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Sample records for nerve cell activity

  1. Stem Cell Transplantation for Auditory Nerve Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Altschuler, Richard A; O’Shea, K. Sue; Miller, Josef M

    2008-01-01

    The successful function of cochlear prostheses depends on activation of auditory nerve. The survival of auditory nerve neurons, however, can vary widely in candidates for cochlear implants and influence implant efficacy. Stem cells offer the potential for improving the function of cochlear prostheses and increasing the candidate pool by replacing lost auditory nerve. The first phase of studies for stem cell replacement of auditory nerve has examined the in vitro survival and differentiation a...

  2. Axonal outgrowth is associated with increased ERK 1/2 activation but decreased caspase 3 linked cell death in Schwann cells after immediate nerve repair in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanje Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2 is activated by nerve damage and its activation precedes survival and proliferation of Schwann cells. In contrast, activation of caspase 3, a cysteine protease, is considered as a marker for apoptosis in Schwann cells. In the present study, axonal outgrowth, activation of ERK1/2 by phosphorylation (p-ERK 1/2 and immunoreactivity of cleaved caspase 3 were examined after immediate, delayed, or no repair of transected rat sciatic nerves. Results Axonal outgrowth, detected by neurofilament staining, was longer after immediate repair than after either the delayed or no repair conditions. Immediate repair also showed a higher expression of p-ERK 1/2 and a lower number of cleaved caspase 3 stained Schwann cells than after delayed nerve repair. If the transected nerve was not repaired a lower level of p-ERK 1/2 was found than in either the immediate or delayed repair conditions. Axonal outgrowth correlated to p-ERK 1/2, but not clearly with cleaved caspase 3. Contact with regenerating axons affected Schwann cells with respect to p-ERK 1/2 and cleaved caspase 3 after immediate nerve repair only. Conclusion The decreased regenerative capacity that has historically been observed after delayed nerve repair may be related to impaired activation of Schwann cells and increased Schwann cell death. Outgrowing axons influence ERK 1/2 activation and apoptosis of Schwann cells.

  3. Activation of NF-?B in Axons and Schwann cells at Site of Sciatic Nerve Crush and Role in Modulating Axon Regeneration in Adult Rats: Studies with Etanercept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darrell; Tweed, Christopher; Fernyhough, Paul; Glazner, Gordon W.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing weight of evidence implicates early inflammatory events as inhibitors of functional recovery in both peripheral and central neuropathologies. In this study, we investigated the role of the inflammatory TNF-?/NF-?B axis on events subsequent to sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed that within 6 hours post-crush NF-?B DNA binding activity increased significantly in a 1 cm section of sciatic nerve, centered on the crush site. Immunofluorescent staining for NF-?B subunits verified increased nuclear localization of p50, but not p65 or c-Rel, in Schwann cells, with no evidence of immune cell infiltration. In rats injected s.c. with etanercept, a TNF-? receptor chimera which binds free cytokine, the injury-induced rise in NF-?B DNA-binding activity was inhibited. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed that nuclear localization of NF-?B subunit p50 in Schwann cells was significantly lower in etanercept treated vs. control nerves following nerve injury. Axonal growth determined 3 days after nerve crush with immunofluorescent staining for GAP43 demonstrated that regeneration distance of leading axons from the site of nerve crush was significantly greater in etanercept treated animals than saline-treated controls. These data indicate that TNF-? mediates rapid activation of injury-induced NF-?B DNA binding in Schwann cells, and inhibits post-injury axonal sprouting. PMID:19458540

  4. Pharmacology of airway afferent nerve activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr Michael J

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Afferent nerves in the airways serve to regulate breathing pattern, cough, and airway autonomic neural tone. Pharmacologic agents that influence afferent nerve activity can be subclassified into compounds that modulate activity by indirect means (e.g. bronchial smooth muscle spasmogens and those that act directly on the nerves. Directly acting agents affect afferent nerve activity by interacting with various ion channels and receptors within the membrane of the afferent terminals. Whether by direct or indirect means, most compounds that enter the airspace will modify afferent nerve activity, and through this action alter airway physiology.

  5. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Panganiban, Clarisse H; Havens, Luke T; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L; Barth, Jeremy L

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  6. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation in axons and Schwann cells in experimental sciatic nerve injury and its role in modulating axon regeneration: studies with etanercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darrell; Tweed, Christopher; Fernyhough, Paul; Glazner, Gordon W

    2009-06-01

    Early inflammatory events may inhibit functional recovery after injury in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. We investigated the role of the inflammatory tumor necrosis factor/nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) axis on events subsequent to sciatic nerve crush injury in adult rats. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that within 6 hours after crush, NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity increased significantly in a 1-cm section around the crush site. By immunofluorescence staining, there was increased nuclear localization of the NF-kappaB subunits p50 but not p65 or c-Rel in Schwann cells but no obvious inflammatory cell infiltration. In rats injected subcutaneously with etanercept, a tumor necrosis factor receptor chimera that binds free cytokine, the injury-induced rise in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity was inhibited, and nuclear localization of p50 in Schwann cells was lowered after the injury. Axonal growth 3 days after nerve crush assessed with immunofluorescence for GAP43 demonstrated that the regeneration distance of leading axons from the site of nerve crush was greater in etanercept-treated animals than in saline-treated controls. These data indicate that tumor necrosis factor mediates rapid activation of injury-induced NF-kappaB DNA binding in Schwann cells and that these events are associated with inhibition of postinjury axonal sprouting. PMID:19458540

  7. Glucose, other secretagogues, and nerve growth factor stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line, INS-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Sekine, N; Roche, E; Filloux, C; Prentki, M; Wollheim, C B; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-01-01

    of this kinase is not sufficient for secretion. In the presence of glucose, however, nerve growth factor potentiated insulin secretion. In INS-1 cells, activation of 44-kDa MAP kinase was partially correlated with the induction of early response genes junB, nur77, and zif268 but not with stimulation......The signaling pathways whereby glucose and hormonal secretagogues regulate insulin-secretory function, gene transcription, and proliferation of pancreatic beta-cells are not well defined. We show that in the glucose-responsive beta-cell line INS-1, major secretagogue-stimulated signaling pathways...... glucagon-like peptide-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide. Activation of 44-kDa MAP kinase by glucose was dependent on Ca2+ influx and may in part be mediated by MEK-1, a MAP kinase kinase. Stimulation of Ca2+ influx by KCl was in itself sufficient to activate 44-kDa MAP kinase and MEK...

  8. Putative intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway in hydra have properties of multipotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the properties of nerve cell precursors in hydra by analyzing the differentiation and proliferation capacity of interstitial cells in the peduncle of Hydra oligactis, which is a region of active nerve cell differentiation. Our results indicate that about 50% of the interstitial cells in the peduncle can grow rapidly and also give rise to nematocyte precursors when transplanted into a gastric environment. If these cells were committed nerve cell precursors, one would not expect them to differentiate into nematocytes nor to proliferate apparently without limit. Therefore we conclude that cycling interstitial cells in peduncles are not intermediates in the nerve cell differentiation pathway but are stem cells. The remaining interstitial cells in the peduncle are in G1 and have the properties of committed nerve cell precursors. Thus, the interstitial cell population in the peduncle contains both stem cells and noncycling nerve precursors. The presence of stem cells in this region makes it likely that these cells are the immediate targets of signals which give rise to nerve cells

  9. Segmentation of the retinal optic nerve head using Hough transform and active contour models

    OpenAIRE

    Nanik Suciati; Ari Wijayanti; Handayani Tjandrasa

    2012-01-01

    Optic nerve head is part of the retina where ganglion cell axons exit the eye to form the optic nerve. Glaucomatous changes related to loss of the nerve fibers decrease the neuroretinal rim and expand the area and volume of the cup. This study implements  the detection of the optic nerve head in retinal fundus images based on the Hough Transform and Active Contour Models. The process starts with the image enhancement using homomorphic filtering for illumination correction, then proceeds with ...

  10. Activation of NF-?B in Axons and Schwann cells at Site of Sciatic Nerve Crush and Role in Modulating Axon Regeneration in Adult Rats: Studies with Etanercept

    OpenAIRE

    SMITH, DARRELL; Tweed, Christopher; Fernyhough, Paul; Glazner, Gordon W.

    2009-01-01

    An increasing weight of evidence implicates early inflammatory events as inhibitors of functional recovery in both peripheral and central neuropathologies. In this study, we investigated the role of the inflammatory TNF-?/NF-?B axis on events subsequent to sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed that within 6 hours post-crush NF-?B DNA binding activity increased significantly in a 1 cm section of sciatic nerve, centered on the crush site. Immu...

  11. Effects of glutamatergic agonists and antagonists on membrane potential and intracellular Na+ activity of leech glial and nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, R; Zens, M; Schlue, W R

    1994-11-28

    The membrane potential of neuropile glial cells and Retzius neurones in the central nervous system of the leech Hirudo medicinalis was measured using electrolyte-filled single-barreled microelectrodes. Intracellular Na+ activity (aNai) was recorded with Na(+)-sensitive double-barreled microelectrodes. Bath-application of kainate, quisqualate and L-glutamate elicited concentration-dependent membrane depolarizations in both cell types as demonstrated by dose-response curves. The competitive quinoxalinedione antagonists 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) to the non-NMDA glutamate receptor inhibited the membrane depolarizations in neuropile glial cells completely, but in Retzius neurones only partially. These results confirm that leech neuropile glial cells have a kainate- and quisqualate-preferring non-NMDA glutamate receptor similar to that in the Retzius neurones. The initial decrease in aNai in neuropile glial cells in kainate- or quisqualate-containing solutions and the afterhyperpolarization in these glial cells and the Retzius neurones following the removal of both glutamate antagonists, were blocked in the presence of the cardiac glycoside ouabain (10(-4) M). In saline solutions containing 42.5 mM Li+ instead of Na+ the afterhyperpolarizations were blocked in neuropile glial cells and Retzius neurones. We conclude that the initial aNai changes and the afterhyperpolarization could be due to the stimulation of the electrogenic Na+/K+ pump in the glial and neuronal membranes. PMID:7882017

  12. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  13. Nerve growth factor regulates the expression and activity of p33cdk2 and p34cdc2 kinases in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchkovich, K J; Ziff, E B

    1994-11-01

    In the absence of serum, nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes the survival and differentiation of the PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line. In the presence of serum, NGF acts primarily as a differentiation factor and negative regulator of cell cycling. To investigate NGF control of cell cycling, we have analyzed the regulation of cyclin dependent kinases during PC12 cell differentiation. NGF treatment leads to a reduction in the steady-state protein levels of p33cdk2 and p34cdc2, two key regulators of cell cycle progression. The decrease in p33cdk2 and p34cdc2 coincides with a decrease in the enzymatic activity of cyclinA-p34cdc2, cyclinB-p34cdc2, cyclinE-p33cdk2, and cyclinA-p33cdk2 kinases. The decline in p33cdk2 and p34cdc2 kinase activity in response to NGF is accelerated in cells that over-express the p140trk NGF receptor, suggesting that the timing of the down- regulation is dependent on the level of p140trk and the strength of the NGF signal. The level of cyclin A, a regulatory subunit of p33cdk2 and p34cdc2, is relatively constant during PC12 differentiation. Nevertheless, the DNA binding activity of the cyclinA-associated transcription factor E2F/DP decreases. Thus, NGF down-regulates the activity of cyclin dependent kinases and cyclin-transcription factor complexes during PC12 differentiation. PMID:7865886

  14. Improvement of peripheral nerve regeneration by a tissue-engineered nerve filled with ectomesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, X; Zhang, Y-J; Tian, W-D; Jiang, M; Dong, R; Chen, J-W; Jin, Y

    2007-01-01

    Ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs) originate from the cranial neural crest. They are a potential source of neuronal and Schwann cells (SCs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) during embryonic development. The third passage of EMSCs enzymatically isolated from the mandibular processes of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in forskolin and bovine pituitary extract for 6 days to generate functional Schwann cell phenotypes. Next, 10-mm defects in the sciatic nerves were bridged with an autograft, tissue-engineered nerve filled with differentiated cells in collagen, or a PLGA conduit alone in 18 rats, and the nerve defects of another four rats were left untreated. The regenerated nerves were evaluated by the sciatic functional index (SFI) monthly and by histological analysis 4 months after grafting. The recovery index of the sciatic nerve improved significantly in the autograft and tissue-engineered nerve groups, both of which were superior to the PLGA group. In animals transplanted with the EMSCs, there was greater regeneration than with conduit alone during the same period of implantation. These results show that when EMSCs are transplanted to a peripheral nerve defect they differentiate into supportive cells that contribute to the promotion of axonal regeneration. PMID:17169530

  15. Nerve growth factor regulates the expression and activity of p33cdk2 and p34cdc2 kinases in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Buchkovich, K J; Ziff, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of serum, nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes the survival and differentiation of the PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line. In the presence of serum, NGF acts primarily as a differentiation factor and negative regulator of cell cycling. To investigate NGF control of cell cycling, we have analyzed the regulation of cyclin dependent kinases during PC12 cell differentiation. NGF treatment leads to a reduction in the steady-state protein levels of p33cdk2 and p34cdc2, two key regulators ...

  16. Denervated sheath cells secrete a new protein after nerve injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, J H; Shooter, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    When rat sciatic nerves are crushed, Schwann cells or other supporting cells distal to the injury site begin to synthesize and secrete an acidic 37-kilodalton (kDa) protein. This crush-induced protein accumulates within the nerve sheath and accounts for 2-5% of the total extracellular protein in the distal nerve stump. Synthesis of the 37-kDa protein increased for 2 weeks after nerve crush and declines slowly, beginning 4-6 weeks after the injury. The synthesis of the protein may be regulated...

  17. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium signaling in nerve cells

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    ALEXEI, VERKHRATSKY.

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an important organelle involved in various types of signaling in nerve cells. The ER serves as a dynamic Ca2+ pool being thus involved in rapid signaling events associated with cell stimulation by either electrical (action potential) or chemical (neurotransmitters) [...] signals. This function is supported by Ca2+ release channels (InsP3 and ryanodine receptors) and SERCA Ca2+ pumps residing in the endomembrane. In addition the ER provides a specific environment for the posttranslational protein processing and transport of various molecules towards their final destination. In parallel, the ER acts as a "calcium tunnel," which facilitates Ca2+ movements within the cell by avoiding cytoplasmic routes. Finally the ER appears as a source of numerous signals aimed at the nucleus and involved in long-lasting adaptive cellular responses. All these important functions are controlled by intra-ER free Ca2+ which integrates various signaling events and establishes a link between fast signaling, associated with ER Ca2+ release/uptake, and long-lasting adaptive responses relying primarily on the regulation of protein synthesis. Disruption of ER Ca2+ homeostasis triggers several forms of cellular stress response and is intimately involved in neurodegeneration and neuronal cell death

  19. ApoER2 and Reelin are expressed in regenerating peripheral nerve and regulate Schwann cell migration by activating the Rac1 GEF protein, Tiam1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasten, Consuelo; Cerda, Joaquín; Jausoro, Ignacio; Court, Felipe A; Cáceres, Alfredo; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2015-11-01

    ApoER2 and its ligand Reelin participate in neuronal migration during development. Upon receptor binding, Reelin induces the proteolytic processing of ApoER2 as well as the activation of signaling pathway, including small Rho GTPases. Besides its presence in the central nervous system (CNS), Reelin is also secreted by Schwann cells (SCs), the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Reelin deficient mice (reeler) show decreased axonal regeneration in the PNS; however neither the presence of ApoER2 nor the role of the Reelin signaling pathway in the PNS have been evaluated. Interestingly SC migration occurs during PNS development and during injury-induced regeneration and involves activation of small Rho GTPases. Thus, Reelin-ApoER2 might regulate SC migration during axon regeneration in the PNS. Here we demonstrate the presence of ApoER2 in PNS. After sciatic nerve injury Reelin was induced and its receptor ApoER2 was proteolytically processed. In vitro, SCs express both Reelin and ApoER2 and Reelin induces SC migration. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying Reelin-dependent SC migration, we examined the involvement of Rac1, a conspicuous small GTPase family member. FRET experiments revealed that Reelin activates Rac1 at the leading edge of SCs. In addition, Tiam1, a major Rac1-specific GEF was required for Reelin-induced SC migration. Moreover, Reelin-induced SC migration was decreased after suppression of the polarity protein PAR3, consistent with its association to Tiam1. Even more interesting, we demonstrated that PAR3 binds preferentially to the full-length cytoplasmic tail of ApoER2 corresponding to the splice-variant containing the exon 19 that encodes a proline-rich insert and that ApoER2 was required for SC migration. Our study reveals a novel function for Reelin/ApoER2 in PNS, inducing cell migration of SCs, a process relevant for PNS development and regeneration. PMID:26386179

  20. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26296589

  1. Segmentation of the retinal optic nerve head using Hough transform and active contour models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanik Suciati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve head is part of the retina where ganglion cell axons exit the eye to form the optic nerve. Glaucomatous changes related to loss of the nerve fibers decrease the neuroretinal rim and expand the area and volume of the cup. This study implements  the detection of the optic nerve head in retinal fundus images based on the Hough Transform and Active Contour Models. The process starts with the image enhancement using homomorphic filtering for illumination correction, then proceeds with the removal of blood vessels on the image  to facilitate the subsequent segmentation process. The result of the Hough Transform fitting circle becomes the initial level set for the active contour model. The experimental results show that the implemented segmentation algorithms are capable of segmenting optic nerve head with the average accuracy of 75.56%. 

  2. Early Interfaced Neural Activity from Chronic Amputated Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Kshitija; Keefer, Edward; Botterman, Barry; Galvan, Pedro; Romero, Mario I.

    2009-01-01

    Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non-restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8?days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3?months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative multi-electrode arrays of open design allow early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. PMID:19506704

  3. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  4. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  5. Mechanical activity of frog esophagus muscle in response to electrical stimulation of intramural nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahide

    2007-04-01

    Microscopic observation of intramural nerves in the frog esophagus, fixed and stained with OsO(4) and ZnI(2), revealed that nerve cell bodies and bundles connecting the nerve cell bodies formed loose and irregular networks. The nerve cell bodies were mostly lying singly in the nerve bundles, with occasional observations of two closely linked nerve cell bodies. Isolated circular and longitudinal segments of esophageal muscle were spontaneously rhythmically contractile, with a frequency of 2.2-3.0 per min. This was not altered by tetrodotoxin (TTX). In longitudinal muscle segments, transmurally applied electrical stimulation produced contractile responses which were not inhibited by atropine or guanethidine, but were reduced in amplitude by TTX, suggesting a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) excitatory innervation in the esophagus muscle. In circular muscle segments, transmural application of brief electrical stimulation evoked two types of mechanical response: a biphasic response consisting of an initial relaxation and a following contraction (type I) and a contraction alone (type II). These mechanical responses were not modulated by either atropine or guanethidine. In the type I response, TTX abolished the relaxation component, suggesting that this was produced by non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerve excitation. In about half of the type II responses, the amplitude of the contraction was significantly reduced by TTX, suggesting that a part of the contraction was produced by activation of NANC excitatory nerves. Thus, the esophageal smooth muscle of the frog demonstrates myogenic activity, and is innervated by both excitatory and inhibitory NANC nerves. PMID:17598959

  6. Receptor-mediated regional sympathetic nerve activation by leptin.

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, W G; Morgan, D. A.; Walsh, S.A.; Mark, A L; Sivitz, W I

    1997-01-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue which acts centrally to decrease appetite and increase energy expenditure. Although leptin increases norepinephrine turnover in thermogenic tissues, the effects of leptin on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity to thermogenic and other tissues are not known. We examined the effects of intravenous leptin and vehicle on sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue, kidney, hindlimb, and adrenal gland in anesthetized Sprague-Da...

  7. Motor neuron activation in peripheral nerves using infrared neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach. The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results. 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7 ± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2-9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance. The observed selectivity of INS indicates that it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS.

  8. Electrical stimulation of nerve cells using conductive nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds with suitable chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties is critical for the success of nerve tissue engineering. Electrical stimulation was directly applied to electrospun conductive nanofibrous scaffolds to enhance the nerve regeneration process. In the present study, electrospun conductive nanofibers were prepared by mixing 10 and 15 wt% doped polyaniline (PANI) with poly (epsilon-caprolactone)/gelatin (PG) (70:30) solution (PANI/PG) by electrospinning. The fiber diameter, pore size, hydrophilicity, tensile properties, conductivity, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of nanofibers were determined, and the in vitro biodegradability of the different nanofibrous scaffolds was also evaluated. Nanofibrous scaffolds containing 15% PANI was found to exhibit the most balanced properties to meet all the required specifications for electrical stimulation for its enhanced conductivity and is used for in vitro culture and electrical stimulation of nerve stem cells. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and scanning electron microscopy results showed that conductive nanofibrous scaffolds are suitable substrates for the attachment and proliferation of nerve stem cells. Electrical stimulation through conductive nanofibrous PANI/PG scaffolds showed enhanced cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth compared to the PANI/PG scaffolds that were not subjected to electrical stimulation. PMID:19496678

  9. Combining acellular nerve allografts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells restores sciatic nerve injury better than either intervention alone

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Gechen; Ka, Ka; HUANG, WENHUA

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we chemically extracted acellular nerve allografts from bilateral sciatic nerves, and repaired 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats using these grafts and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Experiments were performed in three groups: the acellular nerve allograft bridging group, acellular nerve allograft + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and the acellular nerve allograft + brain-derived neurotrophic factor transfected bone...

  10. Malignant granular cell tumour of the sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurrell, M.A.; McLean, C.; Desmond, P.; Tress, B.M.; Kaye, A. [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    1995-05-01

    A case of malignant granular cell tumour of the sciatic nerve is presented. Computed tomography demonstrated isodensity with muscle and minimal enhancement. Magnetic resonance demonstrated T1 isointensity with muscle with marked enhancement, and isointensity with fat on proton and T2 images. Pathological evidence is presented for its probable Schwann cell histogenesis. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Malignant granular cell tumour of the sciatic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of malignant granular cell tumour of the sciatic nerve is presented. Computed tomography demonstrated isodensity with muscle and minimal enhancement. Magnetic resonance demonstrated T1 isointensity with muscle with marked enhancement, and isointensity with fat on proton and T2 images. Pathological evidence is presented for its probable Schwann cell histogenesis. 9 refs., 3 figs

  12. In vivo MRI monitoring nerve regeneration of acute peripheral nerve traction injury following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the continuous process of nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation using MRI. Materials and methods: 1 week after acute nerve traction injury was established in the sciatic nerve of 48 New Zealand white rabbits, 5 × 105 MSCs and vehicle alone were grafted to the acutely distracted sciatic nerves each in 24 animals. Serial MRI and T1 and T2 measurements of the injured nerves were performed with a 1.5-T scanner and functional recovery was recorded over a 10-week follow-up period, with histological assessments performed at regular intervals. Results: Compared with vehicle control, nerves grafted with MSCs had better functional recovery and showed improved nerve regeneration, with a sustained increase of T1 and T2 values during the phase of regeneration. Conclusion: MRI could be used to monitor the enhanced nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with MSC transplantation, reflected by a prolonged increase in T1 and T2 values of the injured nerves

  13. In vivo MRI monitoring nerve regeneration of acute peripheral nerve traction injury following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xiao-Hui, E-mail: duanxiaohui-128@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Cheng, Li-Na, E-mail: kobe10716@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: xinxin110007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: docliujun@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Guo, Ruo-Mi, E-mail: guoruomi-521@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhong, Xiao-Mei, E-mail: enough300@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Wen, Xue-Hua, E-mail: xuehuasuqian@126.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Shen, Jun, E-mail: junshenjun@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess the continuous process of nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation using MRI. Materials and methods: 1 week after acute nerve traction injury was established in the sciatic nerve of 48 New Zealand white rabbits, 5 × 10{sup 5} MSCs and vehicle alone were grafted to the acutely distracted sciatic nerves each in 24 animals. Serial MRI and T1 and T2 measurements of the injured nerves were performed with a 1.5-T scanner and functional recovery was recorded over a 10-week follow-up period, with histological assessments performed at regular intervals. Results: Compared with vehicle control, nerves grafted with MSCs had better functional recovery and showed improved nerve regeneration, with a sustained increase of T1 and T2 values during the phase of regeneration. Conclusion: MRI could be used to monitor the enhanced nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with MSC transplantation, reflected by a prolonged increase in T1 and T2 values of the injured nerves.

  14. The nerve growth factor precursor proNGF exhibits neurotrophic activity but is less active than mature nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, Margaret; Yu, Guanhua; Michalski, Bernadeta; Mathew, Silvy; Colquhoun, Amy; Ross, Gregory M; Coughlin, Michael D

    2004-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes neuronal survival and differentiation and stimulates neurite outgrowth. NGF is synthesized as a precursor, proNGF, which undergoes post-translational processing to generate mature beta-NGF. It has been assumed that, in vivo, NGF is largely processed into the mature form and that mature NGF accounts for the biological activity. However, we recently showed that proNGF is abundant in CNS tissues whereas mature NGF is undetectable, suggesting that proNGF has biological functions beyond its role as a precursor. To determine whether proNGF exhibits biological activity, we mutagenized the precursor-processing site and expressed unprocessed, cleavage-resistant proNGF protein in insect cells. Survival and neurite outgrowth assays on murine superior cervical ganglion neurons and PC12 cells indicated that proNGF exhibits neurotrophic activity similar to mature 2.5S NGF, but is approximately fivefold less active. ProNGF binds to the high-affinity receptor, TrkA, as determined by cross-linking to PC12 cells, and is also slightly less active than mature NGF in promoting phosphorylation of TrkA and its downstream signaling effectors, Erk1/2, in PC12 and NIH3T3-TrkA cells. These data, coupled with our previous report that proNGF is the major form of NGF in the CNS, suggest that proNGF could be responsible for much of the biological activity normally attributed to mature NGF in vivo. PMID:15086515

  15. A Silk Fibroin/Collagen Nerve Scaffold Seeded with a Co-Culture of Schwann Cells and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Sciatic Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruixin; Li, Dong; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    As a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts, tissue-engineered nerve grafts have been extensively studied as a way to bridge peripheral nerve defects and guide nerve regeneration. The main difference between autogenous nerve grafts and tissue-engineered nerve grafts is the regenerative microenvironment formed by the grafts. If an appropriate regenerative microenvironment is provided, the repair of a peripheral nerve is feasible. In this study, to mimic the body’s natural regenerative microenvironment closely, we co-cultured Schwann cells (SCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as seed cells and introduced them into a silk fibroin (SF)/collagen scaffold to construct a tissue-engineered nerve conduit (TENC). Twelve weeks after the three different grafts (plain SF/collagen scaffold, TENC, and autograft) were transplanted to bridge 1-cm long sciatic nerve defects in rats, a series of electrophysiological examinations and morphological analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of the tissue-engineered nerve grafts on peripheral nerve regeneration. The regenerative outcomes showed that the effect of treatment with TENCs was similar to that with autologous nerve grafts but superior to that with plain SF/collagen scaffolds. Meanwhile, no experimental animals had inflammation around the grafts. Based on this evidence, our findings suggest that the TENC we developed could improve the regenerative microenvironment and accelerate nerve regeneration compared to plain SF/collagen and may serve as a promising strategy for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:26799619

  16. Brain Lipid Binding Protein in Axon-Schwann Cell Interactions and Peripheral Nerve Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shyra J.; Li, Hongzhen; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Huang, Yuan; Johansson, Gunnar; Bowersock, Jason; Sidani, Amer; Vitullo, John; Vogel, Kristine; Parysek, Linda M.; DeClue, Jeffrey E.; Ratner, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Loss of axonal contact characterizes Schwann cells in benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients. Tumor Schwann cells demonstrate NF1 mutations, elevated Ras activity, and aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. Using cDNA microarrays, we found that brain lipid binding protein (BLBP) is elevated in an EGFR-positive subpopulation of Nf1 mutant mouse Schwann cells (Nf1?/? TXF) that grows away from axons; BLBP expression was not affected by farnesyltransferase inhibitor, an inhibitor of H-Ras. BLBP was also detected in EGFR-positive cell lines derived from Nf1:p53 double mutant mice and human MPNST. BLBP expression was induced in normal Schwann cells following transfection with EGFR but not H-Ras12V. Furthermore, EGFR-mediated BLBP expression was not inhibited by dominant-negative H-Ras, indicating that BLBP expression is downstream of Ras-independent EGFR signaling. BLBP-blocking antibodies enabled process outgrowth from Nf1?/? TXF cells and restored interaction with axons, without affecting cell proliferation or migration. Following injury, BLBP expression was induced in normal sciatic nerves when nonmyelinating Schwann cells remodeled their processes. These data suggest that BLBP, stimulated by Ras-independent pathways, regulates Schwann cell-axon interactions in normal peripheral nerve and peripheral nerve tumors. PMID:12612091

  17. Changes in Na-K ATPase and protein kinase C activities in peripheral nerve of acrylamide-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, E J; LoPachin, R M; Mathew, J; Eichberg, J

    1994-07-01

    In previous studies on rat peripheral nerve, we showed that acrylamide (ACR) exposure was associated with alterations in axonal and Schwann cell elemental composition that were consistent with decreased Na-K ATPase activity. In the present corollary study, the effects of ACR exposure on Na-K ATPase activity were determined in sciatic and tibial nerves. Subacute ACR treatment (50 mg/kg/d x 10 d, ip) significantly (p < .05) decreased Na-K ATPase activity by 45% in sciatic nerve but did not affect this activity in tibial nerve. Subchronic ACR treatment (2.8 mM in drinking water for 30 d) significantly decreased (p < .05) Na-K ATPase activities by 19% and 35% in sciatic and tibial nerves, respectively. Na-K ATPase activity was not altered in sciatic nerve homogenates exposed to 1.0 mM ACR in vitro. Since protein kinase C (PKC) has been proposed to play a role in the modulation of membrane Na-K ATPase function, PKC activity was also measured in sciatic nerve homogenates and subcellular fractions prepared from control and ACR-treated rats. Regardless of the ACR treatment protocol, PKC activity was elevated in nerve cytosol, but not in a particulate fraction. The results of this study suggest that decreased Na-K ATPase activity is involved in ACR-induced perturbation of axoplasmic and Schwann cell elemental composition in rat peripheral nerves and that loss of activity is not due to direct chemical inhibition of the enzyme. The role of PKC in ACR neurotoxicity requires further elucidation. PMID:8021966

  18. Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden mimics the neuritogenic activity of nerve growth factor via MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in PC-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Syntyche Ling-Sing; Eik, Lee-Fang; Naidu, Murali; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    The traditional application of the sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis (tiger's milk mushroom) by the indigenous folks as tonic and remedy to treat a variety of ailments has been documented in Malaysia. Indigenous communities claimed to have consumed the decoction to boost their alertness during hunting. Mental alertness is believed to be related to neuronal health and neuroactivity. In the present study, the cell viability and neuritogenic effects of L. rhinocerotis sclerotium hot aqueous and ethanolic extracts, and crude polysaccharides on rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells were studied. Interestingly, the hot aqueous extract exhibited neuritogenic activity comparable to NGF in PC-12 cells. However, the extracts and crude polysaccharides stimulated neuritogenesis without stimulating the production of NGF in PC-12 cells. The involvements of the TrkA receptor and MEK/ERK1/2 pathway in hot aqueous extract-stimulated neuritogenesis were examined by Trk (K252a) and MEK/ERK1/2 (U0126 and PD98059) inhibitors. There was no significant difference in protein expression in NGF- and hot aqueous extract-treated cells for both total and phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK. The neuritogenic activity in PC-12 cells stimulated by hot aqueous and ethanolic extracts, and crude polysaccharides of L. rhinocerotis sclerotium mimicking NGF activity via the MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway is reported for the first time. PMID:26542212

  19. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 ?L/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  20. Tirasemtiv amplifies skeletal muscle response to nerve activation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Richard; Saikali, Khalil G; Chou, Willis; Russell, Alan J; Chen, Michael M; Vijayakumar, Vipin; Stoltz, Randall R; Baudry, Stephane; Enoka, Roger M; Morgans, David J.; Wolff, Andrew A; Malik, Fady I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we tested the hypothesis that tirasemtiv, a selective fast skeletal muscle troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium, could amplify the response of muscle to neuromuscular input in humans. Methods: Healthy men received tirasemtiv and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, 4-period, crossover design. The deep fibular nerve was stimulated transcutaneously to activate the tibialis anterior muscle and produce dorsiflexion of the foot. The force–freque...

  1. Peripheral nerve regeneration after experimental section in ovine radial and tibial nerves using synthetic nerve grafts, including expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells: morphological and neurophysiological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañas, Joaquim; de la Torre, Jaime; Soler, Francesc; García, Felix; Rodellar, Clementina; Pumarola, Martí; Climent, Jana; Soler, Robert; Orozco, Lluís

    2014-10-01

    The standard treatment of peripherical nerve injuries with substance gap is to introduce the nerve free extremes in a biodegradable tube which, as a biocamera, allows the continuity of the nerve, promote the neuroconduction and save the lesion from the surrounding fibrosis. However, this procedure has not any direct effect on the neuroregeneration nor to resolve high severe lesions. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can derivate "in vitro" in different lineages, including Schwann cells. Different studies have shown MSC can promote the nerve regeneration in rodents, dogs and primates. Moving to the human clinical application requires the procedure standardization, including the optimal cell dose which we have to use. In the sheep model animal we performed a study of 1 cm. nerve section-ressection and repair with a Neurolac™ biocamera, in whose gap we applied between 30 to 50×10(6) MSC from cancellous bone, all of them selected and cultured with GMP procedures. The results were compared with controls (saline serum ± platelet-rich plasma). We used radial nerve (sensitive) and tibial nerve (motor) from 7 sheep. In the first step we performed the surgical lesion and bone marrow aspiration, and in 3 weeks we performed the surgical repair. 3 sheep were sacrificed in 3 months, and 4 sheep in 6 months. In all surgeries we performed a neurophysiological register. When we obtained the tissue samples, we performed an histological, immunohistiquimical and morphometrical study. The recovery percentage was defined comparing the axonal density from the proximal and distal lesion margins. The 3 months samples results were wrong. In 6 months samples results we observed a significative myelined nervous fibers and conduction increasing, in front of controls, both radial and tibial nerves. These results suggest the MSC application in biodegradable scaffold in nerve injuries promotes good results in terms of regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25384470

  2. Intracisternal injection of inflammatory soup activates the trigeminal nerve system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J; Neeb, L; Israel, H; Dannenberg, F; Triebe, F; Dirnagl, U; Reuter, U

    2009-11-01

    The release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and sensitization of the trigeminal nerve system are important elements in migraine pathophysiology. Sensitization can be induced by topical meningeal administration of inflammatory soup (IS). CGRP release is a marker of trigeminal nerve activation. We examined the effect of intracisternal IS administration on CGRP release in rat jugular vein blood at baseline, 2 and 15 min after the beginning of IS infusion. IS administration caused a significant increase of CGRP levels after 2 and 15 min compared with baseline. Daily oral treatment with topiramate for 4 and 8 weeks led to a dose- and time-dependent reduction of IS-induced CGRP release. Sumatriptan also attenuated stimulated neuropeptide release. These results indicate that intracisternal IS administration leads to activation of the trigeminal system. The inhibition of CGRP release by topiramate offers a possible mechanism that may in part account for the preventative antimigraine activity of this drug. PMID:19558535

  3. Fingolimod induces the transition to a nerve regeneration promoting Schwann cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, André; Beyer, Felix; Tzekova, Nevena; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Successful regeneration of injured peripheral nerves is mainly attributed to the plastic behavior of Schwann cells. Upon loss of axons, these cells trans-differentiate into regeneration promoting repair cells which provide trophic support to regrowing axons. Among others, activation of cJun was revealed to be involved in this process, initiating the stereotypic pattern of Schwann cell phenotype alterations during Wallerian degeneration. Nevertheless, the ability of Schwann cells to adapt and therefore the nerve's potential to regenerate can be limited in particular after long term denervation or in neuropathies leading to incomplete regeneration only and thus emphasizing the need for novel therapeutic approaches. Here we stimulated primary neonatal and adult rat Schwann cells with Fingolimod/FTY720P and investigated its impact on the regeneration promoting phenotype. FTY720P activated a number of de-differentiation markers including cJun and interfered with maturation marker and myelin expression. Functionally, FTY720P treated Schwann cells upregulated growth factor expression and these cells enhanced dorsal root ganglion neurite outgrowth on inhibitory substrates. Our results therefore provide strong evidence that FTY720P application supports the generation of a repair promoting cellular phenotype and suggest that Fingolimod could be used as treatment for peripheral nerve injuries and diseases. PMID:25957629

  4. Bilateral peripheral neural activity observed in vivo following unilateral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Behera, Deepak; Behera, Subrat; Jacobs, Kathleen E.; Biswal, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a surrogate method to measure calcium content in nervous system since manganese physiologically follows calcium. Manganese is detectable in MRI and therefore visualizes structures and cell populations that actively regulate calcium. Since calcium is actively recruited for the transmission of action potentials, our purpose is to validate manganese-enhanced MRI for detection of changes in lumbar nerves related to nociception. A neuropathic ...

  5. Activity-dependent, homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release from auditory nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngodup, Tenzin; Goetz, Jack A; McGuire, Brian C; Sun, Wei; Lauer, Amanda M; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A

    2015-05-19

    Information processing in the brain requires reliable synaptic transmission. High reliability at specialized auditory nerve synapses in the cochlear nucleus results from many release sites (N), high probability of neurotransmitter release (Pr), and large quantal size (Q). However, high Pr also causes auditory nerve synapses to depress strongly when activated at normal rates for a prolonged period, which reduces fidelity. We studied how synapses are influenced by prolonged activity by exposing mice to constant, nondamaging noise and found that auditory nerve synapses changed to facilitating, reflecting low Pr. For mice returned to quiet, synapses recovered to normal depression, suggesting that these changes are a homeostatic response to activity. Two additional properties, Q and average excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitude, were unaffected by noise rearing, suggesting that the number of release sites (N) must increase to compensate for decreased Pr. These changes in N and Pr were confirmed physiologically using the integration method. Furthermore, consistent with increased N, endbulbs in noise-reared animals had larger VGlut1-positive puncta, larger profiles in electron micrographs, and more release sites per profile. In current-clamp recordings, noise-reared BCs had greater spike fidelity even during high rates of synaptic activity. Thus, auditory nerve synapses regulate excitability through an activity-dependent, homeostatic mechanism, which could have major effects on all downstream processing. Our results also suggest that noise-exposed bushy cells would remain hyperexcitable for a period after returning to normal quiet conditions, which could have perceptual consequences. PMID:25944933

  6. Schwann cells direct peripheral nerve regeneration through the Netrin-1 receptors, DCC and Unc5H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Christine A; Christie, Kimberly J; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A; Singh, Bhagat; Singh, Vandana; Thomas, Dorothy; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2011-10-01

    In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SCs) promote nerve regeneration by the secretion of trophic support molecules and the establishment of a supportive growth matrix. Elucidating factors that promote SC outgrowth following nerve injury is an important strategy for improving nerve regeneration. We identified the Netrin-1 receptors, Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) and Uncoordinated (Unc)5H2 as SC receptors that influence nerve regeneration by respectively promoting or inhibiting SC outgrowth. Significantly, we show both DCC and Unc5H2 receptors are distributed within SCs. In adult nerves, DCC is localized to the paranodes and Schmidt-Lantermann incisures of myelinating SCs, as well as along unmyelinated axons. After axotomy, DCC is prominently expressed in activated SCs at the regenerating nerve front. In contrast, Unc5H2 receptor is robustly distributed in myelinating SCs of the intact nerve and it is found at low levels in the SCs of the injury site. Local in vivo DCC siRNA mRNA knockdown at the growing tip of an injured nerve impaired SC activation and, in turn, significantly decreased axon regeneration. This forced DCC inhibition was associated with a dramatic reciprocal upregulation of Unc5H2 in the remaining SCs. Local Unc5H2 knockdown at the injury site, however, facilitated axon regrowth, indicating it has a role as an intrinsic brake to peripheral nerve regeneration. Our findings demonstrate that in adult peripheral nerves, SCs respond to DCC and Unc5H2 signaling, thereby promoting or hindering axon outgrowth and providing a novel mechanism for SC regulation during nerve regeneration. PMID:21656855

  7. Nerve growth factor promoter activity revealed in mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaja, Michael D; Smithson, Laura J; Elliott, Janet; Trinh, Gina; Crotty, Anne-Marie; Michalski, Bernadeta; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its precursor proNGF are perhaps the best described growth factors of the mammalian nervous system. There remains, however, a paucity of information regarding the precise cellular sites of proNGF/NGF synthesis. Here we report the generation of transgenic mice in which the NGF promoter controls the ectopic synthesis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). These transgenic mice provide an unprecedented resolution of both neural cells (e.g., neocortical and hippocampal neurons) and non-neural cells (e.g., renal interstitial cells and thymic reticular cells) that display NGF promoter activity from postnatal development to adulthood. Moreover, the transgene is inducible by injury. At 2 days after sciatic nerve ligation, a robust population of EGFP-positive cells is seen in the proximal nerve stump. These transgenic mice offer novel insights into the cellular sites of NGF promoter activity and can be used as models for investigating the regulation of proNGF/NGF expression after injury. PMID:21456011

  8. AUTOCRINE/PARACRINE MODULATION OF BARORECEPTOR ACTIVITY AFTER ANTIDROMIC STIMULATION OF AORTIC DEPRESSOR NERVE IN VIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Valter J. Santana-Filho; Davis, Greg J; Castania, Jaci A.; Ma, Xiuying; Salgado, Helio C; Abboud, Francois M.; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the sensory nerve endings of nonmyelinated C-fiber afferents evokes release of autocrine/paracrine factors that cause localized vasodilation, neurogenic inflammation, and modulation of sensory nerve activity. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of antidromic electrical stimulation on afferent baroreceptor activity in vivo, and investigate the role of endogenous prostanoids and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating changes in nerve activity. Baroreceptor activity ...

  9. Stromal cell-derived CCL2 drives neuropathic pain states through myeloid cell infiltration in injured nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Auvynet, Constance; Sapienza, Anaïs; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle; Combadière, Christophe; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane

    2015-03-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from peripheral nerve injury involves many persistent neuroinflammatory processes including inflammatory chemokines that control leukocyte trafficking and activate resident cells. Several studies have shown that CCL2 chemokine, a potent attractant of monocytes, and its cognate receptor, CCR2, play a critical role in regulating nociceptive processes during neuropathic pain. However, the role of CCL2 in peripheral leukocyte infiltration-associated neuropathic pain remains poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of individual CCL2-expressing cell populations (i.e. stromal and leukocytes) to immune cell recruitment into the injured nerve has not been established. Here, in preclinical model of peripheral neuropathic pain (i.e. chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve), we have demonstrated that, CCL2 content was increased specifically in nerve fibers. This upregulation of CCL2 correlated with local monocyte/macrophage infiltration and pain processing. Furthermore, sciatic intraneural microinjection of CCL2 in naïve animals triggered long-lasting pain behavior associated with local monocyte/macrophage recruitment. Using a specific CCR2 antagonist and mice with a CCL2 genetic deletion, we have also established that the CCL2/CCR2 axis drives monocyte/macrophage infiltration and pain hypersensitivity in the CCI model. Finally, specific deletion of CCL2 in stromal or immune cells respectively using irradiated bone marrow-chimeric CCI mice demonstrated that stromal cell-derived CCL2 (in contrast to CCL2 immune cell-derived) tightly controls monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the lesion and plays a major role in the development of neuropathic pain. These findings demonstrate that in chronic pain states, CCL2 expressed by sciatic nerve cells predominantly drove local neuro-immune interactions and pain-related behavior through CCR2 signaling. PMID:25449579

  10. Effect of Axon Misdirection on Recovery of Electromyographic Activity and Kinematics after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Manning J. Sabatier; To, Bao Ngoc; Nicolini, Jennifer; English, Arthur W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, patterns of activity in the soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles and hindlimb kinematics were evaluated during slope walking in rats after transection and surgical repair either of the entire sciatic nerve (Sci group) or of its two branches separately, the tibial and common fibular nerves (T/CF group). With the latter method, axons from the tibial and common fibular nerves could not reinnervate targets of the other nerve branch after injury, reducing the opportunity ...

  11. BDNF contributes to IBS-like colonic hypersensitivity via activating the enteroglia-nerve unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Du, Chao; Chen, Fei-Xue; Li, Chang-Qing; Yu, Yan-Bo; Han, Ting; Akhtar, Suhail; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Tan, Xiao-Di; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The over-expressed colonic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been reported to be associated with abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the neuropathological mechanism is unclear. We here investigated the involvement of enteroglial cells (EGCs) and enteric nerves in IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity. We showed that glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) and substance P (SP) were significantly increased in the colonic mucosa of IBS patients. The upregulation of those proteins was also observed in the colon of mice with visceral hypersensitivity, but not in the colon of BDNF+/− mice. Functionally, TrkB or EGC inhibitors, or BDNF knockdown significantly suppressed visceral hypersensitivity in mice. Using the EGC cell line, we found that recombinant human BDNF (r-HuBDNF) could directly activate EGCs via the TrkB-phospholipase Cγ1 pathway, thereby inducing a significant upregulation of SP. Moreover, supernatants from r-HuBDNF-activated EGC culture medium, rather than r-HuBDNF alone, triggered markedly augmented discharges in isolated intestinal mesenteric afferent nerves. r-HuBDNF alone could cause mesenteric afferent mechanical hypersensitivity independently, and this effect was synergistically enhanced by activated EGCs. We conclude that EGC-enteric nerve unit may be involved in IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity, and this process is likely initiated by BDNF-TrkB pathway activation. PMID:26837784

  12. Genetically modified canine Schwann cells--In vitro and in vivo evaluation of their suitability for peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitte, Ruth; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M; Schenk, Henning; Flieshardt, Cornelia; Grothe, Claudia; Haastert, Kirsten

    2010-02-15

    After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells (SC) guarantee for a regeneration-promoting milieu and are crucially involved in axonal regeneration. For extended nerve defects, bridging with an autologous nerve transplant is the gold standard therapy. Artificial biohybrid nerve transplants which combine a synthetic conduit with autologous SC genetically modified to express regeneration-promoting proteins may provide an alternative therapy to autotransplantation. The dog seems to be an ideal translational animal model for new treatment strategies. In the present study, utilizing a new transfection protocol, we transplanted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adult canine SC (cSC) into a 5mm epineural pouch in the sciatic nerve of adult rats (n=9). The epineurial pouch technique serves as proof of principle to follow the fate of the transplanted cSC for up to 14 days after surgery. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed survival and integration of EGFP-expressing cSC into the regenerating host nerve tissue. We demonstrate that transplanted cSC contribute to the formation of bands of Büngner and are located in close vicinity to growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expressing regenerating nerve fibers. This provides first evidence that transplanted genetically modified Schwann cells do successfully integrate into the host tissue where they could actively contribute to the regeneration process. PMID:19962404

  13. Nerve growth factor-mediated targeting of liposomes to cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derivatives of beta-nerve growth factor (NGF), modified by biotinylation of carboxyl groups, were used to target the specific binding of liposomes to cultured rat and human cells bearing NGF receptors. Streptavidin was conjugated via peptide bonds to amino groups on liposomes. Biotinylated NGF, but not unmodified NGF, mediated the binding of radiolabeled streptavidin-liposomes to rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells in suspension at 40C. In contrast, biotinylated NGF did not increase the binding of hemoglobin-conjugated liposomes tested as a control for specificity. Biotinylated NGF also mediated the specific binding of streptavidin-liposomes containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran to PC12 cells and human melanoma HS294 cells. When HS294 cells were incubated at 370C following liposome binding at 40C, the cell-associated fluorescence appeared to become internalized, in that some cells displayed a perinuclear pattern of fluorescence similar to that observed when lysosomes were stained with acridine orange. Trypsin treatment abolished cell-associated fluorescence when cells were held at 40C but did not affect the fluorescence in cells following incubation at 370C. When liposomes containing carboxyfluorescein, a dye that can diffuse out of acidic compartments, were targeted to HS294 cells, incubation at 370C resulted in diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence, suggesting that internalized liposomes encounter lysosomal or prelysosomal organelles

  14. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1301-1312, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26516696

  15. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  16. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  17. Low-dose carbon monoxide inhalation protects neuronal cells from apoptosis after optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeli; Wang, Ruobing; Wu, Jiangchun; Xia, Fangzhou; Sun, Qinglei; Xu, Jiajun; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-22

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathy, including axonal degeneration and apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), eventually leads to irreversible visual impairment. Carbon monoxide (CO) acts as a therapeutic agent against neural injury via its anti-apoptotic effect. Here we hypothesized that low-dose CO inhalation can protect RGCs in a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC). ONC was performed on adult male Sprague Dawley rats to imitate glaucomatous optic damage. Low-dose CO (250 ppm) or air was inhaled for 1 h immediately after ONC, and all the tests were carried out 2 weeks later. Flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP) and pupil light relax (PLR) were recorded for the assessment of visual function. RGC density was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and Fluorogold labeling. Retinal apoptotic process was assessed by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity measurement. Low-dose CO treatment significantly ameliorated the abnormalities of FVEP and PLR induced by ONC. As expected, the RGC density was increased remarkably by CO inhalation after the glaucomatous optic nerve insult. Moreover, CO treatment after ONC significantly decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in ganglion cell layer and attenuated the retinal caspase-3 activity. Low-dose CO inhalation protects RGCs from optic nerve injury via inhibiting caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. PMID:26707638

  18. Nestin-expressing hair follicle-accessible pluripotent stem cells for nerve and spinal cord repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle, discovered by our laboratory, have been shown to be able to form neurons and other nonfollicle cell types. We have shown that the nestin-expressing stem cells from the hair follicle can effect the repair of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. The hair follicle stem cells differentiate into neuronal and glial cells after transplantation to the injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord, and enhance injury repair and locomotor recovery. We have termed these cells hair follicle-accessible pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. When the excised hair follicle with its nerve stump was placed in Gelfoam 3D histoculture, HAP stem cells grew and extended the hair follicle nerve which consisted of ?III-tubulin-positive fibers with F-actin expression at the tip. These findings indicate that ?III-tubulin-positive fibers elongating from the whisker follicle sensory nerve stump were growing axons. The growing whisker sensory nerve was highly enriched in HAP stem cells, which appeared to play a major role in its elongation and interaction with other nerves in 3D Gelfoam histoculture, including the sciatic nerve, the trigeminal nerve, and the trigeminal nerve ganglion. Our results suggest that a major function of the HAP stem cells in the hair follicle is for growth of the follicle sensory nerve. HAP stem cells have critical advantages over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells in that they are highly accessible, require no genetic manipulation, are nontumorigenic, and do not present ethical issues for regenerative medicine. PMID:25766743

  19. Are Natural Killer Cells Distributed in Relationship to Nerve Fibers in the Pregnant Mouse Uterus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Sheikhi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized lymphocytes, called uterine Natural Killer (uNK cells, appear in human and rodent uteri and become abundant at implantation sites during decidualization and early pregnancy. The hallmark of human uNK cells is intense expression of CD56, a neural cell adhesion glycoprotein (NCAM-1 while mature (granulated mouse uNK cells express asialoGM1, a brain ganglioside. Murine uNK cells initiate the normal structural changes induced in maternal spiral arteries by pregnancy but regulation of their recruitment, localization and activation is incompletely understood. To address whether uNK cell distribution is co-localized with nerve fiber distribution, sections of gestation day (gd 6-12 implantation sites from C57BL/6 (B6 mice were studied. Nerve fibers reactive with antibodies to pan neurofilament 150 kD or with tyrosine hydroxylase, an enzyme restricted to sympathetic fibers, were present the walls of branches from the uterine artery in the mesentery. Reactivity was lost as the vessels crossed the myometrium and entered endometrium/decidua. Periodic Acid Schiff’s reactive uNK cells were absent from the mesentery and enriched in decidua basalis where they transcribed NCAM-1 and associated with non-innervated segments of the uterine arteries, including spiral arteries. These data suggest that the localization and activation of mature uNK cells are unlikely to be neurotransmitter regulated.

  20. Electrical interfacing of nerve cells and semiconductor chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromherz, Peter

    2002-03-12

    The electrical interfacing of individual nerve cells and silicon microstructures is considered, as well as the assembly of elementary hybrid systems made of neuronal networks and semiconductor microelectronics. Without electrochemical processes, coupling of the electron-conducting semiconductor and the ion-conducting neurons relies on a close contact of cell membrane and oxidised silicon with a high resistance of the junction and a high conductance of the attached membrane. Neuronal excitation can be elicited and recorded from the chip by capacitive contacts and by field-effect transistors with an open gate. Integrated iono-electronic system are obtained by the outgrowth of neuronal networks on the surface of the silicon chip, by implementing electrical circuits in the chip and by two-way interfacing of the neuronal and the electronic components. PMID:12503174

  1. Changes in the organization of the neuritic cytoskeleton during nerve growth factor-activated differentiation of PC12 cells: a serial electron microscopic study of the development and control of neurite shape

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    After exposure to nerve growth factor, PC12 cells differentiate within a period of only a few days into cholinergic sympathetic neurons. Using computer-assisted three-dimensional serial electron microscopic reconstruction, we describe the progressive cytoskeletal and structural changes of PC12 neurites at different stages in their differentiation. Developmental changes in these neurites can be characterized by two major transitions. First, microtubules (MTs), which define the longitudinal axi...

  2. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide conduits in the field of nerve tissue engineering. PMID:25580010

  3. Cancer Stem Cell-Like Cells Derived from Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Spyra, Melanie; Kluwe, Lan; Hagel, Christian; Panse, Jens; Kurtz, Andreas; Mautner, Victor Felix; Demestre, Maria; Nguyen, Rosalyn T.; Rabkin, Samuel David

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine whether or not cancer stem cells exist in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Cells of established lines, primary cultures and freshly dissected tumors were cultured in serum free conditions supplemented with epidermal and fibroblast growth factors. From one established human MPNST cell line, S462, cells meeting the criteria for cancer stem cells were isolated. Clonal spheres were obtained, which could be passaged multiple times. Enrichment of stem cel...

  4. Sympathetic nerve activity and simulated diving in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuzzaman, Abu; Ackerman, Michael J; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Sert; Accurso, Valentina; Davison, Diane; Amin, Raouf S; Somers, Virend K

    2014-04-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a simple and practical method for simulating diving in humans using facial cold exposure and apnea stimuli to measure neural and circulatory responses during the stimulated diving reflex. We hypothesized that responses to simultaneous facial cold exposure and apnea (simulated diving) would be synergistic, exceeding the sum of responses to individual stimuli. We studied 56 volunteers (24 female and 32 male), average age of 39 years. All subjects were healthy, free of cardiovascular and other diseases, and on no medications. Although muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and vascular resistance increased markedly during both early and late phases of simulated diving, significant reductions in heart rate were observed only during the late phase. Total MSNA during simulated diving was greater than combined MSNA responses to the individual stimuli. We found that simulated diving is a powerful stimulus to sympathetic nerve traffic with significant bradycardia evident in the late phase of diving and eliciting synergistic sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Our data provide insight into autonomic triggers that could help explain catastrophic cardiovascular events that may occur during asphyxia or swimming, such as in patients with obstructive sleep apnea or congenital long QT syndrome. PMID:24368150

  5. Imaging stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings in mouse colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NickSpencer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal afferent neurons play a major role in detecting noxious and innocuous stimuli from visceral organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract. However, all our understanding about spinal afferents has been obtained from recordings of spinal afferent axons, or cell bodies that lie outside the gut wall, or peripheral organ they innervate. No recordings have been made directly from spinal afferent nerve endings, which is where sensory transduction occurs. We developed a preparation whereby recordings could be made from rectal afferent nerve endings in the colon, to characterize mechanisms underlying sensory transduction. Dorsal root ganglia (L6-S2 were removed from mice, whilst retaining neural continuity with the colon. Fluo-4-AM was used to record from rectal afferent nerve endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle at 36oC. In slack (unstretched preparations of colon, no calcium transients were recorded from spinal afferent endings. However, in response to a maintained increase in circumferential diameter, a maintained discharge of calcium transients occurred simultaneously in multiple discrete varicosities along single axons of rectal afferents in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Stretch-activated calcium transients were resistant to hexamethonium and nifedipine, but were abolished by tetrodotoxin, CPA, BAPTA-AM, cobalt, gadolinium, or replacement of extracellular Na+ with NMDG. In summary, we present a novel preparation in which stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings can be recorded, using calcium imaging. We show that circumferential stretch of the colon activates a maintained discharge of calcium transients simultaneously in varicosities along single rectal afferent endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Non-selective cation channels, TTX-sensitive Na+ channels and both extracellular calcium influx and intracellular Ca2+ stores are required for stretch-activated calcium transients in rectal afferent endings.

