final outcome of many of them is discussable, depending on nerve damage etiology. Stem cells in facial nerve repair are used, but long-term outcomes and results are still not fully known. In order to understand this therapeutic approach, clinicians and surgeons should understand the immunobiology of nerve repair and regeneration. In this review, potential stem cell usage in facial nerve regeneration procedures is discussed. PMID:26400886

  16. Fabrication of bioactive conduits containing the fibroblast growth factor 1 and neural stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15 mm critical gap

    Nerve conduits are often used in combination with bioactive molecules and stem cells to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the acidic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) was immobilized onto the microporous/micropatterned poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) nerve conduits after open air plasma treatment. PLA substrates grafted with chitosan in the presence of a small amount of gold nanoparticles (nano Au) showed a protective effect on the activity of the immobilized FGF1 in vitro. Different conduits were tested for their ability to bridge a 15 mm critical gap defect in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Axon regeneration and functional recovery were evaluated by histology, walking track analysis and electrophysiology. Among different conduits, PLA conduits grafted with chitosan–nano Au and the FGF1 after plasma activation had the greatest regeneration capacity and functional recovery in the experimental animals. When the above conduit was seeded with aligned neural stem cells, the efficacy was further enhanced and it approached that of the autograft group. This work suggested that microporous/micropatterned nerve conduits containing bioactive growth factors may be successfully fabricated by micropatterning techniques, open plasma activation, and immobilization, which, combined with aligned stem cells, may synergistically contribute to the regeneration of the severely damaged peripheral nerve. (paper)

  17. Fabrication of bioactive conduits containing the fibroblast growth factor 1 and neural stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15 mm critical gap.

    Ni, Hsiao-Chiang; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Chen, Jeng-Rung; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2013-09-01

    Nerve conduits are often used in combination with bioactive molecules and stem cells to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the acidic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) was immobilized onto the microporous/micropatterned poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) nerve conduits after open air plasma treatment. PLA substrates grafted with chitosan in the presence of a small amount of gold nanoparticles (nano Au) showed a protective effect on the activity of the immobilized FGF1 in vitro. Different conduits were tested for their ability to bridge a 15 mm critical gap defect in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Axon regeneration and functional recovery were evaluated by histology, walking track analysis and electrophysiology. Among different conduits, PLA conduits grafted with chitosan-nano Au and the FGF1 after plasma activation had the greatest regeneration capacity and functional recovery in the experimental animals. When the above conduit was seeded with aligned neural stem cells, the efficacy was further enhanced and it approached that of the autograft group. This work suggested that microporous/micropatterned nerve conduits containing bioactive growth factors may be successfully fabricated by micropatterning techniques, open plasma activation, and immobilization, which, combined with aligned stem cells, may synergistically contribute to the regeneration of the severely damaged peripheral nerve. PMID:23880639

  18. Sympathetic nerve discharge is coupled to muscle cell pH during exercise in humans.

    1988-01-01

    We used phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-NMR) to probe the cellular events in contracting muscle that initiate the reflex stimulation of sympathetic outflow during exercise. In conscious humans, we performed 31P-NMR on exercising forearm muscle and simultaneously recorded muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with microelectrodes in the peroneal nerve to determine if the activation of MSNA is coupled to muscle pH, an index of glycolysis, or to the concentrations (II)...

  19. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Yang Wang; Zheng-wei Li; Min Luo; Ya-jun Li; Ke-qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem ...

  20. Intramuscular injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with small gap neurorrhaphy for peripheral nerve repair.

    Wang, Peiji; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Jiaju; Jiang, Bo

    2015-01-12

    We had previously reported that small gap neurorrhaphy by scissoring and sleeve-jointing epineurium could enhance the rate and quality of peripheral nerve regeneration. To date, local implantation and systemic delivery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been routinely used in nerve tissue engineering, but they each have some intrinsic limitations. We hypothesised that targeted muscular administration of BMSCs capable of reaching the damaged nerve would be advisable. Here, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of transplantation of BMSCs through targeted muscular injection with small gap neurorrhaphy by scissoring and sleeve-jointing epineurium on repairing peripheral nerve injury in a rat model. One week after a rat model of peripheral nerve injury was established by small gap neurorrhaphy, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=12): the intramuscular injection of BMSCs group (IM), the intravenous injection of BMSCs group (IV) and the intramuscular injection of phosphate-buffered solution group (PBS). The process of the nerve regeneration was assayed functionally and morphologically. The results indicated that compared to the IV-treated and PBS-treated groups, the targeted muscular injection therapy resulted in much more beneficial effects, as evidenced by increases in the sciatic function index, nerve conduction velocity, myelin sheath thickness and restoration rate of gastrocnemius muscle wet weight. In conclusion, the combination therapy of small gap neurorrhaphy and BMSC transplantation through targeted muscular injection can significantly promote the regeneration of peripheral nerve and improve the nerve's functional recovery, which may help establish a reliable approach for repairing peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25434870

  1. Cardiac nerve growth factor overexpression induces bone marrow–derived progenitor cells mobilization and homing to the infarcted heart

    Meloni, Marco; Cesselli, Daniela; Caporali, Andrea; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Avolio, Elisa; Reni, Carlotta; Fortunato, Orazio; Martini, Stefania; Madeddu, Paolo; Valgimigli, Marco; Nikolaev, Evgeni; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Angelini, Gianni D.; Beltrami, Antonio P; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    Reparative response by bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells (PCs) to ischemia is a multistep process that comprises the detachment from the BM endosteal niche through activation of osteoclasts and proteolytic enzymes (such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)), mobilization to the circulation, and homing to the injured tissue. We previously showed that intramyocardial nerve growth factor gene transfer (NGF-GT) promotes cardiac repair following myocardial infarction (MI) in mice. Here, we ...

  2. Bone Marrow-Derived, Neural-Like Cells Have the Characteristics of Neurons to Protect the Peripheral Nerve in Microenvironment

    Shi-lei Guo; Zhi-ying Zhang; Yan Xu; Yun-xia Zhi; Chang-jie Han; Yu-hao Zhou; Fang Liu; Hai-yan Lin; Chuan-sen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that “neural-like cells” may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were...

  3. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Vein Conduit on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    Seyed Foroutan, Kamal; Khodarahmi, Ali; Alavi, Hootan; Pedram, Sepehr; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamad Reza; Bordbar, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve repair with sufficient functional recovery is an important issue in reconstructive surgery. Stem cells have attracted extensive research interest in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the vein conduit technique, with and without the addition of mesenchymal stem cells in gap-less nerve injury repair in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three groups: In the first group, nerve repair was performed with simple neurorrhaphy (control group), in the second group, nerve repair was done with vein conduit over site (vein conduit group) and in the third group, bone marrow stem cells were instilled into the vein conduit (stem cell group) after nerve repair with vein conduit over site. Six weeks after the intervention, the sciatic function index, electrophysiological study and histological examination were performed. Results: All animals tolerated the surgical procedures and survived well. The sciatic function index and latency were significantly improved in the vein conduit (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively) and stem cell group (P = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively) compared with the control group. No significant difference was observed in sciatic function and latency between the vein conduit and stem-cell groups. Moreover, histological analysis showed no significant difference in regenerative density between these two groups. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the meticulous microsurgical nerve repair, which was performed using the vein tubulization induced significantly better sciatic nerve regeneration. However, the addition of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to vein conduit failed to promote any significant changes in regeneration outcome. PMID:25825699

  4. Liquiritin potentiate neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells

    Chen, Zheng-ai; Wang, Jun-Long; Liu, Rui-Ting; Ren, Jian-Ping; Wen, Li-Qing; Chen, Xiao-juan; Bian, Guang-Xing

    2009-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation play a crucial role in the development of the nervous system. Understanding of neurotrophins induced neurite outgrowth was important to develop therapeutic strategy for axon regeneration in neurodegenerative diseases as well as after various nerve injuries. It has been reported that extension of neurite and differentiation of sympathetic neuron-like phenotype was modulated by nerve growth factor (NGF) in PC12 cells. In this study, NGF mediated ne...

  5. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    Hirata, Akimasa; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Takagi, Airi; Shimada, Takuo

    2013-11-01

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat.

  6. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat. (paper)

  7. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    Olree Kenneth S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation.

  8. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    AlbarracIn, A L [Catedra de Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Av. Roca 2200, PC 4000 (Argentina); Farfan, F D [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina); Felice, C J [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  9. Distribution of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Effects on Neuronal Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush and Cell Therapy

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise Alessandra; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; da Silva-Junior, Almir Jordão; Nascimento-dos-Santos, Gabriel; Gubert, Fernanda; de Figueirêdo, Ana Beatriz Padilha; Torres, Ana Luiza; Paredes, Bruno D; Teixeira, Camila; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; MARCELO F. SANTIAGO

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have been used in different animal models of neurological diseases. We investigated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) injected into the vitreous body in a model of optic nerve injury. Adult (3–5 months old) Lister Hooded rats underwent unilateral optic nerve crush followed by injection of MSC or the vehicle into the vitreous body. Before they were injected, MSC were labeled with a fluorescent dye or with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanopartic...

  10. Nerve growth factor-induced alteration in the response of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells to epidermal growth factor

    Huff, K; End, D; Guroff, G

    1981-01-01

    PC12 cells, which differentiate morphologically and biochemically into sympathetic neruonlike cells in response to nerve growth fact, also respond to epidermal growth factor. The response to epidermal growth factor is similar in certain respects to the response to nerve growth fact. Both peptides produce rapid increases in cellular adhesion and 2-deoxyglucose uptake and both induce ornithine decarboxylase. But nerve growth factor causes a decreased cell proliferation and a marked hypertrophy ...

  11. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is activated by B-Raf in response to nerve growth factor through interaction with p21ras.

    Jaiswal, R. K.; Moodie, S A; Wolfman, A; Landreth, G E

    1994-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) activates the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through a p21ras-dependent signal transduction pathway in PC12 cells. The linkage between p21ras and MEK1 was investigated to identify those elements which participate in the regulation of MEK1 activity. We have screened for MEK activators using a coupled assay in which the MAP kinase cascade has been reconstituted in vitro. We report that we have detected a single NGF-stimulated MEK-activating activity whi...

  12. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect

  13. Nerve Regeneration Potential of Protocatechuic Acid in RSC96 Schwann Cells by Induction of Cellular Proliferation and Migration through IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt Signaling.

    Ju, Da-Tong; Liao, Hung-En; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chung, Li-Chin; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-12-31

    Peripheral nerve injuries, caused by accidental trauma, acute compression or surgery, often result in temporary or life-long neuronal dysfunctions and inflict great economic or social burdens on the patients. Nerve cell proliferation is an essential process to restore injured nerves of adults. Schwann cells play a crucial role in endogenous repair of peripheral nerves due to their ability to proliferate, migrate and provide trophic support to axons via expression of various neurotrophic factors, such as the nerve growth factor (NGF), especially after nerve injury. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, isolated from the kernels of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq (AOF), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine the fruits of which are widely used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-salivation and anti-diarrheatic. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms by which PCA induces Schwann cell proliferation by activating IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt pathway. Treatment with PCA induces phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine - threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) pathway, and activates expression of cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after 18 h of treatment showed that proliferation of the RSC96 cells was enhanced by PCA treatment. The PCA induced proliferation was accompanied by modulation in the expressions of cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E and cyclin A. Knockdown of PI3K using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibition of IGF-IR receptor resulted in the reduction in cell survival proteins. The results collectively showed that PCA treatment promoted cell proliferation and cell survival via IGF-I signaling. PMID:26717920

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells modified with nerve growth factor improve recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve after mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits.

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cao, J; Yang, X; Lei, D

    2015-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in the treatment of bony deformities and defects. However, injury to the inferior alveolar nerve is a concern. Our aim was to investigate the feasibility of using lentiviral-mediated human nerve growth factor beta (hNGFβ) of the inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. To achieve this, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the bone marrow of rabbit mandibles were isolated and genetically engineered using recombinant lentiviral vector containing hNGFβ. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and 5 million MSC transduced with hNGFβ-vector or control vector were transplanted around the nerve in the gap where the bone had been fractured during the operation (n=10 in each group). After gradual distraction, samples of the nerve were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analysis. We found that the genetically engineered MSC transduced by the lentiviral vector were able to secrete hNGFβ at physiologically relevant concentrations as measured by ELISA. Histological examination of the nerve showed more regenerating nerve fibres and less myelin debris in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. Histomorphometric analysis of the nerve showed increased density of myelinated fibres in the group in which hNGFβ-modified MSC had been implanted than in the control group. The data suggest that implantation of hNGFβ-modified MSC can accelerate the morphological recovery of the inferior alveolar nerve during mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. The use of lentiviral-mediated gene treatment to deliver hNGFβ through MSC may be a promising way of minimising injury to the nerve. PMID:25600702

  15. Nerve cells culture from lumbar spinal cord on surfaces modified by plasma pyrrole polymerization.

    Zuñiga-Aguilar, E; Olayo, R; Ramírez-Fernández, O; Morales, J; Godínez, R

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are several techniques for modified cell culture surfaces under research to improve cell growth and adhesion. Recently, different methods have been used for surface coating, using biomolecules that enhance cell attachment and growth of nerve cells from spinal cord, such as the use of Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin. Plasma-polymerized pyrrole (PPy)-treated surfaces have showed improvement on surfaces biocompatibility with the cells in culture since they do not interfere with any of the biological cell functions. In the present work, we present a novel mouse nerve cell culture technique, using PPy-treated cell culture surfaces. A comparative study of cell survival using Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-treated surfaces was performed. Our results of cell survival when compared with data already reported by other investigators, show that cells cultured on the PPy-modified surface increased survival up to 21 days when compared with Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-coated culture, where 8 days cell survival was obtained. There were electrical and morphological differences in the nerve cells grown in the different surfaces. By comparing the peak ion currents of Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-seeded cells for 8 days with cells grown for 21 days on PPy, an increase of 516% in the Na(+) current and 127% in K(+) currents in cells seeded on PPy were observed. Immunofluorescence techniques showed the presence of cell synapses and culture viability after 21 days. Our results then showed that PPy-modified surfaces are an alternative culture method that increases nerve cells survival from lumbar spinal cord cell culture by preserving its electrical and morphological features. PMID:24650203

  16. Effects of nicotinic receptor agonists on bladder afferent nerve activity in an in vitro bladder-pelvic nerve preparation.