  6. Fibroblast-derived tenascin-C promotes Schwann cell migration through ?1-integrin dependent pathway during peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanhu; Yu, Bin; Gu, Yun; Zhou, Songlin; Qian, Tianmei; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Guohui; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration requires precise coordination and dynamic interaction among various types of cells in the tissue. It remains unclear, however, whether the cellular crosstalk between fibroblasts and Schwann cells (SCs) is related to phenotype modulation of SCs, a critical cellular process after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, microarray analysis revealed that a total of 6,046 genes were differentially expressed in the proximal nerve segment after sciatic nerve transection in rats, and bioinformatics analysis further identified tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, as a key gene regulator. TNC was abundantly produced by nerve fibroblasts accumulating at the lesion site, rather than by SCs as usually expected. TNC significantly promoted SC migration without effects on SC proliferation in primary culture. In co-culture of fibroblasts and SCs, inhibition of TNC expression either by siRNA transfection or antibody blockade could suppress SC migration, while TNC-stimulated SC migration was mediated by TNC binding to ?1-integrin receptor in SCs through activation of Rac1 effectors. The in vivo evidence showed that exogenous TNC protein enhanced SC migration and axonal regrowth. Our results highlight that TNC-mediated cellular interaction between fibroblasts and SCs may regulate SC migration through ?1-integrin-dependent pathway during peripheral nerve regeneration. GLIA 2016;64:374-385. PMID:26497118

  7. Biological Activity of Nerve Growth Factor Precursor Is Dependent upon Relative Levels of Its Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Raheleh; Ioannou, Maria S.; Coughlin, Michael D.; Pagadala, Promila; Neet, Kenneth E.; Clewes, Oliver; Allen, Shelley J.; Dawbarn, David; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is produced as a precursor called pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF), which is secreted by many tissues and is the predominant form of NGF in the central nervous system. In Alzheimer disease brain, cholinergic neurons degenerate and can no longer transport NGF as efficiently, leading to an increase in untransported NGF in the target tissue. The protein that accumulates in the target tissue is proNGF, not the mature form. The role of this precursor is controversial, and both neurotrophic and apoptotic activities have been reported for recombinant proNGFs. Differences in the protein structures, protein expression systems, methods used for protein purification, and methods used for bioassay may affect the activity of these proteins. Here, we show that proNGF is neurotrophic regardless of mutations or tags, and no matter how it is purified or in which system it is expressed. However, although proNGF is neurotrophic under our assay conditions for primary sympathetic neurons and for pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, it is apoptotic for unprimed PC12 cells when they are deprived of serum. The ratio of tropomyosin-related kinase A to p75 neurotrophin receptor is low in unprimed PC12 cells compared with primed PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons, altering the balance of proNGF-induced signaling to favor apoptosis. We conclude that the relative level of proNGF receptors determines whether this precursor exhibits neurotrophic or apoptotic activity. PMID:19389705

  8. Biological activity of nerve growth factor precursor is dependent upon relative levels of its receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Raheleh; Ioannou, Maria S; Coughlin, Michael D; Pagadala, Promila; Neet, Kenneth E; Clewes, Oliver; Allen, Shelley J; Dawbarn, David; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2009-07-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is produced as a precursor called pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF), which is secreted by many tissues and is the predominant form of NGF in the central nervous system. In Alzheimer disease brain, cholinergic neurons degenerate and can no longer transport NGF as efficiently, leading to an increase in untransported NGF in the target tissue. The protein that accumulates in the target tissue is proNGF, not the mature form. The role of this precursor is controversial, and both neurotrophic and apoptotic activities have been reported for recombinant proNGFs. Differences in the protein structures, protein expression systems, methods used for protein purification, and methods used for bioassay may affect the activity of these proteins. Here, we show that proNGF is neurotrophic regardless of mutations or tags, and no matter how it is purified or in which system it is expressed. However, although proNGF is neurotrophic under our assay conditions for primary sympathetic neurons and for pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, it is apoptotic for unprimed PC12 cells when they are deprived of serum. The ratio of tropomyosin-related kinase A to p75 neurotrophin receptor is low in unprimed PC12 cells compared with primed PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons, altering the balance of proNGF-induced signaling to favor apoptosis. We conclude that the relative level of proNGF receptors determines whether this precursor exhibits neurotrophic or apoptotic activity. PMID:19389705

  9. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    KAUST Repository

    Takaku, Yasuharu

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  10. Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden mimics the neuritogenic activity of nerve growth factor via MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in PC-12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Syntyche Ling-Sing Seow; Lee-Fang Eik; Murali Naidu; Pamela David; Kah-Hui Wong; Vikineswary Sabaratnam

    2015-01-01

    The traditional application of the sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis (tiger’s milk mushroom) by the indigenous folks as tonic and remedy to treat a variety of ailments has been documented in Malaysia. Indigenous communities claimed to have consumed the decoction to boost their alertness during hunting. Mental alertness is believed to be related to neuronal health and neuroactivity. In the present study, the cell viability and neuritogenic effects of L. rhinocerotis sclerotium hot aqueous an...

  11. Platelet-rich plasma gel in combination with Schwann cells for repair of sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fagang; Li, Haiyan; Qiao, Guangxi; Chen, Feng; Tao, Hao; Ji, Aiyu; Hu, Yanling

    2012-10-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from New Zealand white rabbits, culture-expanded and differentiated into Schwann cell-like cells. Autologous platelet-rich plasma and Schwann cell-like cells were mixed in suspension at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/mL, prior to introduction into a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit. Fabricated tissue-engineered nerves were implanted into rabbits to bridge 10 mm sciatic nerve defects (platelet-rich plasma group). Controls were established using fibrin as the seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells at identical density to construct tissue-engineered nerves (fibrin group). Twelve weeks after implantation, toluidine blue staining and scanning electron microscopy were used to demonstrate an increase in the number of regenerating nerve fibers and thickness of the myelin sheath in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group. Fluoro-gold retrograde labeling revealed that the number of Fluoro-gold-positive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and the spinal cord anterior horn was greater in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the fibrin group. Electrophysiological examination confirmed that compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity were superior in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group. These results indicate that autologous platelet-rich plasma gel can effectively serve as a seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells to construct tissue-engineered nerves to promote peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25538751

  12. Hirschsprung’s disease: Is there a relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers?

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Amit Kumar; Mishra, Kiran; Mohta, Anup; Agarwal, Sarla

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To define the topography of mast cells and their numbers in cases of Hirschsprung’s disease (HD) and non-HD, assess neural hypertrophy using imaging software and to study the relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers.

  13. Synergistic effects of low-level laser and mesenchymal stem cells on functional recovery in rats with crushed sciatic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Chia; Wang, John; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed to exert beneficial effects on peripheral nerve regeneration after a peripheral nerve injury, but the functional recovery in the denervated limb is still limited. In this study, we used low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct therapy for MSC transplantation on the functional recovery of crushed sciatic nerve in rats. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 48 Sprague-Dawley rats by crushing the unilateral sciatic nerve, using a vessel clamp. The animals with crushed injury were randomly divided into four groups: control group, with no treatment; MSC group, treated with MSC alone; LLLT group, treated with LLLT alone; and MSCLLLT group, treated with a combination of MSC and LLLT. The sciatic function index (SFI), vertical activity of locomotion (VA) and ankle angle (AA) of rats were examined for functional assessments after treatment. Electrophysiological, morphological and S100 immunohistochemical studies were also conducted. The MSCLLLT group showed a greater recovery in SFI, VA and AA, with significant difference from MSC, LLLT and control groups (p?treatment (p?treatment of MSC or LLLT alone. LLLT has a synergistic effect in providing greater functional recovery with MSC transplantation after nerve crush injury. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23468370

  14. Histological Study of Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Stromal Cell Transplantation in Regenerating Rat Peripheral Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Zarbakhsh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bone marrow and umbilical cord stromal cells are multipotential stem cells that have the ability to produce growth factors that play an important role in survival and generation of axons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of the two different mesenchymal stem cells on peripheral nerve regeneration. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a 10 mm segment of the left sciatic nerve of male Wistar rats (250-300 g was removed with a silicone tube interposed into this nerve gap. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs and human umbilical cord stromal cells (HUCSCs were respectively obtained from rat and human. The cells were separately cultured and transplanted into the nerve gap. The sciatic nerve regeneration was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and light and electron microscopy. Moreover, histomorphology of the gastrocnemius muscle was observed. Results: The nerve regeneration in the BMSCs and HUCSCs groups that had received the stem cells was significantly more favorable than the control group. In addition, the BMSCs group was significantly more favorable than the HUCSCs group (P<0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that both homograft BMSCs and heterograft HUCSCs may have the potential to regenerate peripheral nerve injury and transplantation of BMSCs may be more effective than HUCSCs in rat.

  15. Obesity-induced increases in sympathetic nerve activity: sex matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Virginia L.; Shi, Zhigang; Holwerda, Seth W.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence obtained largely from male human and animal subjects indicates that obesity increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which contributes to hypertension development. However, recent studies that included women reported that the strong relationships between muscle SNA and waist circumference or body mass index (BMI) found in men are not present in overweight and obese women. A similar sex difference in the association between adiposity and hypertension development has been identified in animal models of obesity. In this brief review, we consider two possible mechanisms for this sex difference. First, visceral adiposity, leptin, insulin, and angiotensin II have been identified as potential culprits in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation in males. We explore if these factors wield the same impact in females. Second, we consider if sex differences in vascular reactivity to sympathetic activation contribute. Our survey of the literature suggests that premenopausal females may be able to resist obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension in part due to differences in adipose disposition as well as its muted inflammatory response and reduced production of pressor versus depressor components of the renin-angiotensin system. In addition, vascular responsiveness to increased SNA may be reduced. However, more importantly, we identify the urgent need for further study, not only of sex differences per se, but also of the mechanisms that may mediate these differences. This information is required not only to refine treatment options for obese premenopausal women but also to potentially reveal new therapeutic avenues in obese men and women. PMID:25435000

  16. Involvement of Hypothalamic AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation

    OpenAIRE

    TANIDA, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPK?2 in the sympathetic effec...

  17. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-09-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum-iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia. PMID:26381017

  18. A comparison between complete immobilisation and protected active mobilisation in sensory nerve recovery following isolated digital nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henry, F P

    2012-06-01

    Post-operative immobilisation following isolated digital nerve repair remains a controversial issue amongst the microsurgical community. Protocols differ from unit to unit and even, as evidenced in our unit, may differ from consultant to consultant. We undertook a retrospective review of 46 patients who underwent isolated digital nerve repair over a 6-month period. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 18 months. Twenty-four were managed with protected active mobilisation over a 4-week period while 22 were immobilised over the same period. Outcomes such as return to work, cold intolerance, two-point discrimination and temperature differentiation were used as indicators of clinical recovery. Our results showed that there was no significant difference noted in either clinical assessment of recovery or return to work following either post-operative protocol, suggesting that either regime may be adopted, tailored to the patient\\'s needs and resources of the unit.

  19. Tetramethylpyrazine protects Schwann cells from ischemia-like injury and increases cell survival in cold ischemic rat nerves

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ming-Ming, Yang; Wei, Huang; Dian-Ming, Jiang.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetrametilpirazina (TMP), o principal componente do extrato de Ligusticum wallichi Franchat (erva chinesa), apresenta propriedades neuroprotetoras na isquemia. Nesse estudo, avaliamos seus efeitos protetores nas células de Schwann (SC), cultivando-as na presença de condições de depleção de oxigênio [...] da glicose (OGD) e medindo a sobrevivência dos nervos de ratos isquêmicos pelo resfriamento. No modelo de lesão isquêmica em SC induzida por OGD, demonstramos que o tratamento com TMP não somente reduziu as perdas de viabilidade celular induzida por OGD, a morte celular, a apoptose de SC dose-dependente e inibiu a liberação de LDH, mas, também, suprimiu a infra-regulação do Vcl-2 e a supra-regulação de Bax e caspase-3, e inibiu a consequente ativação da caspase-3. No modelo de nervo isquêmico por resfriamento, observamos que a exposição prolongada ao resfriamento por quatro semanas estava, marcadamente, associada com a ausência de SC, com o decréscimo da viabilidade celular e a apoptose em segmentos de nervo incubados na solução da Universidade de Wisconsin apenas. Entretanto, a TMP atenuou o dano no segmento do nervo preservando SC e antagonizando a diminuição da viabilidade da fibra nervosa e o aumento das células TUNEL-positiva de modo dose-dependente. De forma conjunta, nossos resultados indicam que o TMP não só fornece efeitos protetores em um modelo de dano semelhante à isquemia de SC de ratos cultivados pela regulação de BCl-2, Bax e caspase 3, mas, também, aumenta a sobrevivência celular e suprime a apoptose no modelo de isquemia por resfriamento por exposição prolongada por quatro semanas. Então, TMP pode ser uma estratégia terapêutica eficaz para prevenir doenças isquêmicas do sistema nervoso periférico e melhora a armazenagem do nervo periférico. Abstract in english Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a major active ingredient of Ligusticum wallichi Franchat extract (a Chinese herb), exhibits neuroprotective properties in ischemia. In this study, we assessed its protective effects on Schwann cells (SCs) by culturing them in the presence of oxygen glucose deprivation (OG [...] D) conditions and measuring cell survival in cold ischemic rat nerves. In the OGD-induced ischemic injury model of SCs, we demonstrated that TMP treatment not only reduced OGD-induced cell viability losses, cell death, and apoptosis of SCs in a dose-dependent manner, and inhibited LDH release, but also suppressed OGD-induced downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax and caspase-3, as well as inhibited the consequent activation of caspase-3. In the cold ischemic nerve model, we found that prolonged cold ischemic exposure for four weeks was markedly associated with the absence of SCs, a decrease in cell viability, and apoptosis in preserved nerve segments incubated in University of Wisconsin solution (UWS) alone. However, TMP attenuated nerve segment damage by preserving SCs and antagonizing the decrease in nerve fiber viability and increase in TUNEL-positive cells in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that TMP not only provides protective effects in an ischemia-like injury model of cultured rat SCs by regulating Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3, but also increases cell survival and suppresses apoptosis in the cold ischemic nerve model after prolonged ischemic exposure for four weeks. Therefore, TMP may be a novel and effective therapeutic strategy for preventing peripheral nervous system ischemic diseases and improving peripheral nerve storage.

  20. Acrylamide neuropathy. I. Spatiotemporal characteristics of nerve cell damage in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, E J; Balaban, C D; Ross, J F; Reid, M A; LoPachin, R M

    2002-09-01

    Based on evidence from morphometric studies of PNS, we suggested that acrylamide (ACR)-induced distal axon degeneration was a secondary effect related to duration of exposure [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 151 (1998) 211]. To test this hypothesis in CNS, the cupric-silver stain method of de Olmos was used to define spatiotemporal characteristics of nerve somal, dendritic, axonal and terminal degeneration in rat cerebellum. Rats were exposed to ACR at either 50 mg/kg per day (i.p.) or 21 mg/kg per day (p.o.) and at selected times (i.p. = 5, 8 and 11 days; p.o. = 7, 14, 21, 28 and 38 days) brains were removed and processed for silver staining. Results demonstrate that intoxication at the higher ACR dose-rate produced early (day 5) and progressive degeneration of Purkinje cell dendrites in cerebellar cortex. Nerve terminal degeneration occurred concurrently with somatodendritic argyrophilia in cerebellar and brainstem nuclei that receive afferent input from Purkinje neurons. Relatively delayed (day 8), abundant axon degeneration was present in cerebellar white matter but not in cortical layers or in tracts carrying afferent fibers (cerebellar peduncles) from other brain nuclei. Axon argyrophilia coincided with the appearance of perikaryal degeneration, which was selective for Purkinje cells since silver impregnation of other cerebellar neurons was not evident in the different cortical layers or cerebellar nuclei. Intoxication at the lower ACR dose-rate produced simultaneous (day 14) dendrite, axon and nerve terminal argyrophilia and no somatic Purkinje cell degeneration. The spatiotemporal pattern of dendrite, axon and nerve terminal loss induced by both ACR dose-rates is consistent with Purkinje cell injury. Injured neurons are likely to be incapable of maintaining distal processes and, therefore, axon degeneration in the cerebellum is a component of a "dying-back" process of neuronal injury. Because cerebellar coordination of somatomotor activity is mediated solely through efferent projections of the Purkinje cell, injury to this neuron might contribute significantly to gait abnormalities that characterize ACR neurotoxicity. PMID:12387366

  1. Characterization of voltage-activated ionic currents in the GnRH-containing terminalis nerve in transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Luoxiu; Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    The terminalis nerve (TN) is in a class of cranial nerves that plays important roles in animal development, physiology and behavior. Here, we report a study on the characterization of voltage-activated ionic currents in GnRH-containing TN cells in zebrafish. The experiments were performed using acutely dissociated TN cells from the transgenic zebrafish Tg (GnRH-3::GFP). In the transgenic zebrafish, the TN cells express GFP under the transcriptional control of the zebrafish GnRH-3 promoter. In all of the GnRH-containing TN cells examined, we recorded both low-voltage-activated (LVA) and high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium current (I(Ca)). The characteristics of the I(Ca) were similar to those described in other zebrafish cell types. However, the distribution patterns of the currents in the GnRH-containing TN cells were different in comparison to the distribution of the currents in other cell types. In addition, we characterized TTX-sensitive sodium current (I(Na)) and 4AP-sensitive and TEA-resistant potassium current (I(K)). The characteristics of voltage-activated I(Na) and I(K) in the GnRH-containing TN cells were similar to those described in other zebrafish cell types. Together, the data from this study revealed the electrophysiological properties of the GnRH-containing TN cells, thereby providing insight on the regulatory mechanisms of TN-signaling in animal physiology. PMID:20951681

  2. Regeneration of the auditory nerve - a cell transplantation study

    OpenAIRE

    Palmgren, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Since in mammals, the hair cells or the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear do not regenerate, damage to these cells is an irreversible process. Presently the only aid for patients with severe to profound hearing impairment due to damaged hair cells is a cochlear implant (CI). A CI converts sound to electrical signals that stimulate the SGNs via an electrode that is implanted into the cochlea. Hence, for a successful outcome the CI is dependant on the activation ...

  3. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment

  4. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  5. Histological Study of Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Stromal Cell Transplantation in Regenerating Rat Peripheral Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbakhsh, Sam; Goudarzi, Nasim; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Safari, Manouchehr

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow and umbilical cord stromal cells are multipotential stem cells that have the ability to produce growth factors that play an important role in survival and generation of axons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of the two different mesenchymal stem cells on peripheral nerve regeneration. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a 10 mm segment of the left sciatic nerve of male Wistar rats (250-300 g) was removed with a silicone tube interposed into this nerve gap. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and human umbilical cord stromal cells (HUCSCs) were respectively obtained from rat and human. The cells were sepa- rately cultured and transplanted into the nerve gap. The sciatic nerve regeneration was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and light and electron microscopy. Moreover, histo- morphology of the gastrocnemius muscle was observed. Results The nerve regeneration in the BMSCs and HUCSCs groups that had received the stem cells was significantly more favorable than the control group. In addition, the BM- SCs group was significantly more favorable than the HUCSCs group (Pnerve injury and transplantation of BMSCs may be more effective than HUCSCs in rat. PMID:26862526

  6. A local anesthetic, ropivacaine, suppresses activated microglia via a nerve growth factor-dependent mechanism and astrocytes via a nerve growth factor-independent mechanism in neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Atsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local anesthetics alleviate neuropathic pain in some cases in clinical practice, and exhibit longer durations of action than those predicted on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of their blocking effects on voltage-dependent sodium channels. Therefore, local anesthetics may contribute to additional mechanisms for reversal of the sensitization of nociceptive pathways that occurs in the neuropathic pain state. In recent years, spinal glial cells, microglia and astrocytes, have been shown to play critical roles in neuropathic pain, but their participation in the analgesic effects of local anesthetics remains largely unknown. Results Repetitive epidural administration of ropivacaine reduced the hyperalgesia induced by chronic constrictive injury of the sciatic nerve. Concomitantly with this analgesia, ropivacaine suppressed the increases in the immunoreactivities of CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the dorsal spinal cord, as markers of activated microglia and astrocytes, respectively. In addition, epidural administration of a TrkA-IgG fusion protein that blocks the action of nerve growth factor (NGF, which was upregulated by ropivacaine in the dorsal root ganglion, prevented the inhibitory effect of ropivacaine on microglia, but not astrocytes. The blockade of NGF action also abolished the analgesic effect of ropivacaine on neuropathic pain. Conclusions Ropivacaine provides prolonged analgesia possibly by suppressing microglial activation in an NGF-dependent manner and astrocyte activation in an NGF-independent manner in the dorsal spinal cord. Local anesthetics, including ropivacaine, may represent a new approach for glial cell inhibition and, therefore, therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain.

  7. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Secretomes of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura-Wakayama, Yukiko; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Kawai, Takamasa; Ogata, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Hibi, Hideharu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral nerve regeneration across nerve gaps is often suboptimal, with poor functional recovery. Stem cell transplantation-based regenerative therapy is a promising approach for axon regeneration and functional recovery of peripheral nerve injury; however, the mechanisms remain controversial and unclear. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells promote tissue regeneration through a paracrine mechanism. We investigated the effects of conditioned media derived from stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED-CM) on peripheral nerve regeneration. In vitro, SHED-CM-treated Schwann cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation, migration, and the expression of neuron-, extracellular matrix (ECM)-, and angiogenesis-related genes. SHED-CM stimulated neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and increased cell viability. Similarly, SHED-CM enhanced tube formation in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, a 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap model was bridged by silicon conduits containing SHED-CM or serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Light and electron microscopy confirmed that the number of myelinated axons and axon-to-fiber ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the SHED-CM group at 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. The sciatic functional index (SFI) and gastrocnemius (target muscle) wet weight ratio demonstrated functional recovery. Increased compound muscle action potentials and increased SFI in the SHED-CM group suggested sciatic nerve reinnervation of the target muscle and improved functional recovery. We also observed reduced muscle atrophy in the SHED-CM group. Thus, SHEDs may secrete various trophic factors that enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through multiple mechanisms. SHED-CM may therefore provide a novel therapy that creates a more desirable extracellular microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26154068

  8. Elimination of microwave effects on the vitality of nerves after blockage of active transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRee, D.I.; Wachtel, H.

    1986-12-01

    We have previously reported that exposure to microwave fields (a specific absorption rate of 10 W/kg at 2.45-GHz continuous wave) would consistently lower the survival time of isolated frog sciatic nerves stimulated at high repetition rates (50 pulse pairs per second, ppps). The time course of the loss of excitability of the exposed nerve (as compared to its unexposed contralateral mate) is reminiscent of that seen when the active transport of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) is blocked by certain agents--such as the cardiac glycoside ouabain. To assess the role that these microwaves may have in interfering with or counteracting active transport, we performed a series of experiments in which the active Na-K pump was substantially blocked by ouabain prior to microwave exposure. The paired nerves were soaked for 5 min in a high concentration (10(-3) g/liter) of ouabain to achieve the fastest and most complete blockage of the Na-K pump prior to stimulation at 50 ppps. The ''rundown time course'' was, as expected, accelerated in all ouabain-treated nerves, but the microwave-exposed nerves showed no additional shortening of survival time. The experiments were repeated at a slower stimulation rate (5 ppps) so that the survival time of the nerves more closely approximated that of nerves not treated with ouabain (1 to 2 h versus 30 min or less for ouabain-treated nerves stimulated at 50 ppps). Results of these lower stimulation rates also showed that there was no significant difference in the survival time of ouabain-treated exposed and control nerves. These results lend support to the view that the relative loss of excitability in microwave-exposed nerves is related to an interference with or counteraction of the Na-K pump.

  9. M. leprae components induce nerve damage by complement activation: identification of lipoarabinomannan as the dominant complement activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Das, Pranab K; Fluiter, Kees; Rosa, Patricia S; Vreijling, Jeroen; Troost, Dirk; Morgan, B Paul; Baas, Frank; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral nerve damage is the hallmark of leprosy pathology but its etiology is unclear. We previously identified the membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system as a key determinant of post-traumatic nerve damage and demonstrated that its inhibition is neuroprotective. Here, we determined the contribution of the MAC to nerve damage caused by Mycobacterium leprae and its components in mouse. Furthermore, we studied the association between MAC and the key M. leprae component lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in nerve biopsies of leprosy patients. Intraneural injections of M. leprae sonicate induced MAC deposition and pathological changes in the mouse nerve, whereas MAC inhibition preserved myelin and axons. Complement activation occurred mainly via the lectin pathway and the principal activator was LAM. In leprosy nerves, the extent of LAM and MAC immunoreactivity was robust and significantly higher in multibacillary compared to paucibacillary donors (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), with a highly significant association between LAM and MAC in the diseased samples (r = 0.9601, p = 0.0001). Further, MAC co-localized with LAM on axons, pointing to a role for this M. leprae antigen in complement activation and nerve damage in leprosy. Our findings demonstrate that MAC contributes to nerve damage in a model of M. leprae-induced nerve injury and its inhibition is neuroprotective. In addition, our data identified LAM as the key pathogen associated molecule that activates complement and causes nerve damage. Taken together our data imply an important role of complement in nerve damage in leprosy and may inform the development of novel therapeutics for patients. PMID:25772973

  10. Macrophage polarization in nerve injury: do Schwann cells play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Jo Anne; Shah, Prajay T.

    2016-01-01

    In response to peripheral nerve injury, the inflammatory response is almost entirely comprised of infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages are a highly plastic, heterogenic immune cell, playing an indispensable role in peripheral nerve injury, clearing debris and regulating the microenvironment to allow for efficient regeneration. There are several cells within the microenvironment that likely interact with macrophages to support their function – most notably the Schwann cell, the glial cell of the peripheral nervous system. Schwann cells express several ligands that are known to interact with receptors expressed by macrophages, yet the effects of Schwann cells in regulating macrophage phenotype remains largely unexplored. This review discusses macrophages in peripheral nerve injury and how Schwann cells may regulate their behavior.

  11. Afferent renal denervation impairs baroreflex control of efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Ulla C.; Jones, Susan Y.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    2008-01-01

    Increasing efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) increases afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), which decreases ERSNA to prevent sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances ARNA, suggesting an important role for ARNA in suppressing ERSNA during excess sodium intake. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is elevated in afferent renal denervated by dorsal rhizotomy (DRX) rats fed high-sodium diet. We examined whether the increased MAP in DRX is due to impaired arterial baroreflex function. ...

  12. The plasminogen activator system modulates sympathetic nerve function

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Ulrich; Machida, Takuji; Vorlova, Sandra; Strickland, Sidney; Levi, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons synthesize and release tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). We investigated whether t-PA modulates sympathetic activity. t-PA inhibition markedly reduced contraction of the guinea pig vas deferens to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and norepinephrine (NE) exocytosis from cardiac synaptosomes. Recombinant t-PA (rt-PA) induced exocytotic and carrier-mediated NE release from cardiac synaptosomes and cultured neuroblastoma cells; this was a plasmin-independent effect but wa...

  13. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPK?2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPK?2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPK?2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPK?2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPK?2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPK?2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPK?2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPK?2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPK?2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:23418591

  14. Trophic Effects of Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Schwann Cells in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsubasa; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Murakami, Masashi; Hayashi, Yuki; Horibe, Hiroshi; Iohara, Koichiro; Takeuchi, Norio; Okui, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Hidenori; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mesenchymal stem cells have demonstrated a potential for neurotrophy and neurodifferentiation. We have recently isolated mobilized dental pulp stem cells (MDPSCs) using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) gradient, which has high neurotrophic/angiogenic potential. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of MDPSC transplantation on peripheral nerve regeneration. Effects of MDPSC transplantation were examined in a rat sciatic nerve defect model and compared with autografts and control conduits containing collagen scaffold. Effects of conditioned medium of MDPSCs were also evaluated in vitro. Transplantation of MDPSCs in the defect demonstrated regeneration of myelinated fibers, whose axons were significantly higher in density compared with those in autografts and control conduits only. Enhanced revascularization was also observed in the MDPSC transplants. The MDPSCs did not directly differentiate into Schwann cell phenotype; localization of these cells near Schwann cells induced several neurotrophic factors. Immunofluorescence labeling demonstrated reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation in resident Schwann cells in the MDPSC transplant compared with control conduits. These trophic effects of MDPSCs on proliferation, migration, and antiapoptosis in Schwann cells were further elucidated in vitro. The results demonstrate that MDPSCs promote axon regeneration through trophic functions, acting on Schwann cells, and promoting angiogenesis. PMID:25903498

  15. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Wang; Zheng-wei Li; Min Luo; Ya-jun Li; Ke-qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem ...

  16. A nerve guidance conduit with topographical and biochemical cues: potential application using human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip M; Laughter, Melissa R; Lee, David J; Lee, Young M; Freed, Curt R; Park, Daewon

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the pathophysiological understanding of peripheral nerve damage, the treatment of nerve injuries still remains an unmet medical need. Nerve guidance conduits present a promising treatment option by providing a growth-permissive environment that 1) promotes neuronal cell survival and axon growth and 2) directs axonal extension. To this end, we designed an electrospun nerve guidance conduit using a blend of polyurea and poly-caprolactone with both biochemical and topographical cues. Biochemical cues were integrated into the conduit by functionalizing the polyurea with RGD to improve cell attachment. Topographical cues that resemble natural nerve tissue were incorporated by introducing intraluminal microchannels aligned with nanofibers. We determined that electrospinning the polymer solution across a two electrode system with dissolvable sucrose fibers produced a polymer conduit with the appropriate biomimetic properties. Human neural stem cells were cultured on the conduit to evaluate its ability to promote neuronal growth and axonal extension. The nerve guidance conduit was shown to enhance cell survival, migration, and guide neurite extension. PMID:26071111

  17. A nerve guidance conduit with topographical and biochemical cues: potential application using human neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip M.; Laughter, Melissa R.; Lee, David J.; Lee, Young M.; Freed, Curt R.; Park, Daewon

    2015-06-01

    Despite major advances in the pathophysiological understanding of peripheral nerve damage, the treatment of nerve injuries still remains an unmet medical need. Nerve guidance conduits present a promising treatment option by providing a growth-permissive environment that 1) promotes neuronal cell survival and axon growth and 2) directs axonal extension. To this end, we designed an electrospun nerve guidance conduit using a blend of polyurea and poly-caprolactone with both biochemical and topographical cues. Biochemical cues were integrated into the conduit by functionalizing the polyurea with RGD to improve cell attachment. Topographical cues that resemble natural nerve tissue were incorporated by introducing intraluminal microchannels aligned with nanofibers. We determined that electrospinning the polymer solution across a two electrode system with dissolvable sucrose fibers produced a polymer conduit with the appropriate biomimetic properties. Human neural stem cells were cultured on the conduit to evaluate its ability to promote neuronal growth and axonal extension. The nerve guidance conduit was shown to enhance cell survival, migration, and guide neurite extension.

  18. Evaluation of Na+/K+ pump function following repetitive activity in mouse peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2006-01-01

    excitability measures simultaneously from the evoked plantar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and sciatic compound nerve action potential (CNAP). Three minutes after repetitive supramaximal stimulation maximal CMAP and CNAP amplitudes recovered but the threshold was increased approximately 40% for motor......After conduction of prolonged trains of impulses the increased Na+/K+ pump activity leads to hyperpolarization. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model to investigate the Na+/K+ pump function in peripheral nerve by measuring the decrease in excitability during activity......-dependent hyperpolarization. Acute electrophysiological investigations were carried out in seven adult mice. Nerve excitability was evaluated by tracking the change in threshold current after 5 min of 100 Hz stimulation of the tibial nerve at ankle. We developed a threshold tracking system that allowed us to follow several...

  19. Nerve injury stimulates the secretion of apolipoprotein E by nonneuronal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerve trauma initiates significant changes in the composition of proteins secreted by nonneuronal cells. The most prominent of these proteins is a 37-kDa protein, whose expression correlates with the time course of nerve development, degeneration, and regeneration. The authors report that the 37-kDa protein is apolipoprotein E (apoE). They produced a specific antiserum against the 37-kDa protein isolated from previously crushed nerves. This antiserum recognizes a 36-kDa protein in rat serum that they have purified and identified as apoE. The anti-37-kDa antiserum also recognizes apoE on electrophoretic transfer blots of authentic samples of high and very low density lipoproteins. The nerve 37-kDa protein comigrates with apoE by two-dimensional electrophoresis, shares a similar amino acid composition, and reacts with an antiserum against authentic apoE. The purified apoE specifically blocks the immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled 37-kDa protein synthesized by nonneuronal cells. Thus, on the basis of its molecular mass, isoelectric point, amino acid composition, and immunological properties, they conclude that the 37-kDa protein is apoE. They also used light microscopic immunochemistry to localize apoE following nerve injury. They propose that apoE is synthesized by phagocytic cells in response to nerve injury for the purpose of mobilizing lipids produced as a consequence of axon degeneration

  20. Distribution of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Effects on Neuronal Survival and Axon Regeneration after Optic Nerve Crush and Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise Alessandra; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; da Silva-Junior, Almir Jordão; Nascimento-dos-Santos, Gabriel; Gubert, Fernanda; de Figueirêdo, Ana Beatriz Padilha; Torres, Ana Luiza; Paredes, Bruno D.; Teixeira, Camila; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Marcelo F. Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have been used in different animal models of neurological diseases. We investigated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) injected into the vitreous body in a model of optic nerve injury. Adult (3–5 months old) Lister Hooded rats underwent unilateral optic nerve crush followed by injection of MSC or the vehicle into the vitreous body. Before they were injected, MSC were labeled with a fluorescent dye or with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanopartic...

  1. Active cheerleading with radial nerve palsy following supracondylar humerus fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Herold, C; Redeker, J; Knobloch, K; Vogt, PM

    2013-01-01

    Cheerleading is associated with substantial morbidity. As such, cheerleading fall-related injuries may cause serious to fatal outcomes especially falls from attempted pyramids. We report on a female adolescent cheerleader age 14 suffering a supracondylar humerus fracture related to a fall from a pyramid. Unfortunately, lateral pinning led to complete iatrogenic radial nerve palsy. However, given an intriguing compensatory athletic function of the wrist she was able to perform cheerleading art...

  2. Morphine attenuates cholinergic nerve activity in human isolated colonic muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Burleigh, D E; Trout, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The action of morphine on cholinergic nerves in human sigmoid taenia coli muscle strips (taenia) was investigated using a radiolabelling technique. Basal release of tritiated material from taenia was increased by electrical field stimulation (EFS). This increase was tetrodotoxin (3.14 microM)-sensitive and calcium-dependent. Analysis of basal and stimulated release of tritiated material indicated that evoked release (i.e. stimulated minus basal) is almost entirely due to an increase in [3H]-a...

  3. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlbarracIn, A L [Catedra de Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Av. Roca 2200, PC 4000 (Argentina); Farfan, F D [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina); Felice, C J [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  4. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle

  5. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, A. L.; Farfán, F. D.; Felice, C. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  6. Effect on pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells by low let x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Cultured pancreatic beta cells and nerve cells, it is given normal condition of 10% FBS (fetal bovine serum), 11.1 mM glucose and hyperglycemia condition of 1% FBS, 30 mM glucose. For low LET X-ray irradiated with 0.5 Gy/hr dose-rate(total dose: 0.5 to 5 Gy). Survival rates were measured by MTT assay. When non irradiated, differentiated in the pancreatic beta cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a small reduction. However increasing the total dose of X-ray, the survival rate of normal conditions decreased slightly compared to the survival rate of hyperglycemia conditions, the synergistic effect was drastically reduced. When non irradiated, undifferentiated in the nerve cells experiment is hyperglycemia conditions survival rate compared to normal conditions survival rate seemed a large reduction. As the cumulative dose of X-ray normal conditions and hyperglycemia were all relatively rapid cell death. But the rate of decreased survivals by almost parallel to the reduction proceed and it didn't show synergistic effect.

  7. Effects of L-carnosine on splenic sympathetic nerve activity and tumor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Kokichi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2012-02-21

    l-Carnosine (?-alanyl-l-histidine), a dipeptide of the amino acids ?-alanine and histidine, is found in mammalian tissues including those in the central nervous system and in skeletal muscles. In the present study, we examined the effects of intraduodenal (ID) injection of l-carnosine on splenic sympathetic nerve activity (splenic-SNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats and found that ID injection of 3.3mg/kg of body weight of l-carnosine significantly suppressed splenic-SNA. Since it has been suggested that splenic-SNA reduction increases natural killer (NK) activity of splenic cells, which in turn elevates tumor immunity, we then investigated the effect of l-carnosine on the proliferation of human colon cancer cells transplanted into athymic nude mice. The findings of this study revealed that 1mg/mL of l-carnosine solution given as the only drinking water inhibited tumor proliferation. These results suggest that l-carnosine suppresses splenic-SNA and inhibits cancer cell proliferation, probably by elevating NK activity. PMID:22240100

  8. Early gene regulation by nerve growth factor in PC12 cells: induction of an interferon-related gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirone, F; Shooter, E M

    1989-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces the chromaffin cell line PC12 to differentiate into cells with many of the properties of sympathetic neurons. We investigated the early differentiative phase and identified a gene, PC4, rapidly and transiently induced by NGF in PC12 cells. PC4 cDNA is homologous to the partial sequence of a putative mouse beta-interferon and encodes a protein related to a lymphokine, the rat gamma-interferon protein. Nonetheless, PC4 appears devoid of antiviral activity. PC4 ...

  9. Role of Schwann cells in the regeneration of penile and peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Sanford, Melissa T; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system. The end point of SC development is the formation of myelinating and nonmyelinating cells which ensheath large and small diameter axons, respectively. They play an important role in axon regeneration after injury, including cavernous nerve injury that leads to erectile dysfunction (ED). Despite improvement in radical prostatectomy surgical techniques, many patients still suffer from ED postoperatively as surgical trauma causes traction injuries and local inflammatory changes in the neuronal microenvironment of the autonomic fibers innervating the penis resulting in pathophysiological alterations in the end organ. The aim of this review is to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1) the origin and development of SCs in the peripheral and penile nerve system; (2) Wallerian degeneration and SC plastic change following peripheral and penile nerve injury; (3) how SCs promote peripheral and penile nerve regeneration by secreting neurotrophic factors; (4) and strategies targeting SCs to accelerate peripheral nerve regeneration. We searched PubMed for articles related to these topics in both animal models and human research and found numerous studies suggesting that SCs could be a novel target for treatment of nerve injury-induced ED. PMID:25999359

  10. Mirror-image pain is mediated by nerve growth factor produced from tumor necrosis factor alpha-activated satellite glia after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chau-Fu; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chen, Chih-Yang; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Chu, Dachen; Wang, Szu-Yi; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2014-05-01

    Mirror-image pain is characterized by mechanical hypersensitivity on the uninjured mirror-image side. Recent reports favor central mechanisms, but whether peripheral mechanisms are involved remains unclear. We used unilateral spinal nerve ligation (SNL) to induce mirror-image pain in rats. On the mirror-image (contralateral) side, we found that satellite glia in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were activated, whereas macrophages/Schwann cells in the DRG and astrocytes/oligodendrocytes/microglia in the dorsal spinal cord were not. Subsequently, an increase in nerve growth factor (NGF) was detected in the contralateral DRG, and NGF immunoreactivity was concentrated in activated satellite glia. These phenomena were abolished if fluorocitrate (a glial inhibitor) was intrathecally injected before SNL. Electrophysiological recordings in cultured small DRG neurons showed that exogenous NGF enhanced nociceptor excitability. Intrathecal injection of NGF into naive rats induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity, similar to SNL-evoked mirror-image pain. Anti-NGF effectively relieved SNL-evoked mirror-image pain. In the contralateral DRG, the SNL-evoked tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) increase, which started later than in the ipsilateral DRG and cerebrospinal fluid, occurred earlier than satellite glial activation and the NGF increase. Intrathecal injection of TNF-? into naive rats not only activated satellite glia to produce extra NGF in the DRG but also evoked mechanical hypersensitivity, which could be attenuated by anti-NGF injection. These results suggest that after SNL, satellite glia in the contralateral DRG are activated by TNF-? that diffuses from the injured side via cerebrospinal fluid, which then activates satellite glia to produce extra NGF to enhance nociceptor excitability, which induces mirror-image pain. PMID:24447514

  11. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was found with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel grafts than with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells grafts and the autologous nerve grafts.

  12. Thyroid hormone affects Schwann cell and oligodendrocyte gene expression at the glial transition zone of the VIIIth nerve prior to cochlea function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, M; Bandtlow, C; Gestwa, L; Köpschall, I; Rohbock, K; Wiechers, B; Zenner, H P; Zimmermann, U

    1998-09-01

    All cranial nerves, as well as the VIIIth nerve which invades the cochlea, have a proximal end in which myelin is formed by Schwann cells and a distal end which is surrounded by oligodendrocytes. The question which arises in this context is whether peripheral and central parts of these nerves myelinate simultaneously or subsequently and whether the myelination of either of the parts occurs simultaneously at the onset of the cochlea function and under the control of neuronal activity. In the present paper, we examined the relative time course of the myelinogenesis of the distal part of the VIIIth nerve by analyzing the expression of peripheral protein P0, proteolipid protein and myelin basic protein. To our surprise, we observed that the expression of myelin markers in the peripheral and central part of the intradural part of the VIIIth nerve started simultaneously, from postnatal day 2 onwards, long before the onset of cochlea function. The expression rapidly achieved saturation levels on the approach to postnatal day 12, the day on which the cochlea function commenced. Because of its importance for the neuronal and morphological maturation of the cochlea during this time, an additional role of thyroid hormone in cochlear myelinogenesis was considered. Indeed, it transpires that this hormone ensures the rapid accomplishment of glial gene expression, not only in the central but also in the peripheral part of the cochlea. Furthermore, an analysis of the thyroid hormone receptors, TRaplha and TRbeta, indicates that TRbeta is necessary for myelinogenesis of the VIIIth nerve. Rapid thyroid hormone-dependent saturation of myelin marker gene expression in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes of the VIIIth nerve may guarantee nerve conduction and synchronized impulse transmission at the onset of hearing. The thyroid hormone-dependent commencement of nerve conduction is discussed in connection with the patterning refinement of central auditory pathways and the acquisition of deafness. PMID:9716536

  13. An animal model of peripheral nerve regeneration after the application of a collagen-polyvinyl alcohol scaffold and mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Silviu Adrian; Z?rnescu, Otilia; Mihai, Ioana Ruxandra; Giuglea, Carmen; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana

    2014-01-01

    Extensive nerve injuries often leading to nerve gaps can benefit, besides the gold standard represented by autologous nerve grafts, by the inciting field of tissue engineering. To enhance the role of biomaterials in nerve regeneration, the nerve conduits are associated with Schwann or Schwann-like cells. In this study, we evaluated rat sciatic nerve regeneration, by using a biodegradable nerve guide composed of Collagen (COL) and Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA), associated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). After the exposure of the rat sciatic nerve, a nerve gap was created by excising 1 cm of the nerve. Three experimental groups were used for nerve gap bridging: autografts, nerve conduits filled with medium culture and nerve conduits filled with MSC. The methods of sensory and motor assessment consisted of the functional evaluation of sciatic nerve recovery - toe-spread, pinprick tests and gastrocnemius muscle index (GMI). The histological and immunocytochemical analysis of the probes that were harvested from the repair site was performed at 12 weeks. Successful nerve regeneration was noted in all three groups at the end of the 12th week. The functional and immunocytochemical results suggested that COL-PVA tubes supported with mesenchymal stem cells could be considered similar to autologous nerve grafts in peripheral nerve regeneration, without the drawbacks of the last ones. The functional results were better for the autografts and the ultrastructural data were better for the nerve conduits, but there were not noticed any statistical differences. PMID:25329117

  14. [Mechanism of stimulation of the motor activity of the stomach by the greater splanchnic nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smironov, V M; Klevtsov, V A; Lychkov, A A; Popova, L M; Smirnov, N A

    1986-05-01

    The activating effect of the splanchnic nerve on motor activity of the gastro-intestinal tract could not be eliminated either with bilateral vagotomy or separate or joint administration of ornid and benzohexonium, but could be well prevented with atropin blockade of the vegetative ganglia M-serotoninergic receptors as well as diprazin blockade of the smooth muscle D-serotoninergic receptors. The data obtained reveal non-cholinergic and non-adrenergic fibers in the thoracic portion of the major splanchnic nerve which exert obvious activating effect on the stomach contractile function, serotonin being their transmitter. PMID:3013699

  15. Uptake of 3H-thymidine by the receptor cell populations after injury of the sensory nerve fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material of the study was the skin from the beak of two-day ducklings. The investigation was carried out on the 2nd, 5th, 20th and 45th day after the crushing of the sensory nerve fibres entering the capsulated Herbst receptors. Twenty four hours before the biopsy, the ducklings were injected at 6 hours intervals with 3H-thymidine. The number of labelled index in the three cell pupulations, participating in the receptor development was determined. The cells of the subcapsular space of all control animals (with intacted suborbital nerves) have shown the highest labelled index. The index of the capsular perineural cells is about 12 times lower, while the labelled index of the Schwann receptor cells is about 10 times lower. Following the denervation, the labelled index in increasing and reaches its maximum on the 5th postoperative day. The Schwann receptor cells in comparison to the two other cell populations show the most significant deviation during the regeneration (45th day after the intervention). The investigations show that all three cell populations pass through a miotic cycle of innovation. The low labelled index of the Schwann receptors (1-2 labelled cells in 1000) is an indication of a high differentiation. One can assume that their regeneration takes place at the expense of the proper proliferation activity as well as of the differentiation of the Schwann cells from the distal section of the regenerating sensory nerve fibres. Taking into consideration the high labelled index of the other populations, it seems most probable that their regeneration takes place for the expense of their own cell populations. (A.B.)

  16. Cell-type specific short-term plasticity at auditory nerve synapses controls feed-forward inhibition in the dorsal cochlear nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Brenowitz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Feedforward inhibition represents a powerful mechanism by which control of the timing and fidelity of action potentials in local synaptic circuits of various brain regions is achieved. In the cochlear nucleus, the auditory nerve provides excitation to both principal neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Here, we investigated the synaptic circuit associated with fusiform cells (FCs, principal neurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN that receive excitation from auditory nerve fibers and inhibition from tuberculoventral cells (TVCs on their basal dendrites in the deep layer of DCN. Despite the importance of these inputs in regulating fusiform cell firing behavior, the mechanisms determining the balance of excitation and feed-forward inhibition in this circuit are not well understood. Therefore, we examined the timing and plasticity of auditory nerve driven feed-forward inhibition (FFI onto FCs. We find that in some FCs, excitatory and inhibitory components of feed-forward inhibition had the same stimulation thresholds indicating they could be triggered by activation of the same fibers. In other FCs, excitation and inhibition exhibit different stimulus thresholds, suggesting FCs and TVCs might be activated by different sets of fibers. In addition we find that during repetitive activation, synapses formed by the auditory nerve onto TVCs and FCs exhibit distinct modes of short-term plasticity. Feed-forward inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs in FCs exhibit short-term depression because of prominent synaptic depression at the auditory nerve-TVC synapse. Depression of this feedforward inhibitory input causes a shift in the balance of fusiform cell synaptic input towards greater excitation and suggests that fusiform cell spike output will be enhanced by physiological patterns of auditory nerve activity.

  17. Reduced spinal microglial activation and neuropathic pain after nerve injury in mice lacking all three nitric oxide synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimokawa Hiroaki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have investigated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO in acute and chronic pain using mice lacking a single NO synthase (NOS gene among the three isoforms: neuronal (nNOS, inducible (iNOS and endothelial (eNOS. However, the precise role of NOS/NO in pain states remains to be determined owing to the substantial compensatory interactions among the NOS isoforms. Therefore, in this study, we used mice lacking all three NOS genes (n/i/eNOS-/-mice and investigated the behavioral phenotypes in a series of acute and chronic pain assays. Results In a model of tissue injury-induced pain, evoked by intraplantar injection of formalin, both iNOS-/-and n/i/eNOS-/-mice exhibited attenuations of pain behaviors in the second phase compared with that in wild-type mice. In a model of neuropathic pain, nerve injury-induced behavioral and cellular responses (tactile allodynia, spinal microglial activation and Src-family kinase phosphorylation were reduced in n/i/eNOS-/-but not iNOS-/-mice. Tactile allodynia after nerve injury was improved by acute pharmacological inhibition of all NOSs and nNOS. Furthermore, in MG-5 cells (a microglial cell-line, interferon-? enhanced NOSs and Mac-1 mRNA expression, and the Mac-1 mRNA increase was suppressed by L-NAME co-treatment. Conversely, the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, markedly increased mRNA expression of Mac-1, interleukin-6, toll-like receptor 4 and P2X4 receptor. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that the NOS/NO pathway contributes to behavioral pain responses evoked by tissue injury and nerve injury. In particular, nNOS may be important for spinal microglial activation and tactile allodynia after nerve injury.

  18. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  19. Promoting Nerve Cell Functions on Hydrogels Grafted with Poly(L-lysine)

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Lei; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney; Wang, Shanfeng

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel photo-polymerizable poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and use it to modify polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels for creating a better, permissive nerve cell niche. Compared with their neutral counterparts, these PLL-grafted hydrogels greatly enhance pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell survival in encapsulation, proliferation, and neurite growth, and also promote neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation capacity, represented by percentages of both differentiated neur...

  20. The rate of diffusion of Ca2+ and Ba2+ in a nerve cell body.

    OpenAIRE

    Nasi, E.; Tillotson, D

    1985-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method was developed to directly measure the diffusion rate of Ca2+ and some other ions in nerve cell bodies, using pulsed ionophoretic injections and an optical microprobe to record locally absorbance changes of the dye arsenazo III. We report here that Ca2+ and Ba2+ diffuse at approximately the same rate in nerve soma cytoplasm, having effective diffusion coefficients in the range of 7-12 X 10(-7) cm2/s, while identical measurements conducted in an electrolytic solution...

  1. Simultaneous cell death in the trigeminal ganglion and in ganglion neurons present in the oculomotor nerve of the bovine fetus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E; Barazzoni, A M; Costerbosa, G L; Scapolo, P A

    1990-01-01

    A well-developed ganglion and scattered ganglion cells are present in the intracranial portion of the oculomotor nerve during the first half of fetal life in the ox. In the second half of fetal life a dramatic reduction of the ganglion cells associated with the oculomotor nerve occurs because of spontaneous cell death. Concomitantly, the same phenomenon of cell death is found in the trigeminal ganglion, especially in its rostromedial portion. Free degenerating perikarya can be found in the ca...

  2. Phase-based probabilistic active contour for nerve detection in ultrasound images for regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiane, Adel; Vieyres, Pierre; Delbos, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) is steadily growing in popularity, owing to advances in ultrasound imaging technology and the advantages that this technique presents for safety and efficiency. The aim of this work is to assist anaesthetists during the UGRA procedure by automatically detecting the nerve blocks in the ultrasound images. The main disadvantage of ultrasound images is the poor quality of the images, which are also affected by the speckle noise. Moreover, the nerve structure is not salient amid the other tissues, which makes its detection a challenging problem. In this paper we propose a new method to tackle the problem of nerve zone detection in ultrasound images. The method consists in a combination of three approaches: probabilistic, edge phase information and active contours. The gradient vector flow (GVF) is adopted as an edge-based active contour. The phase analysis of the monogenic signal is used to provide reliable edges for the GVF. Then, a learned probabilistic model reduces the false positives and increases the likelihood energy term of the target region. It yields a new external force field that attracts the active contour toward the desired region of interest. The proposed scheme has been applied to sciatic nerve regions. The qualitative and quantitative evaluations show a high accuracy and a significant improvement in performance. PMID:25016592

  3. Distribution of mesenchymal stem cells and effects on neuronal survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush and cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise Alessandra; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; da Silva-Junior, Almir Jordão; Nascimento-Dos-Santos, Gabriel; Gubert, Fernanda; de Figueirêdo, Ana Beatriz Padilha; Torres, Ana Luiza; Paredes, Bruno D; Teixeira, Camila; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have been used in different animal models of neurological diseases. We investigated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) injected into the vitreous body in a model of optic nerve injury. Adult (3-5 months old) Lister Hooded rats underwent unilateral optic nerve crush followed by injection of MSC or the vehicle into the vitreous body. Before they were injected, MSC were labeled with a fluorescent dye or with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which allowed us to track the cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Sixteen and 28 days after injury, the survival of retinal ganglion cells was evaluated by assessing the number of Tuj1- or Brn3a-positive cells in flat-mounted retinas, and optic nerve regeneration was investigated after anterograde labeling of the optic axons with cholera toxin B conjugated to Alexa 488. Transplanted MSC remained in the vitreous body and were found in the eye for several weeks. Cell therapy significantly increased the number of Tuj1- and Brn3a-positive cells in the retina and the number of axons distal to the crush site at 16 and 28 days after optic nerve crush, although the RGC number decreased over time. MSC therapy was associated with an increase in the FGF-2 expression in the retinal ganglion cells layer, suggesting a beneficial outcome mediated by trophic factors. Interleukin-1β expression was also increased by MSC transplantation. In summary, MSC protected RGC and stimulated axon regeneration after optic nerve crush. The long period when the transplanted cells remained in the eye may account for the effect observed. However, further studies are needed to overcome eventually undesirable consequences of MSC transplantation and to potentiate the beneficial ones in order to sustain the neuroprotective effect overtime. PMID:25347773

  4. Malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor and anaplastic astrocytoma collision tumor with high proliferative activity and tumor suppressor p53 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi, Maher; Al-Ardati, Hosam; Baeesa, Saleh S

    2014-01-01

    Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53) gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST) and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa. PMID:25386378

  5. Hirschsprungs disease: Is there a relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Yadav, Kiran Mishra, Anup Mohta, Sarla Agarwal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To define the topography of mast cells and their numbers in cases of Hirschsprung’s disease (HD and non-HD, assess neural hypertrophy using imaging software and to study the relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers.METHODS: HE stained sections of 32 cases of chronic constipation in the age group of 0-14 years were reviewed for ganglion cells. AChE staining was performed on frozen sections of colonic and rectal biopsies. Based on their findings cases were divided into HD and non-HD and mast cells stained by toluidine blue were evaluated. Image analysis by computerized software was applied to S-100 stained sections for assessment of neural hypertrophy.RESULTS: Difference between number of mast cells in HD group (mean = 36.44 and in non-HD group (mean = 14.79 was statistically significant. Image analysis morphometry on S-100 stained sections served as a useful adjunct. The difference between number, size, and perimeter of the nerve fibers between HD and non-HD group was statistically significant.CONCLUSION: Mast cells are significantly increased in HD and their base line values are much higher in Indian children than that reported in Western literature. Their role in HD needs further research. Morphometry of S-100 stained nerve fibers is a useful adjunct to conventional methods for diagnosis of HD.

  6. Synergistic effects of micropatterned biodegradable conduits and Schwann cells on sciatic nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Gregory E.; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a novel biodegradable conduit that provides a combination of physical, chemical and biological cues at the cellular level to facilitate peripheral nerve regeneration. The conduit consists of a porous poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) tubular support structure with a micropatterned inner lumen. Schwann cells were pre-seeded into the lumen to provide additional trophic support. Conduits with micropatterned inner lumens pre-seeded with Schwann cells (MS) were fabricated and compared with three types of conduits used as controls: M (conduits with micropatterned inner lumens without pre-seeded Schwann cells), NS (conduits without micropatterned inner lumens pre-seeded with Schwann cells) and N (conduits without micropatterned inner lumens, without pre-seeded Schwann cells). The conduits were implanted in rats with 1 cm sciatic nerve transections and the regeneration and functional recovery were compared in the four different cases. The number or size of regenerated axons did not vary significantly among the different conduits. The time of recovery, and the sciatic function index, however, were significantly enhanced using the MS conduits, based on qualitative observations as well as quantitative measurements using walking track analysis. This demonstrates that biodegradable micropatterned conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells that provide a combination of physical, chemical and biological guidance cues for regenerating axons at the cellular level offer a better alternative for repairing sciatic nerve transactions than conventional biodegradable conduits.

  7. Effect of axon misdirection on recovery of electromyographic activity and kinematics after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Manning J; To, Bao Ngoc; Nicolini, Jennifer; English, Arthur W

    2011-01-01

    In this study, patterns of activity in the soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles and hindlimb kinematics were evaluated during slope walking in rats after transection and surgical repair either of the entire sciatic nerve (Sci group) or of its two branches separately, the tibial and common fibular nerves (T/CF group). With the latter method, axons from the tibial and common fibular nerves could not reinnervate targets of the other nerve branch after injury, reducing the opportunity for misdirection. Activity in the TA shifted from the swing phase in intact rats to nearly the entire step cycle in both injured groups. Since these changes occur without misdirection of regenerating axons, they are interpreted as centrally generated. Sol activity was changed from reciprocal to that of TA in intact rats to coactivate with TA, but only in the Sci group rats. In the T/CF group rats, Sol activity was not altered from that observed in intact rats. Despite effects of injury that limited foot movements, hindlimb kinematics were conserved during downslope walking in both injury groups and during level walking in the T/CF group. During level walking in the Sci group and during upslope walking in both groups of injured rats, the ability to compensate for the effects of the nerve injury was less effective and resulted in longer limb lengths held at more acute angles throughout the step cycle. Changes in limb movements occur irrespective of axon misdirection and reflect compensatory changes in the outputs of the neural circuits that drive locomotion. PMID:21411964

  8. Synovial sarcoma of nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Scheithauer, BW; Amrami, KK; Folpe, AL; Silva, AI; Edgar, MA; Woodruff, JM; Levi, AD; Spinner, RJ

    2011-01-01

    Tumors of peripheral nerve are largely neuroectodermal in nature and derived from 2 elements of nerve, Schwann or perineurial cells. In contrast, mesenchymal tumors affecting peripheral nerve are rare and are derived mainly from epineurial connective tissue. The spectrum of the latter is broad and includes lipoma, vascular neoplasms, hematopoietic tumors, and even meningioma. Of malignant peripheral nerve neoplasms, the vast majority are primary peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Malignancies of...

  9. Immunologists getting nervous: neuropeptides, dendritic cells and T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambrecht Bart N

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is increasingly recognised that the immune and nervous systems are closely integrated to optimise defence systems within the lung. In this commentary, the contribution of various neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide and somatostatin to the regulation of T cell activation is discussed. These neuropeptides are released not only from nerve endings but also from inflammatory immune cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells, eosinophils and mast cells. On release they can exert both direct stimulatory and inhibitory effects on T cell activation and also indirect effects through their influence on the recruitment and activation of professional antigen-presenting dendritic cells. Neuropeptides should therefore be included in the conceptual framework of the immune regulation of T cell function by dendritic cells.

  10. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyang Gao; Yang You; Guoping Zhang; Feng Zhao; Ziyi Sha; Yong Shen

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cul...

  11. Advantage of recording single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HISAYOSHIMURAI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Elevated sympathetic activation is a characteristic feature of heart failure (HF. Excessive sympathetic activation under resting conditions has been shown to increase from the early stages of the disease, and is related to prognosis. Direct recording of multiunit efferent muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA by microneurography is the best method for quantifying sympathetic nerve activity in humans. To date, this technique has been used to evaluate the actual central sympathetic outflow to the periphery in HF patients at rest and during exercise; however, because the firing occurrence of sympathetic activation is mainly synchronized by pulse pressure, multiunit MSNA, expressed as burst frequency (bursts/min and burst incidence (bursts/100heartbeats, may have limitations for the quantification of sympathetic nerve activity. In HF, multiunit MSNA is near the maximum level, and cannot increase further than the heartbeat. Single-unit MSNA analysis in humans is technically demanding, but provides more detailed information regarding central sympathetic firing. Although a great deal is known about the response of multiunit MSNA to stress, little information is available regarding the responses of single-unit MSNA to physiological stress and disease. The purposes of this review are to describe the differences between multiunit and single-unit MSNA during stress and to discuss the advantages of single-unit MSNA recording in improving our understanding the pathology of increased sympathetic activity in HF.

  12. Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation: Signaling Mechanisms and Cardiovascular Consequences in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmouni, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Obesity increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part by inducing hypertension. One factor linking excess fat mass to cardiovascular diseases may be the sympathetic cardiovascular actions of leptin. Initial studies of leptin showed it regulates appetite and enhances energy expenditure by activating sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to thermogenic brown adipose tissue. Further study, however, demonstrated leptin also causes sympathetic excitation to the kidney that, in turn, increase...

  13. Whole body heat stress attenuates baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during postexercise muscle ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    CUI, Jian; Shibasaki, Manabu; Davis, Scott L.; Low, David A.; Keller, David M; Crandall, Craig G

    2009-01-01

    Both whole body heat stress and stimulation of muscle metabolic receptors activate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) through nonbaroreflex pathways. In addition to stimulating muscle metaboreceptors, exercise has the potential to increase internal temperature. Although we and others report that passive whole body heating does not alter the gain of the arterial baroreflex, it is unknown whether increased body temperature, often accompanying exercise, affects baroreflex function when mus...

  14. Concentrated growth factor increases Schwann cell proliferation and neurotrophic factor secretion and promotes functional nerve recovery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue; Sun, Xiaolin; Wen, Chaoju; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-02-01

    Concentrated growth factor (CGF) is a newly generated complex that comprises a fibrin matrix incorporating growth factors and plasmatic and leukocyte cytokines. It has been widely used in bone regenerative medicine. However, the effect of CGF on peripheral nerve regeneration had not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using CGF for nerve regeneration by i) investigating the effect of CGF on the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) and secretion of neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line?derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro; and ii) analyzing the effect of CGF on functional nerve recovery after nerve injury in vivo. CGF was prepared from venous blood taken from rats, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we noted that it featured a fiber?like appearance with pore size ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 µm. The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media with which to treat the Schwann cell line. A cell counting kit-8 assay and cell cycle analysis were both used to study the proliferative effect of CGF on SCs. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that there was an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of NGF and GDNF, both of which are markers of SC neurotrophic secretion. A model of sciatic nerve crush injury was established for the in vivo experiment, and CGF was found to increase the sciatic functional index (indicative of nerve function). We noted that CGF increased SC proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors in vitro, and promoted functional recovery after peripheral nerve injuries in vivo. These results suggest that CGF is a promising candidate biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration, and may potentially be utilized to repair nerve injuries. PMID:26709397

  15. Nerve Growth Factor Promoter Activity Revealed in Mice Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaja, Michael D.; Smithson, Laura J.; Elliott, Janet; Trinh, Gina; Crotty, Anne-Marie; Michalski, Bernadeta; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its precursor proNGF are perhaps the best described growth factors of the mammalian nervous system. There remains, however, a paucity of information regarding the precise cellular sites of proNGF/NGF synthesis. Here we report the generation of transgenic mice in which the NGF promoter controls the ectopic synthesis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). These transgenic mice provide an unprecedented resolution of both neural cells (e.g., neocortical and hi...

  16. The effect of sodium nitroprusside on resting membrane potential of the leech Retzius nerve cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovi? Jasna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP on the membrane resting potential of the leech (Haemopis sanguisuga Retzius nerve cells (RNC. The membrane potential of RNC of isolated ganglia was recorded in Ringer solution, in SNP solution during the next 30 minutes and after washing out with Ringer solution. We used 1 mmol/L, 2 mmol/L and 5 mmol/L solutions of SNP. Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA test was used to compare the fall of membrane potential of the leech Retzius nerve cells when different SNP concentrations were used. There was no change in the membrane resting potential of the leech Retzius nerve cells with 1 mmol/L concentration of SNP whilst 2 mmol/L concentration of SNP induced hyperpolarization during the first 20 minutes. The highest concentration of 5 mmol/L SNP induced hyperpolarization in 50% of cells during the first minute and during the next 10 minutes in the other 50%. The significant fall of membrane potential was recorded with 5mmol/L SNP concentration (p<0.05. The SNP induced hyperpolarization of RNC might be the effect of this NO donor on the potassium channels of leech RNC.

  17. Acrylamide neuropathy. II. Spatiotemporal characteristics of nerve cell damage in brainstem and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, E J; Balaban, C D; Ross, J F; LoPachin, R M

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies of acrylamide (ACR) neuropathy in rat PNS [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 151 (1998) 211] and cerebellum [NeuroToxicology 23 (2002) 397] have suggested that axon degeneration was not a primary effect and was, therefore, of unclear neurotoxicological significance. To continue morphological examination of ACR neurotoxicity in CNS, a cupric silver stain method was used to define spatiotemporal characteristics of nerve cell body, dendrite, axon and terminal degeneration in brainstem and spinal cord. Rats were exposed to ACR at a dose-rate of either 50 mg/kg per day (i.p.) or 21 mg/kg per day (p.o.), and at selected times brains and spinal cord were removed and processed for silver staining. Results show that intoxication at the higher ACR dose-rate produced a nearly pure terminalopathy in brainstem and spinal cord regions, i.e. widespread nerve terminal degeneration and swelling were present in the absence of significant argyrophilic changes in neuronal cell bodies, dendrites or axons. Exposure to the lower ACR dose-rate caused initial nerve terminal argyrophilia in selected brainstem and spinal cord regions. As intoxication continued, axon degeneration developed in white matter of these CNS areas. At both dose-rates, argyrophilic changes in brainstem nerve terminals developed prior to the onset of significant gait abnormalities. In contrast, during exposure to the lower ACR dose-rate the appearance of axon degeneration in either brainstem or spinal cord was relatively delayed with respect to changes in gait. Thus, regardless of dose-rate, ACR intoxication produced early, progressive nerve terminal degeneration. Axon degeneration occurred primarily during exposure to the lower ACR dose-rate and developed after the appearance of terminal degeneration and neurotoxicity. Spatiotemporal analysis suggested that degeneration began at the nerve terminal and then moved as a function of time in a somal direction along the corresponding axon. These data suggest that nerve terminals are a primary site of ACR action and that expression of axonopathy is restricted to subchronic dosing-rates. PMID:12564387

  18. Monitoring of immune cell response to B cell depletion therapy and nerve root injury using SPIO enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorek, Daniel L.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a robust platform for non-invasive, high-resolution anatomical imaging. However, MR imaging lacks the requisite sensitivity and contrast for imaging at the cellular level. This represents a clinical impediment to greater diagnostic accuracy. Recent advances have allowed for the in vivo visualization of populations and even of individual cells using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) MR contrast agents. These nanoparticles, commonly manifested as a core of a single iron oxide crystal or cluster of crystals coated in a biocompatible shell, function to shorten proton relaxation times. In MR imaging these constructs locally dephase protons, resulting in a decrease in signal (hypointensity) localized to the region of accumulation of SPIO. In the context of immune cell imaging, SPIO can provide insight into the cellular migration patterns, trafficking, temporal dynamics and progression of diseases and their related pathological states. Furthermore, by visualizing the presence and activity of immune cells, SPIO-enabled cellular imaging can help evaluate the efficacy of therapy in immune disorders. This thesis examines the production, modification and application of SPIO in a range of in vitro and in vivo immune-response-relevant cellular systems. The role of different nanoparticle characteristics including diameter, surface charge and concentration are investigated in the labeling of T cells in culture. Following optimization of SPIO loading conditions for lymphocytes, the effect these particles have on the activation of primary B cells are elucidated. B cells are tracked using a variety of modalities, with and without the application of B cell depleting therapy. This is to evaluate the efficacy of SPIO as in vivo marker for B cell distribution. Unmodified SPIO were applied to monitor macrophage infiltration in a transient nerve root compression model, with implications for neck pain diagnosis and treatment. Nanoparticle accumulation and MR hypointensity was correlated to the presence of activated macrophage at the site of injury. Taken together, the application of SPIO to study nanoparticle uptake in vitro and visualization of immune cells in vivo provide a basis for advanced study and diagnosis of diverse pathologies.

  19. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  20. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2009-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical curre...

  1. Filamentous nerve cell inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases: tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies.

    OpenAIRE

    Goedert, M

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are the most common neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by the degeneration of selected populations of nerve cells that develop filamentous inclusions before degeneration. The neuronal inclusions of Alzheimer's disease are made of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in a hyperphosphorylated state. Recent work has shown that the filamentous inclusions of Parkinson's disease are made of the protein alpha-synuclein and that rare, fam...

  2. Axon-Schwann cell interactions during peripheral nerve regeneration in zebrafish larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Ceci, Maria Laura; Mardones-Krsulovic, Camila; SÁNCHEZ, MARIO; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Allende, Miguel L

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injuries can severely affect the way that animals perceive signals from the surrounding environment. While damage to peripheral axons generally has a better outcome than injuries to central nervous system axons, it is currently unknown how neurons re-establish their target innervations to recover function after injury, and how accessory cells contribute to this task. Here we use a simple technique to create reproducible and localized injury in the posterior lateral...

  3. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  4. Analgesic drug delivery via recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and microRNA-183-triggered opening of the blood-nerve barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaobing; Krug, Susanne M; Heitmann, Johanna; Hu, Liu; Reinhold, Ann Kristin; Sauer, Solange; Bosten, Judith; Sommer, Claudia; Fromm, Michael; Brack, Alexander; Rittner, Heike L

    2016-03-01

    The peripheral nerve contains three barriers which include the blood-nerve barrier consisting of endoneurial vessels and the perineurium as well as autotypic junctions in Schwann cells. The perineurium prevents diffusion of perineurally injected drugs that can be used for selective regional pain control. It is composed of a basal membrane and layers of perineurial cells sealed by tight junction proteins like claudin-1. Claudin-1 expression and barrier function are regulated via low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1). Perisciatic application of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) or the catalytically inactive rtPAi - both agonists of LRP-1 - reduced claudin-1 mRNA and protein expression in the rat nerve. This facilitated an increase of nociceptive thresholds after local application of hydrophilic opioids or the voltage gated sodium channel blocker (NaV1.7) ProToxin-II without apparent nerve toxicity. RtPA-induced barrier opening was mediated by LRP-1 and intracellularly by Erk phosphorylation. In silico, microRNA (miR)-rno-29b-2-5p and rno-miR-183-5p were identified as potential regulators of claudin-1 transcription in the rat. RtPA application increased miR-183-5p in the sciatic nerve. MiR-183-5p mimics functionally opened the perineurium and downregulated claudin-1 expression in vivo. In vitro, hsa-miR-183-3p mimics reduced claudin-1 expression in human HT-29/B6 cells. Overall, rtPA regulates perineurial barrier tightness via LRP-1, Erk phosphorylation and miR-183-5p/3p. This mechanism might serve as a new principle to facilitate drug delivery to peripheral nerves in humans. PMID:26735170

  5. Human primordial germ cells migrate along nerve fibers and Schwann cells from the dorsal hind gut mesentery to the gonadal ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, K; Jespersen, Anders; Lutterodt, M C; Høyer, Poul Erik; Møllgård, Kjeld; Jespersen, A; Lutterodt, Melissa Catherine Refsgaard; Yding Andersen, C; Høyer, P E; Byskov, A G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal development of autonomic nerve fibers and primordial germ cells (PGCs) along their migratory route from the dorsal mesentery to the gonadal ridges in human embryos using immunohistochemical markers and electron microscopy. Autonomic nerve...... their intimate contact with PGCs. PGCs expressed GAGE, MAGE-A4, OCT4 and c-Kit. Serial paraffin sections showed that most PGCs were located inside bundles of autonomic nerve fibers with the majority adjacent to the most peripheral fibers (close to Schwann cells). We also show that both nerve fibers and...... PGCs arrive at the gonadal ridge between 29 and 33 days pc. In conclusion, our data suggest that PGCs in human embryos preferentially migrate along autonomic nerve fibers from the dorsal mesentery to the developing gonad where they are delivered via a fine nerve plexus....

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation magnet activation for seizures: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R S; Eggleston, K S; Wright, C W

    2015-01-01

    Some patients receiving VNS Therapy report benefit from manually activating the generator with a handheld magnet at the time of a seizure. A review of 20 studies comprising 859 subjects identified patients who reported on-demand magnet mode stimulation to be beneficial. Benefit was reported in a weighted average of 45% of patients (range 0-89%) using the magnet, with seizure cessation claimed in a weighted average of 28% (range 15-67%). In addition to seizure termination, patients sometimes reported decreased intensity or duration of seizures or the post-ictal period. One study reported an isolated instance of worsening with magnet stimulation (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 157, 2003 and 560). All of the reviewed studies assessed adjunctive magnet use. No studies were designed to provide Level I evidence of efficacy of magnet-induced stimulation. Retrospective analysis of one pivotal randomized trial of VNS therapy showed significantly more seizures terminated or improved in the active stimulation group vs the control group. Prospective, controlled studies would be required to isolate the effect and benefit of magnet mode stimulation and to document that the magnet-induced stimulation is the proximate cause of seizure reduction. Manual application of the magnet to initiate stimulation is not always practical because many patients are immobilized or unaware of their seizures, asleep or not in reach of the magnet. Algorithms based on changes in heart rate at or near the onset of the seizure provide a methodology for automated responsive stimulation. Because literature indicates additional benefits from on-demand magnet mode stimulation, a potential role exists for automatic activation of stimulation. PMID:25145652

  7. LEPTIN SIGNALING IN THE NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII INCREASES SYMPATHETIC NERVE ACTIVITY TO THE KIDNEY

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, Allyn L.; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A.; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) in extra-hypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We previously demonstrated that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue (BAT) and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow...

  8. A PET activation study of brush-evoked allodynia in patients with nerve injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kupers, Ron; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Acute experimental brush-evoked allodynia induces a cortical activation pattern that differs from that typically seen during experimental nociceptive pain. In this study, we used positron emission tomography to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with clinical allodynia. Nine patients with peripheral nerve injury were scanned during rest, brush-evoked allodynia, and brushing of normal contralateral skin. PET data were analyzed for the whole group and for single sub...

  9. Is polycystic ovary syndrome associated with high sympathetic nerve activity and size at birth?

    OpenAIRE

    Sverrisdóttir, YB; Mogren, T; J. Kataoka; Janson, PO; Stener-Victorin, E

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disturbance among women of reproductive age and is proposed to be linked with size at birth and increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease. A disturbance in the sympathetic nervous system may contribute to the etiology of PCOS. This study evaluates sympathetic outflow in PCOS and its relation to size at birth. Directly recorded sympathetic nerve activity to the muscle vascular bed (MSNA) was obtained in 20 women with PCO...

  10. Excitatory and inhibitory effects of prolactin release activated by nerve stimulation in rat anterior pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Li-Zhi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of studies showed the presence of substantial amount of nerve fibers and their close relationship with the anterior pituitary gland cells. Our previous studies have suggested that aside from the classical theory of humoral regulation, the rat anterior pituitary has direct neural regulation on adrenocorticotropic hormone release. In rat anterior pituitary, typical synapses are found on every type of the hormone-secreting cells, many on lactotrophs. The present study was aimed at investigating the physiological significance of this synaptic relationship on prolactin release. Methods The anterior pituitary of rat was sliced and stimulated with electrical field in a self-designed perfusion chamber. The perfusate was continuously collected in aliquots and measured by radioimmunoassay for prolactin levels. After statistic analysis, differences of prolactin concentrations within and between groups were outlined. Results The results showed that stimulation at frequency of 2 Hz caused a quick enhancement of prolactin release, when stimulated at 10 Hz, prolactin release was found to be inhibited which came slower and lasted longer. The effect of nerve stimulation on prolactin release is diphasic and frequency dependent. Conclusions The present in vitro study offers the first physiological evidence that stimulation of nerve fibers can affect prolactin release in rat anterior pituitary. Low frequency stimulation enhances prolactin release and high frequency mainly inhibits it.

  11. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, Martin A.; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin,...

  12. Cooperative roles of BDNF expression in neurons and Schwann cells are modulated by exercise to facilitate nerve regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelm, Jennifer C.; Xu, Mei; Cucoranu, Delia; Chmielewski, Sarah; Holmes, Tiffany; Lau, Kelly; Bassell, Gary J.; English, Arthur W.

    2012-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, neurotrophins play a key role in the regeneration of damaged axons which can be augmented by exercise, although the distinct roles played by neurons and Schwann cells are unclear. In this study, we evaluated the requirement for the neurotrophin, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in neurons and Schwann cells, for the regeneration of peripheral axons after injury. Common fibular or tibial nerves in thy-1-YFP-H mice were cut bilaterally and repaired using a...

  13. Amylin acts in the central nervous system to increase sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Zhang, Zhongming; Morgan, Donald A; Guo, Deng-Fu; Russo, Andrew F; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-07-01

    The pancreatic hormone amylin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease food intake and body weight. We hypothesized that amylin action in the CNS promotes energy expenditure by increasing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. In mice, ip administration of amylin significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. In addition, mice treated with intracerebroventricular (icv) amylin (0.1 and 0.2 nmol) exhibited a dose-related decrease in food intake and body weight, measured 4 and 24 hours after treatment. The icv injection of amylin also increased body temperature in mice. Using direct multifiber sympathetic nerve recording, we found that icv amylin elicited a significant and dose-dependent increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) subserving thermogenic brown adipose tissue (BAT). Of note, icv injection of amylin also evoked a significant and dose-related increase in lumbar and renal SNA. Importantly, icv pretreatment with the amylin receptor antagonist AC187 (20 nmol) abolished the BAT SNA response induced by icv amylin, indicating that the sympathetic effects of amylin are receptor-mediated. Conversely, icv amylin-induced BAT SNA response was enhanced in mice overexpressing the amylin receptor subunit, RAMP1 (receptor-activity modifying protein 1), in the CNS. Our data demonstrate that CNS action of amylin regulates sympathetic nerve outflow to peripheral tissues involved in energy balance and cardiovascular function. PMID:23645151

  14. Large A-fiber activity is required for microglial proliferation and p38 MAPK activation in the spinal cord: different effects of resiniferatoxin and bupivacaine on spinal microglial changes after spared nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decosterd Isabelle

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After peripheral nerve injury, spontaneous ectopic activity arising from the peripheral axons plays an important role in inducing central sensitization and neuropathic pain. Recent evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord microglia also contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. In particular, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in spinal microglia is required for the development of mechanical allodynia. However, activity-dependent activation of microglia after nerve injury has not been fully addressed. To determine whether spontaneous activity from C- or A-fibers is required for microglial activation, we used resiniferatoxin (RTX to block the conduction of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 positive fibers (mostly C- and A?-fibers and bupivacaine microspheres to block all fibers of the sciatic nerve in rats before spared nerve injury (SNI, and observed spinal microglial changes 2 days later. Results SNI induced robust mechanical allodynia and p38 activation in spinal microglia. SNI also induced marked cell proliferation in the spinal cord, and all the proliferating cells (BrdU+ were microglia (Iba1+. Bupivacaine induced a complete sensory and motor blockade and also significantly inhibited p38 activation and microglial proliferation in the spinal cord. In contrast, and although it produced an efficient nociceptive block, RTX failed to inhibit p38 activation and microglial proliferation in the spinal cord. Conclusion (1 Blocking peripheral input in TRPV1-positive fibers (presumably C-fibers is not enough to prevent nerve injury-induced spinal microglial activation. (2 Peripheral input from large myelinated fibers is important for microglial activation. (3 Microglial activation is associated with mechanical allodynia.

  15. Damage and repair of nerve cell DNA in toxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, G E; Kabel, H; Hugon, J; Spencer, P

    1999-08-01

    It is generally agreed that ALS/PDC is triggered by a disappearing environmental factor peculiar to the lifestyle of people of the western Pacific (i.e., Guam, Irian Jaya, Indonesia, and the Kii Peninsula of Japan). A strong candidate is the cycad plant genotoxin cycasin, the beta-D-glucoside of methylazoxymethanol (MAM). We propose that prenatal or postnatal exposure to low levels of cycasin/MAM may damage neuronal DNA, compromise DNA repair, perturb neuronal gene expression, and irreversibly alter cell function to precipitate a slowly evolving disease ("slow-toxin" hypothesis). In support of our hypothesis, we have demonstrated the following: 1. DNA from postmitotic rodent central nervous system neurons is particularly sensitive to damage by MAM. 2. MAM reduces DNA repair in human and rodent neurons, whereas DNA-repair inhibitors potentiate MAM-induced DNA damage and toxicity in mature rodent nervous tissue. 3. Human neurons (SY5Y neuroblastoma) that are deficient in DNA repair are susceptible to MAM-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage, whereas overexpression of DNA repair in similar cells is protective. 4. MAM alters gene expression in SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and, in the presence of DNA damage and reduced DNA repair, enhances glutamate-modulated expression of tau mRNA in rat primary neurons; the corresponding protein (TAU) is elevated in ALS/PDC and Alzheimer's disease. These findings support a direct relationship between MAM-induced DNA damage and neurotoxicity and suggest the genotoxin may operate in a similar manner in vivo. More broadly, a combination of genotoxin-induced DNA damage (via exogenous and/or endogenous agents) and disturbed DNA repair may be important contributing factors in the slow and progressive degeneration of neurons that is characteristic of sporadic neurodegenerative disease. Preliminary studies demonstrate that DNA repair is reduced in the brain of subjects with western Pacific ALS/PDC, ALS, and Alzheimer's disease, which would increase the susceptibility of brain tissue to DNA damage by endogenous/exogenous genotoxins. Interindividual differences in the extent of prior exposure to DNA-damaging agents and/or the efficiency of its repair might produce population variety in the rate of damage accumulation and explain the susceptibility of certain individuals to sporadic neurodegenerative disease. Studies are underway using DNA-repair proficient and deficient neuronal cell cultures and mutant mice to explore gene-environment interplay with respect to MAM treatment, DNA damage, and DNA repair, and the age-related appearance of neurobehavioral and neuropathological compromise. PMID:10461542

  16. Vagal nerve stimulation activates vagal afferent fibers that reduce cardiac efferent parasympathetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Kentaro; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Takamiya, Tatsuo; Yagishita, Daigo; So, Eileen L; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Vaseghi, Marmar

    2015-11-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to have antiarrhythmic effects, but many of these benefits were demonstrated in the setting of vagal nerve decentralization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of afferent fiber activation during VNS on efferent control of cardiac hemodynamic and electrophysiological parameters. In 37 pigs a 56-electrode sock was placed over the ventricles to record local activation recovery intervals (ARIs), a surrogate of action potential duration. In 12 of 37 animals atropine was given systemically. Right and left VNS were performed under six conditions: both vagal trunks intact (n = 25), ipsilateral right (n = 11), ipsilateral left (n = 14), contralateral right (n = 7), contralateral left (n = 10), and bilateral (n = 25) vagal nerve transection (VNTx). Unilateral VNTx significantly affected heart rate, PR interval, Tau, and global ARIs. Right VNS after ipsilateral VNTx had augmented effects on hemodynamic parameters and increase in ARI, while subsequent bilateral VNTx did not significantly modify this effect (%change in ARI in intact condition 2.2 ± 0.9% vs. ipsilateral VNTx 5.3 ± 1.7% and bilateral VNTx 5.3 ± 0.8%, P VNS after left VNTx tended to increase its effects on hemodynamics and ARI response (P = 0.07), but only after bilateral VNTx did these changes reach significance (intact 1.1 ± 0.5% vs. ipsilateral VNTx 3.6 ± 0.7% and bilateral VNTx 6.6 ± 1.6%, P VNS response. The effect of atropine on ventricular ARI was similar to bilateral VNTx. We found that VNS activates afferent fibers in the ipsilateral vagal nerve, which reflexively inhibit cardiac parasympathetic efferent electrophysiological and hemodynamic effects. PMID:26371172

  17. A Preclinical Study of Laryngeal Motor-Evoked Potentials as a Marker Vagus Nerve Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimonprez, Annelies; Raedt, Robrecht; De Taeye, Leen; Larsen, Lars Emil; Delbeke, Jean; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment for refractory epilepsy and depression. Previous studies using invasive recording electrodes showed that VNS induces laryngeal motor-evoked potentials (LMEPs) through the co-activation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and subsequent contractions of the laryngeal muscles. The present study investigates the feasibility of recording LMEPs in chronically VNS-implanted rats, using a minimally-invasive technique, to assess effective current delivery to the nerve and to determine optimal VNS output currents for vagal fiber activation. Three weeks after VNS electrode implantation, signals were recorded using an electromyography (EMG) electrode in the proximity of the laryngeal muscles and a reference electrode on the skull. The VNS output current was gradually ramped up from 0.1 to 1.0 mA in 0.1 mA steps. In 13/27 rats, typical LMEPs were recorded at low VNS output currents (median 0.3 mA, IQR 0.2-0.3 mA). In 11/27 rats, significantly higher output currents were required to evoke electrophysiological responses (median 0.7 mA, IQR 0.5-0.7 mA, [Formula: see text]). The latencies of these responses deviated significantly from LMEPs ([Formula: see text]). In 3/27 rats, no electrophysiological responses to simulation were recorded. Minimally invasive LMEP recordings are feasible to assess effective current delivery to the vagus nerve. Furthermore, our results suggest that low output currents are sufficient to activate vagal fibers. PMID:26510476

  18. Acrylamide neuropathy. III. Spatiotemporal characteristics of nerve cell damage in forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, E J; Balaban, C D; Ross, J F; LoPachin, R M

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies of acrylamide (ACR) neuropathy in rat PNS [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. (1998) 151:211-221] and in spinal cord, brainstem and cerebellum [NeuroToxicology (2002a) 23:397-414; NeuroToxicology (2002b) 23:415-429] have suggested that axon degeneration was not a primary effect and was, therefore, of unclear neurotoxicological significance. To conclude our studies of neurodegeneration in rat CNS during ACR neurotoxicity, a cupric silver stain method was used to define spatiotemporal characteristics of nerve cell body, dendrite, axon and terminal argyrophilia in forebrain regions and nuclei. Rats were exposed to ACR at a dose-rate of either 50 mg/kg per day (i.p.) or 21 mg/kg per day (p.o.) and at selected times brains were removed and processed for silver staining. Results show that intoxication at either ACR dose-rate produced a terminalopathy, i.e. nerve terminal degeneration and swelling were present in the absence of significant argyrophilic changes in neuronal cell bodies, dendrites or axons. Exposure to the higher ACR dose-rate caused early onset (day 5), widespread nerve terminal degeneration in most of the major forebrain areas, e.g. cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus and basal ganglia. At the lower dose-rate, nerve terminal degeneration in the forebrain developed early (day 7) but exhibited a relatively limited spatial distribution, i.e. anteroventral thalamic nucleus and the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra. Several hippocampal regions were affected at a later time point (day 28), i.e. CA1 field and subicular complex. At both dose-rates, argyrophilic changes in forebrain nerve terminals developed prior to the onset of significant gait abnormalities. Thus, in forebrain, ACR intoxication produced a pure terminalopathy that developed prior to the onset of significant neurological changes and progressed as a function of exposure. Neither dose-rate used in this study was associated with axon degeneration in any forebrain region. Our findings indicate that nerve terminals were selectively affected in forebrain areas and, therefore, might be primary sites of ACR action. PMID:12564388

  19. The rate of diffusion of Ca2+ and Ba2+ in a nerve cell body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasi, E; Tillotson, D

    1985-05-01

    A spectrophotometric method was developed to directly measure the diffusion rate of Ca2+ and some other ions in nerve cell bodies, using pulsed ionophoretic injections and an optical microprobe to record locally absorbance changes of the dye arsenazo III. We report here that Ca2+ and Ba2+ diffuse at approximately the same rate in nerve soma cytoplasm, having effective diffusion coefficients in the range of 7-12 X 10(-7) cm2/s, while identical measurements conducted in an electrolytic solution yielded values of 5.2 X 10(-6) cm2/s for Ca and 5.4 X 10(-6) cm2/s for Ba. The results are discussed in relation to the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular concentration of free Ca. PMID:4016193

  20. Altered frequency characteristics of sympathetic nerve activity after sustained elevation in arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, D E; Fels, R J; Kenney, M J

    1998-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sustained elevation in mean arterial pressure (MAP) alters the frequency-domain characteristics of efferent sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) after the return of MAP to control levels. Renal, lumbar, and splanchnic SND were recorded before, during, and after a 30-min increase in MAP produced by phenylephrine (PE) infusion in alpha-chloralose-anesthetized, spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The following observations were made. 1) The basic cardiac-locked pattern of renal, lumbar, and splanchnic SND bursts was altered after sustained elevation in MAP, demonstrating prolonged effects on the neural circuits involved in entraining efferent SND to the cardiac cycle. Importantly, discharge bursts in afferent baroreceptor nerve activity remained pulse-synchronous after sustained increases in arterial pressure. 2) The frequency-domain relationships between the activity in sympathetic nerve pairs were altered after sustained elevation in MAP, suggesting a transformation from a system of tightly coupled neural circuits to one of multiple generators exerting selective control over SND. 3) The most prominent reduction in SND power after sustained elevation in MAP occurred in the frequency band containing the cardiac cycle, indicating that the prolonged suppression of SND after sustained increases in arterial pressure is due primarily to the selective inhibition of cardiac-related SND bursts. We conclude that sustained elevation in MAP profoundly affects the neural circuits responsible for the frequency components of basal SND in SH rats. PMID:9530235

  1. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  2. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Wen, Xuehua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  3. Up-regulation of P2X7 receptors mediating proliferation of Schwann cells after sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xian-min; Xu, Xiao-hui; Zhu, Jiao; Guo, Zhili; Li, Jian; He, Cheng; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Yuan, Hongbin; Xiang, Zhenghua

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common disease, which results in a partial or total loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions, leading to a decrease in quality of life. Schwann cells play a vital role in maintaining the peripheral nervous system and in injury and repair. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, calcium assay and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation assay, the present study clearly demonstrated that P2X7 receptors (R) were expressed in myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells in longitudinal sections of sciatic nerves. After sciatic nerve injury (SNI), P2X7R expression in Schwann cells of injured sciatic nerves was significantly up-regulated during the early days of SNI. Double immunofluorescence of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and P2X7R implied that P2X7R may be involved in proliferation of Schwann cells. Further experiments on primary cultures of Schwann cells showed that P2X7R are functionally expressed in Schwann cells of rat sciatic nerves; ATP via P2X7R can promote Schwann cell proliferation, possibly via the MAPK/ERK intracellular signalling pathway. Other possible roles of P2X7R on Schwann cells are discussed. PMID:25682129

  4. After-effects of exercise on haemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in young patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, K.; Floras, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the after-effects on sympathetic nerve activity and calf and systemic haemodynamics of symptom-limited exercise in young patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS: 14 young patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (mean (SEM) age 35 (2) yr) and 17 healthy controls (age 29 (2) yr). METHODS: Blood pressure, muscle sympathetic nerve activity, calf blood flow, plasma noradrenaline, and stroke volume were recorded during baseline rest and an hour after symptom-limited trea...

  5. Interpretation of fusimotor activity in cat masseter nerve during reflex jaw movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, S; Taylor, A

    1983-12-01

    Simultaneous recordings were made from fusimotor axons in the central ends of filaments of the masseter nerve, and from masseter and temporalis spindle afferents in the mesencephalic nucleus of the fifth cranial nerve in lightly anaesthetized cats. Fusimotor and alpha-motor units in the masseter nerve were differentiated on the basis of their response to passive ramp and hold stretches applied to the jaw. Spindle afferents were identified as primary or secondary according to their dynamic index after administration of suxamethonium. The activity of a given fusimotor unit during reflex movements of the jaw followed one of two distinct patterns: so-called 'tonic' units showed a general increase in activity during a movement, without detailed relation to lengthening or shortening, while 'modulated' units displayed a striking modulation of their activity with shortening, and were usually silent during subsequent lengthening. Comparison of the simultaneously recorded fusimotor and spindle afferent activity suggests that modulated units may be representative of a population of static fusimotor neurones, and tonic units of a population of dynamic fusimotor neurones. In these lightly anaesthetized animals, both primary and secondary spindle afferents showed increased firing during muscle shortening as well as during lengthening. This increase during shortening is not usually seen in conscious animals and reasons are given for the view that it is due to greater depression of alpha-motor activity than of static fusimotor activity during anaesthesia. The results are discussed in relation to the theories of 'alpha-gamma co-activation' and of 'servo-assistance'; and it is suggested that static fusimotor neurones provide a 'temporal template' of the intended movement, while dynamic fusimotor neurones set the required dynamic sensitivity to deviations from the intended movement pattern. PMID:6229627

  6. Up-regulation of platelet-activating factor synthases and its receptor in spinal cord contribute to development of neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okubo Masamichi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is a lipid mediator derived from cell membrane. It has been reported that PAF is involved in various pathological conditions, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain and intrathecal administration of PAF leads to tactile allodynia. However, the expression of PAF synthases and its receptor in the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury is unknown. Methods Using the rat spared nerve injury (SNI model, we investigated the expression of PAF synthases (LPCAT1 and 2 and PAF receptor (PAFr mRNAs in the spinal cord. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and double-labeling analysis of in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH with immunohistochemistry (IHC were employed for the analyses. Pain behaviors were also examined with PAFr antagonist (WEB2086. Results RT-PCR showed that LPCAT2 mRNA was increased in the ipsilateral spinal cord after injury, but not LPCAT1 mRNA. Double-labeling of ISHH with IHC revealed that LPCAT1 and 2 mRNAs were constitutively expressed by a subset of neurons, and LPCAT2 mRNA was increased in spinal microglia after nerve injury. RT-PCR showed that PAFr mRNA was dramatically increased in the ipsilateral spinal cord after nerve injury. Double-labeling analysis of ISHH with IHC revealed that after injury PAFr mRNA was predominantly colocalized with microglia in the spinal cord. Continuous intrathecal administration of the PAFr antagonist suppressed mechanical allodynia following peripheral nerve injury. Delayed administration of a PAFr antagonist did not reverse the mechanical allodynia. Conclusions Our data show the histological localization of PAF synthases and its receptor in the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury, and suggest that PAF/PAFr signaling in the spinal cord acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner among the activated microglia and neurons, thus contributing to development of neuropathic pain.

  7. Effect of SIRT1 regulating cholesterol synthesis in repairing retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the repair mechanism associated with cholesterol synthesis regulated by silent information regulator 1(SIRT1in rat model of optic nerve damage. METHODS: Preparation of optic nerve damage in 70 rats was randomly divided into normal group(10 rats, resveratrol treatment group(experimental group 30 ratsand PBS buffer control group(30 rats. The experimental group and control group was further divided into 3 subgroups(each group 10 rats, respectively. After 7, 14, 21d injected resveratrol or PBS, optic nerve injury were observed, then the rats were sacrificed. Retina was segregated; the surviving retinal ganglion cell(RGCswas counted. Dissection of optic nerve, cholesterol content of them were tested; RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of SIRT1, SREBP2 and HMGCR; Western blot assay was used to test the protein expression levels of SIRT1, cholesterol regulatory element binding protein 2(SREBP2and HMGCR. RESULTS: The numbers of RGCs and cholesterol levels of rat model with optic nerve injury decreased significantly(PPPPCONCLUSION: Up-regulating the expression of SIRT1, SREBP2 and down-regulating HMGCR by resveratrol could repair the injury of optic nerve through promoting the synthesis of cholesterol in neurons and retinal ganglion cells in the repair process. SIRT1 may be as a promising new target for treatment on optic nerve damage.

  8. Painful nerve injury increases plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in axotomized sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemes Geza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA is the principal means by which sensory neurons expel Ca2+ and thereby regulate the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and the processes controlled by this critical second messenger. We have previously found that painful nerve injury decreases resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and activity-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ accumulation in axotomized sensory neurons. Here we examine the contribution of PMCA after nerve injury in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Results PMCA function was isolated in dissociated sensory neurons by blocking intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded with Fura-2 fluorometry. Compared to control neurons, the rate at which depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients resolved was increased in axotomized neurons after spinal nerve ligation, indicating accelerated PMCA function. Electrophysiological recordings showed that blockade of PMCA by vanadate prolonged the action potential afterhyperpolarization, and also decreased the rate at which neurons could fire repetitively. Conclusion We found that PMCA function is elevated in axotomized sensory neurons, which contributes to neuronal hyperexcitability. Accelerated PMCA function in the primary sensory neuron may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain, and thus its modulation could provide a new pathway for peripheral treatment of post-traumatic neuropathic pain.

  9. Neurotrophic Effect of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Erectile Function Recovery by Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor Secretion in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Qiyun; Zheng, Tao; Bian, Jun; Sun, Xiangzhou; Shi, Yanan; Liang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Guoquan; Liu, Guihua; Deng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    The paracrine effect is the major mechanism of stem cell therapy. However, the details of the effect's mechanism remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can ameliorate cavernous nerve injury-induced erectile dysfunction (CNIED) rats and to determine its mechanism. Twenty-eight days after intracavernous injection of 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine- (EdU-) labeled ADSCs, the erectile function of all the rats was evaluated by intracavernosal pressure (ICP). The ADSCs steadily secreted detectable pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in vitro. The expression of PEDF increased in the penis of the bilateral cavernous nerve injury (BCNI) group for 14 days and then gradually decreased. On day 28 after the intracavernous injection, the ADSCs group exhibited a significantly increased ICP compared with the phosphate buffered saline- (PBS-) treated group. Moreover, the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and S100 expression in penile dorsal nerves and the smooth muscle content to collagen ratio in penile tissues significantly increased. Furthermore, elevated PEDF, p-Akt, and p-eNOS were identified in the ADSCs group. This study demonstrated that intracavernous injection of ADSCs improved erectile function, repaired the nerve, and corrected penile fibrosis. One potential mechanism is the PEDF secretion of ADSCs and subsequent PI3K/Akt pathway activation.

  10. The role of lamina cribrosa cells in optic nerve head fibrosis in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Deborah M; O'Brien, Colm J

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic progressive optic neuropathy. There are extracellular matrix (ECM) changes associated with optic disc cupping in the optic nerve head (ONH) and subsequent visual field defects. The primary risk factor for onset and progression of glaucoma is raised intraocular pressure (IOP). Elevated IOP causes deformation at the ONH specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also deposition of ECM causing the LC to initially undergo thickening and posterior migration with eventual shearing and collapse of the LC plates leading to a thin fibrotic connective tissue structure/scar. Cells that populate the LC region of the ONH are those cells that are positive for GFAP (the astrocytes) and those negative for GFAP (the LC cells). The LC cell plays an integral role in ECM remodelling producing ECM when exposed to high level mechanical stretch, TGF- ?1 and a hypoxic environment. PMID:26675406

  11. The role of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling in insulin regulation of food intake, body weight, and sympathetic nerve activity in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Kenjiro; Morgan, Donald A; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-04-01

    Insulin action in the brain particularly the hypothalamus is critically involved in the regulation of several physiological processes, including energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve activity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is implicated in the control of diverse cellular functions, including sensing nutrients and energy status. Here, we examined the role of hypothalamic mTORC1 in mediating the anorectic, weight-reducing, and sympathetic effects of central insulin action. In a mouse hypothalamic cell line (GT1-7), insulin treatment increased mTORC1 activity in a time-dependent manner. In addition, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin to mice activated mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, a key site of central action of insulin. Interestingly, inhibition of hypothalamic mTORC1 with rapamycin reversed the food intake- and body weight-lowering effects of ICV insulin. Rapamycin also abolished the ability of ICV insulin to cause lumbar sympathetic nerve activation. In GT1-7 cells, we found that insulin activation of mTORC1 pathway requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Consistent with this, genetic disruption of PI3K in mice abolished insulin stimulation of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling as well as the lumbar sympathetic nerve activation evoked by insulin. These results demonstrate the importance of mTORC1 pathway in the hypothalamus in mediating the action of insulin to regulate energy homeostasis and sympathetic nerve traffic. Our data also highlight the key role of PI3K as a link between insulin receptor and mTORC1 signaling in the hypothalamus. PMID:25574706

  12. Primary CD56-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma of median nerve: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    KIM, J.; Kim, Y S; Lee, E.J.; Kang, C. S.; Shim, S I

    1998-01-01

    Primary extranodal lymphomas of the central nervous system constitute 2% of all malignant lymphomas. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system is very rare. A solitary primary CD56-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma of the median nerve is described in a 70-year-old woman. On physical examination, a rubbery hard mass measuring 2.0 cm in diameter was palpated on the volar aspect of second to third finger of left hand. Excisional biopsy was performed. Under the fascia, a large fusiform tumor of ...

  13. Regulation of Schwann cell proliferation in cultured segments of the adult rat sciatic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Kanje, M

    1998-01-01

    Schwann cell proliferation was studied in cultured segments of the rat sciatic nerve by measurement of [3H] thymidine incorporation or through bromodeoxyuridine-(BrdU)-labelling and immunocytochemistry. The aim was to delineate mechanisms involved in the injury-induced proliferative response of...... incorporation while phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) enhanced incorporation. Manipulation of the cAMP system showed that increased cAMP levels inhibited proliferation. Inhibition of protein kinase A by HA 1004 increased the incorporation of [3H] thymidine. Immunostaining for BrdU and glial specific markers...

  14. Regulation of sympathetic nerve activity by L-carnosine in mammalian white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiao; Yao, Jia-Fei; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagai, Katsuya

    2008-08-15

    Previously, we showed that l-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide, influences the sympathetic nerve activity innervating kidney and brown adipose tissue. Because the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we investigated the in vivo effects of L-carnosine on the sympathetic nerve activity innervating white adipose tissue (SNA-WAT) and lipolysis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of L-carnosine at doses of 100 ng/rat and 10 microg/rat elevated and suppressed SNA-WAT, respectively. The effect of lower dose of L-carnosine (100 ng/rat) was eliminated by pretreatment with diphenhydramine hydrochloride, a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist. In contrast, the effect of higher dose of L-carnosine (10 microg/rat) was suppressed by thioperamide maleate salt, a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist. Moreover, ip administration of 100 ng and 10 microg of L-carnosine increased and decreased the levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs), respectively. The changes of plasma FFAs resulting from the exposure to 100 ng and 10 microg of L-carnosine were diminished by the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol hydrochloride and the muscarinic receptor blocker atropine sulfate, respectively; and eliminated by the corresponding histamine receptor antagonists, which eliminated the changes in SNA-WAT. Our results suggest that low doses of L-carnosine may regulate the lipolytic processes in adipose tissue through facilitation of the sympathetic nervous system, which is driven by histamine neurons through the H(1) receptor, and that the beta(3)-receptor may be involved in this enhanced lipolytic response. High doses of L-carnosine, on the other hand, may lower lipolysis by suppressing sympathetic nerve activity via the H(3) receptor, and the muscarinic receptor may be related to this response. PMID:18599216

  15. Transgenic inhibition of astroglial NF-?B protects from optic nerve damage and retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brambilla Roberta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optic neuritis is an acute, demyelinating neuropathy of the optic nerve often representing the first appreciable symptom of multiple sclerosis. Wallerian degeneration of irreversibly damaged optic nerve axons leads to death of retinal ganglion cells, which is the cause of permanent visual impairment. Although the specific mechanisms responsible for triggering these events are unknown, it has been suggested that a key pathological factor is the activation of immune-inflammatory processes secondary to leukocyte infiltration. However, to date, there is no conclusive evidence to support such a causal role for infiltrating peripheral immune cells in the etiopathology of optic neuritis. Methods To dissect the contribution of the peripheral immune-inflammatory response versus the CNS-specific inflammatory response in the development of optic neuritis, we analyzed optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells pathology in wild-type and GFAP-I?B?-dn transgenic mice, where NF-?B is selectively inactivated in astrocytes, following induction of EAE. Results We found that, in wild-type mice, axonal demyelination in the optic nerve occurred as early as 8?days post induction of EAE, prior to the earliest signs of leukocyte infiltration (20?days post induction. On the contrary, GFAP-I?B?-dn mice were significantly protected and showed a nearly complete prevention of axonal demyelination, as well as a drastic attenuation in retinal ganglion cell death. This correlated with a decrease in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, as well as a prevention of NAD(PH oxidase subunit upregulation. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that astrocytes, not infiltrating immune cells, play a key role in the development of optic neuritis and that astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity is dependent on activation of a transcriptional program regulated by NF-?B. Hence, interventions targeting the NF-?B transcription factor in astroglia may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis.

  16. Radioautographic characterization of a serotonin-accumulating nerve cell group in adult rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensely labeled nerve cell bodies were identified by radioautography within the pars ventralis of nucleus dorsomedialis hypothalami (hdv), following intraventricular perfusion with 10-5 or 10-4 M tritiated serotonin [3H]5-HT in adult rats pretreated with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. This selective reaction, which involved approximately 1000 neurons on each side of the third ventricle, was unaltered by concomitant administration of 10-3 M non-radioactive norepinephrine, and was absent after intraventricular injection of 10-5 or 10-4 M tritiated norepinephrine. The 3H-labeled 5-HT nerve cell bodies were loosely grouped within the inner and caudal half of the hdv, and appeared morphologically similar to the unreactive neurons among which they were interspersed. Within the same region, numerous labeled axonal varicosities were also detected which were never found in synaptic contact with the reactive cells. If the 3H-labeled 5-HT neurons endogenous 5-HT, they might constitute an intrinsic source of 5-HT innervation in the adult rat hypothalamus. (Auth.)

  17. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  18. Leptin-Induced Sympathetic Nerve Activation: Signaling Mechanisms and Cardiovascular Consequences in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Obesity increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part by inducing hypertension. One factor linking excess fat mass to cardiovascular diseases may be the sympathetic cardiovascular actions of leptin. Initial studies of leptin showed it regulates appetite and enhances energy expenditure by activating sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to thermogenic brown adipose tissue. Further study, however, demonstrated leptin also causes sympathetic excitation to the kidney that, in turn, increases arterial pressure. In animal studies, elevating circulating leptin levels increased arterial pressure. Moreover, mice with diet-induced obesity have a preserved arterial pressure response to leptin despite the resistance to the metabolic action of leptin and these mice have elevated baseline arterial pressure. Conversely, severely obese, but leptin-deficient, mice and humans display low sympathetic tone and decreased blood pressure. Together, these findings demonstrate that leptin plays a physiological role in maintaining sympathetic tone and blood pressure, and further suggest that hyperleptinemia may contribute to the elevated blood pressure associated with obesity. Consistent with this selectivity in leptin resistance, mounting evidence suggests that the sympathetic nervous system subserving different tissues is differentially controlled by leptin. For instance, different molecular signaling mechanisms are engaged by the leptin receptor to control the regional sympathetic nerve activity. Understanding the mechanisms by which leptin controls the sympathetic nervous system will provide insight into the cardiovascular complications of obesity. PMID:21562617

  19. Effects of hyperpolarization-activated channel blocker ZD7288 on polar excitations of frog sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Ang, Foong Yen; Nakajima, Kazuyuki; Kogure, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Ar(+) laser irradiation shows a more selective blocking effect on the generation of anode-break-excitation (AE) than on cathode-make-excitation (CE), and that the effects of laser irradiation closely resemble those following the application of hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) blocker, ZD7288. We therefore examined the effects of ZD7288 and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on polar excitations to reveal whether such a selective effect of ZD7288 on AE is specific in frog sciatic nerve. Supramaximal stimuli (10-ms pulse) were applied while for 30 min each channel blocker was applied to the stimulating sites. Analyses of chronological changes in polar excitations were performed using CEs induced by positive stimuli and AEs induced by negative stimuli, because both were generated on the same stimulating grid against the recording grids. TTX application (1 mM) decreased all types of polar excitations at 30 min after initiation of the application. When ZD7288 (1 mM) was applied, the amplitude of AE displayed a significant decrease after 30 min. When TTX or ZD7288 was applied to the middle portion between the stimulating and recording electrode grids, TTX showed the conduction block, but the latter yielded almost no effect. Western blotting analyses demonstrated expressions of the second and the third subunits of hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonselective cation channels in frog sciatic nerve. Ih channels thus exist in the frog sciatic nerve, and its specific blocker, ZD7288, has the potential to selectively block the generation of AE. PMID:18284714

  20. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingin, Gerald C; Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A; Nelson, Mark T

    2015-09-15

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:26224686

  1. Methylcobalamin promotes the differentiation of Schwann cells and remyelination in lysophosphatidylcholine-induced demyelination of the rat sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tanaka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs are constituents of the peripheral nervous system. The differentiation of SCs in injured peripheral nerves is critical for regeneration after injury. Methylcobalamin (MeCbl is a vitamin B12 analog that is necessary for the maintenance of the peripheral nervous system. In this study, we estimated the effect of MeCbl on SCs. We showed that MeCbl downregulated the activity of Erk1/2 and promoted the expression of the myelin basic protein in SCs. In a dorsal root ganglion neuron–SC coculture system, myelination was promoted by MeCbl. In a focal demyelination rat model, MeCbl promoted remyelination and motor and sensory functional regeneration. MeCbl promoted the in vitro differentiation of SCs and in vivo myelination in a rat demyelination model and may be a novel therapy for several types of nervous disorders.

  2. Analysis of spatial relationships in three dimensions: tools for the study of nerve cell patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raven Mary A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple technologies have been brought to bear on understanding the three-dimensional morphology of individual neurons and glia within the brain, but little progress has been made on understanding the rules controlling cellular patterning. We describe new matlab-based software tools, now available to the scientific community, permitting the calculation of spatial statistics associated with 3D point patterns. The analyses are largely derived from the Delaunay tessellation of the field, including the nearest neighbor and Voronoi domain analyses, and from the spatial autocorrelogram. Results Our tools enable the analysis of the spatial relationship between neurons within the central nervous system in 3D, and permit the modeling of these fields based on lattice-like simulations, and on simulations of minimal-distance spacing rules. Here we demonstrate the utility of our analysis methods to discriminate between two different simulated neuronal populations. Conclusion Together, these tools can be used to reveal the presence of nerve cell patterning and to model its foundation, in turn informing on the potential developmental mechanisms that govern its establishment. Furthermore, in conjunction with analyses of dendritic morphology, they can be used to determine the degree of dendritic coverage within a volume of tissue exhibited by mature nerve cells.

  3. A Preclinical Model of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor-like Melanoma Is Characterized by Infiltrating Mast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Michael; Landsberg, Jennifer; Glodde, Nicole; Bald, Tobias; Rogava, Meri; Riesenberg, Stefanie; Becker, Albert; Jönsson, Göran; Tüting, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Human melanomas exhibit considerable genetic, pathologic, and microenvironmental heterogeneity. Genetically engineered mice have successfully been used to model the genomic aberrations contributing to melanoma pathogenesis, but their ability to recapitulate the phenotypic variability of human disease and the complex interactions with the immune system have not been addressed. Here, we report the unexpected finding that immune cell-poor pigmented and immune cell-rich amelanotic melanomas developed simultaneously in Cdk4R24C-mutant mice upon melanocyte-specific conditional activation of oncogenic BrafV600E and a single application of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Interestingly, amelanotic melanomas showed morphologic and molecular features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). A bioinformatic cross-species comparison using a gene expression signature of MPNST-like mouse melanomas identified a subset of human melanomas with a similar histomorphology. Furthermore, this subset of human melanomas was found to be highly associated with a mast cell gene signature, and accordingly, mouse MPNST-like melanomas were also extensively infiltrated by mast cells and expressed mast cell chemoattractants similar to human counterparts. A transplantable mouse MPNST-like melanoma cell line recapitulated mast cell recruitment in syngeneic mice, demonstrating that this cell state can directly reconstitute the histomorphologic and microenvironmental features of primary MPNST-like melanomas. Our study emphasizes the importance of reciprocal, phenotype-dependent melanoma-immune cell interactions and highlights a critical role for mast cells in a subset of melanomas. Moreover, our BrafV600E-Cdk4R24C model represents an attractive system for the development of therapeutic approaches that can target the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment characteristic of human melanomas. Cancer Res; 76(2); 251-63. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26511633

  4. Attenuated baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity after cardiovascular deconditioning in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Foley, C. M.; Schadt, J. C.; Laughlin, M. H.; Hasser, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system was evaluated after 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) or the control condition. Rats were chronically instrumented with catheters and sympathetic nerve recording electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and recording of lumbar (LSNA) or renal (RSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. Experiments were conducted 24 h after surgery, with the animals in a normal posture. Baroreflex function was assessed using a logistic function that related HR and LSNA or RSNA to MAP during infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Baroreflex influence on HR was not affected by HU. Maximum baroreflex-elicited LSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (204 +/- 11.9 vs. 342 +/- 30.6% baseline LSNA), as was maximum reflex gain (-4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -7.8 +/- 1.3 %LSNA/mmHg). Maximum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (259 +/- 10.8 vs. 453 +/- 28.0% baseline RSNA), minimum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (-2 +/- 2.8 vs. 13 +/- 4.5% baseline RSNA), and maximum gain (-5.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -13.6 +/- 3.1 %RSNA/mmHg) were significantly decreased in HU rats. Results demonstrate that baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity is attenuated after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents. Data suggest that alterations in the arterial baroreflex may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after a period of bedrest or spaceflight in humans.