    Yu, Yongbei; Daugherty, Stephanie L; de Groat, William C

    2016-04-15

    Effects of nicotinic receptor agonists (epibatidine and nicotine) on mechano-sensitive bladder afferent nerve (MS-BAN) activity were studied in an in vitro bladder-pelvic afferent nerve preparation. MS-BAN activity was induced by isotonic distention of the bladder at pressures of 10-40cmH2O. The effect of epibatidine varied according to the concentration, route of administration and the intravesical pressure stimulus. Epibatidine (300-500nM) administered in the perfusate to the serosal surface of the bladder decreased distension evoked afferent firing by 30-50% depending on the bladder pressure. However these concentrations also produced an immediate increase in tonic afferent firing in the empty bladder. Lower concentrations (50-100nM) elicited weaker and more variable effects. The inhibitory effects were blocked by bath application of mecamylamine (150µM) a nicotinic receptor antagonist. Bath application of nicotine (20µM) elicited similar effects. Intravesical administration of epibatidine (500nM) significantly increased MS-BAN firing by 15-30%; while lower concentrations (200-300nM) were ineffective. This facilitatory effect of epibatidine was blocked by intravesical administration of mecamylamine (250µM). Electrical stimulation on the surface of the bladder elicited action potentials (AP) in BAN. Bath application of epibatidine (300nM) or nicotine (20µM) did not change either the voltage threshold or the area of evoked AP. These results indicate that nicotinic agonists: (1) enhance MS-BAN activity originating at afferent receptors near the urothelium, (2) inhibit MS-BAN activity originating at afferent receptors located at other sites in the bladder, (3) directly excite unidentified afferents, (4) do not alter afferent axonal excitability. PMID:26876739

  17. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  18. Uptake and metabolism of fructose by rat neocortical cells in vivo and by isolated nerve terminals in vitro.

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Elsais, Ahmed; Frøland, Anne-Sofie; Taubøll, Erik; Gjerstad, Leif; Quan, Yi; Dingledine, Raymond; Rise, Frode

    2015-05-01

    Fructose reacts spontaneously with proteins in the brain to form advanced glycation end products (AGE) that may elicit neuroinflammation and cause brain pathology, including Alzheimer's disease. We investigated whether fructose is eliminated by oxidative metabolism in neocortex. Injection of [(14) C]fructose or its AGE-prone metabolite [(14) C]glyceraldehyde into rat neocortex in vivo led to formation of (14) C-labeled alanine, glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and glutamine. In isolated neocortical nerve terminals, [(14) C]fructose-labeled glutamate, GABA, and aspartate, indicating uptake of fructose into nerve terminals and oxidative fructose metabolism in these structures. This was supported by high expression of hexokinase 1, which channels fructose into glycolysis, and whose activity was similar with fructose or glucose as substrates. By contrast, the fructose-specific ketohexokinase was weakly expressed. The fructose transporter Glut5 was expressed at only 4% of the level of neuronal glucose transporter Glut3, suggesting transport across plasma membranes of brain cells as the limiting factor in removal of extracellular fructose. The genes encoding aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, enzymes of the polyol pathway that forms glucose from fructose, were expressed in rat neocortex. These results point to fructose being transported into neocortical cells, including nerve terminals, and that it is metabolized and thereby detoxified primarily through hexokinase activity. We asked how the brain handles fructose, which may react spontaneously with proteins to form 'advanced glycation end products' and trigger inflammation. Neocortical cells took up and metabolized extracellular fructose oxidatively in vivo, and isolated nerve terminals did so in vitro. The low expression of fructose transporter Glut5 limited uptake of extracellular fructose. Hexokinase was a main pathway for fructose metabolism, but ketohexokinase (which leads to glyceraldehyde formation) was

  19. Developmental Corneal Innervation: Interactions between Nerves and Specialized Apical Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Kubilus, James K.; Linsenmayer, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    During developmental innervation of the chicken cornea, nerves interact with apical corneal epithelial cells to form synapse-like structures. In addition, these apical epithelial cells express class III β-tubulin, an isoform of β-tubulin generally thought to be neuron specific.

  20. Minocycline inhibits the production of the precursor form of nerve growth factor by retinal microglial cells

    Xiaochun Yang; Xuanchu Duan

    2013-01-01

    A rat model of acute ocular hypertension was established by enhancing the perfusion of balanced salt solution in the anterior chamber of the right eye. Minocycline (90 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally into rats immediately after the operation for 3 consecutive days. Immunofluorescence, western blot assay and PCR detection revealed that the expression of the precursor form of nerve growth factor, nerve growth factor and the p75 neurotrophin receptor, and the mRNA expression of nerve growth factor and the p75 neurotrophin receptor, increased after acute ocular hypertension. The number of double-labeled CD11B- and precursor form of nerve growth factor-positive cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein- and p75 neurotrophin receptor-positive cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein- and caspase-3-positive cells in the retina markedly increased after acute ocular hypertension. The above-described expression decreased after minocycline treatment. These results suggested that minocycline inhibited the increased expression of the precursor form of nerve growth factor in microglia, the p75 neurotrophin receptor in astroglia, and protected cells from apoptosis.

  1. Effects of nerve growth factor on the expression of caspase-12 of nerve cells in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion area

    Jiping Yang; Huaijun Liu; Ying Li; Yan Liu; Haiqing Yang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Researches suggest that cascade reaction of cysteine protease mediated by caspase-12 can cause apoptosis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury;however, nerve growth factor (NGF) can reduce apoptosis through inhibiting activation of that reaction.OBJECTTVE: To observe the effect of NGF on the expression of caspase-12 in brain tissue of rabbits with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and elucidate the protective mechanism of NGF on neural apoptosis induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.DESIGN: Randomized controlled animal study.SETTING: Department of Image, Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University.MATERIALS: A total of 26 healthy New Zealand rabbits, of clean grade, aged 4.5-5 months, weighing (2.6±0.2) kg, were selected in this study. Reagents: NGF (Xiamen Beida Zhilu Biotechnology Co., Ltd.);caspase-12 (Santa Cruz Biotechnology Company, USA, clone number: SC-12395); caspase-3 (Santa Cruz Biotechnology Company, USA, clone number: SC-7272); biotin-antibody Ⅱ and ABC compound (Wuhan Boster Company); in situ end-labeling (ISEL, Beijing Zhongshan Company).METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratories of Nerve Molecule Image Science and Neurology of the Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University from May to August 2005. ① All animals were randomly divided into three groups. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) group (n=10): Left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was blocked for 2 hours and then blooded for 2 hours in order to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models. Sham operation group (n=6): Cork was inserted with 3 cm in depth, and then pulled to common carotid artery. Other procedures were as the same as those in ischemia/reperfusion group.Treatment group (n=10): After modeling, 400 AU (16 μg/L) NGF was inserted into cerebral infarction focus sham operation group and at 3 days after reperfusion in other two groups. In addition, contents of caspase-12 and caspase-3 were measured with immunohistochemical technique; mean

  2. Protection of pattern electroretinogram and retinal ganglion cells by oncostatin M after optic nerve injury.

    Xin Xia

    Full Text Available Injury to retinal ganglion cell (RGC axons leads to selective loss of RGCs and vision. Previous studies have shown that exogenous neurotrophic factors promote RGC survival. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of oncostatin M (OSM, a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines, on pattern electroretinogram (PERG and RGC survival after optic nerve crush (ON-crush in the mouse. BALB/C mice received ON-crush in the left eyes for either 4-second or 1-second duration (4-s or 1-s. Fluoro-gold retrograde labeling was used to identify RGCs. RGC function was assessed by PERG measurement. OSM or CNTF protein was injected intravitreally immediately after ON-crush. OSM responsive cells were identified by localization of increased STAT3 phosphorylation. Significant higher RGC survival (46% of untreated control was seen in OSM-treated eyes when assessed 2 weeks after 4-s ON-crush as compared to that (14% of untreated control of the PBS-treated eyes (P<0.001. In addition, PERG amplitude was significantly higher in eyes treated with OSM or CNTF 1 week after 1-s ON-crush (36% of baseline as compared with the amplitude of PBS-treated eyes (19% of the baseline, P = 0.003. An increase in STAT3 phosphorylation was localized in Müller layer after OSM treatment, suggesting that Müller cells mediate the effect of OSM. Our results demonstrate that one single injection of either OSM or CNTF after ON-crush improves RGC survival together with their electrophysiological activity. These data provide proof-of-concept for using neurotrophic factors OSM and CNTF for RGC degenerative diseases, including glaucoma and acute optic nerve trauma.

  3. Nitric oxide modulates bladder afferent nerve activity in the in vitro urinary bladder–pelvic nerve preparation from rats with cyclophosphamide induced cystitis

    Yu, Yongbei; de Groat, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of a nitric oxide (NO) donor (SNAP), NO substrate (l-arginine), and NO synthase inhibitor (l-NAME) on bladder afferent nerve (BAN) activity were studied in an in vitro bladder–pelvic nerve preparation from untreated or cyclophosphamide (CYP) treated rats. Distension of the bladder induced phasic bladder contractions (PBC) that were accompanied by multiunit afferent firing. Intravesical administration of SNAP (2 mM) which did not change the amplitude of PBC significantly decreased peak...

  4. Tumour necrosis factor α enhances CCL2 and ICAM-1 expression in peripheral nerve microvascular endoneurial endothelial cells

    Evan B. Stubbs

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recruitment and trafficking of autoreactive leucocytes across the BNB (blood–nerve barrier is an early pathological insult in GBS (Guillain-Barré syndrome, an aggressive autoimmune disorder of the PNS (peripheral nervous system. Whereas the aetiology and pathogenesis of GBS remain unclear, pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α, are reported to be elevated early in the course of GBS and may initiate nerve injury by activating the BNB. Previously, we reported that disrupting leucocyte trafficking in vivo therapeutically attenuates the course of an established animal model of GBS. Here, PNMECs (peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells that form the BNB were harvested from rat sciatic nerves, immortalized by SV40 (simian virus 40 large T antigen transduction and subsequently challenged with TNFα. Relative changes in CCL2 (chemokine ligand 2 and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression were determined. We report that TNFα elicits marked dose- and time-dependent increases in CCL2 and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein content and promotes secretion of functional CCL2 from immortalized and primary PNMEC cultures. TNFα-mediated secretion of CCL2 promotes, in vitro, the transendothelial migration of CCR2-expressing THP-1 monocytes. Increased CCL2 and ICAM-1 expression in response to TNFα may facilitate recruitment and trafficking of autoreactive leucocytes across the BNB in autoimmune disorders, including GBS.

  5. Uptake of 3H-thymidine by the receptor cell populations after injury of the sensory nerve fibres

    The material of the study was the skin from the beak of two-day ducklings. The investigation was carried out on the 2nd, 5th, 20th and 45th day after the crushing of the sensory nerve fibres entering the capsulated Herbst receptors. Twenty four hours before the biopsy, the ducklings were injected at 6 hours intervals with 3H-thymidine. The number of labelled index in the three cell pupulations, participating in the receptor development was determined. The cells of the subcapsular space of all control animals (with intacted suborbital nerves) have shown the highest labelled index. The index of the capsular perineural cells is about 12 times lower, while the labelled index of the Schwann receptor cells is about 10 times lower. Following the denervation, the labelled index in increasing and reaches its maximum on the 5th postoperative day. The Schwann receptor cells in comparison to the two other cell populations show the most significant deviation during the regeneration (45th day after the intervention). The investigations show that all three cell populations pass through a miotic cycle of innovation. The low labelled index of the Schwann receptors (1-2 labelled cells in 1000) is an indication of a high differentiation. One can assume that their regeneration takes place at the expense of the proper proliferation activity as well as of the differentiation of the Schwann cells from the distal section of the regenerating sensory nerve fibres. Taking into consideration the high labelled index of the other populations, it seems most probable that their regeneration takes place for the expense of their own cell populations. (A.B.)