  5. Intermittent low-level vagosympathetic nerve trunk stimulation inhibits ganglionated plexi activity to prevent atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanmei; Sun, Juan; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Qingquan; Zhou, Xianhui; Li, Jinxin; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Baopeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cardiac autonomic nervous system (CANS) plays a role in the occurrence and persistence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Low-level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (LL-VNS) has been shown to inhibit the occurrence of AF. Objective: The novel objective of this study was to compare the effects of intermittent low- level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (I-VNS) and continuous low-level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (C-VNS). Methods: 19 beagles were randomly divided into 3 groups: Group A, rapid left atrial appendage pacing for 6 hours; Group B, rapid atrial pacing (RAP) for 6 hours and C-VNS (20 Hz, interval 0.1 ms, square wave) with 50% threshold voltage strength; Group C, RAP for 6 hours and I-VNS (continuously recurring cycles of 30-second ON, 30-second OFF). The atrial monophasic action potential (MAP) and the effective refractory periods (ERP) of the atrium and the pulmonary veins were measured at baseline, 1 hour, 3 hours and 6 hours after the experiment began. After the experiment, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and choline acetyl transferase (CHAT) expression levels in the anterior right ganglionated plexi (ARGP) from each group were measured. Results: Inter-group comparisons of MAP and ERP demonstrated that Group A was significantly different from Groups B and C (P 0.05). The MAP and ERP in Group A gradually decreased, reaching a minimum at 6 hours, but no significant changes were observed in Groups B and C. When compared to Group A, both Groups B and C had reduced TH and CHAT expression. Conclusions: During the occurrence and development of AF, I-VNS could protect the cardiovascular system, possibly replacing C-VNS. Additionally, both I-VNS and C-VNS inhibited ganglionated plexus (GP) activity during the AF prevention. PMID:26131082

  6. A brain leptin-renin angiotensin system interaction in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilzendeger, Aline M; Morgan, Donald A; Brooks, Leonard; Dellsperger, David; Liu, Xuebo; Grobe, Justin L; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D; Mark, Allyn L

    2012-07-15

    The sympathetic nervous system, leptin, and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have been implicated in obesity-associated hypertension. There is increasing evidence for the presence of both leptin and angiotensin II receptors in several key brain cardiovascular and metabolic control regions. We tested the hypothesis that the brain RAS plays a facilitatory role in the sympathetic nerve responses to leptin. In rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of losartan (5 ?g) selectively inhibited increases in renal and brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) produced by leptin (10 ?g ICV) but did not reduce the SNA responses to corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) or the melanocortin receptor agonist MTII. In mice with deletion of angiotensin II type-1a receptors (AT(1a)R(-/-)), increases in renal and BAT SNA induced by leptin (2 ?g ICV) were impaired whereas SNA responses to MTII were preserved. Decreases in food intake and body weight with ICV leptin did not differ in AT(1a)R(-/-) vs. AT(1a)R(+/+) mice. ICV leptin in rats increased AT(1a)R and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) mRNA in the subfornical organ and AT(1a)R mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, suggesting leptin-induced upregulation of the brain RAS in specific brain regions. To evaluate the role of de novo production of brain angiotensin II in SNA responses to leptin, we treated rats with captopril (12.5 ?g ICV). Captopril attenuated leptin effects on renal and BAT SNA. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that the brain RAS selectively facilitates renal and BAT sympathetic nerve responses to leptin while sparing effects on food intake. PMID:22610169

  7. A structure-activity analysis of the variation in oxime efficacy against nerve agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the variation in oxime efficacy of 2-PAM, obidoxime, HI-6 and ICD585 against nerve agents. In vivo oxime protection and in vitro oxime reactivation were used as indicators of oxime efficacy against VX, sarin, VR and cyclosarin. Analysis of in vivo oxime protection was conducted with oxime protective ratios (PR) from guinea pigs receiving oxime and atropine therapy after sc administration of nerve agent. Analysis of in vitro reactivation was conducted with second-order rate contants (kr2) for oxime reactivation of agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from guinea pig erythrocytes. In vivo oxime PR and in vitro kr2 decreased as the volume of the alkylmethylphosphonate moiety of nerve agents increased from VX to cyclosarin. This effect was greater with 2-PAM and obidoxime (> 14-fold decrease in PR) than with HI-6 and ICD585 (r2 as the volume of the agent moiety conjugated to AChE increased was consistent with a steric hindrance mechanism. Linear regression of log (PR-1) against log (kr2 · [oxime dose]) produced two offset parallel regression lines that delineated a significant difference between the coupling of oxime reactivation and oxime protection for HI-6 and ICD585 compared to 2-PAM and obidoxime. HI-6 and ICD585 appeared to be 6.8-fold more effective than 2-PAM and obidoxime at coupling oxime reactivation to oxime protection, which suggested that the isonicotinamide group that is common to both of these oximes, but absent from 2-PAM and obidoxime, is important for oxime efficacy

  8. Nerve regeneration in chitosan conduits and in autologous nerve grafts in healthy and in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Lena; Kodama, Akira; Lindwall-Blom, Charlotta; Dahlin, Lars B

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge about nerve regeneration after nerve injury and reconstruction in appropriate diabetic animal models is incomplete. Short-term nerve regeneration after reconstruction of a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect with either a hollow chitosan conduit or an autologous nerve graft was investigated in healthy Wistar and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. After 21 days, axonal outgrowth, the presence of activated and apoptotic Schwann cells and the thickness of the formed matrix in the conduits were measured. In general, nerve regeneration was superior in autologous nerve grafts. In chitosan conduits, a matrix, which was thicker in diabetic rats, was formed and was positively correlated with length of axonal outgrowth. Axonal outgrowth in conduits and in nerve grafts extended further in diabetic rats than in healthy rats. There was a higher percentage of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-immunostained cells in nerve segments from healthy rats than in diabetic rats after autologous nerve graft reconstruction. In chitosan conduits, more cleaved caspase 3-stained Schwann cells were generally observed in the matrix from the diabetic rats than in healthy rats. However, there were fewer apoptotic cells in the distal segment in diabetic rats reconstructed with a chitosan conduit. Preoperative glucose levels were positively correlated with axonal outgrowth after both reconstruction methods. Axonal regeneration was better in autologous nerve grafts than in hollow chitosan conduits and was enhanced in diabetic GK rats compared to healthy rats after reconstruction. This study provides insights into the nerve regeneration process in a clinically relevant diabetic animal model. PMID:26355640

  9. Local cutaneous nerve terminal and mast cell responses to manual acupuncture in acupoint LI4 area of the rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei-Ling; Xu, Dong-Sheng; Bai, Wan-Zhu; Cui, Jing-Jing; Shu, Hong-Ming; He, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Shi, Hong; Su, Yang-Shuai; Hu, Ling; Zhu, Bing; Jing, Xiang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the effects of manual acupuncture (MA) are contributed by collagen fibers and mast cells in local acupoints, at which acupuncture stimulation causes various afferent fiber groups to be excited. However what happens in local nerve fibers and mast cells after MA remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the response of cutaneous nerve fibers and mast cells to MA stimulation in acupoint Hegu (LI4). The contralateral LI4 of the same rat was used as a non-stimulated control. Immnohistochemistry analysis were carried out to observe the expression of histamine (HA), serotonin (5-HT) and nociceptive neuropeptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP), in the LI4 area. Mast cells were labeled with anti-mast cell tryptase antibody and simultaneously with HA or 5-HT primary antibodies to observe their co-expression. Our results showed that SP and CGRP were expressed more highly on the cutaneous nerve fibers of LI4 after MA stimulation than that of the control. Mast cells aggregated in close proximity to the blood vessels in intra-epidermis and dermis and some of them with degranulation in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissue of LI4. Both mast cells and their granules appeared with HA (+) and 5-HT (+) expression at stimulated L14 sites, while a few intact mast cells with a little expression of 5-HT and HA were distributed in areas of non-stimulated L14. The results indicated that local cutaneous nerve terminals and mast cells responded to MA with higher expression of SP and CGRP in nerve fibers, as well as with aggregation and degranulation of mast cells with HA and 5-HT granules at acupoint LI4. These neuroactive substances may convey signals to certain pathways that contribute to the effects of acupuncture. PMID:26148746

  10. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  11. Giant cell arteritis mimicking infiltrative leptomeningeal disease of the optic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornberg, Michael D; Ratchford, John N; Subramaniam, Rathan M; Probasco, John C

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented with several days of progressive, painless left eye vision loss. He reported mild jaw claudication but denied headache, scalp tenderness or constitutional symptoms. Examination revealed palpable temporal arteries, blurring of the left optic disc, and 20/100 vision in the left eye with mild relative afferent pupillary defect. Inflammatory markers were sent, and methylprednisolone was initiated for presumptive giant cell arteritis (GCA). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was normal, however, and C reactive protein was only mildly elevated, prompting further investigation. Orbital MRI revealed nodular enhancement of the optic nerve sheaths bilaterally from optic nerve head to chiasm, raising concern for an infiltrative leptomeningeal process such as sarcoidosis or lymphoma. Methylprednisolone was temporarily stopped while a broad work up for inflammatory and neoplastic causes was pursued. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ultimately revealed hypermetabolism in the temporal, ophthalmic and occipital arteries suggesting GCA, which was confirmed by temporal artery biopsy. Steroids were restarted, and the patient's vision stabilised. PMID:25858943

  12. Neuritin 1 promotes retinal ganglion cell survival and axonal regeneration following optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, T P; Liu, Y; Wordinger, R J; Pang, I-H; Clark, A F

    2015-01-01

    Neuritin 1 (Nrn1) is an extracellular glycophosphatidylinositol-linked protein that stimulates axonal plasticity, dendritic arborization and synapse maturation in the central nervous system (CNS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of Nrn1 on axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vitro and on the in vivo optic nerve crush (ONC) mouse model. Axotomized cultured RGCs treated with recombinant hNRN1 significantly increased survival of RGCs by 21% (n=6-7, Pdpc) (n=6, Pprotein transduction group. Significantly elevated levels of RGC marker, RNA binding protein with multiple splicing (Rbpms; 73%, n=5-8, Pprotein 43 (Gap43; 36%, n=3, Pdpc in the retinas of the treatment group compared with the control group. Significant increase in Gap43 (100%, n=5-6, P<0.05) expression was observed within the optic nerves of the AAV2-hNRN1 group compared to controls. In conclusion, Nrn1 exhibited neuroprotective, regenerative effects and preserved RGC function on axotomized RGCs in vitro and after axonal injury in vivo. Nrn1 is a potential therapeutic target for CNS neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25719245

  13. The search of the target of promotion: Phenylbenzoate esterase activities in hen peripheral nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain esterase inhibitors, such as carbamates, phosphinates and sulfonyl halides, do not cause neuropathy as some organophosphates, but they may exacerbate chemical or traumatic insults to axons. This phenomenon is called promotion of axonopathies. Given the biochemical and toxicological characteristics of these compounds, the hypothesis was made that the target of promotion is a phenyl valerate (PV) esterase similar to neuropathy target esterase (NTE), the target of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy. However, attempts to identify a PV esterase in hen peripheral nerve have been, so far, unsuccessful. We tested several esters, other than PV, as substrates of esterases from crude homogenate of the hen peripheral nerve. The ideal substrate should be poorly hydrolysed by NTE but extensively by enzyme(s) that are insensitive to non-promoters, such as mipafox, and sensitive to promoters, such as phenyl methane sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). When phenyl benzoate (PB) was used as substrate, about 65% of total activity was resistant to the non-promoter mipafox (up to 0.5 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0), that inhibits NTE and other esterases. More than 90% of this resistant activity was sensitive to the classical promoter PMSF (1 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0) with an IC50 of about 0.08 mM (20 min, pH 8.0). On the contrary, the non-promoter p-toluene sulfonyl fluoride caused only about 10% inhibition at 0.5 mM. Several esterase inhibitors including, paraoxon, phenyl benzyl carbamate, di-n-butyl dichlorovinyl phosphate and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, were tested both in vitro and in vivo for inhibition of this PB activity. Mipafox-resistant PMSF-sensitive PB esterase activity(ies) was inhibited by promoters but not by non promoters and neuropathic compounds

  14. PACAP and VIP affect NF1 expression in rat malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Salvatore; Castorina, Alessandro; Adorno, Alexander; Mazzone, Venera; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; D'Agata, Velia

    2010-02-01

    In our previous study we have identified PACAP, VIP and their receptors in rat malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells, thus showing anti-apoptotic roles. Recently it has been shown that the tumor suppressor neurofibromin, encoded by the Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) gene, promotes MPNST cells sensitivity to apoptosis after serum withdrawal. In the present study we investigated whether PACAP or VIP negatively regulate NF1 expression under normal or serum-dependent pro-apoptotic culture conditions. Results indicated that serum itself significantly influenced gene and protein levels. In fact, the low NF1 levels of cells cultured in normal serum-containing medium were remarkably increased in cells switched to low- or no-serum after 24h and 48 h. Treatment with 100 nM PACAP or VIP did not affect NF1 expression when using normal amounts of serum, whereas it significantly inhibited transcript and protein levels both in low- or no-serum cultured cells. In particular, PACAP reduced NF1 levels already after 24h in low-serum cultured cells, while VIP showed a similar effect only after serum deprivation. However, both PACAP and VIP downregulated gene and protein levels within 48 h either in low-dose and serum-starved cells. Results were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, showing that 100 nM PACAP or VIP attenuated neurofibromin cytoplasmic localization only in low- or no-serum cultured cells. The present study provides a comprehensive analysis of both neuropeptides effect on NF1 expression in normal, low- or serum-starved MPNST cells, ameliorating the hypothesis that resistance to apoptosis in serum-deprived cells might be correlated to PACAP-/VIP-induced NF1 inhibition. PMID:19919880

  15. Hypoglossal nerve paralysis results in hypermetabolic activity on positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the contralateral tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbang, Mary R; Trosman, Samuel J; Lorenz, Robert R

    2015-06-01

    False-positive results on combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography can complicate detection and surveillance of head and neck cancers. We present a rare case of false-positive contralateral [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose tongue uptake after hypoglossal nerve paralysis caused by squamous cell carcinoma originating from the base of the tongue. PMID:25825133

  16. Leptin into the rostral ventral lateral medulla (RVLM augments renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MariaJBarnes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a hormone released from adipose tissue. While this hormone normally acts to reduce feeding behavior and increase energy expenditure, in obesity, resistance to these effects occurs even though the hormone is released in large amounts. Although leptin no longer works to suppress feeding in the obese, leptin retains its potent effects on other autonomic functions such as blood pressure regulation. Leptin has been associated with hypertension and increased sympathetic autonomic activity. Therefore, leptin is emerging as a major contributor to the hypertensive state observed in obesity. Sympathetic control of blood pressure is maintained principally by autonomic reflex control circuits in the caudal brainstem. The rostral ventral-lateral medulla (RVLM is the primary regulator of the sympathetic nervous system, sending excitatory fibers to sympathetic preganglionic neurons to regulate sympathetic control over resistance vessels and blood pressure. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that neurons in the ventral lateral medulla express leptin receptors (ObRb. Our present study using pseudo-rabies multi-synaptic retrograde tract tracing and immunohistochemical methods revealed that neurons within the RVLM that send sympathetic projections to the kidney express leptin receptors. Acute microinjection of leptin (1 and 3µg; 40nL into the RVLM evoked a significant increase in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. When the 3µg dose of leptin was preceded with a leptin antagonist, (SLAN-4; 1ng, it attenuated the cardiovascular response of leptin. Taken together, these data suggest that leptin’s actions within the RVLM may influence blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity.

  17. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Tornøe, Jens; Juliusson, Bengt; Torp, Malene; Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies; Nielsen, Mette S; Handberg, Aase; Sørensen, Jens Christian H.; Wahlberg, Lars U

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device, capable of local delivery of NGF. The clinical device, named NsG0202, houses an NGF-secreting cell line (NGC-0295), which is derived from a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, stably genetical...

  18. Cellular Localization of the Molecular Forms of Acetylcholinesterase in rat Pheochromocytoma Pc12 Cells Treated with Nerve Growth Factor1

    OpenAIRE

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Reiness, C. Gary; Reichardt, Louis F.; Hall, Zach W.

    1981-01-01

    In rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells treated with nerve growth factor (NGF), there are several molecular forms of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which sediment on sucrose density gradients at 4 to 6, 10, and 16 S, respectively. We have investigated the cellular localization of these forms in PC12 cells. In order to determine which forms are soluble and which are membrane bound, we extracted PC12 cells in buffers of various ionic strengths and detergent compositions. To distinguish int...

  19. Synchronized reconstitution of muscle fibers, peripheral nerves and blood vessels by murine skeletal muscle-derived CD34(-)/45 (-) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-10-01

    In order to establish the practical isolation and usage of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs), we determined reconstitution capacity of CD34(-)/CD45(-) (Sk-DN) cells as a candidate somatic stem cell source for transplantation. Sk-DN cells were enzymatically isolated from GFP transgenic mice (C57/BL6N) skeletal muscle and sorted using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), and expanded by collagen gel-based cell culture with bFGF and EGF. The number of Sk-DN cells was small after sorting (2-8 x 10(4)); however, the number increased 10-20 fold (2-16 x 10(5)) after 6 days of expansion culture, and the cells maintained immature state and multipotency, expressing mRNAs for mesodermal and ectodermal cell lineages. Transplantation of expanded Sk-DN cells into the severe muscle damage model (C57/BL6N wild-type) resulted in the synchronized reconstitution of blood vessels, peripheral nerves and muscle fibers following significant recovery of total muscle mass (57%) and contractile function (55%), whereas the non-cell-transplanted control group showed around 20% recovery in both factors. These reconstitution capacities were supported by the intrinsic plasticity of Sk-DN cells that can differentiate into muscular (skeletal muscle), vascular (pericyte, endothelial cell and smooth muscle) and peripheral nerve (Schwann cells and perineurium) cell lineages that was revealed by transplantation to non-muscle tissue (beneath renal capsule) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. PMID:17762938

  20. Release of chemical transmitters from cell bodies and dendrites of nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Nicholls, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Papers in this issue concern extrasynaptic transmission, namely release of signalling molecules by exocytosis or diffusion from neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, axons and glia. Problems discussed concern the molecules, their secretion and importance for normal function and disease. Molecules secreted extrasynaptically include transmitters, peptides, hormones and nitric oxide. For extrasynaptic secretion, trains of action potentials are required, and the time course of release is slower than at synapses. Questions arise concerning the mechanism of extrasynaptic secretion: how does it differ from the release observed at synaptic terminals and gland cells? What kinds of vesicles take part? Is release accomplished through calcium entry, SNAP and SNARE proteins? A clear difference is in the role of molecules released synaptically and extrasynaptically. After extrasynaptic release, molecules reach distant as well as nearby cells, and thereby produce long-lasting changes over large volumes of brain. Such changes can affect circuits for motor performance and mood states. An example with clinical relevance is dyskinesia of patients treated with l-DOPA for Parkinson's disease. Extrasynaptically released transmitters also evoke responses in glial cells, which in turn release molecules that cause local vasodilatation and enhanced circulation in regions of the brain that are active. PMID:26009760

  1. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis and clathrin-dependent endocytosis replenish specific synaptic vesicle pools in central nerve terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Giselle; Jupp, Orla J.; Cousin, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Multiple synaptic vesicle (SV) retrieval modes exist in central nerve terminals to maintain a continual supply of SVs for neurotransmission. Two such modes are clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), which is dominant during mild neuronal activity and activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE), which is dominant during intense neuronal activity. However little is known about how activation of these SV retrieval modes impact on the replenishment of the total SV recycling pool and the pools that r...

  2. FGF21 acts centrally to induce sympathetic nerve activity, energy expenditure, and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Bryn M; Ding, Xunshan; Morgan, Donald A; Coate, Katie Colbert; Bookout, Angie L; Rahmouni, Kamal; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism by which pharmacologic administration of the hormone FGF21 increases energy expenditure to cause weight loss in obese animals is unknown. Here we report that FGF21 acts centrally to exert its effects on energy expenditure and body weight in obese mice. Using tissue-specific knockout mice, we show that ?Klotho, the obligate coreceptor for FGF21, is required in the nervous system for these effects. FGF21 stimulates sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue through a mechanism that depends on the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor. Our findings provide an unexpected mechanistic explanation for the strong pharmacologic effects of FGF21 on energy expenditure and weight loss in obese animals. PMID:25130400

  3. Transcriptional startpoints and methylation patterns in the PMP22 promoters of peripheral nerve, leukocytes and tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huehne, K; Rautenstrauss, B

    2001-06-01

    PMP22 is a dosage sensitive gene responsible for Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathy and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). PMP22 is expressed in myelinating Schwann cells in the peripheral nerve, but also in a variety of other tissues. PMP22 expression is regulated by alternatively used promoters, the relative expression of the different PMP22 transcripts is tissue-specific. At first we analysed the transcriptional startpoints of the different PMP22 transcripts. Transcript 1A starts from a distinct nucleotide, whereas transcript 1B and the here described transcript 1C revealed multiple transcriptional startpoints in sciatic nerve as well as in the osteosarcoma and glioblastoma cell lines, RH30 and SF763. Using promoter specific primers we identified transcripts from each of the three promoters in sciatic nerve and RH30, whereas transcript 1B is absent in SF763. Leukocytes do not express PMP22 at all. Additionally, we determined the methylation pattern of CpG islands present in the PMP22 promoters 1B and 1C for leukocytes, sciatic nerve, SF763 and RH30, the latter carrying multiple copies of the PMP22 gene. We observed that there was no methylation in promoter 1B and 1C in sciatic nerve and leukocytes. However, hypermethylation of promoter 1B was discovered in SF763 and indicates a silencing effect. In RH30 most copies of promoters 1B and 1C were methylated but the few remaining hypomethylated copies were sufficient for strong expression of PMP22. These results indicate that the transcriptional control in tumor cell lines is probably different from leukocytes and sciatic nerve. PMID:11351283

  4. Effects of acrylamide on subcellular distribution of elements in rat sciatic nerve myelinated axons and Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, R M; Castiglia, C M; Lehning, E; Saubermann, A J

    1993-04-16

    Electron probe X-ray microanalysis was used to determine whether experimental acrylamide (ACR) neuropathy involves deregulation of subcellular elements (Na, P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Mg) and water in Schwann cells and small, medium and large diameter myelinated axons of rat sciatic nerve. Results show that in proximal but not distal sciatic nerve, ACR treatment (2.8 mM in drinking water) was associated with an early (15 days of exposure), moderate increase in mean axoplasmic K concentrations (mmol/kg) of medium and small diameter fibers. However, all axons in proximal and distal nerve regions displayed small increases in dry and wet weight contents of axoplasmic Na and P. As ACR treatment progressed (up to 60 days of exposure), Na and P changes persisted whereas proximal axonal K levels returned to control values or below. Alterations in mitochondrial elemental content paralleled those occurring in axoplasm. Schwann cells in distal sciatic nerve exhibited a progressive loss of K, Mg and P and an increase in Na, Cl and Ca. Proximal glia displayed less extensive elemental modifications. Elemental changes observed in axons are not typical of those associated with cell injury and might reflect compensatory or secondary responses. In contrast, distal Schwann cell alterations are consistent with injury, but whether these changes represent primary or secondary mechanisms remains to be determined. PMID:8495358

  5. Intermittent low-level vagosympathetic nerve trunk stimulation inhibits ganglionated plexi activity to prevent atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yanmei; Sun, Juan; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Qingquan; Zhou, Xianhui; LI, Jinxin; Zhang, Yu; TANG, BAOPENG

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cardiac autonomic nervous system (CANS) plays a role in the occurrence and persistence of atrial fibrillation (AF). Low-level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (LL-VNS) has been shown to inhibit the occurrence of AF. Objective: The novel objective of this study was to compare the effects of intermittent low- level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (I-VNS) and continuous low-level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (C-VNS). Methods: 19 beagles were randomly divided into 3 groups...

  6. Ipsilateral cortical fMRI responses after peripheral nerve damage in rats reflect increased interneuron activity

    OpenAIRE

    Pelled, Galit; Bergstrom, Debra A.; Tierney, Patrick L.; Conroy, Richard S.; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Yu, David; Leopold, David A.; Walters, Judith R.; Koretsky, Alan P

    2009-01-01

    In the weeks following unilateral peripheral nerve injury, the deprived primary somatosensory cortex (SI) responds to stimulation of the ipsilateral intact limb as demonstrated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses. The neuronal basis of these responses was studied by using high-resolution fMRI, in vivo electrophysiological recordings, and juxtacellular neuronal labeling in rats that underwent an excision of the forepaw radial, median, and ulnar nerves. These nerves were e...

  7. Protection of ginsenoside Rg1 on central nerve cell damage and the influence on neuron apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; He, Li; Cui, Bingzhou; Lv, Haixin

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to verify the function of ginsenoside in the repair of peripheral nerve injury through the model of sciatic nerve injury in rat. The method was to prepare the model of SD rat injury of sciatic nerve, and to conduct treatment with different dose of ginsenoside Rg1. At the same time, the control group was established. The regenerative repair, functional recovery and the situation of target organ, etc. were evaluated by neuromorphic metrology index, fluorescence gold retrograde tag, animal behavior index (sciatic nerve index). The result was the situation of nerve regenerative repair and functional recovery in high dose ginsenoside Rg1 group was obviously superior to other groups, the recovery of sciatic nerve index, target muscle, etc. were fine and mostly close to normal. It was concluded that ginsenoside Rg1 could effectively promote the regenerative repair of peripheral nerve injury, and accelerate the recovery of its nerve function. It could also promote the regeneration of peripheral nerve and the recovery of its nerve function. PMID:25410069

  8. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central

  9. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiradentes, R.V. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Silva, N.F. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Ramage, A.G. [Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Futuro, H.A. Neto [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  10. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    R.V., Tiradentes; J.G.P., Pires; N.F., Silva; A.G., Ramage; C.H., Santuzzi; H.A., Futuro Neto.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full [...] antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  11. Edaravone promotes functional recovery after mechanical peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Li, Zhengwei; Dong, Jianli; Nan, Feng; Li, Tao; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Edaravone has been shown to reduce ischemia/reperfusion-induced peripheral nerve injury. However, the therapeutic effect of edaravone on peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors is unknown. In the present study, we established a peripheral nerve injury model by crushing the sciatic nerve using hemostatic forceps, and then administered edaravone 3 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The sciatic functional index and superoxide dismutase activity of the sciatic nerve were increased, and the malondialdehyde level was decreased in animals in the edaravone group compared with those in the model group. Bcl-2 expression was increased, but Bax expression was decreased in anterior horn cells of the L4-6 spinal cord segments. These results indicated that edaravone has a neuroprotective effect following peripheral nerve injury caused by mechanical factors through alleviating free radical damage to cells and inhibiting lipid peroxidation, as well as regulating apoptosis-related protein expression. PMID:25374594

  12. Patterns of lipofuscin accumulation in ganglionic nerve cells of superior cervical ganglion in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živkovi? Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Considering available literature lipofuscin is a classical age pigment of postmitotic cells, and a consistently recognized phenomenon in humans and animals. Lipofuscin accumulation is characteristic for nerve cells that are postmitotic. This research was focused on lipofuscin accumulation in ganglionic cells (GC (postganglionic sympathetic cell bodies of superior cervical ganglion in humans during ageing. Methods. We analysed 30 ganglions from cadavers ranging from 20 to over 80 years of age. As material the tissue samples were used from the middle portion of the ganglion, which was separated from the surrounding tissue by the method of macrodissection. The tissue samples were routinely fixed in 10% neutral formalin and embedded in paraffin for classical histological analysis, then three consecutive (successive sections 5 ?m thick were made and stained with hematoxylin and eosin method (HE, silver impregnation technique by Masson Fontana and trichrome stain by Florantin. Results. Immersion microscopy was used to analyse patterns of lipofuscin accumulation during ageing making possible to distinguish diffuse type (lipofuscin granules were irregularly distributed and non-confluent, unipolar type (lipofuscin granules were grouped at the end of the cell, bipolar type (lipofuscin granules were concentrated at the two opposite ends of a cell with the nucleus in between at the center of a cell, annular type (lipofuscin granules were in the shape of a complete or incomplete ring around the nucleus and a cell completely filled with lipofuscin (two subtypes distinguishing, one with visible a nucleus, and the other with invisible one. Even at the age of 20 there were cells with lipofuscin granules accumulated in diffuse way, but in smaller numbers; the GC without lipofuscin were dominant. Growing older, especially above 60 years, all of the above mentioned patterns of lipofuscin accumulation were present with the evident increase in cells completely filled with lipofuscin, but cells without lipofuscin were also present even in the oldest persons. Conclusion. Lipofuscin is present in all periods of ageing with a different intensity of accumulation. GC without the pigment, diffusely distributed, as well as very rare cells with a unipolar type of lipofuscin distribution are characteristic for the age of 20- 60 years. In the age above 60 years, except the cells without pigment and diffuse accumulation type, there are also bipolar and annular types and forms in which cells are completely filled with lipofuscin granules.

  13. CD11b+GR1+ Myeloid Cells Secrete NGF and Promote Trigeminal Ganglion Neurite Growth: Implications for Corneal Nerve Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Joy; Chaudhary, Shweta; Jassim, Sarmad H.; Ozturk, Okan; Chamon, Wallace; Ganesh, Balaji; Tibrewal, Sapna; Gandhi, Sonal; Byun, Yong-Soo; Hallak, Joelle; Mahmud, Dolores L.; Mahmud, Nadim; Rondelli, Damiano; Jain, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    CD11b+GR1+ myeloid cells have immunophenotypic characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). They secrete NGF and promote neuroregeneration. They may have a beneficial role in repairing diseased or injured corneal nerves.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of acrylamide in nerve growth factor or fibroblast growth factor 1-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jong-Hang; Lee, Don-Ching; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2014-03-01

    Acrylamide is a neurological and reproductive toxicant in humans and laboratory animals; however, the neuron developmental toxicity of acrylamide remains unclear. The aims of this study are to investigate the cytotoxicity and neurite outgrowth inhibition of acrylamide in nerve growth factor (NGF)- or fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1)-mediated neural development of PC12 cells. MTS assay showed that acrylamide treatment suppresses NGF- or FGF1-induced PC12 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Quantification of neurite outgrowth demonstrated that 0.5 mM acrylamide treatment resulted in significant decrease in differentiation of NGF- or FGF1-stimulated PC12 cells. This decrease is accompanied with the reduced expression of growth-associated protein-43, a neuronal marker. Moreover, relative levels of pERK, pAKT, pSTAT3 and pCREB were increased within 5-10 min when PC12 cells were treated with NGF or FGF1. Acrylamide (0.5 mM) decreases the NGF-induced activation of AKT-CREB but not ERK-STAT3 within 20 min. Similarly, acrylamide (0.5 mM) decreases the FGF1-induced activation of AKT-CREB within 20 min. In contrast to the NGF treatment, the ERK-STAT3 activation that was induced by FGF1 was slightly reduced by 0.5 mM acrylamide. We further showed that PI3K inhibitor (LY294002), but not MEK inhibitor (U0126), could synergize with acrylamide (0.5 mM) to reduce the cell viability and neurite outgrowth in NGF- or FGF1-stimulated PC12 cells. Moreover, acrylamide (0.5 mM) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) activities in NGF- or FGF1-stimulated PC12 cells. This increase was reversed by Trolox (an ROS scavenging agent) co-treatment. Together, our findings reveal that NGF- or FGF1-stimulation of the neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells is attenuated by acrylamide through the inhibition of PI3K-AKT-CREB signaling, along with the production of ROS. PMID:24318646

  15. Electrochemical Measurements of Optogenetically Stimulated Quantal Amine Release from Single Nerve Cell Varicosities in Drosophila Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Soodabeh; Berglund, E Carina; Dunevall, Johan; Oleinick, Alexander I; Amatore, Christian; Krantz, David E; Ewing, Andrew G

    2015-11-01

    The nerve terminals found in the body wall of Drosophila melanogaster larvae are readily accessible to experimental manipulation. We used the light-activated ion channel, channelrhodopsin-2, which is expressed by genetic manipulation in Type?II varicosities to study octopamine release in Drosophila. We report the development of a method to measure neurotransmitter release from exocytosis events at individual varicosities in the Drosophila larval system by amperometry. A microelectrode was placed in a region of the muscle containing a varicosity and held at a potential sufficient to oxidize octopamine and the terminal stimulated by blue light. Optical stimulation of Type?II boutons evokes exocytosis of octopamine, which is detected through oxidization at the electrode surface. We observe 22700±4200 molecules of octopamine released per vesicle. This system provides a genetically accessible platform to study the regulation of amine release at an intact synapse. PMID:26387683

  16. Sacral nerve stimulation increases activation of the primary somatosensory cortex by anal canal stimulation in an experimental model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, K M

    2011-08-01

    Sacral and posterior tibial nerve stimulation may be used to treat faecal incontinence; however, the mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether sensory activation of the cerebral cortex by anal canal stimulation was increased by peripheral neuromodulation.

  17. Effect of Atorvastatin vs. Rosuvastatin on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in non-diabetic patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of statin therapy on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have not previously been evaluated. To compare the effects of lipophilic atorvastatin and hydrophilic rosuvastatin on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in CHF patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 63 stable outpatients with DCM, who were already receiving standard therapy for CHF, were randomized to atorvastatin (n=32) or rosuvastatin (n=31). We evaluated cardiac sympathetic nerve activity by cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, hemodynamic parameters and neurohumoral factors before and after 6 months of treatment. There were no differences in the baseline characteristics of the 2 groups. In the rosuvastatin group, there were no changes in MIBG parameters, left ventricular ejection fraction or plasma levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) after 6 months of treatment. In contrast, the atorvastatin group showed a significant increase in the delayed heart/mediastinum count ratio (2.18±0.4 vs. 2.36±0.4, P<0.0001), and the washout rate was significantly decreased (34.8±5.7 vs. 32.6±6.3%, P=0.0001) after 6 months of treatment compared with the baseline values. The plasma NT-proBNP level was also significantly decreased (729±858 vs. 558±747 pg/ml, P=0.0139). Lipophilic atorvastatin but not hydrophilic rosuvastatin improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in CHF patients with DCM. (author)

  18. Leptin receptor signaling in the hypothalamus regulates hepatic autonomic nerve activity via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Morgan, Donald A; Kurata, Yasutaka; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-01-14

    Leptin action in the brain has emerged as an important regulator of liver function independently from its effects on food intake and body weight. The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in the regulation of physiological processes by leptin. Here, we used direct recording of nerve activity from sympathetic or vagal nerves subserving the liver to investigate how brain action of leptin controls hepatic autonomic nerve activity. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of leptin activated hepatic sympathetic traffic in rats and mice in dose- and receptor-dependent manners. The hepatic sympatho-excitatory effects of leptin were also observed when leptin was microinjected directly into the arcuate nucleus (ARC), but not into the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). Moreover, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that leptin-induced increase in hepatic sympathetic outflow depends on PI3K but not AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), STAT3, or ERK1/2. Interestingly, ICV leptin also increased hepatic vagal nerve activity in rats. We show that this response is reproduced by intra-ARC, but not intra-VMH, leptin administration and requires PI3K and AMPK. We conclude that central leptin signaling conveys the information to the liver through the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. Our data also provide important insight into the molecular events underlying leptin's control of hepatic autonomic nerve activity by implicating PI3K and AMPK pathways. PMID:25589743

  19. Design, synthesis, and potent antiepileptic activity with latent nerve rehabilitation of novel ?-aminobutyric acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dian; Ma, Jing; Shi, Xiuxiao; Zhao, Chunyan; Hou, Meng; Guo, Qingxin; Ma, Shangxian; Li, Xiaojun; Zhao, Peicheng; Liu, Wenhu; Yang, Zhuqing; Mou, Jianping; Song, Pengfei; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to design and synthesize novel ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivatives with the combination of aspirin (ASA) of nerve rehabilitative pharmacophores so as to develop multifunctional drugs useful in the treatment of neurological disorders. Twenty-four novel esters and amides of 1a were synthesized, biologically evaluated for antiepileptic activity with the model of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and tested for their capacity of penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with HPLC. The distribution of 8a, ASA freed by 8a, 7c, and ASA freed by 7c within 24 h in brain tissue was measured. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) was established and the data of Computer Aided Drug Design (CADD) showed good results. With ED50 values of 0.3684-0.5199 mmol/kg, LD50 1.1487-1.3944 mmol/kg, and therapeutic index (TI) 2.65-3.15, compounds 8a, 3b, 4b, 6c, and 7c exhibited better antiepileptic activities in multiples of 0.3 to 2.2 against the control sodium valproate (VPA). Most importantly, 8a and 7c exhibited excellent antiepileptic activities with TI values of 3.15 and 3.12, respectively. PMID:25047422

  20. Muscle pain perception and sympathetic nerve activity to exercise during opioid modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; O'Connor, P. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of the endogenous opioid system on forearm muscle pain and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during dynamic fatiguing exercise. Twelve college-age men (24 +/- 4 yr) performed graded (1-min stages; 30 contractions/min) handgrip to fatigue 1 h after the ingestion of either 60 mg codeine, 50 mg naltrexone, or placebo. Pain (0-10 scale) and exertion (0-10 and 6-20 scales) intensities were measured during the last 15 s of each minute of exercise and every 15 s during recovery. MSNA was measured continuously from the peroneal nerve in the left leg. Pain threshold occurred earlier [1.8 +/- 1, 2. 2 +/- 1, 2.2 +/- 1 J: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively] and was associated with a lower rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (2.7 +/- 2, 3.6 +/- 2, 3.8 +/- 2: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively) in the codeine condition compared with either the naltrexone or placebo conditions. There were no main effects (i.e., drugs) or interaction (i.e., drugs x time) for either forearm muscle pain or RPE during exercise [pain: F (2, 22) = 0.69, P = 0.51]. There was no effect of drug on MSNA, heart rate, or blood pressure during baseline, exercise, or recovery. Peak exercise MSNA responses were 21 +/- 1, 21 +/- 2.0, and 21 +/- 2.0 bursts/30 s for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. Peak mean arterial pressure responses were 135 +/- 4, 131 +/- 3, and 132 +/- 4 mmHg for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. It is concluded that neither 60 mg codeine nor 50 mg naltrexone has an effect on forearm muscle pain, exertion, or MSNA during high- intensity handgrip to fatigue.

  1. Classic Ras Proteins Promote Proliferation and Survival via Distinct Phosphoproteome Alterations in Neurofibromin-Null Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, Nicole M; Prechtl, Amanda M; Longo, Jody Fromm; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S; Byer, Stephanie J; Brosius, Stephanie N; Carroll, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Neurofibromin, the tumor suppressor encoded by the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, potentially suppresses the activation of H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras. However, it is not known whether these classic Ras proteins are hyperactivated in NF1-null nerve sheath tumors, how they contribute to tumorigenesis, and what signaling pathways mediate their effects. Here we show that H-Ras, N-Ras, and K-Ras are coexpressed with their activators (guanine nucleotide exchange factors) in neurofibromin-null malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells, and that all 3 Ras proteins are activated. Dominant negative (DN) H-Ras, a pan-inhibitor of the classic Ras family, inhibited MPNST proliferation and survival, but not migration. However, NF1-null MPNST cells were variably dependent on individual Ras proteins. In some lines, ablation of H-Ras, N-Ras, and/or K-Ras inhibited mitogenesis. In others, ablation of a single Ras protein had no effect on proliferation; in these lines, ablation of a single Ras protein resulted in compensatory increases in the activation and/or expression of other Ras proteins. Using mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified 7 signaling networks affecting morphology, proliferation, and survival that are regulated by DN H-Ras. Thus, neurofibromin loss activates multiple classic Ras proteins that promote proliferation and survival by regulating several distinct signaling cascades. PMID:25946318

  2. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N Weiss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we present the results of a single patient with optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS. SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and is the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date- www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867. SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the treatment of optic nerve and retinal diseases. Pre- and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams were independently performed at the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, USA. A 27 year old female patient had lost vision approximately 5 years prior to enrollment in SCOTS. Pre-treatment best-corrected visual acuity at the Wilmer Eye Institute was 20/800 Right Eye (OD and 20/4,000 Left Eye (OS. Four months following treatment in SCOTS, the central visual acuity had improved to 20/100 OD and 20/40 OS.

  3. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-?-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-?-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  4. Stereology and ultrastructure of chronic phase axonal and cell soma pathology in stretch-injured central nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Sulaiman, Ahmed; Denman, Nicola; Buchanan, Shaun; Porter, Nicola; Vijay, Sauparnika; Vesi, Sauparnika; Sharpe, Rachel; Graham, David I; Maxwell, William L

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggests that with survival after human traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is ongoing loss of white and grey matter from the injured brain during the chronic phase. However; direct quantitative experimental evidence in support of this observation is lacking. Using the guinea pig stretch-injury optic nerve model, quantitative evidence by stereology of damage to the optic nerve and retina was sought. Stretch injury was applied to the right optic nerve of 15 adult male guinea pigs. Three animals each at 1, 2, 3, 8, or 12 weeks' survival were killed and prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The estimated number of intact and injured axons within bins of transverse diameters 0-0.5, 0.51-1.0, 1.01-1.5, 1.51-2.0, 2.01-2.5, and 2.51-3.0??m in the middle segment of each injured optic nerve and from 5 control animals were compared across all survival time points. The estimated numbers of intact and pyknotic retinal ganglion cells from the same animals were also compared. Loss of myelinated fibers continued throughout the experimental period. The most rapid loss was of the largest fibers; loss of intermediate-sized fibers continued, but the numbers of the smallest fibers increased from 3 weeks onward. There was hypertrophy and proliferation of glial cells within the surrounding neuropil. A relatively low-grade loss of retinal ganglion cells occurred throughout the experiment, with about 60% remaining at 12 weeks' survival. We provide quantitative evidence that after traumatic axonal injury (TAI) there is a continuing loss of nerve fibers and their cell bodies from a CNS tract over a 3-month post-traumatic interval. PMID:21190396

  5. Active skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response in the hand following nerve injury and repair in human upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Aidong; Liu, Dan; Gu, Chen; Gu, Xiaosong; Gu, Jianhui; Hu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstriction/vasodilatation occurs in response to whole body and local cooling/heating, and the vasomotor activities play a pivotal role in thermal control of the human body. The mechanisms underlying regulation of skin blood flow involve both neurogenic and humeral/local chemical influence, contributing to the initial response to thermal stimuli and the prolonged phase of response, respectively. Previous studies have suggested the impairment of cutaneous thermal regulation after nerve injury. However, the evidence regarding how the skin perfusion and thermoregulatory response evolve after nerve injury and repair remains limited. Here we observed, by utilizing laser-Doppler perfusion imaging, baseline skin perfusion and perfusion change in response to thermal stimuli after median and ulnar nerve injury, and the results showed that baseline perfusion in autonomous skin area profoundly decreased and active rewarming after clod stress dramatically diminished before sensory recovery of the skin became detectable. In addition, baseline cutaneous perfusion was recovered as the skin regained touch sensation, and exhibited positive correlation to touch sensibility of the skin. These data indicate that both active perfusion and thermoregulatory response of the skin are markedly compromised during skin denervation and can be recovered by re-innervation. This suggests the importance of timely repair of injured nerve, especially in the practice of replantation. PMID:26529641

  6. Cell Proliferation and Interleukin-6–Type Cytokine Signaling Are Implicated by Gene Expression Responses in Early Optic Nerve Head Injury in Rat Glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Elaine C; Doser, Thomas A.; Cepurna, William O.; Dyck, Jennifer A.; Jia, Lijun; Guo, Ying; Lambert, Wendi S.; Morrison, John C

    2011-01-01

    Although the optic nerve head is the likely site of axonal injury in glaucoma, little is known about the initial cellular responses to elevated intraocular pressure exposure. The authors used microarray analysis and their rat glaucoma model to identify cell proliferation and potential interleukin-6 type cytokine signaling as important early nerve head responses.

  7. Electroactive biodegradable polyurethane significantly enhanced Schwann cells myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaobin; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Shao, Yongpin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-05-01

    Myelination of Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for the success of peripheral nerve regeneration, and biomaterials that can promote SCs' neurotrophin secretion as scaffolds are beneficial for nerve repair. Here we present a biomaterials-approach, specifically, a highly tunable conductive biodegradable flexible polyurethane by polycondensation of poly(glycerol sebacate) and aniline pentamer, to significantly enhance SCs' myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering. SCs are cultured on these conductive polymer films, and the biocompatibility of these films and their ability to enhance myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion are successfully demonstrated. The mechanism of SCs' neurotrophin secretion on conductive films is demonstrated by investigating the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) level and SCs' myelination. Furthermore, the neurite growth and elongation of PC12 cells are induced by adding the neurotrophin medium suspension produced from SCs-laden conductive films. These data suggest that these conductive degradable polyurethanes that enhance SCs' myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion perform great potential for nerve regeneration applications. PMID:26897537

  8. Malignant peripheral nerve cell sheath tumour of the upper lip: a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ward

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST that developed on the upper lip of an 86 year old woman. MPNSTs are highly aggressive sarcomas that very rarely occur in the face. We know of no other reported cases of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour arising from the upper lip.

  9. Role of bone marrow derived pluripotent stem cells in peripheral nerve repair in adult rats: A morphometric evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh S Kurwale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of the effect of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNC on early and late phase of nerve regeneration in rat sciatic nerve model. Materials and Methods: Sciatic nerve transection and repair was performed in 50 inbred female Wistar albino rats divided equally in two groups. In the test group the gap was filled with BM-MNCs obtained from the two male rats and fibrin sealant, while in the control group only fibrin sealant was used. Sciatic nerve was harvested at 15 days and at 60 days interval. Parameters of regeneration were assessed at anastomosis (G, intermediate distal (C, and distal site (A. Semi-quantitative (histopathological and quantitative (morphometric parameters were analyzed. Results: At 15 days there was a statistically significant difference found in mean axon diameter, mean nerve thickness and myelin thickness at the repair site (P < 0.05. However, in the distal areas, the axons were sparse and myelin rings were very thin in both the groups. At 60 days, the difference in above-mentioned parameters was statistically significant at the distal most sites. FISH assay confirmed the presence of Y chromosome, confirming the presence of BM-MNCs from the male rats. Conclusions: Transplanting BM-MNC S at the site of peripheral nerve injury leads to significantly better recovery. These differences were evident at the repair site and at the intermediate distal site at 15 days and at the distal most sites at 60 days. With practically no ethical issue regarding their isolation and application, they can be easily used for clinical trials.

  10. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  11. Regulation of sympathetic nerve activity during the cold pressor test in normotensive pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Charlotte W; Wakefield, Paige K; Skow, Rachel J; Stickland, Michael K; Chari, Radha S; Julian, Colleen G; Steinback, Craig D; Davenport, Margie H

    2015-10-01

    Baseline neurovascular transduction is reduced in normotensive pregnancy; however, little is known about changes to neurovascular transduction during periods of heightened sympathetic activation. We tested the hypothesis that, despite an exacerbated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) response to cold pressor stimulation, the blunting of neurovascular transduction in normotensive pregnant women would result in similar changes in vascular resistance and mean arterial pressure (Finometer) relative to nonpregnant controls. Baseline neurovascular transduction was reduced in pregnant women relative to controls when expressed as the quotient of both total resistance and mean arterial pressure and sympathetic burst frequency (0.32±0.07 versus 0.58±0.16 mm Hg/L/min/bursts/min, Pinduced sympathoexcitation remained blunted in pregnant women (0.25±0.11 versus 0.45±0.08 mm Hg/L/min/bursts/min, Ppregnancy is associated with reductions in neurovascular transduction, which result in the dissociation of sympathetic outflow from hemodynamic outcomes, even during cold pressor-induced sympathoexcitation. PMID:26259593

  12. Dorsal root ganglion-derived Schwann cells combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Li; QU, WEI; Wu, Yuxuan; Ma, Hao; JIANG, HUAJUN

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, nerve regeneration promoters in peripheral nerve tissue engineering, can be used to repair both the peripheral and central nervous systems. However, isolation and purification of Schwann cells are complicated by contamination with fibroblasts. Current reported measures are mainly limited by either high cost or complicated procedures with low cell yields or purity. In this study, we collected dorsal root ganglia from neonatal rats from which we obtained highly purified Schwann c...

  13. Trigger point-related sympathetic nerve activity in chronic sciatic leg pain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, El?bieta; Rychlik, Micha?; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, W?odzimierz

    2014-10-01

    Sciatica has classically been associated with irritation of the sciatic nerve by the vertebral disc and consequent inflammation. Some authors suggest that active trigger points in the gluteus minimus muscle can refer pain in similar way to sciatica. Trigger point diagnosis is based on Travel and Simons criteria, but referred pain and twitch response are significant confirmatory signs of the diagnostic criteria. Although vasoconstriction in the area of a latent trigger point has been demonstrated, the vasomotor reaction of active trigger points has not been examined. We report the case of a 22-year-old Caucasian European man who presented with a 3-year history of chronic sciatic-type leg pain. In the third year of symptoms, coexistent myofascial pain syndrome was diagnosed. Acupuncture needle stimulation of active trigger points under infrared thermovisual camera showed a sudden short-term vasodilatation (an autonomic phenomenon) in the area of referred pain. The vasodilatation spread from 0.2 to 171.9?cm(2) and then gradually decreased. After needling, increases in average and maximum skin temperature were seen as follows: for the thigh, changes were +2.6°C (average) and +3.6°C (maximum); for the calf, changes were +0.9°C (average) and +1.4°C (maximum). It is not yet known whether the vasodilatation observed was evoked exclusively by dry needling of active trigger points. The complex condition of the patient suggests that other variables might have influenced the infrared thermovision camera results. We suggest that it is important to check if vasodilatation in the area of referred pain occurs in all patients with active trigger points. PMID:24970043

  14. Regeneração de nervos periféricos: terapia celular e fatores neurotróficos / Peripheral nerve regeneration: cell therapy and neurotrophic factors

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alessandra Deise, Sebben; Martina, Lichtenfels; Jefferson Luis Braga da, Silva.

    Full Text Available Traumatismos em nervos periféricos resultam na perda de função do órgão inervado e raramente apresentam recuperação sem a intervenção cirúrgica. Diversas técnicas cirúrgicas são passíveis de serem empregadas para o reparo nervoso. Dentre elas, ressalta-se o uso da técnica de tubulização, podendo ser [...] acrescentados fatores com capacidade regenerativa na câmara. A terapia celular e engenharia de tecidos surgem como uma alternativa para estimular e auxiliar a regeneração de nervos periféricos. Portanto, o objetivo desta revisão é fornecer um levantamento e uma análise de estudos experimentais e clínicos, quanto aos resultados obtidos, que utilizam a terapia celular e engenharia de tecidos como ferramentas para otimizar o processo de regeneração. Os artigos utilizados são oriundos de bases de dados científicas LILACS e Medline, através de pesquisas realizadas no PubMed e SciELO. Artigos sobre o uso de células-tronco, células de Schwann, fatores de crescimento, colágeno, laminina e plasma rico em plaquetas no reparo de nervos periféricos foram sintetizados ao longo da revisão. Com base nos diversos estudos pode-se concluir que a utilização de células-tronco derivadas de diferentes fontes apresentam resultados promissores na regeneração nervosa, pois estas possuem capacidade de diferenciação neuronal, demonstrando, assim, resultados funcionais eficazes. O uso de tubos acrescidos de elementos bioativos com liberação controlada também otimiza o reparo nervoso, promovendo uma maior mielinização e crescimento axonal dos nervos periféricos. Outro tratamento promissor é o uso de plasma rico em plaquetas, que, além de liberar fatores de crescimento importantes no reparo nervoso, ainda serve como um carreador para fatores exógenos estimulando a proliferação de células específicas no reparo de nervo periférico. Abstract in english Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for nerve repair. Among these, the tubulization technique can be highlighted: this allows regenerative factors to be introduced into th [...] e chamber. Cell therapy and tissue engineering have arisen as an alternative for stimulating and aiding peripheral nerve regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this review was to provide a survey and analysis on the results from experimental and clinical studies that used cell therapy and tissue engineering as tools for optimizing the regeneration process. The articles used came from the LILACS, Medline and SciELO scientific databases. Articles on the use of stem cells, Schwann cells, growth factors, collagen, laminin and platelet-rich plasma for peripheral nerve repair were summarized over the course of the review. Based on these studies, it could be concluded that the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results relating to nerve regeneration, because these cells have a capacity for neuronal differentiation, thus demonstrating effective functional results. The use of tubes containing bioactive elements with controlled release also optimizes the nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Another promising treatment is the use of platelet-rich plasma, which not only releases growth factors that are important in nerve repair, but also serves as a carrier for exogenous factors, thereby stimulating the proliferation of specific cells for peripheral nerve repair.

  15. Regeneração de nervos periféricos: terapia celular e fatores neurotróficos Peripheral nerve regeneration: cell therapy and neurotrophic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Deise Sebben

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatismos em nervos periféricos resultam na perda de função do órgão inervado e raramente apresentam recuperação sem a intervenção cirúrgica. Diversas técnicas cirúrgicas são passíveis de serem empregadas para o reparo nervoso. Dentre elas, ressalta-se o uso da técnica de tubulização, podendo ser acrescentados fatores com capacidade regenerativa na câmara. A terapia celular e engenharia de tecidos surgem como uma alternativa para estimular e auxiliar a regeneração de nervos periféricos. Portanto, o objetivo desta revisão é fornecer um levantamento e uma análise de estudos experimentais e clínicos, quanto aos resultados obtidos, que utilizam a terapia celular e engenharia de tecidos como ferramentas para otimizar o processo de regeneração. Os artigos utilizados são oriundos de bases de dados científicas LILACS e Medline, através de pesquisas realizadas no PubMed e SciELO. Artigos sobre o uso de células-tronco, células de Schwann, fatores de crescimento, colágeno, laminina e plasma rico em plaquetas no reparo de nervos periféricos foram sintetizados ao longo da revisão. Com base nos diversos estudos pode-se concluir que a utilização de células-tronco derivadas de diferentes fontes apresentam resultados promissores na regeneração nervosa, pois estas possuem capacidade de diferenciação neuronal, demonstrando, assim, resultados funcionais eficazes. O uso de tubos acrescidos de elementos bioativos com liberação controlada também otimiza o reparo nervoso, promovendo uma maior mielinização e crescimento axonal dos nervos periféricos. Outro tratamento promissor é o uso de plasma rico em plaquetas, que, além de liberar fatores de crescimento importantes no reparo nervoso, ainda serve como um carreador para fatores exógenos estimulando a proliferação de células específicas no reparo de nervo periférico.Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for nerve repair. Among these, the tubulization technique can be highlighted: this allows regenerative factors to be introduced into the chamber. Cell therapy and tissue engineering have arisen as an alternative for stimulating and aiding peripheral nerve regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this review was to provide a survey and analysis on the results from experimental and clinical studies that used cell therapy and tissue engineering as tools for optimizing the regeneration process. The articles used came from the LILACS, Medline and SciELO scientific databases. Articles on the use of stem cells, Schwann cells, growth factors, collagen, laminin and platelet-rich plasma for peripheral nerve repair were summarized over the course of the review. Based on these studies, it could be concluded that the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results relating to nerve regeneration, because these cells have a capacity for neuronal differentiation, thus demonstrating effective functional results. The use of tubes containing bioactive elements with controlled release also optimizes the nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Another promising treatment is the use of platelet-rich plasma, which not only releases growth factors that are important in nerve repair, but also serves as a carrier for exogenous factors, thereby stimulating the proliferation of specific cells for peripheral nerve repair.

  16. Methylglyoxal, the foe and friend of glyoxalase and Trx/TrxR systems in HT22 nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafre, A L; Goldberg, J; Wang, T; Spiegel, D A; Maher, P

    2015-12-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a major glycating agent that reacts with basic residues of proteins and promotes the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) which are believed to play key roles in a number of pathologies, such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and inflammation. Here, we examined the effects of MGO on immortalized mouse hippocampal HT22 nerve cells. The endpoints analyzed were MGO and thiol status, the glyoxalase system, comprising glyoxalase 1 and 2 (GLO1/2), and the cytosolic and mitochondrial Trx/TrxR systems, as well as nuclear Nrf2 and its target genes. We found that nuclear Nrf2 is induced by MGO treatment in HT22 cells, as corroborated by induction of the Nrf2-controlled target genes and proteins glutamate cysteine ligase and heme oxygenase 1. Nrf2 knockdown prevented MGO-dependent induction of glutamate cysteine ligase and heme oxygenase 1. The cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc(-), which is also controlled by Nrf2, was also induced. The increased cystine import (system xc(-)) activity and GCL expression promoted GSH synthesis, leading to increased levels of GSH. The data indicate that MGO can act as both a foe and a friend of the glyoxalase and the Trx/TrxR systems. At low concentrations of MGO (0.3mM), GLO2 is strongly induced, but at high MGO (0.75mM) concentrations, GLO1 is inhibited and GLO2 is downregulated. The cytosolic Trx/TrxR system is impaired by MGO, where Trx is downregulated yet TrxR is induced, but strong MGO-dependent glycation may explain the loss in TrxR activity. We propose that Nrf2 can be the unifying element to explain the observed upregulation of GSH, GCL, HO1, TrxR1, Trx2, TrxR2, and system xc(-) system activity. PMID:26165190

  17. Nerves and Anesthesia: A physics perspective on medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a recent theory for nerve pulse propagation and anesthesia and argue that both nerve activity and the action of anesthetics can be understood on the basis of simple physical laws. It was found experimentally that biological membranes melt from a solid state to a liquid state just below physiological temperature. Such melting processes have a profound influence on the physical properties of cell membranes. They make it possible for mechanical pulses (solitons) to travel along nerve axons. In these pulses, a region of solid phase travels in the liquid nerve membrane. These pulses display many properties associated with the action potential in nerves. Both general and local anesthetics lower melting temperatures of membranes. Thus, they make it more difficult to excite the nerve membrane. Since hydrostatic pressure increases melting temperatures, it counteracts anesthesia. This theory has the virtue of providing a simple explanation of the famous Meyer-Overton correlation, which states that the effect...

  18. Sulindac derivatives inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in primary cells from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of NF1-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Reinhard E

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are neoplasms leading to death in most cases. Patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 have an increased risk of developing this malignancy. The metabolites of the inactive prodrug Sulindac, Sulindac Sulfide and Sulindac Sulfone (Exisulind are new chemopreventive agents that show promising results in the treatment of different cancer types. In this study we examined the antineoplastic effect of these compounds on primary cells derived from two MPNSTs of Neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. Results Exisulind and Sulindac Sulfide showed a dramatic time- and dose-dependent growth inhibitory effect with IC50-values of 120 ?M and 63 ?M, respectively. The decrease in viability of the tested cells correlated with induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 500 ?M Exisulind and 125 ?M Sulindac Sulfide for a period of 2 days increased the rate of apoptosis 21-27-fold compared to untreated cells. Reduced expression of RAS-GTP and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was detected in treated MPNST cells. Moreover, elevated levels of phosphorylated SAPK/JNK were found after drug treatment, and low activation of cleaved caspase-3 was seen. Conclusions Our results suggest that this class of compounds may be of therapeutic benefit for Neurofibromatosis type 1 patients with MPNST.