  6. Neuregulin facilitates nerve regeneration by speeding Schwann cell migration via ErbB2/3-dependent FAK pathway.

    Hung-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adequate migration of Schwann cells (Sc is crucial for axon-guidance in the regenerative process after peripheral nerve injury (PNI. Considering neuregulin-erbB-FAK signaling is an essential pathway participating in the regulation of Sc migration during development, the present study is aimed to examine whether neuregulin would exert its beneficial effects on adult following PNI and further determine the potential changes of downstream pathway engaged in neuro-regeneration by both in vitro and in vivo approaches. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultured RSC96 cells treated with neuregulin were processed for erbB2/3 immunofluorescence and FAK immunoblotings. The potential effects of neuregulin on Sc were assessed by cell adherence, spreading, and migration assays. In order to evaluate the functional significance of neuregulin on neuro-regeneration, the in vivo model of PNI was performed by chronic end-to-side neurorrhaphy (ESN. In vitro studies indicated that after neuregulin incubation, erbB2/3 were not only expressed in cell membranes, but also distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of RSC96 cells. Activation of erbB2/3 was positively correlated with FAK phosphorylation. Neuregulin also increases Sc adherence, spreading, and migration by 127.2 ± 5.0%, 336.8 ± 3.0%, and 80.0 ± 5.7%, respectively. As for in vivo study, neuregulin significantly accelerates the speed of Sc migration and increases Sc expression in the distal stump of injured nerves. Retrograde labeling and compound muscle action potential recordings (CMAP also showed that neuregulin successfully facilitates nerve regeneration by eliciting noticeably larger CMAP and promoting quick re-innervation of target muscles. CONCLUSIONS: As neuregulin successfully improves axo-glial interaction by speeding Sc migration via the erbB2/3-FAK pathway, therapeutic use of neuregulin may thus serve as a promising strategy to facilitate the progress of nerve regeneration

  7. Ultrastructural effects of acute tetraethyllead poisoning on nerve cells of the rabbit brain

    Niklowitz, W.J.

    1974-08-01

    A study of the ultrastructural alterations of nerve cell components in specific areas of the brain of the rabbit after acute poisoning with tetraethyllead (TEL). A single dose of 100 mg/kg of TEL caused neurological disorders such as convulsions after a latency of 12 to 18 h. An electron microscopic study revealed that the nerve cells of the areas investigated contained different stages of degenerative changes not demonstrated by light microscopy. These appear to be dependent on location and antedate the neurological disorders. The cytopathogenesis is discussed in the light of these findings and available biochemical data. (CIS Abstract Vol. 2)

  8. Lacrimal gland and perioptic nerve lesions due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis (2007: 9b)

    We report a patient presenting with bilateral lacrimal gland involvement and perioptic nerve sheath lesions due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) invasion. LCH is a rare multisystemic disease characterized by a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. All organs may be involved with a clinical spectrum ranging from a solitary bone lesion to a severe life-threatening multisystem disease. Osteolytic orbital bone lesions with extension into the adjacent orbital soft tissues have been described. To our knowledge, lacrimal gland involvement has probably been described only once before. Perioptic nerve lesions are also very rare, having been described only three times before. (orig.)

  9. Lacrimal gland and perioptic nerve lesions due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis (2007: 9b)

    Herman, M.; Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Gool, S. van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Pediactrics, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels, I. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Ophthalmology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-12-15

    We report a patient presenting with bilateral lacrimal gland involvement and perioptic nerve sheath lesions due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) invasion. LCH is a rare multisystemic disease characterized by a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. All organs may be involved with a clinical spectrum ranging from a solitary bone lesion to a severe life-threatening multisystem disease. Osteolytic orbital bone lesions with extension into the adjacent orbital soft tissues have been described. To our knowledge, lacrimal gland involvement has probably been described only once before. Perioptic nerve lesions are also very rare, having been described only three times before. (orig.)

  10. Nerve Growth Factor Modulate Proliferation of Cultured Rabbit Corneal Endothelial Cells and Epithelial Cells

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells, the in vitro cultured rabbit corneal endothelial cells and epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of NGF.MTT assay was used to examine the clonal growth and proliferation of the cells by determining the absorbency values at 570nm. The results showed that NGF with three concentrations ranging from 5 U/mL to 500 U/mL enhanced the proliferation of rabbit corneal endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF got more increase of proliferation than that of 5 U/mL NGF did.Meanwhile, 50 U/mL and 500 U/mL NGF could promote the proliferation of the rabbit corneal epithelial cells significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. However, 5 U/mL NGF did not enhance the proliferation of epithelial cells. It was suggested that exogenous NGF can stimulate the proliferation of both rabbit corneal endothelial and epithelial cells, but the extent of modulation is different.

  11. [Transplanted epidermal neural crest stem cell in a peripheral nerve gap].

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Jieyuan; Li, Bingcang; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Bin

    2014-04-01

    Neural crest stem cells originated from hair follicle (epidermal neural crest stem cell, EPI-NCSC) are easy to obtain and have potentials to differentiate into various tissues, which make them eminent seed cells for tissue engineering. EPI-NCSC is now used to repair nerve injury, especially, the spinal cord injury. To investigate their effects on repairing peripheral nerve injury, EPI-NCSC from a GFP-SD rat were primarily cultured on coated dishes and on a poly lactic acid coglycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) membrane. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay showed that the initial adhesion rate of EPI-NCSC was 89.7% on PLGA membrane, and the relative growth rates were 89.3%, 87.6%, 85.6%, and 96.6% on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th day respectively. Cell cycles and DNA ploidy analysis demonstrated that cell cycles and proliferation indexes of cultured EPI-NCSC had the same variation pattern on coated dishes and PLGA membrane. Then cultured EPI-NCSC were mixed with equal amount of extracellular matrix and injected into a PLGA conduit to connect a 10 mm surgery excision gap of rat sciatic nerve, Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) was used to substitute EPI-NCSC in the control group. After four weeks of transplantation, the defected sciatic nerve achieved a histological restoration, the sensory function of rat hind limb was partly recovered and the sciatic nerve index was also improved. The above results showed that a PLGA conduit filled with EPI-NCSC has a good repair effect on the peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25195250

  12. Exogenous cholecystokinin-8 reduces vagal efferent nerve activity in rats through CCKA receptors

    Bucinskaite, Violeta; Kurosawa, Mieko; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that the vagus nerve plays a role in mediating cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) effect on such gastric functions as motility, emptying and gastric acid secretion. To examine the contribution of the efferent pathways in realizing these effects, efferent mass activity in the ventral gastric vagal nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats was recorded.Intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (0.1–1 nmol) suppressed the efferent activity. The effect of CCK-8 was significantly reduced in animals with total ...

  13. The neurotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide and copper in Retzius nerve cells of the leech Haemopis sanguisuga.

    Jovanovic, Zorica D; Stanojevic, Marija B; Nedeljkov, Vladimir B

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in cellular damage. Electrophysiological analyses have shown that membrane transport proteins are susceptible to ROS. In the present study, oxidative stress was induced in Retzius nerve cells of the leechHaemopis sanguisugaby bath application of 1 mM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 0.02 mM of copper (Cu) for 20 min. The H2O2/Cu(II) produced considerable changes in the electrical properties of the Retzius nerve cells. Intracellular recording of the resting membrane potential revealed that the neuronal membrane was depolarized in the presence of H2O2/Cu(II). We found that the amplitude of action potentials decreased, while the duration augmented in a progressive way along the drug exposure time. The combined application of H2O2and Cu(II) caused an initial excitation followed by depression of the spontaneous electrical activity. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed a second effect of the oxidant, a powerful inhibition of the outward potassium channels responsible for the repolarization of action potentials. The neurotoxic effect of H2O2/Cu(II) on the spontaneous spike electrogenesis and outward K(+)current of Retzius nerve cells was reduced in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethylthiourea and dimethyl sulfoxide, but not mannitol. This study provides evidence for the oxidative modification of outward potassium channels in Retzius nerve cells. The oxidative mechanism of the H2O2/Cu(II) system action on the electrical properties of Retzius neurons proposed in this study might have a wider significance, referring not only to leeches but also to mammalian neurons. PMID:26935393

  14. The neurotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide and copper in Retzius nerve cells of the leech Haemopis sanguisuga

    Zorica D. Jovanovic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS play an important role in cellular damage. Electrophysiological analyses have shown that membrane transport proteins are susceptible to ROS. In the present study, oxidative stress was induced in Retzius nerve cells of the leech Haemopis sanguisuga by bath application of 1 mM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and 0.02 mM of copper (Cu for 20 min. The H2O2/Cu(II produced considerable changes in the electrical properties of the Retzius nerve cells. Intracellular recording of the resting membrane potential revealed that the neuronal membrane was depolarized in the presence of H2O2/Cu(II. We found that the amplitude of action potentials decreased, while the duration augmented in a progressive way along the drug exposure time. The combined application of H2O2 and Cu(II caused an initial excitation followed by depression of the spontaneous electrical activity. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed a second effect of the oxidant, a powerful inhibition of the outward potassium channels responsible for the repolarization of action potentials. The neurotoxic effect of H2O2/Cu(II on the spontaneous spike electrogenesis and outward K+ current of Retzius nerve cells was reduced in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, dimethylthiourea and dimethyl sulfoxide, but not mannitol. This study provides evidence for the oxidative modification of outward potassium channels in Retzius nerve cells. The oxidative mechanism of the H2O2/Cu(II system action on the electrical properties of Retzius neurons proposed in this study might have a wider significance, referring not only to leeches but also to mammalian neurons.

  15. Human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into nerve-like cells

    MA Lian; FENG Xue-yong; CUI Bing-lin; Frieda Law; JIANG Xue-wu; YANG Li-ye; XIE Qing-dong; HUANG Tian-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background The two most basic properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the capacities to self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into multiple cells and tissue types. The cells from human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly have properties of MSCs and represent a rich source of primitive cells. This study was conducted to explore the possibility of inducing human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs to differentiate into nerve-like cells.Methods MSCs were cultured from the Wharton's Jelly taken from human umbilical cord of babies delivered after full-term normal labor. Salvia miltiorrhiza and β-mercaptoethanol were used to induce the human umbilical cord-derived MSCs to differentiate. The expression of neural protein markers was shown by immunocytochemistry. The induction process was monitored by phase contrast microscopy, electron microscopy (EM), and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) .The pleiotrophin and nestin genes were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results MSCs in the Wharton's Jelly were easily attainable and could be maintained and expanded in culture. They were positive for markers of MSCs, but negative for markers of hematopoietic cells and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related cells. Treatment with Salvia miltiorrhiza caused Wharton's Jelly cells to undergo profound morphological changes. The induced MSCs developed rounded cell bodies with multiple neurite-like extensions. Eventually they developed processes that formed networks reminiscent of primary cultures of neurons. Salvia miltiorrhiza and β-mercaptoethanol also induced MSCs to express nestin, β-tubulinⅢ, neurofilament (NF) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). It was confirmed by RT-PCR that MSCs could express pleiotrophin both before and after induction by Salvia miltiorrhiza. The expression was markedly enhanced after induction and the nestin gene was also expressed.Conclusions MSCs could be isolated from human umbilical

  16. Bone marrow-derived, neural-like cells have the characteristics of neurons to protect the peripheral nerve in microenvironment.

    Guo, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Yan; Zhi, Yun-Xia; Han, Chang-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Hao; Liu, Fang; Lin, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Chuan-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that "neural-like cells" may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were injected into the distal end of severed rabbit peripheral nerves that were no longer integrated with the central nervous system. Electromyography (EMG), immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the development of the cells in the peripheral nerve environment. The CMAP amplitude appeared during the 5th week following surgery, at which time morphological characteristics of myelinated nerve fiber formation were observed. Bone marrow-derived neural-like cells could protect the disintegration and destruction of the injured peripheral nerve. PMID:25861281

  17. Expression and Purification of Active Recombinant Human Nerve Growth Factor from Escherichia coli

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction Nerve growth factor (NGF) was first discovered and purified by Rita Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen in the 1950s[1,2]. It represents the first cellular growth factor ever discovered and involved in the growth, survival, and differentiation of specific nerve cell populations[3]. Although animal tests and phase-Ⅱ clinical trials indicate that rhNGF could be an effective treatment for diabetic[4] and HIV-related neuropathies[5] , a large-scale phase-Ⅲ clinical trial has failed to give similar result[6].

  18. A comparative study of axon-surrounding cells in the two nasal nerve tracts from mouse olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ.