  19. Selective suppression of sphincter activation during sacral anterior nerve root stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Narendra; Grünewald, Volker; Creasey, Graham; Mortimer, J Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to electrically activate small-diameter motor fibers in the sacral anterior roots innervating the urinary bladder, without activating the large-diameter fibers to the sphincter. Quasitrapezoidal current pulses were applied through tripolar spiral nerve electrodes on selected anterior sacral roots during acute experiments on eight dogs, maintained under pentobarbital anesthesia. Pressures were recorded from the bladder and sphincter with catheter-mounted gauges. Stimulation with biphasic quasitrapezoidal pulses showed decrease in sphincter recruitment with increasing pulse amplitudes. The minimum current amplitude that resulted in maximum sphincter suppression was used to stimulate the roots with trains of 20 Hz pulses, with 60 mL of saline filling the bladder. Pressures were also recorded when 100 micros rectangular pulse trains at 20 Hz, both continuous and intermittent, were applied. Trains of stimuli were applied before and after dorsal root rhizotomy. Suppression of sphincter activation was defined to be a percentage, [(Maximum pressure -Minimum pressure)/Maximum pressure x100. The results from 22 roots in eight animals show that with single pulses, the average percentage suppression of sphincter activation was 76.3% (+/-14.0). The minimum current for maximum sphincter suppression was 1.29 mA (+/-0.62). The average bladder pressure evoked was 50 cm of water during pulse train stimulation, with no significant difference due to pulse type. With pulse trains, the sphincter pressures were significantly higher when the bladder was filled. Evacuation of fluid occurred in three animals with average flow rates of 1.0 mL/s. PMID:11835425

  20. Differential Effects of Insulin on Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Agouti Obese Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Donald A.; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hyperinsulinemia, which often coexists with obesity and type 2 diabetes, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and thought to promote hypertension through the sympathetic effects of insulin. Here, we examined the effect of insulin on regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in obesity. Methods Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed to examine insulin sensitivity in agouti obese mice. We used also multifiber recording to compare the regional SNA response to ICV insulin between lean and agouti obese mice. Results Agouti obese mice have significantly elevated levels of blood glucose and plasma insulin associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. In lean mice, ICV administration of insulin (20 and 100 ?U) caused a dose-dependent increase in SNA subserving hindlimb, kidney and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Of note, the regional SNA responses to insulin were differentially altered in agouti obese mice. While lumbar SNA response to insulin was intact in the obese mice, renal and BAT sympathetic activation to insulin were significantly attenuated in these agouti obese mice. Finally, we assessed the role of phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway in mediating sympathetic activation to insulin in obesity. Notably, ICV pre-treatment with a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) blocked the increase in lumbar SNA induced by ICV insulin in lean and agouti obese mice. Conclusions Our data suggest a differential regulation by insulin of sympathetic outflow to peripheral tissues in obesity. Our findings also demonstrate the importance of PI3K in lumbar sympathetic activation to insulin in obesity. PMID:20577122

  1. Effects of Yiqi Huayu Recipe on neural cell adhesion molecule in rats with lumbar nerve root compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Jian ZHOU

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effects of Yiqi Huayu Recipe on neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM in neuromuscular junctions during nerve regeneration in rats with lumbar nerve root compression. Methods: The rats with lumbar nerve root compression were given Yiqi Huayu Recipe for 10, 20 and 30 days respectively. The distribution of N-CAM in neuromuscular junctions of soleus muscle in rats was examined with immunohistochemical method and confocal laser scanning microscopy technique. The acetylcholine receptor (AChR was visualized with fluorescein-conjugated ?-bungarotoxin (?-BTX. The overlap areas of N-CAM and AChR sites were measured with NIH image technique.Results: The aggregates, sprouts and extensions of N-CAM in the neuromuscular junctions and the overlap areas of N-CAM and AChR sites in the Yiqi Huayu Recipe-treated group were all better improved than those in the untreated group. Conclusion: The expression of N-CAM is regulated according to the state of innervation for muscles. Yiqi Huayu Recipe may accelerate this nerve regeneration process.

  2. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. → Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. → The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. → The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  3. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, K.T. [Keele University at the RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Seabright, R.; Logan, A. [Neuropharmacology and Neurobiology, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Birmingham University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Lilly, A.J.; Khanim, F.; Bunce, C.M. [Biosciences, Birmingham University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Johnson, W.E.B., E-mail: w.e.johnson@aston.ac.uk [Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  4. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P stress was augmented in rosacea (both P stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  5. Neuromuscular activity of Bothrops neuwiedi pauloensis snake venom in mouse nerve-muscle preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Durigon

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological effects of Bothrops neuwiedi pauloensis venom on mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND preparations were studied. Venom (20 mug/ml irreversibly inhibited indirectly evoked twitches in PND preparations (60 ± 10% inhibition, mean ± SEM; p<0.05; n=6. At 50 mug/ml, the venom blocked indirectly and directly (curarized preparations evoked twitches in mouse hemidiaphragms. In the absence of Ca2+, venom (50 mug/ml, produced partial blockade only after an 80 min incubation, which reached 40.3 ± 7.8% (p<0.05; n=3 after 120 min. Venom (20 mug/ml increased (25 ± 2%, p< 0.05 the frequency of giant miniature end-plate potentials in 9 of 10 end-plates after 30 min and the number of miniature end-plate potentials which was maximum (562 ± 3%, p<0.05 after 120 min. During the same period, the resting membrane potential decreased from - 81 ± 1.4 mV to - 41.3 ± 3.6 mV 24 fibers; p<0.01; n=4 in the end-plate region and from - 77.4 ± 1.4 to -44.6 ± 3.9 mV (24 fibers; p<0.01; n=4 in regions distant from the end-plate. These results indicate that B. n. pauloensis venom acts primarily at presynaptic sites. They also suggest that enzymatic activity may be involved in this pharmacological action.

  6. Arbitrary units are a composite and useful measure of muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In humans, the muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) signal is challenging to detect, record and analyze. Several methods exist that attempt to capture the latent construct of MSNA. We directly compared the performance of five MSNA parameters: burst frequency, burst incidence, median burst amplitude, arbitrary units (AU) and fractal dimension (FD). The MSNA signal was recorded in 33 subjects for ?30 min before, during and after the application of a graded cold pressor test stimulus at 18 °C, 10 °C and 2 °C in random order with an adequate wash-out period. Using coefficient of variation, Shannon's entropy and principal component analysis, we observed that these five parameters defined two physical and conceptual domains of MSNA—frequency and amplitude. Since AU combines information from both these domains, we observed that it explained maximum inter-subject and inter-experimental segment variation. FD did not explain the inter-subject variability and was identified as a unique parameter in the factor analysis. Epidemiological studies that attempt to quantify MSNA may consistently use AU as the parameter for quantification of MSNA

  7. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and ganglion cell complex (GCC thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Materials and Methods: Average, inferior, and superior values of RNFL and GCC thickness were measured in 123 patients using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The values of participants with DM were compared to controls. Diabetic patients were collected in Groups 1, 2 and 3. Group 1 = 33 participants who had no diabetic retinopathy (DR; Group 2 = 30 participants who had mild nonproliferative DR and Group 3 = 30 participants who had moderate non-proliferative DR. The 30 healthy participants collected in Group 4. Analysis of variance test and a multiple linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: The values of RNFL and GCC in the type 2 diabetes were thinner than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study showed that there is a nonsignificant loss of RNFL and GCC in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. [Damage of macular ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydovskaia, M V; Tsysar', M A; Bo?ko, A N; Akopian, V S; Semenova, N S; Filonenko, I V; Fomin, A V; Gusev, E I

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) characteristics and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to investigate the associations between these parameters and clinical characteristics of patients for evaluation perspectives of using this method for monitoring of disability and neurodegenerative processes. We examined a total of 113 participants (analysis of 211 eyes), divided into three groups: 1. 48 MS patients (66 eyes) with a history of optic neuritis (ON); 2. 35 MS patients (70 eyes) without a history of ON; 3. 30 disease-free control subjects (45 eyes). The estudy included anamnesis collection, neurological examination with assessment of EDSS scores. Refracted visual acuity prior to optical coherence tomography (OCT) was tested. RTVue-100 ??? system was used to assess peripapillary RNFL thickness and macular inner parameter (protocol GCC). The strongly correlated decline of the most RNFL and GCC indices was characteristic of all groups of MS patients with and without ON compared to controls. The damage of GCC was greater in patients with ON. The inverse correlation was found between the indices studied and the level of patient's disability. The study of GCC and RNFL thickness can be used to describe and characterize the level of axonal damage in MS and for objectification of neurodegenerative process in studies on neuroprotection and neuroreparation. PMID:22677679

  9. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao; Yang, Bao-Lin; Liu, Zeng-Xu; Yu, Qing; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Yuan, Keng; Zeng, Hui-Hong; Zhu, Gao-Chun; Liu, De-Ming; Li, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4-5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L4-5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26487865

  10. Microencapsulation improves inhibitory effects of transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells on pain after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory bulb tissue transplantation inhibits P2X2/3 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. However, the olfactory bulb has a complex cellular composition, and the mechanism underlying the action of purified transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs remains unclear. In the present study, we microencapsulated OECs in alginic acid, and transplanted free and microencapsulated OECs into the region surrounding the injured sciatic nerve in rat models of chronic constriction injury. We assessed mechanical nociception in the rat models 7 and 14 days after surgery by measuring paw withdrawal threshold, and examined P2X2/3 receptor expression in L 4-5 dorsal root ganglia using immunohistochemistry. Rats that received free and microencapsulated OEC transplants showed greater withdrawal thresholds than untreated model rats, and weaker P2X2/3 receptor immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglia. At 14 days, paw withdrawal threshold was much higher in the microencapsulated OEC-treated animals. Our results confirm that microencapsulated OEC transplantation suppresses P2X2/3 receptor expression in L 4-5 dorsal root ganglia in rat models of neuropathic pain and reduces allodynia, and also suggest that transplantation of microencapsulated OECs is more effective than transplantation of free OECs for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  11. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, Poul Henrik; Emerich, D F; Thanos, C; Torp, Maja; Bintz, B; Tornøe, Jens; Johnsen, A H; Wahlberg, L U

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG02...... cases correlate with highly improved potency.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 24 November 2011; doi:10.1038/gt.2011.178....

  12. Cell Proliferation and Interleukin-6–Type Cytokine Signaling Are Implicated by Gene Expression Responses in Early Optic Nerve Head Injury in Rat Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, Thomas A.; Cepurna, William O.; Dyck, Jennifer A.; Jia, Lijun; Guo, Ying; Lambert, Wendi S.; Morrison, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. In glaucoma, the optic nerve head (ONH) is the principal site of initial axonal injury, and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the predominant risk factor. However, the initial responses of the ONH to elevated IOP are unknown. Here the authors use a rat glaucoma model to characterize ONH gene expression changes associated with early optic nerve injury. Methods. Unilateral IOP elevation was produced in rats by episcleral vein injection of hypertonic saline. ONH mRNA was extracted, and retrobulbar optic nerve cross-sections were graded for axonal degeneration. Gene expression was determined by microarray and quantitative PCR (QPCR) analysis. Significantly altered gene expression was determined by multiclass analysis and ANOVA. DAVID gene ontology determined the functional categories of significantly affected genes. Results. The Early Injury group consisted of ONH from eyes with <15% axon degeneration. By array analysis, 877 genes were significantly regulated in this group. The most significant upregulated gene categories were cell cycle, cytoskeleton, and immune system process, whereas the downregulated categories included glucose and lipid metabolism. QPCR confirmed the upregulation of cell cycle-associated genes and leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif) and revealed alterations in expression of other IL-6–type cytokines and Jak-Stat signaling pathway components, including increased expression of IL-6 (1553%). In contrast, astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) message levels were unaltered, and other astrocytic markers were significantly downregulated. Microglial activation and vascular-associated gene responses were identified. Conclusions. Cell proliferation and IL-6–type cytokine gene expression, rather than astrocyte hypertrophy, characterize early pressure-induced ONH injury. PMID:20847120

  13. Escalated regeneration in sciatic nerve crush injury by the combined therapy of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells and fermented soybean extracts, Natto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hung-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Attenuation of inflammatory cell deposits and associated cytokines prevented the apoptosis of transplanted stem cells in a sciatic nerve crush injury model. Suppression of inflammatory cytokines by fermented soybean extracts (Natto was also beneficial to nerve regeneration. In this study, the effect of Natto on transplanted human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFS was evaluated. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in SD rats by crushing a sciatic nerve using a vessel clamp. Animals were categorized into four groups: Group I: no treatment; Group II: fed with Natto (16 mg/day for 7 consecutive days; Group III: AFS embedded in fibrin glue; Group IV: Combination of group II and III therapy. Transplanted AFS and Schwann cell apoptosis, inflammatory cell deposits and associated cytokines, motor function, and nerve regeneration were evaluated 7 or 28 days after injury. The deterioration of neurological function was attenuated by AFS, Natto, or the combined therapy. The combined therapy caused the most significantly beneficial effects. Administration of Natto suppressed the inflammatory responses and correlated with decreased AFS and Schwann cell apoptosis. The decreased AFS apoptosis was in line with neurological improvement such as expression of early regeneration marker of neurofilament and late markers of S-100 and decreased vacuole formation. Administration of either AFS, or Natto, or combined therapy augmented the nerve regeneration. In conclusion, administration of Natto may rescue the AFS and Schwann cells from apoptosis by suppressing the macrophage deposits, associated inflammatory cytokines, and fibrin deposits.

  14. Effects of L-carnosine on renal sympathetic nerve activity and DOCA-salt hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niijima, Akira; Okui, Tomoko; Matsumura, Yasuo; Yamano, Toshihiko; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Nagai, Katsuya

    2002-05-31

    The effects of L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) on the neural activity of the renal sympathetic nerve and on DOCA-salt hypertension in rats were examined. Intravenous injection of 1 microg L-carnosine inhibited renal sympathetic nerve activity in urethane-anesthetized animals, and a diet containing 0.0001% or 0.001% L-carnosine decreased blood pressure elevation in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Since L-carnosine is mainly synthesized in the skeletal muscles of mammals, it is not unreasonable to postulate that L-carnosine is an endogenous factor controlling the blood pressure in a manner possibly antagonistic to the obesity-associated hypertensive effect of leptin. PMID:12132650

  15. Low Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Does Not Induce Cell Survival or Regeneration in a Mouse Optic Nerve Crush Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Alexander D.; Makowiecki, Kalina; Bartlett, Carole; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Low intensity repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (LI-rTMS), a non-invasive form of brain stimulation, has been shown to induce structural and functional brain plasticity, including short distance axonal sprouting. However, the potential for LI-rTMS to promote axonal regeneration following neurotrauma has not been investigated. This study examined the effect of LI-rTMS on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival, axon regeneration and levels of BDNF in an optic nerve crush neurotrauma model. Adult C57Bl/6J mice received a unilateral intraorbital optic nerve crush. Mice received 10 minutes of sham (handling control without stimulation) (n=6) or LI-rTMS (n = 8) daily stimulation for 14 days to the operated eye. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess RGC survival (?-3 Tubulin) and axon regeneration across the injury (GAP43). Additionally, BDNF expression was quantified in a separate cohort by ELISA in the retina and optic nerve of injured (optic nerve crush) (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) and non-injured mice (sham n = 5, LI-rTMS n = 5) that received daily stimulation as above for 7 days. Following 14 days of LI-rTMS there was no significant difference in mean RGC survival between sham and treated animals (p>0.05). Also, neither sham nor LI-rTMS animals showed GAP43 positive labelling in the optic nerve, indicating that regeneration did not occur. At 1 week, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels in the retina or optic nerves between sham and LI-rTMS in injured or non-injured mice (p>0.05). Although LI-rTMS has been shown to induce structural and molecular plasticity in the visual system and cerebellum, our results suggest LI-rTMS does not induce neuroprotection or regeneration following a complete optic nerve crush. These results help define the therapeutic capacity and limitations of LI-rTMS in the treatment of neurotrauma. PMID:25993112

  16. Alteration of primary afferent activity following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Shigeji

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to evaluate the neural mechanisms underlying the abnormal facial pain that may develop following regeneration of the injured inferior alveolar nerve (IAN, the properties of the IAN innervated in the mental region were analyzed. Results Fluorogold (FG injection into the mental region 14 days after IAN transection showed massive labeling of trigeminal ganglion (TG. The escape threshold to mechanical stimulation of the mental skin was significantly lower (i.e. mechanical allodynia at 11-14 days after IAN transection than before surgery. The background activity, mechanically evoked responses and afterdischarges of IAN A?-fibers were significantly higher in IAN-transected rats than naive. The small/medium diameter TG neurons showed an increase in both tetrodotoxin (TTX-resistant (TTX-R and -sensitive (TTX-S sodium currents (INa and decrease in total potassium current, transient current (IA and sustained current (IK in IAN-transected rats. The amplitude, overshoot amplitude and number of action potentials evoked by the depolarizing pulses after 1 ?M TTX administration in TG neurons were significantly higher, whereas the threshold current to elicit spikes was smaller in IAN-transected rats than naive. Resting membrane potential was significantly smaller in IAN-transected rats than that of naive. Conclusions These data suggest that the increase in both TTX-S INa and TTX-R INa and the decrease in IA and Ik in small/medium TG neurons in IAN-transected rats are involved in the activation of spike generation, resulting in hyperexcitability of A?-IAN fibers innervating the mental region after IAN transection.

  17. C nociceptor activity in human nerve during painful and non painful skin stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hees, J; Gybels, J

    1981-07-01

    Percutaneous recordings from more than one hundred single C fibres have been performed in the radial nerve of conscious human subjects. All these fibres belong to the poly-modal C nociceptor group, being excited by mechanical and thermal and also by chemical stimulation. Conduction velocities showed a monophasic distribution with a mean value of 0.86 m/s (SD: 0.17). The mechanical threshold, measured with von Frey hairs, varied between 2.3 and 13.1 g. The receptive field was circular or elliptical; for 33 units the mean axes were 6 mm and 7 mm. Mechanically evoked C fibre discharge even up to more than 10 spikes/s was not necessarily accompanied by pain sensation. Nettle sting evoked an irregular C fibre discharge (maximum 10 spikes/s) accompanied by a pricking and burning sensation; the sensation of itch which was sometimes reported, was not correlated with the discharge frequency. C fibre activation by a chemical irritant (paint remover) also evoked an irregular discharge (maximum 3 to 6 spikes/s), accompanied by pricking and burning pain sensation. The C threshold for radiant heat usually lay below the subject's pain threshold. Increasing skin temperature produced increasing neural firing rate. The mean spike frequency rarely exceeded two spikes/s even with stimuli evoking strong heat pain. The occurrence of subjective heat pain response could be as well predicted from th C fibre spike frequency as from the skin temperature. It is concluded that nociceptive C input provoked by thermal or chemical stimuli correlates well with pain sensation. However, similar C input provided by mechanical stimulation which activates also A beta mechanoreceptors, did not necessarily produce pain sensation. PMID:7288447

  18. Functional and structural changes in the brain associated with the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity in obstructive sleep apnoea

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouleh, Rania H.; Hammam, Elie; Lundblad, Linda C.; Macey, Paul M; McKenzie, David K.; Henderson, Luke A.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) during daytime wakefulness, leading to hypertension, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. By recording MSNA concurrently with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of the brain we aimed to identify the central processes responsible for the sympathoexcitation. Spontaneous fluctuations in MSNA were recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into ...

  19. Reduced Light Response of Neuronal Firing Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Optic Nerve of Cryptochrome-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Takahiro J.; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    To examine roles of the Cryptochromes (Cry1 and Cry2) in mammalian circadian photoreception, we recorded single-unit neuronal firing activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a primary circadian oscillator, and optic nerve fibers in vivo after retinal illumination in anesthetized Cry1 and Cry2 double-knockout (Cry-deficient) mice. In wild-type mice, most SCN neurons increased their firing frequency in response to retinal illumination at night, whereas only 17% of SCN neurons responded du...

  20. Mindfulness meditation lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in African-American males with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jeanie; Lyles, Robert H.; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MM) is a stress-reduction technique that may have real biological effects on hemodynamics but has never previously been tested in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the potential blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of MM are unknown. We sought to determine whether MM acutely lowers BP in CKD patients, and whether these hemodynamic changes are mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. In 15 hypertensive African-Am...

  1. Effects of Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 on Autonomic Nerve Activities and Physiological Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiho Otomi; Takuji Ymaguchi; Shin Watanabe; Akiko Kobayashi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi; Naoyuki Hashiguchi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2716 (LG21) on autonomic nerve activities, peripheral blood flow, skin condition (skin pig-mentations and moisture), saliva s-IgA and examination of quality of life (QOL). 20 healthy female volunteers (yogurt containing LG21 group: 10 people, yogurt containing Bifidobacterium (Bif) group: 10 people) were examined. The subjects ingested 100 g of yogurt twice daily for 4 weeks. Analysis was be...

  2. Nerve growth factor eye drops improve visual acuity and electrofunctional activity in age-related macular degeneration: a case report

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alessandro, Lambiase; Marco, Coassin; Paola, Tirassa; Flavio, Mantelli; Luigi, Aloe.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a severe disease affecting visual function in the elderly. Currently available surgical and medical options do not guarantee a significant impact on the outcome of the disease. We describe the effects of nerve growth factor eye drop treatment in a 94 years [...] old female with ARMD, whose visual acuity was progressively worsening in spite of previous surgical and medical treatments. NGF eye drops improved visual acuity and electrofunctional parameters as early as 3 months after initiation of treatment. These results are in line with previous reports on a neuroprotective effect of NGF on retinal cells and on NGF eye drops bioavailability in the retina and optic nerve. No side effects were observed after five years of follow-up, suggesting that topical NGF treatment may be a safe and effective therapy for ARMD.

  3. Selective activation of microglia in spinal cord but not higher cortical regions following nerve injury in adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yuze

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuronal plasticity along the pathway for sensory transmission including the spinal cord and cortex plays an important role in chronic pain, including inflammatory and neuropathic pain. While recent studies indicate that microglia in the spinal cord are involved in neuropathic pain, a systematic study has not been performed in other regions of the central nervous system (CNS. In the present study, we used heterozygous Cx3cr1GFP/+mice to characterize the morphological phenotypes of microglia following common peroneal nerve (CPN ligation. We found that microglia showed a uniform distribution throughout the CNS, and peripheral nerve injury selectively activated microglia in the spinal cord dorsal horn and related ventral horn. In contrast, microglia was not activated in supraspinal regions of the CNS, including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, primary and secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 and S2, insular cortex (IC, amygdala, hippocampus, periaqueductal gray (PAG and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM. Our results provide strong evidence that nerve injury primarily activates microglia in the spinal cord of adult mice, and pain-related cortical plasticity is likely mediated by neurons.

  4. Autonomic markers of emotional processing: skin sympathetic nerve activity in humans during exposure to emotionally-charged images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RachaelBrown

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic innervation of the skin primarily subserves thermoregulation, but the system has also been commandeered as a means of expressing emotion. While it is known that the level of skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA is affected by anxiety, the majority of emotional studies have utilized the galvanic skin response as a means of inferring increases in SSNA. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the changes in SSNA when showing subjects neutral or emotionally-charged images from the International Affective Picture System. Skin sympathetic nerve activity was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in ten subjects. Neutral images, positively-charged images (erotica or negatively-charged images (mutilation were presented in blocks of fifteen images of a specific type, each block lasting two minutes. Images of erotica or mutilation were presented in a quasi-random fashion, each block following a block of neutral images. Both images of erotica or images of mutilation caused significant increases in SSNA, but the increases in SSNA were greater for mutilation. The increases in SSNA were often coupled with sweat release and cutaneous vasoconstriction, however, these markers were not always consistent with the SSNA increases. We conclude that SSNA, comprising cutaneous vasoconstrictor and sudomotor activity, increases with both positively-charged and negatively-charged emotional images. Measurement of SSNA provides a more comprehensive assessment of sympathetic outflow to the skin than does the use of sweat release alone as a marker of emotional processing.

  5. Endocrine cells and nerve ganglia of the small intestine of the Opossum Didelphis aurita Wied-Neuwied, 1826 (Mammalia: Didelphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas-Ribeiro, Gláucia M; Fonseca, Cláudio C; Sartori, Sirlene S R; Loures-Ribeiro, Alan; Neves, Clóvis A

    2012-09-01

    The nervous and endocrine systems jointly control intestinal movements, secretions of their glands and also participate of the processes of nutrient digestion and absorption. Therefore, the central objective of this study was to verify the existence of a possible relationship between the number of nervous cells and ganglia of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses and the number of endocrine cells in the small intestine of adult D. aurita. The utilized staining techniques were Grimelius, modified Masson-Fontana, direct immunoperoxidase and H-E. Argyrophillic, argentaffin and insulin immunoreactive endocrine cells do not numerically vary between the initial, mid and final regions of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum (P>0.05), except for argyrophillic cells in the jejunum (P>0.05). No numerical relationship has yet been verified between the number of nerve ganglia and endocrine cells, and also between nervous and endocrine cells. We recommended the use of new immunohistochemical techniques to confirm the numerical correlation between the nervous and endocrine systems in the small intestine. The morphology and distribution of endocrine cells and the nerve ganglia studied were similar to those encountered in eutherian mammals. PMID:22801379

  6. Spontaneous activity of auditory nerve fibers in the barn owl (Tyto alba): analyses of interspike interval distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Heinrich; Köppl, Christine; Heil, Peter

    2009-06-01

    In vertebrate auditory systems, the conversion from graded receptor potentials across the hair-cell membrane into stochastic spike trains of the auditory nerve (AN) fibers is performed by ribbon synapses. The statistics underlying this process constrain auditory coding but are not precisely known. Here, we examine the distributions of interspike intervals (ISIs) from spontaneous activity of AN fibers of the barn owl (Tyto alba), a nocturnal avian predator whose auditory system is specialized for precise temporal coding. The spontaneous activity of AN fibers, with the exception of those showing preferred intervals, is commonly thought to result from excitatory events generated by a homogeneous Poisson point process, which lead to spikes unless the fiber is refractory. We show that the ISI distributions in the owl are better explained as resulting from the action of a brief refractory period ( approximately 0.5 ms) on excitatory events generated by a homogeneous stochastic process where the distribution of interevent intervals is a mixture of an exponential and a gamma distribution with shape factor 2, both with the same scaling parameter. The same model was previously shown to apply to AN fibers in the cat. However, the mean proportions of exponentially versus gamma-distributed intervals in the mixture were different for cat and owl. Furthermore, those proportions were constant across fibers in the cat, whereas they covaried with mean spontaneous rate and with characteristic frequency in the owl. We hypothesize that in birds, unlike in mammals, more than one ribbon may provide excitation to most fibers, accounting for the different proportions, and that variation in the number of ribbons may underlie the variation in the proportions. PMID:19357334

  7. Persistent alterations in active and passive electrical membrane properties of regenerated nerve fibers of man and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Rosberg, Mette R; Krarup, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Excitability of regenerated fibers remains impaired due to changes in both passive cable properties and alterations in the voltage-dependent membrane function. These abnormalities were studied by mathematical modeling in human regenerated nerves and experimental studies in mice. In three adult male patients with surgically repaired complete injuries of peripheral nerves of the arm 22 months-26 years prior to investigation, deviation of excitability measures was explained by a hyperpolarizing shift in the resting membrane potential and an increase in the passive 'Barrett and Barrett' conductance (GBB) bridging the nodal and internodal compartments. These changes were associated with an increase in the 'fast' K(+) conductance and the inward rectifier conductance (GH). Similar changes were found in regenerated mouse tibial motor axons at 1 month after a sciatic crush lesion. During the first 5 months of regeneration, GH showed partial recovery, which paralleled that in GBB. The internodal length remained one-third of normal. Excitability abnormalities could be reversed by the energy-dependent Na(+) /K(+) pump blocker ouabain resulting in membrane depolarization. Stressing the Na(+) pumping system during a strenuous activity protocol triggered partial Wallerian degeneration in regenerated nerves but not in control nerves from age-matched mice. The current data suggest that the nodal voltage-gated ion channel machinery is restored in regenerated axons, although the electrical separation from the internodal compartment remains compromised. Due to the persistent increase in number of nodes, the increased activity-dependent Na(+) influx could lead to hyperactivity of the Na(+) /K(+) pump resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and neurotoxic energy insufficiency during strenuous activity. PMID:26435009

  8. Morphological changes in gland cells and axons resulting from stimulation of the salivary nerves of the cockroach, Nauphoeta cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D J

    1981-01-01

    The salivary glands of the cockroach, Nauphoeta cinerea (Oliver, 1789), are innervated and there is considerable evidence to suggest that dopamine is the neurotransmitter at the neuroglandular junction. As the gland is a bilaterally symmetrical structure it was possible to electrically stimulate the salivary nerve supplying the ipsilateral side of the gland whilst the contralateral side of the gland served as a convenient control. Saliva elicited from the glands by electrical stimulation of these nerves was collected and used to monitor the physiological state of the tissue. Glands were fixed for light and electron microscopy during secretion and it was observed that the ductules in peripheral acinar cells were distended in stimulated sides of the glands but not in contralateral unstimulated sides. This evidence implies that peripheral cells are responsible for the initiation of salivary fluid secretion. Changes were also observed in the catecholamine containing axons that innervate the glands. In stimulated axons a statistically significant reduction in numbers of small agranular vesicles was observed when compared with contralateral unstimulated controls and freshly fixed tissue. This was not the case with the larger granular vesicles of the same axons which showed no reduction in number as a result of stimulation. In addition it was also noted that the small agranular vesicles tended to aggregate and change their shapes in response to nerve stimulation. These results imply that the small agranular vesicles play a role in transmitter release. PMID:7222008

  9. Oral Contraceptive Use, Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity, and Systemic Hemodynamics in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronee E; Hart, Emma C; Charkoudian, Nisha; Curry, Timothy B; Carter, Jason R; Fu, Qi; Minson, Christopher T; Joyner, Michael J; Barnes, Jill N

    2015-09-01

    Endogenous female sex hormones influence muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a regulator of arterial blood pressure and important factor in hypertension development. Although ?80% of American women report using hormonal contraceptives sometime during their life, the influence of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) on MSNA and systemic hemodynamics remains equivocal. The goal of this study was to determine whether women taking OCs have altered MSNA and hemodynamics (cardiac output and total peripheral resistance) at rest during the placebo phase of OC use compared with women with natural menstrual cycles during the early follicular phase. We retrospectively analyzed data from studies in which healthy, premenopausal women (aged 18-35 years) participated. We collected MSNA values at rest and hemodynamic measurements in women taking OCs (n=53; 25±4 years) and women with natural menstrual cycles (n=74; 25±4 years). Blood pressure was higher in women taking OCs versus those with natural menstrual cycles (mean arterial pressure, 89±1 versus 85±1 mm Hg, respectively; P=0.01), although MSNA was similar in both groups (MSNA burst incidence, 16±1 versus 18±1 bursts/100 heartbeats, respectively; P=0.19). In a subset of women in which detailed hemodynamic data were available, those taking OCs (n=33) had similar cardiac output (4.9±0.2 versus 4.7±0.2 L/min, respectively; P=0.47) and total peripheral resistance (19.2±0.8 versus 20.0±0.9 U, respectively; P=0.51) as women with natural menstrual cycles (n=22). In conclusion, women taking OCs have higher resting blood pressure and similar MSNA and hemodynamics during the placebo phase of OC use when compared with naturally menstruating women in the early follicular phase. PMID:26101348

  10. LEPTIN SIGNALING IN THE NUCLEUS TRACTUS SOLITARII INCREASES SYMPATHETIC NERVE ACTIVITY TO THE KIDNEY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Allyn L.; Agassandian, Khristofor; Morgan, Donald A.; Liu, Xuebo; Cassell, Martin D; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was initially regarded as the principal site of leptin action, but there is increasing evidence for functional leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) in extra-hypothalamic sites, including the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). We previously demonstrated that arcuate injection of leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to brown adipose tissue (BAT) and kidney. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that leptin signaling in the NTS affects sympathetic neural outflow. Using a stereotaxic device in anesthetized rats, we microinjected leptin (0.25 to 1.0 ?g) or saline into the NTS while recording SNA to kidney and BAT. Microinjection of leptin into the commissural and medial subnuclei of the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema in Sprague-Dawley rats produced a dose-related increase in renal SNA (+112±15% with leptin 1 ?g, n=7, P<0.001), but did not increase SNA to BAT (?15±12%; P=NS). This effect was dependent on intact Ob-Rb because it was not observed in Zucker obese rats that have a missense mutation in the leptin receptor. Rostral NTS injection of leptin failed to increase SNA indicating that leptin signaling in the NTS is probably confined to the caudal NTS at the level of the area postrema. In summary, this study demonstrates that leptin signaling in the caudal NTS increases SNA to the kidney, but not brown adipose tissue. The study strengthens the concept of a distributed brain network of leptin action and demonstrates that these distributed brain sites can mediate contrasting sympathetic responses to leptin. PMID:19103999

  11. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity at rest does not differ between morning and afternoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissen, Sarah L.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Brown, Rachael; Witter, Trevor; Taylor, Chloe E.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular events is significantly higher in the morning than other times of day. This has previously been associated with poor blood pressure control via the cardiac baroreflex. However, it is not known whether diurnal variation exists in vascular sympathetic baroreflex function, in which blood pressure is regulated via muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). The aim of this study was to compare vascular sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in the same participants between the morning and afternoon. In 10 participants (mean age 22 ± 2.9 years), continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate and MSNA were made during 10 min of rest in the morning (between 0900 and 1000 h) and afternoon (between 1400 and 1500 h). Spontaneous vascular sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (vascular sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (vascular sympathetic BRStotal). Significant vascular sympathetic BRSinc and vascular sympathetic BRStotal slopes were obtained for 10 participants at both times of day. There was no significant difference in vascular sympathetic BRSinc between morning (?2.2 ± 0.6% bursts/mmHg) and afternoon (?2.5 ± 0.2% bursts/mmHg; P = 0.68) sessions. Similarly, vascular sympathetic BRStotal did not differ significantly between the morning (?3.0±0.5 AU/beat/mmHg) and afternoon (?2.9 ± 0.4 AU/beat/mmHg; P = 0.89). It is concluded that in healthy, young individuals baroreflex modulation of MSNA at rest does not differ between the morning and afternoon. The results indicate that recording MSNA at different times of the day is a valid means of assessing sympathetic function. PMID:26388723

  12. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.; Farr, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heating decreases central venous pressure (CVP) while increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In normothermia, similar decreases in CVP elevate MSNA, presumably via cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading. The purpose of this project was to identify whether increases in MSNA during whole body heating could be attributed to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading coincident with the thermal challenge. Seven subjects were exposed to whole body heating while sublingual temperature, skin blood flow, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and MSNA were monitored. During the heat stress, 15 ml/kg warmed saline was infused intravenously over 7-10 min to increase CVP and load the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. We reported previously that this amount of saline was sufficient to return CVP to pre-heat stress levels. Whole body heating increased MSNA from 25 +/- 3 to 39 +/- 3 bursts/min (P Central blood volume expansion via rapid saline infusion did not significantly decrease MSNA (44 +/- 4 bursts/min, P > 0.05 relative to heat stress period) and did not alter mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) or pulse pressure. To identify whether arterial baroreceptor loading decreases MSNA during heat stress, in a separate protocol MAP was elevated via steady-state infusion of phenylephrine during whole body heating. Increasing MAP from 82 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) caused MSNA to decrease from 36 +/- 3 to 15 +/- 4 bursts/min (P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading during passive heating is not the primary mechanism resulting in elevations in MSNA. Moreover, arterial baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA during heat stress.

  13. Quantal potential fields around individual active zones of amphibian motor-nerve terminals.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, M.R.; Farnell, L.; Gibson, W. G.; Macleod, G T; Dickens, P

    2000-01-01

    The release of a quantum from a nerve terminal is accompanied by the flow of extracellular current, which creates a field around the site of transmitter action. We provide a solution for the extent of this field for the case of a quantum released from a site on an amphibian motor-nerve terminal branch onto the receptor patch of a muscle fiber and compare this with measurements of the field using three extracellular electrodes. Numerical solution of the equations for the quantal potential fiel...

  14. Biological Activity of Nerve Growth Factor Precursor Is Dependent upon Relative Levels of Its Receptors*

    OpenAIRE

    Masoudi, Raheleh; Ioannou, Maria S.; Coughlin, Michael D; Pagadala, Promila; Neet, Kenneth E; Clewes, Oliver; Allen, Shelley J.; Dawbarn, David; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is produced as a precursor called pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF), which is secreted by many tissues and is the predominant form of NGF in the central nervous system. In Alzheimer disease brain, cholinergic neurons degenerate and can no longer transport NGF as efficiently, leading to an increase in untransported NGF in the target tissue. The protein that accumulates in the target tissue is proNGF, not the mature form. The role of this precursor is controversial, and...

  15. Investigation of developmentally regulated membrane proteins in muscle and nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developmental regulation of membrane glycoproteins in muscle and nerve cells has been studied. One of these glycoproteins, designated 5B4 antigen, is recognized by a monoclonal antibody (5B4) in rat brain neurons. On immunoblots of fetal rat brain membranes, 5B4 stains a diffuse band with an M/sub r/ of 180-250 kilodalton (kd). Prior digestion of such membranes with a bacteriophage-encoded endoneuraminidase specific for ?-2,8-linked poly(sialic acid) results in a shift in the form of the antigen to two sharp bands of 140 and 180 kd. In adult brain, 5B4 recognizes a pair of sharp bands of M/sub r/ 140 and 180 kd, which are neither sensitive to endo-neuraminidase digestion nor recognized by H.46. V8 peptide maps of the enzymatically iodinated 140 kd adult antigen and the 140 kd endo-neuraminidase digested fetal antigen are identical. These results demonstrate that the polypeptide backbone of the adult and fetal forms of the 5B4 antigen are similar, and that the observed microheterogeneity in the native fetal antigen is due to polysialation. Membrane glycoproteins are through to play an essential role in myoblast fusion during muscle development. In order to identify such glycoproteins, L6 myoblasts were labeled with 3H-N-acetylglucosamine and 3H-mannose during several stages of differentiation. The effects of various inhibitors of fusion of protein expression were also studied. After identifying membrane glycoproteins whose developmental regulation coincides with myoblast fusion, it is important to establish their role in the fusion process, possibly through reconstitution into phospholipid membrane vesicles (liposomes)

  16. Activation of sulphonylurea-sensitive channels and the NO-cGMP pathway decreases the heart rate response to sympathetic nerve stimulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, RM; Paterson, DJ

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Activation of ATP sensitive K+ channels (K(ATP)) and the NO-cGMP pathway have both been implicated in reducing norepinephrine (NE) release from cardiac sympathetic nerves during stimulation. Our aim was to test whether these pathways could interact and modulate cardiac excitability during sympathetic nerve stimulation (SNS). METHODS: The effect of inhibitors and activators of K(ATP) channels and the NO-cGMP pathway on the heart rate (HR) response to cardiac SNS in the isolated gui...

  17. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Timo; Sager, Hendrik B; Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis. Although incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known cross-talk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary axis, which controls stress-induced catecholamine release in support of the fight-or-flight reflex. It remains unknown, however, whether chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive hematopoietic progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease-promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Under conditions of chronic variable stress in mice, sympathetic nerve fibers released surplus noradrenaline, which signaled bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels through the ?3-adrenergic receptor. Consequently, hematopoietic stem cell proliferation was elevated, leading to an increased output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis-prone Apoe(-/-) mice were subjected to chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promoted plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  18. Apoptosis of sensory neurons and satellite cells after sciatic nerve transection in C57BL/6J mice

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A.L.R., Oliveira.

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The rate of axonal regeneration, after sciatic nerve lesion in adult C57BL/6J mice, is reduced when compared to other isogenic strains. It was observed that such low regeneration was not due just to a delay, since neuronal death was observed. Two general mechanisms of cell death, apoptosis and necro [...] sis, may be involved. By using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) technique, we demonstrated that a large number of sensory neurons, as well as satellite cells found in the dorsal root ganglia, were intensely labeled, thus indicating that apoptotic mechanisms were involved in the death process. Although almost no labeled neurons or satellite cells were observed one week after transection, a more than ten-fold increase in TUNEL labeling was detected after two weeks. The results obtained with the C57BL/6J strain were compared with those of the A/J strain, which has a much higher peripheral nerve regeneration potential. In A/J mice, almost no labeling of sensory neurons or satellite cells was observed after one or two weeks, indicating the absence of neuronal loss. Our data confirm previous observations that approximately 40% of C57BL/6J sensory neurons die after sciatic nerve transection, and indicate that apoptotic events are involved. Also, our observations reinforce the hypothesis that the low rate of axonal regeneration occurring in C57BL/6J mice may be the result of a mismatch in the timing of the neurons need for neurotrophic substances, and production of the latter by non-neuronal cells in the distal stump.

  19. Implantation of neural stem cells embedded in hyaluronic acid and collagen composite conduit promotes regeneration in a rabbit facial nerve injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Chong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs in artificial scaffolds for peripheral nerve injuries draws much attention. NSCs were ex-vivo expanded in hyaluronic acid (HA-collagen composite with neurotrophin-3, and BrdU-labeled NSCs conduit was implanted onto the ends of the transected facial nerve of rabbits. Electromyography demonstrated a progressive decrease of current threshold and increase of voltage amplitude in de-innervated rabbits after implantation for one, four, eight and 12 weeks compared to readouts derived from animals prior to nerve transection. The most remarkable improvement, observed using Electrophysiology, was of de-innervated rabbits implanted with NSCs conduit as opposed to de-innervated counterparts with and without the implantation of HA-collagen, NSCs and HA-collagen, and HA-collagen and neurotrophin-3. Histological examination displayed no nerve fiber in tissue sections of de-innervated rabbits. The arrangement and S-100 immunoreactivity of nerve fibers in the tissue sections of normal rabbits and injured rabbits after implantation of NSCs scaffold for 12 weeks were similar, whereas disorderly arranged minifascicles of various sizes were noted in the other three arms. BrdU+ cells were detected at 12 weeks post-implantation. Data suggested that NSCs embedded in HA-collagen biomaterial could facilitate re-innervations of damaged facial nerve and the artificial conduit of NSCs might offer a potential treatment modality to peripheral nerve injuries.

  20. The long chain fatty acid oleate activates mouse intestinal afferent nerves in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, W Andrew; Beyak, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Vagal afferents innervating the gastrointestinal tract serve an important nutrient-sensing function, and these signals contribute to satiety. Detection of nutrients occurs largely through the release of mediators from specialized enteroendocrine cells within the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. The signaling pathways leading to vagal afferent activation are not clear; however, previous in-vivo studies have implicated a role for cholecystokinin (CCK). We used an in vitro intestinal afferent extracellular recording preparation to study the effect of luminal perfusion of the long chain fatty acid oleate on mouse intestinal afferent activity. Oleate activated intestinal afferents in a concentration-dependent fashion, with an EC50 value of approximately 25 mmol/L. The L-type calcium channel blocker nicardipine attenuated the effect of oleate. Vagotomy resulted in a significant (>60%) reduction of the responses to both oleate and CCK. The CCK-1 receptor antagonist lorglumide nearly abolished responses to CCK and oleate. Our experiments therefore suggest that oleate activates intestinal afferents, with vagal afferents primarily involved; however, nonvagal fibres also contribute. The activation is dependent on CCK release, likely via activation of L-type channels on mucosal enteroendocrine cells, finally resulting in activation of CCK-1 receptors on the afferent terminals. PMID:23656469

  1. The neuromuscular activity of Bothriopsis bilineata smaragdina (forest viper) venom and its toxin Bbil-TX (Asp49 phospholipase A2) on isolated mouse nerve-muscle preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floriano, Rafael Stuani; Rocha, Thalita; Carregari, Victor Corasolla; Marangoni, Sergio; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Hyslop, Stephen; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; Rowan, Edward G

    2015-03-01

    The presynaptic action of Bothriopsis bilineata smaragdina (forest viper) venom and Bbil-TX, an Asp49 PLA2 from this venom, was examined in detail in mouse phrenic nerve-muscle (PND) preparations in vitro and in a neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-SH) in order to gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of the venom and associated Asp49 PLA2. In low Ca(2+) solution, venom (3?g/ml) caused a quadriphasic response in PND twitch height whilst at 10?g/ml the venom additionally induced an abrupt and marked initial contracture followed by neuromuscular facilitation, rhythmic oscillations of nerve-evoked twitches, alterations in baseline and progressive blockade. The venom slowed the relaxation phase of muscle twitches. In low Ca(2+), Bbil-TX [210nM (3?g/ml)] caused a progressive increase in PND twitch amplitude but no change in the decay time constant. Venom (10?g/ml) and Bbil-TX (210nM) caused minor changes in the compound action potential (CAP) amplitude recorded from sciatic nerve preparations, with no significant effect on rise time and latency; tetrodotoxin (3.1nM) blocked the CAP at the end of the experiments. In mouse triangularis sterni nerve-muscle (TSn-m) preparations, venom (10?g/ml) and Bbil-TX (210nM) significantly reduced the perineural waveform associated with the outward K(+) current while the amplitude of the inward Na(+) current was not significantly affected. Bbil-TX (210nM) caused a progressive increase in the quantal content of TSn-m preparations maintained in low Ca(2+) solution. Venom (3?g/ml) and toxin (210nM) increased the calcium fluorescence in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells loaded with Fluo3 AM and maintained in low or normal Ca(2+) solution. In normal Ca(2+), the increase in fluorescence amplitude was accompanied by irregular and frequent calcium transients. In TSn-m preparations loaded with Fluo4 AM, venom (10?g/ml) caused an immediate increase in intracellular Ca(2+) followed by oscillations in fluorescence and muscle contracture; Bbil-TX did not change the calcium fluorescence in TSn-m preparations. Immunohistochemical analysis of toxin-treated PND preparations revealed labeling of junctional ACh receptors but a loss of the presynaptic proteins synaptophysin and SNAP25. Together, these data confirm the presynaptic action of Bbil-TX and show that it involves modulation of K(+) channel activity and presynaptic protein expression. PMID:25572337

  2. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  3. Nerve growth factor is involved in the supportive effect by bone marrow--derived stromal cells of the factor-dependent human cell line UT-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffray, I; Chevalier, S; Froger, J; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Gascan, H; Coulombel, L

    1996-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that murine MS-5 and SI/SI4 cell lines induce the proliferation of human factor-dependent UT-7 cells in the absence of normally required human cytokines and also stimulate the differentiation of CD34+/CD38-LTC-ICs. We report in this study that the effect of MS-5 cells on UT-7 cells can be completely explained by the synergistic action of nerve growth factor (NGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) produced by these murine stromal cells. Purified murine NGF was able to support short-term clone formation and long-term growth of UT-7 cells in suspension cultures as efficiently as rhu-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. NGF action was mediated through the TrkA receptor, in which messenger RNA (mRNA) was easily detected in UT-7 cells by Northern blot. MS-5 cells strongly expressed NGF mRNA in Northern blot, and direct implication of MS-5-derived NGF in the induction of UT-7 cells proliferation was demonstrated in inhibition assays with an anti-NGF monoclonal antibody (MoAb) that neutralized by 84% +/- 4.1% (n = 5) UT-7 clone formation. However, NGF did not act alone, and several arguments demonstrated the synergistic action of MS-5-derived SCF: (1) an anti-c-kit partially inhibited UT-7 cells clone formation in coculture assays, (2) SCF and NGF synergized in an H3-TdR incorporation assay, and (3) the stimulatory effect of 10x-concentrated MS-5 supernatant was completely inhibited by an anti-c-kit but not by an anti-NGF, and levels of soluble NGF (1.2 ng/mL) detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 10x supernatant of MS-5 cells cultures were below the biologically active concentrations. In contrast, although MS-5 cells also promoted the differentiation of very primitive CD34+/CD38- human stem cells both in colony assays and long-term cultures, we could not incriminate MS-5-derived NGF in the observed effect: an anti-NGF MoAb did not inhibit the synergistic effect of MS-5 cells in colony assays or long-term cultures nor did soluble muNGF duplicate MS-5 effect and survival of CD34+/CD38- clonogenic progenitor cells promoted by MS-5 was unaffected by an anti-NGF and was not induced by soluble NGF alone or combined with SCF. In contrast, NGF in synergy with SCF supported the short-term maintenance of high numbers of CD34+/CD38+ mature erythroid progenitors probably through an indirect mechanism implying macrophages. These results suggest that NGF, in which the primary target cells are outside the hematopoietic system, is present in the marrow environment and might act at some steps of hematopoietic stem cell development. These results also underline that the response of cell lines and normal stem cells to stromal cells is mediated by different pathways. PMID:8781416

  4. Cell-type specific short-term plasticity at auditory nerve synapses controls feed-forward inhibition in the dorsal cochlear nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan Brenowitz

    2014-01-01

    Feedforward inhibition represents a powerful mechanism by which control of the timing and fidelity of action potentials in local synaptic circuits of various brain regions is achieved. In the cochlear nucleus, the auditory nerve provides excitation to both principal neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Here, we investigated the synaptic circuit associated with fusiform cells (FCs), principal neurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) that receive excitation from auditory nerve fibers and in...

  5. Activation of Satellite Glial Cells in Rat Trigeminal Ganglion after Upper Molar Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs), which passively support the function of the neurons, but little is known about the interactions between SGCs and TG neurons after peripheral nerve injury. To examine the effect of nerve injury on SGCs, we investigated the activation of SGCs after neuronal damage due to the extraction of the upper molars in rats. Three, 7, and 10 days after extraction, animals were fixed and the TG was removed. Cryosections of the ganglia were immunostained with antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of activated SGCs, and ATF3, a marker of damaged neurons. After tooth extraction, the number of ATF3-immunoreactive (IR) neurons enclosed by GFAP-IR SGCs had increased in a time-dependent manner in the maxillary nerve region of the TG. Although ATF3-IR neurons were not detected in the mandibular nerve region, the number of GFAP-IR SGCs increased in both the maxillary and mandibular nerve regions. Our results suggest that peripheral nerve injury affects the activation of TG neurons and the SGCs around the injured neurons. Moreover, our data suggest the existence of a neuronal interaction between maxillary and mandibular neurons via SGC activation

  6. Mindfulness meditation lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in African-American males with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeanie; Lyles, Robert H; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2014-07-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MM) is a stress-reduction technique that may have real biological effects on hemodynamics but has never previously been tested in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the potential blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of MM are unknown. We sought to determine whether MM acutely lowers BP in CKD patients, and whether these hemodynamic changes are mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. In 15 hypertensive African-American (AA) males with CKD, we conducted a randomized, crossover study in which participants underwent 14 min of MM or 14 min of BP education (control intervention) during two separate random-order study visits. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), beat-to-beat arterial BP, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were continuously measured at baseline and during each intervention. A subset had a third study visit to undergo controlled breathing (CB) to determine whether a reduction in RR alone was sufficient in exacting hemodynamic changes. We observed a significantly greater reduction in systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and HR, as well as a significantly greater reduction in MSNA, during MM compared with the control intervention. Participants had a significantly lower RR during MM; however, in contrast to MM, CB alone did not reduce BP, HR, or MSNA. MM acutely lowers BP and HR in AA males with hypertensive CKD, and these hemodynamic effects may be mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. RR is significantly lower during MM, but CB alone without concomitant meditation does not acutely alter hemodynamics or sympathetic activity in CKD. PMID:24829497

  7. Activation of stretch-activated channels and maxi-K+ channels by membrane stress of human lamina cribrosa cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Irnaten, Mustapha

    2009-01-01

    The lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the optic nerve head is considered the primary site of damage in glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Resident LC cells have a profibrotic potential when exposed to cyclical stretch. However, the mechanosensitive mechanisms of these cells remain unknown. Here the authors investigated the effects of membrane stretch on cell volume change and ion channel activity and examined the associated changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)).

  8. GLP-1 signals via ERK in peripheral nerve and prevents nerve dysfunction in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolivalt, CG; Fineman, M; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Carr, RD; Calcutt, NA

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that induces glucose-dependent insulin secretion and may have neurotrophic properties. Our aim was to identify the presence and activity of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in peripheral nerve and to assess the impact of GLP-1R agonists on...... diabetes-induced nerve disorders. Methods: Tissues were collected from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. GLP-1R function was assessed by incubating tissues from normal and diabetic rats with GLP-1R agonists and antagonists and measuring induction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by Western blot. Streptozotocin......-diabetic mice were also treated with the GLP-1R agonist exenatide for 8 weeks to assess the impact of GLP-1R signalling on peripheral nerve function and structure. Results: GLP-1R protein was detected in rat dorsal root ganglia and the neurons and Schwann cells of the sciatic nerve. Protein levels were not...

  9. Intravitreal Delivery of Human NgR-Fc Decoy Protein Regenerates Axons After Optic Nerve Crush and Protects Ganglion Cells in Glaucoma Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Lin, Jun; Arzeno, Alexander; Choi, Jin Young; Boccio, Juliann; Frieden, Eric; Bhargava, Ajay; Maynard, George; Tsai, James C.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Glaucoma is a major cause of vision loss due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Therapeutic intervention controls increased IOP, but neuroprotection is unavailable. NogoReceptor1 (NgR1) limits adult central nervous system (CNS) axonal sprouting and regeneration. We examined NgR1 blocking decoy as a potential therapy by defining the pharmacokinetics of intravitreal NgR(310)-Fc, its promotion of RGC axonal regeneration following nerve crush, and its neuroprotective effect in a microbead glaucoma model. Methods. Human NgR1(310)-Fc was administered intravitreally, and levels were monitored in rat vitreal humor and retina. Axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush was assessed by cholera toxin ? anterograde labeling. In a microbead model of glaucoma with increased IOP, the number of surviving and actively transporting RGCs was determined after 4 weeks by retrograde tracing with Fluro-Gold (FG) from the superior colliculus. Results. After intravitreal bolus administration, the terminal half-life of NgR1(310)-Fc between 1 and 7 days was approximately 24 hours. Injection of 5 ?g protein once per week after optic nerve crush injury significantly increased RGCs with regenerating axons. Microbeads delivered to the anterior chamber increased pressure, and caused 15% reduction in FG-labeled RGCs of control rats, with a 40% reduction in large diameter RGCs. Intravitreal treatment with NgR1(310)-Fc did not reduce IOP, but maintained large diameter RGC density at control levels. Conclusions. Human NgR1(310)-Fc has favorable pharmacokinetics in the vitreal space and rescues large diameter RGC counts from increased IOP. Thus, the NgR1 blocking decoy protein may have efficacy as a disease-modifying therapy for glaucoma. PMID:25655801

  10. The immunomodulatory properties of adult skin-derived precursor Schwann cells: implications for peripheral nerve injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Jo Anne; Shah, Prajay T; Kumar, Ranjan; Stykel, Morgan G; Shapira, Yuval; Grochmal, Joey; Guo, Gui Fang; Biernaskie, Jeff; Midha, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    Skin-derived precursor Schwann cell (SKPSC) therapy has been identified as a potentially beneficial treatment for peripheral nerve injuries. One hypothesised mechanism by which SKPSCs enhance recovery is via the modulation of macrophages. In the present study, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of adult rat SKPSCs, and demonstrated that these cells expressed a battery of cytokines, including interferon-? (IFN-?), interleukin (IL)-1?, and, most abundantly, IL-6. Whereas macrophages exposed to depleted or fibroblast-conditioned medium secreted minimal amounts of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), in the presence of SKPSC-conditioned medium, macrophages secreted > 500 pg/mL TNF-?. Following the transplantation of SKPSCs into injured rat sciatic nerves, we observed an SKPSC density-dependent increase in the number of macrophages (Pearson's r = 0.66) and an SKPSC density-dependent decrease in myelin debris (Pearson's r = -0.68). To determine the effect of IL-6 in a proinflammatory context, macrophage cultures were primed with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/IFN-?/IL-1? or LPS/IFN-?/IL-1? + IL-6, and this showed a 212% and 301% increase in the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive proinflammatory macrophages respectively. In contrast to neurons exposed to conditioned medium from unprimed macrophages, neurons treated with conditioned medium from proinflammatory-primed macrophages showed a 13-26% reduction in neurite outgrowth. Anti-IL-6 antibody combined with SKPSC transplant therapy following nerve injury did not alter macrophage numbers or debris clearance, but instead reduced iNOS expression as compared with SKPSC + IgG-treated rats. SKPSC + anti-IL-6 treatment also resulted in a two-fold increase in gastrocnemius compound muscle action potential amplitudes as compared with SKPSC + IgG treatment. Understanding the mechanisms underlying immunomodulatory aspects of SKPSC therapy and developing approaches to manipulate these responses are important for advancing Schwann cell-based therapies. PMID:26121489

  11. Single Cell Ras-GTP Analysis Reveals Altered Ras Activity in a Subpopulation of Neurofibroma Schwann Cells but Not Fibroblasts*

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Larry S; Atit, Radhika; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Cox, Adrienne D.; Ratner, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by multiple neurofibromas, peripheral nerve tumors containing mainly Schwann cells and fibroblasts. The NF1 gene encodes neurofibromin, a tumor suppressor postulated to function in part as a Ras GTPase-activating protein. The roles of different cell types and of elevated Ras-GTP in neurofibroma formation are unclear. To determine which neurofibroma cell type has altered Ras-GTP regulation, we developed an immunocytochem...

  12. Non-thermal influence of a weak microwave on nerve fiber activity

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a short selective review of the non-thermal weak microwave field impact on a nerve fiber. The published results of recent experiments are reviewed and analyzed. The theory of the authors is presented, according to which there are strongly pronounced resonances in the range of about 30-300 GHz associated with the excitation of ultrasonic vibrations in the membrane as a result of interactions with the microwave radiation. These forced vibrations create acoustic pressure, which may lead to the redistribution of the protein transmembrane channels, thus changing the threshold of the action potential excitation in the axons of the neural network. The problem of surface charge on the bilayer lipid membrane of the nerve fiber is discussed. Various experiments for observing the effects considered are also discussed.

  13. Prejunctional modulatory action of neuropeptide Y on responses due to antidromic activation of peripheral terminals of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in the isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    OpenAIRE

    Takaki, M.; Nakayama, S.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on motor responses produced by activation of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in the guinea-pig isolated ileum was determined by use of capsaicin itself and electrical mesenteric nerve stimulation as stimuli. 2. NPY inhibited or suppressed the cholinergic contractile response produced by electrical mesenteric nerve stimulation while leaving the contractile response to a threshold concentration of capsaicin. 3. NPY had no effect on motor responses pro...