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Tsuruta, Momoko; Mori, Hisamichi; Nishikawa, Chisa; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2013-03-29

    The olfactory and vomeronasal systems are the two nasal chemical detectors in mammals. While glial cells in the olfactory nerve tracts have been well-investigated, little is known about cells in the vomeronasal nerve tracts. In the present study, we compared the expression patterns of marker proteins in the cells comprising the two nasal nerve tracts in mice. Neural crest-derived cells surrounded the olfactory nerve axons in the lamina propria of the olfactory epithelium. These cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and p75 glycoprotein, which are markers of olfactory ensheathing cells. Neural crest-derived cells also surrounded the vomeronasal nerve axons in the lamina propria of the vomeronasal epithelium. These nerve axon-surrounding cells, however, did not express GFAP or p75. Rather, the vomeronasal nerve axons expressed GFAP and p75. These results suggest that axon-surrounding cells functionally differ between the olfactory and vomeronasal nerve tracts. PMID:23410787

  19. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repairvia paracrine mechanisms

    Zhi-yuan Guo; Xun Sun; Xiao-long Xu; Qing Zhao; Jiang Peng; Yu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the para-crine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These ifndings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  20. Axon-Schwann cell interaction in degenerating and regenerating peripheral nerve

    Severance of a peripheral nerve stimulates a characteristic sequence of events in the distal stump, including the dissolution of axons and myelin and the proliferation of Schwann cells within their basal lamina. The first part of this thesis employs the cat tibial nerve to examine the relationship between the spatio-temporal pattern of Schwann cell mitosis, loss of the structural and functional properties of axolemma, synthesis of P0, the major myelin glycoprotein, and the clearance of morphological myelin. Induction of S phase was measured by determining the uptake of 3H thymidine into trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitates following a 3 hour in vitro incubation in Krebs-Ringers buffer containing 3H thymidine. Nerve transection stimulated a monophasic increase in 3H thymidine uptake that peaked at 4 days post-transection throughout an 80 mm length of distal stump. Light microscope autoradiography revealed prominent incorporation into Schwann cells of myelinated fibers. Nerve transection also produced dramatic changes in the intrafascicular binding of 3H STX which binds to voltage-sensitive sodium channels STX binding fell precipitously to 20% of normal at 4 days post-transection, concurrent with the peak of 3H thymidine uptake. In conclusion, these studies suggest: (a) Schwann cells divide more or less contemporaneously throughout the distal stump; (b) changes in axons rather than myelin are likely to stimulate the Schwann cell to divide; (c) mitosis regulates other events during Wallerian degeneration, including myelin degeneration and the clearance of sodium channels from nodal axolemma

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  2. Selective control of muscle activation with a multipolar nerve cuff electrode.

    Veraart, C; Grill, W M; Mortimer, J T

    1993-07-01

    Acute experiments were performed on adult cats to study selective activation of medial gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis anterior, and extensor digitorum longus with a cuff electrode. A spiral nerve cuff containing twelve "dot" electrodes was implanted around the sciatic nerve and evoked muscle twitch forces were recorded in six experiments. Spatially isolated "dot" electrodes in four geometries: monopolar, longitudinal tripolar, tripolar with four common anodes, and two parallel tripoles, were combined with transverse field steering current(s) from an anode(s) located 180 degrees around from the cathode(s) to activate different regions of the nerve trunk. To quantify the degree of selectivity, a selectivity index was defined as the ratio of the force in one muscle to the force in all four muscles in response to a particular stimulus. The selectivity index was used to construct recruitment curves for a muscle with the optimal degree of selectivity. Physiological responses were correlated with the anatomical structure of the sciatic nerve by identifying the nerve fascicles innervating the four muscles, and by determining the relative positions of the electrodes and the nerve fascicles. The results indicated that the use of transverse field steering current improved selectivity. We also found that tripoles with individual dot anodes were more selective than tripoles with four common dot anodes. Stimulation with two parallel tripoles was effective in activating selectively fascicles that could not be activated selectively with only a single tripole. The multipolar cuff proved an effective method to control selectively and progressively the force in muscles innervated by fascicles that were well defined at the level of the cuff. PMID:8244425

  3. Granular Cell Tumor of Brachial Plexus Mimicking Nerve Sheath Tumor: A Case Report

    Kim, Young-Im; Lee, Chul-kyu; Cho, Ki Hong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Primary tumors of the brachial plexus region are rare and granular cell tumors arising from the brachial plexus region is an extremely rare disease. We present a case of granular cell tumor arising from of the brachial plexus which appeared to be a usual presentation of nerve sheath tumor before the pathological confirmation. We report a granular cell tumor of the brachial plexus with literature review. Total resection is important for good clinical outcome and prognosis in the treatment of g...

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells engrafted in a fibrin scaffold stimulate Schwann cell reactivity and axonal regeneration following sciatic nerve tubulization.

    Cartarozzi, Luciana P; Spejo, Aline B; Ferreira, Rui S; Barraviera, Benedito; Duek, Eliana; Carvalho, Juliana L; Góes, Alfredo M; Oliveira, Alexandre L R

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) associated with a fibrin scaffold (FS) for the peripheral regenerative process after nerve tubulization. Adult female Lewis rats received a unilateral sciatic nerve transection followed by repair with a polycaprolactone (PCL)-based tubular prosthesis. Sixty days after injury, the regenerated nerves were studied by immunohistochemistry. Anti-p75NTR immunostaining was used to investigate the reactivity of the MSCs. Basal labeling, which was upregulated during the regenerative process, was detected in uninjured nerves and was significantly greater in the MSC-treated group. The presence of GFP-positive MSCs was detected in the nerves, indicating the long term survival of such cells. Moreover, there was co-localization between MSCs and BNDF immunoreactivity, showing a possible mechanism by which MSCs improve the reactivity of SCs. Myelinated axon counting and morphometric analyses showed that MSC engrafting led to a higher degree of fiber compaction combined with a trend of increased myelin sheath thickness, when compared with other groups. The functional result of MSC engrafting was that the animals showed higher motor function recovery at the seventh and eighth week after lesion. The findings herein show that MSC+FS therapy improves the nerve regeneration process by positively modulating the reactivity of SCs. PMID:25602253

  5. Bone Marrow-Derived, Neural-Like Cells Have the Characteristics of Neurons to Protect the Peripheral Nerve in Microenvironment

    Shi-lei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that “neural-like cells” may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were injected into the distal end of severed rabbit peripheral nerves that were no longer integrated with the central nervous system. Electromyography (EMG, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were employed to analyze the development of the cells in the peripheral nerve environment. The CMAP amplitude appeared during the 5th week following surgery, at which time morphological characteristics of myelinated nerve fiber formation were observed. Bone marrow-derived neural-like cells could protect the disintegration and destruction of the injured peripheral nerve.

  6. Using Stem Cells to Grow Artificial Tissue for Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Bhangra, Kulraj Singh; Busuttil, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury continues to pose a clinical hurdle despite its frequency and advances in treatment. Unlike the central nervous system, neurons of the peripheral nervous system have a greater ability to regenerate. However, due to a number of confounding factors, this is often both incomplete and inadequate. The lack of supportive Schwann cells or their inability to maintain a regenerative phenotype is a major factor. Advances in nervous system tissue engineering technology have led to efforts to build Schwann cell scaffolds to overcome this and enhance the regenerative capacity of neurons following injury. Stem cells that can differentiate along a neural lineage represent an essential resource and starting material for this process. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell types that are showing promise for nervous system tissue engineering in the context of peripheral nerve injury. We also discuss some of the biological, practical, ethical, and commercial considerations in using these different stem cells for future clinical application.

  7. MODULATION BREATHING OF THE ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY IN THE PHRENIC NERVE DURING STARTLES REFLEXES

    Emanov, Sergey

    2006-01-01

    In the paper the reflex activity in the phrenic nerve is studied in chloralose anesthetized cats during development of somatic startle reflexes. Modulation of responses during the respiratory cycle is described. Organization of possible neurophysiologic mechanisms of phrenic responses during startle reflexes is discussed

  8. Simultaneous cell death in the trigeminal ganglion and in ganglion neurons present in the oculomotor nerve of the bovine fetus.

    Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E; Barazzoni, A M; Costerbosa, G L; Scapolo, P A

    1990-01-01

    A well-developed ganglion and scattered ganglion cells are present in the intracranial portion of the oculomotor nerve during the first half of fetal life in the ox. In the second half of fetal life a dramatic reduction of the ganglion cells associated with the oculomotor nerve occurs because of spontaneous cell death. Concomitantly, the same phenomenon of cell death is found in the trigeminal ganglion, especially in its rostromedial portion. Free degenerating perikarya can be found in the ca...

  9. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity and hemodynamic alterations in middle-aged obese women

    Ribeiro M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the relationship between the sympathetic nerve activity and hemodynamic alterations in obesity, we simultaneously measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, blood pressure, and forearm blood flow (FBF in obese and lean individuals. Fifteen normotensive obese women (BMI = 32.5 ± 0.5 kg/m² and 11 age-matched normotensive lean women (BMI = 22.7 ± 1.0 kg/m² were studied. MSNA was evaluated directly from the peroneal nerve by microneurography, FBF was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography, and blood pressure was measured noninvasively by an autonomic blood pressure cuff. MSNA was significantly increased in obese women when compared with lean control women. Forearm vascular resistance and blood pressure were significantly higher in obese women than in lean women. FBF was significantly lower in obese women. BMI was directly and significantly correlated with MSNA, blood pressure, and forearm vascular resistance levels, but inversely and significantly correlated with FBF levels. Obesity increases sympathetic nerve activity and muscle vascular resistance, and reduces muscle blood flow. These alterations, taken together, may explain the higher blood pressure levels in obese women when compared with lean age-matched women.

  10. Stimulation of raphe (obscurus) nucleus causes long-term potentiation of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-12-01

    1. The respiratory response, measured as integrated phrenic nerve activity, during and for up to an hour following 10 min of continuous electrical stimulation of raphe obscurus was quantitated in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. End-tidal PCO2 and body temperature were kept constant with servocontrollers. 2. Stimulation of raphe obscurus caused a significant increase in both phrenic tidal activity and respiratory frequency that persisted following cessation of the stimulus. This persistent facilitation is referred to as 'long-term potentiation' of respiration. 3. Control stimulations in the parenchyma of the medulla oblongata failed to stimulate respiration and cause the long-term potentiation. 4. Both the direct facilitatory effects of raphe obscurus stimulation on phrenic nerve activity and the long-term potentiation of respiration following the stimulus were prevented by pre-treating cats with methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the raphe obscurus being the potential source of the long-term potentiation of respiration that occurs following stimulation of carotid body afferents (Millhorn, Eldridge & Waldrop, 1980a, b). PMID:3114470

  11. Activation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus by forebrain hypertonicity selectively increases tonic vasomotor sympathetic nerve activity.

    Holbein, Walter W; Toney, Glenn M

    2015-03-01

    We recently reported that mean arterial pressure (MAP) is maintained in water-deprived rats by an irregular tonic component of vasomotor sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) that is driven by neuronal activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). To establish whether generation of tonic SNA requires time-dependent (i.e., hours or days of dehydration) neuroadaptive responses or can be abruptly generated by even acute circuit activation, forebrain sympathoexcitatory osmosensory inputs to PVN were stimulated by infusion (0.1 ml/min, 10 min) of hypertonic saline (HTS; 1.5 M NaCl) through an internal carotid artery (ICA). Whereas isotonic saline (ITS; 0.15 M NaCl) had no effect (n = 5), HTS increased (P phosphonovaleric acid (AP5; n = 6) had similar effects. Analysis of respiratory rhythmic bursting of sSNA revealed that ICA HTS increased mean voltage (P < 0.001) without affecting the amplitude of inspiratory or expiratory bursts. Analysis of cardiac rhythmic sSNA likewise revealed that ICA HTS increased mean voltage. Cardiac rhythmic sSNA oscillation amplitude was also increased, which is consistent with activation of arterial baroreceptor during the accompanying pressor response. Increased mean sSNA voltage by HTS was blocked by prior PVN inhibition (muscimol) and blockade of PVN NMDA receptors (AP5). We conclude that even acute glutamatergic activation of PVN (i.e., by hypertonicity) is sufficient to selectively increase a tonic component of vasomotor SNA. PMID:25519737

  12. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  13. Implanted hair follicle stem cells form Schwann cells that support repair of severed peripheral nerves

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Campillo, Raul; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Katsuoka, Kensei; Penman, Sheldon; Robert M Hoffman

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle bulge area is an abundant, easily accessible source of actively growing, pluripotent adult stem cells. Nestin, a protein marker for neural stem cells, also is expressed in follicle stem cells and their immediate, differentiated progeny. The fluorescent protein GFP, whose expression is driven by the nestin regulatory element in transgenic mice, served to mark the follicle cell fate. The pluripotent nestin-driven GFP stem cells are positive for the stem cell marker CD34 but ne...

  14. Distribution of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Effects on Neuronal Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush and Cell Therapy

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise Alessandra; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; da Silva-Junior, Almir Jordão; Nascimento-dos-Santos, Gabriel; Gubert, Fernanda; de Figueirêdo, Ana Beatriz Padilha; Torres, Ana Luiza; Paredes, Bruno D.; Teixeira, Camila; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have been used in different animal models of neurological diseases. We investigated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) injected into the vitreous body in a model of optic nerve injury. Adult (3–5 months old) Lister Hooded rats underwent unilateral optic nerve crush followed by injection of MSC or the vehicle into the vitreous body. Before they were injected, MSC were labeled with a fluorescent dye or with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which allowed us to track the cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Sixteen and 28 days after injury, the survival of retinal ganglion cells was evaluated by assessing the number of Tuj1- or Brn3a-positive cells in flat-mounted retinas, and optic nerve regeneration was investigated after anterograde labeling of the optic axons with cholera toxin B conjugated to Alexa 488. Transplanted MSC remained in the vitreous body and were found in the eye for several weeks. Cell therapy significantly increased the number of Tuj1- and Brn3a-positive cells in the retina and the number of axons distal to the crush site at 16 and 28 days after optic nerve crush, although the RGC number decreased over time. MSC therapy was associated with an increase in the FGF-2 expression in the retinal ganglion cells layer, suggesting a beneficial outcome mediated by trophic factors. Interleukin-1β expression was also increased by MSC transplantation. In summary, MSC protected RGC and stimulated axon regeneration after optic nerve crush. The long period when the transplanted cells remained in the eye may account for the effect observed. However, further studies are needed to overcome eventually undesirable consequences of MSC transplantation and to potentiate the beneficial ones in order to sustain the neuroprotective effect overtime. PMID:25347773

  15. Effect of nerve growth factor and fibroblast growth factor on PC12 cells: inhibition by orthovanadate

    1993-01-01

    Sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, causes increased levels of tyrosine phosphorylation and blocks, at noncytotoxic concentrations, the differentiative response of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to beta-nerve growth factor (beta NGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a reversible manner. It also prevents growth factor-induced neurite proliferation in primed cells and causes the retraction of previously formed neurites, even in the presence of bet...

  16. Hirschsprung's disease: Is there a relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers?

    Amit Kumar Yadav; Kiran Mishra; Anup Mohta; Sarla Agarwal

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To define the topography of mast cells and their numbers in cases of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) and non-HD, assess neural hypertrophy using imaging software and to study the relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers. METHODS:HE stained sections of 32 cases of chronic constipation in the age group of 0-14 years were reviewed for ganglion cells. AChE staining was performed on frozen sections of colonic and rectal biopsies. Based on their findings cases were divided into HD and non-HD and mast cells stained by toluidine blue were evaluated. Image analysis by computerized software was applied to S-100 stained sections for assessment of neural hypertrophy. RESULTS:Difference between number of mast cells in HD group (mean = 36.44) and in non-HD group (mean = 14.79) was statistically significant. Image analysis morphometry on S-100 stained sections served as a useful adjunct. The difference between number, size, and perimeter of the nerve fibers between HD and non-HD group was statistically significant. CONCLUSION:Mast cells are significantly increased in HD and their base line values are much higher in Indian children than that reported in Western literature. Their role in HD needs further research. Morphometry of S-100 stained nerve fibers is a useful adjunct to conventional methods for diagnosis of HD.

  17. Real-time detection of dopamine released from a nerve model cell by an enzyme-catalyzed luminescence method and its application to drug assessment.

    Shinohara, Hiroaki; Wang, Feifei

    2007-01-01

    A real-time observation of neurotransmitter release from a nerve cell is a useful method for not only neuroscience research, but also assessing of the influence of chemicals, including drugs, on the human nervous system. In this study, a more simple and sensitive method for real-time monitoring of dopamine release from a nerve model cell was developed. Highly sensitive detection of dopamine was performed by using tyramine oxidase for dopamine oxidation, which was followed by a luminol luminescence reaction. This enzyme-catalyzed luminescence method was applied to observe dopamine release from the PC12 cell as a nerve model cell upon stimulation with acetylcholine and an acetylcholine receptor agonist. The results demonstrated that the real-time monitoring of the activation of the PC12 cell was easily performed by this method. This method possessed many advantages, such as high sensitivity, rapid measurement and no pretreatment for cells. It might be applied to drug screening and the assessment of harmful influences of food additives and pesticides on the nerves. PMID:17213629

  18. Advantage of recording single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure

    HISAYOSHI eMURAI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Elevated sympathetic activation is a characteristic feature of heart failure (HF. Excessive sympathetic activation under resting conditions has been shown to increase from the early stages of the disease, and is related to prognosis. Direct recording of multiunit efferent muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA by microneurography is the best method for quantifying sympathetic nerve activity in humans. To date, this technique has been used to evaluate the actual central sympathetic outflow to the periphery in HF patients at rest and during exercise; however, because the firing occurrence of sympathetic activation is mainly synchronized by pulse pressure, multiunit MSNA, expressed as burst frequency (bursts/min and burst incidence (bursts/100heartbeats, may have limitations for the quantification of sympathetic nerve activity. In HF, multiunit MSNA is near the maximum level, and cannot increase further than the heartbeat. Single-unit MSNA analysis in humans is technically demanding, but provides more detailed information regarding central sympathetic firing. Although a great deal is known about the response of multiunit MSNA to stress, little information is available regarding the responses of single-unit MSNA to physiological stress and disease. The purposes of this review are to describe the differences between multiunit and single-unit MSNA during stress and to discuss the advantages of single-unit MSNA recording in improving our understanding the pathology of increased sympathetic activity in HF.

  19. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    Hongyang Gao; Yang You; Guoping Zhang; Feng Zhao; Ziyi Sha; Yong Shen

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cul...

  20. Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation: Signaling Mechanisms and Cardiovascular Consequences in Obesity

    Rahmouni, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Obesity increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part by inducing hypertension. One factor linking excess fat mass to cardiovascular diseases may be the sympathetic cardiovascular actions of leptin. Initial studies of leptin showed it regulates appetite and enhances energy expenditure by activating sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to thermogenic brown adipose tissue. Further study, however, demonstrated leptin also causes sympathetic excitation to the kidney that, in turn, increase...

  1. Protein gene product 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibres and cells in human skin.

    Wang, L; Hilliges, M; Jernberg, T; Wiegleb-Edström, D; Johansson, O

    1990-07-01

    Sections of human skin were processed according to the indirect immunofluorescence technique with a rabbit antiserum against human protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Immunoreactivity was detected in intraepidermal and dermal nerve fibres and cells. The intraepidermal nerves were varicose or smooth with different diameters, running as single processes or branched, straight or bent, projecting in various directions and terminating in the stratum basale, spinosum or granulosum. The density of the intraepidermal nerves varied between the different skin areas investigated. PGP 9.5-containing axons of the lower dermis were found in large bundles. They separated into smaller axon bundles within the upper dermis, entering this portion of the skin perpendicular to the surface. Then they branched into fibres mainly arranged parallel to the epidermal-dermal junctional zone. However, the fibres en route to the epidermis traversed the upper dermis more or less perpendicularly. Furthermore, immunoreactive dermal nerve fibres were found in the Meissner corpuscles, the arrector pili muscles, hair follicles, around the eccrine and apocrine sweat glands and around certain blood vessels. Such fibres were also observed around most subcutaneous blood vessels, sometimes heavily innervating these structures. Numerous weakly-to-strongly PGP 9.5-immunoreactive cells were found both in the epidermis and in the dermis. PMID:2143435

  2. A combination of Schwann-cell grafts and aerobic exercise enhances sciatic nerve regeneration.

    Camila Oliveira Goulart

    Full Text Available Despite the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system, severe nerve lesions lead to loss of target-organ innervation, making complete functional recovery a challenge. Few studies have given attention to combining different approaches in order to accelerate the regenerative process.Test the effectiveness of combining Schwann-cells transplantation into a biodegradable conduit, with treadmill training as a therapeutic strategy to improve the outcome of repair after mouse nerve injury.Sciatic nerve transection was performed in adult C57BL/6 mice; the proximal and distal stumps of the nerve were sutured into the conduit. Four groups were analyzed: acellular grafts (DMEM group, Schwann cell grafts (3×105/2 µL; SC group, treadmill training (TMT group, and treadmill training and Schwann cell grafts (TMT + SC group. Locomotor function was assessed weekly by Sciatic Function Index and Global Mobility Test. Animals were anesthetized after eight weeks and dissected for morphological analysis.Combined therapies improved nerve regeneration, and increased the number of myelinated fibers and myelin area compared to the DMEM group. Motor recovery was accelerated in the TMT + SC group, which showed significantly better values in sciatic function index and in global mobility test than in the other groups. The TMT + SC group showed increased levels of trophic-factor expression compared to DMEM, contributing to the better functional outcome observed in the former group. The number of neurons in L4 segments was significantly higher in the SC and TMT + SC groups when compared to DMEM group. Counts of dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons revealed that TMT group had a significant increased number of neurons compared to DMEM group, while the SC and TMT + SC groups had a slight but not significant increase in the total number of motor neurons.These data provide evidence that this combination of therapeutic strategies can significantly improve functional

  3. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy Activates Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Tuszynski, Mark H.; Yang, Jennifer H.; Barba, David; U, H S.; Bakay, Roy; Pay, Mary M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M.; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and lacks effective disease modifying therapies. In 2001 we initiated a clinical trial of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in AD patients. We present post-mortem findings in 10 subjects with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years post-treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS 10 patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using either ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all eight patients in the first Phase 1 ex vivo trial and two patients in a subsequent Phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In two cases, NGF protein levels were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Degenerating neurons in the AD brain respond to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF, in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and non-treated sides of the brain in three patients that underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P>0.05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers were present in two patients that underwent AAV2-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology as well as neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic genes with resulting activation of cell signaling. No adverse pathological effects related to NGF were observed. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings indicate that

  4. Enhancing nerve regeneration in the peripheral nervous system using polymeric scaffolds, stem cell engineering and nanoparticle delivery system

    Sharma, Anup Dutt

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex biological process responsible for regrowth of neural tissue following a nerve injury. The main objective of this project was to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration using interdisciplinary approaches involving polymeric scaffolds, stem cell therapy, drug delivery and high content screening. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric materials such as poly (lactic acid) were used for engineering conduits with micropatterns capable of providing mechanical support and orientation to the regenerating axons and polyanhydrides for fabricating nano/microparticles for localized delivery of neurotrophic growth factors and cytokines at the site of injury. Transdifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used as cellular replacements for lost native Schwann cells (SCs) at the injured nerve tissue. MSCs that have been transdifferentiated into an SC-like phenotype were tested as a substitute for the myelinating SCs. Also, genetically modified MSCs were engineered to hypersecrete brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to secrete therapeutic factors which Schwann cell secrete. To further enhance the regeneration, nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin-4 (IL4) releasing polyanhydrides nano/microparticles were fabricated and characterized in vitro for their efficacy. Synergistic use of these proposed techniques was used for fabricating a multifunctional nerve regeneration conduit which can be used as an efficient tool for enhancing peripheral nerve regeneration.

  5. Bone marrow cells produce nerve growth factor and promote angiogenesis around transplanted islets

    Naoaki; Sakata; Nathaniel; K; Chan; John; Chrisler; Andre; Obenaus; Eba; Hathout

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the mechanism by which bone marrow cells promote angiogenesis around transplanted islets.METHODS: Streptozotocin induced diabetic BALB/ c mice were transplanted syngeneically under the kidney capsule with the following: (1) 200 islets (islet group: n=12), (2) 1-5×106 bone marrow cells (bone marrow group: n=11), (3) 200 islets and 1-5×106 bone marrow cells (islet + bone marrow group: n= 13), or (4) no cells (sham group:n=5). All mice were evaluated for blood glucose, serum insulin, serum nerve...

  6. Real-Time Assessment of Autonomic Nerve Activity During Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Support or Waon Therapy.

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei

    2016-07-27

    Adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy are recently developed non-pharmacological and noninvasive therapies for patients with heart failure refractory to guideline-directed medical therapy. These therapies decrease both preload and afterload, increase cardiac output, and appear to ameliorate autonomic nerve activity. However, the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies remains unclear. We performed heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc power spectral density method (MemCalc system; Suwa Trust Co, Tokyo) to assess autonomic nerve activity during adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy in two different cases and determined the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies. During both therapies, we found a drastic increase in parasympathetic nerve activity and continuous suppression of sympathetic nerve activity. Heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc method may be promising for the assessment of the efficacy of various treatments, including adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy, from the viewpoint of autonomic nerve activity. PMID:27385607

  7. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization.

    Lv, Xue-Man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  8. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization

    Xue-man Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 µg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery.

  9. Increased autophagic activity in dorsal root ganglion attenuates neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury.