  14. Axons of retinal ganglion cells are insulted in the optic nerve early in DBA/2J glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Gareth R; Libby, Richard T.; Jakobs, Tatjana C.; Smith, Richard S.; Phalan, F. Campbell; Barter, Joseph W.; Barbay, Jessica M.; Marchant, Jeffrey K.; Mahesh, Nagaraju; Porciatti, Vittorio; Whitmore, Alan V.; MASLAND, RICHARD H.; John, Simon W. M.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we use a mouse model (DBA/2J) to readdress the location of insult(s) to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucoma. We localize an early sign of axon damage to an astrocyte-rich region of the optic nerve just posterior to the retina, analogous to the lamina cribrosa. In this region, a network of astrocytes associates intimately with RGC axons. Using BAX-deficient DBA/2J mice, which retain all of their RGCs, we provide experimental evidence for an insult within or very close to the lamina...

  15. Late Onset of Facial Nerve Palsy after Tympanomastoidectomy: HSV-I Activation?

    OpenAIRE

    Akduman, Davut; Haksever, Mehmet; Solmaz, Fevzi; DÖNER, Fehmi

    2015-01-01

    We presented a right peripheral facial palsy occurred 7 days after operation. A 42 year old female patient had an uneventful right tympanomastoidectomy in our clinic.  She developed a Hause-Brackmann Grade II peripheral facial palsy postoperatively. A viral screen was performed using Enzyme Immune Assay. HSV-1 specific antibody titer was determined during the acute phase on the 2nd day of facial palsy, confirming the viral etiology. She was commenced to take steroid therapy. Her facial nerve ...

  16. Pathways Mediating Activity-Induced Enhancement of Recovery From Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Manning J; English, Arthur W

    2015-07-01

    This article outlines the novel hypothesis that exercise promotes axon regeneration after peripheral nerve injury through neuronal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and there are three required means of promoting BDNF expression: 1) increased signaling through androgen receptors, 2) increased cAMP-responsive element-binding protein expression, and 3) increased expression of the transcription factor SRY-box containing gene 11. PMID:25906422

  17. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Murayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH, a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control, a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in “itch-scratch” animal models is under investigation.

  18. Survival, migration and differentiation of mouse tau-GFP embryonic stem cells transplanted into the rat auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Björn; Jiao, Yu; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Stupp, Samuel I; Olivius, Petri

    2012-06-01

    Stem cells have been investigated as treatment for a variety of diagnoses such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and spinal cord injuries. Here, we investigated the possibility of using stem cells as a replacement therapy for lesions of the auditory nerve (AN). We transplanted tau-GFP mouse embryonic stem cells into the AN either by the internal auditory meatus or via the modiolus in rats that had been previously deafened by application of ?-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. We investigated the effect of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cell transplant survival and differentiation. Additionally chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), a digestive enzyme that cleaves the core chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, was used in order to promote possible migration of cells and axons through the transitional zone. A bioactive isoleucine-lysine-valine-alanine-valine (IKVAV) peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber gel was applied around the cell injection site. This nanofiber gel has been shown to promote neural differentiation and other similar gels have been used to encapsulate and release proteins. Three weeks after injection, transplanted cells were found in the scala tympani, the modiolus, the AN trunk and the brain stem. As compared to cell transplantation and gel only, BDNF content in the PA gel increased cell survival and neuronal differentiation. In the animals treated with ChABC we observed extensive migration of cells through the transitional zone to or from the CNS. PMID:22487201

  19. Solid state theory of competitive diffusion of associated Na+ and K+ in cells by free cation and vacancy (hole) mechanisms, with application to nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, F W

    1977-01-01

    If, as recent evidence indicates, most cell potassium is associated with macromolecular fixed charge, then diffusion of potassium ions in cells might occur by (1) diffusion of the small fraction of free potassium in cell water (analogous to electrons in the conduction band of a semiconductor) or by (2) diffusion of vacancies on association sites (analogous to holes in a semiconductor). Derivations of the Fick first law of diffusion predict that partial substitution of sodium for potassium in the cell produces opposite effects on the effective diffusion constant of potassium for those mechanisms. Application of that substitution to nerve data suggests that rubidium ions diffuse by a free cation result when the nerve is clamped at its resting potential, but by a vacancy mechanism when the nerve is clamped at zero voltage. PMID:613332

  20. Endocrine cells and nerve ganglia of the small intestine of the Opossum Didelphis aurita Wied-Neuwied, 1826 (Mammalia: Didelphidae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gláucia M., Freitas-Ribeiro; Cláudio C., Fonseca; Sirlene S.R., Sartori; Alan, Loures-Ribeiro; Clóvis A., Neves.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Os sistemas nervoso e endócrino controlam integra-damente os movimentos intestinais, a secreção de suas glândulas e também participam dos processos de digestão e absorção de nutrientes. Portanto, o objetivo central deste estudo foi verificar a existência de uma possível relação entre o número de cél [...] ulas nervosas e gânglios dos plexos submucosos e mioentéricos e o número de células endócrinas no intestino delgado de adultos de D. aurita. As técnicas de coloração utilizadas foram Grimelius, Masson-Fontana modificada, imunoperoxidase direta e H-E. As células endócrinas argirófilas, argentafins e imunorreativas à insulina não variaram numericamente entre as regiões inicial, média e final do duodeno, jejuno e íleo (P>0,05), exceto as células argirófilas no jejuno (P Abstract in english The nervous and endocrine systems jointly control intestinal movements, secretions of their glands and also participate of the processes of nutrient digestion and absorption. Therefore, the central objective of this study was to verify the existence of a possible relationship between the number of n [...] ervous cells and ganglia of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses and the number of endocrine cells in the small intestine of adult D. aurita. The utilized staining techniques were Grimelius, modified Masson-Fontana, direct immunoperoxidase and H-E. Argyrophillic, argentaffin and insulin immunoreactive endocrine cells do not numerically vary between the initial, mid and final regions of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum (P>0.05), except for argyrophillic cells in the jejunum (P>0.05). No numerical relationship has yet been verified between the number of nerve ganglia and endocrine cells, and also between nervous and endocrine cells. We recommended the use of new immunohistochemical techniques to confirm the numerical correlation between the nervous and endocrine systems in the small intestine. The morphology and distribution of endocrine cells and the nerve ganglia studied were similar to those encountered in eutherian mammals.

  1. Nestin-Expressing Stem Cells from the Hair Follicle Can Differentiate Into Motor Neurons and Reduce Muscle Atrophy after Transplantation to Injured Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Chuansen; HOFFMAN, ROBERT M.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells from the mouse and human are multipotent and can differentiate into many cell types, including neurons and glial cells. The nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can effect nerve and spinal cord repair upon transplantation in mouse models. In the present study, nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were induced by retinoic acid and fetal bovine serum to differentiate and...

  2. Endothelial cell activation by mast cell mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileepan, Kottarappat N; Stechschulte, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are important cells of the immune system, and their secretory products regulate many vascular functions. Although considerable interest is focused on the role of mast cells and infectious agents in atherosclerosis, whether or not mast cell mediators act in concert with bacterial agents to regulate endothelial activation is not known. Here, we have described experimental techniques and presented related results to demonstrate how mast cell granule (MCG) mediators and bacterial products synergize endothelial cell inflammatory responses. The described methods outline: (1) the collection of rat peritoneal mast cells; (2) preparation of MCGs; (3) co-culture of human endothelial cells with mast cell granules; (4) determination of the regulation of endo- thelial cell inflammatory responses; (5) demonstration of the role of MCG protease and histamine in the regulation of endothelial cell function; (6) amplification of lipopolysaccharide-induced signal transduction pathways by mast cell granules; (7) elucidation of histamine-induced amplification of endothelial cell responses to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell wall components; and (8) determination of the expression of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4. We hope the techniques described here can be used for designing experiments focusing on the regulatory role of mast cell mediators on cell functions. PMID:16110164

  3. Imatinib mesylate inhibits cell growth of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in vitro and in vivo through suppression of PDGFR-?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive and associated with poor prognosis. Basic research to develop new treatment regimens is critically needed. The effects of imatinib mesylate on MPNSTs were examined in six human MPNST cell lines and in a xenograft mouse model. The results showed expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-? and suppression of its phosphorylation by imatinib mesylate in all six cell lines. Imatinib mesylate effectively suppressed MPNST cell growth in vitro at concentrations similar to those used clinically (1.46 ? 4.6 ?M) in three of six cell lines. Knockdown of PDGFR-? by transfection with a specific siRNA also caused significant reduction in cell proliferation in the sensitive cell lines, but not in the resistant cell lines. Furthermore, imatinib mesylate also significantly suppressed colony formation within soft agar and tumor growth in xenograft models using two of the three sensitive MPNST cell lines. There was excellent agreement between in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to imatinib mesylate, suggesting possible selection of imatinib-sensitive tumors by in vitro analysis. The results suggest that imatinib mesylate may be useful in the treatment of MPNST patients and in vitro studies may help select cells that are sensitive to imatinib mesylate in vivo

  4. Repair of sciatic nerve defects using tissue engineered nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Caishun; Lv, Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered nerves with acellular nerve allografts in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were prepared using chemical detergents-enzymatic digestion and mechanical methods, in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of Wistar rats cultured in vitro, to repair 15 mm sciatic bone defects in Wistar rats. At postoperative 12 weeks, electrophysiological detection results showed that the conduction velocity of regenerated nerve after repair with tissue-engine...

  5. [Interdependent changes of the axon and Schwann cell in the process of reactive remodeling of a myelinated nerve fiber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokurina, T N; Sotnikov, O S; Novakovskaia, S A; Egorov, A S; Kozhevets, R V; Solnushkin, S D; Chikhman, V N

    2013-01-01

    Using the inverted phase-contrast microscope, the living undamaged frog sciatic nerve fibers and the fibers mechanically injured to varying degrees, were studied. It was found that the swelling of myelin incisures (MI) (of Schmidt-Lanterman) occured according to the principles similar to those controlling the changes of the myelin gap (node of Ranvier) and depended on the swelling of a Schwann cell (SC) perikaryon. It was detected that this was a single process, which which could be united in a complex of nonspecific changes of a myelinated nerve fiber. It was also demonstrated that under the action of mechanical injury and hypotonic solution, swelling of MI, nodes of Ranvier and SC perikaryon occurred without modifications of outer fiber diameter, due to the pronounced local axon thinning. Electron microscopic study of the cytoskeletal axonal structures showed that there was not a simple local contraction of an axon, but a significant local increase in the density of cytoskeletal components of the axoplasm (by 200-275%). Reactive reversible remodeling of a myelinated fiber suggests a new type of interaction between the axon and SC, the mechanism of reversible translocation of liquid axoplasmic fraction to the glial cell cytoplasm. PMID:23898720

  6. C nociceptor activity in human nerve during painful and non painful skin stimulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hees, J.; Gybels, J

    1981-01-01

    Percutaneous recordings from more than one hundred single C fibres have been performed in the radial nerve of conscious human subjects. All these fibres belong to the poly-modal C nociceptor group, being excited by mechanical and thermal and also by chemical stimulation. Conduction velocities showed a monophasic distribution with a mean value of 0.86 m/s (SD: 0.17). The mechanical threshold, measured with von Frey hairs, varied between 2.3 and 13.1 g. The receptive field was circular or ellip...

  7. High sensitivity recording of afferent nerve activity using ultra-compliant microchannel electrodes: an acute in vivo validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Chew, Daniel J.; Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Fawcett, James W.; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2012-04-01

    Neuroprostheses interfaced with transected peripheral nerves are technological routes to control robotic limbs as well as convey sensory feedback to patients suffering from traumatic neural injuries or degenerative diseases. To maximize the wealth of data obtained in recordings, interfacing devices are required to have intrafascicular resolution and provide high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recordings. In this paper, we focus on a possible building block of a three-dimensional regenerative implant: a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel electrode capable of highly sensitive recordings in vivo. The PDMS 'micro-cuff' consists of a 3.5 mm long (100 µm × 70 µm cross section) microfluidic channel equipped with five evaporated Ti/Au/Ti electrodes of sub-100 nm thickness. Individual electrodes have average impedance of 640 ± 30 k? with a phase angle of -58 ± 1 degrees at 1 kHz and survive demanding mechanical handling such as twisting and bending. In proof-of-principle acute implantation experiments in rats, surgically teased afferent nerve strands from the L5 dorsal root were threaded through the microchannel. Tactile stimulation of the skin was reliably monitored with the three inner electrodes in the device, simultaneously recording signal amplitudes of up to 50 µV under saline immersion. The overall SNR was approximately 4. A small but consistent time lag between the signals arriving at the three electrodes was observed and yields a fibre conduction velocity of 30 m s-1. The fidelity of the recordings was verified by placing the same nerve strand in oil and recording activity with hook electrodes. Our results show that PDMS microchannel electrodes open a promising technological path to 3D regenerative interfaces.

  8. Cultures of Schwann-like cells differentiated from adipose-derived stem cells on PDMS/MWNT sheets as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In Ho; Sun, Fangfang; Choi, Yoon Ji; Zou, Fengming; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Cho, Won Ho; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun Sung; Koh, Kwangnak; Lee, Jaebeom

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates as novel scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration. Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive therapeutic targets due to their pivotal role in peripheral nerve regeneration, but primary SCs have limitations for clinical application. However, adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may differentiate into Schwann-like cells. The present study assesses the potential applicability of multiwall CNTs (MWNTs) composited with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which were then seeded with differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (dASCs) to promote neuronal differentiation and growth. Aqueous MWNT dispersion was filtered, and the PDMS/MWNT sheets were prepared using a simple printing-transfer method. Characterization of PDMS/MWNT sheets indicated their unique physical properties, such as superior mechanical strength and electroconductivity, compared with bare PDMS sheets. ASCs were differentiated into Schwann-like cells using a mixture of glial growth factors. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were co-cultured with SCs and dASCs on PDMS/MWNTs sheets or noncoated dishes. An alamar blue proliferation assay of dASC and SCs showed significantly more dASC and SCs cultured on PDMS/MWNT sheets at 48 h and 72 h than when cultured on noncoated dishes (p?PDMS/MWNT sheets seeded with dASCs, the proliferation of DRG neurons and the longest neurite outgrowth length per neuron were significantly greater than when DRG were cultured on PDMS/MWNT sheets alone or on noncoated dishes seeded with SCs or dASCs (p?PDMS/MWNT sheets exhibited excellent biocompatibility for culturing Schwann-like cells differentiated from ASCs. Seeding the dASCs on PDMS/MWNT sheets may produce synergistic effects in peripheral nerve regeneration, similarly to SCs. PMID:25903927

  9. Nasal-Type Extranodal Natural Killer/T-cell Neurolymphomatosis Confined to the Lumbar Nerve Roots: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurolymphomatosis refers to lymphoma that has infiltrated the peripheral nervous system and this is the least common clinical presentation of nervous system lymphoma. Most neurolymphomatosis is due to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and most patients show lymphomatous infiltration in the meninges and brain parenchyma, in addition to peripheral nervous system involvement. We diagnosed a case of neurolymphomatosis that was confined to the right 4th and 5th lumbar nerve roots without involvement of the meninges or brain parenchyma in a patient with the nasal-type extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. We made this diagnosis based on the MRI and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings and the clinical manifestations

  10. Comparison of Central Corneal Thickness and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Ganglion Cell Complex in Patients with Ocular Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Mumcu Ta?l?

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the correlation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT with ganglion cell complex and central corneal thickness (CCT measurements in patients with ocular hypertension and healthy subjects. Material and Method: Seventy-six eyes of 38 patients with ocular hypertension and 76 eyes of 38 healthy subjects were included in this study. Both groups were stratified by CCT into 579 µm (p0.05. In the control group, there was no significant correlation between CCT and RNFLT (average, superior average, inferior average measurements (p>0.05. There was no significant correlation between CCT and average, superior average, inferior average ganglion cell complex in both groups. Discussion: Ocular hypertension patients with CCT <550 µm may represent patients who have very early undetected glaucoma. This may in part explain the higher risk of these patients for progression to glaucoma. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 385-90

  11. Characteristic element of matrix attachment region mediates vector attachment and enhances nerve growth factor expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X Y; Zhang, J H; Sun, Q L; Yao, Z Y; Deng, B G; Guo, W Y; Wang, L; Dong, W H; Wang, F; Zhao, C P; Wang, T Y

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary studies have suggested that a characteristic element of the matrix attachment region (MAR) in human interferon-? mediates the adhesion of vectors to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this study, we investigated if vector adhesion increased nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in CHO cells. The MAR characteristic element sequence of human interferon-? was inserted into the multiple-cloning site of the pEGFP-C1 vector. The target NGF gene was inserted upstream of the MAR characteristic element sequence to construct the MAR/NGF expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CHO cells and stable monoclonal cells were selected using G418. NGF mRNA and protein expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Plasmid reduction experiments were used to determine the state of transfected plasmid in mammalian cells. The insertion of MAR into the vector increased NGF expression levels in CHO cells (1.93- fold) compared to the control. The recombinant plasmid expressing the MAR sequence was digested into a linear space vector. The inserted MAR and NGF sequences were consistent with those inserted into the plasmid before recombination. Therefore, we concluded that the MAR characteristic element mediates vector adhesion to CHO cells and enhances the stability and efficiency of the target gene expression. PMID:26345852

  12. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed. PMID:25861888

  13. Adult-brain-derived neural stem cells grafting into a vein bridge increases postlesional recovery and regeneration in a peripheral nerve of adult pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liard, Olivier; Segura, Stéphanie; Sagui, Emmanuel; Nau, André; Pascual, Aurélie; Cambon, Melissa; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Fusai, Thierry; Moyse, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We attempted transplantation of adult neural stem cells (ANSCs) inside an autologous venous graft following surgical transsection of nervis cruralis with 30?mm long gap in adult pig. The transplanted cell suspension was a primary culture of neurospheres from adult pig subventricular zone (SVZ) which had been labeled in vitro with BrdU or lentivirally transferred fluorescent protein. Lesion-induced loss of leg extension on the thigh became definitive in controls but was reversed by 45-90 days after neurosphere-filled vein grafting. Electromyography showed stimulodetection recovery in neurosphere-transplanted pigs but not in controls. Postmortem immunohistochemistry revealed neurosphere-derived cells that survived inside the venous graft from 10 to 240 post-lesion days and all displayed a neuronal phenotype. Newly formed neurons were distributed inside the venous graft along the severed nerve longitudinal axis. Moreover, ANSC transplantation increased CNPase expression, indicating activation of intrinsic Schwann cells. Thus ANSC transplantation inside an autologous venous graft provides an efficient repair strategy. PMID:22448170

  14. Correlation between the ganglion cell complex and structural measures of the optic disc and retinal nerve fiber layer in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani-Battilana, Erica; Teixeira, Ivan C; Barbosa, Diego T Q; Caixeta-Umbelino, Cristiano; Paolera, Maurício D; Kasahara, Niro

    2015-10-01

    To correlate the ganglion cell complex (GCC) parameters with structural measures of the optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) as evaluated by Fourier-Domain optic coherence tomography (OCT). This retrospective study included patients with glaucoma, ocular hypertensive patients and glaucoma suspects who had previously undergone OCT examination with the RTVue-100. The parameters of GCC (average, superior, inferior, focal loss volume [FLV], global loss volume [GLV]) were correlated with the values of the ONH (cup volume, cup area, horizontal cup-to-disk ratio, vertical cup-to-disk ratio, and rim area) and RNFL (average, superior, and inferior) using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The sample included 74 eyes of 37 patients. All correlations between GCC parameters and RNFL were strong (r > 0.60). The correlation between GCC parameters and ONH were good for most parameters, except that for FLV and cup volume (r = 0.13), GLV and cup volume (r = 0.09), and GLV and cup area (r = 0.21). The GCC parameters can be used as structural measures of the glaucomatous optic neuropathy. PMID:25183459

  15. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, Poul Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG0202, capable of local delivery of NGF by a genetically modified human cell line, NGC-0295. The NsG0202 devices have shown promising safety and therapeutic results in a small phase 1b clinical study. However, results also show that the NGF dose could advantageously be increased. We have used the sleeping beauty transposon expression technology to establish a new clinical grade cell line, NGC0211, with at least 10 times higher NGF production than that of NGC-0295. To test whether encapsulation of this cell line provides a relevant dose escalation step in delivering NGF for treatment of the cognitive decline in AD patients, we have validated the bioactivity of devices with NGC0211 and NGC-0295 cells in normal rat striatumas well as in the quinolinic acid striatal lesion model. These preclinical animal studies show that implantation of devices with NGC0211 cells lead to significantly higher NGF output, which in both cases correlate with highly improved potency.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 24 November 2011; doi:10.1038/gt.2011.178.

  16. Autocrine protective mechanisms of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Fang, Kan-Tang; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the role of autocrine mechanisms in the anti-apoptotic effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after optic nerve (ON) crush. We observed that both G-CSF and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) are expressed in normal rat retina. Further dual immunofluorescence staining showed G-CSFR immunoreactive cells were colocalized with RGCs, Müller cells, horizontal and amacrine cells. These results confirm that G-CSF is an endogenous ligand in the retina. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR finding demonstrated the transcription levels of G-CSF and G-CSFR were up-regulated after ON crush injury. G-CSF treatment further increased and prolonged the expression level of G-CSFR in the retina. G-CSF has been shown to enhance transdifferentiation of the mobilized hematopoietic stem cells into tissue to repair central nervous system injury. We test the hypothesis that the hematopoietic stem cells recruited by G-CSF treatment can transdifferentiate into RGCs after ON crush by performing sublethal irradiation of the rats 5 days before ON crush. The flow cytometric analysis showed the number of CD34 positive cells in the peripheral blood is significantly lower in the irradiated, crushed and G-CSF-treated group than the sham control group or crush and G-CSF treated group. Nevertheless, the G-CSF treatment enhances the RGC survival after sublethal irradiation and ON crush injury. These data indicate that G-CSF seems unlikely to induce hematopoietic stem cell transdifferentiation into RGCs after ON crush injury. In conclusion, G-CSF may serve an endogenous protective signaling in the retina through direct activation of intrinsic G-CSF receptors and downstream signaling pathways to rescue RGCs after ON crush injury, exogenous G-CSF administration can enhance the anti-apoptotic effects on RGCs. PMID:26518178

  17. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2012-02-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  18. Mechanism of sphingosine 1-phosphate- and lysophosphatidic Acid-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and eosinophil chemoattractant in nerve cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costello, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    The lysophospholipids sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) act via G-protein coupled receptors S1P(1-5) and LPA(1-3) respectively, and are implicated in allergy. Eosinophils accumulate at innervating cholinergic nerves in asthma and adhere to nerve cells via intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells were used as an in vitro cholinergic nerve cell model. The G(i) coupled receptors S1P(1), S1P(3), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3) were expressed on IMR-32 cells. Both S1P and LPA induced ERK phosphorylation and ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of ICAM-1 expression, with differing time courses. LPA also induced ERK- and G(i)-dependent up-regulation of the eosinophil chemoattractant, CCL-26. The eosinophil granule protein eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) induced ERK-dependent up-regulation of transcription of S1P(1), LPA(1), LPA(2) and LPA(3), providing the situation whereby eosinophil granule proteins may enhance S1P- and\\/or LPA- induced eosinophil accumulation at nerve cells in allergic conditions.

  19. Post-embryonic nerve-associated precursors to adult pigment cells: genetic requirements and dynamics of morphogenesis and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Erine H; Patterson, Larissa B; Parichy, David M

    2011-05-01

    The pigment cells of vertebrates serve a variety of functions and generate a stunning variety of patterns. These cells are also implicated in human pathologies including melanoma. Whereas the events of pigment cell development have been studied extensively in the embryo, much less is known about morphogenesis and differentiation of these cells during post-embryonic stages. Previous studies of zebrafish revealed genetically distinct populations of embryonic and adult melanophores, the ectotherm homologue of amniote melanocytes. Here, we use molecular markers, vital labeling, time-lapse imaging, mutational analyses, and transgenesis to identify peripheral nerves as a niche for precursors to adult melanophores that subsequently migrate to the skin to form the adult pigment pattern. We further identify genetic requirements for establishing, maintaining, and recruiting precursors to the adult melanophore lineage and demonstrate novel compensatory behaviors during pattern regulation in mutant backgrounds. Finally, we show that distinct populations of latent precursors having differential regenerative capabilities persist into the adult. These findings provide a foundation for future studies of post-embryonic pigment cell precursors in development, evolution, and neoplasia. PMID:21625562

  20. Endocrine cells and nerve ganglia of the small intestine of the Opossum Didelphis aurita Wied-Neuwied, 1826 (Mammalia: Didelphidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia M. Freitas-Ribeiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The nervous and endocrine systems jointly control intestinal movements, secretions of their glands and also participate of the processes of nutrient digestion and absorption. Therefore, the central objective of this study was to verify the existence of a possible relationship between the number of nervous cells and ganglia of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses and the number of endocrine cells in the small intestine of adult D. aurita. The utilized staining techniques were Grimelius, modified Masson-Fontana, direct immunoperoxidase and H-E. Argyrophillic, argentaffin and insulin immunoreactive endocrine cells do not numerically vary between the initial, mid and final regions of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum (P>0.05, except for argyrophillic cells in the jejunum (P>0.05. No numerical relationship has yet been verified between the number of nerve ganglia and endocrine cells, and also between nervous and endocrine cells. We recommended the use of new immunohistochemical techniques to confirm the numerical correlation between the nervous and endocrine systems in the small intestine. The morphology and distribution of endocrine cells and the nerve ganglia studied were similar to those encountered in eutherian mammals.Os sistemas nervoso e endócrino controlam integra-damente os movimentos intestinais, a secreção de suas glândulas e também participam dos processos de digestão e absorção de nutrientes. Portanto, o objetivo central deste estudo foi verificar a existência de uma possível relação entre o número de células nervosas e gânglios dos plexos submucosos e mioentéricos e o número de células endócrinas no intestino delgado de adultos de D. aurita. As técnicas de coloração utilizadas foram Grimelius, Masson-Fontana modificada, imunoperoxidase direta e H-E. As células endócrinas argirófilas, argentafins e imunorreativas à insulina não variaram numericamente entre as regiões inicial, média e final do duodeno, jejuno e íleo (P>0,05, exceto as células argirófilas no jejuno (P<0,05. Nenhuma relação numérica foi verificada entre o número de gânglios nervosos e células endócrinas, e também entre células nervosas e endócrinas. Nós recomendamos o emprego de novas técnicas imunohistoquímicas para confirmar a correlação numérica entre os sistemas nervoso e endócrino no intestino delgado. A morfologia e a distribuição das células endócrinas e dos gânglios nervosos estudados foram similares àqueles encontrados em mamíferos eutérios.

  1. The Influence of Low Doses of Zearalenone on Distribution of Selected Active Substances in Nerve Fibers Within the Circular Muscle Layer of Porcine Ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonkowski, S?awomir; Obremski, Kazimierz; Calka, Jaroslaw

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, whether low doses (25 % of no observable adverse effect levels values) of zearalenone (ZEN) can affect the expression of active substances in nerve fibers in the muscular layer of porcine ileum. The study was performed on ten immature pigs divided into two groups: experimental group (n?=?5), where zearalenone (10 ?g/kg body weight) was given for 42 days, and control animals (n?=?5), where placebo was administered. Fragments of ileum of all animals were processed for single-labelling immunofluorescence technique using the antibodies against vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuronal form of nitric oxide synthase, cocaine and amphetamine regulatory peptide, galanin, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27 and substance P. The number of nerve fibers immunoreactive to particular substances was evaluated by the counting of nerves per observation field (0.1 mm(2)). Low doses of zearalenone caused the clear changes in the expression of substances studied. The number of nerve fibers immunoreactive to the majority of substances increased in experimental animals. The exception was only galanin, the expression of which was less after administration of zearalenone. The obtained results for the first time show that even low doses of zearalenone can affect the nerve fibers in the digestive tract. PMID:25772391

  2. A rationally designed mutant of plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase hydrolyzes the organophosphorus nerve agent soman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Stephen D; Norris, Joseph; Sweeney, Richard; Bahnson, Brian J; Cerasoli, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) such as sarin and soman are some of the most toxic chemicals synthesized by man. They exert toxic effects by inactivating acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and bind secondary target protein. Organophosphorus compounds are hemi-substrates for enzymes of the serine hydrolase superfamily. Enzymes can be engineered by amino acid substitution into OP-hydrolyzing variants (bioscavengers) and used as therapeutics. Some enzymes associated with lipoproteins, such as human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (pPAF-AH), are also inhibited by OPs; these proteins have largely been ignored for engineering purposes because of complex interfacial kinetics and a lack of structural data. We have expressed active human pPAF-AH in bacteria and previously solved the crystal structure of this enzyme with OP adducts. Using these structures as a guide, we created histidine mutations near the active site of pPAF-AH (F322H, W298H, L153H) in an attempt to generate novel OP-hydrolase activity. Wild-type pPAF-AH, L153H, and F322H have essentially no hydrolytic activity against the nerve agents tested. In contrast, the W298H mutant displayed novel somanase activity with a kcat of 5min(-1) and a KM of 590?M at pH7.5. There was no selective preference for hydrolysis of any of the four soman stereoisomers. PMID:26343853

  3. Effects of perindopril on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with congestive heart failure: comparison with enalapril

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of aldosterone in the heart is suppressed by the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor perindopril in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Moreover, perindopril has been reported to have more cardioprotective effects than enalapril. Forty patients with CHF [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) images, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations were measured before and 6 months after treatment. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) and LVEF were also determined by echocardiography. After treatment, in patients receiving perindopril, TDS decreased from 39±10 to 34±9 (P123I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic parameters improved after 6 months of perindopril treatment. These findings indicate that perindopril treatment can ameliorate the cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and the left ventricular performance in patients with CHF. (orig.)

  4. Schwann cells: activated peripheral glia and their role in neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Wendy Marie

    2007-07-01

    Schwann cells provide trophic support and in some cases, insulation to axons. After injury, Schwann cells undergo phenotypic modulation, acquiring the capacity to proliferate, migrate, and secrete soluble mediators that control Wallerian degeneration and regeneration. Amongst the soluble mediators are pro-inflammatory cytokines that function as chemoattractants but also may sensitize nociceptors. At the same time, Schwann cells produce factors that counterbalance the pro-inflammatory cytokines, including, for example, interleukin-10 and erythropoietin (Epo). Epo and its receptor, EpoR, are up-regulated in Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury. EpoR-dependent cell signaling may limit production of TNF-alpha by Schwann cells within the first five days after injury. In addition, EpoR-dependent cell signaling may reduce axonal degeneration and facilitate recovery from chronic pain states. Other novel factors that regulate Schwann cell phenotype in nerve injury have been recently identified, including the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP-1). Our recent studies indicate that LRP-1 may be essential for Schwann cell survival after peripheral nerve injury. To analyze the function of specific Schwann cell gene products in nerve injury and sensory function, conditional gene deletion and expression experiments in mice have been executed using promoters that are selectively activated in myelinating or non-myelinating Schwann cells. Blocking ErbB receptor-initiated cell-signaling in either myelinating or non-myelinating Schwann cells results in unique sensory dysfunctions. Data obtained in gene-targeted animals suggest that sensory alterations can result from changes in Schwann cell physiology without profound myelin degeneration or axonopathy. Aberrations in Schwann cell biology may lie at the foundation of neuropathic pain and represent an exciting target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:17321718

  5. Regional tissue immune responses after sciatic nerve injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Shen, Ruo-wu; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cells play a critical role during nerve regeneration following peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we investigated immune responses in rat sciatic nerve after injury. Wistar rats were randomly divided into the sciatic nerve injury (model) group and control group. The right sciatic nerve of rats in the model group was transected and sutured end-to-end. Our results showed that rats in the model group functionally recovered following sciatic nerve injury. We detected inflammator...

  6. Cbl negatively regulates JNK activation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproul, Andrew A; Xu, Zhiheng; Wilhelm, Michael; Gire, Stephen; Greene, Lloyd A

    2009-08-01

    Here, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in regulation of neuronal apoptosis. In two paradigms of neuron apoptosis - nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation and DNA damage - cellular levels of c-Cbl and Cbl-b fell well before the onset of cell death. NGF deprivation also induced rapid loss of tyrosine phosphorylation (and most likely, activation) of c-Cbl. Targeting c-Cbl and Cbl-b with siRNAs to mimic their loss/inactivation sensitized neuronal cells to death promoted by NGF deprivation or DNA damage. One potential mechanism by which Cbl proteins might affect neuronal death is by regulation of apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. We demonstrate that Cbl proteins interact with the JNK pathway components mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3 and POSH and that knockdown of Cbl proteins is sufficient to increase JNK pathway activity. Furthermore, expression of c-Cbl blocks the ability of MLKs to signal to downstream components of the kinase cascade leading to JNK activation and protects neuronal cells from death induced by MLKs, but not from downstream JNK activators. On the basis of these findings, we propose that Cbls suppress cell death in healthy neurons at least in part by inhibiting the ability of MLKs to activate JNK signaling. Apoptotic stimuli lead to loss of Cbl protein/activity, thereby removing a critical brake on JNK activation and on cell death. PMID:19546888

  7. Chronic upregulation of activated microglia immunoreactive for galectin-3/Mac-2 and nerve growth factor following diffuse axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrzaszcz MaryAnn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diffuse axonal injury in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI can be associated with morbidity ranging from cognitive difficulties to coma. Magnetic resonance imaging scans now allow early detection of axonal injury following TBI, and have linked cognitive disability in these patients to white matter signal changes. However, little is known about the pathophysiology of this white matter injury, and the role of microglial activation in this process. It is increasingly recognized that microglia constitute a heterogeneous population with diverse roles following injury. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that following diffuse axonal injury involving the corpus callosum, there is upregulation of a subpopulation of microglia that express the lectin galectin-3/Mac-2 and are involved in myelin phagocytosis. Methods Adult mice were subject to midline closed skull injury or sham operation and were sacrificed 1, 8, 14 or 28 days later. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques were used to analyze patterns of labelling within the corpus callosum qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Activated microglia immunoreactive for galectin-3/Mac-2 were most abundant 1 day following injury. Their levels were attenuated at later time points after TBI but still were significantly elevated compared to sham animals. Furthermore, the majority of galectin-3/Mac-2+ microglia were immunoreactive for nerve growth factor in both sham and injured animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that galectin-3/Mac-2+ microglia play an important role in the pathogenesis of diffuse axonal injury both acutely and chronically and that they mediate their effects, at least in part by releasing nerve growth factor.

  8. Long-term delivery of nerve growth factor by encapsulated cell biodelivery in the Göttingen minipig basal forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device, capable of local delivery of NGF. The clinical device, named NsG0202, houses an NGF-secreting cell line (NGC-0295), which is derived from a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, stably genetically modified to secrete NGF. Bioactivity and correct processing of NGF was confirmed in vitro. NsG0202 devices were implanted in the basal forebrain of Göttingen minipigs and the function and retrievability were evaluated after 7 weeks, 6 and 12 months. All devices were implanted and retrieved without associated complications. They were physically intact and contained a high number of viable and NGF-producing NGC-0295 cells after explantation. Increased NGF levels were detected in tissue surrounding the devices. The implants were well tolerated as determined by histopathological brain tissue analysis, blood analysis, and general health status of the pigs. The NsG0202 device represents a promising approach for treating the cognitive decline in AD patients.

  9. Axonal transport of labelled proteins and increased functional activity in sciatic nerve of the frog Rana hexadactyla in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro speed of fast moving labelled protein fraction was investigated in the lumbar 8 nerve of R.hexadactyla during normal and electrical stimulation conditions. 3H-leucine labelled oroteins moved in a proximo-distal direction at a speed of 144 mm/day at 25 deg C. No change was observed in the rate of proteins transported in stimulated nerves but the amount of protein bound radioactivity increased over stimulation. In ligature experiments, amount of labelled proteins accumulating at a ligature was higher in stimulated nerves. Electrical stimulation of nerve resulted in an increase in protein synthetic rate in the respective ganglion. (author)

  10. The Effect of Electrospun Gelatin Fibers Alignment on Schwann Cell and Axon Behavior and Organization in the Perspective of Artificial Nerve Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnavi, Sara; Fornasari, Benedetta Elena; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Laurano, Rossella; Zanetti, Marco; Ciardelli, Gianluca; Geuna, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun fibrous substrates mimicking extracellular matrices can be prepared by electrospinning, yielding aligned fibrous matrices as internal fillers to manufacture artificial nerves. Gelatin aligned nano-fibers were prepared by electrospinning after tuning the collector rotation speed. The effect of alignment on cell adhesion and proliferation was tested in vitro using primary cultures, the Schwann cell line, RT4-D6P2T, and the sensory neuron-like cell line, 50B11. Cell adhesion and proliferation were assessed by quantifying at several time-points. Aligned nano-fibers reduced adhesion and proliferation rate compared with random fibers. Schwann cell morphology and organization were investigated by immunostaining of the cytoskeleton. Cells were elongated with their longitudinal body parallel to the aligned fibers. B5011 neuron-like cells were aligned and had parallel axon growth when cultured on the aligned gelatin fibers. The data show that the alignment of electrospun gelatin fibers can modulate Schwann cells and axon organization in vitro, suggesting that this substrate shows promise as an internal filler for the design of artificial nerves for peripheral nerve reconstruction. PMID:26062130

  11. Facial Nerve Palsy In Secondary Syphilis

    OpenAIRE

    Masuria B. L; Batra A; Kothiwala R.K; Khuller R; Singhi M.K

    1999-01-01

    A case of secondary syphilis with right facial nerve palsy is reported. A 28 year old unmarried male presented with diffuse maculopapular rash and facial nerve palsy. He had elevated while cells and protein in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were positive for VDRL and TPHA tests. Facial nerve palsy and maculopapular rash improved with penicillin therapy.

  12. Facial Nerve Palsy In Secondary Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuria B.L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary syphilis with right facial nerve palsy is reported. A 28 year old unmarried male presented with diffuse maculopapular rash and facial nerve palsy. He had elevated while cells and protein in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were positive for VDRL and TPHA tests. Facial nerve palsy and maculopapular rash improved with penicillin therapy.

  13. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF

  14. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A rarity

    OpenAIRE

    Yaga, Uday Shankar; Shivakumar, Rashmi; Kumar, M. Ashwini; Sathyaprakash,

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) of the mandible is an uncommon tumor that develops either from a preexisting neurofibroma or de novo. MPNSTs are sarcomas that originate from peripheral nerves or from cells associated with the nerve sheath, such as Schwann cells, perineural cells or from fibroblasts. Because MPNSTs can arise from multiple cell types, the overall appearance can vary greatly from one case to the next. A case of MPNST of the right side of the mandible in a 23-year...

  15. ProNGF derived from rat sciatic nerves downregulates neurite elongation and axon specification in PC12 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigos, Anna Sofía; Longart, Marines; García, Lisbeth; Castillo, Cecilia; Forsyth, Patricia; Medina, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Several reports have shown that a sciatic nerve conditioned media (CM) causes neuronal-like differentiation in PC12 cells. This differentiation is featured by neurite outgrowth, which are exclusively dendrites, without axon or sodium current induction. In previous studies, our group reported that the CM supplemented with a generic inhibitor for tyrosine kinase receptors (k252a) enhanced the CM-induced morphological differentiation upregulating neurite outgrowth, axonal formation and sodium current elicitation. Sodium currents were also induced by depletion of endogenous precursor of nerve growth factorr (proNGF) from the CM (pNGFd-CM). Given that sodium currents, neurite outgrowth and axon specification are important features of neuronal differentiation, in the current manuscript, first we investigated if proNGF was hindering the full PC12 cell neuronal-like differentiation. Second, we studied the effects of exogenous wild type (pNGFwt) and mutated (pNGFmut) proNGF isoforms over sodium currents and whether or not their addition to the pNGFd-CM would prevent sodium current elicitation. Third, we investigated if proNGF was exerting its negative regulation through the sortilin receptor, and for this, the proNGF action was blocked with neurotensin (NT), a factor known to compete with proNGF for sortilin. Thereby, here we show that pNGFd-CM enhanced cell differentiation, cell proportion with long neurites, total neurite length, induced axonal formation and sodium current elicitation. Interestingly, treatment of PC12 cells with wild type or mutated proNGF isoforms elicited sodium currents. Supplementing pNGFd-CM with pNGFmut reduced 35% the sodium currents. On the other hand, pNGFd-CM+pNGFwt induced larger sodium currents than pNGFd-CM. Finally, treatments with CM supplemented with NT showed that sortilin was mediating proNGF negative regulation, since its blocking induced similar effects than the pNGFd-CM treatment. Altogether, our results suggest that proNGF within the CM, is one of the main inhibitors of full neuronal differentiation, acting through sortilin receptor. PMID:26441535

  16. Improving the Catalytic Activity of Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus horikoshii Prolidase for Detoxification of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents over a Broad Range of Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Theriot, Casey M; Semcer, Rebecca L.; Shah, Saumil S.; Grunden, Amy M

    2011-01-01

    Prolidases hydrolyze Xaa-Pro dipeptides and can also cleave the P-F and P-O bonds found in organophosphorus (OP) compounds, including the nerve agents soman and sarin. Ph1prol (PH0974) has previously been isolated and characterized from Pyrococcus horikoshii and was shown to have higher catalytic activity over a broader pH range, higher affinity for metal, and increased thermostability compared to P. furiosus prolidase, Pfprol (PF1343). To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamin...

  17. Unravelling crucial biomechanical resilience of myelinated peripheral nerve fibres provided by the Schwann cell basal lamina and PMP22

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Rosso; Ivan Liashkovich; Burkhard Gess; Peter Young; Alejandra Kun; Victor Shahin

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the research of the close and enigmatic relationship between nerve biomechanics and the development of neuropathies. Here we present a research strategy based on the application atomic force and confocal microscopy for simultaneous nerve biomechanics and integrity investigations. Using wild-type and hereditary neuropathy mouse models, we reveal surprising mechanical protection of peripheral nerves. Myelinated peripheral wild-type fibres promptly and fully recover f...

  18. The influence of vagus nerve and spinal cord stimulation on the ictal fast ripple activity in a spike-and-wave rat model of seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Jianhang; Sevcencu, Cristian; Jensen, Winnie; Yang, Xiaoyu; Harreby, Kristian R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Fast ripple (FR) activity has received increasing attention as a potential epileptic marker. The current knowledge on how neurostimulation affects FRs is, however, very limited. In this study, we assess the influence of the vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and spinal cord stimulation (SCS...

  19. K(ATP)-channel-dependent regulation of catecholaminergic neurons controls BAT sympathetic nerve activity and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Sulay; Paeger, Lars; Hess, Simon; Morgan, Donald A; Hausen, A Christine; Brönneke, Hella S; Hampel, Brigitte; Ackermann, P Justus; Evers, Nadine; Büning, Hildegard; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Rahmouni, Kamal; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2013-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a critical regulator of glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and its activity is tightly controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying CNS-dependent control of BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) are only partly understood. Here, we demonstrate that catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) adapt their firing frequency to extracellular glucose concentrations in a K(ATP)-channel-dependent manner. Inhibiting K(ATP)-channel-dependent control of neuronal activity via the expression of a variant K(ATP) channel in tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing neurons and in neurons of the LC enhances diet-induced obesity in mice. Obesity results from decreased energy expenditure, lower steady-state BAT SNA, and an attenuated ability of centrally applied glucose to activate BAT SNA. This impairs the thermogenic transcriptional program of BAT. Collectively, our data reveal a role of K(ATP)-channel-dependent neuronal excitability in catecholaminergic neurons in maintaining thermogenic BAT sympathetic tone and energy homeostasis. PMID:24011078

  20. Blockage of the neurokinin 1 receptor and capsaicin-induced ablation of the enteric afferent nerves protect SCID mice against T-cell-induced chronic colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Fernandez, Carmen de Felipe; Claesson, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    , we examined antagonists for the high-affinity neurokinin 1 (NK-1) SP receptor and the TRPV1 receptor agonist capsaicin in a T-cell transfer model for chronic colitis. METHODS: Chronic colitis was induced in SCID mice by injection of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. The importance of NK-1 signaling and TRPV1...... expressing afferent nerves for disease development was studied in recipient SCID mice systemically treated with either high-affinity NK-1 receptor antagonists or neurotoxic doses of capsaicin. In addition, we studied the colitis-inducing effect of NK-1 receptor deleted CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. RESULTS...... prior to CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell transfer completely inhibited the development of colitis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate the importance of an intact enteric afferent nerve system and NK-1 signaling in mucosal inflammation and may suggest new treatment modalities for patients suffering from inflammatory...

  1. Cytologic appearance of retinal cells included in a fine-needle aspirate of a meningioma around the optic nerve of a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvedten, Harold; Hillström, Anna

    2013-06-01

    A 6-year-old Wirehair Dachshund had a meningioma around the optic nerve that caused exophthalmos. A benign mesenchymal tumor was suspected based on the cytologic pattern of a fine-needle aspirate, and a meningioma was diagnosed by histopathologic examination. In addition to the meningioma cells, the cytologic smears included groups of cells from apparently 4 layers of normal retina. In particular, uniform rod-shaped structures in the cytologic sample could suggest rod-shaped bacteria, but these structures were identified as cylindrical outer segments of photoreceptor rod cells. Other retinal structures recognized included pigmented epithelial layer cells with their uniquely formed pigment granules, the characteristic bi-lobed, cleaved nuclei from the outer nuclear layer, and nerve tissue likely from the outer plexiform layer of the retina. PMID:23656635

  2. Anesthetic induction agents, sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex sensitivity: a study in rabbits comparing thiopental, propofol and etomidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aono H

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of arterial hypotension following intravenous anesthetic induction agents are multifactorial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of thiopental, propofol and etomidate on hemodynamics, sympathetic outflow and arterial baroreflex sensitivity using not only neuraxis-intact but also totally baro-denervated rabbits. A total of 60 rabbits was anesthetized with urethane, tracheotomized, and mechanically ventilated with oxygen in nitrogen (FiO2 0.5. The left renal sympathetic nerve was isolated and placed on a bipolar electrode to record renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. Thirty animals underwent a surgical preparation of total baroreceptor denervation. Bolus injections of an anesthesia induction dose of thiopental 4 mg/kg and twice the induction dose of propofol 4 mg/kg significantly decreased RSNA to the same extent (19.4+/-6.7 and 19.7+/-5.2% reduction, mean +/- SEM and mean arterial pressure (MAP also to the same extent (19.5+/-4.6 and 22.1+/-3.1% reduction in the neuraxis-intact animals. RSNA was increased (34.5+/-6% without reduction of MAP by an induction dose of etomidate, 0.3 mg/kg. Sympathetic barosensitivity was attenuated even 10 min after thiopental at 4 mg/kg or propofol at 4 mg/kg (68% and 54% of control, respectively. Propofol at 2 mg/kg (induction dose and etomidate at 0.6 mg/kg decreased RSNA and MAP only in the baro-denervated animals. It was found from the barosensitivity study that patients can be hemodynamically unstable even though blood pressure has returned to normal after thiopental and propofol administration. Data suggest that etomidate can even stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and increase sympathetic outflow. It was also clearly found from the baro-denervated animal study that thiopental was stronger than propofol in directly suppressing sympathetic outflow at the induction dose.

  3. Nerve growth factor stimulates the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol in PC-12 cells: A mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) results in the differentiation of these cells into a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype. Although the initial intracellular signals elicited by NGF remain unknown, some of the cellular effects of NGF are similar to those of other growth factors, such as insulin. The authors have investigated the involvement of a newly identified inositol-containing glycolipid in signal transduction for the actions of NGF. NGF stimulates the rapid generation of a species of diacylglycerol that is labeled with [3H]myristate but not with [3H]arachidonate. NGF stimulates [3H]myristate- or [32P]phosphate-labeled phosphatidic acid production over the same time course. Although NGF alone has no effect on the turnover of inositol phospholipids, it does stimulate the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The NGF-dependent cleavage of this lipid is accompanied by an increase in the accumulation of its polar head group, an inositol phosphate glycan, which is generated within 30-60 sec of NGF treatment. In an unresponsive PC-12 mutant cell line, neither the diacylglycerol nor inositol phosphate glycan response is detected. A possible role for the NGF-stimulated diacylglycerol is suggested by the inhibition of NGF-dependent c-fos induction by staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C. These results suggest that, like insulin, some of the cellular effects of NGF may be mediated by the phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol

  4. Nerve growth factor affects Ca2+ currents via the p75 receptor to enhance prolactin mRNA levels in GH3 rat pituitary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Domínguez, Adriana M; Espinosa, Juan Luis; Navarrete, Araceli; Avila, Guillermo; Cota, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    In clonal pituitary GH3 cells, spontaneous action potentials drive the opening of Cav1 (L-type) channels, leading to Ca2+ transients that are coupled to prolactin gene transcription. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been shown to stimulate prolactin synthesis by GH3 cells, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we studied whether NGF influences prolactin gene expression and Ca2+ currents. By using RT-PCR, NGF (50 ng ml?1) was found to augment prolactin mRNA levels by ?80% when applied to GH3 cells for 3 days. A parallel change in the prolactin content was detected by Western blotting. Both NGF-induced responses were mimicked by an agonist (Bay K 8644) and prevented by a blocker (nimodipine) of L-type channels. In whole-cell patch-clamp experiments, NGF enhanced the L-type Ca2+ current by ?2-fold within 60 min. This effect reversed quickly upon growth factor withdrawal, but was maintained for days in the continued presence of NGF. In addition, chronic treatment (? 24 h) with NGF amplified the T-type current, which flows through Cav3 channels and is thought to support pacemaking activity. Thus, NGF probably increases the amount of Ca2+ that enters per action potential and may also induce a late increase in spike frequency. MC192, a specific antibody for the p75 neurotrophin receptor, but not tyrosine kinase inhibitors (K252a and lavendustin A), blocked the effects of NGF on Ca2+ currents. Overall, the results indicate that NGF activates the p75 receptor to cause a prolonged increase in Ca2+ influx through L-type channels, which in turn up-regulates the prolactin mRNA. PMID:16690703

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on purinergic signaling modulation in rat brain nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purinergic signaling is composed of three modulatory components: a) source of extracellular nucleotides, b) specific receptor expression for these transmitter molecules and c) ectonucleotidase selection that dictate cell response gradually degradation extracellular nucleotides to nucleosides. ATP acts as a fast excitatory transmitter in the CNS. Postsynaptic actions of ATP are mediated by an extended family of purinergic, P2X receptors, widely expressed throughout the CNS. NTPDases hydrolyse extracellular ATP and ADP to AMP and are responsive for purinergfic termination. To investigate if ionizing irradiation could modulate CNS purinergic signalization we monitored activity of NTPDases and abundance of P2X7 receptor in synaptic plasma membranes after whole-body acute irradiation using low (0,5Gy) or therapeutic (2Gy) doses, 1h i 72h after irradiating juvenile (15-day old) and adult (90-day old) rats. Acute irradiation modulate purinergic system components investigated at the different ways in the rat development brain SPM and in the adult brain dependent of dose and time after irradiation

  6. Neurotrophic Effect of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Erectile Function Recovery by Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor Secretion in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Chen; Qiyun Yang; Tao Zheng; Jun Bian; Xiangzhou Sun; Yanan Shi; Xiaoyan Liang; Guoquan Gao; Guihua Liu; Chunhua Deng

    2016-01-01

    The paracrine effect is the major mechanism of stem cell therapy. However, the details of the effect’s mechanism remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can ameliorate cavernous nerve injury-induced erectile dysfunction (CNIED) rats and to determine its mechanism. Twenty-eight days after intracavernous injection of 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine- (EdU-) labeled ADSCs, the erectile function of all the rats was evaluated by intracavern...

  7. The effect of orally administered glycogen on anti-tumor activity and natural killer cell activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakutani, Ryo; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Kajiura, Hideki; Takata, Hiroki; Kuriki, Takashi; Ohno, Naohito

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, innate immune effectors that mediate rapid responses to various antigens, play an important role in potentiating host defenses through the clearance of tumor cells and virally infected cells. By using enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) with the same characteristics as natural glycogen, we examined whether orally administered glycogen enhances the innate defense of tumor-implanted mice and the cytotoxicity of NK cells. Oral administration of ESG led to the suppression of tumor proliferation and the prolongation of survival times of tumor-bearing mice. Splenic NK activities of BALB/c mice treated orally with ESG were significantly higher than those of water-treated mice, which were used as a negative control. In addition, intraduodenal injections of ESG gradually and markedly lowered splenic sympathetic nerve activity, which has an inverse correlation with NK activity. Furthermore, ESG activated Peyer's patch cells to induce the production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and immunoglobulin A (IgA) from these cells. These results demonstrated that orally administrated glycogen significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of NK cells by acting on Peyer's patch cells and autonomic nerves, and eventually induced the potentiation of host defenses. We propose that glycogen functions not only as an energy source for life support but also as an oral adjuvant for immunopotentiation. PMID:22080051

  8. Immunohistochemistry of GluR1 subunits of AMPA receptors of rat cerebellar nerve cells

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Orlando J., Castejón; Michael E., Dailey.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The localization of GluR1 subunits of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the glial cells and inhibitory neurons of cerebellar cortex and their association with the climbing and parallel fibers, and basket cell axons were studied. Samples of P14 and P21 rat cerebellar cortex were exposed to a specific [...] antibody against GluR1 subunit(s) of AMPA receptors and were examined with confocal laser scanning microscopy. GluR1 strong immunoreactivity was confined to Purkinje cell and the molecular layer. Weak GluR1 immunoreactivity was observed surrounding some Golgi cells in the granule cell layer. Intense GluR1 immunoreactivity was localized around Purkinje, basket, and stellate cells. Purkinje cells expressed strong GluR1 immunoreactivity surrounding the cell body, primary dendritic trunk and secondary and tertiary spiny dendritic branches. Marked immunofluorescent staining was also detected in the Bergmann glial fibers at the level of middle and outer third molecular layer. Positive immunofluorescence staining was also observed surrounding basket and stellate cells, and in the capillary wall. These findings suggest the specific localization of GluR1 subunits of AMPA receptors in Bergmann glial cells, inhibitory cerebellar neurons, and the associated excitatory glutamatergic circuits formed by climbing and parallel fibers, and by the inhibitory basket cell axons.

  9. Novel concepts for improved communication between nerve cells and silicon electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Roeland; Braeken, Dries; Van Meerbergen, Bart; Winters, Kurt; Eberle, Wolfgang; Loo, Josine; Tsvetanova, Diana; Chen, Chang; Severi, Simone; Yitzchaik, S.; Spira, M.; Shappir, J.; Callewaert, Geert; Borghs, Gustaaf; Bartic, Carmen

    2008-04-01

    Hybrid integration of living cells and electronic circuits on a chip requires a high-density matrix of sensors and actuators. This matrix must be processable on top of CMOS devices and must be bio-compatible in order to support living cells. Recent studies have shown that the use of nail structures combined with a phagocytosis-like event of the cell can be exploited to improve the electrical coupling between a cell and a sensor. In this paper, two CMOS-compatible fabrication methods for sub-micron nails will be presented. The biocompatibility and proof-of-concept is demonstrated by the culturing of PC12 neuroblastoma cells. Electrical functionality is shown by simultaneous stimulation and recording of pig cardiomyocyte cells. Biocompatibility aspects for more demanding cortical cell cultures have been addressed in a preliminary assessment.