    Guo, Jian-Shuang; Jing, Peng-Bo; Wang, Ji-An; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-07-10

    Autophagy is a process of cellular self-cannibalization, and provides an adaptive mechanism to protect cells against diverse pathological settings. Following peripheral nerve injury, autophagic process was changed in Schwann cells and spinal neurons and glial cells, implicating a vital role of autophagy in chronic pain. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in neuropathic pain. In the present study, we investigated the autophagic process in DRG and its effect on neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). The level of microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, a general marker for autophagy, was increased in L5 DRG after SNL. Immunofluorescence staining showed that LC3-II puncta were observed in DRG neurons after SNL. Injection of autophagy inducer rapamycin into L5 DRG before or after SNL dose-dependently attenuated neuropathic pain. The expression of LC3 was enhanced in L5 DRG by rapamycin. These data suggest that the autophagy in L5 DRG neurons is a defensive reaction to L5 spinal nerve injury, and pharmacological enhancement of autophagy may be a potential treatment to prevent the onset and chronification of neuropathic pain. PMID:26021876

  10. Respiratory-related hypoglossal nerve activity: influence of anesthetics.

    Hwang, J C; St John, W M; Bartlett, D

    1983-09-01

    In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats, phrenic and respiratory-related hypoglossal discharges were evident at normocapnic normoxia or hyperoxia. Both increased progressively in hypercapnia or hypoxia. With increasing drive, onset of inspiratory hypoglossal activity began earlier relative to phrenic onset; an early expiratory hypoglossal burst was also observed. Following subanesthetic doses of chloralose, halothane, ketamine, or pentobarbital, hypoglossal activity was depressed much more than phrenic discharge. In moderate hypercapnia or hypoxia, phrenic activity increased more than hypoglossal, whereas, at high drive, the latter rose more sharply in some cats. Electromyograms of the diaphragm and genioglossus were recorded in intact awake cats to determine if their responses and those of decerebrates are comparable. Respiratory-related genioglossal discharge was evident in normocapnia. We conclude that anesthesia suppresses hypoglossal motor activities much more than those of the bulbospinal-phrenic system. Data for decerebrate cats and unanesthetized cats or humans provide no evidence of a differential distribution of chemoreceptor afferents on hypoglossal and bulbospinal-phrenic neurons, as suggested by results in anesthetized animals. PMID:6629915

  11. Current progress in use of adipose derived stem cells inperipheral nerve regeneration

    Shomari DL Zack-Williams; Peter E Butler; Deepak M Kalaskar

    2015-01-01

    Unlike central nervous system neurons; those in theperipheral nervous system have the potential for fullregeneration after injury. Following injury, recovery iscontrolled by schwann cells which replicate and modulatethe subsequent immune response. The level of nerverecovery is strongly linked to the severity of the initialinjury despite the significant advancements in imagingand surgical techniques. Multiple experimental modelshave been used with varying successes to augment thenatural regenerative processes which occur following nerveinjury. Stem cell therapy in peripheral nerve injury maybe an important future intervention to improve the bestattainable clinical results. In particular adipose derivedstem cells (ADSCs) are multipotent mesenchymal stemcells similar to bone marrow derived stem cells, which arethought to have neurotrophic properties and the ability todifferentiate into multiple lineages. They are ubiquitouswithin adipose tissue; they can form many structuresresembling the mature adult peripheral nervous system.Following early in vitro work; multiple small and largeanimal in vivo models have been used in conjunction withconduits, autografts and allografts to successfully bridgethe peripheral nerve gap. Some of the ADSC relatedneuroprotective and regenerative properties have beenelucidated however much work remains before a modelcan be used successfully in human peripheral nerve injury(PNI). This review aims to provide a detailed overview ofprogress made in the use of ADSC in PNI, with discussionon the role of a tissue engineered approach for PNI repair.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  13. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Yang Wang; Zheng-wei Li; Min Luo; Ya-jun Li; Ke-qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some re-spects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the poly-lactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve ifbers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylac-tic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is ben-eifcial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was found with the

  14. Monitoring of immune cell response to B cell depletion therapy and nerve root injury using SPIO enhanced MRI

    Thorek, Daniel L.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a robust platform for non-invasive, high-resolution anatomical imaging. However, MR imaging lacks the requisite sensitivity and contrast for imaging at the cellular level. This represents a clinical impediment to greater diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances have allowed for the in vivo visualization of populations and even of individual cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents. These nanoparticles, commonly manifested as a core of a single iron oxide crystal or cluster of crystals coated in a biocompatible shell, function to shorten proton relaxation times. In MR imaging these constructs locally dephase protons, resulting in a decrease in signal (hypointensity) localized to the region of accumulation of SPIO. In the context of immune cell imaging, SPIO can provide insight into the cellular migration patterns, trafficking, temporal dynamics and progression of diseases and their related pathological states. Furthermore, by visualizing the presence and activity of immune cells, SPIO-enabled cellular imaging can help evaluate the efficacy of therapy in immune disorders. This thesis examines the production, modification and application of SPIO in a range of in vitro and in vivo immune-response-relevant cellular systems. The role of different nanoparticle characteristics including diameter, surface charge and concentration are investigated in the labeling of T cells in culture. Following optimization of SPIO loading conditions for lymphocytes, the effect these particles have on the activation of primary B cells are elucidated. B cells are tracked using a variety of modalities, with and without the application of B cell depleting therapy. This is to evaluate the efficacy of SPIO as in vivo marker for B cell distribution. Unmodified SPIO were applied to monitor macrophage infiltration in a transient nerve root compression model, with implications for neck pain diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticle accumulation and MR

  15. Analgesic drug delivery via recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and microRNA-183-triggered opening of the blood-nerve barrier.

    Yang, Shaobing; Krug, Susanne M; Heitmann, Johanna; Hu, Liu; Reinhold, Ann Kristin; Sauer, Solange; Bosten, Judith; Sommer, Claudia; Fromm, Michael; Brack, Alexander; Rittner, Heike L

    2016-03-01

    The peripheral nerve contains three barriers which include the blood-nerve barrier consisting of endoneurial vessels and the perineurium as well as autotypic junctions in Schwann cells. The perineurium prevents diffusion of perineurally injected drugs that can be used for selective regional pain control. It is composed of a basal membrane and layers of perineurial cells sealed by tight junction proteins like claudin-1. Claudin-1 expression and barrier function are regulated via low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1). Perisciatic application of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) or the catalytically inactive rtPAi - both agonists of LRP-1 - reduced claudin-1 mRNA and protein expression in the rat nerve. This facilitated an increase of nociceptive thresholds after local application of hydrophilic opioids or the voltage gated sodium channel blocker (NaV1.7) ProToxin-II without apparent nerve toxicity. RtPA-induced barrier opening was mediated by LRP-1 and intracellularly by Erk phosphorylation. In silico, microRNA (miR)-rno-29b-2-5p and rno-miR-183-5p were identified as potential regulators of claudin-1 transcription in the rat. RtPA application increased miR-183-5p in the sciatic nerve. MiR-183-5p mimics functionally opened the perineurium and downregulated claudin-1 expression in vivo. In vitro, hsa-miR-183-3p mimics reduced claudin-1 expression in human HT-29/B6 cells. Overall, rtPA regulates perineurial barrier tightness via LRP-1, Erk phosphorylation and miR-183-5p/3p. This mechanism might serve as a new principle to facilitate drug delivery to peripheral nerves in humans. PMID:26735170

  16. Fractional cable equation models for anomalous electrodiffusion in nerve cells: infinite domain solutions.

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I; Wearne, S L

    2009-12-01

    We introduce fractional Nernst-Planck equations and derive fractional cable equations as macroscopic models for electrodiffusion of ions in nerve cells when molecular diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion due to binding, crowding or trapping. The anomalous subdiffusion is modelled by replacing diffusion constants with time dependent operators parameterized by fractional order exponents. Solutions are obtained as functions of the scaling parameters for infinite cables and semi-infinite cables with instantaneous current injections. Voltage attenuation along dendrites in response to alpha function synaptic inputs is computed. Action potential firing rates are also derived based on simple integrate and fire versions of the models. Our results show that electrotonic properties and firing rates of nerve cells are altered by anomalous subdiffusion in these models. We have suggested electrophysiological experiments to calibrate and validate the models. PMID:19221755

  17. Role of HDACs in optic nerve damage-induced nuclear atrophy of retinal ganglion cells.

    Schmitt, Heather M; Schlamp, Cassandra L; Nickells, Robert W

    2016-06-20

    Optic neuropathies are characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, resulting in the loss of vision. In glaucoma, the most common optic neuropathy, RGC death is initiated by axonal damage, and can be modeled by inducing acute axonal trauma through procedures such as optic nerve crush (ONC) or optic nerve axotomy. One of the early events of RGC death is nuclear atrophy, and is comprised of RGC-specific gene silencing, histone deacetylation, heterochromatin formation, and nuclear shrinkage. These early events appear to be principally regulated by epigenetic mechanisms involving histone deacetylation. Class I histone deacetylases HDACs 1, 2, and 3 are known to play important roles in the process of early nuclear atrophy in RGCs, and studies using both inhibitors and genetic ablation of Hdacs also reveal a critical role in the cell death process. Select inhibitors, such as those being developed for cancer therapy, may also provide a viable secondary treatment option for optic neuropathies. PMID:26733303

  18. Visible light regulates neurite outgrowth of nerve cells

    Higuchi, Akon; Watanabe, Toru; Noguchi, Yusuke; Chang, Yung; Chen, Wen-Yih; Matsuoka, Yuki

    2007-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells on collagen-coated glass plates under light emitting diode (LED) irradiation at several wavelengths (i.e., 455, 470, 525, 600, 630, 880 and 945 nm) was investigated. No neurite outgrowth was observed during cultivation under irradiation from the lamp of an inverted light microscope through filters (yielding mixed light at ca. 525 nm and more than 800 nm), whereas neurite outgrowth was observed during cultivation in the dark. When these cells were irradiated...

  19. Axon-Schwann cell interactions during peripheral nerve regeneration in zebrafish larvae

    Ceci, Maria Laura; Mardones-Krsulovic, Camila; SÁNCHEZ, MARIO; Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Allende, Miguel L

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injuries can severely affect the way that animals perceive signals from the surrounding environment. While damage to peripheral axons generally has a better outcome than injuries to central nervous system axons, it is currently unknown how neurons re-establish their target innervations to recover function after injury, and how accessory cells contribute to this task. Here we use a simple technique to create reproducible and localized injury in the posterior lateral...

  20. The neuroprotective effect of resveratrol on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve transection

    Kim, Seok Hwan; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yu Jeong; Park, Ki Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol in an optic nerve transection (ONT) model and to identify the neuroprotective mechanism of resveratrol in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods ONT and retrograde labeling were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. Various concentrations of resveratrol were injected intravitreally immediately after ONT. The number of labeled RGCs was determined at 1 and 2 weeks after ONT. The effect of resveratrol and sirtinol (a s...

  1. Filamentous nerve cell inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases: tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies.

    Goedert, M

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are the most common neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by the degeneration of selected populations of nerve cells that develop filamentous inclusions before degeneration. The neuronal inclusions of Alzheimer's disease are made of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in a hyperphosphorylated state. Recent work has shown that the filamentous inclusions of Parkinson's disease are made of the protein alpha-synuclein and that rare, fam...

  2. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2009-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical curre...

  3. Large A-fiber activity is required for microglial proliferation and p38 MAPK activation in the spinal cord: different effects of resiniferatoxin and bupivacaine on spinal microglial changes after spared nerve injury

    Decosterd Isabelle

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After peripheral nerve injury, spontaneous ectopic activity arising from the peripheral axons plays an important role in inducing central sensitization and neuropathic pain. Recent evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord microglia also contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. In particular, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in spinal microglia is required for the development of mechanical allodynia. However, activity-dependent activation of microglia after nerve injury has not been fully addressed. To determine whether spontaneous activity from C- or A-fibers is required for microglial activation, we used resiniferatoxin (RTX to block the conduction of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 positive fibers (mostly C- and Aδ-fibers and bupivacaine microspheres to block all fibers of the sciatic nerve in rats before spared nerve injury (SNI, and observed spinal microglial changes 2 days later. Results SNI induced robust mechanical allodynia and p38 activation in spinal microglia. SNI also induced marked cell proliferation in the spinal cord, and all the proliferating cells (BrdU+ were microglia (Iba1+. Bupivacaine induced a complete sensory and motor blockade and also significantly inhibited p38 activation and microglial proliferation in the spinal cord. In contrast, and although it produced an efficient nociceptive block, RTX failed to inhibit p38 activation and microglial proliferation in the spinal cord. Conclusion (1 Blocking peripheral input in TRPV1-positive fibers (presumably C-fibers is not enough to prevent nerve injury-induced spinal microglial activation. (2 Peripheral input from large myelinated fibers is important for microglial activation. (3 Microglial activation is associated with mechanical allodynia.

  4. Electrical neurostimulation for chronic pain: on selective relay of sensory neural activities in myelinated nerve fibers

    Sacré, Pierre; Sarma, Sridevi V.; Guan, Yun; Anderson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain affects about 100 million adults in the US. Despite their great need, neuropharmacology and neurostimulation therapies for chronic pain have been associated with suboptimal efficacy and limited long-term success, as their mechanisms of action are unclear. Yet current computational models of pain transmission suffer from several limitations. In particular, dorsal column models do not include the fundamental underlying sensory activity traveling in these nerve fibers. We developed ...