  10. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristján R

    2014-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun(-/-) mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of the disease, on the other, they respond to it by mounting a c-Jun-dependent response that significantly reduces its impact. Because axonal death is a central feature of much nerve pathology it will be important to establish whether an axon-supportive Schwann cell response also takes place in other conditions. Amplification of this axon-supportive mechanism constitutes a novel target for clinical intervention that might be useful in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and other neuropathies that involve axon loss. PMID:25216747

  11. Minocycline is cytoprotective in human trabecular meshwork cells and optic nerve head astrocytes by increasing expression of XIAP, survivin, and Bcl-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Kernt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Marcus Kernt, Aljoscha S Neubauer, Kirsten H Eibl, Armin Wolf, Michael W Ulbig, Anselm Kampik, Cristoph HirneissDepartment of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, GermanyIntroduction: Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is one of the leading causes of blindness. Activation of optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHA and loss of trabecular meshwork cells (TMC are pathognomonic for this neurodegenerative disease. Oxidative stress and elevated levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF? play an important role in the pathogenesis of POAG. This study investigates the possible antiapoptotic and cytoprotective effects of minocycline on TMC and ONHA under oxidative stress and increased TGF? levels.Methods: TMC and ONHA were treated with minocycline 1–150 ?M. Possible toxic effects and IC50 were evaluated after 48 hours. Cell proliferation and viability were examined in order to assess the protective effects of minocycline on TMC and ONHA. Expression of Bcl-2, XIAP, and survivin, as well as their mRNA expression, were assessed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western Blot analysis 48 hours after treatment with minocycline alone and additional incubation with TGF?-2 or oxidative stress.Results: Minocycline 1–75 ?M showed no toxic effects on TMC and ONHA. Under conditions of oxidative stress, both TMC and ONHA showed an increase in viability and an ability to proliferate when treated with minocycline 20–40 ?M. RT-PCR and Western blotting yielded an overexpression of Bcl-2, XIAP, and survivin when TMC or ONHA were treated with minocycline 20–40 ?M under conditions of oxidative stress and when additionally incubated with TGF?-2.Conclusion: Minocycline up to 75 ?M does not have toxic effects on TMC and ONHA. Treatment with minocycline 20–40 ?M led to increased viability and proliferation under oxidative stress and TGF?-2, as well as overexpression of Bcl-2, XIAP, and survivin. This protective pathway may help to prevent apoptotic cell death of TMC and ONHA and therefore be a promising approach to avoidance of progression of glaucomatous degeneration.Keywords: glaucoma, apoptosis, minocycline, trabecular meshwork, optic nerve head astrocytes

  12. Role of the vestibular system in sudden shutdown of renal sympathetic nerve activity during microgravity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, N; Hagiike, M; Tanaka, K; Tsuchiya, Y; Miyahara, T; Morita, H

    2000-05-26

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of microgravity (muG) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RNA) in rats. Additionally, we estimated the participation of the vestibular system in the response of RNA to muG. Eight normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and five chemically and bilaterally labyrinthectomied SD rats were used to measure RNA during free-drop examination (4.5-s duration of muG); arterial pressure (AP) and aortic flow velocity (AFV) were additionally monitored. Although AFV showed no particular change, AP tended to decrease during muG in the later phase. Prior to this AP fall-off, RNA was immediately and markedly attenuated by muG. This attenuation was transient and RNA returned to 1G level within the mu;muG condition. Interestingly, this phenomenon remained even in labyrinthectomied rats. In conclusion, cephalad shift of the body fluid by loading of muG may cause cardiopulmonary low-pressure receptor activation and consequent RNA attenuation, but the participation of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in this phenomenon is not obvious. PMID:10822153

  13. Neurogenesis in the crustacean ventral nerve cord: homology of neuronal stem cells in Malacostraca and Branchiopoda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzsch, S

    2001-01-01

    In Insecta and malacostracan Crustacea, neurons in the ventral ganglia are generated by the unequal division of neuronal stem cells, the neuroblasts (Nbs), which are arranged in a stereotyped, grid-like pattern. In malacostracans, however, Nbs originate from ectoteloblasts by an invariant lineage, whereas Nbs in insects differentiate without a defined lineage by cell-to-cell interactions within the neuroectoderm. As the ventral ganglia in entomostracan crustaceans were thought to be generated by a general inward proliferation of ectodermal cells, the question arose as to whether neuroblasts in Euarthropoda represent a homologous type of stem cell. In the current project, neurogenesis in metanauplii of the entomostracan crustaceans Triops cancriformis Fabricius, 1780 (Branchiopoda, Phyllopoda) and Artemia salina Linné, 1758 (Branchiopoda, Anostraca) was examined by in vivo incorporation of the mitosis marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and compared to stem cell proliferation in embryos of the malacostracan Palaemonetes argentinus Nobili, 1901 (Eucarida, Decapoda). The developmental expression of synaptic proteins (synapsins) was studied immunohistochemically. Results indicate that in the ventral neurogenic zone of Branchiopoda, neuronal stem cells with cellular characteristics of malacostracan neuroblasts are present. However, a pattern similar to the lineage-dependent, grid-like arrangement of the malacostracan neuroblasts was not found. Therefore, the homology of entomostracan and malacostracan neuronal stem cells remains uncertain. It is now well established that during arthropod development, identical and most likely homologous structures can emerge, although the initiating steps or the mode of generation of these structures are different. Recent evidence suggests that adult Entomostraca and Malacostraca share corresponding sets of neurons so that the present report provides an example that those homologous neurons may be generated via divergent developmental pathways. In this perspective, it remains difficult at this point to discuss the question of common patterns of stem cell proliferation with regard to the phylogeny and evolution of Atelocerata and Crustacea. PMID:11440250

  14. Endoneurial macrophages induce perineural invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by secretion of GDNF and activation of RET tyrosine kinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavel, Oren; Shomron, Olga; Shabtay, Ayelet; Vital, Joseph; Trejo-Leider, Leonor; Weizman, Noam; Krelin, Yakov; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J; Amit, Moran; Gil, Ziv

    2012-11-15

    Perineural invasion of cancer cells (CPNI) is found in most patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PDA), prostate, or head and neck cancers. These patients undergo palliative rather than curative treatment due to dissemination of cancer along nerves, well beyond the extent of any local invasion. Although CPNI is a common source of distant tumor spread and a cause of significant morbidity, its exact mechanism is undefined. Immunohistochemical analysis of specimens excised from patients with PDAs showed a significant increase in the number of endoneurial macrophages (EM?) that lie around nerves invaded by cancer compared with normal nerves. Video microscopy and time-lapse analysis revealed that EM?s are recruited by the tumor cells in response to colony-stimulated factor-1 secreted by invading cancer cells. Conditioned medium (CM) of tumor-activated EM?s (tEM?) induced a 5-fold increase in migration of PDA cells compared with controls. Compared with resting EM?s, tEM?s secreted higher levels of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), inducing phosphorylation of RET and downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in PDA cells. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of the GDNF receptors GFRA1 and RET abrogated the migratory effect of EM?-CM and reduced ERK phosphorylation. In an in vivo CPNI model, CCR2-deficient mice that have reduced macrophage recruitment and activation showed minimal nerve invasion, whereas wild-type mice developed complete sciatic nerve paralysis due to massive CPNI. Taken together, our results identify a paracrine response between EM?s and PDA cells that orchestrates the formation of cancer nerve invasion. PMID:22971345

  15. Development of Polydimethylsiloxane Substrates with Tunable Elastic Modulus to Study Cell Mechanobiology in Muscle and Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Palchesko, Rachelle N.; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yan; Adam W. Feinberg

    2012-01-01

    Mechanics is an important component in the regulation of cell shape, proliferation, migration and differentiation during normal homeostasis and disease states. Biomaterials that match the elastic modulus of soft tissues have been effective for studying this cell mechanobiology, but improvements are needed in order to investigate a wider range of physicochemical properties in a controlled manner. We hypothesized that polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) blends could be used as the basis of a tunable sy...

  16. IN VITRO ACTIVITY OF DUVERNOY'S GLAND SECRETIONS FROM THE AFRICAN BOOMSLANG, Dispholidus typus, ON NERVE-MUSCLE PREPARATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Young, R A

    1996-01-01

    In vitro toxicity assays were performed using Duvernoy's gland secretions from the African boomslang, Dispholidus typus, and isolated rat duodenum and frog sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparations. The Duvernoy's gland secretions of D. typus had no apparent effect on the frog sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparation. The secretions produced an increase in baseline tonus and an increase in the rhythmic contractile force of the rat duodenum, but had no significant effect on the fre...

  17. Development of polydimethylsiloxane substrates with tunable elastic modulus to study cell mechanobiology in muscle and nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchesko, Rachelle N; Zhang, Ling; Sun, Yan; Feinberg, Adam W

    2012-01-01

    Mechanics is an important component in the regulation of cell shape, proliferation, migration and differentiation during normal homeostasis and disease states. Biomaterials that match the elastic modulus of soft tissues have been effective for studying this cell mechanobiology, but improvements are needed in order to investigate a wider range of physicochemical properties in a controlled manner. We hypothesized that polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) blends could be used as the basis of a tunable system where the elastic modulus could be adjusted to match most types of soft tissue. To test this we formulated blends of two commercially available PDMS types, Sylgard 527 and Sylgard 184, which enabled us to fabricate substrates with an elastic modulus anywhere from 5 kPa up to 1.72 MPa. This is a three order-of-magnitude range of tunability, exceeding what is possible with other hydrogel and PDMS systems. Uniquely, the elastic modulus can be controlled independently of other materials properties including surface roughness, surface energy and the ability to functionalize the surface by protein adsorption and microcontact printing. For biological validation, PC12 (neuronal inducible-pheochromocytoma cell line) and C2C12 (muscle cell line) were used to demonstrate that these PDMS formulations support cell attachment and growth and that these substrates can be used to probe the mechanosensitivity of various cellular processes including neurite extension and muscle differentiation. PMID:23240031

  18. Effects of nicorandil on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity after reperfusion therapy in patients with first anterior acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ischaemic preconditioning (PC) is a cardioprotective phenomenon in which short periods of myocardial ischaemia result in resistance to decreased contractile dysfunction during a subsequent period of sustained ischaemia. Nicorandil, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, can induce PC effects on sympathetic nerves during myocardial ischaemia. However, its effects on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and left ventricular remodelling have not been determined. In this study, we sought to determine whether nicorandil administration improves CSNA in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We studied 58 patients with first anterior AMI, who were randomly assigned to receive nicorandil (group A) or isosorbide dinitrate (group B) after primary coronary angioplasty. The nicorandil or isosorbide dinitrate was continuously infused for >48 h. The extent score (ES) was determined from 99mTc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, and the total defect score (TDS) was determined from 201Tl scintigraphy 3-5 days after primary angioplasty. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were determined by left ventriculography 2 weeks later. The delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, delayed TDS and washout rate (WR) were determined from 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) images 3 weeks later. The left ventriculography results were re-examined 6 months after treatment. Fifty patients originally enrolled in the trial completed the entire protocol. After treatment, no significant differences were observed in ES or left ventricular parameters between the two groups. However, in group A (n=25), the TDSs determined from 201Tl and 123I-MIBG were significantly lower (26±6 vs 30±5, P<0.01, and 32±8 vs 40±6, P<0.0001, respectively), the H/M ratio significantly higher (1.99±0.16 vs 1.77±0.30, P<0.005) and the WR significantly lower (36%±8% vs 44%±12%, P<0.005) than in group B (n=25). Moreover, 6 months after treatment, LVEDV and LVEF were better in group A than in group B. These findings indicate that nicorandil can have beneficial effects on CSNA and left ventricular remodelling in patients with first anterior AMI. (orig.)

  19. Effects of nicorandil on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity after reperfusion therapy in patients with first anterior acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Kumakura, Hisao; Takayama, Yoshiaki; Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan, Gunma (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    Ischaemic preconditioning (PC) is a cardioprotective phenomenon in which short periods of myocardial ischaemia result in resistance to decreased contractile dysfunction during a subsequent period of sustained ischaemia. Nicorandil, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, can induce PC effects on sympathetic nerves during myocardial ischaemia. However, its effects on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and left ventricular remodelling have not been determined. In this study, we sought to determine whether nicorandil administration improves CSNA in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We studied 58 patients with first anterior AMI, who were randomly assigned to receive nicorandil (group A) or isosorbide dinitrate (group B) after primary coronary angioplasty. The nicorandil or isosorbide dinitrate was continuously infused for >48 h. The extent score (ES) was determined from {sup 99m}Tc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, and the total defect score (TDS) was determined from {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy 3-5 days after primary angioplasty. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were determined by left ventriculography 2 weeks later. The delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, delayed TDS and washout rate (WR) were determined from {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) images 3 weeks later. The left ventriculography results were re-examined 6 months after treatment. Fifty patients originally enrolled in the trial completed the entire protocol. After treatment, no significant differences were observed in ES or left ventricular parameters between the two groups. However, in group A (n=25), the TDSs determined from {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-MIBG were significantly lower (26{+-}6 vs 30{+-}5, P<0.01, and 32{+-}8 vs 40{+-}6, P<0.0001, respectively), the H/M ratio significantly higher (1.99{+-}0.16 vs 1.77{+-}0.30, P<0.005) and the WR significantly lower (36%{+-}8% vs 44%{+-}12%, P<0.005) than in group B (n=25). Moreover, 6 months after treatment, LVEDV and LVEF were better in group A than in group B. These findings indicate that nicorandil can have beneficial effects on CSNA and left ventricular remodelling in patients with first anterior AMI. (orig.)

  20. Functional and structural changes in the brain associated with the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity in obstructive sleep apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania H. Fatouleh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA during daytime wakefulness, leading to hypertension, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. By recording MSNA concurrently with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI of the brain we aimed to identify the central processes responsible for the sympathoexcitation. Spontaneous fluctuations in MSNA were recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve in 17 OSA patients and 15 healthy controls lying in a 3 T MRI scanner. Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD contrast gradient echo, echo-planar images were continuously collected in a 4 s ON, 4 s OFF (200 volumes sampling protocol. Fluctuations in BOLD signal intensity covaried with the intensity of the concurrently recorded bursts of MSNA. In both groups there was a positive correlation between MSNA and signal intensity in the left and right insulae, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, dorsal precuneus, sensorimotor cortex and posterior temporal cortex, and the right mid-cingulate cortex and hypothalamus. In OSA the left and right dlPFC, medial PFC (mPFC, dorsal precuneus, anterior cingulate cortex, retrosplenial cortex and caudate nucleus showed augmented signal changes compared with controls, while the right hippocampus/parahippocampus signal intensity decreased in controls but did not change in the OSA subjects. In addition, there were significant increases in grey matter volume in the left mid-insula, the right insula, left and right primary motor cortices, left premotor cortex, left hippocampus and within the brainstem and cerebellum, and significant decreases in the mPFC, occipital lobe, right posterior cingulate cortex, left cerebellar cortex and the left and right amygdala in OSA, but there was no overlap between these structural changes and the functional changes in OSA. These data suggest that the elevated muscle vasoconstrictor drive in OSA may result from functional changes within these brain regions, which are known to be directly or indirectly involved in the modulation of sympathetic outflow via the brainstem. That there was no overlap in the structural and functional changes suggests that asphyxic damage due to repeated episodes of nocturnal obstructive apnoea is not the main cause of the sympathoexcitation.

  1. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, S.; Poulletier De Gannes, F.; Haro, E.; Ruffie, G.; Lagroye, I.; Billaudel, B.; Veyret, B. [PIOM laboratory, UMR 5501 CNRS, ENSCPB, 33 -Pessac (France)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO{sub 2}. It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 10{sup 4} cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2 Petri dishes by run). The analysis was done on at least 100 images from two comet slides (one per Petri dish) for each cellular model and exposure condition. Results The analysis of the slides is ongoing. Once the data analysis is completed, I.T.I.S. will break the blinding codes, and the results will be presented at the meeting. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by France Telecom R and D, Bouygues Telecom, the Cnrs and the Aquitaine Council for Research. (authors)

  2. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO2. It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 104 cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2 Petri dishes by run). The analysis was done on at least 100 images from two comet slides (one per Petri dish) for each cellular model and exposure condition. Results The analysis of the slides is ongoing. Once the data analysis is completed, I.T.I.S. will break the blinding codes, and the results will be presented at the meeting. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by France Telecom R and D, Bouygues Telecom, the Cnrs and the Aquitaine Council for Research. (authors)

  3. Effect of cortisol on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in Pima Indians and Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Snitker, Soren; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Cizza, Giovanni; Chrousos, George; Ravussin, Eric; Tataranni, P Antonio; de Courten, Barbora

    2003-01-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) interact to maintain cardiovascular and metabolic homeostasis, especially during stress. Pima Indians have a low SNS activity, which may contribute to both their increased risk of obesity and reduced risk of hypertension....

  4. Isolated Ocular Motor Nerve Palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Nathan H; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2015-10-01

    An isolated ocular motor nerve palsy is defined as dysfunction of a single ocular motor nerve (oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens) with no associated or localizing neurologic signs or symptoms. When occurring in patients aged 50 or older, the most common cause is microvascular ischemia, but serious etiologies such as aneurysm, malignancy, and giant cell arteritis should always be considered. In this article, the authors review the clinical approach, anatomy, and differential diagnosis of each isolated ocular motor nerve palsy and discuss the clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, and treatment of microvascular ischemia. PMID:26444399

  5. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Shigeki; Mizuno, Kosaku [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Chromatin binding of epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor in cells bearing the appropriate surface receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rakowicz-Szulczynska, E. M.; Rodeck, U.; Herlyn, M; Koprowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    We analyzed the uptake and intracellular distribution of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor in different cell lines that express or do not express the respective surface receptors for these factors. After 1 hr of incubation, all three growth factors were detected in the cytoplasmic fraction and in the nucleus, tightly bound to chromatin. The amount of chromatin-bound growth factors continued to increase during the incubation, and anal...

  8. Giant cell arteritis presenting as oculomotor nerve palsy with pupillary dilatation.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, G.E.; Shakir, R A

    1994-01-01

    Acute complete oculomotor palsy with headache is a classical presentation of an extrinsic compression most commonly due to a posterior communicating artery aneurysm. We present a patient with such a presentation but with histologically proven giant cell arteritis. This possibility should be considered especially in the elderly to avoid complications and the need for angiography.

  9. Maintained inspiratory activity during proportional assist ventilation in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation: phrenic nerve and pulmonary stretch receptor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory activity is a prerequisite for successful application of patient triggered ventilation such as proportional assist ventilation (PAV. It has recently been reported that surfactant instillation increases the activity of slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (PSRs followed by a shorter inspiratory time (Sindelar et al, J Appl Physiol, 2005 [Epub ahead of print]. Changes in lung mechanics, as observed in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and after surfactant treatment, might therefore influence the inspiratory activity when applying PAV early after surfactant treatment. Objective To investigate the regulation of breathing and ventilatory response in surfactant-depleted young cats during PAV and during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP early after surfactant instillation in relation to phrenic nerve activity (PNA and the activity of PSRs. Methods Seven anesthetized, endotracheally intubated young cats were exposed to periods of CPAP and PAV with the same end-expiratory pressure (0.2–0.5 kPa before and after lung lavage and after surfactant instillation. PAV was set to compensate for 75% of the lung elastic recoil. Results Tidal volume and respiratory rate were higher with lower PaCO2 and higher PaO2 during PAV than during CPAP both before and after surfactant instillation (p Conclusion PSR activity and the control of breathing are maintained during PAV in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation, with a higher ventilatory response and a lower breathing effort than during CPAP.

  10. Palmar Nerve Sheath Myxoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Amany Fathaddin; Rehab Fatani

    2012-01-01

    Nerve sheath myxoma is a rare benign tumor of the peripheral nerves. It typically presents as a painless, firm, and slow growing nodule with a predilection for extremities mostly fingers and knees. Microscopically, it has characteristic multilobules of spindle cells in an abundant myxoid stroma. The cells are strongly positive for S-100 protein. However, this rare tumor is usually misdiagnosed as other more common benign neuronal tumors. This report describes a rare case of nerve sheath myxom...

  11. Size of the Optic Nerve Head and Its Relationship with the Thickness of the Macular Ganglion Cell Complex and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Nobuko; Anraku, Ayako; Ishida, Kyoko; Takeyama, Asuka; Yagi, Fumihiko; Tomita, Goji

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationships among the optic nerve head (ONH) area, macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC) thickness, circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness, and visual field defects in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods. This retrospective study included 90 eyes of 90 patients with POAG. The ONH area, rim area, mGCC thickness, and cpRNFL thickness were measured using optical coherence tomography. Mean deviation (MD) was measured using standard automated perimetry. The relationships among clinical factors including age, refraction, the ONH area, the rim area, the mGCC thickness, the cpRNFL thickness, and MD were evaluated using correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results. The significant correlation of the ONH area with refraction (r = 0.362, P < 0.001), the mGCC thickness (r = 0.225, P = 0.033), and the cpRNFL thickness (r = 0.253, P = 0.016) was found. Multiple regression analysis showed that the ONH area, rim area, and MD were selected as significant contributing factors to explain the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness. No factor was selected to explain MD. Conclusions. The ONH area, in other words, the disc size itself may affect the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness in POAG patients. PMID:26339503

  12. Effect of Yiqi Huayu Recipe on peanut agglutinin-binding molecules and Schwann's cells in rats after lumbar nerve root compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Chong-Jian

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of Yiqi Huayu Recipe on peanut agglutinin-binding molecules (PNA-BMs and Schwann's cells (Sc of the neuromuscular junction after L5 nerve root compression in rats. Methods: The rats were given Yiqi Huayu Recipe at the 10th, 20th, 30th and 60th day after L5 nerve root compression. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning techniques, we observed the distributions of PNA-BMs and S-100 in the soleus muscle. The overlap area of PNA-BMs and S-100 was measured with NIH image technique. Results: The extracellular matrix (ECM recognized by PNA played an important role in guiding the sprouting and extending of the Schwann' s cells. The agglomeration, sprouting and extension of the terminal Sc and the overlap area of Sc with PNA-BMs in the Yiqi Huayu Recipe group were better than those in the control group. Conclusion: Yiqi Huayu Recipe can promote the growth of ECM and Schwann's cells and accelerate the nerve regeneration process.

  13. Amylin Acts in the Central Nervous System to Increase Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Zhang, Zhongming; Morgan, Donald A.; Guo, Deng-Fu; Andrew F. Russo; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The pancreatic hormone amylin acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease food intake and body weight. We hypothesized that amylin action in the CNS promotes energy expenditure by increasing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. In mice, ip administration of amylin significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. In addition, mice treated with intracerebroventricular (icv) amylin (0.1 and 0.2 nmol) exhibited a dose-related decrease in foo...

  14. Signaling pathways mediating a selective induction of nitric oxide synthase II by tumor necrosis factor alpha in nerve growth factor-responsive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saragovi H Uri

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play a critical role in neurodegeneration associated with acute and chronic insults of the nervous system. Notably, affected neurons are often responsive to and dependent on trophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF. We previously showed in NGF-responsive PC12 cells that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF? and NGF synergistically induce the expression of the free-radical producing enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. We proposed that NGF-responsive neurons might be selectively exposed to iNOS-mediated oxidative damage as a consequence of elevated TNF? levels. With the aim of identifying possible therapeutic targets, in the present study we investigated the signaling pathways involved in NGF/TNF?-promoted iNOS induction. Methods Western blotting, RT-PCR, transcription factor-specific reporter gene systems, mutant cells lacking the low affinity p75NTR NGF receptor and transfections of TNF?/NGF chimeric receptors were used to investigate signalling events associated with NGF/TNF?-promoted iNOS induction in PC12 cells. Results Our results show that iNOS expression resulting from NGF/TNF? combined treatment can be elicited in PC12 cells. Mutant PC12 cells lacking p75NTR did not respond, suggesting that p75NTR is required to mediate iNOS expression. Furthermore, cells transfected with chimeric TNF?/NGF receptors demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of both p75NTR and TrkA signaling is necessary to synergize with TNF? to mediate iNOS expression. Lastly, our data show that NGF/TNF?-promoted iNOS induction requires activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B. Conclusion Collectively, our in vitro model suggests that cells bearing both the high and low affinity NGF receptors may display increased sensitivity to TNF? in terms of iNOS expression and therefore be selectively at risk during acute (e.g. neurotrauma or chronic (e.g. neurodegenerative diseases conditions where high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the nervous system occur pathologically. Our results also suggest that modulation of NF?B-promoted transcription of selective genes could serve as a potential therapeutic target to prevent neuroinflammation-induced neuronal damage.

  15. Effect of renal nerve activity on tubular sodium and water reabsorption in dog kidneys as determined by the lithium clearance method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, U; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of the lithium clearance method in studies of the effect of renal nerve activity upon tubular sodium and water handling in the dog kidney was investigated. Following unilateral acute surgical denervation of the kidney a significant increase in urinary flow rate (40 +/- 7%), sodium...... clearance (26 +/- 4%), lithium clearance (9 +/- 2%) and fractional lithium clearance (8 +/- 2%) was seen, as compared to the contralateral kidney with preserved innervation. Calculated absolute proximal reabsorption rate decreased significantly by 7 +/- 2%, while calculated absolute rates of distal...... alterations in renal nerve activity occurred without measurable changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Administration of amiloride had no significant effect either on the lithium clearance, RBF or GFR, while the sodium excretion rate increased and potassium excretion rate...

  16. Interleukin-10 conjugated electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibre scaffolds for promoting alternatively activated (M2) macrophages around the peripheral nerve in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potas, Jason R; Haque, Farhia; Maclean, Francesca L; Nisbet, David R

    2015-05-01

    Macrophages play a key role in tissue regeneration following peripheral nerve injury by preparing the surrounding parenchyma for regeneration, however, they can be damaging if the response is excessive. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine that promotes macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory/wound healing state (M2 phenotype). The bioactive half-life of IL-10 is dependent on the cellular microenvironment and ranges from minutes to hours in vivo. Our objective was to extend the in vivo bioavailability and bioactivity of IL-10 by attaching the protein onto nanofibrous scaffolds and demonstrating increased expression levels of M2 macrophages when placed around healthy intact peripheral nerves. IL-10 was adsorbed and covalently bound to electrospun poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibrous scaffolds. In vivo bioavailability and bioactivity of IL-10 was confirmed by wrapping IL-10 conjugated nanofibres around the sciatic nerves of Wistar rats and quantifying M2 macrophages immunohistochemically double labelled with ED1 and either arginase 1 or CD206. IL-10 remained immobilised to PCL scaffolds for more than 120 days when stored in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature and for up to 14d ays when implanted around the sciatic nerve. IL-10 conjugated nanofibres successfully induced macrophage polarisation towards the M2 activated state within the scaffold material as well as the adjacent tissue surrounding the nerve. PCL biofunctionalised nanofibres are useful for manipulating the cellular microenvironment. Materials such as these could potentially lead to new therapeutic strategies for nervous tissue injuries as well as provide novel investigative tools for biological research. PMID:25837415

  17. Activation of pelvic afferent nerves from the rat bladder during filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, J; Wen, J; Kibble, A

    1999-01-01

    This short paper has reviewed current information on the physiology of bladder mechanoreceptors. Afferents in the bladder mucosa appear to be sensitive to distension but not to contraction of the viscus, and are also sensitive to the chemical composition of the bladder contents. Evidence is provided that suggest that Neurokinin A is released from primary afferent endings in the submucosa and is involved in both the normal response to distension, and the sensitization process. The results suggest that the low threshold mechanoreceptors are polymodal, and are modulated by various mediators, including some peptides that may originate from the sensory endings themselves, and that these mediators may be active during normal filling. PMID:10573780

  18. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5±6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33±0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50±0.34 in class II, 1.95±0.61 in class III, and 1.39±0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8±12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3±10.2% in class II, 49.2±24.5% in class III, and 66.3±26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  19. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Noto, Nobutaka; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okada, Tomoo; Harada, Kensuke [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5{+-}6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33{+-}0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50{+-}0.34 in class II, 1.95{+-}0.61 in class III, and 1.39{+-}0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8{+-}12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3{+-}10.2% in class II, 49.2{+-}24.5% in class III, and 66.3{+-}26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  20. Comparative effects of long-acting and short-acting loop diuretics on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Yae; Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Funada, Ryuichi; Takama, Noriaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Ichikawa, Shuichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya; Sato, Yuichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Short-acting loop diuretics are known to enhance cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The effects of two loop diuretics—long-acting azosemide and short-acting furosemide—on CSNA were evaluated using 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy in patients with CHF. Methods The present study was a subanalysis of our previously published study, which had reported that serial 123I-MIBG studies were the most useful prognostic indica...

  1. In vivo studies of silk based gold nano-composite conduits for functional peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suradip; Sharma, Manav; Saharia, Dhiren; Sarma, Kushal Konwar; Sarma, Monalisa Goswami; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Bora, Utpal

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel silk-gold nanocomposite based nerve conduit successfully tested in a neurotmesis grade sciatic nerve injury model in rats over a period of eighteen months. The conduit was fabricated by adsorbing gold nanoparticles onto silk fibres and transforming them into a nanocomposite sheet by electrospinning which is finally given a tubular structure by rolling on a stainless steel mandrel of chosen diameter. The conduits were found to promote adhesion and proliferation of Schwann cells in vitro and did not elicit any toxic or immunogenic responses in vivo. We also report for the first time, the monitoring of muscular regeneration post nerve conduit implantation by recording motor unit potentials (MUPs) through needle electromyogram. Pre-seeding the conduits with Schwann cells enhanced myelination of the regenerated tissue. Histo-morphometric and electrophysiological studies proved that the nanocomposite based conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells performed best in terms of structural and functional regeneration of severed sciatic nerves. The near normal values of nerve conduction velocity (50 m/sec), compound muscle action potential (29.7 mV) and motor unit potential (133 ?V) exhibited by the animals implanted with Schwann cell loaded nerve conduits in the present study are superior to those observed in previous reports with synthetic materials as well as collagen based nerve conduits. Animals in this group were also able to perform complex locomotory activities like stretching and jumping with excellent sciatic function index (SFI) and led a normal life. PMID:26026910

  2. Nerve growth factor, neuropeptides and cutaneous nerves in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodeib Abeer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurogenic components, as neurotrophic factors and neuropeptides, are probably involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD with the neuroimmunocutaneous system as they modify the functions of immunoactive cells in the skin. Nerve growth factor (NGF is the best-characterized member of the neurotrophin family. Both NGF and neuropeptides (NPs may be associated with the disease pathogenesis. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the plasma level of NGF and NPs in AD patients and correlate them with the disease activity and nerve changes in the skin by electron microscopy. Materials and Methods: Plasma levels of NGF and vasoactive intestinal peptide (+VIP were measured by an immunoenzymatic assay while plasma levels of calcitonine gene related peptide (CGRP and neuropeptide Y (NPY were measured by radioimmunoassay in 30 AD patients in comparison to 10 normal non-atopic controls. Electron microscopic study was done in 10 AD patients. Results: It has been found that there is significant increase of plasma levels of NGF and NPs in AD patients compared with controls. There is a positive correlation between the plasma levels of NGF and disease activity (correlation coefficient = 0.750, P< 0.005. There is a significant correlation between the number of Schwann axon complex, evidenced by electron microscopic examination and plasma level of NGF in AD patients. Conclusion: It has been concluded that these neurogenic factors; NGF and NPs modulate the allergic response in AD, probably through interactions with cells of the immune-inflammatory component. NGF might be considered as a marker of the disease activity.

  3. Palmitoylethanolamide reduces granuloma-induced hyperalgesia by modulation of mast cell activation in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cinelli Maria Pia; Palazzo Enza; Cipriano Mariateresa; Luongo Livio; De Filippis Daniele; de Novellis Vito; Maione Sabatino; Iuvone Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to obtain evidences of a possible analgesic role for palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in chronic granulomatous inflammation sustained by mast cell (MC) activation in rats at 96 hours. PEA (200-400-800 ?g/mL), locally administered at time 0, reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the expression and release of NGF in comparison with saline-treated controls. PEA prevented nerve formation and sprouting, as shown by histological analysis, reduced mechanical allod...

  4. Electrical stimulation with periodic alternating intervals stimulates neuronal cells to produce neurotrophins and cytokines through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Honjo, Kenichi; Ichioka, Hiroaki; Oseko, Fumishige; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a representative complication of dental surgery. Electrical therapy, based on electrical stimulation with periodic alternating intervals (ES-PAI), may promote nerve regeneration after peripheral nerve injury in a non-invasive manner, potentially providing an effective therapy for neuropathy. This study aimed to analyze the molecular mechanisms underlying the nerve recovery stimulated by ES-PAI. In brief, ES-PAI was applied to a neuronal cell line, Neuro2A, at various intensities using the pulse generator apparatus, FREUDE. Cell viability, neurotrophin mRNA expression, and cytokine production were examined using a tetrazolium-based assay, real-time RT-PCR, and ELISA, respectively. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was assessed using flow cytometry. It was found that ES-PAI increased the viability of cells and elevated expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3); ESPAI also augmented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) expression, which was restored by addition of p38 inhibitors. Phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK-1/2) was augmented by ES-PAI. Hence, ES-PAI may ameliorate peripheral neuropathy by promoting neuronal cell proliferation and production of neurogenic factors by activating p38 and ERK-1/2 pathways. PMID:26510379

  5. Evaluation of sympathetic nerve system activity with MIBG. Comparison with heart rate variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors attempted to elucidate the relations of plasma concentration of norepinephrine (pNE) and findings of heart rate variability and MIBG myocardial scintigraphy and evaluated cardiac autonomic nervous activity in chronic renal failure. Subjects were 211 patients with various heart diseases (coronary artery lesion, cardiomyopathy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal failure and so on), 60 patients with artificial kidney due to chronic renal failure, 13 of whom were found to have coronary arterial disease by Tl myocardial scintigraphy, and 14 normal volunteers. ECG was recorded with the portable recorder for heart rate variability. Together with collection of blood for pNE measurement, myocardial scintigraphy was done at 15 and 150 min after intravenous administration of 111 MBq of MIBG for acquisition of early and delayed, respectively, images of the frontal breast. Accumulation at and elimination during the time points of MIBG were computed in cps unit. Variability of heart rate was found to have the correlation positive with MIBG delayed accumulation and negative with the elimination, and pNE, negative with heart rate variability and the delayed accumulation and positive with the elimination. Thus cardiac autonomic nervous abnormality was suggested to occur before uremic cardiomyopathy. (K.H.)

  6. Evaluation of sympathetic nerve system activity with MIBG. Comparison with heart rate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Chinori; Wakabayashi, Yasushi; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi [Hamamatsu Medical School (Japan); Tawarahara, Kei; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    1997-04-01

    Authors attempted to elucidate the relations of plasma concentration of norepinephrine (pNE) and findings of heart rate variability and MIBG myocardial scintigraphy and evaluated cardiac autonomic nervous activity in chronic renal failure. Subjects were 211 patients with various heart diseases (coronary artery lesion, cardiomyopathy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal failure and so on), 60 patients with artificial kidney due to chronic renal failure, 13 of whom were found to have coronary arterial disease by Tl myocardial scintigraphy, and 14 normal volunteers. ECG was recorded with the portable recorder for heart rate variability. Together with collection of blood for pNE measurement, myocardial scintigraphy was done at 15 and 150 min after intravenous administration of 111 MBq of MIBG for acquisition of early and delayed, respectively, images of the frontal breast. Accumulation at and elimination during the time points of MIBG were computed in cps unit. Variability of heart rate was found to have the correlation positive with MIBG delayed accumulation and negative with the elimination, and pNE, negative with heart rate variability and the delayed accumulation and positive with the elimination. Thus cardiac autonomic nervous abnormality was suggested to occur before uremic cardiomyopathy. (K.H.)

  7. Measuring acute changes in adrenergic nerve activity of the heart in the living animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the function of the adrenergic neurons of the heart may be important indicators of the adaptations of an animal to physiologic stress and disease. Rates of loss of norepinephrine (NE) from the heart were considered to be proportional to NE secretion and to adrenergic function. In rat hearts, yohimbine induced almost identical increases in rates of loss of 3H-NE and of 125I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a functional analog of NE. Clonidine induced decreases in rates of loss of 3H-NE that were also mimicked by those of 125I-MIBG. In the dog heart, pharmacologically-induced increases and decreases in rates of loss of 123I-MIBG could be measured externally; these values were similar to those obtained for 125I-MIBG in the rat heart. Thus acute changes in the adrenergic neuron activity can be measured in the living heart. The method is applicable to man in determining the capacity of the adrenergic system to respond to provocative challenges

  8. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strong the impulse is. You should feel no pain once the test is finished. Often, the nerve ... systemic amyloidosis Sensorimotor polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the ...

  9. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by reducing swelling and inflammation around the nerve. • Steroid injection. In this procedure, steroids are injected near the ... nerve injection), or into the facet joint. Although steroid injections do not relieve the pressure on the nerve ...

  10. Part I The neurobiology of behaviour (from nerve cells, to genes and behaviour, Part II Cell and molecular biology of the neuron, Part III Elementary interactions between neurons: synaptic transmission, Part VIII The development of the nervous system, Learning and memory: Alzheimer's disease and the dementias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherine Fahim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a network of more than 100 billion individual nerve cells interconnected in systems that construct our normal and pathological states. The task of neuroscience is to understand the mental processes by which we perceive, act, learn, move and remember. This clear understanding of the brain in its normal state has implications in disease, for example learning disabilities, mental retardation, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and neuropsychiatric disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, depression, mania and anxiety disorders. How does the brain produce the remarkable individuality of human action? Are mental processes localized in specific regions of the brain? If specific mental processes are represented locally in different brain regions, what rules relate the anatomy and physiology of a region in mentation? Can these rules be understood better by examining the region as a whole or by studying its individual nerve cells, in either humans or animal models? To what extent are mental processes hard-wired into the neural architecture of the brain? What do genes contribute to behaviour, and how is gene expression in nerve cells regulated by developmental and learning processes? How does experience alter the way the brain processes subsequent events? This intensive course based on the Neural Science book by Kandel, Schwartz and Jessell will address all these issues. To that end, we will describe how neuroscience is attempting to link molecules to mind and how proteins responsible for the activities of individual nerve cells are related to the complexity of mental processes. In essence, neuroscience is an essential science towards the clear understanding of the human brain in its normal and pathological states. This is achieved through the close collaboration between neuroscientists, geneticists, physicists and clinicians. Kandel ER, Schwartz JH, Jessell TM 2000 & 2008 (in august 5th edition, Principles of Neural Science, 4th ed. McGraw-Hill, New York

  11. Unravelling crucial biomechanical resilience of myelinated peripheral nerve fibres provided by the Schwann cell basal lamina and PMP22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Gonzalo; Liashkovich, Ivan; Gess, Burkhard; Young, Peter; Kun, Alejandra; Shahin, Victor

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the research of the close and enigmatic relationship between nerve biomechanics and the development of neuropathies. Here we present a research strategy based on the application atomic force and confocal microscopy for simultaneous nerve biomechanics and integrity investigations. Using wild-type and hereditary neuropathy mouse models, we reveal surprising mechanical protection of peripheral nerves. Myelinated peripheral wild-type fibres promptly and fully recover from acute enormous local mechanical compression while maintaining functional and structural integrity. The basal lamina which enwraps each myelinated fibre separately is identified as the major contributor to the striking fibre's resilience and integrity. In contrast, neuropathic fibres lacking the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), which is closely connected with several hereditary human neuropathies, fail to recover from light compression. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of the basal lamina of Pmp22(-/-) fibres is significantly altered compared to wild-type fibres. In conclusion, the basal lamina and PMP22 act in concert to contribute to a resilience and integrity of peripheral nerves at the single fibre level. Our findings and the presented technology set the stage for a comprehensive research of the links between nerve biomechanics and neuropathies. PMID:25446378

  12. The involvement of NF-?B in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-?B in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-?B modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-?B during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-?B during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-?B modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-?B-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-?B is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  13. Vagal nerve stimulator: Evolving trends

    OpenAIRE

    Ogbonnaya, Sunny; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    Over three decades ago, it was found that intermittent electrical stimulation from the vagus nerve produces inhibition of neural processes, which can alter brain activity and terminate seizures. This paved way for the concept of vagal nerve stimulator (VNS). We describe the evolution of the VNS and its use in different fields of medicine. We also review the literature focusing on the mechanism of action of VNS producing desired effects in different conditions. PUBMED and EMBASE search was per...

  14. GRP nerves in pig antrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    We extracted gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its C-terminal decapeptide corresponding to 6.4 and 6.8 pmol/g from pig antrum mucosa. By immunohistochemistry GRP was localized to mucosal, submucosal, and myenteric nerve fibers. A few nerve cell bodies were also identified. Using isolated perfused...... pig antrum with intact vagal innervation, we found concomitant, atropine-resistant release of GRP and gastrin during electrical stimulation of the vagal nerves. Intra-arterial GRP at 10(-11)-10(-10) mol/l caused up to fivefold, dose-dependent increases in gastrin secretion; higher doses were less...... response to GRP and abolished the effect of vagal stimulation. The available evidence strongly suggests that GRP nerves are responsible for the stimulatory vagal effects on gastrin secretion in the pig....

  15. Mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, David M; Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J

    2015-01-01

    All patients with leprosy have some degree of nerve involvement. Perineural inflammation is the histopathologic hallmark of leprosy, and this localization may reflect a vascular route of entry of Mycobacterium leprae into nerves. Once inside nerves, M. leprae are ingested by Schwann cells, with a wide array of consequences. Axonal atrophy may occur early in this process; ultimately, affected nerves undergo segmental demyelination. Knowledge of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy has been greatly limited by the minimal opportunities to study affected nerves in man. The nine-banded armadillo provides the only animal model of the pathogenesis of M. leprae infection. New tools available for this model enable the study and correlation of events occurring in epidermal nerve fibers, dermal nerves, and nerve trunks, including neurophysiologic parameters, bacterial load, and changes in gene transcription in both neural and inflammatory cells. The armadillo model is likely to enhance understanding of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy and offers a means of testing proposed interventions. PMID:25432810

  16. T-cell activation molecule 4-1BB binds to extracellular matrix proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Chalupny, N J; Peach, R.; Hollenbaugh, D; Ledbetter, J.A.; Farr, A G; Aruffo, A

    1992-01-01

    The recently isolated 4-1BB cDNA clone encodes a cell surface protein expressed by activated T cells. Its extracellular domain is homologous to members of the nerve growth factor receptor super family and its cytoplasmic domain contains a sequence homologous to the binding site for the T-cell-specific tyrosine kinase p56lck found in the cytoplasmic domains of CD4 and CD8 alpha. At present the function of 4-1BB is not known. We prepared a 4-1BB-immunoglobulin fusion protein (4-1BB Rg). This pr...

  17. conduction blockade of the rat sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leitao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Newly synthesized chiral xanthone derivatives (CXD from L-Valinol (XEVOL, L-Leucinol (XEL and S-(--?-4- dimethylbenzylamine (XEA are structurally very similar to local anaesthetics [1,2], to which they might share common molecular targets regarding their activity in the nervous system (e.g. anti-epileptic and anti- depressant potential. This prompted us to investigate whether these compounds exhibit anaesthetic-like properties at the neuronal cell level, focusing on their ability to block the rat sciatic nerve conduction [3]. Nerve conduction blockade might result from a selective interference with Na+ ionic currents or from a non-selective modification of membrane stabilizing properties. Thus, we also evaluated the ability of xanthone derivatives to prevent hypotonic haemolysis [4], given that erythrocytes are non-excitable cells that are devoid of voltage- gated Na+ channels.Xanthone derivatives (XEVOL, XEA and XEL and the core nucleus, CMX, were about equipotent regarding blockade of the rat sciatic nerve conduction, when these compounds were applied in the low micromolar concentration range (0.100-3 ?M. However, at this concentration range, xanthone derivatives had little or no protective effect against hypotonic haemolysis; protection of hypotonic haemolysis was observed only when XEVOL, XEL and CMX were used in higher micromolar (30-100 ?M concentrations. It is worth noting that XEA (100 ?M was virtually devoid of the anti-haemolytic effect. Data suggest that nerve conduction blockade caused by newly synthesized xanthone derivatives might result predominantly from an action on Na+ ionic currents. This effect can be dissociated from their ability to stabilize cell membranes, which only became apparent upon increasing the concentration of the xanthone derivatives to the high micromolar range.This work was supported by FCT (I&D, nº226/2003; I&D, nº4040/2007, FEDER, POCI, U. Porto, and Caixa Geral de Depósitos.

  18. Effect of superficial radial nerve stimulation on the activity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons in the cat: role of cutaneous sensory input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of 3H-dopamine (DA) continuously synthesized from 3H-thyrosine was measured in the caudate nucleus (CN) and in the substantia nigra (SN) in both sides of the brain during electrical stimulation of the superficial radial nerve in cats lightly anaesthetized with halothane. Use of appropriate electrophysiologically controlled stimulation led to selective activation of low threshold afferent fibers whereas high stimulation activated all cutaneous afferents. Results showed that low threshold fiber activation induced a decreased dopaminergic activity in CN contralateral to nerve stimulation and a concomitant increase in dopaminergic activity on the ipsilateral side. Stimulation of group I and threshold stimulation of group II afferent fibers induced changes in the release of 3H-DA mainly on the contralateral CN and SN and in the ipsilateral CN. High stimulation was followed by a general increase of the neurotransmitter release in the four structures. This shows that the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons are mainly-if not exclusively-controlled by cutaneous sensory inputs. This control, non-specific when high threshold cutaneous fibers are also activated. Such activations could contribute to restablish sufficient release of DA when the dopaminergic function is impaired as in Parkinson's disease. (Author)

  19. Laminin-based Nanomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Rebekah Anne

    Peripheral nerve transection occurs commonly in traumatic injury, causing motor and sensory deficits distal to the site of injury. One option for surgical repair is the nerve conduit. Conduits currently on the market are hollow tubes into which the nerve ends are sutured. Although these conduits fill the gap, they often fail due to the slow rate of regeneration over long gaps. To facilitate increased speed of regeneration and greater potential for functional recovery, the ideal conduit should provide biochemically relevant signals and physical guidance cues, thus playing an active role in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this dissertation, I fabricated laminin-1 and laminin-polycaprolactone (PCL) blend nanofibers that mimic the geometry and functionality of the peripheral nerve basement membrane. These fibers resist hydration in aqueous media and require no harsh chemical crosslinkers. Adhesion and differentiation of both neuron-like and neuroprogenitor cells is improved on laminin nanofibrous meshes over two-dimensional laminin substrates. Blend meshes with varying laminin content were characterized for composition, tensile properties, degradation rates, and bioactivity in terms of cell attachment and axonal elongation. I have established that 10% (wt) laminin content is sufficient to retain the significant neurite-promoting effects of laminin critical in peripheral nerve repair. In addition, I utilized modified collector plate design to manipulate electric field gradients during electrospinning for the fabrication of aligned nanofibers. These aligned substrates provide enhanced directional guidance cues to the regenerating axons. Finally, I replicated the clinical problem of peripheral nerve transection using a rat tibial nerve defect model for conduit implantation. When the lumens of conduits were filled with nanofiber meshes of varying laminin content and alignment, I observed significant recovery of sensory and motor function over six weeks. This recovery was supported by nerve conduction studies and electromyography which described impulse transmission, muscle stimulation, and foot twitch through the region of regeneration. These studies provide a firm foundation for the use of natural-synthetic blend electrospun nanofibers to enhance existing hollow nerve guidance conduits. The similarity in surgical technique and obvious benefit to the patient should lead to rapid translation into clinical application.

  20. Active cheerleading with radial nerve palsy following supracondylar humerus fracture [Cheerleading mit Radialisparese nach suprakondylärer Humerusfraktur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herold, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available [english] Cheerleading is associated with substantial morbidity. As such, cheerleading fall-related injuries may cause serious to fatal outcomes especially falls from attempted pyramids. We report on a female adolescent cheerleader age 14 suffering a supracondylar humerus fracture related to a fall from a pyramid. Unfortunately, lateral pinning led to complete iatrogenic radial nerve palsy. However, given an intriguing compensatory athletic function of the wrist she was able to perform cheerleading artistic figures such as flic-flac within four months after the injury with a radial nerve palsy, which is highlighted in an attached video. 18 months after the radial palsy she was admitted to our hospital and underwent neuroma resection of the initially transsected radial nerve at the elbow and sural nerve grafting for radial nerve palsy.[german] Cheerleading kann zu verschiedensten Unfällen führen. Insbesondere bei dem Versuch Pyramiden zu bilden sind bereits Todesfälle aufgetreten. Wir berichten von einer 14-jährigen Cheerleaderin welche bei dem Versuch eine Pyramide zu bilden stürzte und sich eine suprakondyläre Humerusfraktur zuzog. Bei der osteosynthetischen Versorgung kam es leider zu einer kompletten Durchtrennung des N. radialis. Dennoch konnte sie bei der gegebenen erstaunlichen Kompensation ihrer Handgelenksgeweglichkeit weiterhin schwierige Cheerleading Übungen wie Flick-Flack durchführen, was im beigefügten Video verdeutlicht wird. 18 Monate nach Eintreten der Radialisparese wurde sie in unserer Klinik vorstellig und es wurde nach einer Neuromresektion eine Suralis Interposition zur Nervenrekonstruktion durchgeführt.

  1. The effect of the sympathetic nervous system on splenic natural killer cell activity in mice administered the Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84

    OpenAIRE

    Izumo, Takayuki; Maekawa, Toshihiro; Horii, Yuko; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Ida, Masayuki; Furukawa, Yuichi; ONO, YOSHIKO; KISO, Yoshinobu; KITAGAWA, Yoshinori; SHIBATA, Hiroshi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2013-01-01

    Splenic sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) modulates cellular immune functions such as splenic natural killer cell activity. Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 enhances splenic natural killer cell activity. Here, we examined whether S-PT84 affects splenic natural killer activity through splenic SNA in BALB/c mice. Splenic SNA was significantly decreased following the administration of S-PT84. This phenomenon was inhibited by pretreatment with thioperamide (histamine H3 receptor antagonist), s...

  2. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... includes multipoint intermolecular interactions that probably involve aggregation of both polymorphic and monomorphic T cell surface molecules. Such aggregations have been shown in vitro to markedly enhance and, in some cases, induce T cell activation. The production of T-derived lymphokines that have been...... implicated in B cell activation is dependent on the T cell receptor for antigen and its associated CD3 signalling complex. T-dependent help for B cell activation is therefore similarly MHC-restricted and involves T-B intercellular interaction. Recent reports that describe antigen-independent B cell...

  3. Use new PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits for promoting peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Qiongjiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nerve conduits provide a promising strategy for peripheral nerve injury repair. However, the efficiency of nerve conduits to enhance nerve regeneration and functional recovery is often inferior to that of autografts. Nerve conduits require additional factors such as cell adhesion molecules and neurotrophic factors to provide a more conducive microenvironment for nerve regeneration. Methods In the present study, poly{(lactic acid-co-[(glycolic acid-alt-(L-lysine]} (PLGL was modified by grafting Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Gly (RGD peptide and nerve growth factor (NGF for fabricating new PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits to promote nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits were tested in the rat sciatic nerve transection model. Rat sciatic nerves were cut off to form a 10 mm defect and repaired with the nerve conduits. All of the 32 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: group PLGL-RGD-NGF, group PLGL-RGD, group PLGL and group autograft. At 3 months after surgery, the regenerated rat sciatic nerve was evaluated by footprint analysis, electrophysiology, and histologic assessment. Experimental data were processed using the statistical software SPSS 10.0. Results The sciatic function index value of groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft was significantly higher than those of groups PLGL-RGD and PLGL. The nerve conduction velocities of groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft were significantly faster than those of groups PLGL-RGD and PLGL. The regenerated nerves of groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft were more mature than those of groups PLGL-RGD and PLGL. There was no significant difference between groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft. Conclusions PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits are more effective in regenerating nerves than both PLGL-RGD nerve conduits and PLGL nerve conduits. The effect is as good as that of an autograft. This work established the platform for further development of the use of PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits for clinical nerve repair.

  4. Demonstration of immunochemical identity between the nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the cell adhesion molecule L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, E; Richter-Landsberg, C; Faissner, A; Schachner, M

    1985-01-01

    -treated rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells yielded comigrating bands by SDS-PAGE. NILE antibodies reacted with immunopurified L1 antigen, but not with N-CAM and other L2 epitope-bearing glycoproteins from adult mouse brain. Finally, by sequential immunoprecipitation from detergent extracts of [35S......The nerve growth factor-inducible large external (NILE) glycoprotein and the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 were shown to be immunochemically identical. Immunoprecipitation with L1 and NILE antibodies of [3H]fucose-labeled material from culture supernatants and detergent extracts of NGF......]methionine-labeled early post-natal cerebellar cell cultures or [3H]fucose-labeled NGF-treated PC12 cells, all immunoreactivity for NILE antibody could be removed by pre-clearing with L1 antibody and vice versa....

  5. Researches of activity of acetylcholinesterase in nerve fibres of both thymus and spleen of rats in remote terms after chronic radioactive and thermal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in nerve fibres of both thymus and spleen in remote period (in a 6 months) after chronic irradiation, thermal effect and combined action of these two factors was investigated. The researches were conducted on 80 rats-males, which were divided into 4 groups: first was the control group, second was subjected to thermal effect (25 sessions - 37 degree, 4 hours ), third - x-ray irradiation (25 sessions -0,02 Gy), fourth - combined action of these two factors. Defined(determined) Activity of AChE was determined by microscope-photometer at length wave 490 nm. Irradiation and heat in used dozes did not cause appreciable changes, but at their combined action the activity of AChE decreased. The additional single thermal effect promoted increase of ferment activity up to a control level in nerve fibres of spleen, but not thymus. Probably, the infringement of interaction processes of systems may be stipulated by changes of activity of endocrine glands. The significant decrease of a level of insulin and glucocorticoids in blood was detected in experiments. 13 refs., 1 fig

  6. Nanotechnology for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Biazar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries (PNI can lead to lifetime loss of function and disfigurement. Different methods such as conventional allograft procedures and using of biological tubes have problems for damaged peripheral nerves reconstruction. Designed scaffolds with natural and synthetic materials are now widely used in the reconstruction of damaged tissues. Utilization of absorbable and non-absorbable synthetic and natural polymers with unique characteristics can be an appropriate solution to repair damaged nerve tissues. Polymeric nanofibrous scaffolds with properties similar to neural structure can be more effective in the reconstruction process. Better cell adhesion and migration, more guiding of axons and structural features such as porosity provide clearer role of nanofibers for the restoration of neural tissues. In this paper, basic concepts of peripheral nerve injury, types of  artificial and natural guides and  the methods to improve the performance of tubes like orientation, nanotechnology applications for nerve reconstruction, fiber and nanofibers, electrospinning methods and their application in the peripheral nerve reconstruction have been reviewed.

  7. Effects of perindopril on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with congestive heart failure: comparison with enalapril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Kumakura, Hisao; Takayama, Yoshiaki; Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan, Department of Internal Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    The production of aldosterone in the heart is suppressed by the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor perindopril in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Moreover, perindopril has been reported to have more cardioprotective effects than enalapril. Forty patients with CHF [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <45%; mean 33{+-}7%] were randomly assigned to perindopril (2 mg/day; n=20) or enalapril (5 mg/day; n=20). All patients were also treated with diuretics. The delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, delayed total defect score (TDS) and washout rate (WR) were determined from {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) images, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations were measured before and 6 months after treatment. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) and LVEF were also determined by echocardiography. After treatment, in patients receiving perindopril, TDS decreased from 39{+-}10 to 34{+-}9 (P<0.01), H/M ratios increased from 1.62{+-}0.27 to 1.76{+-}0.29 (P<0.01), WR decreased from 50{+-}14% to 42{+-}14% (P<0.05) and plasma BNP concentrations decreased from 226{+-}155 to 141{+-}90 pg/ml (P<0.0005). In addition, the LVEDV decreased from 180{+-}30 to 161{+-}30 ml (P<0.05) and the LVESV decreased from 122{+-}35 to 105{+-}36 ml (P<0.05). Although the LVEF tended to increase, the change was not statistically significant (from 33{+-}8% to 36{+-}12%; P=NS). On the other hand, there were no significant changes in these parameters in patients receiving enalapril. Plasma BNP concentrations, {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic parameters improved after 6 months of perindopril treatment. These findings indicate that perindopril treatment can ameliorate the cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and the left ventricular performance in patients with CHF. (orig.)

  8. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural informa...

  9. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a case report of improvement in relapsing auto-immune optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N Weiss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results from a patient with relapsing optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS. SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and has become the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date (www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867. SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs for treatment of retinal and optic nerve diseases. Pre-treatment and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams of a 54 year old female patient were performed both at the Florida Study Center, USA and at The Eye Center of Columbus, USA. As a consequence of a relapsing optic neuritis, the patient?s previously normal visual acuity decreased to between 20/350 and 20/400 in the right eye and to 20/70 in the left eye. Significant visual field loss developed bilaterally. The patient underwent a right eye vitrectomy with injection of BMSCs into the optic nerve of the right eyeand retrobulbar, subtenon and intravitreal injection of BMSCs in the left eye. At 15 months after SCOTS treatment, the patient?s visual acuity had improved to 20/150 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Bilateral visual fields improved markedly. Both macular thickness and fast retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were maximally improved at 3 and 6 months after SCOTS treatment. The patient also reduced her mycophenylate dose from 1,500 mg per day to 500 mg per day and required no steroid pulse therapy during the 15-month follow up.

  10. TRANSPLANTATION OF HYPERTHERMIC PRECONDITIONING OLFACTORY ENSHEATHING CELLS COMBINED WITH NEURAL STEM CELLS IN THE TREATMENT OF CENTRAL NERVE INJURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S G; Wang, C J; Wang, Y X; Qu, C Q

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to observe the effect of the transplantation of hyperthermic preconditioning (HPC) olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) at 40°C combined with neural stem cells (NSCs) in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), based on the OECs and NSCs taken from the olfactory bulbs and cerebral cortex of newborn rats. Forty-two female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into: control group, NSCs+OECs without HPC group and NSCs+HPC OECs group. Firstly, hemisected spinal cord injury model was established; the motor function recovery of the right lower limb of the rats was compared by Basso-Beatie-Bresnahan rating (BBB rating), climbing score and running time on a rotating platform during the whole experiment. At one day, two weeks and four weeks after transplantation, two rats were randomly selected from each group for section preparation. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining was performed on the sections to observe and analyze the pathological changes of the spinal cord tissue, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling was used to observe the distribution of transplanted cells. The results demonstrated that, BBB score of the rats that were treated by transplantation of NSCs combined with HPC OCEs was distinctly improved; a rapid increase of BBB score was found two weeks after transplantation, while BBB score had slightly increased six weeks later. BBB score of the control group and the NSCs+OECs without HPC group was found with a slight increase, especially in the control group. BBB score of NSCs+HPC OECs was significantly higher than in the control group and the NSCs+OECs without HPC group at the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 12th week after treatment (Pstaining results of NSCs+HPC OECs indicated that, cells of the spinal cord were neatly arranged, close to normal. BrdU labeling results revealed that, transplanted cells were found in injury tissue, indicating that they were involved in the spinal cord repair. This study proves that, the effect of NSCs combined with HPC OECs in the treatment of SCI is better than NSCs combined with OECs without HPC, and the ratio of NSCs differentiating to neuron after inducing HPC OECs supernate is higher than that after inducing OECs supernate without HPC. PMID:26403406

  11. Periosteum Metabolism and Nerve Fiber Positioning Depend on Interactions between Osteoblasts and Peripheral Innervation in Rat Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauprivez, Cédric; Bataille, Caroline; Baroukh, Brigitte; Llorens, Annie; Lesieur, Julie; Marie, Pierre J.; Saffar, Jean-Louis; Biosse Duplan, Martin; Cherruau, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system controls bone remodeling by regulating bone formation and resorption. How nerves and bone cells influence each other remains elusive. Here we modulated the content or activity of the neuropeptide Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide to investigate nerve-bone cell interplays in the mandible periosteum by assessing factors involved in nerve and bone behaviors. Young adult rats were chemically sympathectomized or treated with Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide or Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide10-28, a receptor antagonist. Sympathectomy depleted the osteogenic layer of the periosteum in neurotrophic proNerve Growth Factor and neurorepulsive semaphorin3a; sensory Calcitonin-Gene Related Peptide-positive fibers invaded this layer physiologically devoid of sensory fibers. In the periosteum non-osteogenic layer, sympathectomy activated mast cells to release mature Nerve Growth Factor while Calcitonin-Gene Related Peptide-positive fibers increased. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide treatment reversed sympathectomy effects. Treating intact animals with Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide increased proNerve Growth Factor expression and stabilized mast cells. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide10-28 treatment mimicked sympathectomy effects. Our data suggest that sympathetic Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulate the interactions between nervous fibers and bone cells by tuning expressions by osteogenic cells of factors responsible for mandible periosteum maintenance while osteogenic cells keep nervous fibers at a distance from the bone surface. PMID:26509533

  12. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Ganglion Cell Complex in Patients with Optic Neuritis or Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders Using Optical Coherence Tomography in a Chinese Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guohong; Li, Zhenxin; Zhao, Guixian; Feng, Chaoyi; Li, Mengwei; Huang, Yongheng; Sun, Xinghuai

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate a cohort of optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders patients in a territory hospital in China. The peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) were measured using spectral-domain OCT after 6 months of acute onset. The results showed that both the peripapillary RNFL and macular GCC were significantly thinner in all optic neuritis subtypes compared to controls. In addition, the recurrent optic neuritis and NMO groups showed more severe damage on the RNFL and GCC pattern. PMID:26649191

  13. IN VITRO ACTIVITY OF DUVERNOY'S GLAND SECRETIONS FROM THE AFRICAN BOOMSLANG, Dispholidus typus, ON NERVE-MUSCLE PREPARATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. YOUNG

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro toxicity assays were performed using Duvernoy's gland secretions from the African boomslang, Dispholidus typus, and isolated rat duodenum and frog sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparations. The Duvernoy's gland secretions of D. typus had no apparent effect on the frog sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparation. The secretions produced an increase in baseline tonus and an increase in the rhythmic contractile force of the rat duodenum, but had no significant effect on the frequency of contractions. Atropine sulfate (10 M effectively antagonized the excitatory effects of the Duvernoy's gland secretions at concentrations 200 µg/ml. Although the coagulopathic effects of D. typus are well documented, this report provides preliminary data indicating effects of this venom on neuromuscular preparations.

  14. Localization of Interictal Epileptiform Activity Using Magnetoencephalography with Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry in Patients with a Vagus Nerve Stimulator

    OpenAIRE

    Stapleton-Kotloski, Jennifer R.; Kotloski, Robert J.; Boggs, Jane A.; Popli, Gautam; O’Donovan, Cormac A.; Couture, Daniel E.; Cornell, Cassandra; Godwin, Dwayne W.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides useful and non-redundant information in the evaluation of patients with epilepsy, and in particular, during the pre-surgical evaluation of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a common treatment for pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. However, interpretation of MEG recordings from patients with a VNS is challenging due to the severe magnetic artifacts produced by the VNS. We used synthetic aperture magnetometry (g2) [SAM(g2)], an adaptiv...

  15. Differentiation of immortal cells inhibits telomerase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, H W; Sokoloski, J A; Perez, J.R.; Maltese, J Y; Sartorelli, A. C.; Stein, C. A.; Nichols, G; Khaled, Z.; Telang, N. T.; Narayanan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleic acid-protein complex, adds hexameric repeats of 5'-TTAGGG-3' to the ends of mammalian chromosomal DNA (telomeres) to compensate for the progressive loss that occurs with successive rounds of DNA replication. Although somatic cells do not express telomerase, germ cells and immortalized cells, including neoplastic cells, express this activity. To determine whether the phenotypic differentiation of immortalized cells is linked to the regulation of telomerase activity, t...

  16. Cell division activity during apical hook development

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, V.; Koornneef, M.

    2001-01-01

    Growth during plant development is predominantly governed by the combined activities of cell division and cell elongation. The relative contribution of both activities controls the growth of a tissue. A fast change in growth is exhibited at the apical hypocotyl of etiolated seedlings where cells grow at different rates to form a hook-like structure, which is traditionally assumed to result from differential cell elongation. Using new tools we show asymmetric distribution of cell division duri...

  17. Prediction of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac functional outcome after treatment in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Examination using dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Iwasaki, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Tadashi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi; Nagai, Ryozo

    2000-07-01

    This study evaluated whether dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy can predict improvement of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac function. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women, mean age 59{+-}13 years) with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using tracer at 0, 5, 10 and 15 {mu}g/kg/min before treatment. Patients were divided into good responders (LVEF increase {>=}15%) 8 patients (GR Group) and poor responders (LVEF increase <15%) 8 patients (PR Group) after treatment with {beta}-blocker or amiodarone with a background treatment of digitalis, diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging to evaluate cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and echocardiography were performed before and at one year after treatment. MIBG imaging was obtained 4 hours after tracer injection, and the heart/mediastinum count ratio (H/M ratio) calculated from the anterior planar image and the total defect score (TDS) from the single photon emission computed tomography image. LVEF and left ventricular endo-diastolic dimension (LVDd) were measured by echocardiography and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was evaluated. The GR Group showed TDS decreased from 28{+-}6 to 17{+-}12 (p<0.05), H/M ratio increased from 1.79{+-}0.26 to 2.07{+-}0.32 (p<0.05), LVEF increased from 29{+-}8% to 48{+-}10% (p<0.01), and LVDd decreased from 65{+-}4 mm to 58{+-}5 mm (p<0.05). In contrast, the PR group showed no significant changes in TDS. H/M ratio, LVEF and LVDd. NYHA functional class improved in both groups. The improvement was better in the GR Group than in the PR group. Dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy is useful to predict the improvement of the cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac function, and symptoms after treatment in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. (author)

  18. Prediction of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac functional outcome after treatment in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Examination using dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated whether dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy can predict improvement of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac function. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women, mean age 59±13 years) with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using tracer at 0, 5, 10 and 15 ?g/kg/min before treatment. Patients were divided into good responders (LVEF increase ?15%) 8 patients (GR Group) and poor responders (LVEF increase <15%) 8 patients (PR Group) after treatment with ?-blocker or amiodarone with a background treatment of digitalis, diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging to evaluate cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and echocardiography were performed before and at one year after treatment. MIBG imaging was obtained 4 hours after tracer injection, and the heart/mediastinum count ratio (H/M ratio) calculated from the anterior planar image and the total defect score (TDS) from the single photon emission computed tomography image. LVEF and left ventricular endo-diastolic dimension (LVDd) were measured by echocardiography and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was evaluated. The GR Group showed TDS decreased from 28±6 to 17±12 (p<0.05), H/M ratio increased from 1.79±0.26 to 2.07±0.32 (p<0.05), LVEF increased from 29±8% to 48±10% (p<0.01), and LVDd decreased from 65±4 mm to 58±5 mm (p<0.05). In contrast, the PR group showed no significant changes in TDS. H/M ratio, LVEF and LVDd. NYHA functional class improved in both groups. The improvement was better in the GR Group than in the PR group. Dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy is useful to predict the improvement of the cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac function, and symptoms after treatment in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. (author)

  19. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident, an operation is indicated from our experience. PMID:12874724

  20. Palmitoylethanolamide reduces granuloma-induced hyperalgesia by modulation of mast cell activation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinelli Maria Pia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to obtain evidences of a possible analgesic role for palmitoylethanolamide (PEA in chronic granulomatous inflammation sustained by mast cell (MC activation in rats at 96 hours. PEA (200-400-800 ?g/mL, locally administered at time 0, reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the expression and release of NGF in comparison with saline-treated controls. PEA prevented nerve formation and sprouting, as shown by histological analysis, reduced mechanical allodynia, evaluated by Von Frey filaments, and inhibited dorsal root ganglia activation. These results were supported by the evidence that MCs in granuloma were mainly degranulated and closely localized near nerve fibres and PEA significantly reduced MC degranulation and nerves fibre formation. These findings are the first evidence that PEA, by the modulation of MC activation, controls pain perception in an animal model of chronic inflammation, suggesting its potential use for the treatment of all those painful conditions in which MC activation is an initial key step.

  1. Restoration of sensory dysfunction following peripheral nerve injury by the polysaccharide from culinary and medicinal mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr. Pers. through its neuroregenerative action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kah-Hui WONG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral nerves have the unique capability to regenerate after injury. Insights into regeneration of peripheral nerves after injury may have implications for neurodegenerative diseases of the nervous system. We investigated the ability of polysaccharide from Hericium erinaceus mushroom in the treatment of nerve injury following peroneal nerve crush in Sprague-Dawley rats by daily oral administration. In sensory functional recovery test, the time taken for the rats to withdraw its hind limb from contact with the hot plate was measured. The test revealed acceleration of sensory recovery in the polysaccharide group compared to negative controls. Further, peripheral nerve injury leads to changes at the remotely located DRG containing cell bodies of sensory neurons. Immunofluorescence studies showed that Akt and p38 MAPK were expressed in DRG and strongly upregulated in polysaccharide group after peripheral nerve injury. The intensity of endothelial cells antigen-1 that recognized endothelial cells in the blood vessels of distal segments in crushed nerves was significantly higher in the treated groups than in the negative control group. Our findings suggest that H. erinaceus is capable of accelerating sensory functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury and the effect involves the activation of protein kinase signaling pathways and restoration of blood-nerve barrier.

  2. Comparative neuro tissue engineering using different nerve guide implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinis, N; Schaller, H E; Schulte-Eversum, C; Lanaras, T; Schlosshauer, B; Doser, M; Dietz, K; Rösner, H; Müller, H W; Haerle, M

    2007-01-01

    At the moment autologous nerve grafting remains the only reasonable technique for reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. Unfortunately, this technique has a lot of complications and disadvantages. These problems are related to the autologous nerve that is harvested for this procedure. Donor site morbidity with loss of sensitivity, painful neuroma formation and of course the restricted availability of autologous nerves stimulates the idea for alternative techniques on that field. In this paper we describe our experience with different graft materials for reconstruction of a 2 cm nerve gap in a median nerve model in rats. After implantation of various materials (biological/synthetic) the main experiments were conducted with a synthetic, biodegradable nerve conduit seeded with autologous Schwann cells. With this material we were able to reconstruct successfully a 2 cm gap in the rat median nerve. Regeneration with this material was found to be equally to an autologous nerve graft. PMID:17985547

  3. Uptake and metabolism of fructose by rat neocortical cells in vivo and by isolated nerve terminals in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Elsais, Ahmed; Frøland, Anne Sofie; Taubøll, Erik; Gjerstad, Leif; Quan, Yi; Dingledine, Ray; Rise, Frode

    2015-01-01

    Fructose reacts spontaneously with proteins in the brain to form advanced glycation end products (AGE) that may elicit neuroinflammation and cause brain pathology, including Alzheimer’s disease. We investigated whether fructose is eliminated by oxidative metabolism in neocortex. Injection of [14C]fructose or its AGE-prone metabolite [14C]glyceraldehyde into rat neocortex in vivo led to formation of 14C-labeled alanine, glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and glutamine. In isolated neocortical nerve t...

  4. Role of angiotensin-(1-7) in rostral ventrolateral medulla in blood pressure regulation via sympathetic nerve activity in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Toshiaki; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Ito, Koji; Kishi, Takuya; Hoka, Sumio; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) Ang-(1-7) is formed from angiotensin II by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and modulates the renin-angiotensin system. We evaluated whether the Ang-(1-7)-Mas axis in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contributes to neural mechanisms of blood pressure (BP) regulation. We microinjected Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor antagonist A-779, and ACE2 inhibitor DX600 into the RVLM of anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Unilateral Ang-(1-7) microinjection induced a significantly greater increase in AP (arterial blood pressure) in SHR than in WKY. Bilateral A-779 microinjection induced a significantly greater decrease in AP and renal sympathetic nerve activity in SHR than in WKY. Bilateral DX600 microinjection induced a significantly greater decrease in AP in SHR than in WKY. Our results suggest that endogenous Ang-(1-7) in the RVLM contributes to maintain AP and renal sympathetic nerve activity both in SHR and WKY and that its activity might be enhanced in SHR. PMID:21699448

  5. An effect of wrapping peripheral nerve anastomosis with pedicled muscle flap on nerve regeneration in experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumenko L.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite intrinsic capacity of peripheral nerves to regenerate, functional outcomes of peripheral nerves injury remain poor. Nerve ischemia, intra-/perineurial fibrosis and neuroma formation contribute a lot to that. Several authors demonstrated beneficial effects of increased vascularization at the site of injury on peripheral nerves regeneration. The use of highly vascularized autologous tissues (greater omentum as a source of peripheral nerves neovascularization shows promising re-sults. We proposed a surgical technique in which injured peripheral nerves anastomosis was wrapped in a pedicled muscular flap and performed morphological assessment of the efficacy of such technique with the aid of immunohistochemistry. 14 rats (which underwent sciatic nerve transection were operated according to proposed technique. Another 14 rats, in which only end-to-end nerve anastomosis (without muscular wrapping was performed served as controls. Morphological changes were evaluated at 3 weeks and 3 months periods. Higher blood vessel and axon counts were observed in experimental groups at both checkpoints. There was also an increase in Schwann cells and macrophages counts, and less collagen content in pe-ripheral nerves of experimental groups. Axons in neuromas of experimental groups showed a higher degree of arrangement. We conclude that proposed surgical technique provides better vascularisation of injured peripheral nerves, which is beneficial for nerve regeneration.

  6. Contribution of the distal nerve sheath to nerve and muscle preservation following denervation and sensory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Karen; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Minet, Wyatt; Fahnestock, Margaret; Bain, James R

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the contribution of the distal nerve sheath to sensory protection. Following tibial nerve transection, rats were assigned to one of the following groups: (1) saphenous-to-tibial nerve neurorrhaphy; (2) saphenous-to-gastrocnemius neurotization; (3) unprotected controls (tibial nerve transection); or (4) immediate common peroneal-to-tibial nerve neurorrhaphy. After a 6-month denervation period and motor reinnervation, ultrastructural, histologic, and morphometric analyses were performed on the distal tibial nerve and gastrocnemius muscle cross-sections. Sensory axons neurotized to muscle maintain existing muscle integrity, as demonstrated by less fibrosis, collagenization, and fat deposition, more than unprotected muscle, and preserve the distribution pattern of fast twitch fibers. However, neurorrhaphy of the sensory nerve to the distal tibial nerve (involving the distal nerve sheath) improves existing endoneurial sheath structure, demonstrated by reduced collagen, and enhances regeneration, shown by improved axon-to-Schwann cell coupling and increased axon area. The authors conclude that sensory protection of muscle does not require the distal nerve sheath, but that preservation of the distal sheath may contribute to enhanced nerve regeneration. PMID:15672322

  7. Comparative study of the efficacy of decellularization treatment of allogenic and xenogeneic nerves as nerve conduits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of allogenic and xenogeneic nerve grafts that were treated using decellularization. The sciatic nerves of Sprague-Dawley rats and the median nerves of Japanese white rabbits were decellularized with sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100 and examined with a scanning electron microscope and immunofluorescence staining. A bridge-graft into the sciatic nerve in Wistar rats was performed with the decellularized nerves (10 mm in length for short-term evaluation; 15 mm in length for long-term evaluation). As a control, an isograft was performed. The specimens were harvested at 4 weeks postoperatively and prepared for immunohistochemistry. Function, electrophysiological and histomorphological analyses were performed to evaluate nerve recovery at 24 weeks postoperatively. The 3-dimensional structure of the basal lamina column, on which the cell adhesion molecules were integrated, was preserved through the decellularization protocols. Limited ED1-positive macrophage invasion was observed, and abundant NF 160-positive axons, which were accompanied by S-100-positive Schwann cells, penetrated through the implanted nerves. The sciatic nerve function and electrophysiological and histomorphological analyses suggest that the xenogeneic nerve graft was statistically indistinguishable from the allogenic nerve graft but slightly inferior to the isograft in supporting the axonal regeneration and functional recovery. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 445-454, 2016. PMID:26474327

  8. Insulin-like growth factors act synergistically with basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor to promote chromaffin cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) on DNA synthesis in cultured chromaffin cells from fetal, neonatal, and adult rats by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) pulse labeling for 24 or 48 h and...... immunocytochemical staining of cell nuclei. After 6 days in culture in the absence of growth factors, nuclear BrdUrd incorporation was detected in 30% of fetal chromaffin cells, 1.5% of neonatal cells, and 0.1% of adult cells. Addition of 10 nM IGF-I or IGF-II increased the fraction of BrdUrd-labeled nuclei to 50......% of fetal, 20% of neonatal, and 2% of adult chromaffin cells. The ED50 value of IGF-I- and IGF-II-stimulated BrdUrd labeling in neonatal chromaffin cells was 0.3 nM and 0.8 nM, respectively. In neonatal and adult chromaffin cells, addition of 1 nM bFGF or 2 nM NGF stimulated nuclear Brd...

  9. Beneficial effect of perindopril on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and brain natriuretic peptide in patients with chronic heart failure. Comparison with enalapril

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), it remains unclear whether perindopril is more cardioprotective than enalapril. Forty-five stable CHF outpatients undergoing conventional therapy including enalapril therapy were randomized to 2 groups [group I (n=24): continuous enalapril treatment; group II (n=21): enalapril was changed to perindopril]. Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity was evaluated using cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, hemodynamic parameters and neurohumoral factors before and 6 months after treatment. There was no difference in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups. In group I, there were no changes in MIBG parameters, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) or plasma level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). In contrast, in group II delayed heart/mediastinum count ratio was significantly increased (2.0±0.07 vs 2.15±0.07, p=0.013) and the washout rate was significantly decreased (33.0±1.4 vs 30.5±1.2, p=0.030) after 6 months compared with the baseline value. In addition, LVEF was significantly increased and the plasma BNP level was significantly decreased. These findings suggest that for the treatment of CHF, perindopril is superior to enalapril with respect of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and BNP. (author)

  10. Genetically-increased taste cell population with G?-gustducin-coupled sweet receptors is associated with increase of gurmarin-sensitive taste nerve fibers in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsukawa Hideo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptide gurmarin is a selective sweet response inhibitor for rodents. In mice, gurmarin sensitivity differs among strains with gurmarin-sensitive C57BL and gurmarin-poorly-sensitive BALB strains. In C57BL mice, sweet-responsive fibers of the chorda tympani (CT nerve can be divided into two distinct populations, gurmarin-sensitive (GS and gurmarin-insensitive (GI types, suggesting the existence of two distinct reception pathways for sweet taste responses. By using the dpa congenic strain (dpa CG whose genetic background is identical to BALB except that the gene(s controlling gurmarin sensitivity are derived from C57BL, we previously found that genetically-elevated gurmarin sensitivity in dpa CG mice, confirmed by using behavioral response and whole CT nerve response analyses, was linked to a greater taste cell population co-expressing sweet taste receptors and a G? protein, G?-gustducin. However, the formation of neural pathways from the increased taste cell population to nerve fibers has not yet been examined. Results Here, we investigated whether the increased taste cell population with G?-gustducin-coupled sweet receptors would be associated with selective increment of GS fiber population or nonselective shift of gurmarin sensitivities of overall sweet-responsive fibers by examining the classification of GS and GI fiber types in dpa CG and BALB mice. The results indicated that dpa CG, like C57BL, possess two distinct populations of GS and GI types of sweet-responsive fibers with almost identical sizes (dpa CG: 13 GS and 16 GI fibers; C57BL: 16 GS and 14 GI fibers. In contrast, BALB has only 3 GS fibers but 18 GI fibers. These data indicate a marked increase of the GS population in dpa CG. Conclusion These results suggest that the increased cell population expressing T1r2/T1r3/G?-gustducin in dpa CG mice may be associated with an increase of their matched GS type fibers, and may form the distinct GS sweet reception pathway in mice. G?-gustducin may be involved in the GS sweet reception pathway and may be a key molecule for links between sweet taste receptors and cell type-specific-innervation by their matched fiber class.

  11. Ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer measured by fourier-domain optical coherence tomography for early detection of structural damage in patients with preperimetric glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolle T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Rolle, Cristina Briamonte, Daniela Curto, Federico Maria GrignoloEye Clinic, Section of Ophthalmology, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Torino, Torino, ItalyAims: To evaluate the capability of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT to detect structural damage in patients with preperimetric glaucoma.Methods: A total of 178 Caucasian subjects were enrolled in this cohort study: 116 preperimetric glaucoma patients and 52 healthy subjects. Using three-dimensional FD-OCT, the participants underwent imaging of the ganglion cell complex (GCC and the optic nerve head. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and predictive values were calculated for all parameters at the first and fifth percentiles. Areas under the curves (AUCs were generated for all parameters and were compared (Delong test. For both the GCC and the optic nerve head protocols, the OR logical disjunction (Boolean logic operator was calculated.Results: The AUCs didn’t significantly differ. Macular global loss volume had the largest AUC (0.81. Specificities were high at both the fifth and first percentiles (up to 97%, but sensitivities were low, especially at the first percentile (55%–27%.Conclusion: Macular and papillary diagnostic accuracies did not differ significantly based on the 95% confidence interval. The computation of the Boolean OR operator has been found to boost diagnostic accuracy. Using the software-provided classification, sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy were low for both the retinal nerve fiber layer and the GCC scans. FD-OCT does not seem to be decisive for early detection of structural damage in patients with no functional impairment. This suggests that there is a need for analysis software to be further refined to enhance glaucoma diagnostic capability.Keywords: OCT, RNFL, GCC, diagnostic accuracy 

  12. Relation between myocardial response to dobutamine stress and sympathetic nerve activation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. A comparison of 123I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is likely that a close association exists between findings obtained by two methods: dobutamine stress echocardiography and 123I-MIBG scintigraphy. Both of these methods are associated with ?-adrenergic receptor mechanisms. This study was conducted to demonstrate the relation between myocardial response to dobutamine stress and sympathetic nerve release of norepinephrine in the failing heart. In 12 patents with heart failure due to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the myocardial effects of dobutamine stress were evaluated by low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography; and sympathetic nerve function was evaluated by scintigraphic imaging with iodine-123[123I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine. Echocardiography provided quantitative assessment of wall motion and left ventricular dilation; radiotracer studies with 123I-MIBG provided quantitative assessment of the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) uptake ratio and washout rate. Results showed that H/M correlated with baseline wall motion (r=0.682, p=0.0146), wall motion after dobutamine stress (r=0.758, p=0.0043), the change in wall motion (r=0.667, p=0.0178), and with left ventricular diastolic diameter (r=0.837, p=0.0007). In addition, the 123I-MIBG washout rate correlated with baseline wall motion (r=0.608, p=0.0360), wall motion after dobutamine stress (r=0.703, p=0.0107), and with the change in wall motion (r=0.664, p=0.0185). Wall motion, especially in the myocardial response to dobutamine stress, is related to sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure. (author)

  13. Enhanced rat sciatic nerve regeneration through silicon tubes implanted with valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Xing, Danmou; Peng, Zhengren; Rao, Ting

    2008-05-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an effective antiepileptic drug and mood stabilizer. It has recently been demonstrated that VPA could promote neurite outgrowth, activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, and increase B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (bcl-2)and growth cone-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) levels in spinal cord. We hypothesized that VPA could enhance axonal regeneration in the rat. In the present research, we demonstrate the effect of VPA on peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery of motor function through a silicon tube implanted with VPA. The left sciatic nerves were exposed through dorsal-splitting incisions, and 8-mm nerve sections were excised at the middle of the thigh. Then, a 1.0-cm-long silicone tube (internal diameter,1.0 mm; exterior diameter, 2.0 mm) was used to bridge the nerve deficit, anchored to the proximal and distal terminals of the excised deficit of sciatic nerves with 9-0 nylon epineural suture. Sterile petroleum jelly was used to seal the ends of the tubes to avoid leakage. The rats in the VPA group and control group were locally delivered 10 muL VPA injection (400 mg/5 mL) and normal saline, respectively, after the operation. The sciatic nerve index (SFI) was observed in each animal at 2-week intervals and electrophysiology was studied at 4-week intervals for 12 weeks. Histological and morphometrical analyses were performed at the end of the experiment (12 weeks after the operation). Using the digital image-analysis system, the thickness of the myelin sheath was measured, and total numbers of regenerated axons were counted. There was a significant difference in SFI, electrophysiological index (motor-nerve conduct velocity, amplitude of activity potential), and morphometrical results (regenerated axon number and thickness of myelin sheath) in nerve regeneration between the VPA group and controls ( P clinical application of VPA for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury in humans. PMID:18496777

  14. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26025677

  15. In Vitro Conditioned Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote De Novo Functional Enteric Nerve Regeneration, but Not Through Direct-Transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong; Ding, Zhen; Ma, Huan; Shi, Huiying; Gao, Yuanjun; Qian, Wei; Shi, Weina; Sun, Zhaoli; Hou, Xiaohua; Li, Xuhang

    2015-12-01

    Injury or neurodegenerative disorders of the enteric nervous system (ENS) cause gastrointestinal dysfunctions for which there is no effective therapy. This study, using the benzalkonium chloride-induced rat gastric denervation model, aimed to determine whether transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) could promote ENS neuron regeneration and if so, to elucidate the mechanism. Fluorescently labeled BMSC, isolated from either WT (BMSC labeled with bis-benzimide [BBM]) or green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats, were preconditioned in vitro using fetal gut culture media containing glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and transplanted subserosally into the denervated area of rat pylorus. In the nerve-ablated pylorus, grafted BMSC survived and migrated from the subserosa to the submucosa 28 days after transplantation, without apparent dedifferentiation. A massive number of PGP9.5/NSE/HuC/D/Tuj1-positive (but GFP- and BBM-negative) neurons were effectively regenerated in denervated pylorus grafted with preconditioned BMSC, suggesting that they were regenerated de novo, not originating from trans-differentiation of the transplanted BMSC. BMSC transplantation restored both basal pyloric contractility and electric field stimulation-induced relaxation. High levels of GDNF were induced in both in vitro-preconditioned BMSC as well as the previously denervated pylorus after transplantation of preconditioned BMSC. Thus, a BMSC-initiated GDNF-positive feedback mechanism is suggested to promote neuron regeneration and growth. In summary, we have demonstrated that allogeneically transplanted preconditioned BMSC initiate de novo regeneration of gastric neuronal cells/structures that in turn restore gastric contractility in pylorus-denervated rats. These neuronal structures did not originate from the grafted BMSC. Our data suggest that preconditioned allogeneic BMSC may have therapeutic value in treating enteric nerve disorders. Stem Cells 2015;33:3545-3557. PMID:26302722

  16. A novel internal fixator device for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E; Love, James M; Fisher, John P; Shah, Sameer B

    2013-06-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extension--traditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration. PMID:23102114

  17. Ferulic Acid Enhances Peripheral Nerve Regeneration across Long Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Chi Lee; Chin-Chuan Tsai; Chun-Hsu Yao; Yueh-Sheng Chen; Ming-Chang Wu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of ferulic acid (FA) on peripheral nerve injury. In the in vitro test, the effect of FA on viability of Schwann cells was studied. In the in vivo test, right sciatic nerves of the rats were transected, and a 15?mm nerve defect was created. A nerve conduit made of silicone rubber tube filled with FA (5 and 25??g/mL), or saline (control), was implanted into the nerve defect. Results show that the number of proliferating Schwann cells increased significantly in...

  18. Assessment of central chemosensitivity and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity using I-123 MIBG imaging in central sleep apnea syndrome in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine-123 m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging has been used to study cardiac sympathetic function in various cardiac diseases. Central sleep apnea syndrome (CSAS) occurs frequently in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and is reported to be associated with a poor prognosis. One of the mechanisms of its poor prognosis may be related to impaired cardiac sympathetic activity. However, the relationship between chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide, which is reported to correlate with the severity of CSAS, and cardiac sympathetic activity has not been investigated. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess cardiac sympathetic function and chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide in CHF patients. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) was evaluated in 21 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (male/female: 19/2, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)5 times/h underwent polysomnography. Patients with an apnea hypopnea index >15/h but without evidence of obstructive apnea were defined as having CSAS. Early (15 min) and delayed (4 hr) planar MIBG images were obtained from these patients. The mean counts in the whole heart and the mediastinum were obtained. The heart-to-mediastinum count ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the corrected myocardial washout rate (WR) were also calculated. The central chemoreflex was assessed with the rebreathing method using a hypercapnic gas mixture (7% CO2 and 93% O2). Ten of the 21 patients had CSAS. The H/M ratio was similar in patients both with and without CSAS (1.57±0.18 vs. 1.59±0.14, p=0.82). However, the WR was higher in patients with CSAS than in patients without CSAS (40±8% vs. 30±12%, p<0.05). ODI significantly correlated with central chemosensitivity to carbon dioxide. Moreover, there was a highly significant correlation between WR and central chemosensitivity (r=0.65, p<0.05). However, there was no correlation between ODI and the WR (r=0.36, p=0.11). Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and CSAS is impaired. However, central sleep apnea might not directly increase cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. We suggest that central chemosensitivity, which is considered to be one of the mechanisms of CSAS, is correlated with cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. (author)

  19. Tuning adenosine A1 and A2A receptors activation mediates L-citrulline-induced inhibition of [3H]-acetylcholine release depending on nerve stimulation pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timóteo, M A; Oliveira, L; Campesatto-Mella, E; Barroso, A; Silva, C; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Alves-do-Prado, W; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2008-01-01

    The influence of nerve stimulation pattern on transmitter release inhibition by L-citrulline, the co-product of NO biosynthesis by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), was studied in the rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm. We also investigated the putative interactions between NOS pathway and the adenosine system. L-citrulline (10-470 microM), the NOS substrate L-arginine (10-470 microM) and the NO donor 3-morpholinylsydnoneimine (SIN-1, 1-10 microM), concentration-dependently inhibited [(3)H]-acetylcholine ([(3)H]-ACh) release from rat motor nerve endings. Increasing stimulus frequency from 5 Hz-trains to 50 Hz-bursts enhanced [(3)H]-ACh release inhibition by l-arginine (47 microM) and L-citrulline (470 microM), whereas the effect of SIN-1 (10 microM) remained unchanged. NOS inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) prevented the effect of L-arginine, but not that of L-citrulline. Adenosine deaminase (2.5 U/ml) and the adenosine transport inhibitor, S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (10 microM), attenuated release inhibition by L-arginine and L-citrulline. With 5 Hz-trains, blockade of A(1) receptors with 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine (2.5 nM), but not of A(2A) receptors with ZM241385 (10nM), reduced the inhibitory action of l-arginine and L-citrulline; the opposite was verified with 50 Hz-bursts. Blockade of muscarinic M(2) autoreceptors with AF-DX116 (10 nM) also attenuated the effects of L-arginine and L-citrulline with 50 Hz-bursts. L-citrulline (470 microM) increased basal adenosine outflow via the equilibrative nucleoside transport system sensitive to NBTI (10 microM), without significantly (P>0.05) changing the nucleoside release subsequent to nerve stimulation. Data indicate that NOS-derived L-citrulline negatively modulates [(3)H]-ACh release by increasing adenosine outflow channelling to A(1) and A(2A) receptors activation depending on the stimulus paradigm. While adenosine acts predominantly at inhibitory A(1) receptors during 5 Hz-trains, inhibition of ACh release by L-citrulline at 50 Hz-bursts depends on the interplay between adenosine A(2A) and muscarinic M(2) receptors. PMID:18022291

  20. Effect of Signal Intensity on Measurement of Ganglion Cell Complex and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Scans in Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbo; Iverson, Shawn M.; Tan, Ou; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We determined the effect of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal strength index (SSI) and cropping on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) scan repeatability and measurement thickness. Methods Eyes were enrolled in the longitudinal Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study. At each visit, three repeat scans from the optic nerve head and macular protocols were obtained. Each measurement was associated with an SSI value from 0 to 100. Measurements with similar SSI scores were grouped to calculate repeatability defined as pooled standard deviation. Within-visit analysis was used to determine how measured thickness changed in relation to change in SSI level. Results The study included 1130 eyes of 569 patients. Cropped images yielded significantly worse repeatability and they were excluded from subsequent analyses. The within-visit repeatability for RNFL and GCC measurements were significantly better with higher signal strength, and optimal cutoffs were SSI ? 37 and ? 44, respectively. The coefficient of variation was RNFL scans with SSI ? 37 and RNFL among normal (slope = 0.056 ?m/SSI unit, P RNFL and GCC thickness measurements may be improved by excluding images with cropped anatomic features and weak signal strength below recommended SSI cutoffs. Translational Relevance Measurement precision and image quality of inner eye structure by advanced imaging modality are important for clinical diagnosis and tracking of glaucoma disease. PMID:26448900

  1. Three-Dimensional Gastrointestinal Organoid Culture in Combination with Nerves or Fibroblasts: A Method to Characterize the Gastrointestinal Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastu?a, Agnieszka; Middelhoff, Moritz; Brandtner, Anna; Tobiasch, Moritz; Höhl, Bettina; Nuber, Andreas H.; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Neupert, Steffi; Kollmann, Patrick; Mazzuoli-Weber, Gemma; Quante, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium is characterized by a high turnover of cells and intestinal stem cells predominantly reside at the bottom of crypts and their progeny serve to maintain normal intestinal homeostasis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the pivotal role of a niche surrounding intestinal stem cells in crypts, which consists of cellular and soluble components and creates an environment constantly influencing the fate of stem cells. Here we describe different 3D culture systems to culture gastrointestinal epithelium that should enable us to study the stem cell niche in vitro in the future: organoid culture and multilayered systems such as organotypic cell culture and culture of intestinal tissue fragments ex vivo. These methods mimic the in vivo situation in vitro by creating 3D culture conditions that reflect the physiological situation of intestinal crypts. Modifications of the composition of the culture media as well as coculturing epithelial organoids with previously described cellular components such as myofibroblasts, collagen, and neurons show the impact of the methods applied to investigate niche interactions in vitro. We further present a novel method to isolate labeled nerves from the enteric nervous system using Dclk1-CreGFP mice. PMID:26697073

  2. Comparison of two screening bioassays, based on the frog sciatic nerve and yeast cells, for the assessment of herbicide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthimiou, Chrisovalantis; Cabral, Maria de Guadalupe; Mixailidou, Christina; Viegas, Cristina A; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Theophilidis, George

    2004-05-01

    Two different test systems, one based on the isolated sciatic nerve of an amphibian and the other on a microbial eukaryote, were used for the assessment of herbicide toxicity. More specifically, we determined the deleterious effects of increasing concentrations of herbicides of different chemical classes (phenoxyacetic acids, triazines, and acetamides), and of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), a degradation product of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), on electrophysiological parameters and the vitality of the axons of the isolated sciatic nerve of the frog (Rana ridibunda) and on the growth curve of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on microtiter plate susceptibility assays. The no-observed-effect-concentration (NOEC), defined as the maximum concentration of the tested compound that has no effect on these biological parameters, was estimated. In spite of the different methodological approaches and biological systems compared, the NOEC values were identical and correlated with the lipophilicity of the tested compounds. The relative toxicity established here, 2,4-DCP > alachlor, metolachlor > metribuzin > 2,4-D, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), correlates with the toxicity indexes reported in the literature for freshwater organisms. Based on these results, we suggest that the relatively simple, rapid, and low-cost test systems examined here may be of interest as alternative or complementary tests for toxicological assessment of herbicides. PMID:15180372

  3. The Physics of Nerves

    CERN Document Server

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The accepted model for nerve pulse propagation in biological membranes seems insufficient. It is restricted to dissipative electrical phenomena and considers nerve pulses exclusively as a microscopic phenomenon. A simple thermodynamic model that is based on the macroscopic properties of membranes allows explaining more features of nerve pulse propagation including the phenomenon of anesthesia that has so far remained unexplained.

  4. Schwann Cell Migration Induced by Earthworm Extract via Activation of PAs and MMP2/9 Mediated through ERK1/2 and p38

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Yang Huang; Tung-Yuan Lai; Wei-Wen Kuo; Fuu-Jen Tsai; Wen-Kuei Fang; Chang-Hai Tsai; Chien-Liang Liu; Yueh-Sheng Chen; Yung-Ming Chang; Ying-Ting Shih

    2011-01-01

    The earthworm, which has stasis removal and wound-healing functions, is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine in China. Schwann cell migration is critical for the regeneration of injured nerves. Schwann cells provide an essentially supportive activity for neuron regeneration. However, the molecular migration mechanisms induced by earthworms in Schwann cells remain unclear. Here, we investigate the roles of MAPK (ERK1/2, JNK and p38) pathways for earthworm-induced matrix-degrading proteolytic ...

  5. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS Therapy)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... parts of the brain that we know can affect seizure activity, so we know that the vagus nerve normally ... 9 years old. He has staring spells every day and his family says they hear him ... having some seizures during his sleep at night, but he’s not had any of ...

  7. GLP-1 signals via ERK in peripheral nerve and prevents nerve dysfunction in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolivalt, CG; Fineman, M; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Carr, RD; Calcutt, NA

    2011-01-01

    -diabetic mice were also treated with the GLP-1R agonist exenatide for 8 weeks to assess the impact of GLP-1R signalling on peripheral nerve function and structure. Results: GLP-1R protein was detected in rat dorsal root ganglia and the neurons and Schwann cells of the sciatic nerve. Protein levels were not...... affected by streptozotocin-induced diabetes. GLP-1R agonists did not signal via ERK1/2 in sciatic nerve of normal rats. However, GLP-1R agonists significantly increased pERK1/2 levels in sciatic nerves from diabetic rats, indicating that GLP-1Rs are functional in this tissue. Exenatide treatment did not...... peripheral nerve of diabetic rodents exhibits functional GLP-1R and suggest that GLP-1R-mediated ERK-signalling in sciatic nerve of diabetic rodents may protect large motor fibre function and small C fibre structure by a mechanism independent of glycaemic control....

  8. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    Peripheral nerves are susceptible to injury in the athlete because of the excessive physiological demands that are made on both the neurological structures and the soft tissues that protect them. The common mechanisms of injury are compression, traction, ischaemia and laceration. Seddon's original classification system for nerve injuries based on neurophysiological changes is the most widely used. Grade 1 nerve injury is a neuropraxic condition, grade 2 is axonal degeneration and grade 3 is nerve transection. Peripheral nerve injuries are more common in the upper extremities than the lower extremities, tend to be sport specific, and often have a biomechanical component. While the more acute and catastrophic neurological injuries are usually obvious, many remain subclinical and are not recognised before neurological damage is permanent. Early detection allows initiation of a proper rehabilitation programme and modification of biomechanics before the nerve injury becomes irreversible. Recognition of nerve injuries requires an understanding of peripheral neuroanatomy, knowledge of common sites of nerve injury and an awareness of the types of peripheral nerve injuries that are common and unique to each sport. The electrodiagnostic exam, usually referred to as the 'EMG', consists of nerve conduction studies and the needle electrode examination. It is used to determine the site and degree of neurological injury and to predict outcome. It should be performed by a neurologist or physiatrist (physician specialising in physical medicine and rehabilitation), trained and skilled in this procedure. Timing is essential if the study is to provide maximal information. Findings such as decreased recruitment after injury and conduction block at the site of injury may be apparent immediately after injury but other findings such as abnormal spontaneous activity may take several weeks to develop. The electrodiagnostic test assists with both diagnosis of the injury and in predicting outcome. Proximal nerve injuries have a poorer prognosis for neurological recovery. The most common peripheral nerve injury in the athlete is the burner syndrome. Though primarily a football injury, burners have been reported in wrestling, hockey, basketball and weight-lifting as a result of acute head, neck and/or shoulder trauma. Most burners are self-limiting, but they occasionally produce permanent neurological deficits. The axillary nerve is commonly injured with shoulder dislocations but is also susceptible to injury by direct compression. The sciatic and common peroneal nerves can be injured by trauma. The suprascapular, musculocutaneous, ulnar, median and tibial nerves are susceptible to entrapment. The long thoracic and femoral nerves can be injured by severe traction. PMID:9421863

  9. A Flat Interface Nerve Electrode With Integrated Multiplexer

    OpenAIRE

    Lertmanorat, Zeng; Montague, F. W; Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the goals of peripheral nerve cuff electrode development is the design of an electrode capable of selectively activating a specific population of axons in a common nerve trunk. Several designs such as the round spiral electrode or the flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) have shown such ability. However, multiple contact electrodes require many leads, making the implantation difficult and potentially damaging to the nerve. Taking advantage of the flat geometry of the FINE, multiplexer...

  10. Nitric oxide decreases the excitability of interstitial cells of Cajal through activation of the BK channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaohui; Huizinga, Jan D

    2008-01-01

    Nitrergic nerves are structurally and functionally associated with ICC. To further understand mechanisms of communication, the hypothesis was investigated that NO might affect large conductance K channels. To that end, we searched for IbTX-sensitive currents in ICC obtained through explant cultures from the mouse small intestine and studied effects of the NOS inhibitor omega N-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA) and the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). IbTX-sensitive currents acquired in the whole-cell configuration through nystatin perforated patches exhibited high noise levels but relatively low amplitude, whereas currents obtained in the conventional whole-cell configuration exhibited less noise and higher amplitudes; depolarization from -80 to + 40 mV evoked 357 +/- 159 pA current in the nystatin perforated patch configuration and 1075 +/- 597 pA using the conventional whole-cell configuration. Immunohistochemistry showed that ICC associated with ganglia and Auerbach's plexus nerve fibers were immunoreactive to BK antibodies. The IbTX-sensitive currents were increased by SNP and inhibited by LNNA. BK blockers suppressed spontaneous transit outward currents in ICC. After block of BK currents, or before these currents became prominent, calcium currents were activated by depolarization in the same cells. Their peak amplitude occurred at -25 mV and the currents were increased with increasing extracellular calcium and inhibited by cobalt. The hypothesis is warranted that nitrergic innervation inhibits ICC excitability in part through activation of BK channels. In addition, NO is an intracellular regulator of ICC excitability. PMID:18194464

  11. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  12. The effects of normal aging on myelinated nerve fibers in monkey central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Peters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aging on myelinated nerve fibers of the central nervous system are complex. Many myelinated nerve fibers in white matter degenerate and are lost, leading to some disconnections between various parts of the central nervous system. Other myelinated nerve fibers are affected differently, because only their sheaths degenerate, leaving the axons intact. Such axons are remyelinated by a series of internodes that are much shorter than the original ones and are composed of thinner sheaths. Thus the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system, the oligodendrocytes, remain active during aging. Indeed, not only do these neuroglial cell remyelinate axons, with age they also continue to add lamellae to the myelin sheaths of intact nerve fibers, so that sheaths become thicker. It is presumed that the degeneration of myelin sheaths is due to the degeneration of the parent oligodendrocyte, and that the production of increased numbers of internodes as a consequence of remyelination requires additional oligodendrocytes. Whether there is a turnover of oligodendrocytes during life has not been studied in primates, but it has been established that over the life span of the monkey, there is a substantial increase in the numbers of oligodendrocytes. While the loss of some myelinated nerve fibers leads to some disconnections, the degeneration of other myelin sheaths and the subsequent remyelination of axons by shorter internodes slow down the rate conduction along nerve fibers. These changes affect the integrity and timing in neuronal circuits, and there is evidence that they contribute to cognitive decline.

  13. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyigit, Filiz; Kucuk, Aysegul; Akcer, Sezer; Tosun, Murat; Kocak, Emel Fatma; Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Ahmet; Metineren, Hasan; Genc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group). Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (p<0.01), levels of MDA, NO, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) positive cells (p<0.01, p<0.05, respectively), and increased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (p<0.001, p<0.01, p<0.05, respectively) compared with the I/R group that did not receive ebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (p<0.01, p<0.05, p<0.001) and MDA and NO levels (p<0.05, p<0.01) and decreased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (p<0.05) compared with the sham group. The results of this study suggest that ebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects. PMID:26614850

  14. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in -sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyigit, Filiz; Kucuk, Aysegul; Akcer, Sezer; Tosun, Murat; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Ahmet; Metineren, Hasan; Genc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group). Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (P < 0.01), levels of MDA, NO, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively), and increased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively) compared with the I/R group that did not receive ebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.001) and MDA and NO levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and decreased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.05) compared with the sham group. The results of this study suggest that ebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects. PMID:26614850

  15. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ozyigit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group. Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and nitric oxide (NO, and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (P < 0.01, levels of MDA, NO, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively, and increased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively compared with the I/R group that did not receive ebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.001 and MDA and NO levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and decreased SOD, GPx, and CAT activities (P < 0.05 compared with the sham group. The results of this study suggest that ebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects.

  16. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch; la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Bang, Kurt; Eysteinsson, Thor

    2005-01-01

    glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect the...... optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen at...

  17. Transplantation of muscle-derived stem cells plus biodegradable fibrin glue restores the urethral sphincter in a pudendal nerve-transected rat model

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Y., Xu; Y.F., Song; Z.X., Lin.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether fibrin glue (FG) could promote urethral sphincter restoration in muscle-derived stem cell (MDSC)-based injection therapies in a pudendal nerve-transected (PNT) rat, which was used as a stress urinary incontinence (SUI) model. MDSCs were purified from the gastrocnemius muscles [...] of 4-week-old inbred female SPF Wistar rats and labeled with green fluorescent protein. Animals were divided into five groups (N = 15): sham (S), PNT (D), PNT+FG injection (F), PNT+MDSC injection (M), and PNT+MDSC+FG injection (FM). Each group was subdivided into 1- and 4-week groups. One and 4 weeks after injection into the proximal urethra, leak point pressure (LPP) was measured to assess urethral resistance function. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed 4 weeks after injection. LPP was increased significantly in FM and M animals after implantation compared to group D (P

  18. Carcinoma de células escamosas no olho de bovino com invasão cerebral através dos nervos cranianos Ocular squamous cell carcinoma in a cow with cerebral invasion through cranial nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rocha de Barros

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Um carcinoma de células escamosas foi removido do olho de uma vaca de 7 anos de idade que apresentava ptose da orelha esquerda, salivação e perda de peso progressiva. Devido ao mau prognóstico, a vaca foi submetida à eutanásia 9 meses após a cirurgia. Na necropsia e no exame histopatológico, foi observado que o tumor havia invadido o tronco encefálico através dos nervos cranianos. Outros achados de necropsia significativos incluíam pneumonia de aspiração e atrofia por desnervação do músculo temporal esquerdo.A squamous cell carcinoma of the eye was removed from a 7-year-old cow which presented drooping of left ear, drooling and progressive loss of weight. Due to poor prognosis it was euthanatized 9 months after surgery. At necropsy and histopathological examination it was found that the tumor had invaded the brain stem through the cranial nerves. Additional necropsy significant findings included aspiration pneumonia and denervation atrophy of the left temporal muscle.

  19. Longitudinal and Cross-Sectional Analyses of Age Effects on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Ganglion Cell Complex Thickness by Fourier-Domain OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbo; Francis, Brian A.; Dastiridou, Anna; Chopra, Vikas; Tan, Ou; Varma, Rohit; Greenfield, David S.; Schuman, Joel S.; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We studied the effects of age and intraocular pressure (IOP) on retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) and macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness in normal eyes. Methods Data from subjects from the multicenter Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study (AIGS) were analyzed. The data included yearly visits from the normal subjects in the AIGS study. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) was used to measure retinal NFL and macular GCC on each visit. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate the longitudinal effect of age and IOP on the NFL and GCC thickness. The measurements at baseline were used to examine the cross-sectional effects. Results The analysis included 192 eyes (92 participants) from AIGS between 2009 and 2013. The longitudinal analyses showed overall GCC thickness decreased 0.25 ± 0.05 μm per year (P imaging technology in diagnosing and monitoring glaucoma disease. PMID:26966637

  20. The anti-apoptotic and neuro-protective effects of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) on acute optic nerve injury is transient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilan; Xiang, Zhenghua; Cai, Jiping

    2013-09-26

    Progressive death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a major cause of irreversible visual impairment after optic nerve injury. Clinically, there are still no effective treatments for recovering the visual function at present. The probable approaches to maintain the vision and RGCs function involve in preventing RGCs from death and/or promoting the regeneration of damaged RGCs. Previous studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) take neuroprotective effects on ischemia-induced cortical and spinal cord injury, however, whether MSCs have a beneficial effect on the optical nerve injury is not clearly determined. In present study, we transplanted MSCs derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB-MSCs) into the vitreous cavity of adult rats and investigated the probable capacity of anti-apoptosis and pro-neuroprotective effects on RGCs. RGCs were retrogradely traced by fluorescent gold particles (FG); cellular apoptosis was investigated by caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the morphological changes of the retina. Growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43), an established marker for axonal regeneration, was used to visualize the regenerative process over time. Expression of P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), which are responsible for inflammatory and immune responses, was also monitored in our experiments. We found that the hUCB-MSC transplantation significantly decreased cellular apoptosis and promoted the survival of RGCs in early phase. However, this protection was transient and the RGCs could not be protected from death in the end. Consistent with apoptosis detection, P2X7R was also significantly decreased in hUCB-MSC transplanted rats in the early time but without obvious difference to the rats from control group in the end. Thus, our results imply that hUCB-MSCs take anti-apoptotic, pro-neuroregenerative and anti-inflammatory effects in the early time for acute optic nerve injury in adult rats but could not prevent RGCs from death eventually. PMID:23933426

  1. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in immobilized yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase of the immobilized cells was determined. The treatment of the yeast cells with 1 % toluene followed by irradiation with acrylamide and bisacrylamide resulted in a high activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the immobilized cells. The enzyme of the immobilized cells was stable in the pH range of 7.5 - 8.0 and the optimum pH opposed to be 8.5. Although the immobilized cells showed a rather low level of thermostability, it is suggested that they could be used for a long period of time at a temperature of 27 deg C. The immobilized cells did not exhibit any loss in the enzyme activity when stored at 4 deg C or -20 deg C. (author)

  3. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve excitability studies are relatively novel but are acquiring an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral nerves. RECENT FINDINGS: By measuring responses in nerve that are related to nodal fun...

  4. Additional Nerve Supply of Gluteus Maximus by Common Peroneal Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Khayati Sant Ram,; Anjali Aggarwal,; Tulika Gupta; Richa Gupta,; Daisy Sahini

    2015-01-01

    During routine dissection, variation of sciatic nerve was discovered bilaterally. Sciatic nerve emerged from the pelvis through greater sciatic foramen. On both sides, it divided into common peroneal nerve and tibial nerve. Common peroneal nerve pierced the piriformis muscle with resultant splitting of the muscle into two parts. Tibial nerve emerged at the lower border of muscle, thus two divisions of sciatic nerve were separated by the inferior belly of the piriformis muscle. On the left sid...

  5. Peripheral Nerve Dysfunction Secondary to Lymphomatous Infiltration of the Nervous System by Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomatous meningitis (metastasis of lymphoma cells into the cerebrospinal-fluid spaces [CSF] and neurolymphomatosis (lymphomatous infiltration of a peripheral nerve or root are neurologic complications of non-Hodgkin?s lymphoma (NHL that frequently result in significant neurologic dysfunction. Leptomeningeal metastases most commonly present as cerebral dysfunction (hydrocephalus causing headache or apraxia of gait, encephalopathy, or seizures, cranial neuropathy (diplospia, facial weakness, vertigo, hearing loss, and tongue weakness, and spinal-nerve root dysfunction (incomplete cauda equina syndrome ? asymmetric lower- extremity weakness, sensory loss, or incontinence. Diagnosis is made by finding leptomeningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain or spine or demonstration of lymphomatous cells by CSF cytology or flow cytometry. Treatment consists of focal radiotherapy for areas of bulky disease followed by intra-CSF chemotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Neurolymphomatosis typically presents as a painful, sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy affecting multiple limbs in an asymmetric fashion with rapid evolution although variability in presentation can occur. Diagnosis is made by demonstration of enhancement of nerve roots on MRI of the brachial or lumbosacral plexus or peripheral nerves or by increased hyper-metabolic activity following the course of affected nerves on fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. Treatment of neurolymphomatosis consists of focal radiotherapy (if significant neurologic dysfunction is present and high-dose intravenous methotrexate therapy. Standard systemic chemotherapy agents are not effective since they do not penetrate the physiologic ?nerve-blood barrier?. Other disorders that must be differentiated from these entities include peripheral-nerve or nerve root compression and paraneoplastic neuropathy.

  6. Neuromodulation of the suprascapular nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan G

    2014-01-01

    The shoulder joint is an enarthrodial or ball-and-socket joint. A complex network of anatomic structures endows the human shoulder with tremendous mobility, greater than any other joint in the body. Many pathologies can been found in those patients with chronic shoulder pain. The painful limitation of shoulder motion affects hand and arm motion as well; therefore, it significantly influences work performance and everyday activities as well as the quality of life. Therefore, the treatment of patients with chronic shoulder pain has major social and health economic implications. In this article we present a patient with a complex history of shoulder pathology including 7 surgeries that left the patient with chronic debilitating shoulder pain. She was suffering from chronic pain and limited mobility of the shoulder joint due to adhesive shoulder capsulitis. She was treated with a multimodality approach with the goals of increasing shoulder range of motion and decreasing her pain. This did not provide significant improvement. The suprascapular nerve supplies motor and sensory innervation to the shoulder, and can be easily accessible in the supraspinatus fossa. A suprascapular nerve block dramatically decreased her pain. This clinical observation along with confirmatory nerve block play an important role during the decision-making process for a trial period of electrical neuromodulation. She was followed for 3 months after the permanent implantation of a suprascapular nerve stimulator. Her pain and shoulder range of motion in all planes improved dramatically. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of the suprascapular nerve, in addition to multimodality pain management, is one approach to the difficult task of treating adhesive capsulitis with accompanying pain and the inability to move the shoulder. We conducted a literature review on PubMed and found no case describing a similar patient to our knowledge. PMID:25415792

  7. The permanent anatomical effects of neonatal capsaicin on somatosensory nerves.

    OpenAIRE

    Scadding, J W

    1980-01-01

    The effects of neonatal capsaicin on the fibre populations of peripheral somatosensory nerves have been investigated in adult mouse sural nerve and rat saphenous nerve. One or two doses of capsaicin, 50 mg/kg, given in the first few days of life, caused a permanent 50% reduction in the number of unmyelinated axons in mouse sural nerve and a 64% reduction in rat saphenous nerve, compared with untreated controls. Schwann cell sub-units were also reduced in number, and on average contained fewer...

  8. Post-Embryonic Nerve-Associated Precursors to Adult Pigment Cells: Genetic Requirements and Dynamics of Morphogenesis and Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Budi, Erine H.; Patterson, Larissa B.; PARICHY, DAVID M.

    2011-01-01

    The pigment cells of vertebrates serve a variety of functions and generate a stunning variety of patterns. These cells are also implicated in human pathologies including melanoma. Whereas the events of pigment cell development have been studied extensively in the embryo, much less is known about morphogenesis and differentiation of these cells during post-embryonic stages. Previo...

  9. The role of exosomes in peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna C Ching

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries remain problematic to treat, with poor functional recovery commonly observed. Injuries resulting in a nerve gap create specific difficulties for axonal regeneration. Approaches to address these difficulties include autologous nerve grafts (which are currently the gold standard treatment and synthetic conduits, with the latter option being able to be impregnated with Schwann cells or stem cells which provide an appropriate micro-environment for neuronal regeneration to occur. Transplanting stem cells, however, infers additional risk of malignant transformation as well as manufacturing difficulties and ethical concerns, and the use of autologous nerve grafts and Schwann cells requires the sacrifice of a functioning nerve. A new approach utilizing exosomes, secreted extracellular vesicles, could avoid these complications. In this review, we summarize the current literature on exosomes, and suggest how they could help to improve axonal regeneration following peripheral nerve injury.

  10. Activity driven fluctuations in living cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, É; Gov, N S; Visco, P; Weitz, D A; van Wijland, F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  11. Rho GTPase activity analysis in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tongda

    2012-01-01

    Rho-family small GTPases are conserved molecular switches of signaling networks in eukaryotic cells, and regulate many cellular responses, such as cytoskeletal reorganization, gene expression, and polarized vesicular trafficking. To understand the functions of Rho GTPase, it is important to investigate how the activity of Rho GTPase is regulated. Plant Rho-like GTPases (ROPs) are known to be regulated by hormones and environmental cues. A rapid activation of ROPs by a stimulus implies a direct signaling role for the ROP GTPases. Here, I describe an ROP activity assay that allows the measurement of ROP GTPase activity that occurs within seconds upon treatment with a stimulus. This method has been successfully used to investigate auxin activation of ROPs in plant cells and will be generally useful for measuring changes in ROP activity with high time resolution (Xu et al., Cell 143:99-110, 2010). PMID:22576091

  12. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  13. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  14. Genetic control of Drosophila nerve cord development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeath, James B.; Thor, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila ventral nerve cord has been a central model system for studying the molecular genetic mechanisms that control CNS development. Studies show that the generation of neural diversity is a multistep process initiated by the patterning and segmentation of the neuroectoderm. These events act together with the process of lateral inhibition to generate precursor cells (neuroblasts) with specific identities, distinguished by the expression of unique combinations of regulatory genes. The expression of these genes in a given neuroblast restricts the fate of its progeny, by activating specific combinations of downstream genes. These genes in turn specify the identity of any given postmitotic cell, which is evident by its cellular morphology and choice of neurotransmitter.

  15. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    determined by ELISA. Co-incubation of NK cells and a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain caused increased proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production. The proliferative response was further enhanced in the presence of autologous monocytes, probably because cytokines, secreted by monocytes...... h