  5. Respiratory influences on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and vascular conductance in the steady state

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Morgan, Barbara J.; Schrage, William G.; Dempsey, Jerome A.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with hypertension, volitional slowing of the respiratory rate has been purported to reduce arterial pressure via withdrawal of sympathetic tone. We examined the effects of paced breathing at 7, 14, and 21 breaths/min, with reciprocal changes in tidal volume, on muscle sympathetic nerve activity, forearm blood flow, forearm vascular conductance, and blood pressure in 21 men and women, 8 of whom had modest elevations in systemic arterial pressure. These alterations in breathing freq...

  6. LEPTIN SIGNALING IN THE NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII INCREASES SYMPATHETIC NERVE ACTIVITY TO THE KIDNEY

    Mark, Allyn L.; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A.; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D.; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) in extra-hypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We previously demonstrated that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue (BAT) and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow...

  7. Skin sympathetic nerve activity in humans during exposure to emotionally-charged images: sex differences

    Brown, Rachael; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2014-01-01

    While it is known that anxiety or emotional arousal affects skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), the galvanic skin response (GSR) is the most widely used parameter to infer increases in SSNA during stress or emotional studies. We recently showed that SSNA provides a more sensitive measure of emotional state than effector-organ responses. The aim of the present study was to assess whether there are gender differences in the responses of SSNA and other physiological parameters such as blood ...

  8. Excitatory and inhibitory effects of prolactin release activated by nerve stimulation in rat anterior pituitary

    Gao Li-Zhi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of studies showed the presence of substantial amount of nerve fibers and their close relationship with the anterior pituitary gland cells. Our previous studies have suggested that aside from the classical theory of humoral regulation, the rat anterior pituitary has direct neural regulation on adrenocorticotropic hormone release. In rat anterior pituitary, typical synapses are found on every type of the hormone-secreting cells, many on lactotrophs. The present study was aimed at investigating the physiological significance of this synaptic relationship on prolactin release. Methods The anterior pituitary of rat was sliced and stimulated with electrical field in a self-designed perfusion chamber. The perfusate was continuously collected in aliquots and measured by radioimmunoassay for prolactin levels. After statistic analysis, differences of prolactin concentrations within and between groups were outlined. Results The results showed that stimulation at frequency of 2 Hz caused a quick enhancement of prolactin release, when stimulated at 10 Hz, prolactin release was found to be inhibited which came slower and lasted longer. The effect of nerve stimulation on prolactin release is diphasic and frequency dependent. Conclusions The present in vitro study offers the first physiological evidence that stimulation of nerve fibers can affect prolactin release in rat anterior pituitary. Low frequency stimulation enhances prolactin release and high frequency mainly inhibits it.

  9. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  10. Interaction between dendritic cells and nerve fibres in lymphoid organs after oral scrapie exposure.

    Dorban, Gauthier; Defaweux, Valérie; Demonceau, Caroline; Flandroy, Sylvain; Van Lerberghe, Pierre-Bernard; Falisse-Poirrier, Nandini; Piret, Joëlle; Heinen, Ernst; Antoine, Nadine

    2007-12-01

    In transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the infectious agent, called PrPsc, an abnormal isoform of the cellular prion protein, accumulates and replicates in lymphoid organs before affecting the nervous system. To clarify the cellular requirements for the neuroinvasion of the scrapie agent from the lymphoid organs to the central nervous system, we have studied, by confocal microscopy, the innervations within Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes and the spleen of mice in physiological conditions and after oral exposure to prion. Contacts between nerve fibres and PrPsc-associated cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), were evaluated in preclinical prion-infected mice. Using a double immunolabelling strategy, we demonstrated the lack of innervation of PrPsc-accumulating cells (FDCs). Contacts between nerve fibers and PrPsc-propagating cells (DCs) were detected in T-cell zones and cell-trafficking areas. This supports, for the first time, the possible implication of dendritic cells in the prion neuroinvasion process. PMID:17823814

  11. Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Scaini, Denis; León, Verónica; Vázquez, Ester; Cellot, Giada; Privitera, Giulia; Lombardi, Lucia; Torrisi, Felice; Tomarchio, Flavia; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bosi, Susanna; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2016-01-26

    Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices. PMID:26700626

  12. Inhibition of guinea-pig and human sensory nerve activity and the cough reflex in guinea-pigs by cannabinoid (CB2) receptor activation

    Patel, Hema J; Birrell, Mark A; Crispino, Natascia; Hele, David J.; Venkatesan, Priya; Barnes, Peter J; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Belvisi, Maria G.

    2003-01-01

    There is considerable interest in novel therapies for cough, since currently used agents such as codeine have limited beneficial value due to the associated side effects. Sensory nerves in the airways mediate the cough reflex via activation of C-fibres and RARs. Evidence suggests that cannabinoids may inhibit sensory nerve-mediated responses.We have investigated the inhibitory actions of cannabinoids on sensory nerve depolarisation mediated by capsaicin, hypertonic saline and PGE2 on isolated...

  13. Co-transplantation of macaque autologous Schwann cells and human embryonic nerve stem cells in treatment of macaque Parkinson's disease

    Ying Xia; Chengchuan Jiang; Zuowei Cao; Keshan Shi; Yang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the therapeutic effects of co-transplantation with Schwann cells (SCs) and human embryonic nerve stem cells (NSCs) on macaque Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods:Macaque autologous SCs and human embryonic NSCs were adopted for the treatment of macaque PD. Results: Six months after transplantation, positron emission computerized tomography showed that 18F-FP-β-CIT was significantly concentrated in the injured striatum in the co-transplanted group. Immunohistochemical staining of transplanted area tissue showed migration of tyroxine hydroxylase positive cells from the transplant area to the surrounding area was significantly increased in the co-transplanted group. Conclusions: Co-transplantation of SCs and NSCs could effectively cure PD in macaques. SCs harvested from the autologous peripheral nerves can avoid rejection and the ethics problems, so it is expected to be applied clinically.

  14. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Wen, Xuehua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  16. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  17. [Biophysics of nerve excitation].

    Kol'e, O R; Maksimov, G V

    2010-01-01

    The studies testifying to the presence of the interrelation between the physiological functions of the organism and physical and chemical processes in nerves are discussed. Changes in some physical and chemical parameters observed both upon elicited rhythmic exaltation of nerves and during the spontaneous rhythmic activity of neurons are analyzed. Upon rhythmic exaltation, a complex of physical and chemical processes is triggered, and reversible structural and metabolic rearrangements at the subcellular and molecular levels occur that do not take place during the generation of a single action potential. Thus, only in conditions of rhythmic exaltation of a nerve, it is possible to reveal those processes that provide exaltation of nerves in the organism. The future possibilities of the investigations combining the biophysical and physiological approaches are substantiated. Characteristic changes in physicochemical parameters are observed in nerves during the generation of a series of action potentials of different frequency and duration ("frequency dependence") under normal physiological conditions, as well as in extreme situations and in nerve pathology. The structural and metabolic rearrangements are directly related to the mode of rhythmic exaltation and proceed both in the course of rhythmic exaltation and after its termination. Participation and the basic components of the nervous fulcrum (an axon, Shwan cell, myelin, subcellular organelles) in the realization of rhythmic exaltation is shown. In the coordination of all processes involved in rhythmic exaltation, the main role is played by the systems of redistribution and transport of intercellular and endocellular calcium. The idea is put forward that myelin of nerve fibers is not only an isolator, but also an "intercellular depot" of calcium and participates in the redistribution of different ions. Thus, the rhythmic excitation is of great importance in the realization of some physiological functions, the

  18. Primary, non-exophytic, optic nerve germ cell tumors.

    DiLuna, Michael L; Two, Aimee M; Levy, Gillian H; Patel, Toral; Huttner, Anita J; Duncan, Charles C; Piepmeier, Joseph M

    2009-12-01

    Tumors of the optic chiasm are relatively uncommon and usually associated with phakomatoses such as neurofibromatosis. Even more rare is the presentation of a primary, non-exophytic, isolated optic chiasm germ cell tumor (GCT). These tumors have imaging characteristics nearly indistinguishable from optic chiasmatic gliomas (OCGs). Herein we describe two cases of young men who presented with similar findings of progressive, painless visual loss and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction including diabetes insipidus. Brain imaging was non-diagnostic and suggestive of an OCG. Pathology demonstrated GCTs in each case highlighting the importance of biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy and sub-frontal approach to the optic chiasm. The chiasm was diffusely enlarged and discolored in each case without evidence of sellar, suprasellar or perichiasmatic pathology. Pathology demonstrated a malignant mixed GCT in the first patient and a germinoma in the second. This case series highlights the importance of tissue biopsy for patients with progressive symptoms from optic chiasm tumors. Furthermore, this is the first report of a primary, non-exophytic malignant mixed GCT. As the treatment regimens differ widely between optic chiasm GCTs and chiasm gliomas, tissue diagnosis is important. PMID:19554263

  19. Human primordial germ cells migrate along nerve fibers and Schwann cells from the dorsal hind gut mesentery to the gonadal ridge

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Jespersen, Åse; Lutterodt, Melissa Catherine;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal development of autonomic nerve fibers and primordial germ cells (PGCs) along their migratory route from the dorsal mesentery to the gonadal ridges in human embryos using immunohistochemical markers and electron microscopy. Autonomic nerve...... PGCs arrive at the gonadal ridge between 29 and 33 days pc. In conclusion, our data suggest that PGCs in human embryos preferentially migrate along autonomic nerve fibers from the dorsal mesentery to the developing gonad where they are delivered via a fine nerve plexus....

  20. Methods and considerations for the analysis and standardization of assessing muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    White, Daniel W; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Raven, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    The technique of microneurography and the assessment of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are used in laboratories throughout the world. The variables used to describe MSNA, and the criteria by which these variables are quantified from the integrated neurogram, vary among studies and laboratories and, therefore, can become confusing to those starting to learn the technique. Therefore, the purpose of this educational review is to discuss guidelines and standards for the assessment of sympathetic nervous activity through the collection and analysis of MSNA. This review will reiterate common practices in the collection of MSNA, but will also introduce considerations for the evaluation and physiological inference using MSNA. PMID:26299824

  1. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  2. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  3. Activation of the galanin receptor 2 in the periphery reverses nerve injury-induced allodynia

    Wynick David

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galanin is expressed at low levels in the intact sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia with a dramatic increase after peripheral nerve injury. The neuropeptide is also expressed in primary afferent terminals in the dorsal horn, spinal inter-neurons and in a number of brain regions known to modulate nociception. Intrathecal administration of galanin modulates sensory responses in a dose-dependent manner with inhibition at high doses. To date it is unclear which of the galanin receptors mediates the anti-nociceptive effects of the neuropeptide and whether their actions are peripherally and/or centrally mediated. In the present study we investigated the effects of direct administration into the receptive field of galanin and the galanin receptor-2/3-agonist Gal2-11 on nociceptive primary afferent mechanical responses in intact rats and mice and in the partial saphenous nerve injury (PSNI model of neuropathic pain. Results Exogenous galanin altered the responses of mechano-nociceptive C-fibre afferents in a dose-dependent manner in both naive and nerve injured animals, with low concentrations facilitating and high concentrations markedly inhibiting mechano-nociceptor activity. Further, use of the galanin fragment Gal2-11 confirmed that the effects of galanin were mediated by activation of galanin receptor-2 (GalR2. The inhibitory effects of peripheral GalR2 activation were further supported by our demonstration that after PSNI, mechano-sensitive nociceptors in galanin over-expressing transgenic mice had significantly higher thresholds than in wild type animals, associated with a marked reduction in spontaneous neuronal firing and C-fibre barrage into the spinal cord. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the high level of endogenous galanin in injured primary afferents activates peripheral GalR2, which leads to an increase in C-fibre mechanical activation thresholds and a marked reduction in

  4. Protective effects of Achyranthes bidentata polypeptides on retinal ganglion cells post-optic nerve crush in rats

    Nan Hu; Qi Zhao; Fangling Zhang; Junfang Zhang; Xiaosong Gu

    2011-01-01

    Achyranthes bidentata polypeptides (ABPP) have been reported to inhibit apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs).The present study investigated the protective effects of ABPP on RGCs in a rat model of optic nerve injury.With prolonged injury time,RGC densities were gradually decreased.ABPP (5 μg) significantly increased RGC densities and upregulated growth associated protein 43 expression in rats with optic nerve injury.Results demonstrate that ABPP can protect RGCs and promote axonal growth after optic nerve crush.

  5. A PET activation study of brush-evoked allodynia in patients with nerve injury pain

    Witting, Nanna; Kupers, Ron; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    . A direct post hoc comparison of brush -and allodynia-induced rCBF changes showed that allodynia was associated with significantly stronger activations in orbitofrontal cortex and ipsilateral insula whereas non-painful brushing more strongly activated SI and BA 5/7. These findings indicate that...... allodynia. Nine patients with peripheral nerve injury were scanned during rest, brush-evoked allodynia, and brushing of normal contralateral skin. PET data were analyzed for the whole group and for single subjects. Allodynic stimulation activated the contralateral orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11) in every...... patient. Whereas normal brushing activated most strongly the contralateral insular cortex, allodynic brushing produced an ipsilateral activation in this area. Another important difference between normal and allodynic brushing was the absence of a contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI) activation...

  6. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; Kim, So-Ra; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; KANG, MYUNGSEO; Lew, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underly...

  7. Protective effects of soybean phospholipid liposome on glutamate-induced nerve cell injury in vitro

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been previously reported that soybean phosphatide could reduce the cerebral ischemia damage obviously. Whether soybean phospholipid liposome (SPL) can protect cerebral cortical neurons cultured in vitro from glutamate (Glu)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly nerve cell membrane damage has not been fully investigated.OBJECTIVE: To study the protective effects of SPL on Glu-induced neurotoxicity of neurons in culture,and to discuss the possible mechanisms of neuroprotection.DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.SETTING: Department of Biochemistry, Liaoning Medical University.MATERIALS: Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats, of either gender, aged 0 to 1 day, were involved in this study.Drugs and reagents: poly-L-lysine and L-glutamate were purchased from Sigma company (USA).METHODS: The study was carried out in the Department of Biochemistry of Jinzhou Medical University from November 2004 to June 2005. Glu(1×10-4 mol/L) was added to cortical neurons in injury group for 3 hours, while different concentrations of SPL (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 g/L) were added at the same time in the SPL groups. Neurons in the normal control group were untouched.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: According to the instruction of reagent kit, lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) activity and nitric oxide(NO) content in the supematant fluid of the culture medium were assayed, and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and superoxide dismutase(SOD),malonaldehyde (MDA) content in the neurocytes were also determined.RESULTS: ①Activities of LDH and NOS, as well as NO content in the supernatant fluid of injury group were significantly higher than those of normal control group (P < 0.01). Activities of LDH and NOS, and NO content in the supematant fluid of SPL groups were significantly lower than those of injury group (P < 0.01).②MDA content of the SPL groups was significantly lower than that of injury group (P < 0.01); SOD activity of neurons in the injury group was significantly lower than that in

  8. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  9. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor on retrograde cell reaction after facial nerve crush in young adults rats

    Gispen, W.H.; Ulenkate, H.J.L.M.; Jennekens, F.G.I.

    1996-01-01

    Locally applied ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has a powerful effect on retrograde axonal reaction following facial nerve crush in neonatal rats. We examined whether it also exerts a strong effect on retrograde axonal reaction in young adult rats when administered subcutaneously. The dose was 1 mg/kg body weight, three times a week, similar to that used in a previous experiment in which CNTF was reported to have an effect. We studied changes in the morphology of the motor nerve cell bodie...

  10. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    Hongyang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function.

  11. The use of fiber-reinforced scaffolds cocultured with Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells to repair rabbit sciatic nerve defect with vascularization.

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function. PMID:24490158

  12. Nitric oxide modulates bladder afferent nerve activity in the in vitro urinary bladder-pelvic nerve preparation from rats with cyclophosphamide induced cystitis.

    Yu, Yongbei; de Groat, William C

    2013-01-15

    Effects of a nitric oxide (NO) donor (SNAP), NO substrate (l-arginine), and NO synthase inhibitor (l-NAME) on bladder afferent nerve (BAN) activity were studied in an in vitro bladder-pelvic nerve preparation from untreated or cyclophosphamide (CYP) treated rats. Distension of the bladder induced phasic bladder contractions (PBC) that were accompanied by multiunit afferent firing. Intravesical administration of SNAP (2mM) which did not change the amplitude of PBC significantly decreased peak afferent firing from 79 ± 15 spikes/s to 44 ± 8 spikes/s in CYP pretreated but not untreated preparations. In CYP treated preparations SNAP also decreased by 33-55% BAN firing induced by isotonic distension of the bladder at 10-40 cmH(2)O pressures. Electrical stimulation on the surface of the bladder elicited action potentials (AP) in BAN. SNAP significantly increased the voltage threshold by 75% (pbladder hyperactivity induced by pathological conditions. PMID:23063886

  13. Involvement of TRPM2 in peripheral nerve injury-induced infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the spinal cord in mouse neuropathic pain model.

    Kouichi Isami

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2 expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+ BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+, TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+, TRPM2(BM+/Rec-, and TRPM2(BM-/Rec- mice. The numbers of GFP(+ BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+ BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+ mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-/Iba1(+ resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal

  14. Functional recoveries of sciatic nerve regeneration by combining chitosan-coated conduit and neurosphere cells induced from adipose-derived stem cells.

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Tzu-Chieh; Fan, Shih-Chen; Wang, Duo-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Sheng-Che

    2014-02-01

    Suboptimal repair occurs in a peripheral nerve gap, which can be partially restored by bridging the gap with various biosynthetic conduits or cell-based therapy. In this study, we developed a combination of chitosan coating approach to induce neurosphere cells from human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) on chitosan-coated plate and then applied these cells to the interior of a chitosan-coated silicone tube to bridge a 10-mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve. Myelin sheath degeneration and glial scar formation were discovered in the nerve bridged by the silicone conduit. By using a single treatment of chitosan-coated conduit or neurosphere cell therapy, the nerve gap was partially recovered after 6 weeks of surgery. Substantial improvements in nerve regeneration were achieved by combining neurosphere cells and chitosan-coated conduit based on the increase of myelinated axons density and myelin thickness, gastrocnemius muscle weight and muscle fiber diameter, and step and stride lengths from gait analysis. High expressions of interleukin-1β and leukotriene B4 receptor 1 in the intra-neural scarring caused by using silicone conduits revealed that the inflammatory mechanism can be inhibited when the conduit is coated with chitosan. This study demonstrated that the chitosan-coated surface performs multiple functions that can be used to induce neurosphere cells from ASCs and to facilitate nerve regeneration in combination with a cells-assisted coated conduit. PMID:24360575

  15. Myenteric plexus in a freshwater teleost intestine. I. Quantitative study of nerve cells.

    de Souza, R R; Ferri, S; Ferraz de Carvalho, C A; Paranhos, G S

    1982-01-01

    The number of nerve cells in the myenteric plexus of a freshwater teleost (Pimelodus maculatus) was obtained with the aid of statistical methods. 1. The density of neurons/cm2 was the following: 91,142 in the duodenum; 93,133 in the ileum and 82,857 in the rectum. These 3 portions have not showed statistically significant differences. 2. The mean surface area of the intestine being 48 cm2, the total number of neurons in myenteric plexus of the duodenum, ileum and rectum was calculated to be 4,274,112. PMID:7165118

  16. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  17. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  18. Transgenic inhibition of astroglial NF-κB protects from optic nerve damage and retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis

    Brambilla Roberta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optic neuritis is an acute, demyelinating neuropathy of the optic nerve often representing the first appreciable symptom of multiple sclerosis. Wallerian degeneration of irreversibly damaged optic nerve axons leads to death of retinal ganglion cells, which is the cause of permanent visual impairment. Although the specific mechanisms responsible for triggering these events are unknown, it has been suggested that a key pathological factor is the activation of immune-inflammatory processes secondary to leukocyte infiltration. However, to date, there is no conclusive evidence to support such a causal role for infiltrating peripheral immune cells in the etiopathology of optic neuritis. Methods To dissect the contribution of the peripheral immune-inflammatory response versus the CNS-specific inflammatory response in the development of optic neuritis, we analyzed optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells pathology in wild-type and GFAP-IκBα-dn transgenic mice, where NF-κB is selectively inactivated in astrocytes, following induction of EAE. Results We found that, in wild-type mice, axonal demyelination in the optic nerve occurred as early as 8 days post induction of EAE, prior to the earliest signs of leukocyte infiltration (20 days post induction. On the contrary, GFAP-IκBα-dn mice were significantly protected and showed a nearly complete prevention of axonal demyelination, as well as a drastic attenuation in retinal ganglion cell death. This correlated with a decrease in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, as well as a prevention of NAD(PH oxidase subunit upregulation. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that astrocytes, not infiltrating immune cells, play a key role in the development of optic neuritis and that astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity is dependent on activation of a transcriptional program regulated by NF-κB. Hence, interventions targeting the NF-κB transcription

  19. Axonal elongation through long acellular nerve segments depends on recruitment of phagocytic cells from the near-nerve environment. Electrophysiological and morphological studies in the cat

    Sørensen, J; Fugleholm, K; Moldovan, M;

    2001-01-01

    The distal nerve stump plays a central role in the regeneration of peripheral nerve but the relative importance of cellular and humoral factors is not clear. We have studied this question by freezing the tibial nerve distal to a crush lesion in cat. The importance of constituents from the near......-nerve environment was assessed by modification of the contact between the tibial nerve and the environment. Silicone cuffs, containing electrodes for electrophysiological assessment of nerve regeneration, were placed around the tibial nerve distal to the crush site. The interaction between long acellular frozen...... nerve segments (ANS) and the near-nerve environment was ascertained by breaching the silicone cuff to allow access of cellular or humoral components. Tibial nerves were crushed and frozen for 40 mm and enclosed in nerve cuffs with 0.45-microm holes or 2.0-mm holes to allow access of humoral factors or...

  20. Radioautographic characterization of a serotonin-accumulating nerve cell group in adult rat hypothalamus

    Intensely labeled nerve cell bodies were identified by radioautography within the pars ventralis of nucleus dorsomedialis hypothalami (hdv), following intraventricular perfusion with 10-5 or 10-4 M tritiated serotonin [3H]5-HT in adult rats pretreated with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. This selective reaction, which involved approximately 1000 neurons on each side of the third ventricle, was unaltered by concomitant administration of 10-3 M non-radioactive norepinephrine, and was absent after intraventricular injection of 10-5 or 10-4 M tritiated norepinephrine. The 3H-labeled 5-HT nerve cell bodies were loosely grouped within the inner and caudal half of the hdv, and appeared morphologically similar to the unreactive neurons among which they were interspersed. Within the same region, numerous labeled axonal varicosities were also detected which were never found in synaptic contact with the reactive cells. If the 3H-labeled 5-HT neurons endogenous 5-HT, they might constitute an intrinsic source of 5-HT innervation in the adult rat hypothalamus. (Auth.)

  1. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and its tripartite receptor complex by cells of the human optic nerve head

    Liu, Xiaochun; Clark, Abbot F.; Wordinger, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes gene expression, cell survival and differentiation in various types of peripheral and central neurons, glia and nonneural cells. The level of CNTF rises rapidly upon injury to neural tissue, suggesting that CNTF exerts its cytoprotective effects after release from cells via mechanisms induced by cell injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if cells in the optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex. Methods W...

  2. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators red...

  3. NF-κB Regulates B-Cell-Derived Nerve Growth Factor Expression

    Klaus Heese; Noriko Inoue; Tohru Sawada

    2006-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, four neurotrophins have been identified: nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5). NGF exerts an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several types of immune cells, such as mast cells, lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils, produce,store and release NGF. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data indicate that dysfunctions of NGF and the other neurotrophins may contribute to impaired immune responses and concentration of NGF frequently correlates with disease severity. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the potential signaling mechanisms of cytokineneurotrophins interactions contributing to increased NGF levels. Our data show that the transcription factorNF-κB plays a pivotal role in regulating B-cell-derived NGF expression.

  4. Sensory nerves and pancreatitis

    Li, Qingfu; PENG, JIE

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves are a kind of nerve that conduct afferent impulses from the periphery receptors to the central nervous system (CNS) and are able to release neuromediators from the activated peripheral endings. Sensory nerves are particularly important for microcirculatory response, and stimulation of pancreatic sensory nerves releases a variety of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), etc., leading to neurogenic inflammation characterized as the local ...

  5. Methylcobalamin promotes the differentiation of Schwann cells and remyelination in lysophosphatidylcholine-induced demyelination of the rat sciatic nerve

    Shunsuke eNishimoto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs are constituents of the peripheral nervous system. The differentiation of SCs in injured peripheral nerves is critical for regeneration after injury. Methylcobalamin (MeCbl is a vitamin B12 analog that is necessary for the maintenance of the peripheral nervous system. In this study, we estimated the effect of MeCbl on SCs. We showed that MeCbl downregulated the activity of Erk1/2 and promoted the expression of the myelin basic protein in SCs. In a dorsal root ganglion neuron–SC coculture system, myelination was promoted by MeCbl. In a focal demyelination rat model, MeCbl promoted remyelination and motor and sensory functional regeneration. MeCbl promoted the in vitro differentiation of SCs and in vivo myelination in a rat demyelination model and may be a novel therapy for several types of nervous disorders.

  6. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  7. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study.

    Marc Labrunée

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA. METHODS: We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES. RESULTS: Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES. No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  8. Neuroprotective Activity of Thioctic Acid in Central Nervous System Lesions Consequent to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Daniele Tomassoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+- and (−-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/−-, (+-, or (−-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+-thioctic acid being more active than (+/−- or (−-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies.

  9. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    Zhong-jun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10 6 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury.

  10. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury:a biomechanical evaluation

    Zhong-jun Zhang; Ya-jun Li; Xiao-guang Liu; Feng-xiao Huang; Tie-jun Liu; Dong-mei Jiang; Xue-man Lv; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, max-imum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neu-rotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These ifndings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, im-prove biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury.