WorldWideScience

Sample records for maternal effect

  1. Maternal effects in the magpie

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlaja, Marjo

    2006-01-01

    Maternal effects are suggested to be an efficient way to adapt offspring to variable and changing environments with consequent effects on variation in offspring fitness. In birds, mothers are able to affect the quality of their offspring through egg quality and through their incubation and parental care behaviour. Maternal effects via egg quality and hatching asynchrony, caused by incubation behaviour, may incur costs for both the mother and her offspring. For my thesis, I investigated the ad...

  2. Multigenerational effects of maternal undernutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Einstein, Francine H.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine exposure to reduced nutrient availability can have major effects in determining susceptibility to chronic disease later in life. Martínez et al. (2014) demonstrate multigenerational effects of poor maternal nutrition and evidence of germ-line transmission through alterations in DNA methylation.

  3. Maternal ethanol ingestion: effect on maternal and neonatal glucose balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek-Janusek, L.

    1986-08-01

    Liver glycogen availability in the newborn is of major importance for the maintenance of postnatal blood glucose levels. This study examined the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on maternal and neonatal glucose balance in the rate. Female rats were placed on 1) the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet, 2) an isocaloric liquid pair-diet, or 3) an ad libitum rat chow diet at 3 wk before mating and throughout gestation. Blood and livers were obtained from dams and rat pups on gestational days 21 and 22. The pups were studied up to 6 h in the fasted state and up to 24 h in the fed state. Maternal ethanol ingestion significantly decreased litter size, birth weight, and growth. A significantly higher mortality during the early postnatal period was seen in the prenatal ethanol exposed pups. Ethanol significantly decreased fed maternal liver glycogen stores but not maternal plasma glucose levels. The newborn rats from ethanol ingesting dams also had significantly decreased liver glycogen stores. Despite mobilizing their available glycogen, these prenatal ethanol exposed pups became hypoglycemic by 6 h postnatal. This was more marked in the fasted pups. Ethanol did not affect maternal nor neonatal plasma insulin levels. Thus maternal ethanol ingestion reduces maternal and neonatal liver glycogen stores and leads to postnatal hypoglycemia in the newborn rat.

  4. Maternal ethanol ingestion: effect on maternal and neonatal glucose balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liver glycogen availability in the newborn is of major importance for the maintenance of postnatal blood glucose levels. This study examined the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on maternal and neonatal glucose balance in the rate. Female rats were placed on 1) the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet, 2) an isocaloric liquid pair-diet, or 3) an ad libitum rat chow diet at 3 wk before mating and throughout gestation. Blood and livers were obtained from dams and rat pups on gestational days 21 and 22. The pups were studied up to 6 h in the fasted state and up to 24 h in the fed state. Maternal ethanol ingestion significantly decreased litter size, birth weight, and growth. A significantly higher mortality during the early postnatal period was seen in the prenatal ethanol exposed pups. Ethanol significantly decreased fed maternal liver glycogen stores but not maternal plasma glucose levels. The newborn rats from ethanol ingesting dams also had significantly decreased liver glycogen stores. Despite mobilizing their available glycogen, these prenatal ethanol exposed pups became hypoglycemic by 6 h postnatal. This was more marked in the fasted pups. Ethanol did not affect maternal nor neonatal plasma insulin levels. Thus maternal ethanol ingestion reduces maternal and neonatal liver glycogen stores and leads to postnatal hypoglycemia in the newborn rat

  5. Effects of Maternal Depression on Youth Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jennifer

    Depressive disorders are chronic illnesses affecting women and their families for extended periods of time. This paper summarizes research related to the effects of maternal depression on children's short and long term adjustment. Children of depressed mothers are at risk for internalizing and externalizing disorders. Genetics account for a small…

  6. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-08-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. PMID:24661622

  7. Fitness consequences of maternal and grandmaternal effects

    OpenAIRE

    Prizak, Roshan; Ezard, Thomas H. G.; Hoyle, Rebecca B

    2014-01-01

    Transgenerational effects are broader than only parental relationships. Despite mounting evidence that multigenerational effects alter phenotypic and life-history traits, our understanding of how they combine to determine fitness is not well developed because of the added complexity necessary to study them. Here, we derive a quantitative genetic model of adaptation to an extraordinary new environment by an additive genetic component, phenotypic plasticity, maternal and grandmaternal effects. ...

  8. Sex-specific maternal effects in a viviparous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruuk, Loeske E B; Livingston, Julianne; Kahn, Andrew; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    Mothers vary in their effects on their offspring, but studies of variation in maternal effects rarely ask whether differences between mothers are consistent for sons and daughters. Here, we analysed maternal effects in the mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki for development time and adult size of sons and daughters, and a primary male sexual character (gonopodium length). We found substantial maternal effects on all traits, most notably for gonopodium length. There were significant correlations within each sex for maternal effects on different traits, indicative of trade-offs between development rate and adult size. By contrast, there was no evidence of any consistency in maternal effects on sons and daughters. This suggests that the evolution of maternal effects will follow independent trajectories dependent on sex-specific selection on offspring. Importantly, failure to recognize the sex-specific nature of maternal effects in this population would have substantially underestimated the extent of their variation between mothers. PMID:26289441

  9. Maternal effects and maternal selection arising from variation in allocation of free amino acid to eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, Devi; Hunt, John; Mitchell, Christopher; Moore, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Maternal provisioning can have profound effects on offspring phenotypes, or maternal effects, especially early in life. One ubiquitous form of provisioning is in the makeup of egg. However, only a few studies examine the role of specific egg constituents in maternal effects, especially as they relate to maternal selection (a standardized selection gradient reflecting the covariance between maternal traits and offspring fitness). Here, we report on the evolutionary consequences of differences in maternal acquisition and allocation of amino acids to eggs. We manipulated acquisition by varying maternal diet (milkweed or sunflower) in the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus. Variation in allocation was detected by examining two source populations with different evolutionary histories and life-history response to sunflower as food. We measured amino acids composition in eggs in this 2 × 2 design and found significant effects of source population and maternal diet on egg and nymph mass and of source population, maternal diet, and their interaction on amino acid composition of eggs. We measured significant linear and quadratic maternal selection on offspring mass associated with variation in amino acid allocation. Visualizing the performance surface along the major axes of nonlinear selection and plotting the mean amino acid profile of eggs from each treatment onto the surface revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface. While maternal selection appears to have influenced how females allocate amino acids, this maternal effect did not evolve equally in the two populations. Furthermore, none of the population means coincided with peak performance. Thus, we found that the composition of free amino acids in eggs was due to variation in both acquisition and allocation, which had significant fitness effects and created selection. However, although there can be an evolutionary response to novel food resources, females may be constrained from reaching phenotypic optima with regard to allocation of free amino acids. PMID:26120429

  10. The Maternal Migration Effect : Exploring Maternal Healthcare in Diaspora Using Qualitative Proxies for Medical Anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    This project explores the 'maternal migration effect'. Following migration to a high-income country with a low maternal mortality rate, we assume that some immigrant women’s reliance upon maternal practices that respond to a low-income, high-mortality context can adversely affect care-seeking and utilization of treatment facilities. At highest risk in the United Kingdom and Sweden are those from Africa's Horn, particularly Somali women who have experienced diasporic migration. By applying con...

  11. Effects of early maternal employment on maternal health and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterji, Pinka; Markowitz, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study on Early Child Care to examine the effects of maternal employment on maternal mental and overall health, self-reported parenting stress, and parenting quality. These outcomes are measured when children are 6 months old. Among mothers of 6-month-old infants, maternal work hours are positively associated with depressive symptoms and parenting stress and negatively associated with self-rated overall heal...

  12. The Population Dynamics of Maternal-Effect Selfish Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, M. J.; Beeman, R W

    1994-01-01

    We use population genetic methods to describe the expected population dynamics of the selfish-gene chromosomal factor, Medea (maternal-effect dominant embryonic arrest), recently discovered in flour beetles, genus Tribolium. In the absence of deleterious effects on gross fecundity, Medea factors spread to fixation for all degrees of maternal-effect lethality greater than zero and the rate of spread is proportional to the strength of the maternal-effect. The rate of spread when rare is very sl...

  13. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on the offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelien DA Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs which are used by 2-3% of pregnant women in the Nordic countries and by up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States. Antidepressants cross the placenta and are transferred to the fetus, thus, the question arises as to whether children of women taking antidepressants are at risk for altered neurodevelopmental outcomes and, if so, whether the risks are due to SSRI medication exposure or to the underlying maternal depression. This review considers the effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure on offspring development in both clinical and preclinical populations. As it is impossible in humans to study the effects of SSRIs without taking into account the possible underlying effects of maternal depression (healthy pregnant women do not take SSRIs, animal models are of great value. For example, rodents can be used to determine the effects of maternal depression and/or perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring outcomes. Unraveling the joint (or separate effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure will provide more insights into the risks or benefits of SSRI exposure during gestation and will help women make informed decisions about using SSRIs during pregnancy.

  14. Effects of cocaine on maternal behavior and neurochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Febo, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the mother-child bond. While it has been argued the developmental effects of maternal cocaine use on children were initially overstated, it is clear that disruptions of typical maternal behavior (i.e. postpartum depression, anxiety disorders) are detrimental to the physical and emotional health of offspring. Cocaine use in mothers is commonly associated with psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, and it is postulated that many of the negative effects of maternal cocaine use on offspring are mediated through changes in maternal behavior. This review will summarize research on cocaine and maternal behavior in animal and human studies, discuss potential mechanisms, and suggest therapeutic strategies for treating cocaine-affected maternal behavior which may improve the physical and behavioral health of both mother and child. The primary objective is to stimulate future communication, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers who use animals and humans to study cocaine and maternal behavior. PMID:22942878

  15. Effects of Cocaine on Maternal Behavior and Neurochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Nephew, Benjamin C; FEBO, MARCELO

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the...

  16. Maternal effects in birds: effects of nutritional conditions on maternal reproductive effort and offspring performance

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The environment experienced by an organism at different life stages can have substantial effects on its phenotype. The environmental conditions the mother encounters can substantially influence her investment in the present reproductive attempt, and the phenotype of her offspring through the so-called maternal effects. Moreover, prenatal and early postnatal conditions experienced by offspring can interact and modulate their life histories. The aim of this thesis is to give new insight into en...

  17. Maternal smoking effects on infant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maternal smoking is known to have adverse effects on birth weight, duration and volume of breast feeding. It also negatively affects maternal body composition and prolactin concentration at the end of pregnancy. The effect of smoking on longitudinal growth has not been studied thoroughly. Sixteen smoking mothers (S) during pregnancy and lactation (7.1 ± 4.4 cigarettes/day) and 22 non-smoking mothers (NS), were selected at delivery time, in Santiago, Chile. Infants were evaluated monthly and volume of breast milk was measured at one month by dose-to-infant deuterium dilution, as well as cotinine levels. The concentration of zinc, copper and iron in milk was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Zinc, copper and cadmium were also determined in the infant's hair at one and six months and once in the mother (beginning of lactation). Cotinine levels were determined at one and six months by a radio-immuno-analysis standard kit. In monthly visits to the house, additional formula/food intake to breast feeding was determined in a 48 hours questionnaire to the mother, as well as infant's morbidity was registered. At birth, weight and height were not significantly different, although higher in NS infants. Cotinine levels were 30 times higher in S-mothers compared to NS mothers and 12 times higher in their infants. Both S and NS infants grew within normality as defined by the National Centre for Health Statistics (NCHS) in the Z-scores curves (weight/age, height/age and weight/height). Breast milk was similar in a partial group of NS and S groups (730 ± 133 g/d, 736 ± 136 g/d) and there was no difference in the content of zinc, copper and iron in milk or hair, except for cadmium which was higher in infant's hair at one month of age. Significant differences in height and height/age were found from one to six months of age. Weight/height began to be significantly higher in S-infants from three months onward, due to their slower height growth. Another group of infants (from non-smoking mothers during pregnancy but smokers during lactation) had a growth pattern intermediate to both curves, suggesting the impact of maternal smoking at any period of infant growth. Smoking had a clear effect on infant height during the period of breast feeding, attributable to the effect of the known content of cadmium in smoker's milk, on the bioavailability of essential nutrients such as zinc. (author)

  18. Facility-based maternal death reviews: effects on maternal mortality in a district hospital in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumont Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The improvement of obstetric services is one of the key components of the Safe Motherhood Programme. Reviewing maternal deaths and complications is one method that may make pregnancy safer, but there is no evidence about the effectiveness of this strategy. The objective of our before and after study is to assess the effect of facility-based maternal deaths reviews (MDR on maternal mortality rates in a district hospital in Senegal that provides primary and referral maternity services. METHODS: We included all women who were admitted to the maternity unit for childbirth, or within 24 hours of delivery. We recorded maternal mortality during a 1-year baseline period from January to December 1997, and during a 3-year period from January 1998 to December 2000 after MDR had been implemented. Effects of MDR on organization of care were qualitatively evaluated. FINDINGS: The MDR strategy led to changes in organizational structure that improved life-saving interventions with a relatively large financial contribution from the community. Overall mortality significantly decreased from 0.83 (95% CI (confidence interval = 0.60 -1.06 in baseline period to 0.41 (95% CI = 0.25 -0.56 per 100 women 3 years later. CONCLUSION: MDR had a marked effect on resources, management and maternal outcomes in this facility. However, given the design of our study and the local specific context, further research is needed to confirm the feasibility of MDR in other settings and to confirm the benefits of this approach for maternal health in developing countries.

  19. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on the offspring

    OpenAIRE

    JocelienDAOlivier; JodiLPawluski

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs) which are used by 2-3% of pregnant women in the Nordic countries and by up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States. Antidepressants cross the placenta and are transferred to the fetus, thus, the quest...

  20. Maternal Effects of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sarahn M; Dotters-Katz, Sarah; Heine, R Phillip; Grotegut, Chad A; Swamy, Geeta K

    2015-11-01

    Given the illness and deaths caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during the first year of life, preventing infant RSV infections through maternal vaccination is intriguing. However, little is known about the extent and maternal effects of RSV infection during pregnancy. We describe 3 cases of maternal RSV infection diagnosed at a US center during winter 2014. Case-patient 1 (26 years old, week 33 of gestation) received a diagnosis of RSV infection and required mechanical ventilation. Case-patient 2 (27 years old, week 34 of gestation) received a diagnosis of infection with influenza A(H1N1) virus and RSV and required mechanical ventilation. Case-patient 3 (21 years old, week 32 of gestation) received a diagnosis of group A streptococcus pharyngitis and RSV infection and was monitored as an outpatient. Clarifying the effects of maternal RSV infection could yield valuable insights into potential maternal and fetal benefits of an effective RSV vaccination program. PMID:26485575

  1. Maternal effects and heritability of annual productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Julia; Burke, T; Mannarelli, M-E; Dawson, D A; Nakagawa, S

    2012-01-01

    Within-individual consistency and among-individual heterogeneity in fitness are prerequisites for selection to take place. Within-individual variation in productivity between years, however, can vary considerably, especially when organisms become older and more experienced. We examine individual consistency in annual productivity, the covariation between survival and annual productivity, and the sources of variation in annual productivity, while accounting for advancing age, to test the individual-quality and resource-allocation life-history theory hypotheses. We use long-term data from a pedigreed, wild population of house sparrows. Within-individual annual productivity first increased and later decreased with age, but there were no selective mortality due to individual quality and no correlation between lifespan and productivity. Individuals were consistent in their annual productivity (C = 0.49). Narrow-sense heritability was low (h(2) = 0.09), but maternal effects explained much of the variation (M = 0.33). Such effects can influence evolutionary processes and are of major importance for our understanding of how variation in fitness can be maintained. PMID:22082138

  2. Heat stress and age induced maternal effects on wing size and shape in parthenogenetic Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Holm; Pertoldi, C; Scali, V; Loeschcke, V

    2005-01-01

    Maternal effects on progeny wing size and shape in a homozygous parthenogenetic strain of Drosophila mercatorum were investigated. The impact of external maternal factors (heat stress) and the impact of internal maternal factors (different maternal and grand maternal age) were studied. The offspring developed under identical environmental conditions, and due to lack of genetic variation any phenotypic difference among offspring could be ascribed to maternal effects. Wing size was estimated by ce...

  3. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier, J.D.A.; Åkerud, H.; Kaihola, H.; Pawluski, J.L.; Skalkidou, A.; Högberg, U.; Sundström-Poromaa, I.

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well-documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs) which are used by 2-3% of pregnant women in the Nordic countries and by up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States. Antidepressants cross the placenta and are transferred to the fetus, thus, the quest...

  4. Effect of maternal exposure to silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietroiusti A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of nanotechnology is widely recognized in both biomedical and industrial applications, so the search for new nano materials with improved physical and chemical characteristics is rapidly growing, causing a consequent increase in the risk of exposure by the population.Engineered nanoparticles, defined as particles having a different shape, but at least one dimension less than 100 nm, are constituents of many everyday products, including for example, sunscreens, cosmetics and some food packaging. This implies that an increasing number of people can come into contact with these nanoparticles in occupational settings, and the environment. It then becomes mandatory to assess what potential effects nanoparticles may have on biological systems. Although many nanoparticles may not be a problem for the general population, may instead be a problem for subgroups of susceptible individuals. In this context, we aimed to study the effect that maternal exposure to silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs may have on the health of pregnant individuals, with particular attention to the possible harmful effects on the development of the placenta and fetus. To this end we have produced silica nanoparticles of three different sizes: small, medium and large. Each nanoparticle was in turn modified in two different ways, through the introduction of NH2 or COOH functional groups, in order to make their surface positively or negatively charged.SiO2 NPs were intravenously administered to pregnant mice, through the injection into the venous retro-bulbar eye plexus. Administration was performed at two different gestational stages. A group of females received the material 5.5 days after conception, when the placenta is still poorly formed, while a second group was exposed at 12.5 day of pregnancy, a time at which the placenta has completed development. The difference in the administration timing allowed us to evaluate the possible differences in susceptibility of the fetus depending at different stages of placental development. Our results have shown that the smallest SiO2 NP have a high biocompatibility and do not interfere with the development of the embryo, or with placental development. In contrast, the NPs of medium and large size have demonstrated interference with the development of the fetus, leading to the onset of mild structural alterations and the appearance of a large number of identical twins, an extremely rare phenomenon in rodents, generally secondary to a mild teratogenic stimulus. Such effect became apparent only after administration of high doses of nano particles, showing also a relationship with the surface charge.In conclusion, these results suggest caution in the exposure to SiO2 NP of medium and large size during pregnancy.

  5. Effect of maternal lorazepam on the neonate.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitelaw, A. G.; Cummings, A J; McFadyen, I R

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-three neonates born to 51 mothers treated with lorazepam were followed up for five days after delivery. Lorazepam had been given by mouth to 35 mothers and intravenously to 16. In general, maternal plasma concentrations of lorazepam were higher than the corresponding cord plasma concentrations. Cord plasma concentrations exceeding 45 micrograms/l were associated with three-quarters of the infants requiring ventilation at birth. Neonates conjugate lorazepam slowly to the pharmacologicall...

  6. Effect of maternal anthropometry and metabolic parameters on fetal growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarna Mitra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal anthropometry and metabolic parameters on neonatal anthropometry. Materials and Methods: This observational cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2008 to June 2009 at a single tertiary care center. Maternal anthropometry and metabolic parameters like fasting serum insulin, lipid profile, and random blood glucose were estimated in 50 pregnant women at term. Detailed anthropometry of the neonates was performed. Results:Large for gestational age (LGA babies had higher maternal body mass index (BMI, fasting serum insulin, and cord blood insulin levels, and lower maternal high density lipoprotein (HDL compared to appropriate for gestational age (AGA group (P < 0.001. Among the maternal parameters, BMI, gestational age, fasting serum insulin, and random blood sugar (RBS had significant positive correlation, while HDL had negative correlation with birth weight (P < 0.05. However, only maternal BMI was the significant predictor of neonatal birth weight on multiple regression analysis (ß = 0.340, P = 0.01. Conclusion:The BMI of glucose-tolerant mother is more important than metabolic parameters in determining the birth weight of term babies.

  7. Maternal effects mediated by maternal age: from life histories to population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, T G; St Clair, J J H; Plaistow, S J

    2008-09-01

    1. Maternal effects describe how mothers influence offspring life histories. In many taxa, maternal effects arise by differential resource allocation to young, often identified by variation in propagule size, and which affects individual traits and population dynamics. 2. Using a laboratory model system, the soil mite Sancassania berlesei, we show that, controlling for egg size, older mothers lay eggs that hatch later, develop more slowly, and mature at larger body sizes. 3. Such differences in life histories lead to marked population dynamical effects lasting for multiple generations, as evidenced by an experiment initiated with similarly sized eggs that came from young or old mothers. Differences in maturation from the initial cohort led to differences in population structure and life history that propagated the initial differences over time. 4. Maternal-age effects, which are not related to gross provisioning of the egg and are therefore phenotypically cryptic, can have profound implications for population dynamics, especially if environmental variation can affect the age structure of the adult population. PMID:18631260

  8. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  9. The influence of context-dependent maternal effects on population dynamics: an experimental test

    OpenAIRE

    Plaistow, S.J.; Benton, T G

    2009-01-01

    Parental effects arise when either the maternal or paternal phenotype influences the phenotypes of subsequent generations. Simple analytical models assume maternal effects are a mechanism creating delayed density dependence. Such models predict that maternal effects can very easily lead to population cycles. Despite this, unambiguous maternal-effect mediated cycles have not been demonstrated in any system. Additionally, much evidence has arisen to invalidate the underlying assumption that the...

  10. Effect of Maternal Depression on Child Behavior: A Sensitive Period?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Seeley, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of maternal depression during the child's first year of life (i.e., sensitive period) on subsequent behavior problems. Method: Participants were 175 mothers participating in the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project (OADP) who met lifetime diagnostic criteria for major depressive…

  11. Maternal-zygotic gene conflict over sex determination: effects of inbreeding.

    OpenAIRE

    Werren, J.H.; Hatcher, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    There is growing evidence that sex determination in a wide range of organisms is determined by interactions between maternal-effect genes and zygotically expressing genes. Maternal-effect genes typically produce products (e.g., mRNA or proteins) that are placed into the egg during oogenesis and therefore depend upon maternal genotype. Here it is shown that maternal-effect and zygotic genes are subject to conflicting selective pressures over sex determination in species with partial inbreeding...

  12. Effect of Maternal Diabetes on Cerebellum Histomorphometry in Neonatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Khaksar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pregnant mothers, maternal diabetes occurs when pancreas can't produce enough insulin resulting in increased blood glucose levels in the mother and subsequently in the fetus. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellum of offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM, which was carried out at the veterinary faculty of Shiraz University in 2007-2008. Methods: This was an experimental study that included sixteen normal adult female rats divided in two groups. Diabetes was induced in one group by Alloxan agent. Both groups became pregnant by natural mating . At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after birth, the cerebellum of all offsprings were collected and the weight of neonates was also measured. After producing histological slides, Olympus BX51 microscope and ??????? Olysia softwarwere used. Various histological parameters used included gray and white matters thicknesses (µ, the number of cells in gray and white matter separately per unit and the ratio of gray matter to white matter. Results: Cerebellar parameters decreased in ODM as compared to the control group. The body weight of ODM was significantly more than that of the control group (p< 0.05. Conclusions: Maternal hyperglycaemia exhibited deleterious effects on cerebellum during fetal life, which remained persistent during postneonatal period. Maternal diabetes also resulted in reduction of number of cells and thicknesses of both gray and white matter.

  13. The Effects of Maternal Cigarette Smoking on Infant Anthropometric Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    F Sahin Mutlu; U Ayranci; K Ozdamar; S Yazici

    2008-01-01

    "nBackground: The association between maternal smoking and poor pregnancy outcome, which is well established in medi­cal literature, has also been corroborated by the results of this study conducted in a Turkish hospital. Our objective was to investi­gate the effects of cigarette smoking during pregnancy on infant head circumference, height, weight, and body mass in­dex (BMI)."nMethods: In this retrospective study, the data was collected from the Medical Live...

  14. The Effect of Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Early Maternal Feeding Behavior on Later Infant Feeding Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Lisa F.; Pridham, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive maternal feeding behaviors are sensitive and responsive to the infant and support the infant’s participation in feeding. Adaptive infant behaviors help the infant to participate in the feeding within developmental capacities and to interact in a positive manner with the mother. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the contribution of the adaptiveness of early maternal feeding behavior to the adaptiveness of later infant feeding behavior, accounting for maternal depress...

  15. Effects of maternal and paternal smoking on attentional control in children with and without ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Altink, Marieke E.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine I. E.; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Buschgens, Cathelijne J.M.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; Xu, Xiaohui; Franke, Barbara; Sergeant, Joseph A; Faraone, Stephen V.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Maternal smoking during pregnancy is a risk factor for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but data on its adverse effects on cognitive functioning are sparse and inconsistent. Since the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy may be due to correlated genetic risk factors rather than being a pure environmental effect, we examined the effect of prenatal exposure to smoking on attentional control, taking into account the effects of both maternal and paternal...

  16. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gianluca; Setoh, Peipei; Yoshida, Sachine; Kuroda, Kumi O

    2015-01-01

    Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favor their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g., mothers' automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries), and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the neurobiological mechanisms governing social bonding and cooperation in humans by focusing on maternal carrying and its beneficial effect on mother-infant interaction in mammalian species (e.g., in humans, big cats, and rodents). These studies show that infants have a specific calming response to maternal carrying. A human infant carried by his/her walking mother exhibits a rapid heart rate decrease, and immediately stops voluntary movement and crying compared to when he/she is held in a sitting position. Furthermore, strikingly similar responses were identified in mouse rodents, who exhibit immobility, diminished ultra-sonic vocalizations and heart rate. In general, the studies described in the current review demonstrate the calming effect of maternal carrying to be comprised of a complex set of behavioral and physiological components, each of which has a specific postnatal time window and is orchestrated in a well-matched manner with the maturation of the infants. Such reactions could have been evolutionarily adaptive in mammalian mother-infant interactions. The findings have implications for parenting practices in developmentally normal populations. In addition, we propose that infants' physiological response may be useful in clinical assessments as we discuss possible implications on early screening for child psychopathology (e.g., autism spectrum disorders and perinatal brain disorders). PMID:25932017

  17. Maternal obesity and late effects on offspring metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Sá Vido

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim of this study was to evaluate the late effects of maternal obesity induced by lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamus on offspring metabolism.Materials and methods : Thirty days after the bilateral lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamus, female rats were mated and divided into 2 groups of pregnant animals: Control (C – false lesion (sham and Obese (OB – lesion. Three months after that, with the groups of mothers, offspring were divided into control and obese animals that received a normocaloric diet (C-N and OB-N, and control and obese animals that received a hypercaloric diet (C-H and OB-H. At 120 days of age, the animals were euthanized and their carcasses, feces and food were submitted to calorimetric analysis to determine energy balance and body composition.Results : During the growth period, offspring from obese mothers showed higher values of body weight and food intake than controls. Obese animals showed higher body weight gain and gross food efficiency than control animals in adulthood. The hypercaloric diet led to increased metabolizable energy intake, percentage of absorbed energy and energy expenditure in both groups. Body composition was only affected by the association of hypercaloric diet and maternal obesity that led to increased body fat.Conclusions : Maternal obesity has led to the development of later overweight in offspring, suggesting fetal programming. According to the trend presented, it is believed that the prolonged intake of hypercaloric diets in adult animals may, as an additional effect, induce worsening of the overweight induced by maternal obesity. Arq Bras Endocrinol Metab. 2014;58(3:301-7

  18. The influence of context-dependent maternal effects on population dynamics: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaistow, S J; Benton, T G

    2009-04-27

    Parental effects arise when either the maternal or paternal phenotype influences the phenotypes of subsequent generations. Simple analytical models assume maternal effects are a mechanism creating delayed density dependence. Such models predict that maternal effects can very easily lead to population cycles. Despite this, unambiguous maternal-effect mediated cycles have not been demonstrated in any system. Additionally, much evidence has arisen to invalidate the underlying assumption that there is a simple positive correlation between maternal performance and offspring performance. A key issue in understanding how maternal effects may affect population dynamics is determining how the expression of parental effects changes in different environments. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that maternal effects influence population dynamics in a context-dependent way. Populations of the soil mite, Sancassania berlesei, were set up at high density (500 eggs) or low density (50 eggs), with eggs that were either laid by young mothers or old mothers (a previously documented maternal effect in this system). The influence of maternal age on both population and egg and body-size dynamics was only observed in the populations initiated under low density rather than high density. This difference was attributable to the context-dependence of maternal effects at the individual level. In low-density (high food) conditions, maternal effects have an impact on offspring reproductive performance, creating an impact on the population growth rate. In high density (low food), maternal effects impact more on juvenile survival (not adult size or reproduction), creating a smaller impact on the population growth rate. This context dependence of effects at the population level means that, in fluctuating populations, maternal effects cause intermittent delayed density dependence that does not lead to persistent cycles. PMID:19324610

  19. Effect of maternal education on the rate of childhood handicap.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Shawky; W. M. Milaat; B. A. Abalkhail; N. K. Soliman

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were to determine the relation between maternal education and various maternal risk factors, identify the impact of maternal education on the risk of childhood handicap and estimate the proportion of childhood handicap that can be prevented by maternal education. METHODS Data was collected from all married women attending the two major maternity and child hospitals in Jeddah during April 1999. Women with at least one living child were interview...

  20. Maternal effects on tree phenotypes: considering the microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Maria; Kemler, Martin; Slippers, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    The biotic and abiotic environmental experience of plants can influence the offspring without any changes in DNA sequence. These effects can modulate the development of the progeny and their interaction with microorganisms. This interaction includes fungal endophytic communities which have significant effects on trees and their associated ecosystems. In this opinion article, we highlight potential maternal mechanisms through which endophytes could influence the progeny. We argue that a better understanding of these interactions might help to predict the response of trees to stress conditions and enhance the efficiency of tree breeding programs. PMID:26124001

  1. The Effects of Maternal Cigarette Smoking on Infant Anthropometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Sahin Mutlu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The association between maternal smoking and poor pregnancy outcome, which is well established in medi­cal literature, has also been corroborated by the results of this study conducted in a Turkish hospital. Our objective was to investi­gate the effects of cigarette smoking during pregnancy on infant head circumference, height, weight, and body mass in­dex (BMI."nMethods: In this retrospective study, the data was collected from the Medical Live Birth Registry in a maternity hospital with the largest capacity of births in a city of northwest Turkey during 2002."nResults: We found that 16.4% (1040/6332 of mothers investigated had smoked during their pregnancy, with a mean of 5 ciga­rettes per day. Head circumference, height, weight and BMI values of male infants whose mothers smoked were found to be less than those of infants whose mothers did not smoke (P> 0.05, for each one. Head circumference, height, weight and BMI values of female infants whose mothers smoked were less than those whose mothers did not smoke (P> 0.05, P< 0.01, P< 0.05 and P> 0.05, respectively. According to analysis of variance, infant head circumferences, heights and weights in all infants decreased as the rate of the mother's smoking increased (P> 0.05, P< 0.001 and P> 0.05, respec­tively."nConclusions: The results support that maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a linear reduction of height meas­urement, and the infants appeared to be more susceptible to the growth retarding effects of cigarette smoking on height. Thus, if cessation-of-smoking programs are initiated before conception, many of the harmful effects of smoking on fe­tal growth might be prevented.

  2. Food stress causes sex-specific maternal effects in mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Life history theory predicts that females should produce few large eggs under food stress and many small eggs when food is abundant. We tested this prediction in three female-biased size-dimorphic predatory mites feeding on herbivorous spider mite prey: Phytoseiulus persimilis, a specialized spider mite predator; Neoseiulus californicus, a generalist preferring spider mites; Amblyseius andersoni, a broad diet generalist. Irrespective of predator species and offspring sex, most females laid only one small egg under severe food stress. Irrespective of predator species, the number of female but not male eggs decreased with increasing maternal food stress. This sex-specific effect was probably due to the higher production costs of large female than small male eggs. The complexity of the response to the varying availability of spider mite prey correlated with the predators' degree of adaptation to this prey. Most A. andersoni females did not oviposit under severe food stress, whereas N. californicus and P. persimilis did oviposit. Under moderate food stress, only P. persimilis increased its investment per offspring, at the expense of egg number, and produced few large female eggs. When prey was abundant, P. persimilis decreased the female egg sizes at the expense of increased egg numbers, resulting in a sex-specific egg size/number trade-off. Maternal effects manifested only in N. californicus and P. persimilis. Small egg size correlated with the body size of daughters but not sons. Overall, our study provides a key example of sex-specific maternal effects, i.e. food stress during egg production more strongly affects the sex of the large than the small offspring. PMID:26089530

  3. Maternal obesity has little effect on the immediate offspring but impacts on the next generation

    OpenAIRE

    King, V.; Dakin, R.S.; Liu, L.; Hadoke, P W F; Walker, B.R.; Seckl, J.R.; Norman, J.E.; Drake, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy has been linked to an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic disease in the offspring, a phenomenon attributed to developmental programming. Programming effects may be transmissible across generations through both maternal and paternal inheritance, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Using a mouse model, we explored the effects of moderate maternal diet-induced obesity (DIO) on weight gain and glucose-insulin homeostasis in first-generation (F1) an...

  4. Acute Effects of Maternal Smoking on Fetal-Placental-Maternal System Hemodynamics

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Janine Santos, Müller; Marcelo, Antunes; Ivo, Behle; Lucas, Teixeira; Paulo, Zielinsky.

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study acute hemodynamic alterations in the fetal-placental maternal system immediately after maternal exposure to nicotine. METHODS: This is a noncontrolled experimental study involving 21 pregnant smoking women, randomly selected, with uncomplicated pregnancies and without risk factor [...] s for fetal heart disease. Patients underwent ultrasound and fetal echocardiography before and after smoking a cigarette. They were asked to abstain from smoking for 12 hours before the study. The mean nicotine content of the cigarettes used in the study was 0.5mg of nicotine and 6mg of carbon monoxide. RESULTS: The average number of cigarettes smoked per a day prior to the study was 9.67. Gestational age ranged between 18 and 36 weeks. The mean maternal heart rate was elevated (P

  5. Effects of Maternal Nicotine Exposure on Expression of Laminin Alpha 5 in Lung Tissue of Newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Sankian; Alireza Fazel; Mehdi Jalali; Mohammad Reza Nikravesh; Mahdi Shariati Kohbanani; Alireza Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan

    2012-01-01

    Maternal smoking has been clearly demonstrated to be associated with increased health problems in infants and children. Nicotine is the chemical substance with high level of toxicity. It crosses through the placenta and accumulates in the developing organs of fetus. Previous investigation indicated that maternal nicotine exposures induce decreased fibronectin expression in lung parenchyma. In this study, the effect of maternal nicotine exposure on laminin expression of the newborn mice lungs ...

  6. Effects of infants’ birth order, maternal age, and socioeconomic status on birth weight

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed J. Gaemmaghami; Leila Nikniaz; Reza Mahdavi; Zeinab Nikniaz; Farzad Razmifard; Farzaneh Afsharnia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of infants’ birth order, maternal age, and socioeconomic status (SES) on birth weight. Methods. This cross-sectional study included a sample of 858 mothers recruited over a 6-month period in 2010, in a defined population of 9 urban health centers, and who were admitted for their infants’ first vaccination. Maternal clinical data, demographic data, and infants’ birth weight were obtained from the interview and maternal hospital files. Multiple regression ...

  7. The maternal-effect, selfish genetic element Medea is associated with a composite Tc1 transposon

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzen, Marcé D; Gnirke, Andreas; Margolis, Jonathan; Garnes, Jeffrey; Campbell, Margie; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Aggarwal, Rajat; Richards, Stephen; Park, Yoonseong; Beeman, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Maternal-Effect Dominant Embryonic Arrest (“Medea”) factors are selfish nuclear elements that combine maternal-lethal and zygotic-rescue activities to gain a postzygotic survival advantage. We show that Medea1 activity in Tribolium castaneum is associated with a composite Tc1 transposon inserted just downstream of the neurotransmitter reuptake symporter bloated tubules (blot), whose Drosophila ortholog has both maternal and zygotic functions. The 21.5-kb insertion contains defective copies of...

  8. The Effects of Maternal Verbal Aggression on the Adult Child's Future Romantic Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Keith; Patterson, Brian R.

    1997-01-01

    Considers maternal verbal aggression and its effects on the adult-children's romantic relationships later in life. Introduces solidarity, emotional support, and relationship quality as rational outcomes and uses them to evaluate the effects of maternal verbal aggression on relationships. Indicates undergraduate students who report receiving high…

  9. The Effect of Maternal Employment on Children’s Academic Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunifon, Rachel; Toft Hansen, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Using a Danish data set that follows 135,000 Danish children from birth through 9th grade, we examine the effect of maternal employment during a child’s first three and first 15 years on that child’s grade point average in 9th grade. We address the endogeneity of employment by including a rich set of household control variables, instrumenting for employment with the gender- and education-specific local unemployment rate, and by including maternal fixed effects. We find that maternal employment has a positive effect on children’s academic performance in all specifications, particularly when women work part-time. This is in contrast with the larger literature on maternal employment, much of which takes place in other contexts, and which finds no or a small negative effect of maternal employment on children’s cognitive development and academic performance.

  10. Inheritable effect of unpredictable maternal separation on behavioral responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara B Franklin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The long-term impact of early stress on behavior and emotions is well documented in humans, and can be modeled in experimental animals. In mice, maternal separation during early postnatal development induces poor and disorganized maternal care, and results in behavioral deficits that persist through adulthood. Here, we examined the long-term effect of unpredictable maternal separation combined with maternal stress (MSUS on behavior and its transmissibility. We report that unpredictable maternal separation from birth to postnatal day (PND 14 in C57Bl/6J mice has mild behavioral effects in the animals when adult, but that its combination with maternal stress exacerbates this effect. Further, the behavioral deficits are transmitted to the following generation through females, an effect that is independent of maternal care and is not affected by cross-fostering. The combined manipulation does not alter basic components of the HPA axis but decreases the expression of the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 2 (CRFR2 in several nuclei of the amygdala and the hypothalamus in the brain of maternal-separated females. These results suggest a non-genomic mode of transmission of the impact of early stress in mice.

  11. Embriotoxic effects of maternal exposure to Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. S. Barão

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tityus serrulatus is the most venomous scorpion in Brazil; however, it is not known whether its venom causes any harm to the offspring whose mothers have received it. This study investigates whether the venom of T. serrulatus may lead to deleterious effects in the offspring, when once administered to pregnant rats at a dose that causes moderate envenomation (3mg/kg. The venom effects were studied on the 5th and on the 10th gestation day (GD5 and GD10. The maternal reproductive parameters of the group that received the venom on GD5 showed no alteration. The group that received the venom on GD10 presented an increase in post-implantation losses. In this group, an increase in the liver weight was also observed and one-third of the fetuses presented incomplete ossification of skull bones. None of the groups that received the venom had any visceral malformation or delay in the fetal development of their offspring. The histopathological analysis revealed not only placentas and lungs but also hearts, livers and kidneys in perfect state. Even having caused little effect on the dams, the venom may act in a more incisive way on the offspring, whether by stress generation or by a direct action.

  12. Embriotoxic effects of maternal exposure to Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A. A. S., Barão; A. L. A., Nencioni; V. A. C., Dorce.

    Full Text Available Tityus serrulatus is the most venomous scorpion in Brazil; however, it is not known whether its venom causes any harm to the offspring whose mothers have received it. This study investigates whether the venom of T. serrulatus may lead to deleterious effects in the offspring, when once administered t [...] o pregnant rats at a dose that causes moderate envenomation (3mg/kg). The venom effects were studied on the 5th and on the 10th gestation day (GD5 and GD10). The maternal reproductive parameters of the group that received the venom on GD5 showed no alteration. The group that received the venom on GD10 presented an increase in post-implantation losses. In this group, an increase in the liver weight was also observed and one-third of the fetuses presented incomplete ossification of skull bones. None of the groups that received the venom had any visceral malformation or delay in the fetal development of their offspring. The histopathological analysis revealed not only placentas and lungs but also hearts, livers and kidneys in perfect state. Even having caused little effect on the dams, the venom may act in a more incisive way on the offspring, whether by stress generation or by a direct action.

  13. Maternally derived egg hormones, antibodies and antimicrobial proteins: common and different pathways of maternal effects in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuliarova, Monika; Kankova, Zuzana; Bertin, Aline; Leterrier, Christine; Mostl, Erich; Zeman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Avian eggs contain a variety of maternally-derived substances that can influence the development and performance of offspring. The levels of these egg compounds vary in relation to environmental and genetic factors, but little is known about whether there are correlative links between maternal substances in the egg underlying common and different pathways of maternal effects. In the present study, we investigated genetically determined variability and mutually adjusted deposition of sex hormones (testosterone-T, androstenedione-A4 and progesterone-P4), antibodies (IgY) and antimicrobial proteins (lysozyme) in eggs of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). We used different genetic lines that were independently selected for yolk T concentrations, duration of tonic immobility and social reinstatement behaviour, since both selections for behavioural traits (fearfulness and social motivation, respectively) produced considerable correlative responses in yolk androgen levels. A higher selection potential was found for increased rather than decreased yolk T concentrations, suggesting that there is a physiological minimum in egg T levels. Line differences in yolk IgY concentrations were manifested within each selection experiment, but no consistent inter-line pattern between yolk IgY and T was revealed. On the other hand, a consistent inverse inter-line pattern was recorded between yolk IgY and P4 in both selections for behavioural traits. In addition, selections for contrasting fearfulness and social motivation were associated with changes in albumen lysozyme concentrations and an inverse inter-line pattern between the deposition of yolk IgY and albumen lysozyme was found in lines selected for the level of social motivation. Thus, our results demonstrate genetically-driven changes in deposition of yolk T, P4, antibodies and albumen lysozyme in the egg. This genetic variability can partially explain mutually adjusted maternal deposition of sex hormones and immune-competent molecules but the inconsistent pattern of inter-line differences across all selections indicates that there are other underlying mechanisms, which require further studies. PMID:25390303

  14. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte; Lundström, Mats; Nyström, Alf; Tornqvist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study which eye-screening protocol prevails in Swedish maternity/neonatal wards, evaluate efficacy in a prospective study, and compare results with earlier Swedish retrospective results. METHODS: Surveys were sent in 2006 to maternity/neonatal and women's health departments regarding screening policy. Response frequency was 96% (122/127). Data were derived from The Pediatric Cataract Register, PECARE Sweden. All Swedish children diagnosed with congenital cataract and operated on before 1...

  15. Effect of maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk in the offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrauterine and early life exposure to folic acid has significantly increased in North America owing to folic acid fortification, widespread supplemental use and periconceptional folic acid supplementation. The effect of maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk ...

  16. Maternal effects and heterosis influence the fitness of plant hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Heather; Vrieling, Klaas; Klinkhamer, Peter G L

    2005-05-01

    Here we tested two possible nonexclusive explanations for the maintenance of a hybrid swarm between Senecio jacobaea and Senecio aquaticus; first, that genotype-by-environment interactions involving water and nutrient clines are involved in hybrid fitness, and second, heterosis in early hybrid generations may provide an initial hybrid advantage that contributes to hybrid persistence. In three climate chamber studies, fitness and root growth were measured for parental species and natural and artificial F1 hybrids, in order to determine whether hybrids occur in habitats where they are more fit than parental species. Natural hybrids, which are generally back-crossed to S. jacobaea, always equaled S. jacobaea in growth characteristics. Maternal effects played a role in the fitness of F1 hybrids, with offspring from S. jacobaea mothers exhibiting higher fitness than those from S. aquaticus mothers, and compared with parental species and natural hybrids. Natural hybrids are not distributed in zones where they are most fit with respect to nutrient and water regimes. Superior fitness of early generation hybrids may contribute to hybrid swarm stability. PMID:15819930

  17. Maternal effects due to male attractiveness affect offspring development in the zebra finch

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, L.; Williamson, K. A.; Hazon, N; Graves, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Maternal effects occur when offspring phenotype is influenced by environmental factors experienced by the mother. Mothers are predicted to invest differentially in offspring in ways that will maximize offspring fitness depending on the environment she expects them to encounter. Here, we test for maternal effects in response to mate attractiveness on offspring developmental traits in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata. We controlled for parental genetic quality by manipulating male attractive...

  18. Effect of Maternal Methionine Supplementation on the Transcriptome of Bovine Preimplantation Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Souza, Alex H.; Carvalho, Paulo D.; Driver, Ashley M; Gambra, Rocio; Kropp, Jenna; Hackbart, Katherine S.; Luchini, Daniel; Shaver, Randy D.; Wiltbank, Milo C.; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Maternal nutrition exclusively during the periconceptional period can induce remarkable effects on both oocyte maturation and early embryo development, which in turn can have lifelong consequences. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of maternal methionine supplementation on the transcriptome of bovine preimplantation embryos. Holstein cows were randomly assigned to one of two treatments differing in level of dietary methionine (1.89 Met vs. 2.43 Met % of metabolizable prot...

  19. Estimates of direct, maternal and grandmaternal genetic effects for growth traits in Gobra cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Diop, M.; J. Dodenhoff; L.D. Van Vleck

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of genetic parameters for birth (N = 3909), weaning (N = 3425), yearling (N = 2764) and final (N = 2144) weights were obtained from the records of Gobra cattle collected at the Centre de Recherches Zootechniques de Dahra, Senegal. Three animal models were fitted to obtain estimates by REML using an average information (AI) approach. Model 1 considered random direct, maternal genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects. In model 2, a general grandmaternal effect was added to...

  20. Spillover Effects of Maternal Education on Child's Health and Health Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kemptner, Daniel; Marcus, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of maternal education on child's health and health behavior. We draw on a rich German panel data set containing information about three generations. This allows instrumenting maternal education by the number of her siblings while conditioning on grandparental characteristics. The instrumental variables approach has not yet been used in the intergenerational context and works for the sample sizes of common household panels. We find substantial effects on hea...

  1. Maternally administered interventions for preterm infants in the NICU: effects on maternal psychological distress and mother-infant relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C; Levy, Janet A; O'Shea, T Michael; Geraldo, Victoria; David, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    Although studies have examined the effects of interventions focused on preterm infants, few studies have examined the effects on maternal distress (anxiety, depressive symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress) or parenting. This study examined the effects of the auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention and kangaroo care (KC) on maternal distress and the mother-infant relationship compared to an attention control group. 240 mothers from four hospitals were randomly assigned to the three groups. Maternal characteristics in the three groups were similar: 64.1% of ATVV mothers, 64.2% of KC mothers, and 76.5% of control mothers were African American; maternal age averaged 26.3 years for ATVV mothers, 28.1 for KC mothers, and 26.6 for control mothers; and years of education averaged 13.6 for ATVV and KC mothers, and 13.1 for control mothers. Mothers only differed on parity: 68.4% of ATVV and 54.7% of KC mothers were first-time mothers as compared to 43.6% of control mothers. Their infants had a similar mean gestational ages (27.0 weeks for ATVV, 27.2 for KC, and 27.4 for control) and mean birthweights (993 g for ATVV, 1022 for KC, and 1023 for control). Mothers completed questionnaires during hospitalization, and at 2, 6 and 12 months corrected age on demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, state anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress, worry about child health, and child vulnerability (only at 12 months). At 2 and 6 months, 45-min videotapes of mother-infant interactions were made, and the HOME Inventory was scored. Behaviors coded from the videotapes and a HOME subscale were combined into five interactive dimensions: maternal positive involvement and developmental stimulation and child social behaviors, developmental maturity, and irritability. Intervention effects were examined using general linear mixed models controlling for parity and recruitment site. The groups did not differ on any maternal distress variable. Kangaroo care mothers showed a more rapid decline in worry than the other mothers. The only interactive dimensions that differed between the groups were child social behaviors and developmental maturity, which were both higher for kangaroo care infants. Change over time in several individual infant behaviors was affected by the interventions. When mothers reported on the interventions they performed, regardless of group assignment, massage (any form including ATVV) was associated with a more rapid decline in depressive symptoms and higher HOME scores. Performing either intervention was associated with lower parenting stress. These findings suggest that as short-term interventions, KC and ATVV have important effects on mothers and their preterm infants, especially in the first half of the first year. PMID:25247740

  2. Maternal effects on offspring consumption can stabilize fluctuating predator-prey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jennie S; Little, Tom J; Hoyle, Andy

    2015-12-01

    Maternal effects, where the conditions experienced by mothers affect the phenotype of their offspring, are widespread in nature and have the potential to influence population dynamics. However, they are very rarely included in models of population dynamics. Here, we investigate a recently discovered maternal effect, where maternal food availability affects the feeding rate of offspring so that well-fed mothers produce fast-feeding offspring. To understand how this maternal effect influences population dynamics, we explore novel predator-prey models where the consumption rate of predators is modified by changes in maternal prey availability. We address the 'paradox of enrichment', a theoretical prediction that nutrient enrichment destabilizes populations, leading to cycling behaviour and an increased risk of extinction, which has proved difficult to confirm in the wild. Our models show that enriched populations can be stabilized by maternal effects on feeding rate, thus presenting an intriguing potential explanation for the general absence of 'paradox of enrichment' behaviour in natural populations. This stabilizing influence should also reduce a population's risk of extinction and vulnerability to harvesting. PMID:26631563

  3. The effects of maternal body mass index on pregnancy outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, A S

    2012-01-31

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is presenting a critical challenge to healthcare services. We examined the effect of Body Mass Index in early pregnancy on adverse pregnancy outcome. We performed a population register-based cohort study using data from the North Western Perinatal survey (N = 99,403 babies born during 2004-2006), based at The University of Manchester, UK. The main outcome measures were Caesarean section delivery, preterm birth, neonatal death, stillbirth, Macrosomia, small for gestational age and large for gestational age. The risk of preterm birth was reduced by almost 10% in overweight (RR = 0.89, [95% CI: 0.83, 0.95]) and obese women (RR = 0.90, [95% CI: 0.84, 0.97]) and was increased in underweight women (RR = 1.33, [95% CI: 1.16, 1.53]). Overweight (RR = 1.17, [95% CI: 1.09, 1.25]), obese (RR = 1.35, [95% CI: 1.25, 1.45]) and morbidly obese (RR = 1.24, [95% CI: 1.02, 1.52]) women had an elevated risk of post-term birth compared to normal women. The risk of fetal macrosomia and operative delivery increased with BMI such that morbidly obese women were at greatest risk of both (RR of macrosomia = 4.78 [95% CI: 3.86, 5.92] and RR of Caesarean section = 1.66 [95% CI: 1.61, 1.71] and a RR of emergency Caesarean section = 1.59 [95% CI: 1.45, 1.75]). Excessive leanness and obesity are associated with different adverse pregnancy outcomes with major maternal and fetal complications. Overweight and obese women have a higher risk of macrosomia and Caesarean delivery and lower risk of preterm delivery. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear and is worthy of further investigation.

  4. Direct, maternal and nurse sow genetic effects on farrowing-pre-weaning- and total piglet survival

    OpenAIRE

    Knol, E.F.; Ducro, B.J.; Van Arendonk, J A M; Lende, T. van der

    2002-01-01

    Peri- and postnatal survival data, including birth weights and cross-foster information from two line/farm combinations with 33717 and 29200 piglets, respectively, were analyzed to find the best genetic model to describe piglet survival. This was done in terms of direct (piglet), maternal and nurse sow genetic effects, maternal to cover uterine quality and nurse sow to cover mothering ability. The two component traits, farrowing and pre-weaning survival and — birth weight, the most important ...

  5. Combined Norepinephrine / Serotonergic Reuptake Inhibition: Effects on Maternal Behavior, Aggression and Oxytocin in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElizabethThomasCox

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few systematic studies exist on the effects of chronic reuptake of monoamine neurotransmitter systems during pregnancy on the regulation of maternal behavior, although many drugs act primarily through one or more of these systems. Previous studies examining fluoxetine and amfonelic acid treatment during gestation on subsequent maternal behavior in rodents indicated significant alterations in postpartum maternal care, aggression and oxytocin levels. In this study, we extended our studies to include chronic gestational treatment with desipramine or amitriptyline to examine differential effects of reuptake inhibition of norepinephrine and combined noradrenergic and serotonergic systems on maternal behavior, aggression, and oxytocin system changes. METHODS: Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated throughout gestation with saline or one of three doses of either desipramine, which has a high affinity for the norepinephrine monoamine transporter, or amitriptyline, an agent with high affinity for both the norepinephrine and serotonin monoamine transporters. Maternal behavior and postpartum aggression were assessed on postpartum days one and six respectively. Oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions on postpartum day seven. Predictions were that amitriptyline would decrease maternal behavior and increase aggression relative to desipramine, particularly at higher doses. Amygdaloidal oxytocin was expected to decrease with increased aggression. RESULTS: Amitriptyline and desiprimine differentially reduced maternal behavior, and at higher doses reduced aggressive behavior. Hippocampal oxytocin levels were lower after treatment with either drug but were not correlated with specific behavioral effects. These results, in combination with previous findings following gestational treatment with other selective neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitors, highlight the diverse effects of multiple monoamine systems thought to be involved in maternal care.

  6. Effects of Chronic Central Arginine Vasopressin (AVP) on Maternal Behavior in Chronically Stressed Rat Dams

    OpenAIRE

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Robert S. Bridges; Alexander J. Coverdill; Megan McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of mothers to chronic stressors during pregnancy or the postpartum period often leads to the development of depression, anxiety, or other related mood disorders. The adverse effects of mood disorders are often mediated through maternal behavior and recent work has identified arginine vasopressin (AVP) as a key neuropeptide hormone in the expression of maternal behavior in both rats and humans. Using an established rodent model that elicits behavioral and physiological responses simil...

  7. Long maternal separation has protective effects in rats exposed to activity-based anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, O; Cerrato, M; Sanchez, A; Gutierrez, E

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effect of three neonatal treatments of maternal separation during infancy in young adult rats exposed to standard activity-based anorexia (ABA) consisting of food restriction plus free access to an activity wheel. During the first 20 postnatal days of life rat pups were exposed to periods of either brief maternal separation (BMS, 15 min), long maternal separation (LMS, 180 min), or were non-handled (NH). Thereafter, male and female rats were exposed to ABA. Neonatal treatment produced no significant differences in the survival time of male rats, whereas survival was greater in female rats exposed to LMS than in NH rats under ABA procedure. In conclusion, prolonged maternal separation appears to promote resistance in female animals subjected to harsh ABA life-threatening conditions. PMID:19728326

  8. The effects of maternal education versus cognitive test scores on child nutrition in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Alok; Fox-Kean, Melanie

    2003-12-01

    This paper estimates dynamic random effects models for intakes by dietary energy, protein, calcium, iron, zinc, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, and vitamins A, C, D, and E 100 of Kenyan school children (6-9 years) within a multivariate longitudinal framework. The explanatory variables were socioeconomic and background variables, children's body mass index, and maternal education, cognitive test scores and morbidity spells. The model parameters are estimated using the maximum likelihood method controlling for unobserved between-children differences. The main finding is that while maternal education was usually not a significant predictor of dietary intakes, maternal scores on cognitive tests did strongly predict them. Moreover, the paternal cognitive scores and maternal morbidity levels were not significantly associated with the intakes, but an index of socioeconomic status and cash income was a significant predictor. The results indicate the need to consider broader measures of human development and of devising suitable educational programs for women without formal education. PMID:15463981

  9. Effectiveness of strategies incorporating training and support of traditional birth attendants on perinatal and maternal mortality: meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Amie; Gallos, Ioannis D; Plana, Nieves; Lissauer, David; Khan, Khalid S; Zamora, Javier; MacArthur, Christine; Coomarasamy, Arri

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of strategies incorporating training and support of traditional birth attendants on the outcomes of perinatal, neonatal, and maternal death in developing countries.

  10. Effects of Chronic Central Arginine Vasopressin (AVP on Maternal Behavior in Chronically Stressed Rat Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Nephew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of mothers to chronic stressors during pregnancy or the postpartum period often leads to the development of depression, anxiety, or other related mood disorders. The adverse effects of mood disorders are often mediated through maternal behavior and recent work has identified arginine vasopressin (AVP as a key neuropeptide hormone in the expression of maternal behavior in both rats and humans. Using an established rodent model that elicits behavioral and physiological responses similar to human mood disorders, this study tested the effectiveness of chronic AVP infusion as a novel treatment for the adverse effects of exposure to chronic social stress during lactation in rats. During early (day 3 and mid (day 10 lactation, AVP treatment significantly decreased the latency to initiate nursing and time spent retrieving pups, and increased pup grooming and total maternal care (sum of pup grooming and nursing. AVP treatment was also effective in decreasing maternal aggression and the average duration of aggressive bouts on day 3 of lactation. Central AVP may be an effective target for the development of treatments for enhancing maternal behavior in individuals exposed to chronic social stress.

  11. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Gianluca; Setoh, Peipei; Yoshida, Sachine; Kuroda, Kumi O.

    2015-01-01

    Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favor their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g., mothers’ automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries), and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the n...

  12. Effects of Maternal Childhood Aggression and Social Withdrawal on Maternal Request Strategies and Child Compliance and Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunzeweig, Naomi; Stack, Dale M.; Serbin, Lisa A.; Ledingham, Jane; Schwartzman, Alex E.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective, intergenerational study investigated the influences of maternal histories of childhood aggression and social withdrawal on maternal request strategies and child compliance and noncompliance. Seventy-four women from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project, who were rated during childhood using peer nomination measures of…

  13. Effects of maternal characteristics and climatic variation on birth masses of Alaskan caribou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence birth mass of mammals provides insights to nutritional trade-offs made by females to optimize their reproduction, growth, and survival. I evaluated variation in birth mass of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in central Alaska relative to maternal characteristics (age, body mass, cohort, and nutritional condition as influenced by winter severity) during 11 years with substantial variation in winter snowfall. Snowfall during gestation was the predominant factor explaining variation in birth masses, influencing birth mass inversely and through interactions with maternal age and lactation status. Maternal age effects were noted for females ??? 5 years old, declining in magnitude with each successive age class. Birth mass as a proportion of autumn maternal mass was inversely related to winter snowfall, even though there was no decrease in masses of adult females in late winter associated with severe winters. I found no evidence of a hypothesized intergenerational effect of lower birth masses for offspring of females born after severe winters. Caribou produce relatively small offspring but provide exceptional lactation support for those that survive. Conservative maternal investment before parturition may represent an optimal reproductive strategy given that caribou experience stochastic variation in winter severity during gestation, uncertainty of environmental conditions surrounding the birth season, and intense predation on neonates. ?? 2005 American Society of Mammalogists.

  14. Buffering the negative effects of maternal alcohol problems on child behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola A; McKelvey, Lorraine M; Pemberton, Joy R; Mesman, Glenn R; Holmes, Khiela J; Bradley, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to examine how mothers' warmth can protect children from the negative effects of maternal alcohol problems on children's externalizing behavior and, alternately, how harsh parenting can exacerbate the problem. We used data from 1,563 families eligible for Early Head Start and assessed when children were age 5 and again at age 11. We examined whether mothers' warmth or harsh parenting at age 5 moderated the effect of maternal alcohol problems on children's behavior problems at age 11. Results indicated that mothers' symptoms of alcohol problems when children were age 5 predicted greater externalizing behavior problems (aggression and rule breaking) when children were age 11. Aggression and rule-breaking behaviors, externalizing behaviors commonly associated with maternal alcohol problems, were lessened when mothers were warm and did not engage in harsh parenting techniques. Our findings highlight the importance of positive parenting techniques in high-risk families. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26374937

  15. Effects of L-glutamine supplementation on maternal and fetal hemodynamics in gestating ewes exposed to alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Onkar B.; Ramadoss, Jayanth; Hankins, Gary D.; Wu, Guoyao; Washburn, Shannon E.

    2014-01-01

    Not much is known about effects of gestational alcohol exposure on maternal and fetal cardiovascular adaptations. This study determined whether maternal binge alcohol exposure and L-glutamine supplementation could affect maternal-fetal hemodynamics and fetal regional brain blood flow during the brain growth spurt period. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to one of four groups: saline control, alcohol (1.75–2.5 g/kg body weight), glutamine (100 mg/kg body weight) or alcohol + glutamine. A ...

  16. Effects of early life social stress on maternal behavior and neuroendocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgatroyd, Christopher A; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2013-02-01

    Maternal mood disorders such as depression and chronic anxiety can negatively affect the lives of both mothers and their adult offspring. An active focus of maternal depression and anxiety research has been the role of chronic social stress in the development of these disorders. Chronic exposure to social stress is common in humans, especially in lactating mothers, and postpartum mood disorders have been correlated with high levels of social conflict and low levels of social support. Recent studies have described an effective and ethologically relevant chronic social stress (CSS) based rodent model for postpartum depression and anxiety. Since CSS attenuates maternal behavior and impairs both dam and offspring growth, it was hypothesized that CSS is an ethologically relevant form of early life stress for the developing female offspring and may have effects on subsequent adult maternal behavior and neuroendocrinology. Dams exposed to early life CSS as infants display substantial increases in pup retrieval and nursing behavior that are specifically associated with attenuated oxytocin, prolactin, and vasopressin gene expression in brain nuclei involved in the control of maternal behavior. Since the growth patterns of both groups were similar despite substantial increases in nursing duration, the early life CSS dams exhibited an attenuated nursing efficiency. It is concluded that early life CSS has long term effects on the neuroendocrinology of maternal care (oxytocin and prolactin) which results in decreased nursing efficiency in the adult dams. The data support the use of early life CSS as an effective model for stress-induced impairments in nursing, such as those associated with postpartum depression and anxiety. PMID:22770862

  17. Nutrition education and counselling provided during pregnancy: effects on maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Amy Webb; Olude, Oluwafunke

    2012-07-01

    Nutrition education and counselling (NEC) is a commonly applied strategy to improve maternal nutrition during pregnancy. However, with the exception special populations and specific diets, the effect of NEC on maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes has not been systematically reviewed. Using a modified Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group method we systematically reviewed the literature and identified and abstracted 37 articles. We conducted meta-analyses for the effect of NEC on maternal, neonatal and infant health outcomes including gestational weight gain, maternal anaemia, birthweight, low birthweight and preterm delivery. NEC significantly improved gestational weight gain by 0.45 kg, reduced the risk of anaemia in late pregnancy by 30%, increased birthweight by 105 g and lowered the risk of preterm delivery by 19%. The effect of NEC on risk of low birthweight was not significant. The effect of NEC was greater when provided with nutrition support, for example, food or micronutrient supplements or nutrition safety nets. The overall quality of the body of evidence was deemed low for all outcomes due to high heterogeneity, poor study designs and other biases. Additional well-designed research that is grounded in appropriate theories of behaviour change is needed to improve confidence in the effect of NEC. Further, cost-effectiveness research is needed to clarify the added benefit and sustainability of providing NEC with nutritional support and/or safety nets, especially in areas where food insecurity and gender bias may limit women's capacity to adhere to NEC messages. PMID:22742611

  18. Maternal effects of inducible tolerance against the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa in the grazer Daphnia carinata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyanobacterial blooms are becoming potent agents of natural selection in aquatic ecosystems because of their high production of some toxins and increased frequency in recent decades with eutrophication and climate change. Maternal exposure to the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa significantly increased the intrinsic rates of population increase, average life span, and net reproductive rates of a clone of the planktonic grazer Daphnia carinata in an offspring environment where cyanobacteria were present, but not for two additional clones. Offspring from mothers exposed to M. aeruginosa had lower intrinsic rates of population increase, average life span, and net reproductive rates than individuals from unexposed mothers when fed exclusively a green alga. These results suggest that benefits, costs, and clonal variations of maternal effects of inducible tolerance should be considered when trying to understand ecological consequences of cyanobacterial blooms since they can shape the trophic interactions between cyanobacteria and daphnids. -- Highlights: •Maternal exposure to Microcystis aeruginosa significantly increased the offspring tolerance in a Daphnia carinata clone. •Another two clones, however, failed to response to maternal exposure. •Offspring from exposed mothers had lower fitness when fed exclusively a green alga. -- Capsule: Maternal exposure to the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa increased offspring fitness in one of three Daphnia carinata clones and carried a cost

  19. The long-run effect of maternity leave benefits on mental health: evidence from European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendano, Mauricio; Berkman, Lisa F; Brugiavini, Agar; Pasini, Giacomo

    2015-05-01

    This paper examines whether maternity leave policies have an effect on women's mental health in older age. We link data for women aged 50 years and above from countries in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) to data on maternity leave legislation from 1960 onwards. We use a difference-in-differences approach that exploits changes over time within countries in the duration and compensation of maternity leave benefits, linked to the year women were giving birth to their first child at age 16 to 25. We compare late-life depressive symptom scores (measured with a 12-item version of the Euro-D scale) of mothers who were in employment in the period around the birth of their first child to depression scores of mothers who were not in employment in the period surrounding the birth of a first child, and therefore did not benefit directly from maternity leave benefits. Our findings suggest that a more generous maternity leave during the birth of a first child is associated with a reduced score of 0.38 points in the Euro-D depressive symptom scale in old age. PMID:25792339

  20. Reducing maternal morbidity and mortality in the developing world: a simple, cost-effective example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browning A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Browning,1,2 Birhanu Menber21Maternity Africa, Arusha, Tanzania; 2Vision Maternity Care, Barhirdar, Ethiopia Objectives: To determine the impact of volunteer obstetricians and midwife teams on obstetric services in a rural hospital in Ethiopia.Methods: The intervention was undertaken in Mota district hospital, a rural hospital in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, which is the only hospital for 1.2 million people. Before the placement of volunteer teams it had a rudimentary basic obstetric service, no blood transfusion service, and no operative delivery. The study prospectively analyzed delivery data before, during, and after the placement of volunteer obstetrician and midwife teams. The volunteers established emergency obstetric care, and trained and supervised local staff over a 3-year period. Measurable outcomes consisted of the number of women delivering, the number of referrals of pregnant women, the number of maternal deaths, and the number of referrals of obstetric fistula patients.Results: With the establishment of the service the number of women attending hospital for delivery increased by 40%. In the hospital maternal mortality decreased from 7.1% to <0.5%, and morbidity, as measured by number of obstetric fistulae, decreased from 1.5% deliveries to 0.5% over the 3-year intervention period. The improvements were sustained after handing the project back to the government.Conclusion: The placement of volunteer teams was an effective method of decreasing maternal mortality and morbidity. Keywords: emergency obstetric care, volunteers, obstetric fistula, emergency obstetric care

  1. Effects of early life social stress on endocrinology, maternal behavior, and lactation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Lindsay M; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to early life stress is a predictor of mental health disorders, and two common forms of early life stress are social conflict and impaired maternal care, which are predominant features of postpartum mood disorders. Exposure of lactating female rats to a novel male intruder involves robust social conflict and induces deficits in maternal care towards the F1 offspring. This exposure is an early life social stressor for female F1 pups that induces inefficient lactation associated with central changes in oxytocin (OXT), prolactin (PRL), and arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene expression in adult F1 females. The mothers of the rats in the current study were either allowed to raise their pups without exposure to a social stressor (control), or presented with a novel male intruder for 1h each day on lactation days 2-16 (chronic social stress). The effects of this early life chronic social stress (CSS) exposure on subsequent peripheral endocrinology, maternal behavior, and physiology were assessed. Exposure of female pups to early life CSS resulted in persistent alterations in maternal endocrinology at the end of lactation (attenuated prolactin and elevated corticosterone), depressed maternal care and aggression, increased restlessness and anxiety-related behavior, impaired lactation, and decreased saccharin preference. The endocrine and behavioral data indicate that early life CSS has long-term effects which are similar to changes seen in clinical populations of depressed mothers and provide support for the use of the chronic social stress paradigm as an ethologically relevant rodent model for maternal disorders such as postpartum depression and anxiety. PMID:24005186

  2. The Effects of Maternal Alcohol Consumption and Cigarette Smoking during Pregnancy on Acoustic Cry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, J. Kevin; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Measured the neurobehavioral integrity of Irish infants and maternal alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. Subjects were 127 primiparous mothers. Results demonstrated significant cry effects on infants of heavily drinking mothers, supporting the conclusion that newborn infants show functional disturbances in the nervous system resulting from…

  3. Fetal Effects of Maternal/Paternal Alcohol and Other Drug Use: Abstracts of Selected Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Kathy; And Others

    This publication includes abstracts of 45 articles published in recent years on the effects of maternal and paternal alcohol and other drug use on the fetus; prevention and intervention programs; and teaching strategies to be used with prenatally drug-exposed children. While not an exhaustive list of available research on these topics, this review…

  4. EFFECTS OF CHEMICALLY-INDUCED MATERNAL TOXICITY ON PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypothesis that chemically-induced overt maternal toxicity induces a characteristic syndrome of adverse developmental effects in the rat was investigated. regnant animals (Sprague-Dawley strain) were dosed by oral gavage with one of a series of compounds on days 6 through 15 ...

  5. Differential Susceptibility to the Effects of Child Temperament on Maternal Warmth and Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunju J.

    2013-01-01

    A child's difficult temperament can elicit negative parenting and inhibit positive parenting behavior. However, mothers appear to be differentially susceptible to child temperament. The author examined the differential susceptibility to the effects of a child's temperament on the mother-child interaction style (i.e., maternal warmth and…

  6. The Long-Term Effects of Early and Recent Maternal Employment on a Child's Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Charles L.

    2004-01-01

    More children today are being raised in households with mothers who work for pay compared to a generation ago, when most mothers did not engage in marketplace work. This demographic change is important because it could affect children. In this article, the effects of early and recent maternal employment on a child's academic development are…

  7. Absence of Maternal Methylation in Biparental Hydatidiform Moles from Women with NLRP7 Maternal-Effect Mutations Reveals Widespread Placenta-Specific Imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Tayama, Chiharu; Vidal, Enrique; Esteller, Manel; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Deo, Nandita; Barney, Olivia; Maclean, Ken; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Fisher, Rosemary; Monk, David

    2015-11-01

    Familial recurrent hydatidiform mole (RHM) is a maternal-effect autosomal recessive disorder usually associated with mutations of the NLRP7 gene. It is characterized by HM with excessive trophoblastic proliferation, which mimics the appearance of androgenetic molar conceptuses despite their diploid biparental constitution. It has been proposed that the phenotypes of both types of mole are associated with aberrant genomic imprinting. However no systematic analyses for imprinting defects have been reported. Here, we present the genome-wide methylation profiles of both spontaneous androgenetic and biparental NLRP7 defective molar tissues. We observe total paternalization of all ubiquitous and placenta-specific differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in four androgenetic moles; namely gain of methylation at paternally methylated loci and absence of methylation at maternally methylated regions. The methylation defects observed in five RHM biopsies from NLRP7 defective patients are restricted to lack-of-methylation at maternal DMRs. Surprisingly RHMs from two sisters with the same missense mutations, as well as consecutive RHMs from one affected female show subtle allelic methylation differences, suggesting inter-RHM variation. These epigenotypes are consistent with NLRP7 being a maternal-effect gene and involved in imprint acquisition in the oocyte. In addition, bioinformatic screening of the resulting methylation datasets identified over sixty loci with methylation profiles consistent with imprinting in the placenta, of which we confirm 22 as novel maternally methylated loci. These observations strongly suggest that the molar phenotypes are due to defective placenta-specific imprinting and over-expression of paternally expressed transcripts, highlighting that maternal-effect mutations of NLRP7 are associated with the most severe form of multi-locus imprinting defects in humans. PMID:26544189

  8. Absence of Maternal Methylation in Biparental Hydatidiform Moles from Women with NLRP7 Maternal-Effect Mutations Reveals Widespread Placenta-Specific Imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Delgado, Marta; Martin-Trujillo, Alejandro; Tayama, Chiharu; Vidal, Enrique; Esteller, Manel; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Deo, Nandita; Barney, Olivia; Maclean, Ken; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Fisher, Rosemary; Monk, David

    2015-01-01

    Familial recurrent hydatidiform mole (RHM) is a maternal-effect autosomal recessive disorder usually associated with mutations of the NLRP7 gene. It is characterized by HM with excessive trophoblastic proliferation, which mimics the appearance of androgenetic molar conceptuses despite their diploid biparental constitution. It has been proposed that the phenotypes of both types of mole are associated with aberrant genomic imprinting. However no systematic analyses for imprinting defects have been reported. Here, we present the genome-wide methylation profiles of both spontaneous androgenetic and biparental NLRP7 defective molar tissues. We observe total paternalization of all ubiquitous and placenta-specific differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in four androgenetic moles; namely gain of methylation at paternally methylated loci and absence of methylation at maternally methylated regions. The methylation defects observed in five RHM biopsies from NLRP7 defective patients are restricted to lack-of-methylation at maternal DMRs. Surprisingly RHMs from two sisters with the same missense mutations, as well as consecutive RHMs from one affected female show subtle allelic methylation differences, suggesting inter-RHM variation. These epigenotypes are consistent with NLRP7 being a maternal-effect gene and involved in imprint acquisition in the oocyte. In addition, bioinformatic screening of the resulting methylation datasets identified over sixty loci with methylation profiles consistent with imprinting in the placenta, of which we confirm 22 as novel maternally methylated loci. These observations strongly suggest that the molar phenotypes are due to defective placenta-specific imprinting and over-expression of paternally expressed transcripts, highlighting that maternal-effect mutations of NLRP7 are associated with the most severe form of multi-locus imprinting defects in humans. PMID:26544189

  9. Maternity Leave in Turbulent Times: Effects on Labor Market Transitions and Fertility in Russia, 1985-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Theodore P.; Perelli-Harris, Brienna

    2012-01-01

    Maternity leave policies are designed to ease the tension between women's employment and fertility, but whether they actually play such a role remains unclear. We analyze the individual-level effects of maternity leave on employment outcomes and on second conception rates among Russian first-time mothers from 1985-2000 using retrospective job and…

  10. Effects of maternal postpartum depression in a well-resourced sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne; Væver, Mette Skovgaard

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well documented that maternal postpartum depression (PPD) has the potential to disrupt aspects of caregiving known to be critical for healthy child development. However, with regard to long term effects of PPD on global indices of infant development measured by standardized instruments, findings across studies have been inconsistent. Some studies have found small, but significant effects, and other studies found no long term effects, even for vulnerable subgroups. Given that PP...

  11. Contrasting the Effects of Maternal and Behavioral Characteristics on Fawn Birth Mass in White-Tailed Deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Eric S; Demarais, Stephen; Strickland, Bronson K; Belant, Jerrold L

    2015-01-01

    Maternal care influences offspring quality and can improve a mother's inclusive fitness. However, improved fitness may only occur when offspring quality (i.e., offspring birth mass) persists throughout life and enhances survival and/or reproductive success. Although maternal body mass, age, and social rank have been shown to influence offspring birth mass, the inter-dependence among these variables makes identifying causation problematic. We established that fawn birth mass was related to adult body mass for captive male and female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), thus maternal care should improve offspring fitness. We then used path analysis to identify which maternal characteristic(s) most influenced fawn birth mass of captive female white-tailed deer. Maternal age, body mass and social rank had varying effects on fawn birth mass. Maternal body mass displayed the strongest direct effect on fawn birth mass, followed by maternal age and social rank. Maternal body mass had a greater effect on social rank than age. The direct path between social rank and fawn birth mass may indicate dominance as an underlying mechanism. Our results suggest that heavier mothers could use dominance to improve access to resources, resulting in increased fitness through production of heavier offspring. PMID:26288141

  12. Effect of maternal methionine supplementation on the transcriptome of bovine preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Souza, Alex H; Carvalho, Paulo D; Driver, Ashley M; Gambra, Rocio; Kropp, Jenna; Hackbart, Katherine S; Luchini, Daniel; Shaver, Randy D; Wiltbank, Milo C; Khatib, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Maternal nutrition exclusively during the periconceptional period can induce remarkable effects on both oocyte maturation and early embryo development, which in turn can have lifelong consequences. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of maternal methionine supplementation on the transcriptome of bovine preimplantation embryos. Holstein cows were randomly assigned to one of two treatments differing in level of dietary methionine (1.89 Met vs. 2.43 Met % of metabolizable protein) from calving until embryo flushing. High quality preimplantation embryos from individual cows were pooled and then analyzed by RNA sequencing. Remarkably, a subtle difference in methionine supplementation in maternal diet was sufficient to cause significant changes in the transcriptome of the embryos. A total of 276 genes out of 10,662 showed differential expression between treatments (FDR SLAMF7, LCP1, and BLA-DQB). Likewise, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that several Gene Ontology terms, InterPro entries, and KEGG pathways were enriched (FDR <0.05) with differentially expressed genes involved in embryo development and immune system. The expression of most genes was decreased by maternal methionine supplementation, consistent with reduced transcription of genes with increased methylation of specific genes by increased methionine. Overall, our findings provide evidence that supplementing methionine to dams prior to conception and during the preimplantation period can modulate gene expression in bovine blastocysts. The ramifications of the observed gene expression changes for subsequent development of the pregnancy and physiology of the offspring warrant further investigation in future studies. PMID:23991086

  13. Effect of maternal hydration on the increase of amniotic fluid index

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    V.T.M., Borges; J., Rososchansky; J.F., Abbade; A., Dias; J.C., Peraçoli; M.V.C., Rudge.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of maternal hydration with oral isotonic solution and water on the amniotic fluid (AF) index of women with normohydramnios. Women with a normal AF index and gestational age between 33 and 36 weeks without maternal complications were randomized [...] into three groups [isotonic solution (Gatorade®), water, control]. The isotonic solution and water groups were instructed to drink 1.5 L of the respective solution and the control group was instructed to drink 200 mL water over a period of 2 to 4 h. AF index was measured before and after hydration by Doppler ultrasonography. The investigator performing the AF index measurement was blind to the subject’s group. Ninety-nine women completed the study without any adverse maternal effects. The median increase in AF index after hydration was significantly greater for the isotonic solution and water groups than for the control group. There was no significant difference between the isotonic solution and water groups. Hydration with isotonic solution and water caused a 10-fold (95%CI: 2.09-49.89) and 6-fold (95%CI: 1.16-30.95) increase in the chance of a 20% increase of AF index, respectively. Maternal hydration with isotonic solution or water increased the AF index in women with normohydramnios.

  14. Effects of Antenatal Maternal Depression and Anxiety on Children’s Early Cognitive Development: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Gladys; Bernard, Jonathan Y.; Rondet, Claire; Peyre, Hugo; Forhan, Anne; Kaminski, Monique; Saurel-Cubizolles, Marie-Josèphe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown that depression or anxiety occur in 10–20% of pregnant women. These disorders are often undertreated and may affect mothers and children’s health. This study investigates the relation between antenatal maternal depression, anxiety and children’s early cognitive development among 1380 two-year-old children and 1227 three-year-old children. Methods In the French EDEN Mother-Child Cohort Study, language ability was assessed with the Communicative Development Inventory at 2 years of age and overall development with the Ages and Stages Questionnaire at 3 years of age. Multiple regressions and structural equation modeling were used to examine links between depression, anxiety during pregnancy and child cognitive development. Results We found strong significant associations between maternal antenatal anxiety and poorer children’s cognitive development at 2 and 3 years. Antenatal maternal depression was not associated with child development, except when antenatal maternal anxiety was also present. Both postnatal maternal depression and parental stimulation appeared to play mediating roles in the relation between antenatal maternal anxiety and children’s cognitive development. At 3 years, parental stimulation mediated 13.2% of the effect of antenatal maternal anxiety while postnatal maternal depression mediated 26.5%. Discussion The partial nature of these effects suggests that other mediators may play a role. Implications for theory and research on child development are discussed. PMID:26317609

  15. The Effect of Maternal Healthcare on the Probability of Child Survival in Azerbaijan

    OpenAIRE

    Habibov, Nazim; Fan, Lida

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the effects of maternal healthcare on child survival by using nonrandomized data from a cross-sectional survey in Azerbaijan. Using 2SLS and simultaneous equation bivariate probit models, we estimate the effects of delivering in healthcare facility on probability of child survival taking into account self-selection into the treatment. For women who delivered at healthcare facilities, the probability of child survival increases by approximately 18%. Furthermore, if every wo...

  16. Sex-biased maternal effects reduce ectoparasite-induced mortality in a passerine bird

    OpenAIRE

    Badyaev, Alexander V.; Hamstra, Terri L.; Oh, Kevin P; Acevedo Seaman, Dana A.

    2006-01-01

    Duration of developmental stages in animals evolves under contrasting selection pressures of age-specific mortality and growth requirements. When relative importance of these effects varies across environments, evolution of developmental periods is expected to be slow. In birds, maternal effects on egg-laying order and offspring growth, two proximate determinants of nestling period, should enable rapid adjustment of developmental periods to even widely fluctuating mortality rates. We test thi...

  17. Good genes and the maternal effects of polyandry on offspring reproductive success in the bulb mite.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozielska, Magdalena; Krzemi?ska, Alina; Radwan, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Genetic benefits are potentially the most robust explanation of the controversial issue of evolutionary maintenance of polyandry, but the unambiguous demonstration of such benefits has been hindered by the possibility of their confusion with maternal effects. Previous research has shown that polyandrous bulb mite females produce daughters with higher fecundity than monandrous females. Here, we investigate whether this effect arises because polyandrous females invest more in their offspring, o...

  18. Testing Maternal Depression and Attachment Style as Moderators of Early Head Start's Effects on Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Berlin, L. J.; Whiteside-Mansell, L.; Roggman, Lori A.; Green, B L; Robinson, J.; Spieker, S

    2011-01-01

    This study examined maternal depression, attachment avoidance, and attachment anxiety as moderators of Early Head Start's effects on four parenting outcomes assessed at age 3. Participants (N = 947) were drawn from six sites of the Early Head Start National Research and Evaluation Project, a multi-site randomized trial. Findings suggest more positive program effects for mothers with less initial attachment avoidance or attachment anxiety. First, baseline attachment avoidance moderated EHS pro...

  19. Neurodevelopmental Effects of Maternal Nutritional Status and Exposure to Methylmercury from Eating Fish during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Philip W; Strain, J.J.; Myers, Gary J; Thurston, Sally W.; Bonham, Maxine P; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M. W.; Robson, Paula J.; Duffy, Emeir M; Georger, Lesley A.; Sloane-Reeves, Jean; Cernichiari, Elsa; Canfield, Richard L.; Cox, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Fish contain nutrients that promote optimal brain growth and development but also contain methylmercury (MeHg) that can have toxic effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intake of selected nutrients in fish or measures of maternal nutritional status may represent important confounders when estimating the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on child development. The study took place in the Republic of Seychelles, an Indian Ocean archipelago where fish consumption is h...

  20. The subtle intracapsular survival of the fittest: maternal investment, sibling conflict, or environmental effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn E; Thatje, Sven

    2013-10-01

    Developmental resource partitioning and the consequent offspring size variations are of fundamental importance for marine invertebrates, in both an ecological and evolutionary context. Typically, differences are attributed to maternal investment and the environmental factors determining this; additional variables, such as environmental factors affecting development, are rarely discussed. During intracapsular development, for example, sibling conflict has the potential to affect resource partitioning. Here, we investigate encapsulated development in the marine gastropod Buccinum undatum. We examine the effects of maternal investment and temperature on intracapsular resource partitioning in this species. Reproductive output was positively influenced by maternal investment, but additionally, temperature and sibling conflict significantly affected offspring size, number, and quality during development. Increased temperature led to reduced offspring number, and a combination of high sibling competition and asynchronous early development resulted in a common occurrence of "empty" embryos, which received no nutrition at all. The proportion of empty embryos increased with both temperature and capsule size. Additionally, a novel example ofa risk in sibling conflict was observed; embryos cannibalized by others during early development ingested nurse eggs from inside the consumer, killing it in a "Trojan horse" scenario. Our results highlight the complexity surrounding offspring fitness. Encapsulation should be considered as significant in determining maternal output. Considering predicted increases in ocean temperatures, this may impact offspring quality and consequently species distribution and abundance. PMID:24358712

  1. Effect of hemoglobin adjustment on the precision of mercury concentrations in maternal and cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Byung-Mi; Choi, Anna L

    2014-01-01

    The cord-blood mercury concentration is usually considered the best biomarker in regard to developmental methylmercury neurotoxicity. However, the mercury concentration may be affected by the binding of methylmercury to hemoglobin and perhaps also selenium. As cord-blood mercury analyses appear to be less precise than suggested by laboratory quality data, we studied the interrelationships of mercury concentrations with hemoglobin in paired maternal and cord blood samples from a Faroese birth cohort (N=514) and the Mothers and Children?s Environmental Health study in Korea (n=797). Linear regression and structural equation model (SEM) analyses were used to ascertain interrelationships between the exposure biomarkers and the possible impact of hemoglobin as well as selenium. Both methods showed a significant dependence of the cord-blood concentration on hemoglobin, also after adjustment for other exposure biomarkers. In the SEM, the cord blood measurement was a less imprecise indicator of the latent methylmercury exposure variable than other exposure biomarkers available, and the maternal hair concentration had the largest imprecision. Adjustment of mercury concentrations both in maternal and cord blood for hemoglobin improved their precision, while no significant effect of the selenium concentration in maternal blood was found. Adjustment of blood-mercury concentrations for hemoglobin is therefore recommended.

  2. Effects of maternal obesity on early and long-term outcomes for offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirrat LI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Laura I Stirrat,1,2 Rebecca M Reynolds2,3 1Medical Research Council Centre for Reproductive Health, Queens Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Tommy's Centre for Maternal and Fetal Health, Queens Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 3Endocrinology Unit, University/British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queens Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: The prevalence of maternal obesity has increased significantly in recent years, and obesity is currently the most common comorbidity of pregnancy. Pregnancies of obese women are often defined as "high-risk" for the purposes of clinical care, with many well documented risks to the mother and developing baby. Maternal physiology and metabolism is dysregulated in the context of obesity, which may contribute to some of the adverse outcomes during pregnancy. Furthermore, maternal obesity has been hypothesized to cause harmful effects for the developing baby through "early life programming." This review will examine evidence from human studies for outcomes of offspring from obese women during pregnancy, during labor, during the neonatal period, and later in life. Keywords: pregnancy, short-term, physiology, metabolism, early life programming, neonatal complications, adverse intrauterine environment

  3. Adiponectin supplementation in pregnant mice prevents the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-10-13

    Mothers with obesity or gestational diabetes mellitus have low circulating levels of adiponectin (ADN) and frequently deliver large babies with increased fat mass, who are susceptible to perinatal complications and to development of metabolic syndrome later in life. It is currently unknown if the inverse correlation between maternal ADN and fetal growth reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. We tested the hypothesis that ADN supplementation in obese pregnant dams improves maternal insulin sensitivity, restores normal placental insulin/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and nutrient transport, and prevents fetal overgrowth. Compared with dams on a control diet, female C57BL/6J mice fed an obesogenic diet before mating and throughout gestation had increased fasting serum leptin, insulin, and C-peptide, and reduced high-molecular-weight ADN at embryonic day (E) 18.5. Placental insulin and mTORC1 signaling was activated, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?) phosphorylation was reduced, placental transport of glucose and amino acids in vivo was increased, and fetal weights were 29% higher in obese dams. Maternal ADN infusion in obese dams from E14.5 to E18.5 normalized maternal insulin sensitivity, placental insulin/mTORC1 and PPAR? signaling, nutrient transport, and fetal growth without affecting maternal fat mass. Using a mouse model with striking similarities to obese pregnant women, we demonstrate that ADN functions as an endocrine link between maternal adipose tissue and fetal growth by regulating placental function. Importantly, maternal ADN supplementation reversed the adverse effects of maternal obesity on placental function and fetal growth. Improving maternal ADN levels may serve as an effective intervention strategy to prevent fetal overgrowth caused by maternal obesity. PMID:26417088

  4. Maternal Nutrition in Early Pregnancy Effects Placental Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Babu Geddam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experimental and clinical studies have identified maternal malnutrition at conception or during early period of gestation as an important factor determining the fetal growth as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. Placenta is a transient embryonic organ of communication between mother and fetus during pregnancy and is the only source of nutrient transfer to the fetus. Hence its proper development is essential for fetal growth and development right from embryonic stages of development. Objective: To assess and compare the placental morphology by measuring the villous structure, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEG F and placental growth factor (PLGF expression from placental tissue at 7-10 weeks of gestation of low socioeconomic status (LSES and high socioeconomic status (HSES groups, in relation to their nutritional status. Material: Placental tissue samples obtained at 7-10 weeks of gestation from healthy women undergoing medical termination of pregnancy constituted the study material. Methodology: A total of 99 placental tissue samples, 59 from LSES and 40 from HSES groups were examined to assess the morphology of placental villi and also stained for VEG F and PLGF expression. Nutritional status of the subjects was measured by recording weight, height and hemoglobin, serum retinol, serum zinc and folic acid using standard methods. Results: Women belonging to both the income groups were of comparable to age. Body Mass Index (BMI was significantly lower (P < 0.001 in the LSES group. Hemoglobin concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05 more in HSES groups when compared to LSES group. Hematoxylin-eosin stained placental tissue sections showed that number of floating villi (P < 0.001, villous vascular density (P < 0.001, central disposition of blood vessels (P < 0.05 and syncytial sprouts (SS (P < 0.05 were significantly higher in the LSES group. While the intensity of staining for VEGF was higher, the decidual vascular density was significantly (P < 0.05 lower in the LSES group. Serum retinol, folic acid and zinc of both groups were within normal range and comparable. Conclusions: The significant disparity in placental morphology observed in this study between LSES and HSES groups at a comparable gestational period is interesting and suggestive of predominant hypoxemic placental development under the stress of under nutrition.

  5. The persisting effect of maternal mood in pregnancy on childhood psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Kieran J; Glover, Vivette; Barker, Edward D; O'Connor, Thomas G

    2014-05-01

    Developmental or fetal programming has emerged as a major model for understanding the early and persisting effects of prenatal exposures on the health and development of the child and adult. We leverage the power of a 14-year prospective study to examine the persisting effects of prenatal anxiety, a key candidate in the developmental programming model, on symptoms of behavioral and emotional problems across five occasions of measurement from age 4 to 13 years. The study is based on the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children cohort, a prospective, longitudinal study of a large community sample in the west of England (n = 7,944). Potential confounders included psychosocial and obstetric risk, postnatal maternal mood, paternal pre- and postnatal mood, and parenting. Results indicated that maternal prenatal anxiety predicted persistently higher behavioral and emotional symptoms across childhood with no diminishment of effect into adolescence. Elevated prenatal anxiety (top 15%) was associated with a twofold increase in risk of a probable child mental disorder, 12.31% compared with 6.83%, after allowing for confounders. Results were similar with prenatal depression. These analyses provide some of the strongest evidence to date that prenatal maternal mood has a direct and persisting effect on her child's psychiatric symptoms and support an in utero programming hypothesis. PMID:24621564

  6. The effects of maternal irradiation during adulthood on mutation induction and transgenerational instability in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term genetic effects of maternal irradiation remain poorly understood. To establish the effects of radiation exposure on mutation induction in the germline of directly exposed females and the possibility of transgenerational effects in their non-exposed offspring, adult female BALB/c and CBA/Ca mice were given 1 Gy of acute X-rays and mated with control males. The frequency of mutation at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of directly exposed females did not differ from that of controls. Using a single-molecule PCR approach, ESTR mutation frequency was also established for both germline and somatic tissues in the first-generation offspring of irradiated parents. While the frequency of ESTR mutation in the offspring of irradiated males was significantly elevated, maternal irradiation did not affect stability in their F1 offspring. Considering these data and the results of our previous study, we propose that, in sharp contrast to paternal exposure to ionising radiation, the transgenerational effects of maternal high-dose acute irradiation are likely to be negligible.

  7. Effects of early maternal separation on the performance in the elevated plus maze in adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been demonstrated that disruption of mother pup interaction during early life exerts long lasting effects on the brain and behavioral development. Therefore subjects exposed to early maternal separation stress (MS) show variations in anxiety like behaviors. The aim of this study was to investigate the specific effects of SMT stress on anxiety like behaviors in adult male and female wistar rats. Rats were housed with reversed light dark cycle (light on at 7 p.m., off at 7 a.m.), water and food ad libitum. Separation was carried out in postnatal days 1 to 21, twice daily in dark cycle (7:00 a 10:00 y 13:00 a 16:00 p.m.). The anxiety like behaviors were tested through the elevated plus maze (EPM) when the pups reached 230 g of weigh. We found that the MS stress has sex specific effects on anxiety like behaviors: the maternal separated females displayed a lesser anxious outline than the not separated ones and the separated males showed a large exploration/avoidance conflict. These results confirm previous effects of our labs, which may be related to an interaction between vulnerability to environmental challenge and maternal care compensatory behaviors

  8. The effects of maternal irradiation during adulthood on mutation induction and transgenerational instability in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouzeid Ali, Hamdy E. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Radiobiological Applications Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Barber, Ruth C. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-01

    The long-term genetic effects of maternal irradiation remain poorly understood. To establish the effects of radiation exposure on mutation induction in the germline of directly exposed females and the possibility of transgenerational effects in their non-exposed offspring, adult female BALB/c and CBA/Ca mice were given 1 Gy of acute X-rays and mated with control males. The frequency of mutation at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of directly exposed females did not differ from that of controls. Using a single-molecule PCR approach, ESTR mutation frequency was also established for both germline and somatic tissues in the first-generation offspring of irradiated parents. While the frequency of ESTR mutation in the offspring of irradiated males was significantly elevated, maternal irradiation did not affect stability in their F{sub 1} offspring. Considering these data and the results of our previous study, we propose that, in sharp contrast to paternal exposure to ionising radiation, the transgenerational effects of maternal high-dose acute irradiation are likely to be negligible.

  9. GENES AS INSTRUMENTS FOR STUDYING RISK BEHAVIOR EFFECTS: AN APPLICATION TO MATERNAL SMOKING AND OROFACIAL CLEFTS

    OpenAIRE

    Wehby, George; Jugessur, Astanand; Jeffrey C Murray; Moreno, Lina; Wilcox, Allen; Lie, Rolv T

    2011-01-01

    This study uses instrumental variable (IV) models with genetic instruments to assess the effects of maternal smoking on the child’s risk of orofacial clefts (OFC), a common birth defect. The study uses genotypic variants in neurotransmitter and detoxification genes relateded to smoking as instruments for cigarette smoking before and during pregnancy. Conditional maximum likelihood and two-stage IV probit models are used to estimate the IV model. The data are from a population-level sample of ...

  10. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and child outcomes: Real or spurious effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Knopik, Valerie S

    2009-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy (MSDP) is a major public health concern with clearly established consequences to both mother and newborn (e.g., low birth weight, altered cardiorespiratory responses). MSDP has also been associated with higher rates of a variety of poor cognitive and behavioral outcomes in children, including ADHD, conduct disorder, impaired learning and memory, and cognitive dysfunction. However, the evidence suggesting causal effects of MSDP for these outcomes is muddied in...

  11. Effectiveness of maternal referral system in a rural setting: a case study from Rufiji district, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Lindmark Gunilla; Urassa David P; Carlstedt Anders; Pembe Andrea B; Nyström Lennarth; Darj Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The functional referral system is important in backing-up antenatal, labour and delivery, and postnatal services in the primary level of care facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the maternal referral system through determining proportion of women reaching the hospitals after referral advice, appropriateness of the referral indications, reasons for non-compliance and to find out if compliance to referrals makes a difference in the perinata...

  12. Fetal Cardiac Autonomic Control during Breathing and Non-Breathing Epochs: The Effect of Maternal Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafson, Kathleen M.; May, Linda E; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Stephanie K. Million; Allen, John J. B.

    2012-01-01

    We explored whether maternal exercise during pregnancy moderates the effect of fetal breathing movements on fetal cardiac autonomic control assessed by metrics of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty women were assigned to Exercise or Control group (n=15/group) based on the modifiable physical activity questionnaire (MPAQ). Magnetocardiograms (MCG) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer. Periods of fetal breathing activity and apnea were identified using the...

  13. Magnesium supplement in pregnancy-induced hypertension: effects on maternal and neonatal magnesium and calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudnicki, M; Frølich, A; Fischer-Rasmussen, W

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of low dose magnesium supplement upon maternal and fetal serum levels of mineral status in pregnancies complicated with hypertension (PIH). Twenty-five patients with PIH agreed to participate and were randomly allocated, in a double-blind manner, either to intravenous magnesium for 2 days followed by oral magnesium (n = 12) until delivery or placebo (n = 13). In women supplemented with magnesium the level of magnesium increased from 0.74 to ...

  14. Effect of maternal excessive iodine intake on neurodevelopment and cognitive function in rat offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Le; Teng Weiping; Liu Yuhui; Li (Tiffany) Jing; Mao Jinyuan; Fan Chenling; Wang Hong; Zhang Hongmei; Shan Zhongyan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Iodine deficiency and iodine excess are both associated with adverse health consequences. Iodine deficiency during pregnancy leads to insufficient maternal thyroid hormone, subsequently causing irreversible adverse effects on the neurological and cognitive functions of the offspring. The results of our previous epidemiological study suggested that mild iodine excess might increase the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism. In the present study, female Wistar rats mainta...

  15. Effect of a maternal and child health handbook on maternal knowledge and behaviour: a community-based controlled trial in rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Satoko; Soyano, Ayako; Igarashi, Hisato; Ura, Midori; Nakamura, Yasuhide

    2015-11-01

    Maternal and child health (MCH) handbooks are comprehensive home-based booklets designed to integrate MCH records. Although empirical evidence suggests the handbooks are more effective than current card-type records, this has not been scientifically demonstrated. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of the MCH handbook on maternal knowledge and behaviour as measured by antenatal care (ANC) attendance, delivery with skilled birth attendants (SBAs) and delivery at a health facility. The Cambodian version of the MCH handbook was developed and introduced in two health centres, and two other health centres served as controls. Pre-intervention and post-intervention surveys were conducted with 320 women from the intervention areas and 320 women from the control areas who had given birth within 1 year before the survey. We evaluated the impact of the handbook by using difference-in-differences (DID) analysis and calculated adjusted odds ratios for pre-post changes in key indicators by using logistic regression. In addition, we interviewed multiparous women, health staff and health volunteers to assess the acceptance and cultural appropriateness of the handbook. Content analysis was performed with the English-translated transcriptions. The DID analyses revealed that all key indicators increased in the intervention group against counterfactual assumptions. The intervention also increased maternal knowledge of all topics addressed except for the risk of severe bleeding after delivery; this may be attributable to the influence of cultural belief. Logistic regression showed that the intervention increased ANC attendance, delivery with SBAs and delivery at a health facility, even after adjusting for maternal age, education and economic conditions. The qualitative data indicated that the handbook was well received and culturally appropriate. Thus, the MCH handbook is a reasonable and superior alternative to current card-type maternal records. PMID:25595142

  16. Estimates of direct, maternal and grandmaternal genetic effects for growth traits in Gobra cattle

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M., Diop; J., Dodenhoff; L.D., Van Vleck.

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram obtidas as estimativas dos pesos ao nascimento (N = 3909), ao desmame (N = 3425), com 1 ano de idade (N = 2764) e final (N = 2144) a partir dos registros de gado Gobra coletados no Centro de Pesquisas em Zootecnia de Dahra, Senegal. Três modelos animais foram adaptados para obter estimativas p [...] or REML usando uma abordagem de informação média (AI). O modelo 1 considerou os efeitos ambientais aleatórios direto, genético maternal e maternal permanente. No modelo 2, um efeito geral relativo às avós foi adicionado aos efeitos aleatórios considerados no modelo 1, e no modelo 3 o efeito geral relativo às avós foi dividido em efeitos ambientais genético e permanente. Todos os modelos admitiram covariâncias entre os efeitos genéticos. A inclusão dos efeitos relativos às avós nos modelos 2 e 3 não alterou as estimativas dos parâmetros genéticos comparados com o modelo 1. As variâncias atribuíveis aos efeitos relativos às avós tornaram-se negativas e foram posicionadas próximas a zero, exceto para o peso com 1 ano, para o qual a herdabilidade relativa à avo foi 0,03 ± 0,03. As estimativas para as herdabilidades direta e maternal foram, respectivamente, 0,08 ± 0,03 e 0,03 ± 0,02 para peso ao nascimento, 0,20 ± 0,05 e 0,21 ± 0,05 para peso ao desmame, 0,26 ± 0,07 e 0,16 ± 0,07 para peso com 1 ano e 0,14 ± 0,06 e 0,16 ± 0,06 para o peso final. As estimativas da correlação genética entre os efeitos direto e maternal para os pesos ao nascimento, ao desmame, com 1 ano e final foram -0,17 ± 0,40, -0,58 ± 0,32, -0,52 ± 0,34 e -0,34 ± 0,37, respectivamente. Para o peso com 1 ano com herdabilidade relativa à avó estimada como sendo apenas 0,03, o modelo 3 deu estimativas da correlação genética entre os efeitos direto e relativo à avó e entre os efeitos maternal e relativo à avó de 0,28 ± 0,48 e -0,33 ± 0,67, respectivamente. As estimativas de herdabilidade direta e maternal não se alteraram quando os efeitos relativos à avó não foram incluídos no modelo. Abstract in english Estimates of genetic parameters for birth (N = 3909), weaning (N = 3425), yearling (N = 2764) and final (N = 2144) weights were obtained from the records of Gobra cattle collected at the Centre de Recherches Zootechniques de Dahra, Senegal. Three animal models were fitted to obtain estimates by REML [...] using an average information (AI) approach. Model 1 considered random direct, maternal genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects. In model 2, a general grandmaternal effect was added to the random effects considered in model 1, and in model 3, the general grandmaternal effect was divided into grandmaternal genetic and grandmaternal permanent environmental effects. All models allowed covariances among genetic effects. The inclusion of grandmaternal effects in models 2 and 3 did not change the estimates of the genetic parameters compared to model 1. Variances attributable to grandmaternal effects became negative and were set close to zero, except for yearling weight for which grandmaternal heritability was 0.03 ± 0.03. The estimates for direct and maternal heritabilities were, respectively, 0.08 ± 0.03 and 0.03 ± 0.02 for birth, 0.20 ± 0.05 and 0.21 ± 0.05 for weaning, 0.26 ± 0.07 and 0.16 ± 0.07 for yearling and 0.14 ± 0.06 and 0.16 ± 0.06 for final weights. The estimates of the genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects for birth, weaning, yearling and final weights were -0.17 ± 0.40, -0.58 ± 0.32, -0.52 ± 0.34 and -0.34 ± 0.37, respectively. For yearling weight with grandmaternal heritability estimated to be only 0.03, model 3 gave estimates of the genetic correlation between direct and grandmaternal effects and between maternal and grandmaternal effects of 0.28 ± 0.48 and -0.33 ± 0.67, respectively. Estimates of direct and maternal heritabilities were unchanged when grandmaternal effects were not included in the model.

  17. Estimates of direct, maternal and grandmaternal genetic effects for growth traits in Gobra cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Diop

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of genetic parameters for birth (N = 3909, weaning (N = 3425, yearling (N = 2764 and final (N = 2144 weights were obtained from the records of Gobra cattle collected at the Centre de Recherches Zootechniques de Dahra, Senegal. Three animal models were fitted to obtain estimates by REML using an average information (AI approach. Model 1 considered random direct, maternal genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects. In model 2, a general grandmaternal effect was added to the random effects considered in model 1, and in model 3, the general grandmaternal effect was divided into grandmaternal genetic and grandmaternal permanent environmental effects. All models allowed covariances among genetic effects. The inclusion of grandmaternal effects in models 2 and 3 did not change the estimates of the genetic parameters compared to model 1. Variances attributable to grandmaternal effects became negative and were set close to zero, except for yearling weight for which grandmaternal heritability was 0.03 ± 0.03. The estimates for direct and maternal heritabilities were, respectively, 0.08 ± 0.03 and 0.03 ± 0.02 for birth, 0.20 ± 0.05 and 0.21 ± 0.05 for weaning, 0.26 ± 0.07 and 0.16 ± 0.07 for yearling and 0.14 ± 0.06 and 0.16 ± 0.06 for final weights. The estimates of the genetic correlation between direct and maternal effects for birth, weaning, yearling and final weights were -0.17 ± 0.40, -0.58 ± 0.32, -0.52 ± 0.34 and -0.34 ± 0.37, respectively. For yearling weight with grandmaternal heritability estimated to be only 0.03, model 3 gave estimates of the genetic correlation between direct and grandmaternal effects and between maternal and grandmaternal effects of 0.28 ± 0.48 and -0.33 ± 0.67, respectively. Estimates of direct and maternal heritabilities were unchanged when grandmaternal effects were not included in the model.Foram obtidas as estimativas dos pesos ao nascimento (N = 3909, ao desmame (N = 3425, com 1 ano de idade (N = 2764 e final (N = 2144 a partir dos registros de gado Gobra coletados no Centro de Pesquisas em Zootecnia de Dahra, Senegal. Três modelos animais foram adaptados para obter estimativas por REML usando uma abordagem de informação média (AI. O modelo 1 considerou os efeitos ambientais aleatórios direto, genético maternal e maternal permanente. No modelo 2, um efeito geral relativo às avós foi adicionado aos efeitos aleatórios considerados no modelo 1, e no modelo 3 o efeito geral relativo às avós foi dividido em efeitos ambientais genético e permanente. Todos os modelos admitiram covariâncias entre os efeitos genéticos. A inclusão dos efeitos relativos às avós nos modelos 2 e 3 não alterou as estimativas dos parâmetros genéticos comparados com o modelo 1. As variâncias atribuíveis aos efeitos relativos às avós tornaram-se negativas e foram posicionadas próximas a zero, exceto para o peso com 1 ano, para o qual a herdabilidade relativa à avo foi 0,03 ± 0,03. As estimativas para as herdabilidades direta e maternal foram, respectivamente, 0,08 ± 0,03 e 0,03 ± 0,02 para peso ao nascimento, 0,20 ± 0,05 e 0,21 ± 0,05 para peso ao desmame, 0,26 ± 0,07 e 0,16 ± 0,07 para peso com 1 ano e 0,14 ± 0,06 e 0,16 ± 0,06 para o peso final. As estimativas da correlação genética entre os efeitos direto e maternal para os pesos ao nascimento, ao desmame, com 1 ano e final foram -0,17 ± 0,40, -0,58 ± 0,32, -0,52 ± 0,34 e -0,34 ± 0,37, respectivamente. Para o peso com 1 ano com herdabilidade relativa à avó estimada como sendo apenas 0,03, o modelo 3 deu estimativas da correlação genética entre os efeitos direto e relativo à avó e entre os efeitos maternal e relativo à avó de 0,28 ± 0,48 e -0,33 ± 0,67, respectivamente. As estimativas de herdabilidade direta e maternal não se alteraram quando os efeitos relativos à avó não foram incluídos no modelo.

  18. The effects of dietary fructose and salt on maternal, fetal and adult offspring growth, metabolic status and cardiovascular health

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Clint

    2011-01-01

    The modern Western diet is typically high in salt and fructose. Variations in maternal diet can have delayed developmental effects on the adult offspring’s cardiovascular function leading to acute or chronic hypertension. The aim of the work in this thesis was to determine the effect of moderate dietary salt and/or fructose intake on maternal and fetal growth, metabolic status and cardiovascular health of the adult offspring. Sprague Dawley rats were fed either 1) control diet (chow) with tap...

  19. Exercise partially reverses the effect of maternal separation on hippocampal proteins in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Dimatelis, JJ; Hendricks, S.; Hsieh, J; Vlok, NM; Bugarith, K; Daniels, WMU; Russell, VA

    2012-01-01

    Animals subjected to maternal separation stress during the early stages of development display behavioural, endocrine and growth factor abnormalities that mirror the clinical findings in anxiety/depression. In addition, maternal separation has been shown to exacerbate the behavioural deficits induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. In contrast, voluntary exercise reduced the detrimental effects of 6-OHDA in the rat model. The beneficial effects of exercise...

  20. Effects of Child Psychopathology on Maternal Depression: The Mediating Role of Child-Related Acute and Chronic Stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Raposa, Elizabeth; Hammen, Constance L.; Brennan, Patricia A

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent research highlighting the potential effects of children’s behavior on mothers’ mental health, the current study examined 679 mothers and their adolescent children from a community-based sample to determine the effects of youth psychopathology on maternal depression and levels of child-related stress in mothers’ lives. It was hypothesized that the number of past clinical diagnoses in 15-year-old adolescents would predict the presence of maternal depression at youth age 15 an...

  1. Impact of maternal effects on ranking of animal models for genetic parameter estimation for birth weight in male Afrikaner cattle in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Assan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Variance components for additive direct, additive maternal, permanent environmental maternal effects, the covariance between additive direct and maternal effects were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood, fitting four animal models from 1359 pedigree male birth weight records of Afrikaner cattle of Zimbabwe. All investigated models included a random direct genetic effect, but different combinations of random maternal genetic and permanent environmental effects as well as direct-maternal genetic covariance. The direct heritability (h2a ranged from 0.40 to 0.43 when the maternal genetic effects were included in the model, whereas h2a was highest 0.45 when maternal effects were excluded. The maternal heritability (h2m was 0.00 when only maternal genetic effects were included in the model and were 0.09 and 0.09 when the permanent environmental effect of the dam was added. The permanent environmental effect of the dam was negligible. A weak negative covariances between direct and maternal genetic effects (?2am was observed in model which had all the random effects fitted and proved to the appropriate among the four models using the log likelihood ration test.

  2. Placental serotonin: implications for the developmental effects of SSRIs and maternal depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Velasquez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its role in the pathophysiology of numerous psychiatric disorders, increasing evidence points to serotonin (5-HT as a crucial molecule for the modulation of neurodevelopmental processes. Recent evidence indicates that the placenta is involved in the synthesis of 5-HT from maternally derived tryptophan (TRP. This gives rise to the possibility that genetic and environmental perturbations directly affecting placental TRP metabolism may lead to abnormal brain circuit wiring in the developing embryo, and therefore contribute to the developmental origin of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we discuss how perturbations of the placental TRP metabolic pathway may lead to abnormal brain development and function throughout life. Of particular interest is prenatal exposure to maternal depression and antidepressants, both known to alter fetal development. We review existing evidence on how antidepressants can alter placental physiology in its key function of maintaining fetal homeostasis and have long-term effects on fetal forebrain development.

  3. Effects of taurine supplementation on hepatic markers of inflammation and lipid metabolism in mothers and offspring in the setting of maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minglan; Reynolds, Clare M; Sloboda, Deborah M; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with obesity and metabolic disorders in offspring. However, intervention strategies to reverse or ameliorate the effects of maternal obesity on offspring health are limited. Following maternal undernutrition, taurine supplementation can improve outcomes in offspring, possibly via effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The effects of taurine in mediating inflammatory processes as a protective mechanism has not been investigated. Further, the efficacy of taurine supplementation in the setting of maternal obesity is not known. Using a model of maternal obesity, we examined the effects of maternal taurine supplementation on outcomes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism in mothers and neonates. Time-mated Wistar rats were randomised to either: 1) control : control diet during pregnancy and lactation (CON); 2) CON supplemented with 1.5% taurine in drinking water (CT); 3) maternal obesogenic diet (high fat, high fructose) during pregnancy and lactation (MO); or 4) MO supplemented with taurine (MOT). Maternal and neonatal weights, plasma cytokines and hepatic gene expression were analysed. A MO diet resulted in maternal hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia and increased plasma glucose, glutamate and TNF-? concentrations. Taurine normalised maternal plasma TNF-? and glutamate concentrations in MOT animals. Both MO and MOT mothers displayed evidence of fatty liver accompanied by alterations in key markers of hepatic lipid metabolism. MO neonates displayed a pro-inflammatory hepatic profile which was partially rescued in MOT offspring. Conversely, a pro-inflammatory phenotype was observed in MOT mothers suggesting a possible maternal trade-off to protect the neonate. Despite protective effects of taurine in MOT offspring, neonatal mortality was increased in CT neonates, indicating possible adverse effects of taurine in the setting of normal pregnancy. These data suggest that maternal taurine supplementation may ameliorate the adverse effects observed in offspring following a maternal obesogenic diet but these effects are dependent upon prior maternal nutritional background. PMID:24146946

  4. Effects of Taurine Supplementation on Hepatic Markers of Inflammation and Lipid Metabolism in Mothers and Offspring in the Setting of Maternal Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minglan; Reynolds, Clare M.; Sloboda, Deborah M.; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with obesity and metabolic disorders in offspring. However, intervention strategies to reverse or ameliorate the effects of maternal obesity on offspring health are limited. Following maternal undernutrition, taurine supplementation can improve outcomes in offspring, possibly via effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The effects of taurine in mediating inflammatory processes as a protective mechanism has not been investigated. Further, the efficacy of taurine supplementation in the setting of maternal obesity is not known. Using a model of maternal obesity, we examined the effects of maternal taurine supplementation on outcomes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism in mothers and neonates. Time-mated Wistar rats were randomised to either: 1) control : control diet during pregnancy and lactation (CON); 2) CON supplemented with 1.5% taurine in drinking water (CT); 3) maternal obesogenic diet (high fat, high fructose) during pregnancy and lactation (MO); or 4) MO supplemented with taurine (MOT). Maternal and neonatal weights, plasma cytokines and hepatic gene expression were analysed. A MO diet resulted in maternal hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia and increased plasma glucose, glutamate and TNF-? concentrations. Taurine normalised maternal plasma TNF-? and glutamate concentrations in MOT animals. Both MO and MOT mothers displayed evidence of fatty liver accompanied by alterations in key markers of hepatic lipid metabolism. MO neonates displayed a pro-inflammatory hepatic profile which was partially rescued in MOT offspring. Conversely, a pro-inflammatory phenotype was observed in MOT mothers suggesting a possible maternal trade-off to protect the neonate. Despite protective effects of taurine in MOT offspring, neonatal mortality was increased in CT neonates, indicating possible adverse effects of taurine in the setting of normal pregnancy. These data suggest that maternal taurine supplementation may ameliorate the adverse effects observed in offspring following a maternal obesogenic diet but these effects are dependent upon prior maternal nutritional background. PMID:24146946

  5. The effects of EITC payment expansion on maternal smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Averett, Susan L.; Wang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is the largest anti-poverty program in the U.S. In 1993, the EITC benefit levels were changed significantly based on the number of children in the family such that families with two or more children experienced an exogenous expansion in their incomes. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, we employ a triple differences plus Fixed-Effects framework to examine the effect of this change on the probability of smoking among low-e...

  6. Interactive effects of maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes decrease survival of larval southern toads (Bufo terrestris)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted a mesocosm study to assess the individual and interactive effects of previous maternal exposure and larval exposure to trace element-laden sediments on southern toads (Bufo terrestris). Previous maternal exposure to coal combustion wastes (CCW) reduced larval survival to metamorphosis up to 57% compared to larvae of unexposed females. Larvae reared on CCW accumulated significant concentrations of trace elements resulting in extended larval periods, reduced growth rates, and reduced mass at metamorphosis. However, the effects were dependent on age of sediments, suggesting the effects of contaminants from CCW may be partially ameliorated over time through the reduced bioavailability of trace elements in aged CCW. Most importantly, maternal exposure to contaminants coupled with larval exposure to fresh CCW interacted to reduce survival to metamorphosis by 85% compared to reference conditions. Our study yields further evidence that disposal of CCW in aquatic basins potentially creates ecological traps for some amphibian populations. - Highlights: ? The interaction of maternal exposure and larval exposure to CCW reduced survival. ? Previous maternal exposure to CCW had a latent effect on survival to metamorphosis. ? Larval southern toads exposed to CCW experienced prolonged larval periods. ? Larval southern toads exposed to CCW had reduced growth rates. ? Larval southern toads exposed to CCW had reduced mass at metamorphosis. - Maternal and environmental exposure to coal combustion wastes interact to decrease survival in larval amphibians.

  7. The importance of effective communication in interprofessional practice: perspectives of maternity clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Bernadette M; Heatley, Michelle L; Gallois, Cindy; Kruske, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Midwives and doctors require effective information-sharing strategies to provide safe and evidence-based care for women and infants, but this can be difficult to achieve. This article describes maternity care professionals' perceptions of communication in their current workplace in Australia. We invoke social identity theory (SIT) to explore how these perceptions affect interprofessional practice. A survey was conducted with 337 participants (281 midwives and 56 doctors). Using exploratory factor analysis we developed three scales that measured interprofessional workplace practice collaboration. Results indicated an intergroup environment in maternity care in which the professionals found exchange of ideas difficult, and where differences with respect to decision making and professional skills were apparent. Although scores on some measures of collaboration were high, the two professions differed on their ratings of the importance of team behaviors, information sharing, and interprofessional socialization as indicators of collaborative practice. These results highlight the complexities among maternity care providers with different professional identities, and demonstrate the impact of professional identity on interprofessional communication. PMID:26362334

  8. Maternal and Paternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Risk of ADHD Symptoms in Offspring: Testing for Intrauterine Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, Kate; Heron, Jon; Smith, George Davey; Thapar, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring. It is assumed by many that this association is causal. Others suggest that observed associations are due to unmeasured genetic factors or other confounding factors. The authors compared risks of maternal smoking during pregnancy with those of paternal smoking during pregnancy. With a causal intrauterine effect, no independent association should be observed between paternal smokin...

  9. Short- and long-term reproductive effects of prenatal and lactational growth restriction caused by maternal diabetes in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Amorim Elaine MP; Damasceno Débora C; Perobelli Juliana E; Spadotto Raquel; Fernandez Carla DB; Volpato Gustavo T; Kempinas Wilma DG

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background A suboptimal intrauterine environment may have a detrimental effect on gonadal development and thereby increases the risk for reproductive disorders and infertility in adult life. Here, we used uncontrolled maternal diabetes as a model to provoke pre- and perinatal growth restriction and evaluate the sexual development of rat male offspring. Methods Maternal diabetes was induced in the dams through administration of a single i.v. dose of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin, 7 days bef...

  10. The Effects of Paternal Support and Maternal Support on Vocational Exploration and Commitment of Taiwanese College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Hua Mao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of paternal support and maternal support on the Vocational Exploration and commitment to career choices of 368 Taiwanese college students were examined. Based on an integrative literature review, this study designed four constructs pertaining to paternal/maternal support: emotional support, information provision, esteem and autonomy support, and tangible assistance. The Commitment to Career Choices Scale (CCCS) was divided to two dimensions: a Vocational exploration...

  11. The effect of maternal common mental disorders on infant undernutrition in Butajira, Ethiopia: The P-MaMiE study

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulahi Abdulreshid; Aray Mesfin; Worku Bogale; Lakew Zufan; Tesfaye Fikru; Alem Atalay; Dewey Michael; Hanlon Charlotte; Medhin Girmay; Tomlinson Mark; Hughes Marcus; Patel Vikram; Prince Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although maternal common mental disorder (CMD) appears to be a risk factor for infant undernutrition in South Asian countries, the position in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is unclear Methods A population-based cohort of 1065 women, in the third trimester of pregnancy, was identified from the demographic surveillance site (DSS) in Butajira, to investigate the effect of maternal CMD on infant undernutrition in a predominantly rural Ethiopian population. Participants were intervi...

  12. Effects of Maternal Nicotine Exposure on Expression of Laminin Alpha 5 in Lung Tissue of Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal smoking has been clearly demonstrated to be associated with increased health problems in infants and children. Nicotine is the chemical substance with high level of toxicity. It crosses through the placenta and accumulates in the developing organs of fetus. Previous investigation indicated that maternal nicotine exposures induce decreased fibronectin expression in lung parenchyma. In this study, the effect of maternal nicotine exposure on laminin expression of the newborn mice lungs has been evaluated. Female pregnant Balb/C mice were divided randomly in to four groups as fallow: Experimental group1 (Exp D1; was received 3 mg kg-1 nicotine intra peritoneal injection (IP from gestational day 7 (GD7 to the last day of pregnancy, Experimental group 2 (Exp D14; was received 3 mg kg-1 nicotine from GD7 to postnatal day 14, Groups 3 and 4; as sham control groups (Sha-Con were received the same volume (3 mg kg-1 of normal saline parallel to experimental groups. At the end of exposure times, all of newborns were anesthetized; their lungs were removed and prepared for immunohistochemical method and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The finding indicated that laminin alpha 5 (Lama5 mRNA expressions in the lung of newborn in the nicotine treated Exp D1 decreased by 0.63 fold but increased in Exp D14 by 1.57 fold comparing to Sh-Con groups. Lama5 immunoreactivity was not similar in different parts of the lungs including alveoli and bronchiole, having a significant increase in the experimental groups in contrast to the Sh-Con groups. However, increase in immunoreactivity observed more in Exp D14. Immunoreactivity intensity in small vessels of all experimental groups was not significantly different. These data also indicate that maternal nicotine exposure may induce abnormal laminin expression which may cause defects in lung function during life time.

  13. Effects of intrapartum maternal glucose infusion on the normal fetus and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola, J; Grylack, L J; Scanlon, J W

    1982-01-01

    The effect of maternal intravenous glucose infusion on the newborn's glucose, insulin, and neurobehavioral performance was studied prospectively in 56 normal mother-newborn pairs. Maternal blood glucose levels at the time of delivery, umbilical venous blood glucose and insulin levels, and neonatal blood glucose levels were measured. Neurobehavioral assessment of the newborns was performed at 4 and 24 hours of life. The median value for total amount of glucose infused to the mother was 32.5 g, the median rate of glucose infusion was 8 g/h, and the median maternal blood glucose concentration at delivery was 110 mg/dl. Median umbilical venous blood glucose concentrations were 104 mg/dl and median insulin concentration was 15 microunits/ml. Six babies were hypoglycemic at 1 hour of age. Umbilical venous glucose and insulin levels correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the rate of glucose infusion to the mother and her blood glucose level. The incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia was significantly related (p less than 0.05) to a maternal blood glucose level greater than 120 mg/dl, to a glucose infusion rate of 20 g/hr or greater and to an umbilical venous insulin level of greater than 40 microunits/ml. There were no major differences in neurobehavior that distinguished hypoglycemic neonates. It is recommended that the normal parturient be given less than 20 g/hr of intravenous glucose before delivery and have a blood glucose level less than 120 mg/dl at the time of delivery. Newborns delivered to mothers with hyperglycemia or excessive glucose infusion should be tested for hypoglycemia at 1 and 2 hours of age. PMID:7032366

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support System in Improving Maternal Health Care in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalaba, Maxwell Ayindenaba; Akweongo, Patricia; Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Saronga, Happiness Pius; Williams, John; Blank, Antje; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Sauerborn, Rainer; Loukanova, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider’s perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out. Results Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC) in the intervention health centres (before-intervention= 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention= 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value=0.010). In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention= 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value=0.305). Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost –effectiveness ratio) decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention) to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention). Incremental cost –effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS), cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285. Conclusions Computer –assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether the additional benefit is worth the additional cost. PMID:25974093

  15. Effects of Home Visitation on Maternal Competencies, Family Environment, and Child Development: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierau, Susan; Dähne, Verena; Brand, Tilman; Kurtz, Vivien; von Klitzing, Kai; Jungmann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Based on the US Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) program, the German home visiting program "Pro Kind" offered support for socially and financially disadvantaged first-time mothers from pregnancy until the children's second birthday. A multi-centered, longitudinal randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess its effectiveness on mothers and children. A total of 755 women with multiple risk factors were recruited, 394 received regular home visits (treatment group), while 361 only had access to standard community services (control group). Program influences on family environment (e.g., quality of home, social support), maternal competencies (e.g., maternal self-efficacy, empathy, parenting style), and child development (e.g., cognitive and motor development) were assessed from mothers' program intake in pregnancy to children's second birthday based on self-reports in regular interviews and developmental tests. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models showed small, but significant positive treatment effects on parental self-efficacy, and marginally significant effects on social support, and knowledge on child rearing. Maternal stress, self-efficacy, and feelings of attachment in the TG tend to show a more positive development over time. Subgroup effects were found for high-risk mothers in the TG, who reported more social support over time and, generally, had children with higher developmental scores compared to their CG counterparts. Post hoc analyses of implementation variables revealed the quality of the helping relationship as a significant indicator of treatment effects. Results are discussed in terms of implementation and public policy differences between NFP and Pro Kind. PMID:26103919

  16. Effect of cocaine on periadolescent rats with or without early maternal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planeta, C S; Marin, M T

    2002-11-01

    Cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and weight loss were investigated in periadolescent Wistar rats kept with their mothers or subjected to repeated maternal separation. Litters allocated to the separation procedure were placed in a temperature-controlled (33 degrees C) chamber for 3 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P20. Non-handled rats were left undisturbed until weaning. Treatments were started on P30-31 and the test was performed on P36-37. Animals received injections of saline or cocaine (10 mg/kg, sc) twice daily for 5 days. On day 6 all animals received saline. On day 7 animals were challenged with 10 mg/kg cocaine and their locomotion was evaluated in activity cages. A third group received saline throughout the 7-day period. Body weights were recorded on P30-31 and P36-37. Two-way ANOVA on body weights showed a main effect of treatment group (F(1,35) = 10.446, P = 0.003; N = 10-12). Non-handled rats treated with cocaine for 5 days gained significantly less weight, while no significant effect was observed in maternally separated rats. Two-way ANOVA revealed a main effect of drug treatment on locomotor activity (F(2,32) = 15.209, P<0.001; N = 6-8), but not on rearing condition (F(1,32)<0.001, P = 0.998). Animals pretreated with cocaine showed a clear behavioral sensitization relative to the saline group. No difference in the magnitude of sensitization was found between separated and non-handled animals. Only the effect of cocaine on weight gain was significantly affected by repeated episodes of early maternal separation during the pre-weaning period. PMID:12426637

  17. Reexamining the effects of gestational age, fetal growth, and maternal smoking on neonatal mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platt Robert W

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low birth weight ( Methods We derived data on over 10 million singleton live births delivered at ? 24 weeks from the 1998–2000 U.S. natality data files. Nonparametric multivariable logistic regression based on generalized additive models was used to examine neonatal mortality (deaths within the first 28 days in relation to fetal growth (gestational age-specific standardized birth weight, gestational age, and number of cigarettes smoked per day. All analyses were further adjusted for the confounding effects due to maternal age and gravidity. Results The relationship between standardized birth weight and neonatal mortality is nonlinear; mortality is high at low z-score birth weights, drops precipitously with increasing z-score birth weight, and begins to flatten for heavier infants. Gestational age is also strongly associated with mortality, with patterns similar to those of z-score birth weight. Although the direct effect of smoking on neonatal mortality is weak, its effects (on mortality appear to be largely mediated through reduced fetal growth and, to a lesser extent, through shortened gestation. In fact, the association between smoking and reduced fetal growth gets stronger as pregnancies approach term. Conclusions Our study provides important insights regarding the combined effects of fetal growth, gestational age, and smoking on neonatal mortality. The findings suggest that the effect of maternal smoking on neonatal mortality is largely mediated through reduced fetal growth.

  18. PREMIM and EMIM: tools for estimation of maternal, imprinting and interaction effects using multinomial modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howey Richard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we present two new computer tools, PREMIM and EMIM, for the estimation of parental and child genetic effects, based on genotype data from a variety of different child-parent configurations. PREMIM allows the extraction of child-parent genotype data from standard-format pedigree data files, while EMIM uses the extracted genotype data to perform subsequent statistical analysis. The use of genotype data from the parents as well as from the child in question allows the estimation of complex genetic effects such as maternal genotype effects, maternal-foetal interactions and parent-of-origin (imprinting effects. These effects are estimated by EMIM, incorporating chosen assumptions such as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or exchangeability of parental matings as required. Results In application to simulated data, we show that the inference provided by EMIM is essentially equivalent to that provided by alternative (competing software packages such as MENDEL and LEM. However, PREMIM and EMIM (used in combination considerably outperform MENDEL and LEM in terms of speed and ease of execution. Conclusions Together, EMIM and PREMIM provide easy-to-use command-line tools for the analysis of pedigree data, giving unbiased estimates of parental and child genotype relative risks.

  19. Effects of Taurine Supplementation on Hepatic Markers of Inflammation and Lipid Metabolism in Mothers and Offspring in the Setting of Maternal Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Minglan; Clare M. Reynolds; Deborah M. Sloboda; Gray, Clint; Vickers, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with obesity and metabolic disorders in offspring. However, intervention strategies to reverse or ameliorate the effects of maternal obesity on offspring health are limited. Following maternal undernutrition, taurine supplementation can improve outcomes in offspring, possibly via effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The effects of taurine in mediating inflammatory processes as a protective mechanism has not been investigated. Further, the effica...

  20. Developmental Timing of the Effects of Maternal Care on Gene Expression and Epigenetic Regulation of Hormone Receptor Levels in Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Peña, Catherine Jensen; Neugut, Y. Dana; Champagne, Frances A.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal care experienced during postnatal development has enduring effects on neuroendocrine function and behavior. Previous studies in rats have illustrated the effect of maternal licking/grooming (LG) on hormone receptors and maternal behavior of adult female offspring associated with altered DNA methylation. However, the developmental timing of these effects, which provide insight into the cellular and molecular pathways through which early experience alters later behavior, had not been e...

  1. A life-history evaluation of the impact of maternal effects on recruitment and fisheries reference points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calduch-Verdiell, Núria; MacKenzie, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Fishing causes dramatic changes in the age and size structure of fish stocks. In particular, the targeting of the largest and oldest individuals in a stock changes the age and size distribution of that stock. A large female produces a higher quantity of eggs than a young female because of its larger size, but recent laboratory evidence further indicates that large females also produce eggs of higher quality, a phenomenon known as maternal effects. However, most traditional management models assume that all female fish contribute equally per unit biomass to future recruitment. Here we investigate whether this assumption is valid by calculating the impact of maternal effects both before and after accounting for density-dependent effects. We find that the contribution of large individuals to reproduction is much more pronounced for unfished than for fished stocks. Fisheries reference points are largely unaffected by maternal effects. Our results indicate that the incorporation of maternal effects into impact assessments of fisheries is not expected to change advice substantially. Important exceptions are stocks whose demography is very vulnerable to fishing (and which therefore have low fishing reference points) for which maternal effects are relevant and necessary to consider.

  2. A Maternal-Effect Sex-Transformation Mutant of the Housefly, MUSCA DOMESTICA L

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Hiroyoshi, Toshiki

    1986-01-01

    A maternal-effect sex-transformation mutant, transformer (tra), of the housefly is described. It is located on autosome 4 in close linkage with the Ba locus. Normally, the sex of Musca domestica is determined by the presence or absence of an epistatic factor, M. When produced by tra/tra mothers, a large fraction of the tra/tra genotypic female progeny carrying no M factors are transformed to develop into intersexes or fertile phenotypic males. The tra/+ progeny are also transformed, but le...

  3. X chromosome effect on maternal recombination and meiotic drive in the mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    de La Casa-Esperón, Elena; Loredo-Osti, J Concepción; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Briscoe, Tammi L; Malette, Jan Michel; Vaughan, Joe E.; Morgan, Kenneth; Sapienza, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    We observed that maternal meiotic drive favoring the inheritance of DDK alleles at the Om locus on mouse chromosome 11 was correlated with the X chromosome inactivation phenotype of (C57BL/6-Pgk1(a) x DDK)F(1) mothers. The basis for this unexpected observation appears to lie in the well-documented effect of recombination on meiotic drive that results from nonrandom segregation of chromosomes. Our analysis of genome-wide levels of meiotic recombination in females that vary in their X-inactivat...

  4. Effect of Source and Level of Maternal Vitamin D on Carryover to Newly Hatched Chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, F.; Wang, Z; S. Cerate; Cesar Coto; P.W. Waldroup

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the carryover effect of maternal vitamin D level and source on performance and bone development of the progeny. Breeder hens were fed a vitamin D deficient diet for two months to deplete stores. After this period, experimental diets in a factorial arrangement were fed to the hens with five levels of cholecalciferol (0, 300, 600, 1200 and 2400 IU/kg) and two levels of 25OHD3 (HyD) (0 and 68 ?g/kg) for a total of 10 treatments. At the end of two months on the e...

  5. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    OpenAIRE

    Thwaites, CL; Beeching, NJ; Newton, CR

    2014-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surve...

  6. Effects of maternal smoking and exposure to methylmercury on brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentrations in umbilical cord serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spulber, Stefan; Rantamäki, Tomi

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin essential for neuronal survival and differentiation. We examined the concentration of BDNF in cord serum from newborns exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in utero by maternal consumption of whale meat. The cohort consisted of 395 singleton births (206 boys and 189 girls), gestational age ranging from 38 to 42 weeks. Serum BDNF was measured by sandwich ELISA. Maternal smoking habits and other relevant factors were obtained by interviewing the mothers. The exposure to MeHg was estimated from Hg concentrations in cord blood, whereas exposure to PCB was estimated based on maternal serum concentrations. Only MeHg exposure affected the serum BDNF, which decreased in a concentration-dependent manner in girls born to nonsmoking mothers. Maternal smoking significantly increased BNDF in girls but not in boys. For further statistical analyses, we used the serum BDNF concentration as a continuous outcome variable in supervised regression models. Serum BDNF concentration increased with gestational age, increased by maternal smoking, decreased slightly with MeHg exposure, and maternal smoking enhanced the decrease in serum BDNF induced by MeHg exposure. Cord blood BDNF has been reported to increase in association with perinatal brain injuries and has been proposed as a possible predictive marker of neurodevelopmental outcomes. The negative effect that MeHg seems to exert on cord blood BDNF concentration could endanger compensatory responses to an adverse impact and therefore deserves attention.

  7. Maternal transfer of methimazole and effects on thyroid hormone availability in embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herck, Stijn L J; Geysens, Stijn; Bald, Edward; Chwatko, Grazyna; Delezie, Evelyne; Dianati, Elham; Ahmed, R G; Darras, Veerle M

    2013-07-01

    Methimazole (MMI) is an anti-thyroid drug used in the treatment of chronic hyperthyroidism. There is, however, some debate about its use during pregnancy as MMI is known to cross the mammalian placenta and reach the developing foetus. A similar problem occurs in birds, where MMI is deposited in the egg and taken up by the developing embryo. To investigate whether maternally derived MMI can have detrimental effects on embryonic development, we treated laying hens with MMI (0.03% in drinking water) and measured total and reduced MMI contents in the tissues of hens and embryos at different stages of development. In hens, MMI was selectively increased in the thyroid gland, while its levels in the liver and especially brain remained relatively low. Long-term MMI treatment induced a pronounced goitre with a decrease in thyroxine (T?) content but an increase in thyroidal 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T?) content. This resulted in normal T? levels in tissues except in the brain. In chicken embryos, MMI levels were similar in the liver and brain. They gradually decreased during development but always remained above those in the corresponding maternal tissues. Contrary to the situation in hens, T? availability was only moderately affected in embryos. Peripheral T? levels were reduced in 14-day-old embryos but normal in 18-day-old embryos, while brain T? content was decreased at all embryonic stages tested. We conclude that all embryonic tissues are exposed to relatively high doses of MMI and its oxidised metabolites. The effect of maternal MMI treatment on embryonic thyroid hormone availability is most pronounced for brain T? content, which is reduced throughout the embryonic development period. PMID:23608220

  8. Development of Infant Positive Emotionality: The Contribution of Maternal Characteristics and Effects on Subsequent Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgett, David J.; Laake, Lauren M.; Gartstein, Maria A.; Dorn, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the influence of maternal characteristics on the development of infant smiling and laughter, a marker of early positive emotionality (PE) and how maternal characteristics and the development of infant PE contributed to subsequent maternal parenting. One hundred fifty-nine mothers with 4-month-old infants participated.…

  9. Effect of maternal exercise on biochemical parameters in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Thiago Beltram; de Lemos Rodrigues, Patrícia Idalina; Miguel, Patrícia Maidana; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Pereira Silva, Lenir Orlandi; Matté, Cristiane

    2015-10-01

    Pregnancy is a critical period for brain metabolic programming, being affected by individual environment, such as nutrition, stress, and physical exercise. In this context, we previously reported a cerebral antioxidant upregulation and mitochondrial biogenesis in the offspring delivered from exercised mothers, which could provide neuroprotection against neonatal insults. Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) encephalopathy is one of the most studied models of neonatal brain injury; disrupting motor, cognitive, and learning abilities. Physiopathology includes oxidative stress, allied to mitochondria energy production failure, glutamatergic excitotoxicity, and cell death. In this study we evaluated the effect of maternal swimming during pregnancy on offspring?s brain oxidative status evaluated fourteen days after HI stablishment. Swimming exercise was performed by female adult rats one week before and during pregnancy, in controlled environment. Their offspring was submitted to HI on postnatal day 7, and the brain samples for biochemical assays were obtained in the weaning. Contrary to our expectations, maternal exercise did not prevent the oxidative alterations observed in brain from HI-rats. In a general way, we found a positive modulation in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, measured two weeks after HI, in hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum of pups delivered from exercised mothers. Reactive species levels were modulated differently in each structure evaluated. Considering the scenery presented, we concluded that HI elicited a neurometabolic adaptation in both brain hemispheres, particularly in hippocampus, parietal cortex, and cerebellum; while striatum appears to be most damaged. The protocol of aerobic maternal exercise was not enough to fully prevent HI-induced brain damages. PMID:26119914

  10. Effect of maternal autonomy and relatedness and borderline personality disorder on adolescent symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel-Waldheter, Miriam; Macfie, Jenny; Strimpfel, Jennifer M; Watkins, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Several theories propose a relationship between deficits in autonomy and relatedness and the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Empirical work supports relationships between maternal BPD and adolescent symptomatology, as well as between maternal autonomy and relatedness and adolescent symptomatology. However, no study has examined how individuals with BPD differ from normative comparisons on autonomy and relatedness, or whether mothers' BPD mediates the relationship between their autonomy and relatedness and their adolescents' symptomatology. We sampled 28 mothers with BPD and their adolescents aged 14-17 years, as well as 28 normative comparisons matched on demographic variables. We assessed BPD as a categorical diagnosis and along a continuum of self-reported borderline features. In a videotaped problem-solving interaction, controlling for current major depressive disorder, mothers with BPD were less likely to promote and more likely to inhibit relatedness, and they were marginally more likely to inhibit but equally likely to promote autonomy with their adolescents. Mothers' total borderline features mediated the relationship between mothers' promotion of autonomy plus relatedness and adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptoms (anxious depression, withdrawn depression, somatic problems, rule breaking, and aggression) and adolescent borderline features (affective instability and self-harm). Mothers' total borderline features also mediated the relationship between mothers' inhibition of autonomy plus relatedness and adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptoms (anxious depression, withdrawn depression, somatic problems, and aggression but not rule breaking) and adolescent borderline features (affective instability and self-harm). We discuss findings in terms of light shed on BPD and the effect of maternal BPD on adolescent development. PMID:25867839

  11. Effect of birth weight, maternal education and prenatal smoking on offspring intelligence at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Kaja; Rahu, Mati; Pullmann, Helle; Allik, Jüri

    2010-08-01

    To examine the combined effect of birth weight, mothers' education and prenatal smoking on psychometrically measured intelligence at school age 1,822 children born in 1992-1999 and attending the first six grades from 45 schools representing all of the fifteen Estonian counties with information on birth weight, gestational age and mother's age, marital status, education, parity and smoking in pregnancy, and intelligence tests were studied. The scores of Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices were related to the birth weight: in the normal range of birth weight (>or=2500 g) every 500 g increase in birth weight was accompanied by around 0.7-point increase in IQ scores. A strong association between birth weight and IQ remained even if gestational age and mother's age, marital status, education, place of residence, parity and smoking during pregnancy have been taken into account. Maternal prenatal smoking was accompanied by a 3.3-point deficit in children's intellectual abilities. Marriage and mother's education had an independent positive correlation with offspring intelligence. We concluded that the statistical effect of birth weight, maternal education and smoking in pregnancy on offspring's IQ scores was remarkable and remained even if other factors have been taken into account. PMID:20634008

  12. Effects of maternal diet and host quality on oviposition patterns and offspring performance in a seed beetle (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Segovia, Ricardo; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    In seed beetles, oviposition decisions may influence the offspring phenotype because eggs constitute the initial resources available for larval development. We tested the effects of host quality variations (small vs. large seeds of the host plant Calystegia sepium, Convolvulaceae) on oviposition patterns and offspring performance of the seed beetle Megacerus eulophus. We also manipulated the maternal diet: high diet quality vs. low diet quality to evaluate possible interactive effects of the maternal nutritional environment and host quality on oviposition patterns. We further assessed the consequences of egg size variation in offspring size. Female M. eulophus fed with high-quality diet (H-diet) laid more eggs and lived longer than females fed with low-quality diet (P-diet). Fecundity decreased under a low-quality host for both maternal diets. The occurrence of maternal environmental effects on egg size plasticity was detected. Under conditions of low-quality host, mothers fed with the high-quality diet produced bigger eggs in comparison with a high-quality host, whereas females fed with the low-quality diet produced smaller ones. Regardless of these differences observed in egg size depending on the maternal diet, progeny emerging from small seeds (low-quality host) showed a similar performance at emergence. Offspring traits were only significantly affected by host quality. Beetles emerging from large seeds had greater body weight and length than those reared on small seeds. Variations in oviposition patterns in response to host quality are discussed.

  13. Neuroanatomical substrates of the disruptive effect of olanzapine on rat maternal behavior as revealed by c-Fos immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changjiu; Li, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Olanzapine is one of the most widely prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia. Besides its well-known side effect on weight gain, it may also impair human parental behavior. In this study, we took a preclinical approach to examine the behavioral effects of olanzapine on rat maternal behavior and investigated the associated neural basis using the c-Fos immunohistochemistry. On postpartum days 6-8, Sprague-Dawley mother rats were given a single injection of sterile water or olanzapine (1.0, 3.0 or 5.0mg/kg, sc). Maternal behavior was tested 2h later, after which rats were sacrificed and brain tissues were collected. Ten brain regions that were either implicated in the action of antipsychotic drugs and/or in the regulation of maternal behavior were examined for c-Fos immunoreactivity. Acute olanzapine treatment dose-dependently disrupted various components of maternal behavior (e.g., pup retrieval, pup licking, nest building, crouching) and increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens shell and core (NAs and NAc), dorsolateral striatum (DLSt), ventral lateral septum (LSv), central amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), important brain areas generally implicated in the incentive motivation and reward processing. In contrast, olanzapine treatment did not alter c-Fos in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (vBST) and medial amygdala (MeA), the core brain areas directly involved in the mediation of rat maternal behavior. These findings suggest that olanzapine disrupts rat maternal behavior primarily by suppressing incentive motivation and reward processing via its action on the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems, other limbic and striatal areas, but not by disrupting the core processes involved in the mediation of maternal behavior in particular. PMID:22960130

  14. Effects of postpartum anxiety disorders and depression on maternal self-confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Corinna; Noe, Daniela; Gerstenlauer, Jakob; Stehle, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Low maternal self-confidence may damage the early mother-infant relationship and negatively influence infant development. The goal of this study was to test whether a current and previous history of DSM-IV anxiety and depressive disorders is associated with maternal self-confidence two weeks after delivery. Postpartum anxiety disorder and depression was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria in a community sample of 798 women. The data showed a significant link between current postpartum anxiety and depressive disorders and maternal self-confidence. Furthermore, women with a depression or anxiety disorder in their previous psychiatric history scored lower in maternal self-confidence. There is a need for appropriate preventive programmes to promote maternal self-confidence. With such programmes it is possible to prevent infant developmental disorders which might result from reduced feelings of maternal self-confidence and associated maternal interaction behaviour. PMID:22261433

  15. Genome wide study of maternal and parent-of-origin effects on the etiology of orofacial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Min; Murray, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We performed a genome wide association analysis of maternally-mediated genetic effects and parent-of-origin (POO) effects on risk of orofacial clefting (OC) using over 2,000 case-parent triads collected through an international cleft consortium. We used log-linear regression models to test individual SNPs. For SNPs with a P-value

  16. Effects of Child Psychopathology on Maternal Depression: The Mediating Role of Child-Related Acute and Chronic Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposa, Elizabeth B.; Hammen, Constance L.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    In light of recent research highlighting the potential effects of children's behavior on mothers' mental health, the current study examined 679 mothers and their adolescent children from a community-based sample to determine the effects of youth psychopathology on maternal depression and levels of child-related stress in mothers' lives. It was…

  17. Effectiveness of prenatal screening for Down syndrome on the basis of maternal age in Cape Town

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M F, Urban; C, Stewart; T, Ruppelt; L, Geerts.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The prenatal screening programme for Down syndrome (DS) in the South African public health sector remains primarily based on advanced maternal age (AMA). We assessed the changes over time and effectiveness of this screening programme within a Cape Town health district. METHODS: Retrospect [...] ive analysis of the Groote Schuur Hospital Cytogenetic Laboratory and Pregnancy Counselling Clinic databases and audit of maternal delivery records at a primary health care facility. RESULTS The number of amniocenteses performed for AMA in consecutive 5-year periods reduced progressively from 786 in 1981 - 1985 to 360 in 2001 - 2005. Comparing prenatal with neonatal diagnoses of DS, the absolute number and the proportion diagnosed prenatally have remained relatively constant over time. The Pregnancy Counselling Database showed that, of 507 women receiving genetic counselling for AMA in 2008 - 2009, 158 (31.1%) accepted amniocentesis - uptake has reduced considerably since the early 1990s. The audit of women delivering at a primary care facility found that only 10 (16.4%) of 61 AMA women reached genetic counselling in tertiary care: reasons included late initiation of antenatal care and low referral rates from primary care. CONCLUSION: Prenatal screening and diagnosis for DS based on AMA is working ineffectively in the Cape Town health district assessed, and this appears to be representative of a broader trend in South Africa. Inclusion of fetal ultrasound in the process of prenatal screening for DS should be explored as a way forward.

  18. The genetic control of maternal effects on mutations recovered from X-rayed mature drosophila sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila melanogaster males carrying a ring-X-chromosome were X-rayed and crossed to virgin females of 7 stocks, which had their second and third chromosomes systematically substituted. In the same experiment dominant lethals, sex-chromosome losses, and reciprocal translocations were recorded. Maternal effects on mutation fixation were observable as differences in the mutation frequencies observed with the different types of females. With the set of substitution stocks studied it was found that the maternal genotype strongly influences the frequencies of chromosome losses. The influence on classical chromosome-breakage phenomena, such as dominant lethals and translocations, however, are weak. The differences in the chromosome-loss frequencies may result either from different time intervals between insemination and the beginning of chromosome replication, and/or the efficiency of a repair system. One or more strong genetic factors reponsible for such modifications could be located on the third chromosome. On the second chromosome, at best only weak factors are present. (Auth.)

  19. Embryo transfers between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice: Examination of a maternal effect on ethanol teratogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliam, David

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors influence fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) in both humans and animals. Experiments using inbred and selectively bred mouse stocks that controlled for (1) ethanol dose, (2) maternal and fetal blood ethanol levels, and (3) fetal developmental exposure stage, show genotype can affect teratogenic outcome. Other experiments distinguish the teratogenic effects mediated by maternal genotype from those mediated by fetal genotype. One technique to distinguish maternal versus fe...

  20. Serotonergic and noradrenergic lesions suppress the enhancing effect of maternal exercise during pregnancy on learning and memory in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, M M; Emami-Abarghoie, M; Safari, M; Sadighi-Moghaddam, B; Vafaei, A A; Bandegi, A R; Rashidy-Pour, A

    2008-02-19

    The beneficial effects of exercise on learning and memory are well documented but the effects of prenatal exposure to maternal exercise on offspring are not clear yet. Using a two-trial-per-day Morris water maze for five consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial 2 days later we showed that maternal voluntary exercise (wheel running) by pregnant rats increased the acquisition phase of the pups' learning. Maternal forced swimming by pregnant rats increased both acquisition and retention phases of the pups' learning. Also we found that the rat pups whose mother was submitted to forced-swimming during pregnancy had significantly higher brain, liver, heart and kidney weights compared with their sedentary counterparts. On the other hand we estimated the cell number of different regions of the hippocampus in the rat pups. We found that both exercise models during pregnancy increased the cell number in cornus ammonis subregion 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rat pups. To determine the role that noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors hold in mediation of the maternal exercise in offspring, we used N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) and MK-801 to eliminate or block the above systems, respectively. Blocking the NMDA receptors, significantly abolished learning and memory in rat pups from all three experimental groups. Elimination of noradrenergic or serotonergic input did not significantly attenuate the learning and memory in rat pups whose mothers were sedentary, while it significantly reversed the positive effects of maternal exercise during pregnancy on rat pups' learning and memory. The presented results suggest that noradrenergic and serotonergic systems in offspring brain seem to have a crucial specific role in mediating the effects of maternal physical activity during pregnancy on rat pups' cognitive function in both models of voluntary and forced exercise. PMID:18207332

  1. Maternal immunocompetence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies of distribution patterns of 51Cr-labelled lymphocytes in pregnant mice were designed to explore the effect of pregnancy on the immunologic behaviour of the intact pregnant animal rather than on the isolated maternal lymphocyte. The distribution pattern of 51Cr-labelled syngenic and semiallogenic lymphocytes was studied in intact primigravida mice, and there was no difference between interstrain and intrastrain pregnant mice, and there was no evidence of immunologically specific 'trapping' in the para-aortic lymph nodes draining the interstrain pregnant uterus. There is little evidence that the primigravida animal is even immunologically aware of the 'foreignness'of a semiallogenic fetus. (JIW)

  2. Effect of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on rat maternal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürtz, Nelson; Deis, Ricardo P; Jahn, Graciela A; Duffard, Ricardo; Evangelista de Duffard, Ana María

    2008-05-21

    Exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) has several deleterious effects on the nervous system such as alterations in the concentrations of neurotransmitters in the brain and/or behavioral changes, myelination rate, ganglioside pattern [Bortolozzi, A., Duffard, R., Antonelli, M., Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., 2002. Increased sensitivity in dopamine D(2)-like brain receptors from 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-exposed and amphetamine-challenged rats. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 965, 314-323; Duffard, R., García, G., Rosso, S., Bortolozzi, A., Madariaga, M., DiPaolo, O., Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., 1996. Central nervous system myelin deficit in rats exposed to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid throughout lactation. Neurotoxicol. Teratol. 18, 691-696; Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., Orta, C., Duffard, R., 1990. Behavioral changes in rats fed a diet containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic butyl ester. Neurotoxicology 11, 563-572; Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., Bortolozzi, A., Duffard, R.O., 1995. Altered behavioral responses in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treated and amphetamine challenged rats. Neurotoxicology 16, 479-488; Munro, I.C., Carlo, G.L., Orr, J.C., Sund, K., Wilson, R.M. Kennepohl, E. Lynch, B., Jablinske, M., Lee, N., 1992. A comprehensive, integrated review and evaluation of the scientific evidence relating to the safety of the herbicide 2,4-D. J. Am. Coll. Toxicol. 11, 559-664; Rosso et al., 2000], and its administration to pregnant and lactating rats adversely affects litter growth and milk quality. Since normal growth of the offspring depends on adequate maternal nursing and care, we evaluated the effect of 2,4-D on rat maternal behavior as well as the dam's monoamine levels in arcuate nucleus (AcN) and serum prolactin (PRL) levels. Wistar dams were exposed to the herbicide through the food from post partum day (PPD) 1 to PPD 7. Dams were fed either with a 2,4-D treated diet (15, 25 or 50mg 2,4-D/kg/daybw) or with a control diet. We observed that maternal nesting behavior was not modified by 2,4-D treatment. However, mother-pup interactions, specially the nursing behavior, were altered. Retrieval, crouching and licking of pups were reduced or suspended after 2,4-D treatment. We also observed an increase in the latency of retrieval and crouching in the dams treated with the herbicide. Dams showed movement along cage peripheries, food consumption during the light phase and high self-grooming. In addition of the deficits observed in maternal behavior parameters, increased catecholamine levels and a drastic decrease in indolamine levels in the AcN of treated dams were determined. Serum PRL levels were also diminished by 62%, 68% and 70% with respect to control dams in the 15, 25 and 50mg 2,4-D/kgbw treated dams, respectively. In conclusion, exposure to 2,4-D during the first post partum days produced changes in maternal behavior, serum prolactin and monoamine levels in the AcN of treated dams. PMID:18420331

  3. Effect of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on rat maternal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) has several deleterious effects on the nervous system such as alterations in the concentrations of neurotransmitters in the brain and/or behavioral changes, myelination rate, ganglioside pattern [Bortolozzi, A., Duffard, R., Antonelli, M., Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., 2002. Increased sensitivity in dopamine D(2)-like brain receptors from 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-exposed and amphetamine-challenged rats. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 965, 314-323; Duffard, R., Garcia, G., Rosso, S., Bortolozzi, A., Madariaga, M., DiPaolo, O., Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., 1996. Central nervous system myelin deficit in rats exposed to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid throughout lactation. Neurotoxicol. Teratol. 18, 691-696; Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., Orta, C., Duffard, R., 1990. Behavioral changes in rats fed a diet containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic butyl ester. Neurotoxicology 11, 563-572; Evangelista de Duffard, A.M., Bortolozzi, A., Duffard, R.O., 1995. Altered behavioral responses in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treated and amphetamine challenged rats. Neurotoxicology 16, 479-488; Munro, I.C., Carlo, G.L., Orr, J.C., Sund, K., Wilson, R.M. Kennepohl, E. Lynch, B., Jablinske, M., Lee, N., 1992. A comprehensive, integrated review and evaluation of the scientific evidence relating to the safety of the herbicide 2,4-D. J. Am. Coll. Toxicol. 11, 559-664; Rosso et al., 2000], and its administration to pregnant and lactating rats adversely affects litter growth and milk quality. Since normal growth of the offspring depends on adequate maternal nursing and care, we evaluated the effect of 2,4-D on rat maternal behavior as well as the dam's monoamine levels in arcuate nucleus (AcN) and serum prolactin (PRL) levels. Wistar dams were exposed to the herbicide through the food from post partum day (PPD) 1 to PPD 7. Dams were fed either with a 2,4-D treated diet (15, 25 or 50 mg 2,4-D/kg/day bw) or with a control diet. We observed that maternal nesting behavior was not modified by 2,4-D treatment. However, mother-pup interactions, specially the nursing behavior, were altered. Retrieval, crouching and licking of pups were reduced or suspended after 2,4-D treatment. We also observed an increase in the latency of retrieval and crouching in the dams treated with the herbicide. Dams showed movement along cage peripheries, food consumption during the light phase and high self-grooming. In addition of the deficits observed in maternal behavior parameters, increased catecholamine levels and a drastic decrease in indolamine levels in the AcN of treated dams were determined. Serum PRL levels were also diminished by 62%, 68% and 70% with respect to control dams in the 15, 25 and 50 mg 2,4-D/kg bw treated dams, respectively. In conclusion, exposure to 2,4-D during the first post partum days produced changes in maternal behavior, serum prolactin and monoamine levels in the AcN of treated dams

  4. Cholecystokinin modulation of maternal behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Freitas Felicio; Aline Mello Cruz; Mariana Schroeder; Aron Weller

    2013-01-01

    Maternal behavior is regulated by several neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and hormones. This mini-review focuses on the role of cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuropeptide and gut hormone best known as a satiety signal, in mediating maternal behavior. In addition to the role of CCK in the infant in mother-infant interactions, maternal CCK appears to also be important. We discuss maternal behavior research, mainly in rats, that has examined the effect of administering CCK to dams, CCK-opioid in...

  5. Strain-dependent effects of prenatal maternal immune activation on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babri, Shirin; Doosti, Mohammad-Hossein; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2014-03-01

    There is converging evidence that prenatal maternal infection can increase the risk of occurrence of neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, autism, anxiety and depression in later life. Experimental studies have shown conflicting effects of prenatal maternal immune activation on anxiety-like behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis development in offspring. We investigated the effects of maternal immune activation during pregnancy on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in pregnant mice and their offspring to determine whether these effects are dependent on strain. NMRI and C57BL/6 pregnant mice were treated with either saline or lipopolysaccharide on gestational day 17 and then interleukin (IL)-6 and corticosterone (COR) levels; anxiety or depression in the pregnant mice and their offspring were evaluated. The results indicate that maternal inflammation increased the levels of COR and anxiety-like behavior in NMRI pregnant mice, but not in C57BL/6 dams. Our data also demonstrate that maternal inflammation elevated the levels of anxiety-and depression-like behaviors in NMRI offspring on the elevated plus-maze, elevated zero-maze, tail suspension test and forced swimming test respectively, but not in the open field and light-dark box. In addition, we did not find any significant change in anxiety- and depression-like behaviors of adult C57BL/6 offspring. Our findings suggest that prenatal maternal immune activation can alter the HPA axis activity, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in a strain- and task-dependent manner in offspring and further comprehensive studies are needed to prove the causal relationship between the findings found here and to validate their relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. PMID:24326014

  6. Father involvement moderates the effect of maternal depression during a child's infancy on child behavior problems in kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezulis, Amy H; Hyde, Janet Shibley; Clark, Roseanne

    2004-12-01

    This research investigated whether father involvement in infancy may reduce or exacerbate the well-established adverse effect of maternal depression during a child's infancy on behavior problems in childhood. In a community sample (N = 350), the authors found that fathers' self-reported parenting styles interacted with the amount of time fathers spent caring for their infants to moderate the longitudinal effect of maternal depression during the child's infancy on children's internalizing, but not externalizing, behaviors. Low to medium amounts of high-warmth father involvement and high amounts of medium- or high-control father involvement at this time were associated with lower child internalizing behaviors. Paternal depression during a child's infancy exacerbated the effect of maternal depression, but this moderating effect was limited to depressed fathers spending medium to high amounts of time caring for their infants. Results emphasize the moderating role fathers may play in reducing or exacerbating the adverse long-term effects of maternal depression during a child's infancy on later child behavior problems. PMID:15598163

  7. Maternal Avoidant Coping Mediates the Effect of Parenting Stress on Depressive Symptoms during Early Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Steeger, Christine M.; Gondoli, Dawn M.; Morrissey, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined maternal avoidant coping as a mediator between maternal parenting stress and maternal depressive symptoms during early adolescence. Three years of self-report data were collected from 173 mothers, beginning when mothers’ adolescents were in 6th grade and aged 11–13 years. Utilizing longitudinal path analysis, results indicated that avoidant coping at time two mediated the association between parenting stress at time one and depressive symptoms at time three. Additionally, the reve...

  8. Imprinting effects of maternal water deprivation during late gestation on fetal and offspring RAS in the rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the imprinting effect of maternal water deprivation during late gestation on fetal and offspring renin-angiotensin system ( RAS) in the rats. Methods: After three days of maternal water deprivation during late gestation, fetal heart, kidney, placenta and body dry, wet weight as well as body and tail length were examined. Both fetal and offspring plasma angiotensin (Ang) II concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Angiotensinogen (ATG) mRNA in the fetal and offspring liver and cardiovascular responses to intravenous injection of Ang II were also determined by real-time PCR. Results: Maternal water deprivation during late gestation significantly decreased heart, kidney, and body dry and wet weight ,the length of the fetal body and tail (P 0. 05), and increased fetal plasma Ang II concentration (P imprintingeffect of diseases in fetal origins. (authors)

  9. The Effect of Maternal Thyroid Disorders (Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism During Pregnancy and Lactation on Skin Development in Wistar Rat Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Amerion

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Previous studies have shown that thyroid hormones are necessary for normal development of many organs and because of the importance of skin as the largest and the most important organ in human body protection in spite of external environment, the study of thyroid hormones effects on skin development is considerable. In this survey we have tried to study the effects of maternal hypothyroidism on skin development in fetus during pregnancy and lactation by immunohistochemistry technique.   Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into 4 groups, hypothyroids, hyperthyroids, hypothyroids are treated with levothyroxin and a control group. The rat mothers were exposed to PTU with 50 mg/lit dosage and levothyroxin with 1 mg/lit dosage and PTU and levothyroxin simultaneously and with the same dosage respectively in hypothyroid, hyperthyroid and treated hypothyroids with levothyroxin groups. After 14 days, blood sample was taken from mothers, and if thyroid hormones level had change well, mating was allowed. After pregnancy and delivery, 1th day dorsal skin (as the sample for pregnancy assay and 10th day skin (as for lactation assay was used for immunohystochemical and morphometric studies. Results: In this study it was observed that maternal hypothyroidism during pregnancy and lactation causes significant increase in laminin expression, in most areas of skin, and maternal hyperthyroidism during pregnancy and lactation causes significant decrease in laminin expression. Also significant decrease was observed in hair follicles number and epidermis thickness in hypothyroidism groups. Conclusion: This study showed maternal hypothyroidism causes significant decrease in epidermis thickness and hair follicles number and it causes less hair in fetus. Also maternal hypothyroidism causes large changes in laminin expression in different parts of skin. At the same time,maternal hyperthyroidism causes opposite results. In fact, thyroid hormones regulate laminin expression negatively which means increase in thyroid hormone level, decreases laminin expression. So changes in thyroid hormones level can influence skin development significantly.

  10. The Effects of Decreasing Maternal Anxiety on Fetal Oxygenation and Nucleated Red Blood Cells Count in the Cord Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Masoudi, Zahra; Akbarzadeh, Marziyeh; Vaziri, Farideh; Zare, Najaf; Ramzi, Mani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Vasoconstriction during anxiety reduces fetal oxygenation and leads to hypoxia. Hypoxia in turn results in increase of the number of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in the cord blood. The present study aimed to assess the effect of decreasing maternal anxiety on fetal oxygenation and NRBCs count in the cord blood.

  11. Maternal Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Discipline: The Effectiveness of a Hands-On Education Program in Positive Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Rachel; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Jacobvitz, Deborah; Hazen-Swann, Nancy; Burton, Rosalinda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined which method is most effective in supporting parents to use positive guidance techniques, a lecture-based only parent training series or a lecture-based plus hands-on parent training series. Maternal characteristics of depression, stress level, and attitudes towards positive guidance were explored as possible moderators. In…

  12. Effect of maternal stress on the stress hormone and growth response of pigs to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed the effect of maternal stress on the stress hormone and growth response of the progeny following an endotoxin challenge. Sows were assigned to one of two treatments (n = 10 per treatment) and subjected to either a daily 5-min restraint stress (stressed; S) from d 84 to d 112 of g...

  13. Maternal transfer of xenobiotics and effects on larval striped bass in the San Francisco Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrach, David J; Low-Marchelli, Janine M; Eder, Kai J; Whiteman, Shaleah J; Zinkl, Joe G

    2008-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems around the world face serious threats from anthropogenic contaminants. Results from 8 years of field and laboratory investigations indicate that sublethal contaminant exposure is occurring in the early life stages of striped bass in the San Francisco Estuary, a population in continual decline since its initial collapse during the 1970s. Biologically significant levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and current-use/legacy pesticides were found in all egg samples from river-collected fish. Developmental changes previously unseen with standard methods were detected with a technique using the principles of unbiased stereology. Abnormal yolk utilization, brain and liver development, and overall growth were observed in larvae from river-collected fish. Histopathological analyses confirmed and identified developmental alterations. Using this methodology enabled us to present a conclusive line of evidence for the maternal transfer of xenobiotics and their adverse effects on larval striped bass in this estuary. PMID:19033204

  14. Partitioning genetic effects due to embryo, cytoplasm and maternal parent for oil content in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jian-Guo, Wu; Chun-Hai, Shi; Hai-Zhen, Zhang.

    Full Text Available Analysis of genetic main effects and genotype x environment (GE) interaction effects on the oil content of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was conducted by using a genetic model for the quantitative traits of seeds in diploid plants. The experiments were carried out over two years with 8 parents an [...] d a diallel mating design, which produced F1 and F2 generations. We found that the oil content of rape was simultaneously controlled by embryo genetic effect, cytoplasmic effects and maternal genetic effect as well as GE interaction effects, with the cytoplasmic and maternal effects playing the main role. The results indicate that selection of maternal plants for high oil content would be more efficient than selection based on single seeds. Since the GE interaction effects accounted for 73.69% of the total genetic effects and were more important than the genetic main effects it seems that selection might be influenced by environmental conditions. The estimate of narrow-sense heritability for oil content was 73.52% with the interaction heritability being larger than the general heritability, indicating that the early generations can be used for selection for high oil content. The prediction of genetic effects suggested that the parent cultivars Youcai 601 and Gaoyou 605 were better than the other cultivars for increasing oil content during the breeding of B. napus. The implications for the quantitative trait loci mapping of seed traits interfered by these three genetic systems is also discussed.

  15. Bringing it all together: effective maternal and child health practice as a means to improve public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Effective maternal and child health (MCH) practice requires skillfully combining a number of theoretical models and frameworks to support systems addressing the health needs of women, children, and families. This paper describes three perspectives relevant to current MCH practice: the federal Maternal & Child Health Bureau's Pyramid of MCH Health Services [1], Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid [Frieden in Am J Public Health 100(4):590-595, (2010)], and life course theory [Halfon in Milbank Quart, 80:433-79, (2002); Kotelchuck in Matern Child Health J, 7:5-11, (2003); Pies (2009)], an emerging conceptual framework that addresses a number of pressing maternal and child health issues including health disparities and the social determinants of health. While developed independently, a synthesis of these three frameworks provides an important analytical perspective to assess the adequacy and comprehensiveness of current public health programs and systems supporting maternal and child health improvement. Synthesizing these frameworks from the specific vantage point of MCH practice provides public health practitioners with important and dynamic opportunities to promote improvements in health, especially for state and local governmental health agencies with the statutory authority and public accountability for improving the health of women, children, and families in their jurisdictions. A crucial finding of this synthesis is that significant improvements in MCH outcomes at the state and local levels are the result of collaborative, integrated, and synergistic implementation of many different interventions, programs and policies that are carried out by a number of stakeholders, and administered in many different settings. MCH programs have a long history of coordinating disparate sectors of the health care and public health enterprise to create systems of services that improve maternal and child health. Future improvements in MCH build on this legacy but will come from a "paradigm shift" in MCH practice that blends (1) evidence-based interventions and best practices that improve the health of individuals, communities, and populations, and crosscuts health service settings with (2) public policies that promote and improve maternal and child health needs at the local, state, and national levels, and (3) supports MCH leadership to implement such changes in MCH systems nationwide. As such, the challenge presented by this synthesis is not merely technical, i.e. having the scientific and organizational capacity to address identified MCH needs. Instead, a more pressing challenge is providing effective leadership in the coordination and integration of these frameworks and using them in practice to develop a vision that guides programs and policies to improve maternal and child health nationwide. PMID:22722915

  16. Methyl donor supplementation in rats reverses the deleterious effect of maternal separation on depression-like behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternain, Laura; Martisova, Eva; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Ramírez, Maria J; Milagro, Fermin I

    2016-02-15

    Adverse early life events are associated with altered stress responsiveness and metabolic disturbances in the adult life. Dietary methyl donor supplementation could be able to reverse the negative effects of maternal separation by affecting DNA methylation in the brain. In this study, maternal separation during lactation reduced body weight gain in the female adult offspring without affecting food intake, and altered total and HDL-cholesterol levels. Also, maternal separation induced a cognitive deficit as measured by NORT and an increase in the immobility time in the Porsolt forced swimming test, consistent with increased depression-like behaviour. An 18-week dietary supplementation with methyl donors (choline, betaine, folate and vitamin B12) from postnatal day 60 also reduced body weight without affecting food intake. Some of the deleterious effects induced by maternal separation, such as the abnormal levels of total and HDL-cholesterol, but especially the depression-like behaviour as measured by the Porsolt test, were reversed by methyl donor supplementation. Also, the administration of methyl donors increased total DNA methylation (measured by immunohistochemistry) and affected the expression of insulin receptor in the hippocampus of the adult offspring. However, no changes were observed in the DNA methylation status of insulin receptor and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter regions in the hypothalamus. In summary, methyl donor supplementation reversed some of the deleterious effects of an early life-induced model of depression in rats and altered the DNA methylation profile in the brain. PMID:26628207

  17. Effects of maternal nutrition and arginine supplementation on postnatal liver and jejunal oxygen consumption and hypothalamic neuropeptide content in ovine offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal nutrient restriction during gestation exerts long-term effects on offspring health and performance. Energy utilized by fetal visceral tissues can be altered in response to changes in maternal feed intake. Prolonged nutritional changes during early pregnancy can impact hypothalamic neuropept...

  18. Protective Effect of Pregnancy in Rural South Africa: Questioning the Concept of “Indirect Cause” of Maternal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garenne, Michel; Kahn, Kathleen; Collinson, Mark; Gómez-Olivé, Xavier; Tollman, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of the level and composition of maternal mortality depends on the definition used, with inconsistencies leading to inflated rates and invalid comparisons across settings. This study investigates the differences in risk of death for women in their reproductive years during and outside the maternal risk period (pregnancy, delivery, puerperium), focusing on specific causes of infectious, non-communicable and external causes of death after separating out direct obstetrical causes. Methods Data on all deaths of women aged 15–49 years that occurred in the Agincourt sub-district between 1992 and 2010 were obtained from the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance system (HDSS) located in rural South Africa. Causes of death were assessed using a validated verbal autopsy instrument. Analysis included 2170 deaths, of which 137 occurred during the maternal risk period. Findings Overall, women had significantly lower mortality during the maternal risk period than outside it (age-standardized RR?=?0.75; 95% CI?=?0.63–0.89). This was true in most age groups with the exception of adolescents aged 15–19 years where the risk of death was higher. Mortality from most causes, other than obstetric causes, was lower during the maternal risk period except for malaria, cardiovascular diseases and violence where there were no differences. Lower mortality was significant for HIV/AIDS (RR?=?0.29, P<0.0001), cancers (RR?=?0.10, P<0.023), and accidents (RR?=?0, P<0.0001). Interpretation In this rural setting typical of much of Southern Africa, pregnancy was largely protective against the risk of death, most likely because of a strong selection effect amongst those women who conceived successfully. The concept of indirect cause of maternal death needs to be re-examined. PMID:23675536

  19. Maternal Smoking before and after Pregnancy: Effects on Behavioral Outcomes in Middle Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, David M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the extent to which maternal smoking before and after pregnancy was associated with disruptive behaviors in childhood. When confounding factors were removed, found that maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a small but statistically detectable increase in problem behaviors. Smoking after pregnancy was not associated with…

  20. Adverse Effects of Heavy Prenatal Maternal Smoking on Attentional Control in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Maria G.; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Katsovich, Liliya; Thompson, Nancy; Scahill, Lawrence; King, Robert A.; Peterson, Bradley S.; Schultz, Robert T.; Leckman, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Exposure to heavy maternal cigarette smoking in pregnancy and severe maternal psychosocial stress during pregnancy appear to be important risk factors for the development of ADHD. This study aimed to determine whether these perinatal risk factors were associated with neuropsychological deficits commonly seen in ADHD. Method: We examined…

  1. Repercussões maternas e perinatais da hidroterapia na gravidez Maternal and perinatal effects of hydrotherapy in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Terezinha Scudeller Prevedel

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estudar os efeitos maternos (composição corporal e capacidade cardiovascular e perinatais (peso e prematuridade da prática da hidroterapia na gestação. MÉTODOS: estudo prospectivo, coorte, aleatorizado, com 41 gestantes de baixo risco e gestação única, praticantes (grupo estudo, n=22 e não-praticantes (grupo controle, n=19 de hidroterapia. Avaliações antropométricas definiram-se os índices de peso corporal, massa magra e gordura absoluta e relativa. Por teste ergométrico, definiu-se os índices de consumo máximo de oxigênio(VO2máx, volume sistólico (VS e débito cardíaco (DC. Como resultado perinatal observaram-se ocorrência de prematuridade e recém-nascidos pequenos para a idade gestacional. Compararam-se os índices iniciais e finais entre e dentro de cada grupo. As variáveis maternas foram avaliadas pelo teste t para amostras dependentes e independentes e empregou-se o chi ² para estudo das proporções. RESULTADOS: a comparação entre os grupos não evidenciou diferença significativa nas variáveis maternas no início e no final da hidroterapia. A comparação dentro de cada grupo confirmou efeito benéfico da hidroterapia: no grupo estudo os índices de gordura relativa foram mantidos (29,0% e no grupo controle aumentaram de 28,8 para 30,7%; o grupo estudo manteve os índices de VO2máx (35,0% e aumentou VS (106,6 para 121,5 e DC de (13,5 para 15,1; no grupo controle observaram-se queda nos índices de VO2máx e manutenção de VS e de DC. A hidroterapia não interferiu nos resultados perinatais, relacionados à prematuridade e baixo peso ao nascimento. CONCLUSÕES: a hidroterapia favoreceu adequada adaptação metabólica e cardiovascular materna à gestação e não determinou prematuridade e baixo peso nos recém-nascidos.PURPOSE: to study maternal (body composition and cardiovascular capacity and perinatal (weight and prematurity effects of hydrotherapy during pregnancy. METHODS: a prospective, random cohort study, with 41 low-risk pregnant women in their first pregnancy, practicing (study group, n=22 and not (control group, n=19 hydrotherapy. Anthropometric evaluation was used to assess lean mass, and absolute and relative body fat. Ergometric tests were used for maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max, stroke volume (SV and cardiac output (CO. Perinatal results showed premature births and small for gestational age newborns. Initial and final indexes within and between groups were compared. Maternal variables were evaluated using the t test for dependent and independent values; the chi ² test was used to study proportions. RESULTS: there were no significant differences between the groups for maternal variables at the start and end of hydrotherapy. Comparison within each group confirmed the beneficial effect of hydrotherapy. In the study group, relative fat index was maintained at 29.0%; the control group showed an increase from 28.8% to 30.7%; the study group maintained VO2max at 35%, and increased SV from 106.6 to 121.5 and CO from 13.5 to 15.1; the control group showed a drop in VO2max and no change in SV and CO. There was no relationship between hydrotherapy and perinatal results. CONCLUSIONS: hydrotherapy adequately assisted metabolic and cardiovascular maternal adaptation to pregnancy and did not cause prematurity or weight loss in newborns.

  2. Repercussões maternas e perinatais da hidroterapia na gravidez / Maternal and perinatal effects of hydrotherapy in pregnancy

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tânia Terezinha Scudeller, Prevedel; Iracema de Mattos Paranhos, Calderon; Marta Helena, De Conti; Elenice Bertanha, Consonni; Marilza Vieira Cunha, Rudge.

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estudar os efeitos maternos (composição corporal e capacidade cardiovascular) e perinatais (peso e prematuridade) da prática da hidroterapia na gestação. MÉTODOS: estudo prospectivo, coorte, aleatorizado, com 41 gestantes de baixo risco e gestação única, praticantes (grupo estudo, n=22) e [...] não-praticantes (grupo controle, n=19) de hidroterapia. Avaliações antropométricas definiram-se os índices de peso corporal, massa magra e gordura absoluta e relativa. Por teste ergométrico, definiu-se os índices de consumo máximo de oxigênio(VO2máx), volume sistólico (VS) e débito cardíaco (DC). Como resultado perinatal observaram-se ocorrência de prematuridade e recém-nascidos pequenos para a idade gestacional. Compararam-se os índices iniciais e finais entre e dentro de cada grupo. As variáveis maternas foram avaliadas pelo teste t para amostras dependentes e independentes e empregou-se o chi ² para estudo das proporções. RESULTADOS: a comparação entre os grupos não evidenciou diferença significativa nas variáveis maternas no início e no final da hidroterapia. A comparação dentro de cada grupo confirmou efeito benéfico da hidroterapia: no grupo estudo os índices de gordura relativa foram mantidos (29,0%) e no grupo controle aumentaram de 28,8 para 30,7%; o grupo estudo manteve os índices de VO2máx (35,0%) e aumentou VS (106,6 para 121,5) e DC de (13,5 para 15,1); no grupo controle observaram-se queda nos índices de VO2máx e manutenção de VS e de DC. A hidroterapia não interferiu nos resultados perinatais, relacionados à prematuridade e baixo peso ao nascimento. CONCLUSÕES: a hidroterapia favoreceu adequada adaptação metabólica e cardiovascular materna à gestação e não determinou prematuridade e baixo peso nos recém-nascidos. Abstract in english PURPOSE: to study maternal (body composition and cardiovascular capacity) and perinatal (weight and prematurity) effects of hydrotherapy during pregnancy. METHODS: a prospective, random cohort study, with 41 low-risk pregnant women in their first pregnancy, practicing (study group, n=22) and not (co [...] ntrol group, n=19) hydrotherapy. Anthropometric evaluation was used to assess lean mass, and absolute and relative body fat. Ergometric tests were used for maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Perinatal results showed premature births and small for gestational age newborns. Initial and final indexes within and between groups were compared. Maternal variables were evaluated using the t test for dependent and independent values; the chi ² test was used to study proportions. RESULTS: there were no significant differences between the groups for maternal variables at the start and end of hydrotherapy. Comparison within each group confirmed the beneficial effect of hydrotherapy. In the study group, relative fat index was maintained at 29.0%; the control group showed an increase from 28.8% to 30.7%; the study group maintained VO2max at 35%, and increased SV from 106.6 to 121.5 and CO from 13.5 to 15.1; the control group showed a drop in VO2max and no change in SV and CO. There was no relationship between hydrotherapy and perinatal results. CONCLUSIONS: hydrotherapy adequately assisted metabolic and cardiovascular maternal adaptation to pregnancy and did not cause prematurity or weight loss in newborns.

  3. Variation in maternal effects and embryonic development rates among passerine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.; Schwabl, H.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic development rates are reflected by the length of incubation period in birds, and these vary substantially among species within and among geographical regions. The incubation periods are consistently shorter in North America (Arizona study site) than in tropical (Venezuela) and subtropical (Argentina) South America based on the study of 83 passerine species in 17 clades. Parents, mothers in particular, may influence incubation periods and resulting offspring quality through proximate pathways, while variation in maternal strategies among species can result from selection by adult and offspring mortality. Parents of long-lived species, as is common in the tropics and subtropics, may be under selection to minimize costs to themselves during incubation. Indeed, time spent incubating is often lower in the tropical and subtropical species than the related north temperate species, causing cooler average egg temperatures in the southern regions. Decreased egg temperatures result in longer incubation periods and reflect a cost imposed on offspring by parents because energy cost to the embryo and risk of offspring predation are both increased. Mothers may adjust egg size and constituents as a means to partially offset such costs. For example, reduced androgen concentrations in egg yolks may slow development rates, but may enhance offspring quality through physiological trade-offs that may be particularly beneficial in longer-lived species, as in the tropics and subtropics. We provide initial data to show that yolks of tropical birds contain substantially lower concentrations of growth-promoting androgens than north temperate relatives. Thus, maternal (and parental) effects on embryonic development rates may include contrasting and complementary proximate influences on offspring quality and deserve further field study among species. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

  4. Effect of maternal vitamin A supplementation on retinol concentration in colostrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evellyn C. Grilo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of vitamin A supplementation on the retinol concentration in colostrum under fasting and postprandial conditions. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study, with before and after assessments, conducted with 33 patients treated at a public maternity hospital. Blood and colostrum samples were collected under fasting conditions in the immediate postpartum period. A second colostrum collection occurred two hours after the first meal of the day, at which time a mega dose of 200,000 IU of retinyl palmitate was administered. On the following day, the colostrum was collected again under fasting and postprandial conditions. Serum and colostrum retinol concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: The serum retinol concentration was 37.3 (16.8-62.2 µg/dL, indicating adequate nutritional status. The colostrum retinol concentration before supplementation was 46.8 (29.7-158.9 µg/dL in fasting and 67.3 (31.1-148.7 µg/dL in postprandial condition (p < 0.05, showing an increase of 43.8%. After supplementation, the values were 89.5 (32.9-264.2 µg/dL and 102.7 (37.3-378.3 µg/dL in fasting and postprandial conditions, respectively (p < 0.05, representing an increase of 14.7%. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that maternal supplementation with high doses of vitamin A in postpartum resulted in a significant increase of the retinol concentration in colostrum under fasting conditions, with an even greater increase after a meal.

  5. Effect of multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy on maternal and birth outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakoob Mohammad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives/background Given the widespread prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries, supplementation with multiple micronutrients rather than iron-folate alone, could be of potential benefit to the mother and the fetus. These benefits could relate to prevention of maternal complications and reduction in other adverse pregnancy outcomes such as small-for-gestational age (SGA births, low birth weight, stillbirths, perinatal and neonatal mortality. This review evaluates the evidence of the impact of multiple micronutrient supplements during pregnancy, in comparison with standard iron-folate supplements, on specific maternal and pregnancy outcomes of relevance to the Lives Saved Tool (LiST. Data sources/review methods A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Search engines used were PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the WHO regional databases and hand search of bibliographies. A standardized data abstraction and Child Health Epidemiology Reference (CHERG adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE technique were used for data abstraction and overall quality of evidence. Meta-analyses were performed to calculate summary estimates of utility to the LiST model for the specified outcome of incidence of SGA births. We also evaluated the potential impact of multiple micronutrients on neonatal mortality according to the proportion of deliveries occurring in facilities (using a threshold of 60% to indicate functionality of health systems for skilled births. Results We included 17 studies for detailed data abstraction. There was no significant benefit of multiple micronutrients as compared to iron folate on maternal anemia in third trimester [Relative risk (RR = 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.87 – 1.22 (random model]. Our analysis, however, showed a significant reduction in SGA by 9% [RR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.86 – 0.96 (fixed model]. In the fixed model, the SGA outcome remained significant only in women with mean body mass index (BMI ? 22 kg/m2. There was an increased risk of neonatal mortality in studies with majority of births at home [RR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.13-1.92]; such an effect was not evident where ? 60% of births occurred in facility settings [RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.81-1.09]. Overall there was no increase in the risk of neonatal mortality [RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92 – 1.19 (fixed model]. Conclusion This review provides evidence of a significant benefit of MMN supplementation during pregnancy on reducing SGA births as compared to iron-folate, with no significant increase in the risk of neonatal mortality in populations where skilled birth care is available and majority of births take place in facilities. Given comparability of impacts on maternal anemia, the decision to replace iron-folate with multiple micronutrients during pregnancy may be taken in the context of available services in health systems and birth outcomes monitored.

  6. Long-Term Effects of Breastfeeding, Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy, and Recurrent Lower Respiratory Tract Infections on Asthma in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Karmaus, Wilfried; Dobai, Alina L.; Ogbuanu, Ikechukwu; Arshard, Syed Hasan; Matthews, Sharon; Ewart, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of breastfeeding on asthma is controversial, which may be explained by related and interacting early childhood risk factors. We assessed the joint effects of a risk-triad consisting of maternal smoking during pregnancy, breastfeeding for less than 3 months, and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections (RLRTI) on physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The association was assessed in the Isle of Wight birth cohort study (1989–1990) using a repeated measurement approach with data c...

  7. Neuroanatomical substrates of the disruptive effect of olanzapine on rat maternal behavior as revealed by c-Fos immunoreactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Changjiu; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Olanzapine is one of the most widely prescribed atypical antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia. Besides its well-known side effect on weight gain, it may also impair human parental behavior. In this study, we took a preclinical approach to examine the behavioral effects of olanzapine on rat maternal behavior and investigated the associated neural basis using the c-Fos immunohistochemistry. On postpartum Days 6–8, Sprague-Dawley mother rats were given a single injection of ster...

  8. Effects of maternal dietary exposure to cadmium during pregnancy on mammary cancer risk among female offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Davis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since heavy metal cadmium is an endocrine disrupting chemical, we investigated whether maternal exposure to cadmium during the pregnancy alters mammary tumorigenesis among female offspring. Methods: From gestation day 10 to day 19, pregnant rat dams were fed modified American Institute of Nutrition (AIN93G diet containing 39% energy from fat (baseline diet, or the baseline diet containing moderate (75 ?g/kg of feed or high (150 ?g/kg cadmium levels. Some dams were injected with 10 ?g 17?-estradiol (E2 daily between gestation days 10 and 19. Results: Rats exposed to a moderate cadmium dose in utero were heavier and exhibited accelerated puberty onset. Both moderate and high cadmium dose led to increased circulating testosterone levels and reduced the expression of androgen receptor in the mammary gland. The moderate cadmium dose mimicked the effects of in utero E2 exposure on mammary gland morphology and increased both the number of terminal end buds and pre-malignant hyperplastic alveolar nodules (HANs, but in contrast to the E2, it did not increase 7, 12-dimethylbenz (a anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis. Conclusions: The effects of in utero cadmium exposure were dependent on the dose given to pregnant dams: Moderate, but not high, cadmium dose mimicked some of the effects seen in the in utero E2 exposed rats, such as increased HANs in the mammary gland.

  9. Cholecystokinin modulation of maternal behavior

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciano Freitas, Felicio; Aline de Mello, Cruz; Mariana, Schroeder; Aron, Weller.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal behavior is regulated by several neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and hormones. This mini-review focuses on the role of cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuropeptide and gut hormone best known as a satiety signal, in mediating maternal behavior. In addition to the role of CCK in the infant in moth [...] er-infant interactions, maternal CCK appears to also be important. We discuss maternal behavior research, mainly in rats, that has examined the effect of administering CCK to dams, CCK-opioid interactions, and maternal behavior in rats that lack CCK1 receptors. We discuss the possibility that CCK might play a role in neurological adjustments during pregnancy that ultimately influence behavioral adaptations by the offspring during lactation. Finally, we hypothesize that maternal CCK is also involved in maternal memory and reward.

  10. Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation: effect on developmental outcome in breast-fed infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, L.; JØrgensen, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accumulates in the brain during the 1st and 2nd years of life. The objective of this study was to see if an increased content of DHA in breast-milk via maternal fish oil (FO)-supplementation affects mental development in term infants. one hundred twenty-two Danish mothers with a habitual fish intake below the population median were randomized to 4.5 g center dot d(-1) of FO or olive oil (OO) for the first four months of lactation. Fifty-three mothers with habitual fish intake in the highest quartile were included as reference group. The effect of the resulting increase in infant DHA-intake and RBC-DHA level was assessed on problem solving ability at nine months and language at one and two years of age. Infants in the three groups performed equally well on the problem test and no association was observed between problem solving and erythrocyte-DHA at four months. Passive vocabulary at one year was lower in the children of the FO-compared with the OO-group ( P <0.05), but no differences were found at two years of age. Word comprehension at one year was inversely associated with erythrocyte-DHA at four months. The trial indicate a small effect of DHA levels in breast-milk on early language development of breast-fed infants.

  11. Stage dependence of phenotypical and phenological maternal effects: insight into squamate reptile reproductive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorioux, Sophie; Vaugoyeau, Marie; Denardo, Dale F; Clobert, Jean; Guillon, Michaël; Lourdais, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Enhanced thermal conditions have been credited as a driving force for the evolution of viviparity, particularly in squamate reptiles, among which it has independently evolved more than 100 times. However, maternal thermoregulation is also a critical component of reproduction in oviparous squamates, for which considerable embryonic development occurs prior to oviposition. When carrying eggs, oviparous mothers modify thermoregulation in a manner similar to that of pregnant females. To further understand the role of temperature in influencing reproductive strategies, it is critical that we elucidate the degree to which thermal sensitivity varies across developmental stages. We studied stage-dependent embryonic sensitivity in a viviparous snake, the aspic viper (Vipera aspis). We manipulated female body temperature at different stages of pregnancy-early development, early embryonic growth, and late embryonic growth-by imposing two contrasting daily thermal cycles that mimicked reproductive (warm) and nonreproductive (cool) female temperature profiles. Thermal sensitivity of offspring phenotype was stage dependent, with offspring quality more negatively affected when exposure to cool temperatures occurred early in development. In contrast, developmental rate was slowed by the cooler cycle, independent of the timing of the exposure. Given the more persistent effect on phenology, phenological effects likely provide a greater driving force for complete embryonic retention (i.e., viviparity). PMID:23852356

  12. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective : evaluation of the Pediatric Cataract Register of Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study which eye-screening protocol prevails in Swedish maternity/neonatal wards, evaluate efficacy in a prospective study, and compare results with earlier Swedish retrospective results. METHODS: Surveys were sent in 2006 to maternity/neonatal and women's health departments regarding screening policy. Response frequency was 96% (122/127). Data were derived from The Pediatric Cataract Register, PECARE Sweden. All Swedish children diagnosed with congenital cataract and operated on before 1 year of age between January 2007 and December 2009 were included. Statistical comparison with earlier retrospective results was performed. RESULTS: Eye screening is routine protocol at a rate of 90% of Swedish maternity wards. Sixty-one children were included in the study. An increase was shown in case referrals from maternity wards compared to ten years ago (64% versus 50%). Detection was performed within 6 weeks of age in 75% of the cases. A significant difference between the probabilities of early referral (0.38; p

  13. BIRTH DEFECTS RISK ASSOCIATED WITH MATERNAL SPORT FISH CONSUMPTION: POTENTIAL EFFECT MODIFICATION BY SEX OF OFFSPRING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated sport fish consumption may result in exposure to various reproductive and developmental toxicants, including pesticides and other suspected endocrine disruptors. We investigated the relation between maternal sport fish meals and risk of major birth defects among infa...

  14. Effect of Gestation and Maternal Copper on the Fetal Fluids and Tissues Copper Concentrations in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd E. Hefnawy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Samples of allantoic, amniotic fluid, fetal liver, kidney, maternal plasma and liver were collected from 30 ewes and classified into either early or late gestation and copper concentrations were measured. Approach: The Cu concentrations in the maternal plasma, allantoic, amniotic fluid, fetal liver and kidney increased significantly (pResults: Significant positive relationships were recorded between age of the fetus and Cu concentrations in the allantoic and amniotic fluid (r = 0.71-0.83, pConclusion: A significant negative correlation was recorded between the Cu concentrations in the maternal liver and fetal age (r = -0.74, p<0.01. Strong fetal-maternal relationships in Cu concentration were evident throughout the gestational period and dams seem to sacrifice Cu levels in order to maintain that in the fetus. Cu concentrations in the amniotic and allantoic fluids could be used as a possible indicator of the Cu status of the fetus throughout gestation.

  15. Effects of Early Life Social Stress on Maternal Behavior and Neuroendocrinology

    OpenAIRE

    Murgatroyd, Christopher A.; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2012-01-01

    Maternal mood disorders such as depression and chronic anxiety can negatively affect the lives of both mothers and their adult offspring. An active focus of maternal depression and anxiety research has been the role of chronic social stress in the development of these disorders. Chronic exposure to social stress is common in humans, especially in lactating mothers, and postpartum mood disorders have been correlated with high levels of social conflict and low levels of social support. Recent s...

  16. The Intergenerational Effects on Birth Weight and Its Relations to Maternal Conditions, São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Leide Irislayne Macena da Costa e; Gomes, Filumena Maria da Silva; Valente, Maria Helena; Escobar, Ana Maria de Ulhôa; Brentani, Alexandra Valéria Maria; Sandra J. F. E. Grisi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Parents' birth weight acts as a predictor for the descendant birth weight, with the correlation more strongly transmitted through maternal line. The present research aims to study the correlation between the child's low or increased birth weight, the mother's birth weight, and maternal conditions. Methods. 773 mother-infant binomials were identified with information on both the baby's and the mother's birth weight recorded. Group studies were constituted, dividing t...

  17. The effects of maternal immunity and age structure on population immunity to measles

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, A.; Ferrari, M. J.; Shea, K.

    2015-01-01

    Measles was successfully eradicated in the Pan-American Health Region in 2002. However, maintenance of elimination in parts of Africa, Europe, the USA, and other regions is proving difficult, despite apparently high vaccine coverage. This may be due to the different age structure in developed and developing populations, as well as to differences in the duration of maternal immunity. We explore the interaction between maternal immunity and age structure and quantify the resulting immunity gap ...

  18. Exploring Maternal and Child Effects of Comorbid Anxiety Disorders among African American Mothers with Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Rhonda C.; Tervo-Clemmens, Brenden

    2013-01-01

    Comorbid depression and anxiety disorders are commonly experienced in mothers. Both maternal depression and anxiety as well as their comorbidity has been shown to increase psychopathology in children, however, there is limited research focusing on African American families. The aim of this study is to examine whether comorbid anxiety disorders are associated with maternal depression severity, kinship support, and child behavioral problems in a sample of African American mothers with depressio...

  19. The Effects of Fetal Gender on Maternal and Fetal Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer M.; Segurado, Ricardo; Mahony, Rhona M.; Foley, Michael E.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Gender plays a role in the development of a number of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that females may be more insulin resistant in utero. We sought to assess the relationship between infant gender and insulin resistance in a large pregnancy cohort. Study Design This is a secondary analysis of a cohort from the ROLO randomized control trial of low GI diet in pregnancy. Serum insulin, glucose and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. At delivery cord blood C-peptide and leptin were measured. A comparison of maternal factors, fetal biometry, insulin resistance and leptin was made between male and female offspring. A multivariate regression model was built to account for the possible effects of maternal BMI, birthweight and original study group assignment on findings. Results A total of 582 women were included in this secondary analysis, of whom 304 (52.2%) gave birth to male and 278 (47.8%) gave birth to female infants. Compared to male infants at birth, female infants were significantly lighter, (3945 ± 436 vs. 4081± 549g, p<0.001), shorter in length (52.36 ± 2.3 vs. 53.05 ± 2.4cm, p<0.001) and with smaller head circumferences (35.36 ± 1.5 vs. 36.10 ± 1.1cm, p<0.001) than males. On multiple regression analysis, women pregnant with female fetuses were less insulin resistant in early pregnancy, i.e. had lower HOMA indices (B = -0.19, p = 0.01). Additionally female fetuses had higher concentrations of both cord blood leptin and C-peptide at birth when compared to male offspring (B = 0.38, p<0.001 and B = 0.31, p = 0.03 respectively). Conclusion These findings suggest gender is a risk factor for insulin resistance in–utero. Additionally, carrying a female fetus decreases the risk of insulin resistance in the mother, from as early as the first trimester. PMID:26368559

  20. Understanding the determinants of the complex interplay between cost-effectiveness and equitable impact in maternal and child mortality reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey Chopra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most unexpected outcomes arising from the efforts towards maternal and child mortality reduction is that all too often the objective success has been coupled with increased inequity in the population. The aim of this study is to analyze the determinants of the complex interplay between cost-effectiveness and equity and suggest strategies that will promote an impact on mortality that reduce population child health inequities.

  1. The effects of maternal depression and use of antidepressants during pregnancy on risk of a child small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans MØrch; GrØn, Randi

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Use of antidepressants during pregnancy has been associated with an increased rate of children small for gestational age (SGA), but it is unclear whether this is due to an effect of the underlying depressive disorder. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the effect of antidepressants on SGA in a nationwide sample and to separate the effect of exposure to antidepressants in utero from the effect of maternal depression. METHODS: A register study was conducted on all pregnant women in Denmark from 1996 to 2006 linking nationwide individualized data from the Medical Birth Register, the Psychiatric Central Register, and a prescription database. The rate of SGA (birth weight below the 10 percentile at given gestational week) was investigated for children exposed in utero to antidepressants or to a maternal psychiatric diagnosis of depression compared to children not prenatally exposed to antidepressants or maternal diagnosis. RESULTS: A total of 673,853 pregnancies were included in the study of which 35.737 women had a diagnosis of depression and/or used antidepressants before end of pregnancy. Antidepressant use during pregnancy was weakly associated with SGA (hazard ratios (HR)?=?1.19; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.11-1.28), whereas a psychiatric diagnosis before or during pregnancy was not (HR?=?1.02; 95 % CI, 0.92-1.13). The association for use during pregnancy was found for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and newer antidepressants, but not for older antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The use of antidepressants during pregnancy slightly increases the rate of SGA. The association seems unrelated to the underlying maternal depressive disorder.

  2. Effect of maternal separation on mitochondrial function and role of exercise in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hendricks, Sharief; Ojuka, Edward; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Mabandla, Musa V.; Russell, Vivienne A

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress, such as maternal separation, causes adaptive changes in neural mechanisms that have adverse effects on the neuroplasticity of the brain in adulthood. As a consequence, children who are exposed to stress during development may be predisposed to neurodegenerative disorders in adulthood. A possible mechanism for increased vulnerability to neurodegeneration may be dysfunctional mitochondria. Protection from neurotoxins, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), has been observed foll...

  3. Effects of Maternal Diet and Exercise during Pregnancy on Glucose Metabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Fat of Weanling Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Raipuria, Mukesh; Bahari, Hasnah; Morris, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in offspring. Maternal exercise may limit gestational weight gain and ameliorate these programming effects. We previously showed benefits of post-weaning voluntary exercise in offspring from obese dams. Here we examined whether voluntary exercise during pregnancy influences lipid and glucose homeostasis in muscle and fat in offspring of both lean and obese dams. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed chow (C) or high ...

  4. The Effect Of Health Education With Modelling Approach On Mother’s Attitude, Maternal Confidence, and Infant (3 Months) Development.

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Ariyanti

    2008-01-01

    The first years of age of a child is a critical time that will affect the child growth development process. Any untreated disorders may impair the process that subsequently influences quality of life of the child in the future. Therefore, it is imperative for a mother to optimize the growth development process. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of health education with modelling approach on mother’s attitude, maternal confidence, and infant (3 months) development. A Quasi...

  5. Mechanistic basis of adaptive maternal effects: egg jelly water balance mediates embryonic adaptation to acidity in Rana arvalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Longfei; Suter, Marc J-F; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Environmental stress, such as acidification, can challenge persistence of natural populations and act as a powerful evolutionary force at ecological time scales. The ecological and evolutionary responses of natural populations to environmental stress at early life-stages are often mediated via maternal effects. During early life-stages, maternal effects commonly arise from egg coats (the extracellular structures surrounding the embryo), but the role of egg coats has rarely been studied in the context of adaptation to environmental stress. Previous studies on the moor frog Rana arvalis found that the egg coat mediated adaptive divergence along an acidification gradient in embryonic acid stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these adaptive maternal effects remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of water balance and charge state (zeta potential) of egg jelly coats in embryonic adaptation to acid stress in three populations of R. arvalis. We found that acidic pH causes severe water loss in the egg jelly coat, but that jelly coats from an acid-adapted population retained more water than jelly coats from populations not adapted to acidity. Moreover, embryonic acid tolerance (survival at pH 4.0) correlated with both water loss and charge state of the jelly, indicating that negatively charged glycans influence jelly water balance and contribute to embryonic adaptation to acidity. These results indicate that egg coats can harbor extensive intra-specific variation, probably facilitated in part via strong selection on water balance and glycosylation status of egg jelly coats. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms of environmental stress tolerance and adaptive maternal effects. PMID:25983113

  6. Effect of maternal restraint-stress during gestation on temporal lipopolysacharide-induced neuroendocrine and immune responses of progeny

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, C.T.; Williams, P N; J. A. Carroll; T. H. Welsh; J. C. Laurenz

    2010-01-01

    The impact of gestational dam restraint stress on progeny immune and neuroendocrine temporal hormone responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was assessed. Maternal stress (5-min snout snare restraint stress during d 84 to 112 of gestation) increased (P < 0.05) the magnitude of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-6, epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE) and serum amyloid A (SAA) production following LPS infusion in the offspring. Moreover, these effects appear to be dependen...

  7. Effect of Skin to Skin Contact on Maternal State Anxiety in a Cesarean Section Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Haghani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed at investigating the effect of skin to skin contact (SSC on maternal state anxiety (MSA in cesarean section unit in Akbarabadi Hospital in Tehran. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 60 Iranian mothers with at least one record of cesarean section delivery were assigned to two intervention (SSC and control groups. In the morning shift and two hours after the operation, as a routine postoperative care, pain-killers were given to all mothers. Then the mothers’ pain scores were measured using visual analog scale (VAS. If VAS was?3, MSA was measured by using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Scale (Spiel Berger. Thirty minutes of SSC intervention was done for mothers in the intervention group. Six hours later, in case VAS was ? 3, MSA was re-measured by using the Spiel Berger Scale for all mothers. Results: Six hours after implementing the intervention, there were no meaningful statistical differences between the MSA mean scores of the two groups, but severity of MSA in intervention group was less than that of the control group (P=0.037. Six hours after the intervention, there was a significant decrease in the MSA mean score in SSC group (P=0.002. Conclusion: As regards the important role of constant anxiety in developing postpartum depression, and as the results of this study indicate, SSC is recommended in postpartum and especially cesarean section wards.

  8. Birth defects risk associated with maternal sport fish consumption: potential effect modification by sex of offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contaminated sport fish consumption may result in exposure to various reproductive and developmental toxicants, including pesticides and other suspected endocrine disruptors. We investigated the relation between maternal sport fish meals and risk of major birth defects among infants born to members of the New York State (NYS) Angler Cohort between 1986 and 1991 (n=2237 births). Birth defects (n=125 cases) were ascertained from both newborn medical records and the NYS Congenital Malformations Registry. For sport fish meals eaten during pregnancy, the odds ratio (OR) for all major malformations combined was slightly elevated for ?1 meal/month (OR=1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84, 1.89) and ?2 meals/month (OR=1.51, CI=0.74, 3.09), with no meals during pregnancy as the reference category. Higher ORs were consistently observed among male offspring compared with females. For ?2 meals/month, the risk for males was significantly elevated (males: OR=3.01, CI: 1.2, 7.5; females: OR=0.73, CI: 0.2, 2.4). Exposure during pregnancy and effect modification by infants sex could be important considerations for future studies of birth outcomes associated with endocrine disruptors

  9. Effect of exercise on the maternal outcome in pregnancy of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renato, Rocha; José Carlos, Peraçoli; Gustavo Tadeu, Volpato; Débora Cristina, Damasceno; Kleber Eduardo de, Campos.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of exercise (swimming) on pregnancy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). METHODS: Thirty three pregnant female SHR were distributed into three groups (n=11 animals/group): SHR Control=non-exercised (sedentary); SHR Ex0 = exercised from day zero to day 20 of [...] pregnancy; and SHR Ex7 = exercised from day 7 to 20 of pregnancy. Body weight and systolic blood pressure were indirectly measured during pregnancy. On gestational day 21, the rats were anaesthetized and uterine content was withdrawn for analysis of maternal reproductive outcome parameters and fetal development. RESULTS: The reduced blood pressure percentage was higher in SHR Ex0 and SHR Ex7 compared to SHR Control group. Weight gain was present in all pregnancy periods, but it was lower in SHR Ex7 than in SHR Control dams. The exercise increased the pre-implantation loss rate. The post-implantation loss rate was lower in SHR Ex0 group. SHR Ex7 group showed a significantly higher percentage of fetuses classified as small for gestational age as compared to others groups. CONCLUSION: The exercise contributed to lowering gestational blood pressure in SHR rats, but had a negative impact on the developing embryo.

  10. The relationship between umbilical and maternal blood leptin and it's effect in fetal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the correlation of leptin between maternal serum and cord blood and to know relationship between leptin and fetal growth, and the origin of leptin. Methods: The concentration of leptin in 55 cases of maternal serum and cord arterial and venous blood were measured by ELISA assay. According to the neonatal weight and gestational age, three groups were divided into small gestational age (SGA), appropriate gestational age (AGA) and large gestational age (LGA). The nutrition status of neonatal was evaluated by index of Pondernal. The comparision was made in these groups. Results: The concentration of leptin in the cord artery, venous and maternal serum among 55 cases was 16.58 ± 8.13 ng/ml, 12.05 ± 9.87 ng/ml, 13.24 ± 10.58 ng/ml respectively; The concentration of maternal serum leptin was higher than that of cord artery. The concentration of maternal serum leptin was higher than that of venous serum leptin slightly. There was significant difference between cord artery and venous in different gestational age groups. Serum leptin levels of cord artery and venous were well correlated with the one of the weight and gestational age of neonatal. Maternal serum leptin level was not correlated with birth weight, placental weight and gestational age. Conclusions: The leptin from placenta is concerned with the adjustment of fetal growth. Cord leptin can reflect the status of fetal growth. Cord venous leptin indicate that the leptin be from placenta. Cord artery leptin demonstrates a part of placenta leptin, which acts on the fetus and then induces the fetal fat tissue to produce leptin. The maternal leptin does not adjust fetal weight directly. It only adjusts fat content itself and energy metabolism. (authors)

  11. Survey study of effective factors on maternal mortality in Kurdestan province from 1998 to 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golyan Tehrani Sh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pregnancy is a natural phenomena and basis of birth but can induce various dangers to mother and fetus. Since mother is the central part of family, maternal mortality would be an irreparable damage to the community. On average 10100 live births and 12 maternal mortalities occur in Kurdestan province each year; the maternal mortality rate is therefore 118/100000 live births which in comparison to similar figure in whole country (37/100000 live births is three times higher. Materials and Methods: This research is an analytic case-control study. Cases and controls were matched for place of residence and age at gestation. Cases (n=55 were chosen by census and controls (n=220 were chosen by random sampling. The tool used to collect data was questionnaire, validity and reliability of which was tested by content validity and test-retest method. The statistical testing used in this study were Chi square and odds ratio. Data were analyzed by SPSS .11 software. Results: Most of maternal mortalities had occurred in women 18-35 years of age, illiterate and living in rural areas. Marivan had the highest maternal mortality compared to other surveyed cities (29.1%. Prenatal care (OR= 22.7, parturition agent (OR= 9.85, use of one of the method of family planning (OR= 2.5 and parturition method (OR= 2.3 had meaningful relationship with maternal mortality. Conclusion: According to findings of this research, it is possible to decrease the maternal mortality by improving prenatal care and family planning and preventing parturition by uneducated midwives and avoiding unnecessary cesarian sections.

  12. Anticipatory maternal effects in two different clones of Daphnia magna in response to food shortage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria ROSSI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of food shortage on growth, fecundity, male production and offspring size and starvation tolerance in two different clones of Daphnia magna (Clone L and Clone P were evaluated by disentangling the effects of resource depletion and crowding per se. Three experimental conditions were tested: high food - low daphnid density (the optimum, low food - low daphnid density and high food - high daphnid density. In the two first conditions, daphnids experienced the same population density but they had different food availability. In the two latter conditions, daphnids had the same per capita, low, food availability but they lived at different algae and daphnid densities. Moreover, the response of crowded females to recovery at high food availability and low population density was evaluated. Low food availability reduced growth and fecundity of both clones and increased male production only in the Clone L. Crowding per se did not affect growth but reduced fecundity. In both clones, low food availability due to low algae density enhanced investment in offspring size and resistance to starvation. In response to food shortage either due to low algae density and to crowding, Clone P increased the investment in offspring size and starvation tolerance but reduced fecundity to a lesser extent than Clone L and did not produce males. Clone L, in response to food shortage due to crowding at high algae density, increased development time, produced more males, as at low algae density, but halved fecundity producing offspring that were not starvationtolerant. These results might reflect differences in anticipatory maternal effects between clones and suggest that neonate quality varies according to either, the environment the mother experienced and the competitive environment the neonates will cope due to their mother life strategy.

  13. Effective Linkages of Continuum of Care for Improving Neonatal, Perinatal, and Maternal Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Enuameh, Yeetey; Yasuoka, Junko; Nanishi, Keiko; Shibanuma, Akira; Gyapong, Margaret; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Asare, Gloria Quansah; Hodgson, Abraham; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuum of care has the potential to improve maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) by ensuring care for mothers and children. Continuum of care in MNCH is widely accepted as comprising sequential time (from pre-pregnancy to motherhood and childhood) and space dimensions (from community-family care to clinical care). However, it is unclear which linkages of care could have a greater effect on MNCH outcomes. The objective of the present study is to assess the effectiveness of different continuum of care linkages for reducing neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality in low- and middle-income countries. Methods We searched for randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials that addressed two or more linkages of continuum of care and attempted to increase mothers’ uptake of antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care. The outcome variables were neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality. Results Out of the 7,142 retrieved articles, we selected 19 as eligible for the final analysis. Of these studies, 13 used packages of intervention that linked antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care. One study each used packages that linked antenatal care and skilled birth attendance or skilled birth attendance and postnatal care. Four studies used an intervention package that linked antenatal care and postnatal care. Among the packages that linked antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care, a significant reduction was observed in combined neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality risks (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.89, I2 79%). Furthermore, this linkage reduced combined neonatal, perinatal, and maternal mortality when integrating the continuum of care space dimension (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.93, I2 81%). Conclusions Our review suggests that continuous uptake of antenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postnatal care is necessary to improve MNCH outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. The review was conclusive for the reduction of neonatal and perinatal deaths. Although maternal deaths were not significantly reduced, composite measures of all mortality were. Thus, the evidence is sufficient to scale up this intervention package for the improvement of MNCH outcomes. PMID:26422685

  14. Effect of maternal separation on mitochondrial function and role of exercise in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Sharief; Ojuka, Edward; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Mabandla, Musa V; Russell, Vivienne A

    2012-09-01

    Early life stress, such as maternal separation, causes adaptive changes in neural mechanisms that have adverse effects on the neuroplasticity of the brain in adulthood. As a consequence, children who are exposed to stress during development may be predisposed to neurodegenerative disorders in adulthood. A possible mechanism for increased vulnerability to neurodegeneration may be dysfunctional mitochondria. Protection from neurotoxins, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), has been observed following voluntary exercise. The mechanism of this neuroprotection is not understood and mitochondria may play a role. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of maternal separation and exercise on mitochondrial function in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Maternally separated (pups separated from the dam for 3 h per day from postnatal day (P) 2-14) and non-separated rats were placed in individual cages with or without attached running wheels for 1 week prior to unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA (5 ?g/4 ?l, 0.5 ?l/min) into the left medial forebrain bundle at P60. After 2 h recovery, rats were returned to their cages and wheel revolutions recorded for a further 2 weeks. On P72, the rats' motor function was assessed using the forelimb akinesia test. On P74, rats were sacrificed for measurement of mitochondrial function. Exercise increased the respiratory control index (RCI) in the non-lesioned hemisphere of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. This effect was evident in the striatum of non-separated rats and the prefrontal cortex of maternally separated rats. These results suggest that early life stress may reduce the adaptive response to exercise in the striatum, a major target of dopamine neurons, but not the prefrontal cortex in this model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22527997

  15. Short- and long-term reproductive effects of prenatal and lactational growth restriction caused by maternal diabetes in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorim Elaine MP

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A suboptimal intrauterine environment may have a detrimental effect on gonadal development and thereby increases the risk for reproductive disorders and infertility in adult life. Here, we used uncontrolled maternal diabetes as a model to provoke pre- and perinatal growth restriction and evaluate the sexual development of rat male offspring. Methods Maternal diabetes was induced in the dams through administration of a single i.v. dose of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin, 7 days before mating. Female rats presenting glycemic levels above 200 mg/dL after the induction were selected for the experiment. The male offspring was analyzed at different phases of sexual development, i.e., peripuberty, postpuberty and adulthood. Results Body weight and blood glucose levels of pups, on the third postnatal day, were lower in the offspring of diabetic dams compared to controls. Maternal diabetes also provoked delayed testicular descent and preputial separation. In the offspring of diabetic dams the weight of reproductive organs at 40, 60 and 90 days-old was lower, as well as sperm reserves and sperm transit time through the epididymis. However the plasma testosterone levels were not different among experimental groups. Conclusions It is difficult to isolate the effects directly from diabetes and those from IUGR. Although the exposure to hyperglycemic environment during prenatal life and lactation delayed the onset of puberty in male rats, the IUGR, in the studied model, did not influenced the structural organization of the male gonads of the offspring at any point during sexual development. However the decrease in sperm reserves in epididymal cauda and the acceleration in sperm transit time in this portion of epididymis may lead to an impairment of sperm quality and fertility potential in these animals. Additional studies are needed in attempt to investigate the fertility of animals with intrauterine growth restriction by maternal diabetes and possible multigenerational effects.

  16. Pathogenic effects of maternal antinuclear antibodies during pregnancy in women with lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lupus is an autoimmune disease that primarily affects young women of childbearing age. Fertility rates in lupus patients depend on various factors, including disease activity, nephritis, and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies; however, after lupus patients become pregnant, different factors may affect the course of pregnancy, such as the production of autoantibodies, pre-existing renal disease, and eclampsia, among others. The placenta is a temporary hemochorial organ that prevents immunological conflict due to exposure to alloantigens at the maternal-fetal interface; placental regulatory T cells play a major role in maternal-fetal tolerance. Typically, significant amounts of maternal IgG class antibodies cross the placenta and enter the fetal circulation. This transition depends on the distribution of Fc receptors along the syncytiotrophoblast. The production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA is a hallmark of lupus, and these autoantibodies can form immune complexes that are typically trapped in the placenta during gestation. However, the entry of ANA into the fetal circulation depends on the IgG-ANA concentration and the FcR placental density. Maternal antinuclear antibodies with anti-Ro or anti-La specificity might be pathogenic to the fetus if transfused by the placental pathway and could induce neonatal pathologies, such as neonatal lupus and congenital heart block. Here, we review the experimental and clinical data supporting a pathogenic role for maternal autoantibodies transmitted to the fetus

  17. The SHINE Trial Infant Feeding Intervention: Pilot Study of Effects on Maternal Learning and Infant Diet Quality in Rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amy; Smith, Laura E; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Chigumira, Ancikaria; Fundira, Dadirai; Tavengwa, Naume V; Malaba, Thokozile R; Majo, Florence D; Humphrey, Jean H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2015-12-15

    The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is designed to measure the independent and combined effects of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene and improved infant feeding on child stunting and anemia in Zimbabwe. We developed and pilot-tested the infant feeding intervention delivered by 9 village health workers to 19 mothers of infants aged 7-12 months. Between September 2010 and January 2011, maternal knowledge was assessed using mixed methods, and infant nutrient intakes were assessed by 24-hour recall. We observed positive shifts in mothers' knowledge. At baseline, 63% of infants met their energy requirement and most did not receive enough folate, zinc, or calcium; none met their iron requirement. Postintervention, all infants received sufficient fat and vitamin A, and most consumed enough daily energy (79%), protein (95%), calcium (89%), zinc (89%), folate (68%), and iron (68%). The SHINE trial infant feeding intervention led to significant short-term improvements in maternal learning and infant nutrient intakes. PMID:26602298

  18. The SHINE Trial Infant Feeding Intervention: Pilot Study of Effects on Maternal Learning and Infant Diet Quality in Rural Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amy; Smith, Laura E.; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Chigumira, Ancikaria; Fundira, Dadirai; Tavengwa, Naume V.; Malaba, Thokozile R.; Majo, Florence D.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is designed to measure the independent and combined effects of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene and improved infant feeding on child stunting and anemia in Zimbabwe. We developed and pilot-tested the infant feeding intervention delivered by 9 village health workers to 19 mothers of infants aged 7–12 months. Between September 2010 and January 2011, maternal knowledge was assessed using mixed methods, and infant nutrient intakes were assessed by 24-hour recall. We observed positive shifts in mothers' knowledge. At baseline, 63% of infants met their energy requirement and most did not receive enough folate, zinc, or calcium; none met their iron requirement. Postintervention, all infants received sufficient fat and vitamin A, and most consumed enough daily energy (79%), protein (95%), calcium (89%), zinc (89%), folate (68%), and iron (68%). The SHINE trial infant feeding intervention led to significant short-term improvements in maternal learning and infant nutrient intakes. PMID:26602298

  19. Effects of maternal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) during pregnancy on susceptibility to neonatal asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used as a plasticizer and is widely dispersed in the environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of maternal exposure to DEHP during pregnancy on neonatal asthma susceptibility using a murine model of asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Pregnant BALB/c mice received DEHP from gestation day 13 to lactation day 21. Their offspring were sensitized on postnatal days (PNDs) 9 and 15 by intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 ?g OVA with 200 ?g aluminum hydroxide. On PNDs 22, 23 and 24, live pups received an airway challenge of OVA for 30 min. Offspring from pregnant mice that received DEHP showed reductions in inflammatory cell count, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, and eotaxin in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in total immunoglobulin E and OVA-specific IgE in their plasma compared with offspring from pregnant mice that did not receive DEHP treatment. These results were consistent with histological analysis and immunoblotting. Maternal exposure to DEHP reduces airway inflammation and mucus production in offspring, with a decrease in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lung tissue. This study suggests that maternal exposure to DEHP during pregnancy reduces asthmatic responses induced by OVA challenge in offspring. These effects were considered to be closely related to the suppression of Th2 immune responses and iNOS expression. - Highlights: • Maternal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate reduces asthmatic response in pups. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate reduces eosinophilia induced by ovalbumin exposure. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate reduces T-helper type 2 cytokine production. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate attenuates airway inflammation and mucus production. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung tissue

  20. Effects of maternal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) during pregnancy on susceptibility to neonatal asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, In-Sik; Lee, Mee-Young [Basic Herbal Medicine Research Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 483 Expo-ro, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun-Sang [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun-young [College of Nursing and Health, Kongju National University, 56 Gongju Daehak-ro, Gongju, Chungnam 314-701 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hwa-Young [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung-Youl, E-mail: youl10@hanmail.net [College of Nursing and Health, Kongju National University, 56 Gongju Daehak-ro, Gongju, Chungnam 314-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used as a plasticizer and is widely dispersed in the environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of maternal exposure to DEHP during pregnancy on neonatal asthma susceptibility using a murine model of asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Pregnant BALB/c mice received DEHP from gestation day 13 to lactation day 21. Their offspring were sensitized on postnatal days (PNDs) 9 and 15 by intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 ?g OVA with 200 ?g aluminum hydroxide. On PNDs 22, 23 and 24, live pups received an airway challenge of OVA for 30 min. Offspring from pregnant mice that received DEHP showed reductions in inflammatory cell count, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, and eotaxin in their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in total immunoglobulin E and OVA-specific IgE in their plasma compared with offspring from pregnant mice that did not receive DEHP treatment. These results were consistent with histological analysis and immunoblotting. Maternal exposure to DEHP reduces airway inflammation and mucus production in offspring, with a decrease in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lung tissue. This study suggests that maternal exposure to DEHP during pregnancy reduces asthmatic responses induced by OVA challenge in offspring. These effects were considered to be closely related to the suppression of Th2 immune responses and iNOS expression. - Highlights: • Maternal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate reduces asthmatic response in pups. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate reduces eosinophilia induced by ovalbumin exposure. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate reduces T-helper type 2 cytokine production. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate attenuates airway inflammation and mucus production. • Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung tissue.

  1. Effect of 5-HT1B receptor agonists injected into the prefrontal cortex on maternal aggression in rats

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    C.P., Veiga; K.A., Miczek; A.B., Lucion; R.M.M. de, Almeida.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT1B) receptors play an essential role in the inhibition of aggressive behavior in rodents. CP-94,253, a 5-HT1B receptor agonist, can reduce aggression in male mice when administered directly into the ventro-orbitofrontal (VO) prefrontal cortex (PFC). The objective of the current study [...] was to assess the effects of two selective 5-HT1B receptor agonists (CP-94,253 and CP-93,129), microinjected into the VO PFC, on maternal aggressive behavior after social instigation in rats. CP-94,253 (0.56 µg/0.2 µL, N = 8, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µL, N = 8) or CP-93,129 (1.0 µg/0.2 µL, N = 9) was microinjected into the VO PFC of Wistar rats on the 9th day postpartum and 15 min thereafter the aggressive behavior by the resident female against a male intruder was recorded for 10 min. The frequency and duration of aggressive and non-aggressive behaviors were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc tests. CP-93,129 significantly decreased maternal aggression. The frequency of lateral attacks, bites and pinnings was reduced compared to control, while the non-aggressive behaviors and maternal care were largely unaffected by this treatment. CP-94,253 had no significant effects on aggressive or non-aggressive behaviors when microinjected into the same area of female rats. CP-93,129, a specific 5-HT1B receptor agonist, administered into the VO PFC reduced maternal aggressive behavior, while the CP-94,253 agonist did not significantly affect this behavior after social instigation in female rats. We conclude that only the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP-93,129 administered into the VO PFC decreased aggression in female rats postpartum after social instigation.

  2. Effect of 5-HT1B receptor agonists injected into the prefrontal cortex on maternal aggression in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Veiga

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT1B receptors play an essential role in the inhibition of aggressive behavior in rodents. CP-94,253, a 5-HT1B receptor agonist, can reduce aggression in male mice when administered directly into the ventro-orbitofrontal (VO prefrontal cortex (PFC. The objective of the current study was to assess the effects of two selective 5-HT1B receptor agonists (CP-94,253 and CP-93,129, microinjected into the VO PFC, on maternal aggressive behavior after social instigation in rats. CP-94,253 (0.56 µg/0.2 µL, N = 8, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µL, N = 8 or CP-93,129 (1.0 µg/0.2 µL, N = 9 was microinjected into the VO PFC of Wistar rats on the 9th day postpartum and 15 min thereafter the aggressive behavior by the resident female against a male intruder was recorded for 10 min. The frequency and duration of aggressive and non-aggressive behaviors were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc tests. CP-93,129 significantly decreased maternal aggression. The frequency of lateral attacks, bites and pinnings was reduced compared to control, while the non-aggressive behaviors and maternal care were largely unaffected by this treatment. CP-94,253 had no significant effects on aggressive or non-aggressive behaviors when microinjected into the same area of female rats. CP-93,129, a specific 5-HT1B receptor agonist, administered into the VO PFC reduced maternal aggressive behavior, while the CP-94,253 agonist did not significantly affect this behavior after social instigation in female rats. We conclude that only the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP-93,129 administered into the VO PFC decreased aggression in female rats postpartum after social instigation.

  3. A comparative study of evaluate dose related feto-maternal effects of syntocinon during labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhin Radhanpuri

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: There is significant reduction in the duration of labor by augmenting labor with slow low regulated dose of syntocinon drip, thus reducing the maternal exhaustion and morbidity due to prolonged labor. There is significant reduction in the operative interference like LSCS, vacuum and forceps delivery, thus reducing maternal morbidity associated with operative interference and anesthesia. It also reduces the cost of medical services. The incidence of fetal distress and LSCS for the same does not increase in the augmentation group, indicating that syntocinon can be safely used for the augmentation. At this time, much attention in the field of obstetrics is focused on attempting to reduce the rate of cesarean section, not only to reduce maternal morbidity, but to lower the cost of medical care. Our finding is that syntocinon administration can significantly reduce the cesarean section rate. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(5.000: 1344-1348

  4. The effect of maternal Inflammation on foetal programming of metabolic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Camilla; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy increases the child's risk of developing obesity and obesity?related diseases later in life. Key components in foetal programming of metabolic risk remain to be identified; however, chronic low?grade inflammation associated with obesity might be responsible for metabolic imprinting in the offspring. We have therefore surveyed the literature to evaluate the role of maternal obesity?induced inflammation in foetal programming of obesity and related diseases. The literature on this topic is limited, so this review also includes animal models where maternal inflammation is mimicked by single injections with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). An LPS challenge results in an immunological response that resembles the obesity?induced immune profile, although LPS injections provoke a stronger response than the subclinical obesity?associated response. Maternal LPS or cytokine exposures result in increased adiposity and impaired metabolic homeostasis in the offspring, similar to the phenotype observed after exposure to maternal obesity. The cytokine levels might be specifically important for the metabolic imprinting, as cytokines are both transferable from maternal to foetal circulation and have the capability to modulate placental nutrient transfer. However, the immune response associated with obesity is moderate and therefore potentially weakened by the pregnancy?driven immune modulation, dominated by anti?inflammatory Treg and Th2 cells. We know from other low?grade inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, that pregnancy can improve disease state. If pregnancy is also capable of suppressing the obesity?associated inflammation, the immunological markers might be less likely to affect metabolic programming in the developing foetus than otherwise implied.

  5. Lack of effect of the MR (mutator) factor on the maternal repair system in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were designed to test whether the functioning of the maternal repair system will be different in females heterozygous for MR (male recombination factor) relative to that in females not carrying the MR. Muller-5 males were irradiated and mated to either MR/ + or Cy/ + females, and the frequencies of sex-linked recessive lethals in mature spermatozoa were determined and compared. The frequencies were similar with both types of female, demonstrating that heterozygosity for MR does not lead to an alteration in the functioning of the maternal repair system. (orig.)

  6. Effect of traditional food supplementation during pregnancy on maternal weight gain and birthweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseb, F; Kimiagar, M; Ghafarpoor, M; Valaii, N

    2002-12-01

    The effects of supplementary traditional food on pregnant women were investigated in a clinical trial in Islamshahr, a suburban area 35 km southwest of Tehran. The study comprised 53 healthy mothers who were neither addicts nor on medication and were free from genetic disorders. The pregnant mothers' health was evaluated by their weight gain, that of lactating mothers by breast milk adequacy, and that of newborns by their weight at birth. The experimental group received traditional food (rice-milk porridge, lentils, pottage, cheese, yogurt, eggs, and milk with bread), supplying an extra 400 kcal energy and 15 g protein from the fourth month of pregnancy until childbirth. All subjects were weighed monthly. To ascertain breast milk sufficiency, the duration of exclusive breastfeeding and the growth trend of infants were surveyed. The study showed the weight gain in the experimental and control groups to be 11.0 +/- 2.9 and 8.5 +/- 3 kg respectively; the difference was 29.4% and statistically significant (p < 0.02). The confounding variables (energy and protein intake, age, height, BMI, age at first pregnancy, parity, last pregnancy spacing, number of children, number of miscarriages, duration of residence in the area, family size, education, housing, occupation of the mother or her husband) did not reveal any significant differences. Maternal weight gain was higher in the experimental compared to the control group. Birth weights in experimental and control groups were 3.33 +/- 0.4 and 3.08 +/- 0.3 kg, respectively. This difference, which amounts to 8.1%, was statistically significant (p < 0.05). While the two groups of newborns had equal breastfeeding duration, heights and weights of newborns were significantly higher in the experimental group. This was also confirmed when compared to the NCHS figures. PMID:12596505

  7. Maternal age effect and severe germ-line bottleneck in the inheritance of human mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases depends on the frequency of heteroplasmy (the presence of several alleles in an individual), yet its transmission across generations cannot be readily predicted owing to a lack of data on the size of the mtDNA bottleneck during oogenesis. For deleterious heteroplasmies, a severe bottleneck may abruptly transform a benign (low) frequency in a mother into a disease-causing (high) frequency in her child. Here we present a high-resolution study of heteroplasmy transmission conducted on blood and buccal mtDNA of 39 healthy mother-child pairs of European ancestry (a total of 156 samples, each sequenced at ?20,000× per site). On average, each individual carried one heteroplasmy, and one in eight individuals carried a disease-associated heteroplasmy, with minor allele frequency ?1%. We observed frequent drastic heteroplasmy frequency shifts between generations and estimated the effective size of the germ-line mtDNA bottleneck at only ?30-35 (interquartile range from 9 to 141). Accounting for heteroplasmies, we estimated the mtDNA germ-line mutation rate at 1.3 × 10(-8) (interquartile range from 4.2 × 10(-9) to 4.1 × 10(-8)) mutations per site per year, an order of magnitude higher than for nuclear DNA. Notably, we found a positive association between the number of heteroplasmies in a child and maternal age at fertilization, likely attributable to oocyte aging. This study also took advantage of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to validate heteroplasmies and confirm a de novo mutation. Our results can be used to predict the transmission of disease-causing mtDNA variants and illuminate evolutionary dynamics of the mitochondrial genome.

  8. Maternal age effect and severe germ-line bottleneck in the inheritance of human mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Stoler, Nicholas; McElhoe, Jennifer A; Dickins, Benjamin; Blankenberg, Daniel; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Nielsen, Rasmus; Holland, Mitchell M; Paul, Ian M; Nekrutenko, Anton; Makova, Kateryna D

    2014-10-28

    The manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases depends on the frequency of heteroplasmy (the presence of several alleles in an individual), yet its transmission across generations cannot be readily predicted owing to a lack of data on the size of the mtDNA bottleneck during oogenesis. For deleterious heteroplasmies, a severe bottleneck may abruptly transform a benign (low) frequency in a mother into a disease-causing (high) frequency in her child. Here we present a high-resolution study of heteroplasmy transmission conducted on blood and buccal mtDNA of 39 healthy mother-child pairs of European ancestry (a total of 156 samples, each sequenced at ?20,000× per site). On average, each individual carried one heteroplasmy, and one in eight individuals carried a disease-associated heteroplasmy, with minor allele frequency ?1%. We observed frequent drastic heteroplasmy frequency shifts between generations and estimated the effective size of the germ-line mtDNA bottleneck at only ?30-35 (interquartile range from 9 to 141). Accounting for heteroplasmies, we estimated the mtDNA germ-line mutation rate at 1.3 × 10(-8) (interquartile range from 4.2 × 10(-9) to 4.1 × 10(-8)) mutations per site per year, an order of magnitude higher than for nuclear DNA. Notably, we found a positive association between the number of heteroplasmies in a child and maternal age at fertilization, likely attributable to oocyte aging. This study also took advantage of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to validate heteroplasmies and confirm a de novo mutation. Our results can be used to predict the transmission of disease-causing mtDNA variants and illuminate evolutionary dynamics of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:25313049

  9. The effects of vitamin D supplementation on maternal and neonatal outcome: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Mojibian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy has been supposed to defend against adverse gestational outcomes. Objective: This randomized clinical trial study was conducted to assess the effects of 50,000 IU of vitamin D every two weeks supplementation on the incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and preterm labor, vitamin D status at term and neonatal outcomes contrasted with pregnant women that received 400 IU vitamin D daily. Materials and Methods: 500 women with gestational age 12-16 weeks and serum 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25 (OH D less than 30 ng/ml randomly categorized in two groups. Group A received 400 IU vitamin D daily and group B 50,000 IU vitamin D every 2 weeks orally until delivery. Maternal and Neonatal outcomes were assessed in two groups. Results: The incidence of GDM in group B was significantly lower than group A (6.7% versus 13.4% and odds ratio (95% Confidence interval was 0.46 (0.24-0.87 (P=0.01. The mean ± SD level of 25 (OH D at the time of delivery in mothers in group B was significantly higher than A (37.9 ± 19.8 versus 27.2 ± 18.8 ng/ml, respectively (P=0.001. There were no differences in the incidence of preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, preterm labor, and low birth weight between two groups. The mean level of 25 (OH D in cord blood of group B was significantly higher than group A (37.9 ± 18 versus 29.7 ± 19ng/ml, respectively. Anthropometric measures between neonates were not significantly different. Conclusion: Our study showed 50,000 IU vitamin D every 2 weeks decreased the incidence of GDM.

  10. Genetic moderation of effects of maternal sensitivity on girl's age of menarche: Replication of the Manuck et al. study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sarah; Widaman, Keith F; Belsky, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Manuck, Craig, Flory, Halder, and Ferrell (2011) reported that a theoretically anticipated effect of family rearing on girls' menarcheal age was genetically moderated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the estrogen receptor-? gene. We sought to replicate and extend these findings, studying 210 White females followed from birth. The replication was general because a different measure of the rearing environment was used in this inquiry (i.e., maternal sensitivity) than in the prior one (i.e., family cohesion). Extensions of the work included prospective rather than retrospective measurements of the rearing environment, reports of first menstruation within a year of its occurrence rather than decades later, accounting for some heritability of menarcheal age by controlling for maternal age of menarche, and using a new model-fitting approach to competitively compare diathesis-stress versus differential-susceptibility models of Gene × Environment interaction. The replication/extension effort proved successful in the case of both estrogen receptor-? SNPs, with the Gene × Environment interactions principally reflecting diathesis-stress: lower levels of maternal sensitivity predicted earlier age of menarche for girls homozygous for the minor alleles of either SNP but not for girls carrying other genotypes. Results are discussed in light of the new analytic methods adopted. PMID:25195863

  11. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Citrulline Supplementation on Renal Transcriptome Prevention of Nitric Oxide Depletion-Related Programmed Hypertension: The Impact of Gene-Nutrient Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Chien-Te; Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition can elicit gene expression leading to fetal programming. l-citrulline (CIT) can be converted to l-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO). We examined whether maternal CIT supplementation can prevent NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (l-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor)-induced programmed hypertension and examined their effects on the renal transcriptome in male offspring using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received l-NAME adm...

  12. Paternal Involvement in Multisystemic Therapy: Effects on Adolescent Outcomes and Maternal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervan, Shannon; Granic, Isabela; Solomon, Tracy; Blokland, Kirsten; Ferguson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The association between paternal involvement in therapy, adolescent outcomes and maternal depression was examined within the context of Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an empirically supported, family- and community-based treatment for antisocial adolescents. Ninety-nine families were recruited from five mental health agencies providing MST. We…

  13. The maternal-effect, selfish genetic element Medea in Tribolium is a Tc1 transposon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously characterized selfish genes act prezygotically and are independent of cytotype. Selfish “Medea” (M) elements are unique in combining maternal and zygotic components to gain a postzygotic survival advantage. We show that Medea1 activity in Tribolium castaneum is associated with a composi...

  14. Effect of Sustained Maternal Responsivity on Later Vocabulary Development in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nancy; Warren, Steven F.; Fleming, Kandace; Keller, Juliana; Sterling, Audra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This research explored whether sustained maternal responsivity (a parent-child interaction style characterized by warmth, nurturance, and stability as well as specific behaviors, such as contingent positive responses to child initiations) was a significant variable predicting vocabulary development of children with fragile X syndrome…

  15. Effects of melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction on vascularity and cell proliferation in the ovine placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously we reported increased umbilical artery blood flow in ewes supplemented with melatonin from mid- to late-pregnancy, while maternal nutrient restriction decreased uterine artery blood flow. To further unravel these responses, this study was designed to assess placental cell proliferation an...

  16. Effects of maternal postpartum depression in a well-resourced sample : early concurrent and longitudinal effects of on infant cognitive, language, and motor development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne

    Background: It is well documented that maternal postpartum depression (PPD) has the potential to disrupt aspects of caregiving known to be critical for healthy child development. However, with regard to long term effects of PPD on global indices of infant development measured by standardized instruments, findings across studies have been inconsistent. Some studies have found small, but significant effects, and other studies found no long term effects, even for vulnerable subgroups. Given that PPD onset for the majority is within 3 months postpartum, and given that most women recover in 6-7 months postpartum, it is possible that potential adverse effects of PPD on infant development for a large part have diminished or buffered by protective factors at the time when infant development is measured. However, little is known about how the concurrent exposure to maternal depressed mood impacts on infant development before 6 months of age, that is, at the time when maternal postpartum depressive symptoms are most present. To address this issue, additionally to a long-term measure of infant development, the present study examines early concurrent effects of maternal clinical depression. Method: Mothers (N=85) were recruited into a longitudinal study and assessed with Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the clinical interviews Present State Examination and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II. The Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition, were administered when infants were 4 and 13 months of age. Results: MANCOVA revealed a significant adverse effect of maternal depression on infant cognitive development at four months of age, the effect size being large, and with similar effects for boys and girls. At 13 months of age infants of mothers who had been suffering from depression three to four months postpartum did not differ from infants of non-clinical mothers. However, regardless of depression group membership boys scored lower on the language scale at 13 months of age. Discussion: These results suggest that maternal depression can have an acute, concurrent effect on infant cognitive development as early as at four months postpartum; at the same time, in the lack of other risk factors, this effect may not be enduring. From a developmental psychopathology perspective this study stresses the importance of understanding the complex nature of how risk factors may impact on infant development differently at different ages. Instead of pointing selectively to a single predictor of developmental outcome, such as PPD, rather a combination of several risk factors may predict children’s long-term developmental problems.

  17. Effect of strenuous maternal exercise before and during pregnancy on rat progeny renal function

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A.O., Oliveira; C., Fileto; M.S., Melis.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of strenuous exercise before and during pregnancy on the renal function and morphological alterations of the progeny were determined in a study on female Wistar rats. This research was done based on a previous study carried out in our laboratory, which showed morphological alterations in [...] rats submitted to this kind of exercise. As the form is related to the function, the physiological relevance of submitting a pregnant female to a high-intensity exercise training regimen could be explained by the fact that morphological alterations can influence kidney function. The animals were assigned to one of two groups: control animals that did not exercise during pregnancy and trained animals that swam for 120 min 5 days a week for 8 weeks before pregnancy and daily for 60 min over a period of 8 weeks starting on the second day of pregnancy. Seven rats of each group were analyzed for morphological alterations and for renal function. The progeny of the rats used for morphological evaluation were born by cesarean section and the progeny of the animals used to evaluate renal function were born normally. The progeny were two months old when renal function was evaluated. Fertility and morbidity were the same for both groups. Strenuous maternal exercise had no significant influence on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) but renal plasma flow was lower in the progeny of the trained group (mean ± SD, 16.65 ± 3.77 ml min-1 kg-1) compared to the progeny of the control group (33.42 ± 2.56 ml min-1 kg-1). Antidiuretic and antinatriuretic effects on the progeny of the trained group were observed, since urine flow as percentage of GFR and the fraction of urinary sodium excretion were lower in this group (1.38 ± 0.10 and 0.60 ± 0.04%, respectively) compared to the progeny of the control group (2.36 ± 0.11 and 1.55 ± 0.20%, respectively). Moreover, in this exercise program, fetuses from trained animals were small-sized (2.45 ± 0.19 vs 4.66 ± 2.45 g for control animals) and showed lower differentiation compared to fetuses from the control group. These effects were probably caused by caloric restriction, hypoxia and reduction of umbilical cord length.

  18. Effect of strenuous maternal exercise before and during pregnancy on rat progeny renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Oliveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of strenuous exercise before and during pregnancy on the renal function and morphological alterations of the progeny were determined in a study on female Wistar rats. This research was done based on a previous study carried out in our laboratory, which showed morphological alterations in rats submitted to this kind of exercise. As the form is related to the function, the physiological relevance of submitting a pregnant female to a high-intensity exercise training regimen could be explained by the fact that morphological alterations can influence kidney function. The animals were assigned to one of two groups: control animals that did not exercise during pregnancy and trained animals that swam for 120 min 5 days a week for 8 weeks before pregnancy and daily for 60 min over a period of 8 weeks starting on the second day of pregnancy. Seven rats of each group were analyzed for morphological alterations and for renal function. The progeny of the rats used for morphological evaluation were born by cesarean section and the progeny of the animals used to evaluate renal function were born normally. The progeny were two months old when renal function was evaluated. Fertility and morbidity were the same for both groups. Strenuous maternal exercise had no significant influence on glomerular filtration rate (GFR but renal plasma flow was lower in the progeny of the trained group (mean ± SD, 16.65 ± 3.77 ml min-1 kg-1 compared to the progeny of the control group (33.42 ± 2.56 ml min-1 kg-1. Antidiuretic and antinatriuretic effects on the progeny of the trained group were observed, since urine flow as percentage of GFR and the fraction of urinary sodium excretion were lower in this group (1.38 ± 0.10 and 0.60 ± 0.04%, respectively compared to the progeny of the control group (2.36 ± 0.11 and 1.55 ± 0.20%, respectively. Moreover, in this exercise program, fetuses from trained animals were small-sized (2.45 ± 0.19 vs 4.66 ± 2.45 g for control animals and showed lower differentiation compared to fetuses from the control group. These effects were probably caused by caloric restriction, hypoxia and reduction of umbilical cord length.

  19. Sex-dependent effects of an early life treatment in rats that increases maternal care: vulnerability or resilience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Fuentes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early life stress (ELS in rodents has profound long-term effects that are partially mediated by changes in maternal care. ELS not only induces “detrimental” effects in adulthood, increasing psychopathology, but also promotes resilience to further stressors. In Long-Evans rats, we evaluated a combination of two procedures as a model of ELS: restriction of bedding during the first postnatal days and exposure to a “substitute” mother. The maternal care of biological and “substitute” mothers was measured. The male and female offspring were evaluated during adulthood in several contexts. Anxiety was measured by the elevated plus-maze (EPM, acoustic startle response (ASR and forced swim test (FST. In other group of animals, novelty-seeking was measured (activity in an inescapable novel environment, preference for novel environments and exploration of novel objects. Plasmatic ACTH and corticosterone in basal conditions and in response to stress were also measured. Cognitive impulsivity was assessed by a delay-discounting paradigm, and impulsive action, attention and compulsive-like behaviour by a five choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT. ELS decreased pup body weight and increased the care of the biological mother; however, the “substitute” mother did not exhibit overt maltreatment. A mixture of “detrimental” and “beneficial” effects was shown. In the 5CSRTT, attention was impaired in both genders, and in females, ELS increased compulsive-like behaviour. Novel object exploration was only increased by ELS in males, but the preference for novel spaces decreased in both genders. Baseline anxiety (EPM and ASR and recognition memory were not affected. Unexpectedly, ELS decreased the ACTH response to novelty and swim stress and increased active coping in the FST in both genders. Cognitive impulsivity was decreased only in females, but impulsive action was not affected. The enhancement in maternal care may “buffer” the effects of ELS in a context-dependent manner.

  20. Hemoglobinas humanas: hipótese malária ou efeito materno? / Human hemoglobins: malaria hypothesis or maternal effect?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Felipe R., Torres; Claudia R., Bonini-Domingos.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available As hemoglobinopatias têm provido uma das poucas demonstrações convincentes da seleção, influenciando a freqüência de único gene na população humana. A alta taxa de desordens, tais como a anemia falciforme e a beta-talassemia, ocorridas em áreas subtropicais ou tropicais dentro do cinturão da malária [...] , levou Haldane a propor que a malária pode ser o agente seletivo responsável que balanceia a perda dos genes para a talassemia e a anemia falciforme, por morte prematura dos homozigotos a partir do aumento do valor adaptativo de heterozigotos no ambiente com malária. Mas uma nova proposta surgiu para explicar a manutenção deste polimorfismo, baseada na fertilidade diferencial ou efeito parental. Alguns autores observaram uma distorção favorecendo a transmissão de alelos mutantes em áreas não endêmicas de malária. Com base nestas observações, esses autores propuseram um efeito materno para explicar tais distorções. Este estudo tem como objetivo apresentar uma revisão destes mecanismos envolvidos na manutenção do polimorfismo de hemoglobinopatias, desde seu modelo clássico até hipóteses alternativas que surgiram recentemente na literatura. Abstract in english Hemoglobinopathies are providing one of the few convincing demonstrations of selection, influencing the frequency of a single gene in the human population. The high rate of disorders, such as the sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia that occur in the subtropical or tropical regions within the str [...] ip affected by malaria, led Haldane to propose that malaria may be the selective agent responsible for balancing the loss of thalassemia and sickle cell anemia genes due to the early death of homozygous patients. But a new proposal appeared to explain the maintenance of these polymorphisms, based on the differential fertility or parental effect. Some authors observed a distortion favoring the transmission of mutant alleles in non-endemic malaria areas. Based on these observations, the authors proposed a maternal effect to explain these distortions. This study aims at presenting a review of the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of polymorphisms of hemoglobinopathies, both from the classic model and the recently published alternative hypotheses.

  1. Genetic correlations between the maternal genetic effect on chick weight and the direct genetic effects on egg composition traits in a White Leghorn line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, C; Johansson, K; Strandberg, E; Rydhmer, L

    2003-01-01

    Selection can be a useful way to alter yolk proportion and thereby egg dry matter which, owing to its economic importance, is a trait of substantial importance for the egg-processing industry. However, the egg is primarily the chamber of embryonic development. The main purpose of this study was to estimate genetic correlations between the maternal effect on chick weight at hatching and the direct effect on different egg composition traits, in particular, yolk proportion. Additionally, genetic parameters were estimated for egg composition traits. To create a data set suitable for estimation of genetic parameters, a three-round selection experiment was set up. Birds were selected based on their predicted breeding values for the genetic maternal effect on chick weight and the direct genetic effect on yolk proportion according to the theory of elliptical selection. Genetic parameters were estimated using a multiple trait animal model and restricted maximum likelihood. The maternal heritability for chick weight was 0.5, whereas the direct heritability was dose to 0. The genetic correlations between the maternal effect on chick weight and the direct effect on yolk proportion, yolk weight, albumen weight, albumen dry matter concentration, and egg weight were 0.14, 0.76, 0.93, 0.14, and 0.99, respectively. The heritabilities for yolk proportion, yolk weight, albumen weight, albumen dry matter concentration, and egg weight were 0.33, 0.43, 0.57, 0.38, and 0.60, respectively. We conclude that breeding ought to be a useful way to increase egg dry matter with no expected unfavorable correlated effects on chick weight. PMID:12580237

  2. The effect of maternal exposure to psychosocial job strain on pregnancy outcomes and child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ann Dyreborg

    2015-02-01

    Psychological stress at work is a rising problem in Denmark. Nearly one third of the women reported in 2005 that they had difficulties completing their work tasks, and 17 % found that they had only limited or no influence on their work tasks. The corresponding numbers for 1987 were 18.3 % and 16 %, respectively. Work-related stress shortens the life expectancy and reduces the number of years without prolonged disease. For the society work-related stress amounts to more than 30,000 hospital admissions each year, half a million extra days on sick-leave for women, 500,000 contacts to general practitioners, 1600 early retirements for women, and an overuse of the health-care system. With the second highest employment rate in Europe for women - and many of them in the childbearing age - effects of psychological stress at work may extend beyond the exposed individual and affect pregnancy, birth and health of the child. Few studies on job stress relative to pregnancy have been carried out, but both animal and epidemiological studies have shown effect of exposure to stressful conditions during pregnancy and adverse effects on the offspring. The specific aims for the three studies included in this thesis were to investigate the association between maternal psychosocial job strain during pregnancy, measured as high demands and low control and the risk of: - Having a child born preterm or with low or high birth weight relative to gestational week (paper I + II) - Congenital malformations in offspring (paper III) - Asthma and atopic dermatitis in the children (paper IV). Furthermore, it was also the ambition to maximize and secure the quality of research and integrity of the data used by documenting the methods in a protocol that described the analyses before they were done and to keep transparency in the methods used following good epidemiological practices (GEP) for occupational and environmental epidemiological research. All analyses in this thesis are based on information and data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). The cohort was established in 1994 and baseline information from the enrolled 100,418 pregnancies was gathered from 1996 to 2002. At their first antenatal visit pregnant women were invited to participate in the cohort by their general practitioner. To contribute the women had to be pregnant, have intentions of carrying the pregnancy to term, reside in Denmark and speak Danish sufficiently well to participate in telephone interviews. When enrolled the women were asked to participate in two telephone interviews during pregnancy at approximately 12-14 and 30-32 weeks of gestation and two after birth when the child was six and 18 months old and a follow-up questionnaire at age seven years.  Exposure to work-related stress was assessed based on information from the first interview on two questions regarding job control and job demands. These questions were interpreted as dimensions of demands and control, and hereafter used as a proxy for the dimensions of the job strain model by Karasek.  Based on their answers, the women were divided into the four job strain categories: high strain, active, passive and low strain. Gestational age at birth, birthweight and congenital malformations were extracted from the Danish Medical Birth Register. The outcome variable on asthma and atopic dermatitis were based on maternal self-reports from the fourth (child 18 months) and fifth (child seven years old) interviews/questionnaires. All studies in the thesis were based on protocols describing methods, analyses etc. prior to handling. No associations were found between exposure to high strain (high demands, low control) during pregnancy and preterm birth, small for gestational age, congenital malformations and asthma in the children when compared to women exposed to low strain (low demands, high control). A protective effect on large for gestational age was observed when exposed to high strain, suggesting an impact on the birthweight although it was not seen among the small for gestational age children. An association between hi

  3. Effect of maternal diabetes on female offspring / Efeito do diabetes materno na prole feminina

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juliana de Oliveira, Martins; Maurício Isaac, Panício; Marcos Paulo Suehiro, Dantas; Guiomar Nascimento, Gomes.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Avaliar o efeito do diabetes materno sobre a pressão arterial e a função renal da prole feminina, bem como verificar se as alterações observadas se exacerbam durante a prenhez. Métodos O diabetes mellitus foi induzido em ratas com a adminis [...] tração de estreptozocina em dose única, uma semana antes do cruzamento. Durante a prenhez, foram feitas medidas da pressão arterial por pletismografia. No 20o dia da prenhez, os animais foram colocados durante 24 horas em gaiolas metabólicas para obtenção de amostras de urina. Após a retirada dos animais das gaiolas, foram obtidas amostras de sangue. Um mês após a prenhez, foram obtidas novas amostras de sangue e urina para as determinações. A função renal foi avaliada por meio de proteinúria, ureia plasmática, creatinina plasmática, carga excretada de creatinina, fluxo urinário e clearance de creatinina. Resultados As fêmeas da prole de mães diabéticas apresentaram elevação da pressão arterial e redução do ritmo de filtração glomerular em relação ao grupo controle. Conclusão A hiperglicemia durante a gestação foi capaz de causar elevação da pressão arterial e disfunção renal na prole de sexo feminino. Abstract in english Objective To evaluate the effect of maternal diabetes on the blood pressure and kidney function of female offspring, as well as if such changes exacerbate during pregnancy. Methods Diabetes mellitus was induced in female rats with the administ [...] ration of streptozotocin in a single dose, one week before mating. During pregnancy, blood pressure was measured through plethysmography. On the 20th day of pregnancy, the animals were placed for 24 hours in metabolic cages to obtain urine samples. After the animals were removed from the cages, blood samples were withdrawn. One month after pregnancy, new blood and urine sample were collected. Kidney function was evaluated through proteinuria, plasma urea, plasma creatinine, creatinine excretion rate, urinary flow, and creatinine clearance. Results The female offspring from diabetic mothers showed an increase in blood pressure, and a decrease in glomerular filtration rate in relation to the control group. Conclusion Hyperglycemia during pregnancy was capable of causing an increase in blood pressure and kidney dysfunction in the female offspring.

  4. Effect of maternal excessive iodine intake on neurodevelopment and cognitive function in rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Le

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iodine deficiency and iodine excess are both associated with adverse health consequences. Iodine deficiency during pregnancy leads to insufficient maternal thyroid hormone, subsequently causing irreversible adverse effects on the neurological and cognitive functions of the offspring. The results of our previous epidemiological study suggested that mild iodine excess might increase the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism. In the present study, female Wistar rats maintained on low-iodine grain were randomly assigned to three groups based on iodated water concentration: low iodine (LI, 1.2??g/d, normal iodine (NI, 5–6??g/d, and 3-fold high iodine (3HI, 15–16??g/d. The present study investigated whether higher-than-normal iodine intake (3HI by rats from before pregnancy until breastfeeding affects the postnatal (PN neurodevelopment (PN7 and PN45 of their offspring during particularly sensitive periods in brain development. Results After 12?weeks of treatment (before pregnancy, iodine concentrations in urine and thyroid tissue and circulating thyroxine of adult females correlated with iodine intake. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in the hippocampi of pups on PN7 and PN45 was decreased in 3HI group compared to the NI controls (P??0.05, all On PN7 and PN45, the BDNF levels of the 3HI pups were 83.5% and 88.8%, respectively, that of the NI pups. In addition, the 3HI group had a higher neuroendocrine-specific protein A (NSP-A level than the NI controls on PN7 (P??0.05. NSP-A levels of the 3HI pups were 117.0% that of the NI pups. No significant difference was observed in the expressions of c-Fos or c-Jun in the hippocampal CA1 region of the 3HI group compared to the controls (P?>?0.05. Results from the Morris water maze test revealed that pups of the 3HI group had mild learning and spatial memory deficits. Conclusions The neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits of the 3HI pups were mild and temporary, likely related to the changes in hippocampal protein expressions of BDNF and NSP-A.

  5. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Deprivation on Cholinergic System in Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Markovi?, Branka; NEVENA V. RADONJI?; Aksi?, Milan; Filipovi?, Branislav; Petronijevi?, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated an association between early stressful life events and adult life psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. In rodents, early life exposure to stressors such as maternal deprivation (MD) produces numerous hormonal, neurochemical, and behavioral changes and is accepted as one of the animal models of schizophrenia. The stress induces acetylcholine (Ach) release in the forebrain and the alterations in cholinergic neurotransmitter system are report...

  6. The Epigenetics of Maternal Cigarette Smoking During Pregnancy and Effects on Child Development

    OpenAIRE

    Knopik, Valerie S; Maccani, Matthew A.; Francazio, Sarah; McGeary, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The period of in utero development is one of the most critical windows during which adverse intrauterine conditions and exposures may influence the growth and development of the fetus as well as its future postnatal health and behavior. Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy remains a relatively common but nonetheless hazardous in utero exposure. Previous studies have associated prenatal smoke exposure with reduced birth weight, poor developmental and psychological outcomes, and increase...

  7. Long-term effects of maternal immune activation on depression-like behavior in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, D; Fernando, P; Cicvaric, A; Berger, A.; Pollak, A; Monje, F J; Pollak, D D

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mental disease affecting a large population worldwide, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which remain incompletely understood. Prenatal infection and associated activation of the maternal immune system (MIA) are prominently related to an increased risk for the development of several psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and autism in the offsprings. However, the role of MIA in the etiology of depression and its neurobiological basis are insufficiently i...

  8. Neonatally Induced Mild Diabetes in Rats and Its Effect on Maternal, Placental, and Fetal Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Iessi, Isabela Lovizutto; Bueno, Aline; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Damasceno, Débora Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess placental changes and reproductive outcomes in neonatally induced mild diabetic dams and fetal development in their offspring. At birth, female rats were assigned either to control or diabetic group (100?mg of streptozotocin/Kg, subcutaneously). At adulthood, the female rats were mated. During pregnancy, the blood glucose levels and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. At term, maternal reproductive outcomes, fetal and placental weight, and p...

  9. Maternal deprivation and mood stabilizing drugs : Effects on rat brain NPY

    OpenAIRE

    Husum Bak-Jensen, Henriette

    2002-01-01

    Experiences of early adverse life events are more frequent among adult depressed patients than healthy subjects. Studies with non-human primates and rats show that maternal deprivation leads to changes in hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA)-axis activity/reactivity and increased levels of anxiety and alcohol preference. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely and abundantly distributed in mammalian brain, in particular in limbic areas. NPY modulates a number of behavioral and physio...

  10. Effects of Maternal HIV on Children’s Psychosocial Adjustment with Peers and with Their Mother

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Debra A.; Marelich, William D.; Lanza, H. Isabella; Herbeck, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal assessment was undertaken of young adolescents’ psychosocial outcomes affected by maternal HIV/AIDS, focusing on both parent-child psychosocial ties and peer relationships. Data were taken from the Parents and Children Coping Together study (PACT), a 15-year study assessing mothers with HIV/AIDS and their well children every 6 months. Families (N = 118) who participated in PACT II and PACT III are included in the current analyses, who were assessed every 6 months for 36 months ...

  11. Familial Autoimmunity: Maternal Parent-of-Origin Effect in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeft, Andrew; Shear, Edith S.; Thompson, Susan D; GLASS, DAVID N.; Prahalad, Sampath

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an autoimmune (AI) disease characterized by chronic arthritis in children. Children with JIA have increased prevalence of other AI diseases. Furthermore, relatives of children with JIA have been shown to have an increased prevalence of AI diseases. Our objective was to determine if there were differences in the prevalence of AI diseases among maternal and paternal relatives of children with JIA. Information about AI diseases among all living first and se...

  12. Placental serotonin: implications for the developmental effects of SSRIs and maternal depression

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez, Juan C.; Goeden, Nick; Bonnin, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role in the pathophysiology of numerous psychiatric disorders, increasing evidence points to serotonin (5-HT) as a crucial molecule for the modulation of neurodevelopmental processes. Recent evidence indicates that the placenta is involved in the synthesis of 5-HT from maternally derived tryptophan (TRP). This gives rise to the possibility that genetic and environmental perturbations directly affecting placental TRP metabolism may lead to abnormal brain circuit wiring in th...

  13. A Gestational Profile of Placental Exosomes in Maternal Plasma and Their Effects on Endothelial Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Salomon, Carlos; Torres, Maria Jose; Kobayashi, Miharu; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Sobrevia, Luis; Dobierzewska, Aneta; Illanes, Sebastian E; Mitchell, Murray D.; Rice, Gregory E

    2014-01-01

    Studies completed to date provide persuasive evidence that placental cell-derived exosomes play a significant role in intercellular communication pathways that potentially contribute to placentation and development of materno-fetal vascular circulation. The aim of this study was to establish the gestational-age release profile and bioactivity of placental cell-derived exosome in maternal plasma. Plasma samples (n?=?20 per pregnant group) were obtained from non-pregnant and pregnant women in t...

  14. Effect of hemoglobin adjustment on the precision of mercury concentrations in maternal and cord blood

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byung-Mi; Choi, Anna L.; Ha, Eun-Hee; Pedersen, Lise; Nielsen, Flemming; Weihe, Pal; Hong, Yun-Chul; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Grandjean, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The cord-blood mercury concentration is usually considered the best biomarker in regard to developmental methylmercury neurotoxicity. However, the mercury concentration may be affected by the binding of methylmercury to hemoglobin and perhaps also selenium. As cord-blood mercury analyses appear to be less precise than suggested by laboratory quality data, we studied the interrelationships of mercury concentrations with hemoglobin in paired maternal and cord blood samples from a Faroese birth ...

  15. Alternative Strategies to Reduce Maternal Mortality in India: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Delphine; Goldie, Sue J.; Sweet, Steven Goldie; Carvalho, Natalie Ida; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli

    2010-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-quarter of all pregnancy- and delivery-related maternal deaths worldwide occur in India. Taking into account the costs, feasibility, and operational complexity of alternative interventions, we estimate the clinical and population-level benefits associated with strategies to improve the safety of pregnancy and childbirth in India. Methods and Findings: Country- and region-specific data were synthesized using a computer-based model that simulates the natural histor...

  16. Effects of sildenafil on maternal hemodynamics and fetal growth in normal rat pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Sasser, Jennifer M; Baylis, Chris

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil may be useful in the treatment of hypertension during pregnancy. However, we have reported a selective increase in renal inner medullary PDE5 that participates in the sodium retention of pregnancy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether oral sildenafil treatment impairs maternal plasma volume expansion and/or fetal growth during rat pregnancy. Rats received sildenafil (10 mg·kg?1·day?1, 50 mg...

  17. The effect of maternal and child health and family planning services on mortality: is prevention enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Fauveau, V.; Wojtyniak, B; Chakraborty, J.; Sarder, A.M.; Briend, A.

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the impact on mortality of a child survival strategy, mostly based on preventive interventions. DESIGN--Cross sectional comparison of cause specific mortality in two communities differing in the type, coverage, and quality of maternal and child health and family planning services. In the intervention area the services were mainly preventive, community based, and home delivered. SUBJECTS--Neonates, infants, children, and mothers in two contiguous areas of rural Bangladesh...

  18. PREVALENCE OF PHYSICAL VIOLENCE AGAINST PREGNANT WOMEN AND EFFECTS ON MATERNAL AND BIRTH OUTCOMES

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nojomi Z. Akrami

    2006-01-01

    Violence and the threat of violence against pregnant women are main barriers to women’s empowerment and equal participation in society. When stress and violence increase in developing societies, women’s safety in the home, workplace and community is often seriously affected. To determine the prevalence of physical abuse in pregnant women and to assess association between physical violence during pregnancy and maternal complications and birth outcomes, we used clinicbased data from a sample of...

  19. Seed fates in crop-wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-02-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  20. Seed fates in crop–wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  1. PREVALENCE OF PHYSICAL VIOLENCE AGAINST PREGNANT WOMEN AND EFFECTS ON MATERNAL AND BIRTH OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nojomi Z. Akrami

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Violence and the threat of violence against pregnant women are main barriers to women’s empowerment and equal participation in society. When stress and violence increase in developing societies, women’s safety in the home, workplace and community is often seriously affected. To determine the prevalence of physical abuse in pregnant women and to assess association between physical violence during pregnancy and maternal complications and birth outcomes, we used clinicbased data from a sample of 403 women who delivered live born infants during the summer of 2002 in our hospital. Data of physical violence against women’s during pregnancy and 3 months before that were based on questionnaire and interview. Outcomes data including antenatal hospitalization, labor and delivery complications were obtained from the records. Prevalence of physical violence during pregnancy was reported as 10.7%. Prevalence of experience of physical abuse 3 months before pregnancy was 11.9%. Women who experienced physical violence compared with those not reporting abuse were more likely to be smoker and hospitalized before delivery for maternal complications such as preterm labor, kidney infections, premature rupture of membranes and vaginal bleeding with pain. There was a significant association between physical violence and low birth weight and mother’s education. Physical violence during pregnancy is common and is associated with maternal complications and adverse birth outcomes. We suggest including methods to determine frequency of violence during pregnancy and assessment of violence in pregnancy by a screening program integrated in prenatal care.

  2. Maternal hyperglycemia at different stages of gestation and its effects on male reproductive functions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akindele, O O; Kunle-Alabi, O T; Udofia, U A; Ahmed, T T; Raji, Y

    2015-12-01

    The critical period during which maternal hyperglycemia predisposes offspring to develop reproductive disorders in adult life is not known. The relationship between maternal hyperglycemia at different stages and reproductive functions of male offspring was investigated. A single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (90 mg/kg body weight) was administered at gestation days (GD) 1, 8 and 15. Animals were subsequently given 10% glucose solution daily as drinking water until parturition. All male pups were sacrificed on the 63rd day of postnatal life. Birth weight, anogenital distance index (AGDi), testes descent day, preputial separation day, sperm profile, serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels and the histology of the testis were assessed. Data significance test was based on 95% confidence interval. GD1 pups showed a significant increase in mean birth weight, whereas GD8 pups and GD15 pups had significantly reduced birth weight as compared with control. AGDi was significantly increased in GD8 and GD15 pups. Testes descent and preputial separation in all the experimental groups were significantly earlier. There was a significant reduction in sperm count and viability in GD8 offspring. Sperm motility was reduced in all test groups. Testosterone level was reduced in all test groups. Histology of the testis showed varying degrees of pathologies. It was deduced from this study that maternal hyperglycemia caused alterations in reproductive functions in male offspring of Wistar rats irrespective of the period of gestation involved, although GD8 pups were most severely affected. PMID:26496962

  3. Effects of maternal administration of vitamins C and E on ethanol neurobehavioral teratogenicity in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Christopher M; Ibram, Ferda; Dringenberg, Hans C; Reynolds, James N; Brien, James F

    2007-12-01

    Consumption of ethanol during human pregnancy can produce a wide spectrum of teratogenic effects, including neurobehavioral dysfunction. This study, in the guinea pig, tested the hypothesis that chronic maternal administration of antioxidant vitamins C plus E, together with ethanol, mitigates ethanol neurobehavioral teratogenicity. Pregnant guinea pigs received one of the following four chronic oral regimens: ethanol and vitamins C plus E; ethanol and vitamin vehicle; isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding and vitamins C plus E; or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding and vehicle. Vitamins C (250 mg) plus E (100mg) or vehicle were given daily, and ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) (E) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding was given for 5 consecutive days followed by 2 days of no treatment each week throughout gestation. One neonate from selected litters was studied on postnatal day (PD) 0. Neurobehavioral function was determined by measuring task acquisition and task retention using an 8-day moving-platform version of the Morris water-maze task, starting on PD 45. Thereafter, in vivo electrophysiologic assessment of changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity was conducted. There was an ethanol-induced decrease in neonatal brain weight compared with sucrose. The vitamins C plus E regimen protected hippocampal weight relative to brain weight in ethanol offspring, and mitigated the ethanol-induced deficit in the task-retention component of the water-maze task. However, in the sucrose group, this Vit regimen produced deficits in both task acquisition and task retention. The vitamins C plus E regimen did not mitigate the ethanol-induced impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation. These results indicate that maternal administration of this high-dose vitamins C plus E regimen throughout gestation has limited efficacy and potential adverse effects as a therapeutic intervention for E neurobehavioral teratogenicity. PMID:17980996

  4. Reciprocal crosses between two populations of Trissolcus vassilievi (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) reveal maternal effects on thermal phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranipour, S; BenaMolaei, P; Asgari, S; Michaud, J P

    2015-06-01

    The egg parasitoid Trissolcus vassilievi (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) is a significant natural enemy of the sunn pest, Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae), the most important pest of wheat in Iran. This study examined the developmental time and egg-to-adult survival of two geographically separate populations of T. vassilievi on two corresponding host populations at five constant temperatures ranging from 15.0 to 35.0 ± 1°C. No wasps of either population emerged at 15.0°C and the temperature threshold for development was similar between populations, ranging from 13.1 ± 0.3 to 13.8 ± 0.4°C for males and 12.2 ± 0.1 to 12.6 ± 0.1°C for females, but the thermal constant varied with gender and parasitoid population. Development of wasps from the colder Tabriz location was slower, with thermal constants for males and females of 172.6 ± 3.1 and 204.1 ± 1.2 degree-days, respectively, compared to Varamin wasps with 164.7 ± 3.0 and 195.6 ± 1.3 degree-days, respectively. Based on genetic inheritance patterns, reciprocal crosses between the two populations were expected to result in females with thermal phenotypes intermediate to their parental populations, and males that resembled their mothers. However, female progeny of crosses more closely resembled their maternal population, indicating a maternal effect on thermal phenotype. Furthermore, the magnitude of the maternal effect on the thermal constant was asymmetric and was more strongly expressed by Varmin than Tabriz females. These results suggest the possibility of using selective crosses between wasp populations, in combination with artificial selection in the laboratory, to tune the thermal phenotype of parasitoids to specific regions prior to augmentative releases. PMID:25809416

  5. Analgesic effects of JCM-16021 on neonatal maternal separation-induced visceral pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Xiang Bian, Man Zhang, Quan-Bin Han, Hong-Xi Xu, Joseph JY Sung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the pharmacological effect of JCM-16021, a Chinese herbal formula, and its underlying mechanisms.METHODS: JCM-16021 is composed of seven herbal plant materials. All raw materials of the formula were examined according to the quality control criteria listed in the Chinese Pharmacopeia (2005. In a neonatal maternal separation (NMS model, male Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to daily maternal separation from postnatal day 2 to day 14, or no specific handling (NH. Starting from postnatal day 60, rats were administered JCM-16021 (2, 4, 8 g/kg per day orally twice a day for 28 d. Pain threshold pressure and electromyographic activities of external oblique muscles in response to colorectal distention recorded with a Power Lab System (AD Instruments International, were tested as pain indices. Changes in serotonin (5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA concentrations in the colon of rats were analyzed; the enterochromaffin cell numbers and serotonin transporter in the colon of rats were also evaluated with an immunohistochemistry method.RESULTS: NMS treatment significantly reduced pain threshold pressure (37.4 ± 1.4 mmHg, as compared to that of NH rats (57.7 ± 1.9 mmHg, P < 0.05. After JCM-16021 treatment, the pain threshold pressure significantly increased when compared to that before treatment (34.2 ± 0.9 mmHg vs 52.8 ± 2.3 mmHg in the high dose group, 40.2 ± 1.6 mmHg vs 46.5 ± 1.3 mmHg in the middle dose group, and 39.3 ± 0.7 mmHg vs 46.5 ± 1.6 mmHg in the low dose group, P < 0.05. Also JCM-16021 significantly and dose-dependently decreased electromyographic activity to the graded colorectal distension (CRD, (the mean ?AUC values were: 0.17 ± 0.03, 0.53 ± 0.15, 1.06 ± 0.18, 1.22 ± 0.24 in the high dose group; 0.23 ± 0.04, 0.68 ± 0.17, 1.27 ± 0.26, 1.8 ± 0.3 in the middle dose group; and 0.29 ± 0.06, 0.8 ± 0.16, 1.53 ± 0.24, 2.1 ± 0.21 in the low dose group for the pressures 20, 40, 60, 80 mmHg, as compared to the NMS vehicle group. The mean ?AUC values were: 0.57 ± 0.12, 1.33 ± 0.18, 2.57 ± 0.37, 3.08 ± 0.37 for the pressures 20, 40, 60, 80 mmHg (P < 0.05. JCM-16021 treatment significantly reduced the 5-HT concentrations (from high, middle and low dosage groups: 60.25 ± 5.98 ng/100 mg, 60.32 ± 4.22 ng/100 mg, 73.31 ± 7.65 ng/100 mg, as compared to the NMS vehicle groups (93.11 ± 9.85 ng/100 mg, P < 0.05; and increased the 5-HIAA concentrations (after treatment, from high, middle and low dosage groups: 54.24 ± 3.27 ng/100 mg, 50.34 ± 1.26 ng/100 mg, 51.37 ± 2.13 ng/100 mg when compared to that in the NMS vehicle group (51.75 ± 1.98 ng/100 mg, P < 0.05; but did not change the enterochromaffin cell numbers in the colon of rats. In addition, NMS rats had higher SERT expression (n = 10 than NH rats (n = 8, P < 0.05. JCM-16021 treatment significantly decreased SERT expression when compared to the NMS group (P < 0.01-0.001.CONCLUSION: JCM-16021 can attenuate visceral hypersensitivity, and this analgesic effect may be mediated through the serotonin signaling pathway in the colon of rats.

  6. Comparison of the effects of perinatal and neonatal administration of sodium ferulate on repair following excitotoxic neuronal damages induced by maternal oral administration of monosodium glutamate at a late stage of pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yongping Zhang; Lijian Yu; Rundi Ma; Xiaoyu Zhang,; Tingxi Yu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Our previous studies have revealed that ferulic acid (FA) and sodium ferulate (SF) show significant protective effect on excitotoxicity, the present study was conducted to compare its potential favorable effects of maternal?newborn?and both maternal and newborn intraperitoneal (ip) injection of SF on repair following excitotoxic neuronal damages induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG). Methods: The maternal mice were assigned randomly into seven groups (n = 10 animals in each group):...

  7. Comparison between Effects of Intravenous Labetalol and Hydralazine on Control of Hypertension and Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Severe Preeclamptic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabasi Z

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Severe preeclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for 25% of maternal mortality, especially in developing countries. Considering the importance of this complication, the present study aimed to compare between effects of labetalol and hydralazine on control of hypertension and the maternal and neonatal outcomes in severe preeclamptic patients.Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 190 severe preeclamptic patients classified into two groups (95 subjects in each group. Two groups were randomly received hydralazine (5 mg intravenously,, every 20 minutes, up to a maximum of five doses or labetalol (at first 20 mg intravenously, and if not effective, 40, 80, 80, 80 mg respectively, every 20 minutes, up to a maximum of five doses. In both groups, blood pressure and heart rate were recorded 20 minutes after drug administration. Blood pressure control, as well as the maternal and neonatal outcomes, compared between two groups. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared using chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney, and t tests. All significant differences were at p<0.05. Results: Demographic characteristics and blood pressure control were similar in both groups, only five women in the hydralazine group and four women in labetalol group had persistent severe hypertension after maximum of five doses. Hypotension was not observed in both groups. Maternal tachycardia was similar in two groups. Others maternal and neonatal outcomes had no significant differences between two groups.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the effect of labetalol and hydralazin is similar in the control of hypertension in severe preeclamptic patients and there isn’t significant different in maternal and neonatal outcome in two groups.

  8. Neonatal maternal separation exacerbates the reward-enhancing effect of acute amphetamine administration and the anhedonic effect of repeated social defeat in adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Der-Avakian, Andre; Markou, Athina

    2010-01-01

    Early life adversity or parental neglect is linked to the development of a number of psychiatric illnesses, including major depression and substance use disorder. These two disorders are often comorbid and characterized by anhedonia, defined as the reduced ability to experience pleasure or reward. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of neonatal maternal separation in Long Evans rats, a model of early life stress, on anhedonia under baseline conditions and in response to ...

  9. Effects of Maternal Choline Supplementation on the Septohippocampal Cholinergic System in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christy M; Ash, Jessica A; Powers, Brian E; Velazquez, Ramon; Alldred, Melissa J; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Strupp, Barbara J; Mufson, Elliott J

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology including hippocampal cholinergic projection system degeneration. Here we determined the effects of age and maternal choline supplementation (MCS) on hippocampal cholinergic deficits in Ts65Dn mice compared to 2N mice sacrificed at 6-8 and 14-18 months of age. Ts65Dn mice and disomic (2N) littermates sacrificed at ages 6-8 and 14-18 mos were used for an aging study and Ts65Dn and 2N mice derived from Ts65Dn dams were maintained on either a choline-supplemented or a choline-controlled diet (conception to weaning) and examined at 14-18 mos for MCS studies. In the latter, mice were behaviorally tested on the radial arm Morris water maze (RAWM) and hippocampal tissue was examined for intensity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. Hippocampal ChAT activity was evaluated in a separate cohort. ChAT-positive fiber innervation was significantly higher in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus in Ts65Dn mice compared with 2N mice, independent of age or maternal diet. Similarly, hippocampal ChAT activity was significantly elevated in Ts65Dn mice compared to 2N mice, independent of maternal diet. A significant increase with age was seen in hippocampal cholinergic innervation of 2N mice, but not Ts65Dn mice. Degree of ChAT intensity correlated negatively with spatial memory ability in unsupplemented 2N and Ts65Dn mice, but positively in MCS 2N mice. The increased innervation produced by MCS appears to improve hippocampal function, making this a therapy that may be exploited for future translational approaches in human DS. PMID:26391045

  10. The effect of maternal common mental disorders on infant undernutrition in Butajira, Ethiopia: The P-MaMiE study

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    Abdulahi Abdulreshid

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although maternal common mental disorder (CMD appears to be a risk factor for infant undernutrition in South Asian countries, the position in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA is unclear Methods A population-based cohort of 1065 women, in the third trimester of pregnancy, was identified from the demographic surveillance site (DSS in Butajira, to investigate the effect of maternal CMD on infant undernutrition in a predominantly rural Ethiopian population. Participants were interviewed at recruitment and at two months post-partum. Maternal CMD was measured using the locally validated Self-Reported Questionnaire (score of ? six indicating high levels of CMD. Infant anthropometry was recorded at six and twelve months of age. Result The prevalence of CMD was 12% during pregnancy and 5% at the two month postnatal time-point. In bivariate analysis antenatal CMD which had resolved after delivery predicted underweight at twelve months (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.50. There were no other statistically significant differences in the prevalence of underweight or stunted infants in mothers with high levels of CMD compared to those with low levels. The associations between CMD and infant nutritional status were not significant after adjusting for pre-specified potential confounders. Conclusion Our negative finding adds to the inconsistent picture emerging from SSA. The association between CMD and infant undernutrition might be modified by study methodology as well as degree of shared parenting among family members, making it difficult to extrapolate across low- and middle-income countries.

  11. Effects of day of gestation and feeding regimen in Holstein × Gyr cows: II. Maternal and fetal visceral organ mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotta, P P; Filho, S C Valadares; Gionbelli, T R S; Costa E Silva, L F; Engle, T E; Marcondes, M I; Campos, M M; Menezes, A C B; Lobo, A A G

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the influence of day of gestation (DG) and feeding regimens (FR) on maternal and fetal visceral organ mass in Holstein × Gyr cows. Forty-four pregnant multiparous Holstein × Gyr cows with an average initial body weight of 480±10.1 kg and an average initial age of 5±0.5 yr were allocated to 1 of 2 FR: ad libitum (AL; n=20) or maintenance level (ML; n=24). Maintenance level was considered to be 1.15% of body weight (dry matter basis) and met 100% of the energy requirements; AL provided 190% of the total net energy requirements. Cows were individually fed a corn silage and concentrate-based diet composed of 93% roughage and 7% concentrate (dry matter basis) as a total mixed ration twice daily. Pregnant cows were slaughtered at 4 DG: 139 (n=11), 199 (n=11), 241 (n=11), and 268 (n=11) d, which was followed by necropsy. Mass of heart, liver, and gastrointestinal tract was heavier in AL- than in ML-fed cows. Mammary gland mass was heavier in AL- than in ML-fed cows, and the heaviest mass was observed at 268 d of gestation. Feeding regimen did not influence fetal body weight in this study. The majority of the visceral organ masses were similar in fetuses from cows fed AL or ML. These data indicate that maternal feed restriction does not affect the development of most fetal organs or fetal development; however, some maternal organs are affected by the FR provided. Moreover, the negative effect on mammary gland mass caused by ML feeding will probably not affect the subsequent lactation because the crude protein concentration in the mammary gland increased with ML feeding. However, we suggest that the AL diet in pregnant dry cows should be provided with caution because the amount of fat in the mammary gland increased at 268 d of gestation. PMID:25726105

  12. Effect of the exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood on the body mass index until adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Ana Paula; Gonçalves-Silva, Regina Maria Veras; Ferreira, Márcia Gonçalves; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo E; Sichieri, Rosely

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Investigate the effect of exposure to smoking during pregnancy and early childhood on changes in the body mass index (BMI) from birth to adolescence. METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405). Between 2009 and 2011, the cohort was re-evaluated. Information about birth weight was obtained from medical records, and exposure to smoking during pregnancy and childhood was assessed at the first interview. Linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and preschool age, and the body mass index of children at birth, childhood and adolescence. RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood. Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester. The changes in body mass index at birth and in childhood were similar for children exposed and those not exposed to maternal smoking. However, from childhood to adolescence the rate of change in the body mass index was higher among those exposed only during pregnancy than among those who were not exposed. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to smoking only during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, seems to affect changes in the body mass index until adolescence, supporting guidelines that recommend women of childbearing age to stop smoking. PMID:26247384

  13. Effect of the exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood on the body mass index until adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Muraro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Investigate the effect of exposure to smoking during pregnancy and early childhood on changes in the body mass index (BMI from birth to adolescence. METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405. Between 2009 and 2011, the cohort was re-evaluated. Information about birth weight was obtained from medical records, and exposure to smoking during pregnancy and childhood was assessed at the first interview. Linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and preschool age, and the body mass index of children at birth, childhood and adolescence. RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2% also smoked during early childhood. Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59, 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester. The changes in body mass index at birth and in childhood were similar for children exposed and those not exposed to maternal smoking. However, from childhood to adolescence the rate of change in the body mass index was higher among those exposed only during pregnancy than among those who were not exposed. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to smoking only during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, seems to affect changes in the body mass index until adolescence, supporting guidelines that recommend women of childbearing age to stop smoking.

  14. Investigating the effects of in utero benzene exposure on epigenetic modifications in maternal and fetal CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrook, Nicola A; Winn, Louise M

    2015-11-15

    Exposure to the ubiquitous environmental pollutant benzene is positively correlated with leukemia in adults and may be associated with childhood leukemia following in utero exposure. While numerous studies implicate oxidative stress and DNA damage as playing a role in benzene-mediated carcinogenicity, emerging evidence suggests that alterations in epigenetic regulations may be involved. The present study aimed to determine whether DNA methylation and/or various histone modifications were altered following in utero benzene exposure in CD-1 mice. Global DNA methylation and promoter-specific methylation of the tumor suppressor gene, p15, were assessed. Additionally, levels of acetylated histones H3, H4, and H3K56, as well as methylated histones H3K9 and H3K27 were assessed by Western blotting. A significant decrease in global DNA methylation of maternal bone marrow was observed following benzene exposure; however no effect on global DNA methylation was detected in fetal livers. Additionally, no effect of benzene exposure was observed on p15 promoter methylation or any measured histone modifications in both maternal bone marrow and fetal livers. These results suggest that the methodology used in the present study did not reveal alterations in DNA methylation and histone modifications following in utero exposure to benzene; however further experimentation investigating these modifications at the whole genome/epigenome level, as well as at later stages of benzene-induced carcinogenesis, are warranted. PMID:26341289

  15. Effect of the exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood on the body mass index until adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Ana Paula; Gonçalves-Silva, Regina Maria Veras; Ferreira, Márcia Gonçalves; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Sichieri, Rosely

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Investigate the effect of exposure to smoking during pregnancy and early childhood on changes in the body mass index (BMI) from birth to adolescence. METHODS A population-based cohort of children (0-5 years old) from Cuiabá, Midwest Brazil, was assessed in 1999-2000 (n = 2,405). Between 2009 and 2011, the cohort was re-evaluated. Information about birth weight was obtained from medical records, and exposure to smoking during pregnancy and childhood was assessed at the first interview. Linear mixed effects models were used to estimate the association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and preschool age, and the body mass index of children at birth, childhood and adolescence. RESULTS Only 11.3% of the mothers reported smoking during pregnancy, but most of them (78.2%) also smoked during early childhood. Among mothers who smoked only during pregnancy (n = 59), 97.7% had smoked only in the first trimester. The changes in body mass index at birth and in childhood were similar for children exposed and those not exposed to maternal smoking. However, from childhood to adolescence the rate of change in the body mass index was higher among those exposed only during pregnancy than among those who were not exposed. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to smoking only during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, seems to affect changes in the body mass index until adolescence, supporting guidelines that recommend women of childbearing age to stop smoking. PMID:26247384

  16. Effectiveness of a multiple-strategy community intervention to reduce maternal and child health inequalities in Haryana, North India: a mixed-methods study protocol

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    Madhu Gupta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A multiple-strategy community intervention, known as National Rural Health Mission (NRHM, launched in India to improve the availability of and access to better-quality healthcare, especially for rural, poor mothers and children. The final goal of the intervention is to reduce maternal and child health inequalities across geographical areas, socioeconomic status groups, and sex of the child. Extensive, in-depth research is necessary to assess the effectiveness of NRHM, on multiple outcome dimensions. This paper presents the design of a new study, able to overcome the shortcomings of previous research. Objective: To propose a comprehensive, methodologically sound protocol to assess the extent of implementation and the effectiveness of NRHM measures to improve maternal and child health outcomes and reduce maternal and child health inequalities. Design: A mixed-methods approach (quantitative and qualitative is proposed for this study in Haryana, a state in North India. NRHM's health sector plans included health system strengthening, specific maternal and child healthcare strategies, and communitization. Mission documents and reports on progress, financial monitoring, and common and joint review will be reviewed in-depth to assess the extent of the implementation of plans. Data on maternal and child health indicators will be obtained from demographic health surveys held before, during, and after the implementation of the first phase of the NRHM (2005–2012 and compared over time. Differences in maternal and child health indicators will be used to measure maternal and child health inequalities; these will be compared pre- and post-NRHM. Focus group discussions (FGDs with service providers and in-depth interviews with program managers, community representatives, and mothers will be conducted until data saturation is achieved, in two districts of Haryana. Using Nvivo software, an inductive qualitative content analysis will be performed to search for the broader themes across the interviews and FGDs. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research.

  17. Maternal Dental Anxiety and its Effect on Caries Experience Among Children in Udaipur, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ruchi; Shah, Altaf Hussain; Wyne, Amjad Hassan; Sharma, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Context Dental caries is a common oral disease among children. There are various factors that influence caries development. Parents and family environment influence oral health behaviours among children. Dental Anxiety is a common hindrance in seeking dental treatment. Mothers’ dental anxiety may act as a barrier to seek professional advice about their children’s caries experience. Aim To evaluate dental anxiety among mothers and its possible relationship with caries experience in their children in Udaipur city, India Setting and Design The sample was selected from those attending Darshan Dental College and Hospital, Udaipur for dental treatment. The study period was from June 2014 to November 2014. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional survey was designed. A total of 187 mother-child pairs were recruited for the study. The children’s age ranged from 3-14 years. Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS), Hindi version, was used to evaluate dental anxiety among the mothers that categorizes the dental anxiety into five levels. Demographic detail such as age, educational level, and family income was also collected. The World Health Organization (WHO) criteria was utilized for the diagnosis of dental caries in children. DMFT (Decayed, missing and filled teeth) and DMFS (Decayed, missing and filled surfaces) scores were then calculated. Statistical Analysis Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0 was used to interpret data. Maternal anxiety scores taken as mean MDAS were compared with various independent variables. Statistical tests were used to compare maternal anxiety and children’s caries experience. A p value equal or less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results Almost half (49.7%) of the mothers reported as being ‘fairly anxious’ or ‘very anxious’. There was a significant (p=.001) difference in maternal dental anxiety level in relation to age of the children. Mothers of younger children reported higher anxiety scores. Similarly, mothers with lesser education and lesser family income reported higher anxiety scores. The mean decayed score in children of very anxious mothers and phobic mothers was significantly (p=.001) higher as compared to the children of the mothers with lower anxiety levels. Conclusion There was a strong positive association between maternal dental anxiety and children’s dental caries experience. PMID:26266216

  18. Effect of cocaine on periadolescent rats with or without early maternal separation

    OpenAIRE

    Planeta, C.S.; M.T. Marin

    2002-01-01

    Cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and weight loss were investigated in periadolescent Wistar rats kept with their mothers or subjected to repeated maternal separation. Litters allocated to the separation procedure were placed in a temperature-controlled (33ºC) chamber for 3 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P20. Non-handled rats were left undisturbed until weaning. Treatments were started on P30-31 and the test was performed on P36-37. Animals received injections of saline or coca...

  19. Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation: effect on developmental outcome in breast-fed infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, L.; Jørgensen, M.H.; Olsen, S.F.; Straarup, Ellen Marie; Michaelsen, K.F.

    2005-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accumulates in the brain during the 1st and 2nd years of life. The objective of this study was to see if an increased content of DHA in breast-milk via maternal fish oil (FO)-supplementation affects mental development in term infants. one hundred twenty-two Danish mothers with a habitual fish intake below the population median were randomized to 4.5 g center dot d(-1) of FO or olive oil (OO) for the first four months of lactation. Fifty-three mothers with habitual fish...

  20. The effect of reducing the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio during pregnancy and lactation on maternal and fetal adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    The INFAT-study examines the effect of a reduction in the ratio of n-6/n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation on adipose tissue development of the infant. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the effect of the dietary intervention on adipokines (leptin, sOB-R, adiponectin) and insulin in maternal blood and breast milk samples during pregnancy and lactation in a subgroup of the INFAT-study. Moreover, these adipokines, insulin and oth...

  1. The Effect of the Timing of Intramuscular Oxytocin Injection on Maternal Bleeding during the Third Stage of Labour

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    Sakine Mohamadian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: The third stage of labour is one of the most troublesome stages of child delivery. The basic principle of the third stage management is administrating prophylactic uterotonics. However, the time of its administration varies in different hospitals. This study aimed to determine the effect of intramuscular oxytocin injection after emergence of the fetal anterior shoulder or placental expulsion on bleeding in the third stage of labour. Methodology: This clinical trial was conducted on 100 pregnant women with gestational age of 38-42 weeks, and singleton pregnancies. Subjects were selected using convenience sampling and were then randomly assigned to intervention (injection of 10 IU intramuscular oxytocin after emergence of the fetal anterior shoulder and control (injection of 10 IU intramuscular oxytocin after placental expulsion groups. Blood was collected in containers and weighed with a weighing scale.  A checklist was used to record labor and delivery related data. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5, using Chi-square and t-test. Findings: The mean amount of bleeding during the third stage of labour was 183.4 ± 145.8 and 202.2 ±208.8 ml in intervention and control group, respectively. No significant difference was found between two groups in terms of maternal bleeding. Conclusion: Injection of intramuscular oxytocin either after emergence of the fetal anterior shoulder or placental expulsion does not affect the amount of maternal bleeding during the third stage of labour.

  2. Effects of maternal ischemic preconditioning in the colon of newborn rats submitted to hypoxia-reoxygenation insult

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Andréia Lopes de, Freitas; Rúdnei de Oliveira Luciano, Gomes; Bruno Leonardo de Freitas, Soares; Ricardo, Artigiani Neto; Edna Frasson de Souza, Montero; José Luiz, Martins.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of maternal remote ischemic preconditioning (IPCr) in the colonic mucosa of newborn rats subjected to hypoxia and reoxygenation. METHODS: Newborn Wistar rats were divided into three groups. Control Group (CG), Hypoxia and Reoxygenation Group (HRG) and Remote Isc [...] hemic Preconditioning Group (IPCrG). Hypoxia and reoxygenation was performed 2x per day, with an interval of 6 hours, on the 1st, 2nd and 3rd days of life, with 10 minutes of CO2 at 100%, followed by 10 minutes O2 at 100%(HRG/IPCrG). The maternal IPCr was performed 24 hours before delivery by applying a rubber band tourniquet to the left hind limb (IPCrG). Segments of the colon underwent histological (HE) and immunohistochemical analysis for caspase-3 and COX - 2. RESULTS: The histological findings showed no intestinal mucosal damage in the CG group and severe lesions in HRG that was attenuated in the IPCrG (p

  3. Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Do the Effects on Innate (Toll-Like Receptor Function Have Implications for Subsequent Allergic Disease?

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    Prescott Susan L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Subtle increases in immaturity of immune function in early infancy have been implicated in the rising susceptibility to allergic disease, particularly relative impairment of type 1 interferon (IFN-? responses in the neonatal period. Although genetic predisposition is a clear risk factor, the escalating rates of allergic disease in infancy suggest that environmental factors are also implicated. We previously showed that maternal smoking in pregnancy may impair neonatal IFN-? responses. Our more recent studies now indicate that this common avoidable toxic exposure is also associated with attenuation of innate immune function, with attenuated Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated microbial responses (including TLR-2, -3, -4, and -9 responses. Most notably, the effects were more marked if the mothers were also allergic. In this review, we discuss the significance of these observations in the context of the emerging hypothesis that variations in TLR function in early life may be implicated in allergic propensity. There is now growing evidence that many of the key pathways involved in subsequent T-cell programming and regulation (namely, antigen-presenting cells and regulatory T cells rely heavily on microbe-driven TLR activation for maturation and function. Factors that influence the function and activity of these innate pathways in early life may contribute to the increasing predisposition for allergic disease. Although "cleaner" environments have been implicated, here we explore the possibility that other common environmental exposures (such as maternal smoking could also play a role.

  4. Effect of maternal nutritional status on the birth weight among women of tea tribe in Dibrugarh district

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    Gogoi Gourangie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What is the influence of maternal nutritional status during pregnancy on the birth weight? Objective: To assess the effect of maternal nutritional status during pregnancy on the birth weight of the baby among tea tribe women in Dibrugarh district. Study Design: Field-based cohort study. Setting: Five tea estates in Dibrugarh District, Assam. Period of Study: One year (April 1998 to April 1999. Participants: A cohort of non-pregnant currently married tea garden women of reproductive age group (15-44 years from similar socio-economic background. Materials and Methods: Oral questionnaire for age, family structure, obstetric history, annual income, and period of gestation. Anthropometric measurements of weight and height were recorded using bathroom scales and the anthropometric rod. Measurements of weight were repeated during the first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy. Birth weight of the baby was recorded at delivery, irrespective of the period of gestation and mode of delivery. Statistical Analysis: Correlation co-efficient, standard deviation, and regression analysis. Results and Conclusions: Of all, 88% mothers had pre-pregnant weight of < 45 kg, and 61% babies had birth weight < 2500 gm. Subjects with better pre-pregnant weight had corresponding favorable total weight gain, resulting in better birth weight of the babies. Pre-pregnant weight had direct positive linear relationship with the birth weight. There is a need to improve the nutritional status of the adolescent girl in order to build up her pre-pregnant weight for a favorable birth weight.

  5. The Effects of Paternal Support and Maternal Support on Vocational Exploration and Commitment of Taiwanese College Students

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    Ching-Hua Mao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of paternal support and maternal support on the Vocational Exploration and commitment to career choices of 368 Taiwanese college students were examined. Based on an integrative literature review, this study designed four constructs pertaining to paternal/maternal support: emotional support, information provision, esteem and autonomy support, and tangible assistance. The Commitment to Career Choices Scale (CCCS was divided to two dimensions: a Vocational exploration and Commitment (VEC dimension reflecting variations in one’s level of commitment to career choices, and a Tendency to Foreclose (TTF dimension assessing individual differences in how one commits to career choices. According to the results of regression analysis, the esteem and autonomy support from mothers negatively predicted vocational exploration and commitment (VEC. Furthermore, the esteem and autonomy support from fathers was the only negative and significant predictor of the tendency to foreclose. The negative relationship represents openness to the exploratory experiences of the commitment process with paternal support. The other three significant predictors, esteem and autonomy support from mothers, information support from mothers, and emotional support from fathers, were positively correlated with the tendency to foreclose.

  6. Adolescent eating disorder behaviours and cognitions: gender-specific effects of child, maternal and family risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, N.; De Stavola, B.; Ploubidis, G.; Simonoff, E.; Treasure, J.; Field, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Eating disorder behaviours begin in adolescence. Few longitudinal studies have investigated childhood risk and protective factors. Aims To investigate the prevalence of eating disorder behaviours and cognitions and associated childhood psychological, physical and parental risk factors among a cohort of 14-year-old children. Method Data were collected from 6140 boys and girls aged 14 years. Gender-stratified models were used to estimate prospective associations between childhood body dissatisfaction, body mass index (BMI), self-esteem, maternal eating disorder and family economic disadvantage on adolescent eating disorder behaviours and cognitions. Results Childhood body dissatisfaction strongly predicted eating disorder cognitions in girls, but only in interaction with BMI in boys. Higher self-esteem had a protective effect, particularly in boys. Maternal eating disorder predicted body dissatisfaction and weight/shape concern in adolescent girls and dieting in boys. Conclusions Risk factors for eating disorder behaviours and cognitions vary according to gender. Prevention strategies should be gender-specific and target modifiable predictors in childhood and early adolescence. PMID:26206865

  7. Adolescent eating disorder behaviours and cognitions: gender-specific effects of child, maternal and family risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, N; De Stavola, B; Ploubidis, G; Simonoff, E; Treasure, J; Field, A E

    2015-10-01

    BackgroundEating disorder behaviours begin in adolescence. Few longitudinal studies have investigated childhood risk and protective factors.AimsTo investigate the prevalence of eating disorder behaviours and cognitions and associated childhood psychological, physical and parental risk factors among a cohort of 14-year-old children.MethodData were collected from 6140 boys and girls aged 14 years. Gender-stratified models were used to estimate prospective associations between childhood body dissatisfaction, body mass index (BMI), self-esteem, maternal eating disorder and family economic disadvantage on adolescent eating disorder behaviours and cognitions.ResultsChildhood body dissatisfaction strongly predicted eating disorder cognitions in girls, but only in interaction with BMI in boys. Higher self-esteem had a protective effect, particularly in boys. Maternal eating disorder predicted body dissatisfaction and weight/shape concern in adolescent girls and dieting in boys.ConclusionsRisk factors for eating disorder behaviours and cognitions vary according to gender. Prevention strategies should be gender-specific and target modifiable predictors in childhood and early adolescence. PMID:26206865

  8. Effects of maternal restriction in vitamin B-6 on neocortex development in rats: neuron differentiation and synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groziak, S M; Kirksey, A

    1990-05-01

    Effects of maternal restrictions in vitamin B-6 on neuron differentiation and synaptogenesis in developing neocortex were examined. Rats were fed ad libitum a vitamin B-6-free diet supplemented with 0.0 or 0.6 mg pyridoxine hydrochloride (PN.HCl)/kg diet during gestation followed by a control level of 7.0 mg/kg diet during lactation, or they were fed the vitamin B-6-free diet supplemented with 0.6 or 7.0 mg PN.HCl/kg diet throughout gestation and lactation. Neocortices of the offspring were examined at 30 d of age by light and electron microscopy. All maternal restrictions in vitamin B-6 reduced the number of higher order dendrites on stellate neurons in layer II and on pyramidal neurons in layer V of the neocortex and decreased synaptic density in the neuropil of the neocortex. The findings indicated that vitamin B-6 restriction during gestation, either marginal or severe, was the critical treatment factor that adversely affected synaptogenesis and at least one event in neuron differentiation in the neocortex, the arborization of dendrites. PMID:2341912

  9. Effectiveness of Lactobacillus reuteri in infantile colic and colicky induced maternal depression: a prospective single blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Guo-Lin; Zhao, Lei; Qiao, Dong-Dong; Kang, Wen-Qing; Tang, Mao-Qin; Xu, Jin-Ke

    2015-06-01

    Infant colic, excessive crying of unknown cause, is a major burden to families and effects about 10-30 % of infants. Despite decades of research, the exact cause and treatment of infant colic has remained elusive. The use of Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938) in infant colic is somewhat controversial and hence, we designed this study to evaluate its efficacy in infantile colic. We recruited predominantly or exclusively breastfed infants, aged less than 4 months in a placebo controlled observational randomized study. Participants' were assigned to receive L. reuteri at a dose 10(8) colony forming units (n = 21) and placebo (n = 21). Placebo was an identical formulation without live micro-organisms. Treatment was given to subjects for 21 days and they were followed for 4 weeks. Treatment success (primary outcome), daily reduction in crying time, parent satisfaction and reduction in maternal depression (secondary outcomes) were assessed at the end of study period. Treatment success was observed in all infants (100 %) of the probiotic group while it was seen in 15.7 % of the placebo group. Mean daily crying time was more significantly reduced to 32.1 ± 8.3 min/day (P parent's satisfaction and improvement in maternal depression (Edinburgh postnatal depression scale) was also significantly higher in the probiotic group. In our study population, reduction in crying time was significant (P depression during infantile colic. We suggest L. reuteri may be a safe and efficacious option for reducing infant colic. PMID:25876529

  10. Effects of maternal gate-keeping behavior on father involvement in care of a pre-school child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihi? Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The research so far indicates that the context in which the father’s role takes place significantly influences the form and level of father involvement in taking care of the child. The primary goal of this research was to describe the forms and effects of maternal gate-keeping behavior as a characteristic form of interaction between parents which is, as part of the context, considered a significant factor in father involvement in care of the child. Research participants were 247 parental couples from complete families whose oldest child attended a pre-school institution. Fathers provided assessments of their own involvement via the Father Involvement Inventory, as well as assessments of prominence of gate-keeping behavior in their wives via the checklist of maternal gate-keeping behavior. Mothers reported on their beliefs about the importance and possibilities of father involvement in care of the child, as well as on their personal satisfaction with the current involvement of their husband in the joint care of the child. The results point out to the particular forms of mothers’ ambivalence when it comes to the joint care of the child, which is a form of gate-keeping behavior. The frequency of gate-keeping behavior, assessed by the checklist, significantly changes the possibilities of father involvement in taking care of the child in the developmental phase of the family, having in mind that the task of this phase is precisely the definition of parental roles and formation of parent cooperative principle.

  11. Adolescent opiate exposure in the female rat induces subtle alterations in maternal care and transgenerational effects on play behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicole L; Carini, Lindsay; Schenk, Marian E; Stewart, Michelle; Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription opiates, such as Vicodin(®) and MSContin(®), has increased dramatically over the past decade. Of particular concern is the rising popularity of these drugs in adolescent female populations. Use during this critical developmental period could have significant long-term consequences for both the female user as well as potential effects on her future offspring. To address this issue, we have begun modeling adolescent opiate exposure in female rats and have observed significant transgenerational effects despite the fact that all drugs are withdrawn several weeks prior to pregnancy. The purpose of the current set of studies was to determine whether adolescent morphine exposure modifies postpartum care. In addition, we also examined juvenile play behavior in both male and female offspring. The choice of the social play paradigm was based on previous findings demonstrating effects of both postpartum care and opioid activity on play behavior. The findings revealed subtle modifications in the maternal behavior of adolescent morphine-exposed females, primarily related to the amount of time females' spend nursing and in non-nursing contact with their young. In addition, male offspring of adolescent morphine-exposed mothers (MOR-F1) demonstrate decreased rough and tumble play behaviors, with no significant differences in general social behaviors (i.e., social grooming and social exploration). Moreover, there was a tendency toward increased rough and tumble play in MOR-F1 females, demonstrating the sex-specific nature of these effects. Given the importance of the postpartum environment on neurodevelopment, it is possible that modifications in maternal-offspring interactions, related to a history of adolescent opiate exposure, plays a role in the observed transgenerational effects. Overall, these studies indicate that the long-term consequences of adolescent opiate exposure can impact both the female and her future offspring. PMID:21713113

  12. Adolescent opiate exposure in the female rat induces subtle alterations in maternal care and transgenerational effects on play behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElizabethMcConeByrnes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-medical use of prescription opiates, such as Vicodin® and MSContin®, has increased dramatically over the past decade. Of particular concern is the rising popularity of these drugs in adolescent female populations. Use during this critical developmental period could have significant long-term consequences for both the female user as well as potential effects on her future offspring. To address this issue, we have begun modeling adolescent opiate exposure in female rats and have observed significant transgenerational effects despite the fact that all drugs are withdrawn several weeks prior to pregnancy. The purpose of the current set of studies was to determine whether adolescent morphine exposure modifies postpartum care. In addition, we also examined juvenile play behavior in both male and female offspring. The choice of the social play paradigm was based on previous findings demonstrating effects of both postpartum care and opioid activity on play behavior. The findings revealed subtle modifications in the maternal behavior of adolescent morphine-exposed females, primarily related to the amount of time females’ spend nursing and in non-nursing contact with their young. In addition, male offspring of adolescent morphine-exposed mothers (MOR-F1 demonstrate decreased rough and tumble play behaviors, with no significant differences in general social behaviors (i.e. social grooming and social exploration. Moreover, there was a tendency toward increased rough and tumble play in MOR-F1 females, demonstrating the sex-specific nature of these effects. Given the importance of the postpartum environment on neurodevelopment, it is possible that modifications in maternal-offspring interactions, related to a history of adolescent opiate exposure, plays a role in the observed transgenerational effects. Overall, these studies indicate that the long-term consequences of adolescent opiate exposure can impact both the female and her future offspring.

  13. Maternal Microchimerism

    OpenAIRE

    Kanold, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Microchimerism refers to one individual harboring cells or DNA at a low level that derive from another individual. The most common source is pregnancy when cells from the fetus and the mother pass the placenta bidirectionally, and give rise to maternal microchimerism (cells from the mother in the fetus) and fetal microchimerism (cells from the fetus in the mother). The cells persist in the individual, at least until middleage. Several hypotheses have addressed the consequences ...

  14. Maternal care

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    In June 2000 a distinguished group of obstetricians, midwives, general practitioners, and medical statisticians came together to discuss maternal care. Chaired by Professor James Drife from Leeds, discussion ranged over many topics, including: the changing role of the obstetrician, general practitioners, and the increasing status and responsibility of midwives. Other subjects include the induction of labour, obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia, and debates about the place and kind of delivery...

  15. Maternal Moderators of Child Care: The Role of Maternal Separation Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Susan L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between maternal separation anxiety, maternal employment, and quality of child care for 49 mothers of 2- to 3-year olds in day care centers. Findings suggest that the mother's concern about separation is an important moderator of the effects of maternal employment and child care on children's development. (BB)

  16. Differential Effects Of Maternal Sensitivity To Infant Distress And Non-Distress On Social-Emotional Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Leerkes, Esther M.; Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Associations between maternal sensitivity to infant distress and non-distress and infant social-emotional adjustment were examined in a subset of dyads from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care (N = 376). Mothers reported on infant temperament at 1 and 6 months postpartum, and maternal sensitivity to distress and non-distress were observed at 6 months. Child behavior problems, social competence, and affect dysregulation were measured at 24 and 36 months. Maternal sensitivity to distress but no...

  17. The effectiveness of community-based interventions to improve maternal and infant health in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Alan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based intervention project aimed at reducing maternal and infant mortality in a poor urban district in the city of Natal, in the Northeast of Brazil. Methods. The intervention, called the ProNatal project, introduced a program of integrated community health care to a geographically defined population. The interventions included the establishment of antenatal clinics at the district's health centers, the opening of the maternity facilities at the polyclinic for low-risk deliveries, the introduction of a family planning clinic and a breast-feeding clinic, support from pediatricians for under-5 (well-baby clinics, children's outpatient services and children's emergency care, and the introduction of health agents recruited from the local community. Representative surveys of the population were taken at the project's inception (July 1995 and then 30 months later (December 1997, using a general health questionnaire adapted to the local conditions. Mortality data were collected from local registration systems as well as from an autopsy survey of perinatal and infant deaths. Results. During 1995 there were 4 maternal deaths from 1 195 pregnancies (maternal mortality of 335/100 000; three of the deaths were related to hypertension and one to uterine perforation after an illegal abortion. During 1998 (post-intervention, there were no maternal deaths in pregnancy or childbirth. In 1993 no deliveries took place at the polyclinic, but in 1998 there were 946 deliveries at the clinic without any serious complications. The method of delivery, the incidence of prematurity, and the incidence of low birthweight did not change significantly over the study period. In the post-intervention survey, 75% of women reported receiving contraceptive advice from a doctor in the preceding year, compared to 50% in the first sample. A mortality survey carried out in 1993-1995 estimated the infant mortality rate to be 60/1 000 live births. By 1998, using data collected locally by active surveillance, the infant mortality rate was 37/1 000 live births. The causes of infant death in both those periods were dominated by respiratory infections and diarrheal disease. Over 95% of both samples initiated breast-feeding, but a higher proportion of the post-intervention sample reported breast-feeding for longer than 6 months (41% vs. 32%, P = 0.0005. No differences were apparent in the use of under-5 clinics, but immunization rates improved. Post-intervention, significant improvements were documented in the mothers' understanding of basic hygiene, their knowledge of causes of common diseases, and their management of acute respiratory infections and diarrhea in children. This was particularly true for the households visited by a community health agent. Conclusions. Inequalities in health care in poor urban populations can be reduced by integrated community-based interventions, including the use of health agents recruited from the local community.

  18. Negative Effects of Maternal Smoking on Pregnancy and the Fetus in Relation to Elevated Levels of Erythropoetin in Umbilical Cord Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Šumichrastová; Ingrid Škor?ová; Erik Kúdela; Jana Siváková; Michaela Hrtánková; Iveta Švecová; Kamil Biringer; Ján Danko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Based on many scientific research studies, there has been demonstrated a relation between smoking of pregnant women and its negative effects on pregnancy, intrauterine fetal growth, postnatal newborn condition, and development. The aim of our study is to highlight the adverse effects of cigarette use during pregnancy and to evaluate the effect of maternal smoking on the levels of erythropoietin (EPO) in umbilical cord plasma. Our aim was to show an effect ...

  19. Effect of essential oil from Citrus aurantium in maternal reproductive outcome and fetal anomaly frequency in rats

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gustavo T., Volpato; Luis A.D., Francia-Farje; Débora C., Damasceno; Renata V., Oliveira; Clélia A., Hiruma-Lima; Wilma G., Kempinas.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus aurantium L., conhecida popularmente como laranja amarga, é amplamente utilizada na medicina popular, mas há poucos dados na literatura sobre seus efeitos na gestação. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a influencia do óleo essencial obtido das frutas de Citrus aurantium no desempenho [...] reprodutivo materno e na incidência de anomalias fetais em ratos. Ratas Wistar prenhes foram randomizadas em quarto grupos (n mínimo = 12 animais/grupo): G1 = controle, G2 à G4 = tratados com óleo essencial de C. aurantium nas doses de 125, 250 e 500 mg/kg, respectivamente. Ratas foram tratadas oralmente, por gavage, com óleo essencial da planta ou veículo durante os períodos de pré-implantação e organogênese (dias de prenhez 0-14). No dia 20 de prenhez as ratas foram anestesiadas e o útero foi pesado com seu conteúdo e os fetos foram analisados. Resultados mostraram que o grupo tratado com 500 mg/kg apresentou diminuição do peso e índice placentário, embora o tratamento com óleo essencial de laranja amarga não mostrou nenhuma alteração no desempenho reprodutivo materno, efeito tóxico, mudanças na ossificação e nas taxas de malformações. Concluindo, o tratamento com óleo essencial de Citrus aurantium não foi teratogênico e não alterou o desempenho reprodutivo materno. Abstract in english Citrus aurantium L., commonly known as bitter orange, is widely used in folk medicine, but there is little data in the literature about the effects on pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of essential oil obtained from fruits of Citrus aurantium on the maternal repr [...] oductive outcome and fetal anomaly incidence in rats. Pregnant Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n minimum = 12 animals/group): G1 = control, G2 to G4 = treated with essential oil from C. aurantium at dose 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Rats were orally treated, by gavage, with plant essential oil or vehicle during pre-implantation and organogenic period (gestational day 0-14). On gestational day 20 the rats were anaesthetized and the gravid uterus was weighed with its contents and the fetuses were analyzed. Results showed that the treated group with 500 mg/kg presented decreased placental weights and placental index, although the treatment with bitter orange essential oil did not show any alteration in maternal reproductive performance, toxicological effect, changes in ossification sites, and malformation index. In conclusion, the treatment of Citrus aurantium essential oil was not teratogenic and did not alter the maternal reproductive outcome.

  20. Nutrients and disturbance history in two Plantago species: maternal effects as a clue for observed dichotomy between resprouting and seeding strategies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Latzel, Vít; Hájek, Tomáš; Klimešová, Jitka; Gómez, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 118, ?. 11 (2009), s. 1669-1678. ISSN 0030-1299 R&D Projects: GA ?R GD206/08/H044; GA ?R(CZ) GA526/06/0723 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : maternal effects * nutrients * disturbance Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2009

  1. EFFECTS ON THE FETAL RAT INTESTINE OF MATERNAL MALNUTRITION AND EXPOSURE TO NITROFEN (2,4-DICHLOROPHENYL-P-NITROPHENYL ETHER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of maternal protein-energy malnutrition and exposure to nitrofen on selected aspects of intestinal morphology and function were studied in the fetal rat. Pregnant rats were fed, throughout gestation, diets containing 24% or 6% casein as the sole source of protein. Red...

  2. Effects of maternal and pre-weaning undernutrition in rat offspring: Age at reproductive senescence and intergenerational pup growth and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal and/or postnatal undernutrition are widespread in human populations and are components of many experimental developmental and reproductive toxicology bio-assays. This study investigated in utero and/or pre-weaning undernutrition effects on reproductive maturation and se...

  3. MATERNAL SELF-ESTEEM, EXPOSURE TO LEAD, AND CHILD NEURODEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Pamela J. Surkan; Schnaas, Lourdes; Wright, Rosalind J; Téllez-Rojo, Martha M.; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hu, Howard; Hernández-Avila, E. Mauricio; Bellinger, David C.; Schwartz, Joel; Perroni, Estela; Wright, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    The notion that maternal personality characteristics influence cognitive development in their children has been grounded in stress moderation theory. Maternal personality traits, such as self-esteem, may buffer maternal stressors or lead to improved maternal-child interactions that directly impact neurodevelopment. This can be extended to suggest that maternal personality may serve to attenuate or exacerbate the effects of other neurotoxicants, although this has not been studied directly. We ...

  4. Effects of chronic stress during pregnancy on maternal performance in the guinea pig (Cavia aperea f. porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Teresa; Schöpper, Hanna; Huber, Susanne

    2013-03-01

    Stress experienced during pregnancy can have persistent impact on the female's physiology and behaviour not only during but even beyond pregnancy. The present study aimed to evaluate such long-term effects of stress in terms of repeated strobe light exposure during early to mid gestation on behavioural aspects of mothering activities and lactational effort in lactating guinea pigs. We found that maternal behaviour was negatively affected by stress experience during pregnancy with treatment females developing a higher level of offspring-directed aggression than controls. In addition, our measure of lactational performances showed tendencies of lowered milk supply and longer pup suckling durations in stressed females. We suggest that this may represent a strategy to advance infant weaning following demanding conditions caused by chronic stress experience during pregnancy. PMID:23287615

  5. Alcohol Abuse in Pregnant Women: Effects on the Fetus and Newborn, Mode of Action and Maternal Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher Ornoy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Offspring of mothers using ethanol during pregnancy are known to suffer from developmental delays and/or a variety of behavioral changes. Ethanol, may affect the developing fetus in a dose dependent manner. With very high repetitive doses there is a 6–10% chance of the fetus developing the fetal alcoholic syndrome manifested by prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, specific craniofacial dysmorphic features, mental retardation, behavioral changes and a variety of major anomalies. With lower repetitive doses there is a risk of "alcoholic effects" mainly manifested by slight intellectual impairment, growth disturbances and behavioral changes. Binge drinking may impose some danger of slight intellectual deficiency. It is advised to offer maternal abstinence programs prior to pregnancy, but they may also be initiated during pregnancy with accompanying close medical care. The long term intellectual outcome of children born to ethanol dependent mothers is influenced to a large extent by the environment in which the exposed child is raised.

  6. No evidence for pathogenic variants or maternal effect of ZFP57 as the cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Susanne E; Hahnemann, Johanne M D

    2012-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome, which, in 50-60% of sporadic cases, is caused by hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1 differentially methylated region (DMR) at chromosome 11p15.5. The underlying defect of this hypomethylation is largely unknown. Recently, recessive mutations of the ZFP57 gene were reported in patients with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus type 1, showing hypomethylation at multiple imprinted loci, including KCNQ1OT1 DMR in some. The aim of our study was to determine whether ZFP57 alterations were a genetic cause of the hypomethylation at KCNQ1OT1 DMR in patients with BWS. We sequenced ZFP57 in 27 BWS probands and in 23 available mothers to test for a maternal effect. We identified three novel, presumably benign sequence variants in ZFP57; thus, we found no evidence for ZFP57 alterations as a major cause in sporadic BWS cases.

  7. Effect of maternal intrapartum glucose therapy on neonatal blood glucose levels and neurobehavioral status of hypoglycemic term newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, S

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of 45 term, vaginally delivered infants were studied to determine effect of maternal intrapartum glucose therapy on neonatal blood glucose level at birth and at one and 2 hours of age. Twenty-three infants whose mother received glucose infusion prior to delivery (study group) had a significantly higher mean cord blood glucose level, lower 2 hour blood glucose levels and about three times higher incidence of hypoglycemia (glucose level less than or equal to 2.2 mmol/l) as compared to 22 infants whose mothers did not receive any glucose or fluid therapy. Neurobehavioral evaluation of the infants at 1 and 2 hour demonstrated, a significant association between hypoglycemia and a low muscle tone score and a delayed habituation to various stimuli. Blood glucose levels must be routinely monitored in infants whose mother receive glucose infusion prior to delivery to detect and treat early neonatal hypoglycemia. PMID:3210107

  8. Nutritional skewing of conceptus sex in sheep: effects of a maternal diet enriched in rumen-protected polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Jim E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary theory suggests that in polygynous mammalian species females in better body condition should produce more sons than daughters. Few controlled studies have however tested this hypothesis and controversy exists as to whether body condition score or maternal diet is in fact the determining factor of offspring sex. Here, we examined whether maternal diet, specifically increased n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA intake, of ewes with a constant body condition score around the time of conception influenced sex ratio. Methods Ewes (n = 44 maintained in similar body condition throughout the study were assigned either a control (C diet or one (F enriched in rumen-protected PUFA, but otherwise essentially equivalent, from four weeks prior to breeding until d13 post-estrus. On d13, conceptuses were recovered, measured, cultured to assess their capacity for interferon-tau (IFNT production and their sex determined. The experiment was repeated with all ewes being fed the F diet to remove any effects of parity order on sex ratio. Maternal body condition score (BCS, plasma hormone and metabolite concentrations were also assessed throughout the study and related to diet. Results In total 129 conceptuses were recovered. Ewes on the F diet produced significantly more male than female conceptuses (proportion male = 0.69; deviation from expected ratio of 0.5, P 0.1, but positively correlated with maternal body condition score (P Conclusion These results provide evidence that maternal diet, in the form of increased amounts of rumen-protected PUFA fed around conception, rather than maternal body condition, can skew the sex ratio towards males. These observations may have implications to the livestock industry and animal management policies when offspring of one sex may be preferred over the other.

  9. Enhancing the Interactions of Teenage Mothers and Their At-Risk Children: Effectiveness of a Maternal-Focused Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Barbara; Fewell, Rebecca R.; Gross, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a short-term interaction-focused parenting curriculum on maternal behaviors and child development outcomes. Participants were 94 teen-mother-child dyads; 48 in the intervention group received a relationship-focused curriculum offered in 24, 1-hour sessions. Maternal behaviors during play were videotaped and…

  10. Maternal obesity and late effects on offspring metabolism / Obesidade materna e efeitos tardios sobre o metabolismo da prole

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Daniele Sá, Vido; Mariana Bocca, Nejm; Neila Ribeiro, Silva; Sylvia Maria Affonso, Silva; Sérgio Luiz, Cravo; Jacqueline, Luz.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Avaliar os efeitos tardios da obesidade materna induzida por lesão do núcleo ventromedial do hipotálamo sobre o metabolismo da prole. Trinta dias após a lesão bilateral do hipotálamo ventromedial, ratos fêmeas foram colocadas para acasalar e divididas em dois grupos de animais gestantes: Co [...] ntrole (C) – falsa lesão e Obeso (OB) – lesionados. Três meses após o nascimento, de acordo com os grupos das mães, os filhotes foram divididos em animais controle e obesos que recebiam dieta normocalórica (C-N and OB-N) e animais controle e obesos que recebiam dieta hipercalórica (C-H and OB-H). Aos 120 dias de idade, os animais foram eutanasiados e as carcaças, fezes e ração foram submetidas à análise calorimétrica para determinação do balanço energético e composição corporal.Resultados Durante o período de crescimento, os filhos de mães obesas mostraram maiores valores de peso corporal e ingestão alimentar que animais controle. Os animais obesos apresentaram maiores valores de ganho de peso corporal e eficiência metabólica que os animais controle quando adultos. A dieta hipercalórica levou ao aumento da energia metabolizável, percentagem de energia absorvida e gasto energético para ambos os grupos. A composição corporal foi somente afetada pela associação da dieta hipercalórica com a obesidade materna que levou ao aumento da gordura corporal.Conclusões : A obesidade materna levou ao sobrepeso tardio na prole, sugerindo uma programação fetal. Pela tendência apresentada, acreditamos que a ingestão prolongada de dietas hipercalóricas em animais adultos possa induzir uma piora no quadro de sobrepeso induzido pela obesidade materna. Arq Bras Endocrinol Metab. 2014;58(3):301-7 Abstract in english Objective : The aim of this study was to evaluate the late effects of maternal obesity induced by lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamus on offspring metabolism.Materials and methods : Thirty days after the bilateral lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamus, female rats were mated and divided into 2 [...] groups of pregnant animals: Control (C) – false lesion (sham) and Obese (OB) – lesion. Three months after that, with the groups of mothers, offspring were divided into control and obese animals that received a normocaloric diet (C-N and OB-N), and control and obese animals that received a hypercaloric diet (C-H and OB-H). At 120 days of age, the animals were euthanized and their carcasses, feces and food were submitted to calorimetric analysis to determine energy balance and body composition.Results : During the growth period, offspring from obese mothers showed higher values of body weight and food intake than controls. Obese animals showed higher body weight gain and gross food efficiency than control animals in adulthood. The hypercaloric diet led to increased metabolizable energy intake, percentage of absorbed energy and energy expenditure in both groups. Body composition was only affected by the association of hypercaloric diet and maternal obesity that led to increased body fat.Conclusions : Maternal obesity has led to the development of later overweight in offspring, suggesting fetal programming. According to the trend presented, it is believed that the prolonged intake of hypercaloric diets in adult animals may, as an additional effect, induce worsening of the overweight induced by maternal obesity. Arq Bras Endocrinol Metab. 2014;58(3):301-7

  11. Maternal employment and adolescent development

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhm, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates how maternal employment is related to the outcomes of 10 and 11 year olds, controlling for a wide variety of child, mother and family characteristics. The results suggest that limited amounts of work by mothers benefit youths who are relatively disadvantaged and even long hours, which occur relatively rarely, are unlikely to leave them much worse off. By contrast, maternal labor supply is estimated to have much more harmful effects on advantaged adolescents. Particular...

  12. Maternal Hipertansiyon Ve Meonatal Nötropeni

    OpenAIRE

    CENG?Z, A.T.; KEND?, Ö.; KIYAN, M.; MALATYALIO?LU, E.; Aydin, M

    2010-01-01

    MATERNAL HYPERTANSION AND NEONATAL NEUTROPENIA. ? Maternal hypertension effects the hematopoietic system of fetus. In this study, total white blood cell, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes count were compared in two groups of newborns. First group included 37 newborns whose mothers had hypertension during preg¬nancy (n=37), and, control group consisted of 40 newborns whose mothers were normotensive. All newborns were mature and their birth weights were above 2500 gr. Blood sample...

  13. Effects of Maternal Lead Acetate Exposure during Lactation on Postnatal Development of Testis in Offspring Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Dorostghoal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sDuring recent years, there has been an increasing interest in contribution of environmental pollutants as heavy metals to human male infertility. Present study was aimed to investigate the effects of maternal lead acetate exposure during lactation on postnatal development of testis in offspring rats.Materials and MethodsA total of 60 female rats randomly divided into four equal groups; control and three treatment groups received 20, 100 and 300 mg/kg/day lead acetate via drinking water from day 2 to day 21 of lactation. At 7, 14, 21, 28, 60, 90 and 120 days after birth, the testis weight and volume of offspring were measured and their epididymal semen analyzed. Following tissue processing, 5 ?m sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and evaluated with quantitative techniques. Testicular parameters in different groups were compared by one-way ANOVA.ResultsTestis weight and volume of offspring decreased significantly in a dose-related manner in moderate (P< 0.05 and high (P< 0.01 doses groups. Dose-dependent significant reductions were seen in seminiferous tubules diameter and germinal epithelium height during neonatal, prepubertal and postpubertal periods in moderate (P< 0.05 and high (P< 0.01 doses groups until 90 and 120 days after birth, respectively. Significant decreases were observed in mean sperm density of offspring at puberty in moderate and high doses groups until 90 and 120 days after birth, respectively. Testosterone levels decreased significantly in a dose-related manner at puberty in moderate and high doses groups. ConclusionPresent study showed maternal lead acetate exposure during lactation caused dose-related and long-term alterations of testicular parameters in offspring rats.

  14. Effects of maternal education on diet, anemia, and iron deficiency in Korean school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Hyeon-Jeong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relationship among socioeconomic status factors, the risk of anemia, and iron deficiency among school-aged children in Korea. Methods The sample consisted of fourth-grade students aged 10 y recruited from nine elementary schools in Korean urban areas in 2008 (n = 717. Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels lower than 11.5 g/dl. Iron deficiency was defined as serum iron levels lower than 40 ug/dl. We also obtained data on parental education from questionnaires and on children's diets from 3-day food diaries. Parental education was categorized as low or high, with the latter representing an educational level beyond high school. Results Children with more educated mothers were less likely to develop anemia (P = 0.0324 and iron deficiency (P = 0.0577 than were those with less educated mothers. This group consumed more protein (P = 0.0004 and iron (P = 0.0012 from animal sources than did the children of less educated mothers, as reflected by their greater consumption of meat, poultry, and derivatives (P Conclusions As a contributor to socioeconomic status, maternal education is important in reducing the risk of anemia and iron deficiency and in increasing children's consumption of animal food sources.

  15. Growth of preterm low birth weight infants until 24 months corrected age: effect of maternal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Kiy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the growth pattern of low birth weight preterm infants born to hypertensive mothers, the occurrence of growth disorders, and risk factors for inadequate growth at 24 months of corrected age (CA. METHODS: Cohort study of preterm low birth weight infants followed until 24 months CA, in a university hospital between January 2009 and December 2010. Inclusion criteria: gestational age < 37 weeks and birth weight of 1,500-2,499 g. Exclusion criteria: multiple pregnancies, major congenital anomalies, and loss to follow up in the 2nd year of life. The following were evaluated: weight, length, and BMI. Outcomes: growth failure and risk of overweight at 0, 12, and 24 months CA. Student's t-test, Repeated measures ANOVA (RM-ANOVA, and multiple logistic regression were used. RESULTS: A total of 80 preterm low birth weight infants born to hypertensive mothers and 101 born to normotensive mothers were studied. There was a higher risk of overweight in children of hypertensive mothers at 24 months; however, maternal hypertension was not a risk factor for inadequate growth. Logistic regression showed that being born small for gestational age and inadequate growth in the first 12 months of life were associated with poorer growth at 24 months. CONCLUSION: Preterm low birth weight born infants to hypertensive mothers have an increased risk of overweight at 24 months CA. Being born small for gestational age and inadequate growth in the 1st year of life are risk factors for growth disorders at 24 months CA.

  16. Effects of maternal vitamin B6 deficiency and over-supplementation on DNA damage and oxidative stress in rat dams and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mara Ribeiro; Venâncio, Vinícius Paula; Aissa, Alexandre Ferro; Darin, Joana Darc Castania; Pires Bianchi, Maria Lourdes; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin B6 is a cofactor for more than 140 essential enzymes and plays an important role in maternal health and fetal development. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal vitamin B6 on DNA damage and oxidative stress status in rat dams and their offspring. Female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three dietary groups fed a standard diet (control diet), a diet supplemented with 30?mg/kg of vitamin B6, or a deficient diet (0?mg/kg of vitamin B6) for 10 weeks before and during mating, pregnancy and lactation. The dams were euthanized at weaning, and their male pups were euthanized either 10 days or 100 days after birth. We found that maternal vitamin B6 deficiency increased the micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells and also increased the concentration of hepatic TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) in newborn pups (10 days old). In conclusion, maternal 5- to 6-fold over-supplementation of vitamin B6 had no adverse effects, however its deficiency may induce chromosomal damage and hepatic lipid peroxidation in the offspring. PMID:25818462

  17. Maternal obesity and preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Azar Aghamohammadi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a modern day epidemic. The incidence appears to be rapidly increasing in bothdeveloped and developing countries and has become much more obvious in the last decade.Aim& Objective: The present research was done with the aim of studying the effects of obesity definedas a first trimester maternal body mass index >30 on the preeclampsia.Methods: This study was a descriptive-comparative study two hundred fifty singleton pregnancies ofwomen with first trimester BMI >30 who de...

  18. The effects of food and maternal conditions in fetal growth and size in wild reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terje Skogland

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available Fetal growth rates and birth weights were studied in four wild reindeer areas in Southern Norway (Hardangervidda, Hallingskarvet, Knutshø, Forelhogna, representing high and low density populations, with a 5-fold difference in mean lichen winter-food availability. Fetal growth was depressed by 42% in the high-densitv Hardangervidda population, and mean birth weights were 3.7 vs. 6.2 kg, with a 10 days difference in mean birth dates. Fetal size was better correlated with maternal weight, than age. Maternal weights increased until 5 yrs. of age and then decreased in the high-density Hardangervidda population (but not so in the low density Knutshø-Forclhogna populations. 55% of the offspring died before weaning in the Hardangervidda herd, but no significant calf losses were found amont the large-sized does in the food-abundant areas.Effekter av ernæring og simlas kondisjon på vekst og størrelse av foster hos villrein.Abstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Fostervekst og fødselsvekter ble undersøkt i fire villreinområder i Sør-Norge (Hardangervidda, Hallingskarvet, Knutshø og Forelhogna som representerer høg- og lågtetthetsstammer, med en 5-foldig forskjell i gjennomsnittlig lavbeite-tilgang om vinteren. Fosterveksten ble nedsatt med 42% i høgtetthetsstammen på Hardangervidda og fødselsvektene var i gjennomsnitt 3,7 kg, mot 6,2 kg i det beste området, og med en 10 dagers forsinkelse i midlere fødselsdato. Fosterets størrelse var korrelert med morens vekt, som igjen var avhengig av hennes alder. Hos de minste simlene i det dårligste området økte vektene til 5-års alder, for deretter å avta for hvert gjenlevende år. Hos simlene i det beste området økte vektene til 10-års alder, og var da dobbelt så tunge som fra det dårligste området. 55% av avkommet døde før de var avvent med diing hos Hardangervidda-simlene, mens det ikke var noen statistisk målbar dødelighet hos kalvene i Knutshø-Forelhogna.Ravinnon vaikutus ja naarasporon kunto porosikion kasvuun ja suuruuteen.Abstract in Finnish / Yhteenveto: Etelå-Norjan neljallå peura-alueella, jotka ovat Hardangervidda, Hallingskarvet, Knutsho ja Forelhogna, tutkittiin porosikion kasvua ja syntymåpainoja. Alueet edustavat ylintå ja alinta tiheyskantaa ja loytyy 5-kertainen eroavaisuus keskimåarin jåkålålaiduntaan talvisaikaan. Sikion kasvu aleni 42% ylemmåsså tiheyskannassa Hardangervidda-alueella ja syntymåpainot olivat keskimåarin 3,7 kg mutta 6,2 kg parhaimmalla alueella, ja 10 påivån myohastyminen keskimååråisesta syntymåpåivayksestå. Sikion suuruus oli vastaavuussuhteessa emon painoon, joka oli taas riippuvainen sen iåstå. Huonoimmalla alueella pieninpien naaraiden painot lisåantyivåt 5-ikåvuoteen asti, vahetåkseen sen jålkeen jokaista jåljellåolevaa elovuotta kohden. Parhaimmalla alueella naaraiden painot lisåantyivåt 10-ikåvuoteen asti, ja oli silloin kaksi kertaa niin raskaita kuin huonoimman alueen naarasporot. 55% jålkelåisistå kuoli ennenkuin ne olivat vierottuneet Hardangervidda-naarasporoista. Sitåvastoin ei ollut mitåån tilastollisesti mitattavissa olevaa Knutsho - Forelhogna-alueiden vasakuolevaisuudesta.

  19. The Costs, Benefits, and Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Delphine; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Hoffman, Daniel; Sweet, Steven Goldie; Goldie, Sue J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In Mexico, the lifetime risk of dying from maternal causes is 1 in 370 compared to 1 in 2,500 in the U.S. Although national efforts have been made to improve maternal services in the last decade, it is unclear if Millennium Development Goal 5 - to reduce maternal mortality by three-quarters by 2015 - will be met. Methodology/Principal Findings: We developed an empirically calibrated model that simulates the natural history of pregnancy and pregnancy-related complications in a ...

  20. Effect of a difficult calving on the vigour of the calf, the onset of maternal behaviour, and some behavioural indicators of pain in the dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier, A C; Ruelle, E; Haskell, M J; Dwyer, C M

    2012-03-01

    The neonate's development and survival is dependent upon being vigorous at birth and receiving appropriate maternal care. However, difficulty at delivery can result in less vigorous offspring and maternal care can be altered, probably as a consequence of exhaustion, pain and human intervention. The first 3h after expulsion of the calf were observed continuously from videos following twelve natural calvings and sixteen calvings assisted by farm staff (including four malpresentations) from Holstein cows. Calvings were balanced within groups for parity of the dam, genetic group, sex and birth weight of the calf, calving pen and calving season. Assisted calves were less vigorous with higher latencies to attempt to stand, achieve standing, walk and reach the udder than unassisted calves (Pless likely to stand and walk within the first 3h after birth (P0.05), indicating no delayed onset or impaired expression of maternal behaviour in dams given assistance at delivery. Study of potential pain-related behaviours revealed that assisted dams spent less time self-grooming (P=0.033) than dams delivering naturally, which could suggest greater pain. However, there were no significant differences in any of the other pain-related behaviours. Our results suggest that, although maternal behaviour was unaffected by a difficult delivery, dairy calves born following difficult calvings have lower vigour in the first 3h after birth than unassisted calves. This might have longer-term effects on the health and survival of the calves. PMID:21958900

  1. Embryo transfers between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice: Examination of a maternal effect on ethanol teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, David

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors influence fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) in both humans and animals. Experiments using inbred and selectively bred mouse stocks that controlled for (1) ethanol dose, (2) maternal and fetal blood ethanol levels, and (3) fetal developmental exposure stage, show genotype can affect teratogenic outcome. Other experiments distinguish the teratogenic effects mediated by maternal genotype from those mediated by fetal genotype. One technique to distinguish maternal versus fetal genotype effect is to utilize embryo transfers. This study is the first to examine ethanol teratogenesis - fetal weight deficits and mortality, and digit, kidney, and vertebral malformations - in C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) fetuses that were transferred as blastocysts into B6 and D2 dams. We hypothesized that, following maternal alcohol exposure, B6 and D2 fetuses gestating within B6 mothers, as compared to D2 mothers, will exhibit a higher frequency of malformations. On day 9 of pregnancy, females were intubated (IG) with either 5.8 g/kg ethanol (E) or maltose-dextrin (MD). Other females were mated within strain and treated with either ethanol or maltose, or were not exposed to either treatment. Implantation rates were affected by genotype. Results show more B6 embryos implanted into D2 females than B6 females (p digit, vertebral, and/or kidney) regardless of whether they were transferred into a B6 or D2 female, or were naturally conceived. This suggests the D2 maternal uterine environment did not offer any protection against ethanol teratogenesis for B6 fetuses. One of the questions remaining is the how the B6 uterine environment affects D2 teratogenesis. No definitive conclusions can be drawn because too few viable D2 litters were produced. PMID:25566321

  2. Effects of maternal versus direct exposure to pulp and paper mill effluent on rainbow trout early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rosanne J; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Smith, Murray A; Ling, Nicholas

    2005-03-12

    The acute and chronic effects of secondary-treated effluent from a New Zealand pulp and paper mill were assessed using both long-term adult and early life stage (ELS) laboratory exposures of rainbow trout. The relative impact of maternal exposure versus ELS exposure was assessed by a comparison of directly exposed eggs and larvae with the eggs and larvae of exposed adult trout that were reared in reference water. Rainbow trout were exposed to a secondary-treated mixed thermomechanical/bleached kraft mill effluent at a concentration of 15% or to reference water from the egg through to 320-d-old juveniles. The 2 adult rainbow trout exposures were undertaken with nominal concentrations of 10% and 12% treated effluent, respectively. There was no marked effect of water hardening with 15% effluent on fertility or survival of eggs to 16 d. In a subsequent exposure (with hardening in reference water), no significant effects were found on mortality to hatch, time to hatch, length at hatch, mortality to swim-up, mortality to 320 d, or deformity rate at hatch. At experimental termination (320 d), direct-exposed juveniles had smaller livers and reduced condition factor, likely due to differences in food consumption. In 2 subsequent consecutive experiments, exposure of adult trout to 10% and 12% effluent for 2 mo, followed by incubation of the fertilized eggs in reference water, produced no impact on fertility, survival to hatch, survival to swim-up, or length and weight of fry at swim-up. Exposure of adult trout to 12% treated effluent for 8 mo prior to egg fertilization also did not result in differing rates of fertility, mortality to hatch or mortality to swim-up. However, the 8-mo maternal exposure did result in swim-up fry that were significantly shorter and weighed less than the reference swim-up fry. This difference was directly attributable to smaller eggs in the 8-mo-exposed female trout. These results demonstrate that this pulp and paper mill effluent is more likely to elicit indirect impacts on progeny size through chronic exposure of adults to effluent during gonadal recrudescence rather than through direct exposure of early life stages to effluent. PMID:15799628

  3. Nature, nurture or nutrition? Impact of maternal nutrition on maternal care, offspring development and reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, K L; Vickers, M H; Beltrand, J; Meaney, M J; Sloboda, D M

    2012-05-01

    We have previously reported that offspring of mothers fed a high fat (HF) diet during pregnancy and lactation enter puberty early and are hyperleptinaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and obese as adults. Poor maternal care and bonding can also impact offspring development and disease risk.We therefore hypothesized that prenatal nutrition would affect maternal care and that an interaction may exist between a maternal HF diet and maternal care, subsequently impacting on offspring phenotype.Wistar rats were mated and randomized to control dams fed a control diet (CON) or dams fed a HF diet from conception until the end of lactation (HF). Maternal care was assessed by observing maternal licking and grooming of pups between postnatal day (P)3 and P8. Postweaning (P22), offspring were fed a control (–con) or HF (–hf) diet. From P27, pubertal onset was assessed. At ?P105 oestrous cyclicity was investigated. Maternal HF diet reduced maternal care; HF-fed mothers licked and groomed pups less than CON dams.Maternal fat:lean ratio was higher in HF dams at weaning and was associated with higher maternal plasma leptin and insulin concentrations, but there was no effect of maternal care on fat:lean ratio or maternal hormone levels. Both female and male offspring of HF dams were lighter from birth to P11 than offspring of CON dams, but by P19, HF offspring were heavier than controls. Prepubertal retroperitoneal fat mass was greater in pups from HF-fed dams compared to CON and was associated with elevated circulating leptin concentrations in females only, but there was neither an effect of maternal care, nor an interaction between maternal diet and care on prepubertal fat mass. Pups from HF-fed dams went into puberty early and this effect was exacerbated by a postweaning HF diet.Maternal and postweaning HF diets independently altered oestrous cyclicity in females: female offspring of HF-fed mothers were more likely to have prolonged or persistent oestrus, whilst female offspring fed a HF diet postweaning were more likely to have irregular oestrous cycles and were more likely to have prolonged or persistent oestrus. These data indicate that maternal HF nutrition during pregnancy and lactation results in a maternal obese phenotype and has significant impact on maternal care during lactation. Maternal and postweaning nutritional signals, independent of maternal care, alter offspring body fat pre-puberty and female reproductive function in adulthood, which may be associated with advanced ovarian ageing and altered fertility. PMID:22411006

  4. Early Detection of Maternal Risk for Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Mikat, B.; Gellhaus, A.; Wagner, N.; C. Birdir; Kimmig, R; A. Köninger

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. New molecular insights offer new possibilities of early diagnosis of elevated maternal risk. Maternal risk factors, biophysical parameters like Doppler examination of the uterine arteries and biochemical parameters allow early risk calculation. Preventive and effective therapeutic agents like acetylsalicylacid can be started in the early second trimester. This article reviews the diagnostic possibilities ...

  5. The Neuroendocrinology of Primate Maternal Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Saltzman, Wendy; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In nonhuman primates and humans, similar to other mammals, hormones are not strictly necessary for the expression of maternal behavior, but nevertheless influence variation in maternal responsiveness and parental behavior both within and between individuals. A growing number of correlational and experimental studies have indicated that high circulating estrogen concentrations during pregnancy increase maternal motivation and responsiveness to infant stimuli, while effects of prepartum or post...

  6. Efectividad de la hidroterapia materna parenteral en el oligohidramnios aislado: its effectiveness in isolated oligohydramnios Parenteral maternal hydrotherapy:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsel Cárdenas Ramón

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El oligohidramnios u oligoamnios es la disminución del líquido amniótico a cifras patológicas con un índice de líquido amniótico (ILA menor o igual a 5 cm, y constituye un alto riego fetal y secundariamente materno. OBJETIVO: demostrar a través de un ensayo clínico controlado la efectividad de la hidroterapia materna parenteral en oligoamnios aislados, en el aumento del ILA y consecutivamente su repercusión en esos resultados perinatológicos. MÉTODOS: se realizó un ensayo clínico controlado para valorar la efectividad de la hidroterapia materna parenteral (HMP en gestantes con oligoamnios aislado, de 28 sem o más de embarazo, en el Hospital Ginecoobstétrico Docente de Guanabacoa, entre el 1ro de enero del 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2004. La muestra fue de 141 oligoamnios aislados y se dividió en 2 grupos: grupo estudio: 56 y el grupo control: 85. Al grupo estudio se le aplicó HMP con 2000 mL de solución salina isotónica al 0,9 %, y con el grupo control se mantuvo conducta expectante. RESULTADOS: el oligoamnios aislado es más frecuente en el embarazo a término. Al administrar HMP aumenta el ILA en un 43 % (grupo estudio y solo en un 22 % de los casos del grupo control. Igualmente, se logra aumentar la edad gestacional en 2 sem desde el diagnóstico. Fue mayor el parto transpelviano en el grupo estudio; la principal causa de cesárea fue el sufrimiento fetal agudo en ambos, principalmente en el grupo control. En el grupo estudio no hubo recién nacidos con Síndrome de distress respiratorio ni bronconeumonía congénita. CONCLUSIONES: la HMP parece ser efectiva en el manejo del oligoamnios aislado, lo cual disminuye la morbilidad y mortalidad perinatal y secundariamente el bienestar materno.Oligohydramnios or oligoamnios is the amniotic fluid decrease to pathological figures with a high amniotic fluid rate (AFR less or similar to 5 cm, and it is a fetal high risk, and secondarily maternal. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate through a controlled clinical assay the effectiveness of parenteral maternal hydrotherapy (PMH in isolated oligoamnios, in increase of AFR, and consecutively its repercussion on those perinatal results. METHODS: We made a controlled clinical assay to assess effectiveness of PHM in pregnants with isolated oligoamnios of 28 weeks or more of pregnancy in Gynecology and Obstetrics Teaching Hospital of Guanabacoa municipality from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. Sample included 141 isolated oligoamnios and it was divided in two groups: study group with 56 patients and control-group with 85 patients. In study group, we administered PHM with 2000 mL of 0,9% isotopic saline solution, and in control-group there was an expectant behavior RESULTS: Isolated aligoamnios is more frequent in term pregnancy. Administration of PHM increases AFR in 43% (study group, and only in 22% of cases from control- group. Likewise, it was possible to increase gestational age in two weeks from diagnosis. In study group, transpelvic pregnancy; main cause of cesarean section was the acute fetal suffering in both groups, mainly in the control one. In study group there were not newborns presenting with neither respiratory syndrome nor congenital bronchopneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: PMH looks to be effective in management o isolated oligoamnios, decreasing perinatal morbidity and mortality, and secondarily, maternal wellbeing.

  7. Reconfiguring Maternity Care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Nis

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation constitutes a reflection on two initiatives seeking to reconfigure maternity care. One initiative sought to digitalise maternity records and included a pilot run of an electronic maternity record in a Danish county. The other consisted of a collaboration between a maternity ward at a hospital and a group of researchers which included me. Both initiatives involved numerous seemingly different interests that were held together and related to reconfiguring maternity care. None of ...

  8. Effect of Maternal Intake of Organically or Conventionally Produced Feed on Oral Tolerance Development in Offspring Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melballe Jensen, Maja; Halekoh, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maternal consumption of organically or conventionally produced feed on immunological biomarkers and their offsprings’ response to a novel dietary antigen. First-generation rats were fed plant-based diets from two different cultivation systems (organic or conventional) or a chow. Second-generation rats were exposed to ovalbumin (OVA) via their mother’s milk and subsequently challenged with OVA after weaning onto the chow diet. In the chow diet group feeding the dams OVA resulted in suppression of the pups’ anti-OVA antibody response to the OVA challenge (total OVA-specific IgG was 197 for the OVA-treated chow diet group and 823 for the control chow diet group (arbitrary ELISA units)). In contrast, OVA exposure of the dams from the plant-based dietary groups did not result in a similar suppression. Cultivation system had no effect on the immunological biomarkers, except for a higher spleen prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in pups originating from dams fed the conventional plant-based diet (223 ng/L) than from those fed the organic plant-based diet (189 ng/L).

  9. Metabolismo mineral óseo durante la gestación y efectos sobre la masa ósea de la madre / Bone mineral metabolism during gestation and its effects on maternal bone mass

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luis, Vidal; Maritza, Vidal; Santiago, Cabrera; Eduardo, Ortega; Vicente, Santiváñez; Jorge, Polo; Jorge, Barnaby; Rolando, Vargas; Angélica, del Castillo.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La gestación y lactancia son periodos de alta demanda de calcio, para el crecimiento fetal y para la producción de leche materna. Durante la gestación, la madre transfiere al feto 25 a 30 g de calcio y durante la lactancia se secretan 200 a 240 mg de calcio diario en la leche materna. Durante la ges [...] tación, los mecanismos adaptativos más importantes son el incremento en la absorción de calcio y el incremento del recambio óseo materno; durante la lactancia, hay tendencia a conservar más calcio a nivel renal, pero la desmineralización temporal del esqueleto materno parece ser el mecanismo más importante. Los estudios que emplean absorciometría dual de rayos X (DXA) son escasos, por el riesgo de radiación materna y fetal; pero, con otras técnicas, como el ultrasonido cuantitativo, se ha descrito una pérdida de masa ósea durante la gestación predominantemente dependiente del hueso trabecular. Mediante marcadores bioquímicos del remodelamiento óseo se ha demostrado que los suplementos de calcio reducen la tasa de remodelamiento durante el embarazo y parecen tener efecto benéfico sobre la pérdida ósea materna. Estudios longitudinales que emplean ultrasonido cuantitativo también han encontrado una disminución de la pérdida ósea, entre las mujeres que recibieron aporte o suplemento adecuado de calcio durante la gestación. Abstract in english Pregnancy and lactation are periods of high calcium demand for skeletal growth and maternal milk production. Approximately 25-30 g of calcium are transferred to the fetus during pregnancy, and breast-feeding mothers secrete 200-240 mg/day of calcium in breast milk every day. During pregnancy, major [...] physiologic adaptations include increased both calcium intestinal absorption and rate of maternal bone turnover; during lactation, there is a contribution of renal calcium conservation, but temporary maternal bone demineralization is the main mechanism to meet calcium requirements. Data on bone mineral density assessed by dual energy x-ray absortiometry (DXA) are sparse mainly due to concern about potential risk of radiation exposure to the fetus. Other radiation-free techniques like quantitative ultrasound have been used to assess maternal bone mass changes during pregnancy. Maternal bone loss mainly depending on trabecular areas during pregnancy has been described. Calcium supplements reduce maternal skeletal-bone turnover as evaluated by bone resorption markers during pregnancy and seem to have beneficial effects on maternal bone loss. Longitudinal studies with repeated measurements of quantitative ultrasound during pregnancy have found decrease in bone loss in pregnant women with adequate calcium intake or supplementation.

  10. Protective Effect of Pregnancy in Rural South Africa: Questioning the Concept of “Indirect Cause” of Maternal Death

    OpenAIRE

    Garenne, Michel; KAHN, KATHLEEN; Collinson, Mark; Gomez-Olive, Xavier; Tollman, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Measurement of the level and composition of maternal mortality depends on the definition used, with inconsistencies leading to inflated rates and invalid comparisons across settings. This study investigates the differences in risk of death for women in their reproductive years during and outside the maternal risk period (pregnancy, delivery, puerperium), focusing on specific causes of infectious, non-communicable and external causes of death after separating out direct obstetrical...

  11. Maternal Body Mass Index, Dietary Intake and Socioeconomic Status: Differential Effects on Breast Milk Zinc, Copper and Iron Content

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinab Nikniaz; Seyed Jamal Gayem-magami; Bahram Pourghassem Gargari; Reza Mahdavi; Leila Nikniaz

    2011-01-01

    Background: As breast milk micronutrients content are essential for health and growth of the infants, this study was conducted to determine the breast milk zinc, copper and iron concen-trations and their possible correlations with maternal nutritional status, dietary intakes as well as socioeconomic status.Methods: Breast milk samples and information on maternal anthropometric characteristics and dietary intake were collected from 90 Iranian lactating women with 3 different socioeco-nomic sta...

  12. Maternal Care Effects on the Development of a Sexually Dimorphic Motor System: The Role of Spinal Oxytocin

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Kathryn M.; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2010-01-01

    Maternal licking in rats affects the development of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB), a sexually dimorphic motor nucleus that controls penile reflexes involved with copulation. Reduced maternal licking results in decreased motoneuron number, size, and dendritic length in the adult SNB, as well as deficits in adult male copulatory behavior. Our previous findings that licking-like tactile stimulation influences SNB dendritic development and upregulates Fos expression in the lumbo...

  13. Environmental enrichment does not reverse the effects of maternal deprivation on NMDAR and Balb/c mice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akillioglu, Kubra; Yilmaz, M Bertan; Boga, Ayper; Binokay, Secil; Kocaturk-Sel, Sabriye

    2015-10-22

    Early adverse life experiences have been associated with anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play an important role in brain development. Enriched environments are known to positively influence emotional and cognitive functions in the brain. We examined the effects of maternal deprivation (MD) on NMDAR subunits in the hippocampus, locomotor activity, anxiety behaviors, and learning-memory performance of Balb/c mice. We also examined whether these effects could be reversed by raising the offspring in an enriched environment. The mice were separated from their mothers for a single 24h episode on postnatal day (PND) 9. The mice were weaned on day 21 and were housed under either standard (SE) or enriched (EE) environmental conditions. Emotional behaviors and cognitive processes of mice were evaluated using an open field (OF) test, an elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and a Morris water-maze (MWM). NMDAR subunits (GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B) mRNA expression levels in the hippocampus were examined by real-time PCR. In OF, MD had no effect on horizontal locomotor activity. MD increased anxiety-like behaviors in the EPM and decreased spatial learning performance in MWM; however, these effects were not reversed by EE. MD (in SE and EE conditions) increased GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B mRNA expressions in the hippocampus. In conclusion, MD led to the deterioration of the emotional and cognitive processes during adulthood. Moreover, environmental enrichment did not reverse the deleterious effects of the MD on emotional and cognitive functions and increased the NMDAR levels. PMID:26300221

  14. EFFECT OF INDIVIDUAL AND COMMUNITY FACTORS ON MATERNAL HEALTH CARE SERVICE USE IN INDIA: A MULTILEVEL APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Awdhesh; Kesarwani, Ranjana

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess empirically the influence of individual and community (neighbourhood) factors on the use of maternal health care services in India through three outcomes: utilization of full antenatal care (ANC) services, safe delivery and utilization of postnatal care services. Data were from the third round of the National Family Health Survey (2005-06). The study sample constituted ever-married women aged 15-49 from 29 Indian states. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was performed for the three outcomes of interest accounting for individual- and community-level factors associated with the use of maternal health care services. A substantial amount of variation was observed at the community level. About 45%, 51% and 62% of the total variance in the use of full ANC, safe delivery and postnatal care, respectively, could be attributed to differences across the community. There was significant variation in the use of maternal health care services at the individual level, with socioeconomic status and mother's education being the most prominent factors associated with the use of maternal health care services. At the community level, urban residence and poverty concentration were found to be significantly associated with maternal health care service use. The results suggest that an increased focus on community-level interventions could lead to an increase in the utilization of maternal health care services in India. PMID:25741587

  15. Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy, Child Behavior Problems, and Adolescent Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesler, Pamela C.; Kandel, Denise B.; Davies, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Used longitudinal sample of 187 mother-child dyads to examine the role of child behavior problems in explaining the effect of maternal prenatal smoking on adolescent daughters' smoking. Found that maternal prenatal smoking retained a unique effect on girls' current smoking with controls for current maternal smoking, child behavior problems, and…

  16. A single dose of S-ketamine induces long-term antidepressant effects and decreases oxidative stress in adulthood rats following maternal deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Carlessi, Anelise S; Titus, Stephanie E; Abelaira, Helena M; Ignácio, Zuleide M; da Luz, Jaine R; Matias, Beatriz I; Bruchchen, Livia; Florentino, Drielly; Vieira, Andriele; Petronilho, Fabricia; Quevedo, João

    2015-11-01

    Ketamine, an antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, has produced rapid antidepressant effects in patients with depression, as well as in animal models. However, the extent and duration of the antidepressant effect over longer periods of time has not been considered. This study evaluated the effects of single dose of ketamine on behavior and oxidative stress, which is related to depression, in the brains of adult rats subjected to maternal deprivation. Deprived and nondeprived Wistar rats were divided into four groups nondeprived?+?saline; nondeprived?+?S-ketamine (15 mg/kg); deprived?+?saline; deprived?+?S-ketamine (15 mg/kg). A single dose of ketamine or saline was administrated during the adult phase, and 14 days later depressive-like behavior was assessed. In addition, lipid damage, protein damage, and antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated in the rat brain. Maternal deprivation induces a depressive-like behavior, as verified by an increase in immobility and anhedonic behavior. However, a single dose of ketamine was able to reverse these alterations, showing long-term antidepressant effects. The brains of maternally deprived rats had an increase in protein oxidative damage and lipid peroxidation, but administration of a single dose of ketamine reversed this damage. The activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in the deprived rat brains. However, ketamine was also able to reverse these changes. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a single dose of ketamine is able to induce long-term antidepressant effects and protect against neural damage caused by oxidative stress in adulthood rats following maternal deprivation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1268-1281, 2015. PMID:25728399

  17. The Study of Maternal Effects on Estimation of Heritabilities and Determination of Environmental Factors on Early Growth Traits in Kermani Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Van Vleck

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from the birth weight (BW, the average daily gain from birth to weaning (ADG and the weaning weight (WW of 1182, 1099 and 1099 lambs were respectively collected and applied to estimate the maternal effects on heritabilities as well as on the determination of the environmental factors. The data were collected from Shahrbabak Sheep Breeding Research Station within five year, from 1993 to 1998. The effects of the year of birth, the age of the dam and its sex on all the traits were significant. The type of birth had no effect on BW but it was significant for the other two traits. Estimates of (covariance components and genetic parameters were obtained by restricted maximum likelihood, using single and two-trait animal models. Based on the most appropriate fitted model, direct heritability of BW, ADG and WW were estimated at 0.10± 0.06, 0.21 ±0.08 and 0.22± 0.09, respectively. The maternal heritability for the three traits was also estimated at 0.27± 0.04, 0.15 ±0.05 and 0.19 ±0.05, respectively. Direct genetic and phenotypic correlations between BW and ADG; BW and WW; ADG and WW were estimated at 0.85 and 0.41; 0.82 and 0.48 and 0.99 and 0.99, respectively. Ignoring maternal effects in animal model caused overestimation of direct heritability. Thus maternal effects are significant sources of variation for early growth traits and their ignorance in the animal model causes inaccurate genetic evaluation of the lambs.

  18. The effect of maternal body mass index on spontaneous versus induced preterm birth: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghadami N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Preterm birth which is defined as delivery before 37 completed weeks was implicated in approximately two thirds of neonatal death. Also preterm labors are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity of infants in recent years and it costs high prices for health system. We evaluate the relationship between prepregnancy maternal body mass Index (BMI and spontaneous and indicated preterm birth."n"n Methods: This study included 250 healthy pregnant women, without any risk factors of preterm birth, were classified into categories that were based on their body mass index. Association between BMI, weight gain and rout of delivery were examined. Rates of indicated and spontaneous preterm birth were compared."n"n Results: Obese women delivered at a more advanced gestational age. (38/34±1/66 weeks vs 37/61±2/44, p=0/006. Obese patients had significantly lower incidence of spontaneous preterm birth at < 37 weeks of gestation (16/8% vs 31/2% p=0/008. Obese women had larger infants (3354/95±596/75 vs 311.24±558/357 p=0/001, and had more frequent cesarean delivery (69/6% vs 52/8%, p=0/006. Weight gain during pregnancy is poorly correlated with prepregnancy BMI (14/41±7/93 kg vs 13/78±4/94kg, p=0/4 and preterm birth."n"n Conclusion: In this survey, there was adverse correlation between body mass index (BMI before pregnancy and preterm labor less than 37 completed weeks and we suggest more study for evaluation between spontaneous and induced preterm labor mechanism and in obese and non obese women. However according to this survey obesity before pregnancy is associated with a lower rate of spontaneous preterm birth.

  19. Maternal Eating Disorders and Infant Feeding Difficulties: Maternal and Child Mediators in a Longitudinal General Population Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Nadia; Simonoff, Emily; Stahl, Daniel; Treasure, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Background: Maternal eating disorders (ED) have been shown to increase the risk of feeding difficulties in the offspring. Very few studies, however, have investigated whether the effect of a maternal ED on childhood feeding is a direct effect or whether it can be ascribed to other child or maternal factors. We aimed to determine the role of…

  20. The effect of magnesium on maternal blood pressure in pregnancy-induced hypertension. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudnicki, M; Frölich, A; Rasmussen, W F; McNair, P

    1991-01-01

    The effects of magnesium were compared with those of placebo in a randomized double-blind controlled study of 58 patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension, of whom 27 received magnesium and 31 placebo. Twenty patients in each group were nulliparas. The treatment comprised 48 h of either intravenous magnesium or placebo infusion followed by daily oral magnesium or placebo tablets until one day after delivery. Magnesium supplementation significantly reduced maternal mean arterial blood pressure...

  1. The ocular manifestations of congenital infection: a study of the early effect and long-term outcome of maternally transmitted rubella and toxoplasmosis.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, J F

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the spectrum of adverse ocular effects which result from maternally transmitted rubella and toxoplasma infection; further, to record the long-term visual and neurodevelopmental outcomes of these 2 major causes of fetal infection. STUDY DESIGN AND PATIENTS: A series of 55 patients with congenital infection have been studied prospectively on a long-term basis. The study group included a cohort of 34 cases with congenital rubella syndrome demonstrated by virus isolation, and 21...

  2. Effect of maternal supplementation with seaweed extracts on growth performance and aspects of gastrointestinal health of newly weaned piglets after challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, G; Sweeney, T; O'Shea, C J; Doyle, D N; O'Doherty, J V

    2014-12-28

    In the present study, a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement was conducted to investigate the effect of maternal supplementation with seaweed extracts ( - SWE v. +SWE, n 20) from day 83 of gestation until weaning (day 28) on post-weaning (PW) growth performance, faecal score, faecal enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) toxin quantification, intestinal histology and cytokine mRNA of unchallenged and ETEC-challenged pigs. Pigs were ETEC challenged on day 9 PW. There was a maternal treatment × challenge (SWE × ETEC) interaction effect on growth performance and faecal score (P0.10). Pigs from the SWE-supplemented sows had reduced heat-labile enterotoxin gene copy numbers than those from the basal-fed sows (P< 0.05). Maternal SWE supplementation increased the villus height in the ileum of pigs (P< 0.05). There was a SWE × ETEC interaction effect (P< 0.05) on IL-6 mRNA and a SWE × gastrointestinal (GI) region interaction effect (P< 0.05) on transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) and TNF-? mRNA. IL-6 mRNA was down-regulated in SC pigs than BC pigs (P< 0.05). However, there was no difference in IL-6 mRNA between SE and BE pigs. The mRNA of TGF-?1 and TNF-? was down-regulated in the colon of pigs from the SWE-supplemented sows compared with those from the basal-fed sows (P< 0.05). However, there was no difference in TGF-?1 and TNF-? mRNA in the ileum between the pigs from the SWE-supplemented sows and basal-fed sows. In conclusion, maternal SWE supplementation improves ADG and the aspects of GI health of weaned pigs following an ETEC challenge. PMID:25345748

  3. Effects of endurance exercise on expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein in developing rats with maternal infection-induced cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kijeong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a common white matter lesion affecting the neonatal brain. PVL is closely associated with cerebral palsy (CP) and characterized by increase in the number of astrocytes, which can be detected by positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Change in myelin basic protein (MBP) is an early sign of white matter abnormality. Maternal or placental infection can damage the neonatal brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill w...

  4. A factorial randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of micronutrients supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on maternal endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and oxidative stress of the newborn

    OpenAIRE

    Girón Sandra; Salazar Blanca; Mosquera Mildrey; Ortega José; Echeverri Isabella; Romero Miryam; Ramírez-Vélez Robinson; Saldarriaga Wilmar; Aguilar de Plata Ana; Mateus Julio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many studies have suggested a relationship between metabolic abnormalities and impaired fetal growth with the development of non-transmissible chronic diseases in the adulthood. Moreover, it has been proposed that maternal factors such as endothelial function and oxidative stress are key mechanisms of both fetal metabolic alterations and subsequent development of non-transmissible chronic diseases. The objective of this project is to evaluate the effect of micronutrient su...

  5. Effects of aerobic exercise training on maternal and neonatal outcome: a randomized controlled trial on pregnant women in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the effect of aerobic exercise training on maternal and neonatal outcome. Methods: The case-control study was conducted between January and July, 2011. It was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of Toyserkan Azad University, and data was collected at prenatal clinics and delivery centres located in Hamedan, Iran. It comprised 80 pregnant women between 20-26 weeks of gestation randomly assigned to two equal and matching groups of cases and controls. The intervention group did exercise continuously on a bicycle ergometre for 15 minutes, three times a week; the intensity being 50-60% of maximal heart rate. The control group did not do any exercise training. All information was obtained from the clinics, delivery centres, and from the reports of delivery room midwives. Results: No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in gestational weight gain, pregnancy length, mode of delivery, first and second stage of labour, perineal tear, and 1st and 5th min Apgar score. Mean neonatal weight was significantly less in the intervention group than the control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Exercising on a bicycle ergometer during pregnancy seems to be safe for the mother and the neonate. (author)

  6. Aromatase gene and its effects on growth, reproductive and maternal ability traits in a multibreed sheep population from Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Maria Bezerra Oliveira, Lôbo; Raimundo Nonato Braga, Lôbo; Samuel Rezende, Paiva.

    Full Text Available We determined the polymorphism C242T of the aromatase gene (Cyp19) and its allelic frequency, as well as the effect of the variants on productive and reproductive traits in 71 purebred Santa Inês sheep, 13 purebred Brazilian Somali sheep, nine purebred Poll Dorset sheep, and 18 crossbred 1/2 Dorper [...] sheep. The animals were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP technique. The influence of the animal's genotype on its performance or on the performance of its lambs was analyzed by the least square method. Another factor assessed was the importance of the animal's genotype in analysis models for quantitative breeding value estimates, and whether there were differences among the averages of breeding values of animals with different genotypes for this gene. In the sample studied, no AA individuals were observed; the AB and BB frequencies were 0.64 and 0.36, respectively. All Brazilian Somali sheep were of genotype BB. All 1/2 Dorper BB animals presented a lower age at first lambing, and the Santa Inês BB ewes presented a lower lambing interval. In these same genetic groups, AB ewes presented higher litter weight at weaning. This is evidence that BB ewes have a better reproductive performance phenotype, whereas AB ewes present a better maternal ability phenotype. However, in general, animals with genotype AB presented better average breeding values than those with genotype BB.

  7. Effects of maternal tobacco-smoke exposure on fetal growth and neonatal size

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Shane; Bernstein, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke, through both active and passive measures, has a significant impact on women's health, including effects on the cardiovascular, pulmonary and reproductive systems. Of particular interest is the effect of smoking on pregnancy outcomes. One crucial outcome that has been linked to the subsequent development of both neonatal and adult disease is intrauterine or fetal growth restriction. In this article, we will summarize the effects of smoking on newborn size and fetal g...

  8. Deleterious effects of maternal ingestion of cocoa upon fetal ductus arteriosus in late pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Zielinsky, Paulo; Martignoni, Felipe V.; Vian, Izabele

    2014-01-01

    Cocoa powder has twice more antioxidants than red wine and three times more than green tea. Ten percent of its weight is made up of flavonoids. Cocoa has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating cyclooxigenase-2 receptors expression in the endothelium and enhancing nitric oxide bioavailability. There are evidences that while polyphenols ingestion have cardioprotective effects in the adult, it may have deleterious effect on the fetus if ingested by the mother on the third tr...

  9. Intergenerational effects of maternal birth season on offspring size in rural Gambia

    OpenAIRE

    I. J. Rickard; Courtiol, A; A. M. Prentice; Fulford, A.J.C.; T.H. CLUTTON-BROCK; Lummaa, V.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental conditions experienced in early life can influence an individual's growth and long-term health, and potentially also that of their offspring. However, such developmental effects on intergenerational outcomes have rarely been studied. Here we investigate intergenerational effects of early environment in humans using survey- and clinic-based data from rural Gambia, a population experiencing substantial seasonal stress that influences foetal growth and has long-term effects on firs...

  10. Contribution of maternal oxygenic state to the effects of chronic postnatal hypoxia on mouse body and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Natalina; Dominguez, Moises; Kravitz, Jacob; Komitova, Mila; Vaccarino, Flora M; Schwartz, Michael L

    2015-09-14

    1-2% of live births are to very low birth weight, premature infants that often show a developmental trajectory plagued with neurological sequelae including ventriculomegaly and significant decreases in cortical volume. We are able to recapitulate these sequelae using a mouse model of hypoxia where early postnatal pups are exposed to chronic hypoxia for one week. However, because the timing of hypoxic exposure occurs so early in development, dams and pups are housed together in the hypoxic chamber, and therefore, dams are also subjected to the same hypoxic conditions as the pups. To understand the relative contribution of hypoxia directly on the pups as opposed to the indirect contribution mediated by the effects of hypoxia and potential alterations in the dam's care of the pups, we examined whether reducing the dams exposure to hypoxia may significantly increase pup outcomes on measures that we have found consistently changed immediately following chronic hypoxia exposure. To achieve this, we rotated dams between normoxic and hypoxic conditions, leaving the litters untouched in their respective conditions and compared gross anatomical measures of normoxic and hypoxic pups with non-rotating or rotating mothers. As we expected, hypoxic-rearing decreased pup body weight, brain weight and cortical volume. Reducing the dam's exposure to hypoxic conditions actually amplified the effects of hypoxia on body weight, such that hypoxic pups with rotating mothers showed significantly less growth. Interestingly, rotation of hypoxic mothers did not have the same deleterious effect on brain weight, suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms conserving brain weight and development even under extremely low body weight conditions. The factors that potentially contribute to these compensatory changes remain to be determined, however, nutrition, pup feeding/metabolism, or changes in maternal care are important candidates, acting either together or independently to change pup body and brain development. PMID:26222256

  11. Family Structure Effects on Maternal and Paternal Parenting in Low-Income Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Davis, Christina M.

    2008-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Survey, a birth cohort study, this study analyzes the effect of family structure on parenting for 3,402 mothers and 2,615 fathers. To address the problem of omitted variable bias, fixed effects methods are used to control for the presence of time-invariant unobserved…

  12. Maternal and social genetic effects on average daily gain of piglets from birth until weaning

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwman, A.C.; Bergsma, R.; Duijvestein, N.; Bijma, P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is heritable social variation in ADG from birth until weaning in piglets. Nursing and the establishment of teat order are sources of social interaction among suckling piglets nursed by the same sow. If a heritable social effect is present, but ignored, the selected animals might be the most competitive ones with negative effects on growth of their group mates, resulting in less response to selection than expected. The social interaction m...

  13. Phenotypic effects of maternal immune activation and early postnatal milieu in mice mutant for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, C; Desbonnet, L; Clarke, N; Petit, E; Tighe, O; Lai, D; Harvey, R; Waddington, J L; O'Tuathaigh, C

    2014-09-26

    Risk of schizophrenia is likely to involve gene × environment (G × E) interactions. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a schizophrenia risk gene, hence any interaction with environmental adversity, such as maternal infection, may provide further insights into the basis of the disease. This study examined the individual and combined effects of prenatal immune activation with polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C) and disruption of the schizophrenia risk gene NRG1 on the expression of behavioral phenotypes related to schizophrenia. NRG1 heterozygous (NRG1 HET) mutant breeding pairs were time-mated. Pregnant dams received a single injection (5mg/kg i.p.) of Poly I:C or vehicle on gestation day 9 (GD9). Offspring were then cross-fostered to vehicle-treated or Poly I:C-treated dams. Expression of schizophrenia-related behavioral endophenotypes was assessed at adolescence and in adulthood. Combining NRG1 disruption and prenatal environmental insult (Poly I:C) caused developmental stage-specific deficits in social behavior, spatial working memory and prepulse inhibition (PPI). However, combining Poly I:C and cross-fostering produced a number of behavioral deficits in the open field, social behavior and PPI. This became more complex by combining NRG1 deletion with both Poly I:C exposure and cross-fostering, which had a robust effect on PPI. These findings suggest that concepts of G × E interaction in risk of schizophrenia should be elaborated to multiple interactions that involve individual genes interacting with diverse biological and psychosocial environmental factors over early life, to differentially influence particular domains of psychopathology, sometimes over specific stages of development. PMID:24969132

  14. Protective effect of maternal prenatal melatonin administration on rat pups born to mothers submitted to constant light during gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Cisternas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of adverse conditions such as constant light (LL on the circadian rhythm of malate (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37 and lactate (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27 dehydrogenase activities of the testes of male Wistar rats on postnatal day 28 (PN28, anxiety-like behavior (elevated plus-maze test at PN60 and sexual behavior at PN120. The rats were assigned to mother groups on day 10 of pregnancy: control (12-h light/dark, LL (light from day 10 to 21 of pregnancy, and LL+Mel (LL and sc injection to the mothers of a daily dose of melatonin, 1 mg/kg body weight at circadian time 12, from day 17 to 21 of pregnancy. LL offspring did not show circadian rhythms of MDH (N = 62 and LDH (N = 63 activities (cosinor and ANOVA-LSD Fisher. They presented a 44.7% decrease in open-arm entries and a 67.9% decrease in time (plus-maze test, N = 15, P < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test, an increase in mounting (94.4%, intromission (94.5% and ejaculation (56.6% latencies (N = 12, P < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test and lower numbers of these events (61, 59 and 73%, respectively; P < 0.01, N = 12 compared to controls. The offspring of the LL+Mel group presented MDH and LDH circadian rhythms (P < 0.05, N = 50, cosinor and ANOVA-LSD Fisher, anxiety-like and sexual behaviors similar to control. These findings supported the importance of the melatonin signal and provide evidence for the protective effects of hormones on maternal programming during gestation. This protective action of melatonin is probably related to its entrainment capacity, favoring internal coupling of the fetal multioscillatory system.

  15. Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation: Effect on visual acuity and n-3 fatty acid content of infant erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, L.; JØrgensen, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Studies on formula-fed infants indicate a beneficial effect of dietary DHA on visual acuity. Cross-sectional studies have shown an association between breast-milk DHA levels and visual acuity in breast-fed infants. The objective in this study was to evaluate the biochemical and functional effects of fish oil (FO) supplements in lactating mothers. In this double-blinded randomized trial, Danish mothers with habitual fish intake below the 50th percentile of the Danish National Birth Cohort were randomized to microencapsulated FO [1.3 g/d long-chain n-3 FA (n-3 LCPUFA)] or olive oil (00). The intervention started within a week after delivery and lasted 4 mon. Mothers with habitual high fish intake and their infants were included as a reference group. Ninety-seven infants completed the trial (44 OO-group, 53 FO-group) and 47 reference infants were followed up. The primary outcome measures were: DHA content of milk samples (0, 2, and 4 mon postnatal) and of infant red blood cell (RBC) membranes (4 mon postnatal), and infant visual acuity (measured by swept visual evoked potential at 2 and 4 mon of age). FO supplementation gave rise to a threefold increase in the DHA content of the 4-mon milk samples (P <0.001). DHA in infant RBC reflected milk contents (r = 0.564, P <0.001) and was increased by almost 50% (P <0.001). Infant visual acuity was not significantly different in the randomized groups but was positively associated at 4 mon with infant RBC-DHA (P = 0.004, multiple regression). We concluded that maternal FO supplementation during lactation did not enhance visual acuity of the infants who completed the intervention. However, the results showed that infants with higher RBC levels of n-3 LCPUFA had a better visual acuity at 4 mon of age, suggesting that n-3 LCPUFA may influence visual maturation.

  16. Sex-specific effects of neonatal exposures to low levels of cadmium through maternal milk on development and immune functions of juvenile and adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a major environmental contaminant. Although immunotoxic effects have been associated with Cd exposure, the inconsistency of experimental results underlines the need of an experimental approach more closely related to environmental conditions. We investigated the effects of exposing neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats to environmentally relevant doses of Cd through maternal milk. Dams received 10 parts per billion (ppb) or 5 parts per million (ppm) Cd chloride (CdCl2) in drinking water from parturition until the weaning of the pups. Half of the offspring was sampled at weaning time. The remaining juvenile rats received water without addition of Cd until adulthood. Cd accumulation in kidneys of juvenile rats fed from dams exposed to Cd indicated the transfer of the metal from mother to pups through maternal milk. This neonatal exposure resulted in decreased body, kidney and spleen weights of just weaned females but not of males. This effect was more pronounced in the less exposed females fed from dams exposed to 10 ppb Cd, which also displayed lower hepatic metallothionein-1 (MT-1) mRNA levels. The effect of Cd exposure on body and organ weights did not persist to adulthood. In contrast, we observed gender-specific effects of neonatal Cd exposure on the cytotoxic activity of splenic NK-cells of both juvenile and adult rats. Cd also strongly inhibited the proliferative response of Con A-stimulated thymocytes in both male and female adult rats 5 weeks after the cessation of Cd exposure. These immunotoxic effects were observed at doses much lower than those reported to produce similar effects when exposure occurred during adulthood. In conclusion, neonatal exposures to environmentally relevant levels of Cd through maternal milk represent a critical hazard liable to lead to both transitory and persistent immunotoxic effects

  17. Efectividad de la hidroterapia materna parenteral en el oligohidramnios aislado: its effectiveness in isolated oligohydramnios / Parenteral maternal hydrotherapy:

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Itsel, Cárdenas Ramón; Sonia, Águila Setién; Jacinta, Otero Iglesias.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El oligohidramnios u oligoamnios es la disminución del líquido amniótico a cifras patológicas con un índice de líquido amniótico (ILA) menor o igual a 5 cm, y constituye un alto riego fetal y secundariamente materno. OBJETIVO: demostrar a través de un ensayo clínico controlado la efectividad de la h [...] idroterapia materna parenteral en oligoamnios aislados, en el aumento del ILA y consecutivamente su repercusión en esos resultados perinatológicos. MÉTODOS: se realizó un ensayo clínico controlado para valorar la efectividad de la hidroterapia materna parenteral (HMP) en gestantes con oligoamnios aislado, de 28 sem o más de embarazo, en el Hospital Ginecoobstétrico Docente de Guanabacoa, entre el 1ro de enero del 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2004. La muestra fue de 141 oligoamnios aislados y se dividió en 2 grupos: grupo estudio: 56 y el grupo control: 85. Al grupo estudio se le aplicó HMP con 2000 mL de solución salina isotónica al 0,9 %, y con el grupo control se mantuvo conducta expectante. RESULTADOS: el oligoamnios aislado es más frecuente en el embarazo a término. Al administrar HMP aumenta el ILA en un 43 % (grupo estudio) y solo en un 22 % de los casos del grupo control. Igualmente, se logra aumentar la edad gestacional en 2 sem desde el diagnóstico. Fue mayor el parto transpelviano en el grupo estudio; la principal causa de cesárea fue el sufrimiento fetal agudo en ambos, principalmente en el grupo control. En el grupo estudio no hubo recién nacidos con Síndrome de distress respiratorio ni bronconeumonía congénita. CONCLUSIONES: la HMP parece ser efectiva en el manejo del oligoamnios aislado, lo cual disminuye la morbilidad y mortalidad perinatal y secundariamente el bienestar materno. Abstract in english Oligohydramnios or oligoamnios is the amniotic fluid decrease to pathological figures with a high amniotic fluid rate (AFR) less or similar to 5 cm, and it is a fetal high risk, and secondarily maternal. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate through a controlled clinical assay the effectiveness of parenteral ma [...] ternal hydrotherapy (PMH) in isolated oligoamnios, in increase of AFR, and consecutively its repercussion on those perinatal results. METHODS: We made a controlled clinical assay to assess effectiveness of PHM in pregnants with isolated oligoamnios of 28 weeks or more of pregnancy in Gynecology and Obstetrics Teaching Hospital of Guanabacoa municipality from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004. Sample included 141 isolated oligoamnios and it was divided in two groups: study group with 56 patients and control-group with 85 patients. In study group, we administered PHM with 2000 mL of 0,9% isotopic saline solution, and in control-group there was an expectant behavior RESULTS: Isolated aligoamnios is more frequent in term pregnancy. Administration of PHM increases AFR in 43% (study group), and only in 22% of cases from control- group. Likewise, it was possible to increase gestational age in two weeks from diagnosis. In study group, transpelvic pregnancy; main cause of cesarean section was the acute fetal suffering in both groups, mainly in the control one. In study group there were not newborns presenting with neither respiratory syndrome nor congenital bronchopneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: PMH looks to be effective in management o isolated oligoamnios, decreasing perinatal morbidity and mortality, and secondarily, maternal wellbeing.

  18. Maternal age at Holocaust exposure and maternal PTSD independently influence urinary cortisol levels in adult offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RachelYehuda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parental traumatization has been associated with increased risk for the expression of psychopathology in offspring, and maternal PTSD appears to increase the risk for the development of offspring PTSD. In this study, Holocaust-related maternal age of exposure and PTSD were evaluated for their association with offspring ambient cortisol and PTSD-associated symptom expression. Method: 95 Holocaust offspring and Jewish comparison subjects received diagnostic and psychological evaluations, and 24 hour urinary cortisol was assayed by RIA. Offspring completed the Parental PTSD Questionnaire to assess maternal PTSD status. Maternal Holocaust exposure was identified as having occurred in childhood, adolescence or adulthood and examined in relation to offspring psychobiology. Results: Urinary cortisol levels did not differ for Holocaust offspring and comparison subjects but differed significantly in offspring based on maternal age of exposure and maternal PTSD status. Increased maternal age of exposure and maternal PTSD were each associated with lower urinary cortisol in offspring, but did not exhibit a significant interaction. In addition, offspring PTSD-associated symptom severity increased with maternal age at exposure and PTSD diagnosis. A regression analysis of correlates of offspring cortisol indicated that both maternal age of exposure and maternal PTSD were significant predictors of lower offspring urinary cortisol, whereas childhood adversity and offspring PTSD symptoms were not. Conclusions: Offspring low cortisol and PTSD-associated symptom expression are related to maternal age of exposure, with the greatest effects associated with increased age at exposure. These effects are relatively independent of the negative consequences of being raised by a trauma survivor. These observations highlight the importance of maternal age of exposure in determining a psychobiology in offspring that is consistent with increased risk for stress-related pathology.

  19. Mother Knows Best: Epigenetic Inheritance, Maternal Effects, and the Evolution of Human Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary evolution biology has recognized the role of development in evolution. Evolutionarily oriented psychologists have similarly recognized the role that behavioral plasticity, particularly early in development, may have had on the evolution of species, harking back to the ideas of Baldwin (the Baldwin effect). Epigenetic theories of…

  20. Antenatal Maternal Stress and Long-Term Effects on Child Neurodevelopment: How and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talge, Nicole M.; Neal, Charles; Glover, Vivette

    2007-01-01

    We review a significant body of evidence from independent prospective studies that if a mother is stressed while pregnant, her child is substantially more likely to have emotional or cognitive problems, including an increased risk of attentional deficit/hyperactivity, anxiety, and language delay. These findings are independent of effects due to…

  1. Antepartum and Postpartum Exposure to Maternal Depression: Different Effects on Different Adolescent Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Dale F.; Pawlby, Susan; Waters, Cerith S.; Sharp, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Background: Postpartum depression (PPD) is considered a major public health problem that conveys risk to mothers and offspring. Yet PPD typically occurs in the context of a lifelong episodic illness, and its putative effects might derive from the child's exposure to other episodes, in pregnancy or later childhood. The aim of the study is to test…

  2. The Effects of Maternal Social Phobia on Mother-Infant Interactions and Infant Social Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lynne; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Schofield, Elizabeth; Sack, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Background: Social phobia aggregates in families. The genetic contribution to intergenerational transmission is modest, and parenting is considered important. Research on the effects of social phobia on parenting has been subject to problems of small sample size, heterogeneity of samples and lack of specificity of observational frameworks. We…

  3. Effects of maternal exposure to estrogen and PCB on different life stages of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Per-Erik; Westerlund, L.; Billsson, K.; Berg, A.H. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cellular and Developmental Biology; Teh, S.J.; Hinton, D.E. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology; Tysklind, M. [Umeaa Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry; Nilsson, Jan; Eriksson, Lars-Ove [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Aquaculture

    1999-02-01

    PCBs have been found to impair both reproduction and development in fish. We have investigated the effects of 3 PCB congeners, 2,3,3`,4,4`,5,6-HpCB (PCB-190); 2,3,4,4`-TeCB (PCB-60); and 2,2`,4,6,6`-PeCB (PCB-104), and the estrogenic hormone 17{beta}-estradiol on fecundity, early life-stage mortality, gross morphology and histology of zebrafish (Danio rerio). While none of the studied substances reduced fecundity, they increased embryo and larval mortality. The most severe effects on viability were observed following treatment with 17{beta}-estradiol or the weakly estrogenic PCB-104. Following 17{beta}-estradiol or PCB-104 exposure, mortality continued through the yolksac absorption phase. PCB-60, on the other hand, resulted in mortality between the 30% epiboly stage and 75% epiboly stage. At the same time as embryos started to die, embryo development and hatching were delayed. PCB-190 showed only moderate effects on early-life stage mortality. The fish were reared until sexual maturation where after they were subjected to gross morphological and histological analyses. Changes in morphology were observed following PCB-104 and PCB-190 treatment. Both substances gave rise to craniofacial malformations while PCB-104 also led to lordosis in females and scoliosis in fish of both sexes. From histological analysis it was found that PCB-104 and 17{beta}-estradiol resulted in karyorrhexis and karyolysis in the kidney. Possible signs of bile stasis were observed following 17{beta}-estradiol and PCB-190 treatment. Some effects were observed on the gonads, including areas in the ovary showing atresia and limited failure of testicular spermatogenesis in 17{beta}-estradiol, PCB-104, and PCB-60 treated fish. While all studied substances resulted in effects on offspring, the observation that estrogenic substances are highly embryotoxic, raises concern that endocrine disrupting substances may severely reduce fish populations in polluted areas

  4. Sepsis and maternal mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, CD; Knight, M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Despite global progress towards reducing maternal mortality, sepsis remains a leading cause of preventable maternal death. This review focuses on current measurement challenges, trends, causes and efforts to curb maternal death from sepsis in high and low-income countries. RECENT FINDINGS: Under-reporting using routine registration data, compounded by misclassification and unreported deaths, results in significant underestimation of the burden of maternal death from sepsis....

  5. Maternal mortality in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Högberg, Ulf

    1985-01-01

    Every year about half a million women die from complications of pregnancy, parturition and puerperium, most of which are preventable. The purpose of this thesis was to chart the distribution and decline in maternal mortality in Sweden between 1751 and 1980, and furthermore to characterize positive (predisposing) factors and negative (protective) factors of maternal mortality. Maternal mortality declined from 900 to 6.6 per 100,000 live births in these 230 years. Maternal deaths accounted for ...

  6. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide increases maternal behavior, decreases maternal odor preference, and induces lipopolysaccharide hyporesponsiveness

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sandra, Penteado; Cristina de Oliveira Massoco-Salles, Gomes; Thiago, Kirsten; Thiago, Reis-Silva; Rafael César de, Melo; Michelli, Acenjo; Nicolle, Queiroz-Hazarbassanov; Maria Martha, Bernardi.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether late maternal inflammation disrupts the mother/pup interaction, resulting in long-lasting effects on pup behavior and alterations in biological pathways, thereby programming prepubertal behavior and the pups' inflammatory responses after bacterial endotoxin tre [...] atment. Female rats received 100 ?g/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or .9% saline solution on gestation day 18. Reproductive performance was observed at birth. On lactation days (LD) 5 and LD 6, respectively, maternal behavior and maternal aggressive behavior were assessed. In pups, maternal odor preference on LD 7, open field behavior on LD 21, and serum tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) levels after LPS challenge on LD 21 were investigated. The results showed that prenatal LPS exposure improved maternal care and reduced maternal aggressive behavior but did not alter maternal reproductive performance. Male offspring exhibited increased body weights at birth and reduced maternal odor preference. Lipopolysaccharide challenge increased the duration of immobility in the open field and induced a slight increase in serum TNF-? levels. Prenatal exposure to LPS during late pregnancy improved maternal care, reduced maternal olfactory preference, and induced TNF-? hyporesponsiveness to a single dose of LPS in pups.

  7. Quantitative effects of tobacco smoking exposure on the maternal-fetal circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen Guilherme O; Filho Plínio VM; de B Machado Julia; Chatkin José M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the existence of various published studies regarding the effects of tobacco smoking on pregnancy, and especially in regards to placental blood flow and vascular resistance, some points still require clarification. In addition, the amount of damage due to tobacco smoking exposure that occurs has not been quantified by objective means. In this study, we looked for a possible association between flow resistance indices of several arteries and the levels of urinary cot...

  8. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and effects on neonatal anthropometry: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Bolat, Fatih; EREN, Özge; BOLAT, Güher; Can, Emrah; Cömert, Serdar; USLU, Hasan Sinan; NUHO?LU, Asiye

    2012-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with cigarette smoking during pregnancy and to evaluate the effect of smoking on anthropometric measurements. Materials and methods: This study was carried out prospectively in selected women who gave birth to a healthy, term infant at ?i?li Etfal Education and Research Hospital from January 2009 to January 2010. Smoking status during pregnancy was categorized into 3 groups: nonsmoker; smoker; passive smoker. Regression analysis was performed to compare ri...

  9. The effects of maternal social phobia on mother-infant interactions and infant social responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    MURRAY, L.; Cooper, P.; Creswell, C; Schofield, E; C. & Sack

    2007-01-01

    Background: Social phobia aggregates in families. The genetic contribution to intergenerational transmission is modest, and parenting is considered important. Research on the effects of social phobia on parenting has been subject to problems of small sample size, heterogeneity of samples and lack of specificity of observational frameworks. We addressed these problems in the current study.Methods: We assessed mothers with social phobia (N = 84) and control mothers (N = 89) at 10 weeks in face-...

  10. Effects of genistein in the maternal diet on reproductive development and spatial learning in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Evan R; Caniglia, Mary Kay; Wilcox, Jenna L.; Overton, Karla A.; Burr, Marra J.; Wolfe, Brady D.; Sanders, Brian J.; Amy B. Wisniewski; Wrenn, Craige C.

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors, chemicals that disturb the actions of endogenous hormones, have been implicated in birth defects associated with hormone-dependent development. Phytoestrogens are a class of endocrine disruptors found in plants. In the current study we examined the effects of exposure at various perinatal time periods to genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, on reproductive development and learning in male rats. Dams were fed genistein-containing (5 mg/kg feed) food during both gestation and l...

  11. Developmental Programming Resulting from Maternal Obesity: Effects on Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Calvert, John W; David J. Lefer; Gundewar, Susheel; Poston, Lucilla; Coetzee, William A.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive number of epidemiological and animal studies suggest that prenatal and early life events are important determinants for disorders later in life. Among them, prenatal stress (i.e. stress experienced by the pregnant mother with impact on the fetal ontogeny) has clear programming effects on the cardiovascular system. A fetus developing under adverse conditions becomes an adult who is susceptible to disease, which may include hypertension, insulin resistance, altered blood lipid l...

  12. Longitudinal Effects of Adaptability on Behavior Problems and Maternal Depression in Families of Adolescents with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Jason K.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick.; Greenberg, Jan S

    2011-01-01

    Research on families of individuals with autism has tended to focus on child-driven effects utilizing models of stress and coping. The current study used a family-systems perspective to examine whether family-level adaptability promoted beneficial outcomes for mothers and their adolescents with autism over time. Participants were 149 families of children diagnosed with autism who were between the ages of 10 and 22 years during the three-year period examined. Mothers reported on family adaptab...

  13. Effect of self-hypnosis on duration of labor and maternal and neonatal outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Anette; Uldbjerg, Niels; Zachariae, Robert; Nohr, Ellen A

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of a brief course in self-hypnosis for childbirth on duration of the labor and other birth outcomes. DESIGN: A randomized, controlled, single-blind trial. SETTING: Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Denmark. POPULATION: A total of 1222 healthy nulliparous women. METHODS: A hypnosis group receiving three 1-h lessons in self-hypnosis with additional audio-recordings to ease childbirth, a relaxation group receiving three 1-h lessons in various relaxation methods and...

  14. Effect of strenuous maternal exercise before and during pregnancy on rat progeny renal function

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira A.O.; Fileto C.; Melis M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of strenuous exercise before and during pregnancy on the renal function and morphological alterations of the progeny were determined in a study on female Wistar rats. This research was done based on a previous study carried out in our laboratory, which showed morphological alterations in rats submitted to this kind of exercise. As the form is related to the function, the physiological relevance of submitting a pregnant female to a high-intensity exercise training regimen could be ...

  15. Maternal, social and abiotic environmental effects on growth vary across life stages in a cooperative mammal

    OpenAIRE

    English, Sinead; Andrew W. Bateman; Mares, Rafael; Ozgul, Arpat; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2013-01-01

    Resource availability plays a key role in driving variation in somatic growth and body condition, and the factors determining access to resources vary considerably across life stages. Parents and carers may exert important influences in early life, when individuals are nutritionally dependent, with abiotic environmental effects having stronger influences later in development as individuals forage independently. Most studies have measured specific factors influencing growth across development,...

  16. Maternal, social and abiotic environmental effects on growth vary across life stages in a cooperative mammal

    OpenAIRE

    English, Sinead; Andrew W. Bateman; Mares, Rafael; Ozgul, Arpat; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2013-01-01

    Resource availability plays a key role in driving variation in somatic growth and body condition, and the factors determining access to resources vary considerably across life stages. Parents and carers may exert important influences in early life, when individuals are nutritionally dependent, with abiotic environmental effects having stronger influences later in development as individuals forage independently.Most studies have measured specific factors influencing growth across development o...

  17. Maternal, social and abiotic environment effects on growth vary across life stages in a cooperative mammal

    OpenAIRE

    English, Sinead; Andrew W. Bateman; Mares, Rafael; Ozgul, Arpat; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2014-01-01

    1. Resource availability plays a key role in driving variation in somatic growth and body condition, and the factors determining access to resources vary considerably across life stages. Parents and carers may exert important influences in early life, when individuals are nutritionally dependent, with abiotic environmental effects having stronger influences later in development as individuals forage independently. 2. Most studies have measured specific factors influencing growt...

  18. The effect of maternal alcohol consumption on fetal growth and preterm birth.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Leary, CM; Nassar, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal growth and preterm birth and to estimate the effect of dose and timing of alcohol exposure in pregnancy. DESIGN: A population-based cohort study linked to birth information on the Western Australian Midwives Notification System. SETTING: Western Australia. POPULATION: A 10% random sample of births restricted to nonindigenous women who had delivered a singleton infant (n= 4719) in 1995-1997. METHODS: The imp...

  19. Effects of early life adverse experiences on the brain: implications from maternal separation models in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    MayumiNishi

    2014-01-01

    During postnatal development, adverse early life experiences can affect the formation of neuronal circuits and exert long-lasting influences on neural function. Many studies have shown that daily repeated MS, an animal model of early life stress, can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis) and can affect subsequent brain function and emotional behavior during adulthood. However, the molecular basis of the long-lasting effects of early life stress on brain function has not ...

  20. Extension of maternity leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    In 1987, the period when prenatal maternity allowance is paid in Finland was extended from 25 to 30 days. The total period when maternity allowance is paid is now 263 days. In 1988, the period when maternity allowance is paid was extended another 60 days in the case of multiple births. PMID:12289744

  1. Effect of number of pig embryos in the uterus on their survival and development and on maternal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Père, M C; Dourmad, J Y; Etienne, M

    1997-05-01

    The effects of pig embryo number on fetal survival and growth and maternal metabolism were evaluated with 114 Large White gilts. Gilts were assigned at 38 kg to three treatments: control (CTR), ligature of the left oviduct (LIG), or right hemi-hysteroovariectomy (HHO). Insemination occurred at 311 +/- 18 d of age. A laparotomy was performed at d 35 of gestation, and gilts were slaughtered at d 112. Ovulation rate per uterine horn was 4.30, 8.70, and 17.12 in the LIG, CTR, and HHO groups, respectively. The hierarchy was the same for litter size at d 35 of gestation, but the relative differences were reduced (3.24, 5.98, and 8.40 fetuses/uterine horn, respectively). Litter size per uterine horn was similar in the CTR and HHO groups at d 112 of pregnancy (2.93, 4.69, and 4.76 fetuses in the LIG, CTR, and HHO groups, respectively). Early (before d 35 of gestation), late, and total fetal mortality increased with embryo potential per uterine horn. There was a compensation between early and late fetal mortality in the CTR and HHO groups. Fetal weight at d 112 was related to litter size in early pregnancy (1.50, 1.38, and 1.27 kg in the LIG, CTR, and HHO groups, respectively). Uterine capacity limits litter size and fetal development, even in sows with a conventional potential of embryos. Availability of energetic and gluconeogenic substrates was higher at 110 than at 60 d of gestation in the three groups. Blood substrate levels suggested that lipid mobilization and glucose uptake were higher in the gilts with a larger litter weight. PMID:9159282

  2. The effectiveness of community-based interventions to improve maternal and infant health in the Northeast of Brazil Eficacia de intervenciones en la comunidad para mejorar la salud maternoinfantil en el nordeste de Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Emond; Jon Pollock; Nilma da Costa; Técia Maranhão; Albanita Macedo

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based intervention project aimed at reducing maternal and infant mortality in a poor urban district in the city of Natal, in the Northeast of Brazil. Methods. The intervention, called the ProNatal project, introduced a program of integrated community health care to a geographically defined population. The interventions included the establishment of antenatal clinics at the district's health centers, the opening of the maternity facilitie...

  3. Búsqueda intencionada y reclasificación de muertes maternas en México: el efecto en la distribución de las causas / Intentional search and reclassification of maternal deaths in Mexico: The effect on the distribution of causes

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luis Manuel, Torres; Ana Luisa, Rhenals; Aline, Jiménez; Dolores, Ramírez-Villalobos; Rocío, Urióstegui; Miriam, Piña; Humberto, Rocha.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Corregir la mala clasificación y mejorar la calidad de la información sobre la mortalidad materna en México. Material y métodos. A través de los registros clínicos y autopsias verbales, se estudiaron todas las defunciones certificadas como maternas y una selección de defunciones de mujeres [...] en edad fértil, cuyas causas fueron consideradas como sospechosas de encubrir una muerte materna; todas ocurridas durante 2011 en México. Resultados. La búsqueda intencionada y reclasificación de muertes maternas permitió rescatar más de 100 muertes que no habían sido registradas ni codificadas inicialmente como maternas y se ratificaron o rectificaron las causas anotadas en los certificados de defunción. Este procedimiento también permitió reclasificar como muertes maternas 297 defunciones de la base preliminar del Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía. Conclusiones. La Búsqueda Intencionada y Reclasificación de Muertes Maternas es un procedimiento muy útil para mejorar la calidad de la información sobre la mortalidad materna. Abstract in english Objective. To correct the misclassification and improve the quality of information on maternal mortality in Mexico. Materials and methods. Using clinical records and verbal autopsies, we studied all deaths certified as maternal deaths as well as a selection of deaths of women of childbearing age who [...] se causes were considered as suspected of hiding a maternal death, all of which occurred during 2011 within Mexico. Results. The deliberate search of maternal deaths and reclassification allowed the rescue of just over 100 deaths that were not originally registered or coded as maternal and confirmed or corrected the causes of death recorded on death certificates as confirmed maternal deaths. This procedure also allowed the reclassification of 297 maternal deaths of women in the groundwork of the National Institute of Statistics and Geography. Conclusions. International Search and Reclassification of Maternal Deaths is a very useful procedure for improving the classification of cases that were not classified as maternal deaths and the effect was greater with the coding of indirect obstetric deaths.

  4. Using Observational Data to Estimate the Effect of Hand Washing and Clean Delivery Kit Use by Birth Attendants on Maternal Deaths after Home Deliveries in Rural Bangladesh, India and Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Nadine; Prost, Audrey; Copas, Andrew; Corbin, Marine; Li, Leah; Colbourn, Tim; Osrin, David; Neuman, Melissa; Azad, Kishwar; Kuddus, Abdul; Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Cortina-Borja, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, puerperal sepsis accounts for an estimated 8–12% of maternal deaths, but evidence is lacking on the extent to which clean delivery practices could improve maternal survival. We used data from the control arms of four cluster-randomised controlled trials conducted in rural India, Bangladesh and Nepal, to examine associations between clean delivery kit use and hand washing by the birth attendant with maternal mortality among home deliveries. Methods We tested associations between clean delivery practices and maternal deaths, using a pooled dataset for 40,602 home births across sites in the three countries. Cross-sectional data were analysed by fitting logistic regression models with and without multiple imputation, and confounders were selected a priori using causal directed acyclic graphs. The robustness of estimates was investigated through sensitivity analyses. Results Hand washing was associated with a 49% reduction in the odds of maternal mortality after adjusting for confounding factors (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.51, 95% CI 0.28–0.93). The sensitivity analysis testing the missing at random assumption for the multiple imputation, as well as the sensitivity analysis accounting for possible misclassification bias in the use of clean delivery practices, indicated that the association between hand washing and maternal death had been over estimated. Clean delivery kit use was not associated with a maternal death (AOR 1.26, 95% CI 0.62–2.56). Conclusions Our evidence suggests that hand washing in delivery is critical for maternal survival among home deliveries in rural South Asia, although the exact magnitude of this effect is uncertain due to inherent biases associated with observational data from low resource settings. Our findings indicating kit use does not improve maternal survival, suggests that the soap is not being used in all instances that kit use is being reported. PMID:26295838

  5. Maternal transmission effects of the PAX genes among cleft case–parent trios from four populations

    OpenAIRE

    Sull, Jae Woong; Liang, Kung-yee; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Fallin, Margaret Daniele; Ingersoll, Roxanne G; Park, Jiwan; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Chen, Philip K.; Chong, Samuel S.; Cheah, Felicia; Yeow, Vincent; Park, Beyoung Yun; Jee, Sun Ha; Jabs, Ethylin W; Redett, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is among the most common human birth defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 700 live births. The paired box (PAX) genes have been suggested as candidate genes for CL/P based largely on mouse models; however, few human studies have focused on this gene family. This study tests for association between markers in four PAX genes and CL/P using a case-parent trio design considering parent-of-origin effects. Trios from four populations (76 from Mar...

  6. Maternal Employment and Adolescent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhm, Christopher J

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates how maternal employment is related to the cognitive development and body weight of 10 and 11 year olds, controlling for a wide variety of child, mother and family characteristics. The results suggest that limited market work benefits youths who are relatively "disadvantaged" and even long hours, which occur infrequently, are unlikely to leave them much worse off. By contrast, maternal labor supply is estimated to have more uniformly harmful consequences for "advantaged" adolescents. The negative cognitive effects for these youths probably partly occur because maternal labor supply reduces the time spent in enriching home environments. Some of the growth in obesity may be related to determinants of excess weight common to the child and mother. PMID:19830269

  7. Effects of maternal dexamethasone treatment early in pregnancy on glucocorticoid receptors in the ovine placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, H; Meng, W; Sloboda, D M; Li, S; Ehrlich, L; Plagemann, A; Dudenhausen, J W; Henrich, W; Newnham, J P; Challis, J R G; Braun, T

    2015-05-01

    The effects of endogenous cortisol on binucleate cells (BNCs), which promote fetal growth, may be mediated by glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), and exposure to dexamethasone (DEX) in early pregnancy stages of placental development might modify this response. In this article, we have investigated the expression of GR as a determinant of these responses. Pregnant ewes carrying singleton fetuses (n = 119) were randomized to control (2 mL saline/ewe) or DEX-treated groups (intramuscular injections of 0.14 mg/kg ewe weight per 12 hours) at 40 to 41 days of gestation (dG). Placental tissue was collected at 50, 100, 125, and 140 dG. Total glucocorticoid receptor protein (GRt) was increased significantly by DEX at 50 and 125 dG in females only, but decreased in males at 125 dG as compared to controls. Glucocorticoid receptor ? (GR?) protein was not changed after DEX treatment. Three BNC phenotypes were detected regarding GR? expression (++, +-, --), DEX increased the proportion of (++) and decreased (--) BNC at 140 dG. Effects were sex- and cell type dependent, modifying the responsiveness of the placenta to endogenous cortisol. We speculate that 3 maturational stages of BNCs exist and that the overall activity of BNCs is determined by the distribution of these 3 cell types, which may become altered through early pregnancy exposure to elevated glucocorticoids. PMID:25332218

  8. Effects of inadequate maternal dietary protein:carbohydrate ratios during pregnancy on offspring immunity in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuchscherer Margret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate nutrition in utero may retard foetal growth and alter physiological development of offspring. This study investigated the effects of low and high protein diets fed to primiparous German Landrace sows throughout pregnancy on the immune function of their offspring at different ages. Sows were fed diets with adequate (AP, 12.1%; n?=?13, low (LP, 6.5%; n?=?15, or high (HP, 30%; n?=?14 protein content, made isoenergetic by varying carbohydrate levels. Cortisol, total protein and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgM, IgA concentrations were measured in the blood of sows over the course of pregnancy. Cortisol, total protein, immunoglobulins, lymphocyte proliferation, immune cell counts, and cytokines were assessed in the blood of offspring at baseline and under challenging conditions (weaning; lipopolysaccharide (LPS administration. Results In sows, the LP diet increased cortisol (P?P?P?P?+ cell percentage and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio increased after weaning (P?P?=?0.09 and HP (P?P? Conclusions Our results indicate that both low and high protein:carbohydrate ratios in the diet of pregnant sows can induce short-term as well as long-lasting effects on immune competence in piglets that may have serious consequences for host defence against bacterial pathogens.

  9. Antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Rat maternal behavior is a complex social behavior. Many clinically used antipsychotic drugs, including the typical drug haloperidol and the atypical drugs clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, and amisulpride, disrupt active maternal responses (e.g. pup retrieval, pup licking, and nest building) to various extents. In this review, I present a summary of recent studies on the behavioral effects and neurobiological mechanisms of antipsychotic action on maternal behavior in rats. I argue that antipsychotic drugs at clinically relevant doses disrupt active maternal responses primarily by suppressing maternal motivation. Atypical drug-induced sedation also contributes to their disruptive effects, especially that on pup nursing. Among many potential receptor mechanisms, dopamine D2 receptors and serotonin 5-HT2A/2C receptors are shown to be critically involved in the mediation of the maternal disruptive effects of antipsychotic drugs, with D2 receptors contributing more to typical antipsychotic-induced disruptions, whereas 5-HT2A/2C receptors contributing more to atypical drug-induced disruptions. The nucleus accumbens shell-related reward circuitry is an essential neural network in the mediation of the behavioral effects of antipsychotic drugs on maternal behavior. This research not only helps understand the extent and mechanisms of impact of antipsychotic medications on human maternal care, but is also important for enhancing our understanding of the neurochemical basis of maternal behavior. It is also valuable for understanding the complete spectrum of therapeutic effects and side-effects of antipsychotic treatment. This knowledge may facilitate the development of effective intervening strategies to help patients coping with such undesirable effects. PMID:26221833

  10. Testing an Undertested Comparison: Maternal Effects on Sons' and Daughters' Attitudes Toward Women in the Labor Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brian; Steelman, Lala Carr

    1982-01-01

    Examined the relationship between a mother's work status and educational level and the sex-role attitudes of her offspring. Results suggested that the association between maternal characteristics and attitudes toward women in the labor force is stronger for males than it is for females. (Author)

  11. Predicting Infant Maltreatment in Low-Income Families: The Interactive Effects of Maternal Attributions and Child Status at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugental, Daphne Blunt; Happaney, Keith

    2004-01-01

    Maternal attributions and child neonatal status at birth were assessed as predictors of infant maltreatment (harsh parenting and safety neglect). The population included low-income, low-education families who were primarily Hispanic. Child maltreatment during the 1st year of life (N = 73) was predicted by neonatal status (low Apgar scores, preterm…

  12. The Effect of Maternal Language on Bilingual Children's Vocabulary and Emergent Literacy Development during Head Start and Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Davison, Megan Dunn; Lawrence, Frank R.; Miccio, Adele W.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of maternal language and children's gender on bilingual children's vocabulary and emergent literacy development during 2 years in Head Start and kindergarten. Seventy-two mothers and their children who attended English immersion programs participated. Questionnaires administered annually over a 3-year period…

  13. Effect of maternal exposure to ozone on reproductive outcome and immune, inflammatory, and allergic responses in the offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is growing concern that exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy affects health outcomes in the offspring due to alterations in the development of immune and other homeostatic processes. To assess the risks of maternal inhalation exposure to ozone (O3), timed pregnant BA...

  14. Individual Differences in Trajectories of Emotion Regulation Processes: The Effects of Maternal Depressive Symptomatology and Children's Physiological Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandon, Alysia Y.; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; O'Brien, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Trajectories of emotion regulation processes were examined in a community sample of 269 children across the ages of 4 to 7 using hierarchical linear modeling. Maternal depressive symptomatology (Symptom Checklist-90) and children's physiological reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) and vagal regulation ([delta]RSA) were explored as…

  15. Temporal and maternal effects on reproductive ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    We used mixed-effects models to examine relationships of reproductive characteristics of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) to improve population modeling and conservation planning for this species. Neonates from larger litters had lower mass, and mass of neonates also was affected by random variation among mothers. Length of mother did not affect relative mass of litters; however, our data suggest that longer mothers expended less reproductive effort per offspring than shorter mothers. We detected random variation in length of neonates among mothers, but these lengths were not related to length of mother or size of litter. Mean size of litter varied among years, but little evidence existed for a relationship between size of litter or mass of litter and length of mother. Sex ratios of neonates did not differ from 1:1.

  16. Prenatal Enrichment And Recovery From Perinatal Cortical Damage: Effects Of Maternal Complex Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbin Gibb

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Birth is a particularly vulnerable time for acquiring brain injury. Unfortunately, very few treatments are available for those affected. Here we explore the effectiveness of prenatal intervention in an animal model of early brain damage. We used a complex housing paradigm as a form of prenatal enrichment. Six nulliparous dams and one male rat were placed in complex housing (condomom group for 12 hours per day until the dams' delivered their pups. At parturition the dams were left in their home (standard cages with their pups. Four dams were housed in standard cages (cagemom group throughout pregnancy and with their pups until weaning. At postnatal day 3 (P3 infants of both groups received frontal cortex removals or sham surgery. Behavioural testing began on P60 and included the Morris water task and a skilled reaching task. Brains were processed for Golgi analyses. Complex housing of the mother had a significant effect on the behaviour of their pups. Control animals from the condomom group outperformed those of the cagemom group in the water task. Condomom animals with lesions performed better than their cagemom cohorts in both the water task and in skilled reaching. Condomom animals showed an increase in cortical thickness at anterior planes and thalamic area at both anterior and posterior regions. Golgi analyses revealed an increase in spine density. These results suggest that prenatal enrichment alters brain organization in manner that is prophylactic for perinatal brain injury. This result could have significant implications for the prenatal management of infants expected to be at risk for difficult birth.

  17. Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia during Labour: Effect of Addition of Background Infusion on Quality of Analgesia & Maternal Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA is a well established technique for pain relief during labor. But the inclusion of continuous background infusion to PCEA is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess whether the use of continuous infusion along with PCEA was beneficial for laboring women with regards to quality of analgesia, maternal satisfaction and neonatal outcome in comparison to PCEA alone. Fifty five parturients received epidural bolus of 10ml solution containing 0.125% bupivacaine +2 ìg.ml-1 of fentanyl. For maintenance of analgesia the patients of Group PCEA self administered 8 ml bolus with lockout interval of 20 minutes of above solution on demand with no basal infusion. While the patients of Group PCEA + CI received continuous epidural infusion at the rate of 10 ml.hr-1 along with self administered boluses of 3 ml with lockout interval of 10 minutes of similar epidural solution. Patients of both groups were given rescue boluses by the anaesthetists for distressing pain. Verbal analogue pain scores, incidence of distressing pain, need of supplementary/rescue boluses, dose of bupivacaine consumed, maternal satisfaction and neonatal Apgar scores were recorded. No significant difference was observed between mean VAS pain scores during labor, maternal satisfaction, mode of delivery or neonatal Apgar scores. But more patients (n=8 required rescue boluses in PCEA group for distressing pain. The total volume consumed of bupivacaine and opioid was slightly more in PCEA + CI group. In both the techniques the highest sensory level, degree of motor block were comparable& prolongation of labor was not seen. It was concluded that both the techniques provided equivalent labor analgesia, maternal satisfaction and neonatal Apgar scores. PCEA along with continuous infusion at the rate of 10 ml/ hr resulted in lesser incidence of distressing pain and need for rescue analgesic. Although this group consumed higher dose of bupivacaine, it did not affect maternal or neonatal safety.

  18. Effects of early life adverse experiences on brain activity: Implications from maternal separation models in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MayumiNishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, adverse early life experiences can affect the formation of neuronal circuits and exert long-lasting influences on neural function. Many studies have shown that daily repeated MS, an animal model of early life stress, can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis and can affect subsequent brain function and emotional behavior during adulthood. However, the molecular basis of the long-lasting effects of early life stress on brain function has not been completely elucidated. In this review, we introduce various cases of MS in rodents and illustrate the alterations in HPA axis activity by focusing on corticosterone (CORT, an end product of the HPA axis in rodents. We then present a characterization of the brain regions affected by various patterns of MS, including repeated MS and single time MS at various stages before weaning, by investigating c-Fos expression, a biological marker of neuronal activity. These CORT and c-Fos studies suggest that repeated early life stress may affect neuronal function in region- and temporal-specific manners, indicating a critical period for habituation to early life stress. Next, we discuss how early life stress can impact behavior, namely by inducing depression, anxiety or eating disorders. Furthermore, alterations in gene expression in adult mice exposed to MS, especially epigenetic changes of DNA methylation, are discussed.

  19. Effect of Irradiation Maternal Diets on the Post-natal Development of Brain Rat Pups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Effect of Protein-calorie malnutrition was studied on the pups born to mothers receiving either irradiated normal diet (consisted equal parts of gram and wheat) or irradiation low protein diet (consisted one part of normal diet and three parts of heat). Level of DNA, RNA and protein content were found markedly reduced in the brain of irradiated low protein diet fed pups than in the pups fed on the irradiated normal diet. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was found lower while catalase and lipid peroxidation activity were higher in the pups given irradiated low protein diet, compared whit the pups fed irradiated normal diet. On the whole both the irradiated low protein diet as well as irradiated normal diet fed pups showed higher index of biochemical changes than in the unirradiated low protein diet fed pups. Post-natal mortality was 60% in the pups given irradiated low protein diet, whereas the pups fed on the irradiated normal diet and unirradiated low protein diet did not show any death. The study given evidence that feeding of the irradiated low protein diet interferes more with the development of brain compared with the pups fed on irradiated normal diet

  20. Effect of Maternal Nutrition on Kits During Pre and Post Partum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hasanuzzaman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 15 young rabbits (kits of 35 days old were randomly allocated to same concentrate mixture (T2 in a completely randomized design. All the rabbits were offered ad-libitum green grass with same concentrate mixture. All the animals were kept in the same management. The feed intake, live weight changes and feed conversion efficiency was recorded. DM intake in three different groups (A, B, C were 350.53?46.57, 403.62 ± 41.89 and 389.30 ± 53.71 (g/wk which were not significant. The average daily gains in group A, B and C were 11.25 ± 8.71, 15.20 ± 8.33 and 14.43 ± 9.84 respectively and the differences among groups were not significant. The differences in growth velocity among different groups were not significant. Feed conversion efficiency were 4.45, 3.79 and 3.85 for group A, B and C respectively and the values were found non-significantly different. The result indicated that feeding of mother in terms of energy did not have any significant effect on DM intake, live weight changes, growth velocity and feed conversion efficiency upon their kits.

  1. Quantitative effects of tobacco smoking exposure on the maternal-fetal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Guilherme O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the existence of various published studies regarding the effects of tobacco smoking on pregnancy, and especially in regards to placental blood flow and vascular resistance, some points still require clarification. In addition, the amount of damage due to tobacco smoking exposure that occurs has not been quantified by objective means. In this study, we looked for a possible association between flow resistance indices of several arteries and the levels of urinary cotinine and the concentration of carbon monoxide in the exhaled air (COex of both smoking and non-smoking pregnant women. We also looked for a relationship between those findings and fetal growth and birth weight. Methods In a prospective design, thirty pregnant smokers and thirty-four pregnant non-smokers were studied. The volunteers signed consent forms, completed a self-applied questionnaire and were subjected to Doppler velocimetry. Tobacco smoking exposure was quantified by subject provided information and confirmed by the measurement of urinary cotinine levels and by the concentration of carbon monoxide in the exhaled air (COex. The weight of newborns was evaluated immediately after birth. Results Comparing smoking to non-smoking pregnant women, a significant increase in the resistance index was observed in the uterine arteries (P = 0.001 and umbilical artery (P = 0.001, and a decrease in the middle cerebral artery (P = 0.450. These findings were associated with progressively higher concentrations of COex and urinary cotinine. A decrease in the birth weight was also detected (P Conclusions In pregnant women who smoke, higher arterial resistance indices and lower birth weights were observed, and these findings were associated with increasing levels of tobacco smoking exposure. The values were significantly different when compared to those found in non-smoking pregnant women. This study contributes to the findings that smoking damage during pregnancy is dose-dependent, as demonstrated by the objective methods for measuring tobacco smoking exposure.

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of maternal atrazine exposure on male Balb/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrazine is a widely used herbicide applied to corn, sugar and other crops as a broad leaf weed inhibitor. Using the Balb/c mouse model, we have determined that prenatal/lactational exposure to atrazine alters adult immune function. Pregnant Balb/c dams were exposed subcutaneously for 21 days via time release pellets to 700 ?g per day of atrazine beginning between days 10 and 12 of pregnancy. Prenatal/Lactational exposure caused no overt physical malformations in the offspring and had no effect on the number of litters carried to term or the litter size. Upon reaching early adulthood (approximately 3 months of age), the state of their immune system was evaluated. There were no changes in body weight or in the organ to body weight ratio of the spleen. Additionally, no changes were observed in the number of CD8+ T cell, CD4+ T cell, or B220+ B cell subpopulations in the spleen. T cell function was assessed by measuring proliferation and cytolytic activity after in vitro allogeneic stimulation. Male mice which had been prenatally/lactationally exposed to atrazine had an increase in both T cell proliferation and cytolytic activity. The humoral immune response was assessed after immunization with heat killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (HKSP). There was a significant increase in the number of HKSP-specific IgM secreting B cells in the spleen of prenatal/lactational exposed male mice. Inasmuch as atrazine is a widespread environmental contaminant, this immunopotentiation raises concerns that it may potentiate clinical diseases, such as autoimmune disease and hypersensitivity, and needs to be carefully monitored and studied

  3. Qualitatively and quantitatively similar effects of active and passive maternal tobacco smoke exposure on in utero mutagenesis at the HPRT locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Stephen G

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced mutagenesis in utero is likely to have life-long repercussions for the exposed fetus, affecting survival, birth weight and susceptibility to both childhood and adult-onset diseases, such as cancer. In the general population, such exposures are likely to be a consequence of the lifestyle choices of the parents, with exposure to tobacco smoke one of the most pervasive and easily documented. Previous studies attempting to establish a direct link between active smoking and levels of somatic mutation have largely discounted the effects of passive or secondary exposure, and have produced contradictory results. Methods Data from three studies of possible smoking effects on in utero mutagenesis at the HPRT locus were compiled and reanalyzed, alone and in combination. Where possible, passive exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was considered as a separate category of exposure, rather than being included in the non-smoking controls. Molecular spectra from these studies were reanalyzed after adjustment for reported mutation frequencies from the individual studies and the entire data set. Results A series of related studies on mutation at the X-linked HPRT locus in human newborn cord blood samples has led to the novel conclusion that only passive maternal exposure to tobacco mutagens has a significant effect on the developing baby. We performed a pooled analysis of the complete data from these studies, at the levels of both induced mutation frequency and the resulting mutational spectrum. Conclusion Our analysis reveals a more commonsensical, yet no less cautionary result: both active maternal smoking and secondary maternal exposure produce quantitatively and qualitatively indistinguishable increases in fetal HPRT mutation. Further, it appears that this effect is not perceptibly ameliorated if the mother adjusts her behavior (i.e. stops smoking when pregnancy is confirmed, although this conclusion may also be affected by continued passive exposure.

  4. Aerobic Exercise during Pregnancy and Presence of Fetal-Maternal Heart Rate Synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Van Leeuwen, Peter; Gustafson, Kathleen M.; Cysarz, Dirk; Geue, Daniel; May, Linda E; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that short-term direct interaction between maternal and fetal heart rates may take place and that this interaction is affected by the rate of maternal respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal aerobic exercise during pregnancy on the occurrence of fetal-maternal heart rate synchronization.

  5. Early Maternal Time Investment and Early Child Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Del Bono, Emilia; Francesconi, Marco; Kelly, Yvonne; Sacker, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Using large longitudinal survey data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study, this paper estimates the effect of maternal time inputs on early child development. We find that maternal time is a quantitatively important determinant of skill formation and that its effect declines with child age. There is evidence of a long shadow of the effect of early maternal time inputs on later outcomes, especially in the case of cognitive skill development. In the case of non-cognitive development, this effect...

  6. Maternal undernutrition during critical windows of development results in differential and sex-specific effects on postnatal adiposity and related metabolic profiles in adult rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, G J; Sloboda, D M; Vickers, M H

    2012-07-01

    It is well established that altered maternal nutrition may induce long-term metabolic consequences in offspring. However, the effects of maternal undernutrition during different developmental windows on sex-specific growth and metabolism in offspring are not well defined. We investigated the effect of moderate maternal undernutrition during pregnancy and/or lactation on postnatal growth and metabolic outcomes in offspring. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) control (CONT) dams fed a standard diet throughout pregnancy and lactation; (2) dams undernourished to 50 % of CONT during pregnancy (UNP); (3) dams fed at 50 % of CONT throughout lactation (UNL); (4) dams fed at 50 % of CONT throughout pregnancy and lactation (UNPL). UNP and UNPL offspring were lighter at birth compared to CONT and UNL. UNL and UNPL offspring were growth restricted at weaning and remained smaller into adulthood. UNP males and females developed increased adiposity and hyperleptinaemia in adulthood compared to all other groups. Adiposity in UNL and UNPL males was similar to CONT offspring. In UNL and UNPL females, adiposity was lower than for CONT females. Markers of bone mass, lipid metabolism and hepatic function were altered in UNP offspring but were similar in UNL and UNPL offspring compared to CONT. Lack of catch-up growth during lactation in offspring of undernourished mothers prevented development of adiposity and related metabolic disorders in later life. These data highlight that the timing and duration of undernutrition during critical windows of development exert differential effects on postnatal outcomes in a sex-specific manner. PMID:22018052

  7. The effect of a controlled manipulation of maternal dietary fat intake on medium and long chain fatty acids in human breast milk in Saskatoon, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Alison M; Nasser Roseann; Goh Yeow K; Clandinin M Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Few studies in recent years have demonstrated the effect of maternal diet on fatty acid composition of human milk. Methods Fourteen free-living lactating women participated in a cross-over dietary intervention study, consuming a low fat diet (17.6% of energy as fat, 14.4% of energy as protein, 68.0% of energy as carbohydrate) and a high fat diet (40.3% of energy as fat, 14.4% of energy as protein, 45.3% of energy as carbohydrate) each for periods of 4 days, in randomised o...

  8. Temporal effects of maternal and pregnancy characteristics on serum PAPP-A and free ?-hCG at 7-14 weeks' gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, Susan; Ekelund, Charlotte; Wright, Dave; Kirkegaard, Ida; Nørgaard, Pernille; Petersen, Olav Bjørn; Tabor, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Investigate gestational age dependent effects of racial origin, smoking status and mode of conception on maternal serum levels of free ß-human chorionic gonadotropin (?-hCG) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) at 7-14 weeks' gestation. Methods: Data arise from prospective first-trimester combined screening for aneuploidies in singleton pregnancies, with serum free ß-hCG and PAPP-A measured at 7(+1) -14(+3) weeks' gestation. We include 27,908 pregnancies from three centr...

  9. Temporal effects of maternal and pregnancy characteristics on serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and free ?-human chorionic gonadotropin at 7-14 weeks' gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, S; Ekelund, C; Wright, D; Kirkegaard, I; Nørgaard, P; Petersen, O B; Tabor, A; Sperling, Lene

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate gestational age-dependent effects of racial origin, smoking status and mode of conception on maternal serum levels of free ?-human chorionic gonadotropin (?-hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) at 7-14 weeks' gestation. METHODS: This was an analysis of data from prospective first-trimester combined screening for aneuploidies in singleton pregnancies, with ?-hCG and PAPP-A measured at 7?+?1 to 14?+?3 weeks' gestation. We inclu...

  10. The Length of Maternity Leave and Family Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuchert-Pedersen, Louise Voldby; Humlum, Maria Knoth

    2014-01-01

    We study the relationship between the length of maternity leave and the physical and psychological health of the family. Using a reform of the parental leave scheme in Denmark that increased the number of weeks of leave with full benefit compensation,we estimate the effect of the length of maternity leave on a range of health indicators including the number of hospital admissions for both mother and child and the probability of the mother receiving antidepressants. The reform led to an increase in average post-birth maternity leave of 32 days. We find limited evidence that the increase in the length of maternity leave matters for child or maternal health outcomes and thus we complement the existing evidence on maternity leave expansions that tends to find limited effcts on children's later developmental, educational, and labor market outcomes. Our results suggest that any benecial effects of increasing the length of maternity leave are greater for low-resource families.

  11. Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy: Do the Effects on Innate (Toll-Like Receptor) Function Have Implications for Subsequent Allergic Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Prescott Susan L; Noakes Paul S

    2007-01-01

    Subtle increases in immaturity of immune function in early infancy have been implicated in the rising susceptibility to allergic disease, particularly relative impairment of type 1 interferon (IFN)-? responses in the neonatal period. Although genetic predisposition is a clear risk factor, the escalating rates of allergic disease in infancy suggest that environmental factors are also implicated. We previously showed that maternal smoking in pregnancy may impair neonatal IFN-? responses. Our m...

  12. The Effect of Maternal Language on Bilingual Children’s Vocabulary and Emergent Literacy Development During Head Start and Kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    HAMMER, CAROL SCHEFFNER; Davison, Megan Dunn; Lawrence, Frank R.; Miccio, Adele W.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of maternal language and children’s gender on bilingual children’s vocabulary and emergent literacy development during 2 years in Head Start and kindergarten. Seventy-two mothers and their children who attended English immersion programs participated. Questionnaires administered annually over a 3-year period revealed that mothers increased their usage of English to their children. In addition, more mothers of sons reported using “More or All English” wit...

  13. The effect of hospital volume on maternal outcomes in women with prior cesarean delivery undergoing trial of labor

    OpenAIRE

    CHANG, Jen Jen; STAMILIO, David M.; Macones, George A

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined the association between hospital volume of vaginal delivery after cesarean (VBAC) and VBAC failure, uterine rupture, and maternal morbidity. This study was a secondary analysis of a retrospective cohort study from 1995 to 2000. Trained nurses extracted medical records of more than 25,000 women with a prior cesarean delivery from 17 community and tertiary care hospitals. Detailed Information was obtained for each patient. The study sample included 12,844 women with prior c...

  14. Maternal Vitamin D Status: Effect on Milk Vitamin D Content and Vitamin D Status of Breastfeeding Infants123

    OpenAIRE

    Dawodu, Adekunle; Tsang, Reginald C.

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing reports of rickets and vitamin D deficiency worldwide. Breastfeeding without adequate sunlight exposure and vitamin D supplementation are the major risk factors. In view of the drive to promote and increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding, the relationship among maternal vitamin D status, vitamin D concentration of human milk, and hence vitamin D status of breastfeeding infants deserves reassessment. This review provides current information on the interrelationship be...

  15. The Effect of Ephedrine on Fetal Outcome in Treatment of Maternal Hypotension Caused by Spinal Anesthesia During Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Fardin Yousefshahi; Fatemeh Davari Tanha; Mahbod Kaveh; Roghayeh Hamidian; Khosro Barkhordari

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare maternal complications and labor outcome in obese and non-obese women. Materials and methods: It is a retrospective comparative study conducted at the Department of obstetrics and gynecology, Unit 1, Civil Hospital, Karachi from December 2008 to December 2009. A sample size of 220 gravid women is selected by Non Probability Convenience sampling technique. In these 110 obese women as cases was compared with 110 non-obese women as controls, booked at <20 weeks of ge...

  16. Effects of caesarean section on maternal health in low risk nulliparous women: a prospective matched cohort study in Shanghai, China

    OpenAIRE

    Gao Xiao-ling; Zhu Li-ping; Guo Yu-na; Zhong Ye; Coulter David; Liang Hong; Zhou Li-feng; Wang Bing-shun; Yuan Wei; Gao Er-sheng

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Rates of caesarean section are progressively increasing in many parts of the world. As a result of psychosocial factors there has been an increasing tendency for pregnant women without justifiable medical indications for caesarean section to ask for this procedure in China. A critical examination of this issue in relation to maternal outcomes is important. At present there are no clinical trials to help assess the risks and benefits of caesarean section in low risk women. ...

  17. Individual Differences in Trajectories of Emotion Regulation Processes: The Effects of Maternal Depressive Symptomatology and Children’s Physiological Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Blandon, Alysia Y.; CALKINS, SUSAN D.; Keane, Susan P.; O’Brien, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Trajectories of emotion regulation processes were examined in a community sample of 269 children across the ages of 4 to 7 using hierarchical linear modeling. Maternal depressive symptomatology (Symptom Checklist-90) and children’s physiological reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) and vagal regulation (?RSA) were explored as predictors of individual differences in trajectories of emotion regulation and negativity (mother-reported Emotion Regulation Checklist; A. M. Shields & D. Ci...

  18. Is prenatal childbirth preparation effective in decreasing adverse maternal and neonatal response to labor? A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Hee; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A; Kim, Sun Kyung; Kim, Seo Hui; Kim, Yun Ju; Han, Jung Yeol; Ahn, Hyun Kyong; Ryu, Hyun Mee; Yang, Jae Hyug; Kim, Moon Young

    2008-04-01

    Sophrology, based on a combination of Western relaxation therapy and Eastern yoga and meditation might decrease maternal stress during labor. This study aimed to evaluate whether prenatal sophrologic childbirth preparation may decrease maternal and neonatal adverse response associated with delivery. In a nested case-control study, 69 nulliparous, singleton pregnant women who underwent an educational course of sophrologic childbirth preparation were compared to 69 nulliparous, singleton, age- and gestational age-matched pregnant women who did not receive any childbirth preparation. All babies were vaginally delivered. Groups were not different (P > 0.05) in the number of neonates born with meconium-stained amniotic fluid as well as in the number of babies with Apgar score sophrologic childbirth preparation, i.e. 58.0% vs 72.5% (P = 0.07) and 1.4% vs 10.9% (P = 0.06), respectively. In conclusion, we were unable to confirm that prenatal sophrologic childbirth preparation has a definitive role in decreasing adverse maternal and fetal response to pain or in shortening labor. Prospective cohort studies with a larger sample size or randomized trials may help to clarify this gap. PMID:18551817

  19. Direct and Indirect Effects of Maternal and Peer Influences on Sexual Intention among Urban African American and Hispanic Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Cederbaum, Julie; Sathoff, Chelsea; Toro, Rosa

    2014-12-01

    Peer and family influences are interconnected in complex ways. These influences shape adolescent decision-making regarding engagement in sexual behaviors. Evidence indicates the more proximal (and direct) a process is to an individual, the more likely it is to affect his/her development and behavior. Therefore, family factors (e.g., parenting practices) and peer influence (e.g., peer norms) tend to be more strongly associated with adolescent behavior than distal factors (e.g., media or the economy). Guided by an ecological framework, this study explored how maternal influence variables interact with perceptions of peer influence to affect daughters' intentions to have sex. A nonprobability sample of 176 mother-daughter dyads was recruited in clinics and service organizations in the northeastern United States. Results from path analysis revealed that maternal influence variables had a significant indirect relationship with daughters' intentions to have sex through daughters' perceptions of peer influence. Maternal processes can act as protective factors for adolescent girls who perceive their peers are engaged in sexual behaviors. Therefore, risk reduction interventions with adolescents should include opportunities for parents to learn about sex-related issues and develop skills that will allow them to buffer negative peer influence. PMID:25422533

  20. Climate change and the potential effects on maternal and pregnancy outcomes: an assessment of the most vulnerable--the mother, fetus, and newborn child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Charlotta; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Sandanger, Torkjel Manning

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presented a large amount of evidence about global warming and the impact of human activities on global climate change. The Lancet Commission have identified a number of ways in which climate change can influence human health: lack of food and safe drinking water, poor sanitation, population migration, changing disease patterns and morbidity, more frequent extreme weather events, and lack of shelter. Pregnant women, the developing fetus, and young children are considered the most vulnerable members of our species and are already marginalized in many countries. Therefore, they may have increased sensitivity to the effects of climate change. Published literature in the fields of climate change, human health, tropical diseases, and direct heat exposure were assessed through the regular search engines. This article demonstrates that climate change will increase the risk of infant and maternal mortality, birth complications, and poorer reproductive health, especially in tropical, developing countries. Thus, climate change will have a substantial impact on the health and survival of the next generation among already challenged populations. There is limited knowledge regarding which regions will be most heavily affected. Research efforts are therefore required to identify the most vulnerable populations, fill knowledge gaps, and coordinate efforts to reduce negative health consequences. The effects of malnutrition, infectious diseases, environmental problems, and direct heat exposure on maternal health outcomes will lead to severe health risks for mothers and children. Increased focus on antenatal care is recommended to prevent worsening maternal health and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Interventions to reduce the negative health impacts caused by climate change are also crucial. Every effort should be made to develop and maintain good antenatal care during extreme life conditions as a result of climate change. PMID:23481091

  1. Climate change and the potential effects on maternal and pregnancy outcomes: an assessment of the most vulnerable – the mother, fetus, and newborn child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Rylander

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC presented a large amount of evidence about global warming and the impact of human activities on global climate change. The Lancet Commission have identified a number of ways in which climate change can influence human health: lack of food and safe drinking water, poor sanitation, population migration, changing disease patterns and morbidity, more frequent extreme weather events, and lack of shelter. Pregnant women, the developing fetus, and young children are considered the most vulnerable members of our species and are already marginalized in many countries. Therefore, they may have increased sensitivity to the effects of climate change. Published literature in the fields of climate change, human health, tropical diseases, and direct heat exposure were assessed through the regular search engines. This article demonstrates that climate change will increase the risk of infant and maternal mortality, birth complications, and poorer reproductive health, especially in tropical, developing countries. Thus, climate change will have a substantial impact on the health and survival of the next generation among already challenged populations. There is limited knowledge regarding which regions will be most heavily affected. Research efforts are therefore required to identify the most vulnerable populations, fill knowledge gaps, and coordinate efforts to reduce negative health consequences. The effects of malnutrition, infectious diseases, environmental problems, and direct heat exposure on maternal health outcomes will lead to severe health risks for mothers and children. Increased focus on antenatal care is recommended to prevent worsening maternal health and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Interventions to reduce the negative health impacts caused by climate change are also crucial. Every effort should be made to develop and maintain good antenatal care during extreme life conditions as a result of climate change.

  2. Disturbances in Maternal Steroidogenesis and Appearance of Intrauterine Growth Retardation at High-Altitude Environments Are Established from Early Pregnancy. Effects of Treatment with Antioxidant Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraguez, Victor H.; Mamani, Sandra; Cofré, Eileen; Castellaro, Giorgio; Urquieta, Bessie; De los Reyes, Mónica; Astiz, Susana; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancies at high-altitudes are influenced by hypoxia and oxidative stress and frequently affected by IUGR. However, a common thought is that early pregnant women visiting altitude have no major complications for gestation development, since IUGR is developed during the second half of pregnancy. Thus, using a well-characterized sheep-model, we aimed to determine whether long- and/or short-term exposure to high-altitude may affect maternal steroidogenesis and therefore embryo-fetal growth from conception. The second aim was to differentiate the relative role of hypoxia and oxidative stress by assessing the effects of supplementation with antioxidant agents during this early-pregnancy stage, which were previously found to be useful to prevent IUGR. The results indicate that both long- and short-term exposure to high-altitude causes disturbances in maternal ovarian steroidogenesis and negatively affects embryo-fetal growth already during the very early stages of gestation, with the consequences being even worsened in newcomers to high-altitude. The supply of antioxidant during this period only showed discrete effects for preventing IUGR. In conclusion, the present study gives a warning for clinicians about the risks for early-pregnant women when visiting high-altitude regions and suggests the need for further studies on the effects of the length of exposure and on the interaction of the exposure with the pregnancy stage. PMID:26560325

  3. Disturbances in Maternal Steroidogenesis and Appearance of Intrauterine Growth Retardation at High-Altitude Environments Are Established from Early Pregnancy. Effects of Treatment with Antioxidant Vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraguez, Victor H; Mamani, Sandra; Cofré, Eileen; Castellaro, Giorgio; Urquieta, Bessie; De Los Reyes, Mónica; Astiz, Susana; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancies at high-altitudes are influenced by hypoxia and oxidative stress and frequently affected by IUGR. However, a common thought is that early pregnant women visiting altitude have no major complications for gestation development, since IUGR is developed during the second half of pregnancy. Thus, using a well-characterized sheep-model, we aimed to determine whether long- and/or short-term exposure to high-altitude may affect maternal steroidogenesis and therefore embryo-fetal growth from conception. The second aim was to differentiate the relative role of hypoxia and oxidative stress by assessing the effects of supplementation with antioxidant agents during this early-pregnancy stage, which were previously found to be useful to prevent IUGR. The results indicate that both long- and short-term exposure to high-altitude causes disturbances in maternal ovarian steroidogenesis and negatively affects embryo-fetal growth already during the very early stages of gestation, with the consequences being even worsened in newcomers to high-altitude. The supply of antioxidant during this period only showed discrete effects for preventing IUGR. In conclusion, the present study gives a warning for clinicians about the risks for early-pregnant women when visiting high-altitude regions and suggests the need for further studies on the effects of the length of exposure and on the interaction of the exposure with the pregnancy stage. PMID:26560325

  4. Genetic testing of newborns for type 1 diabetes susceptibility: a prospective cohort study on effects on maternal mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Per

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns about the general psychological impact of genetic testing have been raised. In the Environmental Triggers of Type 1 Diabetes (MIDIA study, genetic testing was performed for HLA-conferred type 1 diabetes susceptibility among Norwegian newborns. The present study assessed whether mothers of children who test positively suffer from poorer mental health and well-being after receiving genetic risk information about their children. Methods The study was based on questionnaire data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa study conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Many of the mothers in the MoBa study also took part in the MIDIA study, in which their newborn children were tested for HLA-conferred genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. We used MoBa questionnaire data from the 30th week of pregnancy (baseline and 6 months post-partum (3-3.5 months after disclosure of test results. We measured maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression (SCL-8, maternal self-esteem (RSES, and satisfaction with life (SWLS. The mothers also reported whether they were seriously worried about their child 6 months post-partum. We compared questionnaire data from mothers who had received information about having a newborn with high genetic risk for type 1 diabetes (N = 166 with data from mothers who were informed that their baby did not have a high-risk genotype (N = 7224. The association between genetic risk information and maternal mental health was analysed using multiple linear regression analysis, controlling for baseline mental health scores. Results Information on genetic risk in newborns was found to have no significant impact on maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression (p = 0.9, self-esteem (p = 0.2, satisfaction with life (p = 0.2, or serious worry about their child (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.64-1.48. Mental health before birth was strongly associated with mental health after birth. In addition, an increased risk of maternal worry was found if the mother herself had type 1 diabetes (OR = 2.39, 95% CI 1.2-4.78. Conclusions This study did not find evidence supporting the notion that genetic risk information about newborns has a negative impact on the mental health of Norwegian mothers.

  5. Dossier "Maternal health"

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This dossier serves as a background to the Maternal Health portal. The portal shares examples of practical projects and initiatives that have been undertaken with the explicit objective of contributing to the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 5. Another aim of the dossier is to file (scientific) documents that are relevant to all maternal health specialists, ranging from midwives to policy makers. The portal and dossier are an initiative of the ‘MDG5 Meshwork for Improving Maternal...

  6. EL CAFÉ Y SUS EFECTOS EN LA SALUD CARDIOVASCULAR Y EN LA SALUD MATERNA / COFFEE, CAFFEINE, AND ITS EFFECTS ON CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH AND MATERNAL HEALTH

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alfonso, Valenzuela B.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La cafeína es el principal componente activo del café y los efectos del consumo de café se asocian mayoritariamente a la cafeína, una metilxantina que actúa como antagonista de los receptores de adenina en el sistema nervioso. Son numerosos los efectos en la salud atribuidos a la cafeína, siendo alg [...] unos benéficos y otros deletéreos: en la salud cardiovascular, diabetes tipo 2, tolerancia a la glucosa y sensibilidad a la insulina, en la cinosis hepática y el carcinoma hepatocelular, entre otros efectos. Este artículo realiza una revisión de dos aspectos de preocupación en la salud pública relacionados con el consumo de café y la cafeína: su efecto en la salud cardiovascular y en la salud maternal (período perinatal). La conclusión general es que el consumo de cafeína, hasta 300 mg/día, no constituye un mayor riesgo de infarto al miocardio, de hipertensión, o de modificación de los niveles plasmáticos de indicadores de riesgo cardiovascular, como la proteína C reactiva y la homocisteína. En relación a la salud maternal, las conclusiones son similares, un consumo moderado de cafeína (300 mg/día o menos) no constituye un riesgo de menor concepción, de diabetes gestacional, de menor crecimiento fetal, o de defectos congénitos. La ausencia de riesgo, sin embargo, no constituye un estímulo al consumo de café durante el embarazo. Si el consumo de café por parte de la futura madre es moderado, puede considerarse la continuación del consumo durante el embarazo bajo supervisión médica. Abstract in english Caffeine is the principal active component of coffee and the effects of coffee consumption are mainly associated to this component. Caffeine is a methylxanthine, which acts as antagonist of adenine receptors at the nervous system. A great number of health effects, both beneficial and detrimental, ha [...] ve been associated to caffeine consumption: such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, hepatic cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, are included as the main targets. The present work reviews two of the main concerns about coffee and caffeine consumption: cardiovascular disease and maternal health (perinatal period). The general conclusion is that caffeine consumption up to 300 mg/day does not constitute a risk of myocardial infarction, hypertension, or modification of cardiovascular risk markers such as reactive C protein or homocysteine plasmatic levels. Similar conclusions are reached about the maternal health. Moderate caffeine consumption (300 mg/day or less) does not constitute a major risk of less conception, increased gestational diabetes, decrease fetal growth, or congenital defects. However, absence frisk may not be interpreted as a signal to stimulate coffee consumption during pregnancy. Future mothers, which are moderated coffee consumers, may be suggested to continue this consumption during pregnancy, but under medical supervision.

  7. EL CAFÉ Y SUS EFECTOS EN LA SALUD CARDIOVASCULAR Y EN LA SALUD MATERNA COFFEE, CAFFEINE, AND ITS EFFECTS ON CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH AND MATERNAL HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Valenzuela B

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La cafeína es el principal componente activo del café y los efectos del consumo de café se asocian mayoritariamente a la cafeína, una metilxantina que actúa como antagonista de los receptores de adenina en el sistema nervioso. Son numerosos los efectos en la salud atribuidos a la cafeína, siendo algunos benéficos y otros deletéreos: en la salud cardiovascular, diabetes tipo 2, tolerancia a la glucosa y sensibilidad a la insulina, en la cinosis hepática y el carcinoma hepatocelular, entre otros efectos. Este artículo realiza una revisión de dos aspectos de preocupación en la salud pública relacionados con el consumo de café y la cafeína: su efecto en la salud cardiovascular y en la salud maternal (período perinatal. La conclusión general es que el consumo de cafeína, hasta 300 mg/día, no constituye un mayor riesgo de infarto al miocardio, de hipertensión, o de modificación de los niveles plasmáticos de indicadores de riesgo cardiovascular, como la proteína C reactiva y la homocisteína. En relación a la salud maternal, las conclusiones son similares, un consumo moderado de cafeína (300 mg/día o menos no constituye un riesgo de menor concepción, de diabetes gestacional, de menor crecimiento fetal, o de defectos congénitos. La ausencia de riesgo, sin embargo, no constituye un estímulo al consumo de café durante el embarazo. Si el consumo de café por parte de la futura madre es moderado, puede considerarse la continuación del consumo durante el embarazo bajo supervisión médica.Caffeine is the principal active component of coffee and the effects of coffee consumption are mainly associated to this component. Caffeine is a methylxanthine, which acts as antagonist of adenine receptors at the nervous system. A great number of health effects, both beneficial and detrimental, have been associated to caffeine consumption: such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, hepatic cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, are included as the main targets. The present work reviews two of the main concerns about coffee and caffeine consumption: cardiovascular disease and maternal health (perinatal period. The general conclusion is that caffeine consumption up to 300 mg/day does not constitute a risk of myocardial infarction, hypertension, or modification of cardiovascular risk markers such as reactive C protein or homocysteine plasmatic levels. Similar conclusions are reached about the maternal health. Moderate caffeine consumption (300 mg/day or less does not constitute a major risk of less conception, increased gestational diabetes, decrease fetal growth, or congenital defects. However, absence frisk may not be interpreted as a signal to stimulate coffee consumption during pregnancy. Future mothers, which are moderated coffee consumers, may be suggested to continue this consumption during pregnancy, but under medical supervision.

  8. Tendências genéticas dos efeitos genéticos direto e materno em características reprodutivas de suínos Genetic trends for maternal and direct genetic effects on reproductive traits of swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin Vieira Pires

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados dados de peso da leitegada ao nascimento (PLN, peso da leitegada aos 21 dias (PL21, tamanho de leitegada ao nascimento (TLN, tamanho de leitegada ao desmame (TLD e taxa de mortalidade (TM, para avaliar a tendência genética atribuída aos efeitos genéticos aditivos diretos e maternos, em suínos Duroc, Landrace e Large White. As estimativas dos componentes de (covariância foram obtidas pelo método da máxima verossimilhança restrita (REML. As tendências genéticas dos efeitos genéticos direto e materno foram calculadas pela regressão das médias dos valores genéticos preditos das características, em relação ao ano de nascimento das porcas. As estimativas de tendências genéticas dos efeitos diretos mostraram que pouco ou praticamente nenhum progresso ocorreu nas características de leitegada, havendo tendências genéticas negativas (-0,0382 a 0,0756 kg no PLN, -0,1119 a 0,1118 kg no PL21, -0,0031 a 0,0509 leitões no TLN, -0,0217 a 0,0084 leitões no TLD e 0,0997 a --0,0059% na TM, evidenciando a dificuldade de se obterem ganhos genéticos expressivos nas características reprodutivas. Estes resultados destacam a importância de se utilizar a informação de parentes no melhoramento genético destas características, para otimizar os ganhos por seleção. As estimativas de tendência genética dos efeitos genéticos materno apresentaram-se, em geral, negativas, possivelmente em função das correlações genéticas negativas entre os efeitos genéticos aditivos direto e materno.Data of Duroc, Landrace and Large White swine were used to estimate genetic trends for maternal and direct genetic effects of litter size (TLN and litter weight (PLN born alive, litter size (TLD and litter weight (PL21 at 21 days and mortality rate (TM. The genetic parameters were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood (REML method. Estimated genetic direct and maternal trends were obtained by regressing genetic values averages on dam birth year. Estimated genetic direct trends showed no progress or very small progress for litter traits, being these progresses, in some cases, even negatives (-0.0382 to 0.0756 kg in PLN, -0.1119 to 0.1118 kg in PL21, -0.0031 to 0.0509 pigs in TLN, -0.0217 to 0.0084 pigs in TLD and 0.0997 to --0.0059% in TM, showing the difficulty to get high genetic gain in reproductive traits. These results showed the importance of considering relationships informations, in order to obtain higher selection gain for these traits. Estimated genetic maternal trends were, in general, negatives, possibly in function of negative genetic correlations among direct and maternal genetic additive effect.

  9. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazquez, Alba G; Briz, Oscar; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Perez, Maria J; Ghanem, Carolina I; Marin, Jose J G

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. PMID:24631341

  10. A factorial randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of micronutrients supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on maternal endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and oxidative stress of the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girón Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have suggested a relationship between metabolic abnormalities and impaired fetal growth with the development of non-transmissible chronic diseases in the adulthood. Moreover, it has been proposed that maternal factors such as endothelial function and oxidative stress are key mechanisms of both fetal metabolic alterations and subsequent development of non-transmissible chronic diseases. The objective of this project is to evaluate the effect of micronutrient supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on endothelium-dependent vasodilation maternal and stress oxidative of the newborn. Methods and design 320 pregnant women attending to usual prenatal care in Cali, Colombia will be included in a factorial randomized controlled trial. Women will be assigned to the following intervention groups: 1. Control group: usual prenatal care (PC and placebo (maltodextrine. 2. Exercise group: PC, placebo and aerobic physical exercise. 3. Micronutrients group: PC and a micronutrients capsule consisting of zinc (30 mg, selenium (70 ?g, vitamin A (400 ?g, alphatocopherol (30 mg, vitamin C (200 mg, and niacin (100 mg. 4. Combined interventions Group: PC, supplementation of micronutrients, and aerobic physical exercise. Anthropometric measures will be taken at the start and at the end of the interventions. Discussion Since in previous studies has been showed that the maternal endothelial function and oxidative stress are related to oxidative stress of the newborn, this study proposes that complementation with micronutrients during pregnancy and/or regular physical exercise can be an early and innovative alternative to strengthen the prevention of chronic diseases in the population. Trial registration NCT00872365.

  11. Effects of Diesel Engine Exhaust Origin Secondary Organic Aerosols on Novel Object Recognition Ability and Maternal Behavior in BALB/C Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin-Tin Win-Shwe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have reported an increased risk of cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality associated with increasing exposure to air pollution. Ambient particulate matter consists of primary particles emitted directly from diesel engine vehicles and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs are formed by oxidative reaction of the ultrafine particle components of diesel exhaust (DE in the atmosphere. However, little is known about the relationship between exposure to SOA and central nervous system functions. Recently, we have reported that an acute single intranasal instillation of SOA may induce inflammatory response in lung, but not in brain of adult mice. To clarify the whole body exposure effects of SOA on central nervous system functions, we first created inhalation chambers for diesel exhaust origin secondary organic aerosols (DE-SOAs produced by oxidation of diesel exhaust particles caused by adding ozone. Male BALB/c mice were exposed to clean air (control, DE and DE-SOA in inhalation chambers for one or three months (5 h/day, 5 days/week and were examined for memory function using a novel object recognition test and for memory function-related gene expressions in the hippocampus by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, female mice exposed to DE-SOA for one month were mated and maternal behaviors and the related gene expressions in the hypothalamus examined. Novel object recognition ability and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor expression in the hippocampus were affected in male mice exposed to DE-SOA. Furthermore, a tendency to decrease maternal performance and significantly decreased expression levels of estrogen receptor (ER-a, and oxytocin receptor were found in DE-SOA exposed dams compared with the control. This is the first study of this type and our results suggest that the constituents of DE-SOA may be associated with memory function and maternal performance based on the impaired gene expressions in the hippocampus and hypothalamus, respectively.

  12. Effects of a mindfulness-based intervention on psychological distress, well-being, and maternal self-efficacy in breast-feeding mothers: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Blasco, Josefa; Viguer, Paz; Rodrigo, Maria F

    2013-06-01

    Several pilot studies have provided evidence that mindfulness-based intervention is beneficial during pregnancy, yet its effects in mothers during the early parenting period are unknown. The purpose of the present pilot study was to examine the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based intervention in breast-feeding mothers. We developed and tested an 8-week mindfulness-based intervention aimed at improving maternal self-efficacy, mindfulness, self-compassion, satisfaction with life, and subjective happiness, and at reducing psychological distress. A randomized controlled, between-groups design was used with treatment and control groups (n = 26) and pretest and posttest measures. ANCOVA results indicated that, compared to the control group, mothers in the treatment group scored significantly higher on maternal self-efficacy, some dimensions of mindfulness (observing, acting with awareness, non-judging, and non-reactivity), and self-compassion (self-kindness, mindfulness, over-identification, and total self-compassion). In addition, mothers who received the treatment exhibited significantly less anxiety, stress, and psychological distress. The results supported previous research findings about the benefits of mindfulness-based intervention in women from the perinatal and postpartum periods through the early parenting period. Additional research is needed to validate our findings in non-breast-feeding mothers and to examine the intervention's indirect benefits in terms of family relationships and child development. PMID:23512648

  13. Treatment with tianeptine induces antidepressive-like effects and alters the neurotrophin levels, mitochondrial respiratory chain and cycle Krebs enzymes in the brain of maternally deprived adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della, Franciela P; Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Santos, Maria Augusta B dos; Tomaz, Débora B; Antunes, Altamir R; Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Maternally deprived rats were treated with tianeptine (15 mg/kg) once a day for 14 days during their adult phase. Their behavior was then assessed using the forced swimming and open field tests. The BDNF, NGF and energy metabolism were assessed in the rat brain. Deprived rats increased the immobility time, but tianeptine reversed this effect and increased the swimming time; the BDNF levels were decreased in the amygdala of the deprived rats treated with saline and the BDNF levels were decreased in the nucleus accumbens within all groups; the NGF was found to have decreased in the hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens of the deprived rats; citrate synthase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine and the creatine kinase was decreased in the hippocampus and amygdala of the deprived rats; the mitochondrial complex I and II-III were inhibited, and tianeptine increased the mitochondrial complex II and IV in the hippocampus of the non-deprived rats; the succinate dehydrogenase was increased in the hippocampus of non-deprived rats treated with tianeptine. So, tianeptine showed antidepressant effects conducted on maternally deprived rats, and this can be attributed to its action on the neurochemical pathways related to depression. PMID:23325329

  14. Second Trimester Maternal Serum Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Second Trimester Maternal Serum Screening Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: AFP Maternal; Maternal Serum AFP; MSAFP; msAFP; Triple Screen; Triple ...

  15. Radionuclides and maternal lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase in the number of nuclear medicine centers, both official and private in the country, as well as the increase in the number of patients, due to the effectiveness of their diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, brings out new situations that must be studied from the point of view of radioprotection. This work makes a revision in the medical literature about procedures with radioisotopes during the maternal nursing period. In general, it is recommended to stop nursing for 24 hours for 99mtc test, and to resume it after the draining of the milky content. This can be done in spite of the sensitivity of the target organ of the baby, because the dosage will be below permissible limits accepted by international agencies with respect to diagnostic test and I-131 treatment, and if continuing nursing is desired, it is recommended to use other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures before discontinuing the most important nutritional resource at this age

  16. Combined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and maternal restraint stress on hypothalamus adrenal axis (HPA) function in the offspring of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although it is known that prenatal exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) can cause developmental adverse effects in mammals, the disruptive effects of this compound on hormonal systems are still controversial. Information concerning the effects of PFOS on hypothalamus adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress and corticosterone levels is not currently available. On the other hand, it is well established that stress can enhance the developmental toxicity of some chemicals. In the present study, we assessed the combined effects of maternal restraint stress and PFOS on HPA axis function in the offspring of mice. Twenty plug-positive female mice were divided in two groups. Animals were given by gavage 0 and 6 mg PFOS/kg/day on gestation days 12-18. One half of the animals in each group were also subjected to restraint stress (30 min/session, 3 sessions/day) during the same period. Five plug-positive females were also included as non-manipulated controls. At 3 months of age, activity in an open-field and the stress response were evaluated in male and female mice by exposing them to 30 min of restraint stress. Male and female offspring were subsequently sacrificed and blood samples were collected to measure changes in corticosterone levels at four different moments related to stress exposure conditions: before stress exposure, immediately after 30 min of stress exposure, and recuperation levels at 60 and 90 min after stress exposure. Results indicate corticosterone levels were lower in mice prenatally exposed to restraint. In general terms, PFOS exposure decreased corticosterone levels, although this effect was only significant in females. The recuperation pattern of corticosterone was mainly affected by prenatal stress. Interactive effects between PFOS and maternal stress were sex dependent. The current results suggest that prenatal PFOS exposure induced long-lasting effects in mice.

  17. Asma na gestação: efeitos na vitalidade fetal, complicações maternas e perinatais / Asthma during pregnancy: effects on fetal well-being, and maternal and perinatal complications

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renata Franco Pimentel, Mendes; Roseli Mieko Yamamoto, Nomura; Cristiane, Ortigosa; Rossana Pulcineli Vieira, Francisco; Marcelo, Zugaib.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da asma materna sobre a gravidez, analisando as repercussões da gravidade da doença no comprometimento do bem-estar fetal, bem como as complicações maternas e perinatais associadas. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo retrospectivo de 117 gestações complicadas pela asma matern [...] a e sem outras comorbidades, no período de janeiro de 2005 a dezembro de 2010. Os critérios de inclusão foram: gestação única; diagnóstico de asma prévio à gestação; início do pré-natal antes da 28ª semana de gravidez; parto realizado na instituição; peso do recém-nascido acima de 500g e idade gestacional no parto acima de 22 semanas; ausência de malformações fetais ou anomalias cromossômicas; ausência de comorbidades maternas. A gravidade da asma foi classificada em intermitente, persistente leve, persistente moderada, persistente grave. Foram analisados os resultados do perfil biofísico fetal e da dopplervelocimetria de artéria umbilical realizados até 14 dias antes do parto. RESULTADOS: Do total de 117 gestantes asmáticas analisadas: 41 (35,0%) eram intermitentes, 33 (28,2%) persistentes leves, 21 (17,9%) persistentes moderadas e 22 (18,8%) persistentes graves. Não houve diferença significativa entre os grupos quanto ao tipo de parto: a cesárea foi realizada em 65,8% dos casos, a corticoterapia materna no momento do parto em 20,5%, a idade gestacional no parto apresentou média de 38,6 semanas (DP 1,9 semanas) e o peso ao nascimento apresentou média de 3056 g (DP 581 g). O perfil biofísico fetal realizado no período anteparto (n = 90, 76,9%) apresentou resultado normal (8 ou 10) em 99% dos casos. A dopplervelocimetria de artéria umbilical foi avaliada em 23,9% (n = 28) das gestantes, e apresentou-se normal em 100% dos casos. O uso de corticoterapia sistêmica foi significativamente (p Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of maternal asthma on pregnancy, analyzing the consequences of the severity of the disease in the impairment of fetal well-being, as well as the related maternal and perinatal complications. METHODS: A retrospective study with 117 pregnancies complicated by maternal [...] asthma and with no other comorbidities, in the period from January, 2005 to December, 2010. Inclusion criteriawere as follows: singleton pregnancy; pregnantwomen diagnosed with asthma prior to pregnancy; initiation of prenatal care before the 28th week of pregnancy; birth at this institution; newborn weighing over 500 g and gestational age at delivery of 22 weeks or more; absence of fetal malformations or chromosomal abnormalities; absence of maternal comorbidities. Asthma was classified as intermittent, mild persistent, moderate persistent, or severe persistent. The results of fetal biophysical profile and of Doppler velocimetry of the umbilical artery performed 14 days prior to birth were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the total of 117 pregnant women with asthma, 41 (35.0%) had intermittent, 33 (28.2%) mild persistent, 21 (17.9%) moderate persistent, and 22 (18.8%) severe persistent asthma. There was no significant difference among the groups as to the type of birth: cesarean section was performed in 65.8% of the cases, maternal corticosteroid therapy was used at the moment of birth in 20.5%, the gestational age at birth averaged 38.6 weeks (SD 1.9 weeks), and birth weight averaged 3,056 g (SD 581 g). The fetal biophysical profile performed during the antepartum period (n = 90, 76.9%) showed a normal result (8 or 10) in 99% of the cases. Doppler velocimetry of the umbilical artery was assessed in 23.9% (n = 28) of the pregnant women, and delivered normal results in 100% of the cases. The use of systemic corticosteroid therapy was significantly (p

  18. Effect of vitamin D administration in vitamin D-deficient pregnant women on maternal and neonatal serum calcium and vitamin D concentrations: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Sima; Lalooha, Fatemeh; Zahir Mirdamadi, Shabnam; Ziaee, Amir; Dabaghi Ghaleh, Talaat

    2013-11-14

    There are several studies in which a correlation between maternal vitamin D deficiency and serum mineral disorders in the mother and the newborn has been reported. The present randomised clinical trial was designed to investigate the effect of vitamin D administration on maternal and fetal Ca and vitamin D status. The trial was carried out on 160 pregnant women. Vitamin D-deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) < 30 ng/ml) pregnant women were recruited at 26-28 weeks of pregnancy. In the control group, a multivitamin supplement containing 400 IU vitamin D3/d was given. Patients in the treatment group were treated with 50 000 IU vitamin D3 weekly for a total duration of 8 weeks. At delivery, maternal and fetal Ca and 25(OH)D levels in both groups were compared. In total, 81 % of pregnant women were vitamin D deficient. At the time of delivery, Ca and vitamin D levels were higher in the treatment group compared with the control group (92 (SD 3) v. 85 (SD 4) mg/l, respectively, P= 0·001 for serum Ca; 47·8 (SD 11·1) v. 15·9 (SD 6·6) ng/ml, respectively, P< 0·001 for vitamin D). At the time of delivery, 32·7 % of women in the control group had hypocalcaemia, while no hypocalcaemic case was detected in the vitamin D-treated group. Mean neonatal serum 25(OH)D was higher in the treatment group compared with the control group (27·7 (SD 5·2) v.10·9 (SD 4·4) ng/ml, respectively, P< 0·01). The neonatal Ca level in the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group (99 (SD 3) v. 91 (SD 3) mg/l, respectively, P< 0·001). The administration of vitamin D to pregnant women with vitamin D deficiency improves both maternal and neonatal Ca levels. PMID:23628132

  19. Maternal Mortality Among Migrants in Western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Grete Skøtt; Grøntved, Anders; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Rich-Edwards, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether an excess risk of maternal mortality exists among migrant women in Western Europe. We searched electronic databases for studies published 1970 through 2013 for all observational studies comparing maternal mortality between the host country and a defined migrant population. Results were derived from a random-effects meta-analysis, and statistical heterogeneity assessed by the I (2) statistic. In sub-analyses we also calculated summary estimates stratified by direct and indirect...

  20. Maternal mortality among migrants in Western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Grete Skøtt; Grøntved, Anders; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Rich-Edwards, Janet

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether an excess risk of maternal mortality exists among migrant women in Western Europe. We searched electronic databases for studies published 1970 through 2013 for all observational studies comparing maternal mortality between the host country and a defined migrant population. Results were derived from a random-effects meta-analysis, and statistical heterogeneity assessed by the I (2) statistic. In sub-analyses we also calculated summary estimates stratified by direct and indirect...

  1. Maternal dietary patterns and gestational diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen Alma Tryggvadóttir 1980

    2014-01-01

    Background: A healthy diet during pregnancy is important for mother and child. Studies have implied that pregnant women of normal weight before pregnancy have healthier diets than those overweight or obese before pregnancy. Obesity is one of the risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which is associated with negative health effects on both mother and child. Objective: 1) Investigate associations between maternal dietary pattern and GDM. 2) Compare maternal diets for wom...

  2. Maternal mental health: The missing "m" in the global maternal and child health agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Najia; Lovell, Karina; Rahman, Atif

    2015-08-01

    While the physical health of women and children is emphasized, the mental aspects of their health are often ignored by maternal and child health programs, especially in low- and middle-income countries. We review the evidence of the magnitude, impact, and interventions for common maternal mental health problems with a focus on depression, the condition with the greatest public health impact. The mean prevalence of maternal depression ranges between 15.6% in the prenatal and 19.8% in the postnatal period. It is associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and poor infant growth and cognitive development. There is emerging evidence for the effectiveness of interventions, especially those that can be delivered by non-specialists, including community health workers, in low-income settings. Strategies for integrating maternal mental health in the maternal and child health agenda are suggested. PMID:26164538

  3. Maternal plasma RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses the question: which steps are essential or need to be optimized so that maternal plasma RNA sequencing for pre-eclampsia and related syndromes will become as specific and sensitive as maternal plasma DNA sequencing for trisomy? PMID:25792020

  4. The effect of a controlled manipulation of maternal dietary fat intake on medium and long chain fatty acids in human breast milk in Saskatoon, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Alison M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies in recent years have demonstrated the effect of maternal diet on fatty acid composition of human milk. Methods Fourteen free-living lactating women participated in a cross-over dietary intervention study, consuming a low fat diet (17.6% of energy as fat, 14.4% of energy as protein, 68.0% of energy as carbohydrate and a high fat diet (40.3% of energy as fat, 14.4% of energy as protein, 45.3% of energy as carbohydrate each for periods of 4 days, in randomised order. Each mother was her own control. Mature milk samples were collected during each period and analysed for medium and long chain fatty acids. Results The concentration of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA, was 13.6% in breast milk for the low fat diet compared to 11.4% for the high fat (p Conclusions Changing maternal dietary fat intake has a rapid response in terms of changes to fatty acids in breast milk.

  5. Effects of Maternal Nicotine Exposure on Expression of Collagen Type IV and its Roles on Pulmonary Bronchogenesis and Alveolarization in Newborn Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Mohammadi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is one the chemical substance with high level of toxically. It crosses the placenta and accumulates in the developing organs of fetus. Our previous investigations indicated that collagen type IV plays a key role in basement membrane of various embryonic organs. In this study we evaluated the effect of maternal nicotine exposure pre and postnatal period on collagen IV expression during bronchogenesis and alveolarization in the lungs of newborn mice. Female Balb/C mice were mated and Sperm positive in vaginal smear was designated as embryonic day zero. Pregnant mice were divided into 2 experimental and 2 control groups. Experimental group 1, received 3 mg/kg nicotine intrapritoneally from day 5 of gestation to last day of pregnancy. Experimental group 2 received the same amount of nicotine during the same gestational days as well as 2 first week after birth (lactation. The control groups received the same volume of normal saline during the same periods. At the end of exposure times, all of newborns were anesthetized and their lungs were removed for immunohistochemical method.Our finding indicated that collagen reaction in the bronchial basement membrane and extra cellular matrix of lung parenchyma in experimental groups increased significantly compared to control groups. Our results also showed alveolar remodeling and abnormal bronchogenesis were observed in experimental group especially group 2. These data indicate that maternal nicotine exposure may induce abnormal collagen IV expression and cause defects in bronchopulmonary development.

  6. Effects of maternal exposure to cow´s milk high or low in isoflavones on carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis among rat offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Purup, Stig

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether maternal exposure during pregnancy to cow's milk containing endogenous estrogens and insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and either high or low levels of isoflavones from dietary legumes (HIM and LIM, respectively) affected carcinogen-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given HIM, LIM or tap water (control) from gestational day (GD) 11 until birth; hereafter all rats received tap water. Mammary tumorigenesis was induced by administrating 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) on postnatal day (PND) 50. No differences in maternal serum estradiol (P = 0.19) and IGF-1 levels (P = 0.15) at GD 19 or birth weight among the milk and water groups were seen, but estradiol, and IGF-1 levels and birth weight were numerically higher in the LIM than in the HIM group. Puberty onset occurred earlier in the LIM offspring than in controls (P = 0.03). Although the high isoflavone content seemed to prevent the effect on circulating estradiol and IGF-1levels and advanced puberty onset seen in the LIM group, HIM increased DMBA-DNA adducts in the mammary gland and tended to increase mammary tumorigenesis. In contrast, offspring exposed to LIM in utero, did not exhibit increased breast cancer risk, despite having higher estradiol and IGF-1 environment and consequently earlier puberty onset. These results indicate that the phytochemical content in the cow's milk, consumed by a pregnant dam, determines how milk affects the offspring.

  7. Maternal Employment and Childhood Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gwozdz, Wencke; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso; Reisch, Lucia; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Henauw, Stefaan De; Eiben, Gabriele; Fernández-Alvira, Juan M.; Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos; Kovács, Eva; Lauria, Fabio; Veidebaum, Toomas; Williams, Garrath; Bammann, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The substantial increase in female employment rates in Europe over the past two decades has often been linked in political and public rhetoric to negative effects on child development, including obesity. We analyse this association between maternal employment and childhood obesity using rich objective reports of various anthropometric and other measures of fatness from the IDEFICS study of children aged 2-9 in 16 regions of eight European countries. Based on such data as accelerometer measures a...

  8. A Model for Maternal Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Connelly, Cynthia D.; Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Hazen, Andrea L.; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2010-01-01

    With the awareness of maternal depression as a prevalent public health issue and its important link to child physical and mental health, attention has turned to how healthcare providers can respond effectively. Intimate partner violence (IPV) and the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are strongly related to depression, particularly for low-income women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends psychosocial screening of pregnant women at least once per t...

  9. Efectos Genéticos Directo y Materno sobre el Crecimiento de Ovinos de la Raza Junín / Direct and maternal genetic effects on the growth of Junín sheep breed

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Diógenes, Valerio; Gustavo, Gutiérrez; Juan, Chávez.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de estimar los efectos genéticos - directo y materno - vinculados a la expresión de características de crecimiento en corderos de la raza Junín, se aplicaron cuatro modelos mixtos en el estudio de sus pesos de nacimiento (PN), destete (PD), primera esquila (PE) y ganancia diaria del [...] nacimiento al destete (GPND), a través de análisis univariado y bivariado. Los modelos usados en análisis univariado incluyeron como efectos fijos el año de nacimiento y sexo, y como covariables el peso de la madre al empadre (para PN y PD), la edad del cordero al destete (para PD y GPND) y la edad a la primera esquila (para PE). El Modelo 1 incluyó los efectos fijos y el efecto genético aditivo directo (a); el Modelo 2, similar al 1, adicionó el efecto genético aditivo materno (m), considerando la Cov am= 0; en el Modelo 3, igual al 2, se asumió la Cov = A? ; y el Modelo 4, igual al 3, se adicionó el efecto del ambiente permanente materno (c). Los modelos para el análisis bivariado fueron extensiones del univariado, empleándose en todos los análisis el método de máxima verosimilitud restringida (REML), instrumentado en el programa ASReml. En el análisis univariado, el Modelo 2, y en el bivariado el Modelo 3, estimaron mejor los parámetros genéticos, incluidas las correlaciones entre los efectos aditivos directos y maternos para las características. Los valores estimados de heredabilidad variaron entre bajos y moderados, indicando la posibilidad de ser aplicados en planes de mejora genética del ovino Junín, los mismos que incrementarían su eficiencia al adicionarse a ellos los valores, entre moderados y altos, de las correlaciones genéticas y fenotípicas estimadas. Abstract in english In order to estimate the genetic effects - direct and maternal - linked to the expression of growth traits in lambs of Junín breed, four mixed models were applied in the study of the birth weight (PN), weaning weight (PD), first shearing weight (PE) and daily body weight gain from birth to weaning ( [...] GPND), through univariate and bivariate analysis. The models used in univariate analysis included as fixed effects year of birth and sex, and as covariates the mother’s weight at mating (for PN and PD), age of lamb at weaning (for PD and GPND), and age at first shearing (for PE). Model 1 included the fixed effects and the direct additive genetic effect (a); Model 2, similar to 1, added additive maternal genetic effect (m), considering Cov am=0; Model 3, similar to 2, assumed Cov=A? ; and Model 4, equal to 3, added the maternal permanent environmental effect (c). All bivariate models were extensions of the univariate ones. In all the analyses, the restricted maximum likelihood (REML) method, implemented in the ASReml program was applied. Univariate Model 2 and bivariate Model 3 estimated the best genetic parameters, including correlations between direct and maternal additive effects for the traits. The estimated heritability values ranged from low to moderate, indicating the possibility of its application in genetic improvement plans for Junín sheep, which would increase its efficiency when the estimated, moderate to high genetic and phenotypic correlations are also included.

  10. Pilot study of a program delivered within the regular service system in Germany: effect of a short-term attachment-based intervention on maternal sensitivity in mothers at risk for child abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillhofer, Melanie; Spangler, Gottfried; Bovenschen, Ina; Kuenster, Anne K; Gabler, Sandra; Fallon, Barbara; Fegert, Joerg M; Ziegenhain, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This pilot study examined the effectiveness of a short-term attachment-based intervention, the Ulm Model, in a German population at risk for child abuse and neglect. The intervention used home visits and video feedback to promote maternal sensitivity, and was implemented by trained staff within the health care and youth welfare systems. Mothers in the control group (n=33) received standard services only, while those in the intervention group (n=63) additionally the Ulm Model intervention. The outcomes measured were maternal sensitivity, as assessed by the CARE-Index at pre-intervention, after the last session, and at about 6 and 12 months of age; and infant socio-emotional development, as assessed by the ET6-6 development test at about 6 and 12 months of age. The moderating effects on treatment outcomes of two variables were examined: risk for child abuse (moderate vs. high) and type of maternal attachment representation (secure vs. insecure). Among participants at moderate risk for child abuse, no differences were found between the intervention group and control group in either maternal sensitivity or infant development. Among those considered high risk, mothers in the intervention group showed a significant increase in maternal sensitivity from pre- to post-intervention; however, no group differences were seen at follow-up. There were some indications that infants of mothers in the intervention group showed better emotional development. The variable of maternal attachment representation was not a significant moderator for the intervention effect, but post hoc analysis indicated that the mean sensitivity of secure mothers was significant higher at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:25066526

  11. Effects of caesarean section on maternal health in low risk nulliparous women: a prospective matched cohort study in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiao-ling

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of caesarean section are progressively increasing in many parts of the world. As a result of psychosocial factors there has been an increasing tendency for pregnant women without justifiable medical indications for caesarean section to ask for this procedure in China. A critical examination of this issue in relation to maternal outcomes is important. At present there are no clinical trials to help assess the risks and benefits of caesarean section in low risk women. To fill the gap left by trials, this indication-matched cohort study was carried out to examine prospectively the outcomes of caesarean section on women with no absolute obstetric indication compared with similar women who had vaginal delivery. Methods An indication-matched cohort study was undertaken to compare maternal outcomes following caesarean section with those undergoing vaginal delivery, in which the two groups were matched for non-absolute indications. 301 nulliparous women with caesarean section were matched successfully with 301 women who delivered vaginally in the Maternal and Children's Hospitals (MCHs in Shanghai, China. Logistic regression model or binomial regression model was used to estimate the relative risk (RR directly. Adjusted RRs were calculated adjusting for propensity score and medical indications. Results The incidence of total complications was 2.2 times higher in the caesarean section group during hospitalization post-partum, compared with the vaginal delivery group (RR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.4. The risk of haemorrhage from the start of labour until 2 hours post-partum was significantly higher in the caesarean group (RR = 5.6; 95% CI: 1.2-26.9. The risk of chronic abdominal pain was significantly higher for the caesarean section group (RR = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.2-10.9 than for the vaginal delivery group within 12 months post-partum. The two groups had similar incidences of anaemia and complicating infections such as wound complications or urinary tract infection. Conclusions In nulliparous women who were at low risk, caesarean section was associated with a higher rate of post-partum morbidity. Those requesting the surgical procedure with no conventional medical indication, should be advised of the potential risks.

  12. Efectos genéticos directos y maternos del peso al destete en una población de ganado Cebú de Cuba / Direct and maternal genetic effects for weaning weight in a Zebu beef cattle population in Cuba

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alejandro, Palacios-Espinosa; José Luis, Espinoza-Villavicencio; Danilo, Guerra-Iglesias; Dianelys, González-Peña Fundora; Rafael, de Luna de la Peña.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue estimar los parámetros genéticos para peso al destete en ganado Cebú. Se utilizaron datos de 20,151 terneros nacidos entre 1988 y 2006 en la provincia de Camagüey, Cuba. Se aplicaron seis modelos estadísticos que tuvieron como efecto fijo en común al grupo de contempo [...] ráneas (año-hato-época-sexo) y como covariables la edad al destete lineal y la edad de la madre al parto lineal y cuadrática. El efecto aleatorio del animal fue común a todos los modelos y se alternaron los efectos genético materno, del ambiente permanente y la covarianza genética entre los efectos directo y materno. De acuerdo con la prueba del logaritmo de la verosimilitud, el mejor modelo fue el que incluyó los efectos aleatorios del animal, maternos y del ambiente permanente, además, la covarianza entre los efectos directos y maternos. La heredabilidad de los efectos genéticos directo (0.06 a 0.34) y materno (0.06 a 0.19) varió entre los modelos. La correlación entre el efecto directo y materno varió entre -0.12 ± 0.13 y -0.19 ± 0.15. El efecto materno ambiental determinó un 13 % de la variabilidad total. Se concluyó que la heredabilidad del peso al destete en el ganado Cebú de la población estudiada puede ser sobre estimada cuando el modelo animal no incluye los efectos maternos; y no obstante que los valores de heredabilidad encontrados fueron bajos para los efectos directos y maternos, la ausencia relativa de antagonismo genético entre ellos podría permitir un mejoramiento genético moderado por selección. Abstract in english Genetic parameters for weaning weight were estimated in a Zebu beef cattle population in Camagüey province, Cuba. Data for 20,151 calves born between 1988 and 2006 were used in six variants of the statistical animal model. Contemporary groups (yearherd-season-sex) were used as a common fixed effect, [...] and a weaning age linear regression and dam age linear and quadratic regressions as covariables. Animal random effect was common to all models, and models 2 to 6 had different combinations of genetic maternal effects, maternal permanent environmental effect and covariance between direct and maternal genetic effects. A log likelihood test showed the best model to be that which included animal random effects, maternal effects, covariance between direct and maternal effects and permanent environment. Heritability for direct (0.06 to 0.34) and maternal genetic effects (0.06 to 0.19) varied between models. Correlation between direct and maternal genetic effects varied from -0.12 ± 0.13 to -0.19 ± 0.15. The maternal permanent environmental effect explained 13 % of total variability. Heritability of weaning weight in the studied population can be overestimated when the animal model does not include maternal effects. The direct and maternal effects heritability values were low, but the relative absence of genetic antagonism between these effects indicates the possibility of moderate genetic improvement by selection.

  13. The effect of feeding a low iron diet prior to and during gestation on fetal and maternal iron homeostasis in two strains of rat

    OpenAIRE

    Cornock, Ruth; Gambling, Lorraine; Langley-Evans, Simon C.; Harry J. McArdle; McMullen, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anaemia during pregnancy is a global problem, with short and long term consequences for maternal and child health. Animal models have demonstrated that the developing fetus is vulnerable to maternal iron restriction, impacting on postnatal metabolic and blood pressure regulation. Whilst long-term outcomes are similar across different models, the commonality in mechanistic events across models is unknown. This study examined the impact of iron deficiency on matern...

  14. The Effect of Maternal Child Marriage on Morbidity and Mortality of Children Under 5 in India: Cross Sectional Study of a Nationally Representative Sample

    OpenAIRE

    RAJ, Anita; Saggurti, Niranjan; Winter, Michael; Labonte, Alan; Decker, Michele R; Balaiah, Donta; Silverman, Jay Glen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess associations between maternal child marriage (marriage before age 18) and morbidity and mortality of infants and children under 5 in India. Design: Cross-sectional analyses of nationally representative household sample. Generalised estimating equation models constructed to assess associations. Adjusted models included maternal and child demographics and maternal body mass index as covariates. Setting: India. Population: Women aged 15-49 years (n=124?385); data collected ...

  15. Investigating within-day and longitudinal effects of maternal stress on children's physical activity, dietary intake, and body composition: Protocol for the MATCH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve F; Liao, Yue; Dzubur, Eldin; Leventhal, Adam M; Huh, Jimi; Gruenewald, Tara; Margolin, Gayla; Koprowski, Carol; Tate, Eleanor; Intille, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Parental stress is an understudied factor that may compromise parenting practices related to children's dietary intake, physical activity, and obesity. However, studies examining these associations have been subject to methodological limitations, including cross-sectional designs, retrospective measures, a lack of stress biomarkers, and the tendency to overlook momentary etiologic processes occurring within each day. This paper describes the recruitment, data collection, and data analytic protocols for the MATCH (Mothers And Their Children's Health) study, a longitudinal investigation using novel real-time data capture strategies to examine within-day associations of maternal stress with children's physical activity and dietary intake, and how these effects contribute to children's obesity risk. In the MATCH study, 200 mothers and their 8 to 12 year-old children are participating in 6 semi-annual assessment waves across 3 years. At each wave, measures for mother-child dyads include: (a) real-time Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) of self-reported daily psychosocial stressors (e.g., work at a job, family demands), feeling stressed, perceived stress, parenting practices, dietary intake, and physical activity with time and location stamps; (b) diurnal salivary cortisol patterns, accelerometer-monitored physical activity, and 24-hour dietary recalls; (c) retrospective questionnaires of sociodemographic, cultural, family, and neighborhood covariates; and (d) height, weight, and waist circumference. Putative within-day and longitudinal effects of maternal stress on children's dietary intake, physical activity, and body composition will be tested through multilevel modeling and latent growth curve models, respectively. The results will inform interventions that help mothers reduce the negative effects of stress on weight-related parenting practices and children's obesity risk. PMID:25987483

  16. Intervention effects on dietary intake among children by maternal education level : results of the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt W; von Kappelgaard, Lene M

    2015-01-01

    Dietary intake among Danish children, in general, does not comply with the official recommendations. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the 3-year effect of a multi-component school-based intervention on nutrient intake in children, and to examine whether an intervention effect depended on maternal education level. A total of 307 children (intervention group: n 184; comparison group: n 123) were included in the present study. All had information on dietary intake pre- and post-intervention (mean age 6·8 and 9·5 years for intervention and comparison groups, respectively) assessed by a 7-d food record. Analyses were conducted based on the daily intake of macronutrients (energy percentage (E%)), fatty acids (E%), added sugar (E%) and dietary fibre (g/d and g/MJ). Analyses were stratified by maternal education level into three categories. Changes in nutrient intake were observed in the intervention group, mainly among children of mothers with a short education ( < 10 years). Here, intake of dietary fibre increased (? = 2·1 g/d, 95 % CI 0·5, 3·6, P= 0·01). Intake of protein tended to increase (? = 0·6 E%, 95 % CI - 0·01, 1·2, P= 0·05), while intake of fat (? = - 1·7 E%, 95 % CI - 3·8, 0·3, P= 0·09) and SFA (? = - 0·9, 95 % CI - 2·0, 0·2, P= 0·10) tended to decrease. Also, a significant intervention effect was observed on the intake of SFA among children of mothers with a long education (? = - 0·8, 95 % CI - 1·5, - 0·03, P= 0·04). This multi-component school-based intervention resulted in changes in the dietary intake, particularly among children of mothers with a short education. As the dietary intake of this subgroup generally differs most from the recommendations, the results of the present study are particularly encouraging.

  17. Intervention effects on dietary intake among children by maternal education level: results of the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt W.; von Kappelgaard, Lene M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary intake among Danish children, in general, does not comply with the official recommendations. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the 3-year effect of a multi-component school-based intervention on nutrient intake in children, and to examine whether an intervention effect depended on maternal education level. A total of 307 children (intervention group: n 184; comparison group: n 123) were included in the present study. All had information on dietary intake pre- and post-intervention (mean age 6·8 and 9·5 years for intervention and comparison groups, respectively) assessed by a 7-d food record. Analyses were conducted based on the daily intake of macronutrients (energy percentage (E%)), fatty acids (E%), added sugar (E%) and dietary fibre (g/d and g/MJ). Analyses were stratified by maternal education level into three categories. Changes in nutrient intake were observed in the intervention group, mainly among children of mothers with a short education ( <10 years). Here, intake of dietary fibre increased (? = 2·1 g/d, 95 % CI 0·5, 3·6, P= 0·01). Intake of protein tended to increase (? = 0·6 E%, 95 % CI ? 0·01, 1·2, P= 0·05), while intake of fat (? = ? 1·7 E%, 95 % CI ? 3·8, 0·3, P= 0·09) and SFA (? = ? 0·9, 95 % CI ? 2·0, 0·2, P= 0·10) tended to decrease. Also, a significant intervention effect was observed on the intake of SFA among children of mothers with a long education (? = ? 0·8, 95 % CI ? 1·5, ? 0·03, P= 0·04). This multi-component school-based intervention resulted in changes in the dietary intake, particularly among children of mothers with a short education. As the dietary intake of this subgroup generally differs most from the recommendations, the results of the present study are particularly encouraging.

  18. Influencia de la inclusión del efecto materno en la estimación de parámetros genéticos del peso al destete en un hato de ganado de carne / Influence of maternal effect in estimating genetic parameters for weaning weight in a beef cattle herd

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan C, Quintero; Juan G, Triana; Jorge H, Quijano; Elkin, Arboleda.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estimaron componentes de (co)varianza y parámetros genéticos para la característica peso al destete en animales de las razas brahman y cebú comercial. El objetivo general fue estimar y comparar los parámetros genéticos incluyendo o no el efecto genético materno por medio de [...] l Modelo Animal, usando el programa MTDFREML. Se consideraron cinco modelos que incluyeron como efectos fijos el grupo genético materno, el número de partos y el grupo contemporáneo, y como aleatorios los efectos genéticos directos y maternos y los efectos del ambiente permanente materno, además del efecto del error residual. Los coeficientes de heredabilidad directa fueron de medios a bajos (h² a, 0.10 a 0.29) en todos los modelos. Los modelos que incluyeron el efecto genético materno presentaron valores de heredabilidad materna bajos (h² m, 0.07 a 0.17). Las correlaciones genéticas entre los efectos directo y materno fueron de baja magnitud y negativas (-0.18 y -0.29). Se compararon los modelos entre sí realizando la prueba de máxima verosimilitud (-2LogL) a través de la prueba de ji cuadrado, obteniéndose como resultado que el mejor modelo fue el número 5 (Y = X? + Z1a + Z3m + Z2ep + e), el cual tuvo en cuenta todos los efectos. Abstract in english The component of (co)variance and genetic parameters for weaning weight trait in animals of pure (Brahman) or crossbreed (Zebu cattle) breeds were estimated, with the aim to estimate and to compare the genetic parameters and genetic value with or without including the maternal genetic effects by mea [...] n of Animal model, using MTDFREML program. Five models were considered including 1) the maternal genetic group, 2) calving, and 3) contemporary group as fixed effects, 4) direct and maternal genetic effects and 5) maternal permanent environmental effects, as random effects, and finally the residual error effect. Direct heritability coefficients varied form median to low (h² a, 0.10 to 0.29) in all models. Models that included the maternal genetic effect presented the lowest values of maternal heritability (h² m, 0.07 to 0.17). The genetic correlations between direct and maternal effects were negative and with low magnitude (-0.18 and -0.29). The models were compared between each other using the Maximum Likelihood method (- 2 log L) based on a X2 test, and it gave as result that the best model was the five one (Y = Xb + Z1a + Z3m + Z2ep + e) which included all effects.

  19. Influencia de la inclusión del efecto materno en la estimación de parámetros genéticos del peso al destete en un hato de ganado de carne Influence of maternal effect in estimating genetic parameters for weaning weight in a beef cattle herd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Quintero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estimaron componentes de (covarianza y parámetros gen??ticos para la característica peso al destete en animales de las razas brahman y cebú comercial. El objetivo general fue estimar y comparar los parámetros genéticos incluyendo o no el efecto genético materno por medio del Modelo Animal, usando el programa MTDFREML. Se consideraron cinco modelos que incluyeron como efectos fijos el grupo genético materno, el número de partos y el grupo contemporáneo, y como aleatorios los efectos genéticos directos y maternos y los efectos del ambiente permanente materno, además del efecto del error residual. Los coeficientes de heredabilidad directa fueron de medios a bajos (h² a, 0.10 a 0.29 en todos los modelos. Los modelos que incluyeron el efecto genético materno presentaron valores de heredabilidad materna bajos (h² m, 0.07 a 0.17. Las correlaciones genéticas entre los efectos directo y materno fueron de baja magnitud y negativas (-0.18 y -0.29. Se compararon los modelos entre sí realizando la prueba de máxima verosimilitud (-2LogL a través de la prueba de ji cuadrado, obteniéndose como resultado que el mejor modelo fue el número 5 (Y = X? + Z1a + Z3m + Z2ep + e, el cual tuvo en cuenta todos los efectos.The component of (covariance and genetic parameters for weaning weight trait in animals of pure (Brahman or crossbreed (Zebu cattle breeds were estimated, with the aim to estimate and to compare the genetic parameters and genetic value with or without including the maternal genetic effects by mean of Animal model, using MTDFREML program. Five models were considered including 1 the maternal genetic group, 2 calving, and 3 contemporary group as fixed effects, 4 direct and maternal genetic effects and 5 maternal permanent environmental effects, as random effects, and finally the residual error effect. Direct heritability coefficients varied form median to low (h² a, 0.10 to 0.29 in all models. Models that included the maternal genetic effect presented the lowest values of maternal heritability (h² m, 0.07 to 0.17. The genetic correlations between direct and maternal effects were negative and with low magnitude (-0.18 and -0.29. The models were compared between each other using the Maximum Likelihood method (- 2 log L based on a X2 test, and it gave as result that the best model was the five one (Y = Xb + Z1a + Z3m + Z2ep + e which included all effects.

  20. Does high maternal first trimester iron status have an effect on the 50 g oral glucose test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, A Ö; Ergenoglu, A M; Sanhal, C Y; Sahin, C; Ulukus, M; Oztekin, K

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to test the hypothesis that 1st trimester high body iron status is associated with a high positive 50 g oral glucose tolerance test. In this study, 29 pregnant women with positive 50 g oral glucose tolerance test were compared with 94 negative 50 g OGTT patients as the control group in terms of 1st trimester iron status. Both groups had similar age, weight, height, body mass index and also median gravidity and parity values. Our results showed that there were no differences between groups in mean haemoglobin, haematocrit, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron binding capacity and transferrin. Since it seems that free radicals have much influence on oxidative stress and glucose metabolism, prospective, randomised clinical trials should be designed to demonstrate the possible relation between maternal iron status and glucose intolerance. PMID:22519474

  1. The Effect of Ephedrine on Fetal Outcome in Treatment of Maternal Hypotension Caused by Spinal Anesthesia During Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Yousefshahi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare maternal complications and labor outcome in obese and non-obese women. Materials and methods: It is a retrospective comparative study conducted at the Department of obstetrics and gynecology, Unit 1, Civil Hospital, Karachi from December 2008 to December 2009. A sample size of 220 gravid women is selected by Non Probability Convenience sampling technique. In these 110 obese women as cases was compared with 110 non-obese women as controls, booked at <20 weeks of gestation. Data were collected regarding maternal complication, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome by trained medical officers. Data were entered and analyzed by SPSS version 11.0 through descriptive analysis, chi-square test and independent sample t test. The p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Pregnancy induced hypertension was present in 9 (8.2% women in control group and 21 (19.1% in cases (p=0.01. Gestational diabetes was seen in one (0.9% in control compared to 8 (7.3% in obese women (p=0.01. Obese women were found to be at increased risk of caesarean section [17 (15.5% "nVs. 39 (35.4%, p=0.002]. Apgar score at 1 and 10 minute were lower in cases compared to controls (p=0.0001. Conclusion: Obese women are at increased risk of pregnancy induced obesity and associated with an increased risk of hypertension, gestational diabetes mellitus, thromboembolic disease and urinary tract infection.    

  2. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Cuckle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs, chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening.

  3. Maternal aggression in Wistar rats: effect of 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist and antagonist microinjected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter and medial septum

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    R.M.M. de, Almeida; M., Giovenardi; S.P. da, Silva; V.P. de, Oliveira; D.J., Stein.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the role of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor at two specific brain sites, i.e., the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG) and the medial septal (MS) area, in maternal aggressive behavior after the microinjection of either a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist or anta [...] gonist. Female Wistar rats were microinjected on the 7th postpartum day with the selective agonist alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine maleate (5-HT2A/2C) or the antagonist 5-HT2A/2C, ketanserin. The agonist was injected into the DPAG at 0.2 (N = 9), 0.5 (N = 10), and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9), and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9). The agonist was injected into the medial septal area (MS) at 0.2 (N = 9), 0.5 (N = 7), and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 6) and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 5). For the control, saline was injected into the DPAG (N = 7) and the MS (N = 12). Both areas are related to aggressive behavior and contain a high density of 5-HT receptors. Non-aggressive behaviors such as horizontal locomotion (walking) and social investigation and aggressive behaviors such as lateral threat (aggressive posture), attacks (frontal and lateral), and biting the intruder were analyzed when a male intruder was placed into the female resident's cage. For each brain area studied, the frequency of the behaviors was compared among the various treatments by analysis of variance. The results showed a decrease in maternal aggressive behavior (number of bites directed at the intruder) after microinjection of the agonist at 0.2 and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (1.6 ± 0.7 and 0.9 ± 0.3) into the DPAG compared to the saline group (5.5 ± 1.1). There was no dose-response relationship with the agonist. The present findings suggest that the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist has an inhibitory effect on maternal aggressive behavior when microinjected into the DPAG and no effect when microinjected into the MS. Ketanserin (1.0 µg/0.2 µl) decreased locomotion when microinjected into the DPAG and MS, but did not affect aggressive behavior. We interpret these findings as evidence for a specific role of 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the DPAG in the inhibition of female aggressive behavior, dissociated from those on motor activity.

  4. Maternal aggression in Wistar rats: effect of 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist and antagonist microinjected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter and medial septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida R.M.M. de

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the role of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor at two specific brain sites, i.e., the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG and the medial septal (MS area, in maternal aggressive behavior after the microinjection of either a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist or antagonist. Female Wistar rats were microinjected on the 7th postpartum day with the selective agonist alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine maleate (5-HT2A/2C or the antagonist 5-HT2A/2C, ketanserin. The agonist was injected into the DPAG at 0.2 (N = 9, 0.5 (N = 10, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9, and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9. The agonist was injected into the medial septal area (MS at 0.2 (N = 9, 0.5 (N = 7, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 6 and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 5. For the control, saline was injected into the DPAG (N = 7 and the MS (N = 12. Both areas are related to aggressive behavior and contain a high density of 5-HT receptors. Non-aggressive behaviors such as horizontal locomotion (walking and social investigation and aggressive behaviors such as lateral threat (aggressive posture, attacks (frontal and lateral, and biting the intruder were analyzed when a male intruder was placed into the female resident's cage. For each brain area studied, the frequency of the behaviors was compared among the various treatments by analysis of variance. The results showed a decrease in maternal aggressive behavior (number of bites directed at the intruder after microinjection of the agonist at 0.2 and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (1.6 ± 0.7 and 0.9 ± 0.3 into the DPAG compared to the saline group (5.5 ± 1.1. There was no dose-response relationship with the agonist. The present findings suggest that the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist has an inhibitory effect on maternal aggressive behavior when microinjected into the DPAG and no effect when microinjected into the MS. Ketanserin (1.0 µg/0.2 µl decreased locomotion when microinjected into the DPAG and MS, but did not affect aggressive behavior. We interpret these findings as evidence for a specific role of 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the DPAG in the inhibition of female aggressive behavior, dissociated from those on motor activity.

  5. Efectos mnemónicos maternos prenatales sobre el sexo psíquico humano. Insuficiencia del mecanismo inmunitario: Nueva propuesta desde la tolerancia-rechazo materno-fetal / Prenatal maternal mnemonic effects on the human neuro-psychic sex: A new proposition from fetus-maternal tolerance-rejection

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carlos Y, Valenzuela.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english In approximately 15% of homosexual men, their phenotype is associated to the fraternal birth order. Older biological brothers induce in their mothers anti-male factors (antibodies) that interfere the brain maleness development ofyounger fetuses. This effect is seldom seen in non-right-handed men and [...] is not seen in women. The influence of older siblings is seen in their sex ratio (SR). In contradiction with previous hypothesis, significant heterogeneities of SR have been found among older siblings of males or females, right or non-right-handed and homo or heterosexual individuáis. This can only be understood as if the ñndings found among homosexuals were part of a general mechanism of fetus-maternal tolerance-rejection processes of placental mammals. We found, in relation to ABO and Rh systems and sex, that embryos with genes different from those of their mothers, induced better pregnancies and maternal tolerance than embryos similar to their mothers. Assuming that homo or heterosexuality and right or non-right-handedness behave similar to ABO or Rh alíeles, the author provides a speculative interpretation ofthese results. Homosexual women (¡esbians) and especially if they are non-right-handed, are preceded by siblings with a high SR (maternal environment with anti-female or pro-male factors); then lesbianism or non-right-handedness may induce tolerance to be a woman in such anti-female environment. Non-right-handedness could induce tolerance for anti-male factors of mothers, thus preventing the production ofgays in a pro-male maternal environment, but leading to the production of non-right-handed gays in anti-male maternal environments. Several new hypotheses and interpretations merge from this newproposition. Also, complete sexual orientation could be acquired after birth.

  6. Efectos mnemónicos maternos prenatales sobre el sexo psíquico humano. Insuficiencia del mecanismo inmunitario: Nueva propuesta desde la tolerancia-rechazo materno-fetal Prenatal maternal mnemonic effects on the human neuro-psychic sex: A new proposition from fetus-maternal tolerance-rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Y Valenzuela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In approximately 15% of homosexual men, their phenotype is associated to the fraternal birth order. Older biological brothers induce in their mothers anti-male factors (antibodies that interfere the brain maleness development ofyounger fetuses. This effect is seldom seen in non-right-handed men and is not seen in women. The influence of older siblings is seen in their sex ratio (SR. In contradiction with previous hypothesis, significant heterogeneities of SR have been found among older siblings of males or females, right or non-right-handed and homo or heterosexual individuáis. This can only be understood as if the ñndings found among homosexuals were part of a general mechanism of fetus-maternal tolerance-rejection processes of placental mammals. We found, in relation to ABO and Rh systems and sex, that embryos with genes different from those of their mothers, induced better pregnancies and maternal tolerance than embryos similar to their mothers. Assuming that homo or heterosexuality and right or non-right-handedness behave similar to ABO or Rh alíeles, the author provides a speculative interpretation ofthese results. Homosexual women (¡esbians and especially if they are non-right-handed, are preceded by siblings with a high SR (maternal environment with anti-female or pro-male factors; then lesbianism or non-right-handedness may induce tolerance to be a woman in such anti-female environment. Non-right-handedness could induce tolerance for anti-male factors of mothers, thus preventing the production ofgays in a pro-male maternal environment, but leading to the production of non-right-handed gays in anti-male maternal environments. Several new hypotheses and interpretations merge from this newproposition. Also, complete sexual orientation could be acquired after birth.

  7. The maternal autopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rushton, DI; Dawson, IMP

    1982-01-01

    Careful study of reports prepared for the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in England and Wales has made it clear that many maternal autopsy reports are not as informative as they might be. This is, in part at least, because no pathologist who does not work in a maternity unit can expect to see more than a handful of such deaths in a working lifetime. This paper describes briefly the particular features to look for at autopsy, stresses the importance of taking adequate material for...

  8. The Effects of Maternal Natural (RRR Alpha-Tocopherol Acetate) or Synthetic (All-Rac Alpha-Tocopherol Acetate) Vitamin E Supplementation on Suckling Calf Performance, Colostrum IgG, and Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of maternally supplemented natural- or synthetic-source vitamin E on suckling calf performance and immune response. In a two-year study, 152 two- and three-year old spring-calving Angus-cross beef cows were blocked by age, BW, and BCS into on...

  9. Efecto de la ganancia de peso gestacional en la madre y el neonato / The effect of gestational weight gain on maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Abraham, Zonana-Nacach; Rogelio, Baldenebro-Preciado; Marco Antonio, Ruiz-Dorado.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el efecto de la ganancia de peso gestacional (GPG) en la madre y el neonato. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se incluyeron 1 000 mujeres en puerperio inmediato atendidas en el Hospital de Ginecología del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, en Tijuana, Baja California, México. Se consideró un [...] a GPG óptima si en las mujeres con bajo peso, peso normal, sobrepeso u obesidad previo al embarazo, la GPG fue Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of gestational weight gain (GWG) on maternal and neonatal outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During 2009, women in the immediate puerperium were assessed at the Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. GWG was considered optimal when [...] 18 kg,

  10. Interactive Effects of Early Exclusive Breastfeeding and Pre-Pregnancy Maternal Weight Status on Young Children’s BMI – A Chinese Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baomin; Liang, Xiong; Adair, Linda; Thompson, Amanda; Zhang, Jianduan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess if the maternal pre-pregnancy weight status (MPWS) alters the association of early infant feeding pattern (at one and third months) with infant body mass index (BMI) in the first two years of life. Methods A cohort of 2,220 neonates were recruited in a community-based study conducted in China. Body weight and length were measured at birth, at age one and two, with BMI calculated accordingly. The BMI z-scores (BMI-Z) were computed according to the World Health Organization Growth Standard (2006). Feeding patterns were classified as exclusive breastfeeding (EBF), mixed feeding (MF), and formula feeding (FF). General linear models (GLM) were employed to estimate main and interaction effects of EBF and MPWS on children’s BMI-Z. Results No main effect of MPWS was found on child BMI-Z at ages one and two, nor the feeding patterns. An interaction between MPWS and feeding patterns was detected (pchildren who were formula fed during the first month, those who were born to overweight/obesity (OW/OB) mothers had a significantly greater BMI-Z at ages one and two, compared with those with underweight/normal weight (UW/NW) mothers. FF children had greater BMI-Z at ages one and two compared with their EBF and MF counterparts, when they were born to OW/OB mothers. Conclusions Maternal pre-pregnancy weight control and early initiation of EBF for children are essential for healthy development in children’s BMI, hence the prevention of early life obesity. PMID:26641272

  11. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Citrulline Supplementation on Renal Transcriptome Prevention of Nitric Oxide Depletion-Related Programmed Hypertension: The Impact of Gene-Nutrient Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lin Tain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal malnutrition can elicit gene expression leading to fetal programming. l-citrulline (CIT can be converted to l-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO. We examined whether maternal CIT supplementation can prevent NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (l-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor-induced programmed hypertension and examined their effects on the renal transcriptome in male offspring using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received l-NAME administration at 60mg/kg/day subcutaneously via osmotic minipump during pregnancy alone or with additional 0.25% l-citrulline solution in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to three groups: control, l-NAME, and l-NAME + CIT. l-NAME exposure induced hypertension in the 12-week-old offspring, which CIT therapy prevented. Identified differentially expressed genes in l-NAME and CIT-treated offspring kidneys, including Guca2b, Hmox1, Hba2, Hba-a2, Dusp1, and Serpine1 are related to regulation of blood pressure (BP and oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data suggests that the beneficial effects of CIT supplementation are attributed to alterations in expression levels of genes related to BP control and oxidative stress. Our results suggest that early nutritional intervention by CIT has long-term impact on the renal transcriptome to prevent NO depletion-related programmed hypertension. However, our RNA-Seq results might be a secondary phenomenon. The implications of epigenetic regulation at an early stage of programming deserve further clarification.

  12. Long-term effects of maternal citrulline supplementation on renal transcriptome prevention of nitric oxide depletion-related programmed hypertension: the impact of gene-nutrient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Chien-Te; Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition can elicit gene expression leading to fetal programming. L-citrulline (CIT) can be converted to L-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO). We examined whether maternal CIT supplementation can prevent N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor)-induced programmed hypertension and examined their effects on the renal transcriptome in male offspring using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received L-NAME administration at 60mg/kg/day subcutaneously via osmotic minipump during pregnancy alone or with additional 0.25% L-citrulline solution in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to three groups: control, L-NAME, and L-NAME + CIT. L-NAME exposure induced hypertension in the 12-week-old offspring, which CIT therapy prevented. Identified differentially expressed genes in L-NAME and CIT-treated offspring kidneys, including Guca2b, Hmox1, Hba2, Hba-a2, Dusp1, and Serpine1 are related to regulation of blood pressure (BP) and oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data suggests that the beneficial effects of CIT supplementation are attributed to alterations in expression levels of genes related to BP control and oxidative stress. Our results suggest that early nutritional intervention by CIT has long-term impact on the renal transcriptome to prevent NO depletion-related programmed hypertension. However, our RNA-Seq results might be a secondary phenomenon. The implications of epigenetic regulation at an early stage of programming deserve further clarification. PMID:25517031

  13. Maternal health and human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Ratsma, Ymkje E; Malongo, Joyce

    2009-01-01

    In Malawi the maternal mortality ratio is extremely high. Since almost all maternal deaths are avoidable, maternal mortality is also an issue of human rights. This paper examines the root causes of high maternal mortality in Malawi and applies a human rights-based approach to the reduction of maternal mortality. It recommends roles for the various duty-bearers. It describes indicators to monitor and evaluate the strategy and suggests how transparency and accountability should be ensured. In c...

  14. Maternal mortality in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Nantume, S.

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines maternal health as the health of women during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. According to estimates from UNICEF, Uganda’s maternal mortality ratio, the annual number of deaths of women from pregnancy-related causes per 100,000 live births stands at 435. Women die as a result of complications during and following pregnancy and childbirth and the major complications include severe bleeding, infections, unsafe abortion and obstructed ...

  15. Maternal-Child Health

    OpenAIRE

    Groß, Uwe; Wydra, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-Child Health is one of the greatest challenges the world has to cope with today. Every year, thousands of women, newborns and children die unnecessarily, particularly in resource-poor settings. There is a great disparity caused by food insecurity and hunger, environmental health risks, sanitation challenges, cultural barriers and non-accessibility to diagnosis and treatment. "Maternal-Child Health: Interdisciplinary Aspects within the Perspective of Global Health" addresses these iss...

  16. Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Long-term effects of maternal exposure to Di (2-ethylhexyl Phthalate on sperm and testicular parameters in Wistar rats offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Moazedi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phthalate esters have been shown to cause reproductive toxicity in both developing and adult animals. Objective: This study was designed to assess long-term effects of maternal exposure to Di (2-ethylhexyl Phthalate (DEHP on reproductive ability of both neonatal and adult male offspring.Materials and Methods: 60 female rats randomly divided in four equal groups; vehicle control and three treatment groups that received 10, 100 and 500 mg/kg/day DEHP via gavage during gestation and lactation. At different ages after birth, the volumes of testes were measured by Cavellieri method, testes weights recorded and epididymal sperm samples were assessed for number and gross morphology of spermatozoa. Following tissue processing, seminiferous tubules diameter and germinal epithelium height evaluated with morphometric techniques.Results: Mean testis weight decreased significantly (p<0.05 in 500 mg/kg/day dose group from 28 to 150 days after birth. Significant decreases were seen in total volumes of testis in 100 (p<0.05 and 500 (p<0.01 mg/kg/day doses groups until 150 days after birth. Seminiferous tubules diameter and germinal epithelium height decreased significantly in 100 (p<0.05 and 500 (p<0.01 mg/kg/day doses groups during postnatal development. Also, mean sperm density in 100 mg/kg/day (p<0.05 and 500 mg/kg/day (p<0.01 doses groups and percent of morphologically normal sperm in highest dose group (p<0.05 decreased significantly until 150 days after birth. Conclusion: Present study showed that maternal exposure to Di (2-ethylhexyl Phthalate during gestation and lactation caused to permanent and dose-related reductions of sperm and testicular parameters in rats offspring

  18. Effectiveness of different databases in identifying studies for systematic reviews: experience from the WHO systematic review of maternal morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure to be comprehensive can distort the results of a systematic review. Conversely, extensive searches may yield unmanageable number of citations of which only few may be relevant. Knowledge of usefulness of each source of information may help to tailor search strategies in systematic reviews. Methods We conducted a systematic review of prevalence/incidence of maternal mortality and morbidities from 1997 to 2002. The search strategy included electronic databases, hand searching, screening of reference lists, congress abstract books, contacting experts active in the field and web sites from less developed countries. We evaluated the effectiveness of each source of data and discuss limitations and implications for future research on this topic. Results Electronic databases identified 64098 different citations of which 2093 were included. Additionally 487 citations were included from other sources. MEDLINE had the highest yield identifying about 62% of the included citations. BIOSIS was the most precise with 13.2% of screened citations included. Considering electronic citations alone (2093, almost 20% were identified uniquely by MEDLINE (400, 7.4% uniquely by EMBASE (154, and 5.6% uniquely by LILACS (117. About 60% of the electronic citations included were identified by two or more databases. Conclusions This analysis confirms the need for extending the search to other sources beyond well-known electronic databases in systematic reviews of maternal mortality and morbidity prevalence/incidence. These include regional databases such as LILACS and other topic specific sources such as hand searching of relevant journals not indexed in electronic databases. Guidelines for search strategies for prevalence/incidence studies need to be developed.

  19. Mitigating or exacerbating effects of maternal-fetal programming of female mice through the food choice environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenseke, Bonnie; Bahamonde, Javiera; Talanian, Michael; Kornfeind, Ellie; Daly, Jacquiline; Cobb, Grayson; Zhang, Jinhua; Prater, M Renee; Davis, George C; Good, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Humans live, eat, and become overweight/obese in complex surroundings where there are many available food choices. Prenatal exposure to poor food choices predisposes offspring to increased negative health risks, including obesity. Many animal experiments have analyzed intergenerational body weight parameters in an environment without food choices, which may not be directly translatable to the human food environment. In this study, offspring from mothers with a defined high-fat diet (HFD) or low-fat diet (LFD) were arbitrarily assigned to either an exclusively LFD or HFD or to a diet where they have a choice between LFD and HFD (choice diet). Offspring displayed negative outcomes of increased body weight, body fat, serum leptin, and blood glucose levels when given the choice diet compared with offspring on the LFD. Conversely, improved energy expenditure was found for offspring given the choice diet compared with offspring from HFD dams given LFD. In addition, maternal diet-specific influences on offspring metabolic parameters were identified, especially in offspring from HFD dams, including positive outcomes of reduced leptin in LFD offspring, reduced corticosterone and cholesterol levels in HFD offspring, and increased exercise levels in choice offspring, as well as the negative outcome of increased calorie intake in LFD offspring from HFD dams. This defined model can now be used as the basis for future studies to characterize the cycle of inter- and intragenerational obesity and whether more realistic diet environments, especially those including choice, can mitigate phenotype. PMID:25386832

  20. Effect of maternal cadmium exposure on postnatal development and tissue cadmium, copper and zinc concentrations in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranski, B.

    1986-04-01

    Administration of 60 ppm cadmium (Cd) in drinking water from the 1sup(st) to the 20sup(th) day of gestation to female rats did not affect the viability, body weight gain, food, and water consumption of offspring. The blood hemoglobin level was reduced in 2-week-old females and males but not in 16-week-old offspring. Hematocrit and serum glucose level were not affected at either age. Cadmium concentration in the intestinal wall was increased in both age groups, with marginal uptake in other organs. A decrease in copper (Cu) concentration was found in the brain of 2-week-old offspring of both sexes and of 16-week-old females. The brain zinc (Zn) concentration was decreased only in 16-week-old animals. The physical and neuromuscular development of offspring before weaning was not impaired by maternal Cd treatment. The alterations in Cu and Zn metabolism were associated with reduced locomotor activity and affected open-field behavior in adult offspring of either sex and with decreased avoidance acquisition in adult female offspring. The results obtained suggest a relationship between the reduced brain Cu and Zn levels and CNS dysfunction in adult offspring of female rats exposed to Cd during gestation.

  1. Maternal Relationship Security as a Moderator of Home Visiting Impacts on Maternal Psychosocial Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    McFarlane, Elizabeth; Burrell, Lori; Crowne, Sarah; Cluxton-Keller, Fallon; Fuddy, Loretta; Leaf, Philip J.; Duggan, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There is variability in home visiting program impacts on the outcomes achieved by high risk families. An understanding of how effects vary among families is important for refining service targeting and content. The current study assessed whether and how maternal attributes, including relationship security, moderate short- and long-term home visiting impacts on maternal psychosocial functioning. In this multisite RCT of home visiting in a population-based, ethnically-diverse sample of families...

  2. Facility-based maternal death reviews: effects on maternal mortality in a district hospital in Senegal / Analyse des décès maternels dans les établissements de soins: effets sur la mortalité maternelle dans un hôpital de district au Sénégal / Análisis de las defunciones maternas basados en centros de salud: efectos en la mortalidad materna en un hospital de distrito del Senegal

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Alexandre, Dumont; Alioune, Gaye; Luc de, Bernis; Nils, Chaillet; Anne, Landry; Joanne, Delage; Marie-Hélène, Bouvier-Colle.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: La mejora de los servicios obstétricos es un componente clave del Programa Maternidad sin Riesgo. El análisis de las defunciones maternas y de las complicaciones asociadas es un método para reducir los riesgos del embarazo, pero no hay indicios sobre la eficacia de esa estrategia. El objet [...] ivo de nuestro estudio comparativo antes-después consistió en evaluar el efecto de los análisis de las defunciones maternas (ADM) en centros de salud sobre las tasas de mortalidad materna en un hospital de distrito del Senegal que ofrece servicios de maternidad primarios y de derivación. MÉTODOS: Incluimos a todas las mujeres ingresadas en el servicio de maternidad para dar a luz o en las primeras 24 horas tras el parto. Registramos la mortalidad materna durante un periodo basal de un año, de enero a diciembre de 1997, y luego durante tres años, de enero de 1998 a diciembre de 2000, tras aplicar los ADM. Los efectos de estos análisis en la organización de la atención fueron evaluados cualitativamente. RESULTADOS: La estrategia basada en los ADM provocó en la estructura orgánica una serie de cambios que mejoraron diversas intervenciones salvavidas, con una contribución financiera relativamente importante de la comunidad. La mortalidad general disminuyó significativamente, de 0,83 (IC (intervalo de confianza) del 95% = 0,60-1,06) en el periodo basal a 0,41 (IC95% = 0,25-0,56) por 100 mujeres 3 años más tarde. CONCLUSIÓN: Los ADM tuvieron un efecto marcado en los recursos, la gestión y los resultados maternos en el centro estudiado. Sin embargo, dado el diseño de nuestro estudio y el contexto específico local, habrá que llevar a cabo nuevas investigaciones para confirmar la viabilidad de los ADM en otros entornos, así como las ventajas de este sistema para la salud materna en los países en desarrollo. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: The improvement of obstetric services is one of the key components of the Safe Motherhood Programme. Reviewing maternal deaths and complications is one method that may make pregnancy safer, but there is no evidence about the effectiveness of this strategy. The objective of our before and [...] after study is to assess the effect of facility-based maternal deaths reviews (MDR) on maternal mortality rates in a district hospital in Senegal that provides primary and referral maternity services. METHODS: We included all women who were admitted to the maternity unit for childbirth, or within 24 hours of delivery. We recorded maternal mortality during a 1-year baseline period from January to December 1997, and during a 3-year period from January 1998 to December 2000 after MDR had been implemented. Effects of MDR on organization of care were qualitatively evaluated. FINDINGS: The MDR strategy led to changes in organizational structure that improved life-saving interventions with a relatively large financial contribution from the community. Overall mortality significantly decreased from 0.83 (95% CI (confidence interval) = 0.60 -1.06) in baseline period to 0.41 (95% CI = 0.25 -0.56) per 100 women 3 years later. CONCLUSION: MDR had a marked effect on resources, management and maternal outcomes in this facility. However, given the design of our study and the local specific context, further research is needed to confirm the feasibility of MDR in other settings and to confirm the benefits of this approach for maternal health in developing countries.

  3. Temporal effects of maternal and pregnancy characteristics on serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A and free ?-human chorionic gonadotropin at 7-14 weeks' gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, S; Ekelund, C

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate gestational age-dependent effects of racial origin, smoking status and mode of conception on maternal serum levels of free ?-human chorionic gonadotropin (?-hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) at 7-14 weeks' gestation. METHODS: This was an analysis of data from prospective first-trimester combined screening for aneuploidies in singleton pregnancies, with ?-hCG and PAPP-A measured at 7?+?1 to 14?+?3 weeks' gestation. We included 27,908 pregnancies from three centers in the U.K. and 125,461 pregnancies from 22 centers in Denmark, all with known normal fetal karyotype or resulting in the birth of a phenotypically normal neonate. Multiple regression modelling of log10 -transformed marker concentrations was used to produce log10 multiple of the median (MoM) values for free ?-hCG and PAPP-A and to examine pregnancy characteristics that have significant effects on marker concentrations. RESULTS: Serum free ?-hCG and PAPP-A concentrations were significantly affected by gestational age, maternal weight, racial origin, parity, smoking and mode of conception. There were significant gestational age-dependent effects attributed to Afro-Caribbean race, smoking and conception through in-vitro fertilization (IVF) on PAPP-A and free ?-hCG levels. In women of Afro-Caribbean race there was a weekly increase in PAPP-A of 5.3% and in free ?-hCG of 1.8%. In smokers there was a weekly decrease in PAPP-A of 2.4% and in free ?-hCG of 1.6%. In cases of IVF conceptions there was a weekly increase in PAPP-A of 4.5% and in free ?-hCG of 4.6%. CONCLUSIONS: Serum free ?-hCG and PAPP-A concentrations at 7-14 weeks' gestation are affected by several pregnancy characteristics. The effects of Afro-Caribbean race, smoking and IVF conception change with gestational age.

  4. Improving Maternal Care through a State-Wide Health Insurance Program: A Cost and Cost-Effectiveness Study in Rural Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Gabriela B.; Foster, Nicola; Brals, Daniella; Nelissen, Heleen E.; Bolarinwa, Oladimeji A.; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Boers, Alexander C.; van Eck, Diederik; Rosendaal, Nicole; Adenusi, Peju; Agbede, Kayode; Akande, Tanimola M.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Hankins, Catherine A.; Schultsz, Constance

    2015-01-01

    Background While the Nigerian government has made progress towards the Millennium Development Goals, further investments are needed to achieve the targets of post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, including Universal Health Coverage. Economic evaluations of innovative interventions can help inform investment decisions in resource-constrained settings. We aim to assess the cost and cost-effectiveness of maternal care provided within the new Kwara State Health Insurance program (KSHI) in rural Nigeria. Methods and Findings We used a decision analytic model to simulate a cohort of pregnant women. The primary outcome is the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the KSHI scenario compared to the current standard of care. Intervention cost from a healthcare provider perspective included service delivery costs and above-service level costs; these were evaluated in a participating hospital and using financial records from the managing organisations, respectively. Standard of care costs from a provider perspective were derived from the literature using an ingredient approach. We generated 95% credibility intervals around the primary outcome through probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) based on a Monte Carlo simulation. We conducted one-way sensitivity analyses across key model parameters and assessed the sensitivity of our results to the performance of the base case separately through a scenario analysis. Finally, we assessed the sustainability and feasibility of this program’s scale up within the State’s healthcare financing structure through a budget impact analysis. The KSHI scenario results in a health benefit to patients at a higher cost compared to the base case. The mean ICER (US$46.4/disability-adjusted life year averted) is considered very cost-effective compared to a willingness-to-pay threshold of one gross domestic product per capita (Nigeria, US$ 2012, 2,730). Our conclusion was robust to uncertainty in parameters estimates (PSA: median US$49.1, 95% credible interval 21.9–152.3), during one-way sensitivity analyses, and when cost, quality, cost and utilization parameters of the base case scenario were changed. The sustainability of this program’s scale up by the State is dependent on further investments in healthcare. Conclusions This study provides evidence that the investment made by the KSHI program in rural Nigeria is likely to have been cost-effective; however, further healthcare investments are needed for this program to be successfully expanded within Kwara State. Policy makers should consider supporting financial initiatives to reduce maternal mortality tackling both supply and demand issues in the access to care. PMID:26413788

  5. Temporal effects of maternal and pregnancy characteristics on serum PAPP-A and free ?-hCG at 7-14 weeks' gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, Susan; Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Investigate gestational age dependent effects of racial origin, smoking status and mode of conception on maternal serum levels of free ß-human chorionic gonadotropin (?-hCG) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) at 7-14 weeks' gestation. Methods: Data arise from prospective first-trimester combined screening for aneuploidies in singleton pregnancies, with serum free ß-hCG and PAPP-A measured at 7(+1) -14(+3) weeks' gestation. We include 27,908 pregnancies from three centres in the UK and 125,461 pregnancies from 22 centres in Denmark with normal fetal karyotype or birth of a phenotypically normal neonate. Multiple regression modelling of log(10) -transformed marker concentrations was used to produce log(10) multiple of the median (MoM) values for free ?-hCG and PAPP-A and to examine pregnancy characteristics that have significant effects on marker concentrations. Results: Serum free ß-hCG and PAPP-A concentrations were significantly affected by gestational age, maternal weight, racial origin, parity, smoking and mode of conception. There were significant gestational age dependent effects of Afro-Caribbean race, smoking and IVF conception on PAPP-A and free ß-hCG levels. In women of Afro-Caribbean race there was a weekly increase in PAPP-A of 5.3% and in free ß-hCG of 1.8%. In smokers there was a weekly decrease in PAPP-A of 2.4% and in free ?-hCG of 1.6%. In IVF conceptions there was a weekly increase in PAPP-A of 4.5% and in free ß-hCG of 4.6%. Conclusions: Serum free ß-hCG and PAPP-A concentrations at 7-14 weeks are affected by several pregnancy characteristics. The effects of Afro-Caribbean race, smoking and IVF conception change with gestational age. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Maternal Affective Disorder and Children's Representation of Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteche, Adriane; Murray, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Children's perceptions of family relationship are related to their later emotional and social adjustment. This is of particular relevance in the context of family stressors such as maternal affective disorder. This study investigated the effects of maternal postnatal depression and anxiety on children's family representations. In our sample of…

  7. Maternal Depression, Paternal Psychopathology, and Toddlers' Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Laura J.; Jennings, Kay Donahue; Kelley, Sue A.; Marshal, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article examined the effects of maternal depression during the postpartum period (Time 1) on the later behavior problems of toddlers (Time 3) and tested if this relationship was moderated by paternal psychopathology during toddlers' lives and/or mediated by maternal parenting behavior observed during mother-child interaction (Time 2). Of the…

  8. Interação genótipo-ambiente para características sob efeito maternal na raça Nelore nos estados do Maranhão, Mato Grosso e Pará / Genotype-environment interaction for maternal effect traits in Nellore cattle from Maranhão, Mato Grosso and Pará States

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Leandro Lopes, Nepomuceno; Thaymisson Santos de, Lira; Fernando Brito, Lopes; Raysildo Barbosa, Lôbo; Jorge Luís, Ferreira.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar a interação genótipo-ambiente sobre os pesos aos 120 e 210 dias de bovinos da raça Nelore, criados a pasto, nos Estados do Maranhão, Mato Grosso e Pará. O estudo foi realizado utilizando-se de dados de campo da raça Nelore cedidos pelo Programa de Melhoramento Genético da Raça [...] Nelore (PMGRN-ANCP), totalizando 37.032 animais registrados desde 1993 a 2010. As estimativas médias e desvios padrão para pesos padronizados aos 120 dias (P120), e aos 210 dias (P210) de idade para os estados do MA, MT e PA foram de 123,43±17,06; 133,91±19,62; 130,07±16,03kg (P120), 181,83±34,15; 194,73±28,52; 189,76±23,45kg (P210), respectivamente. As correlações genéticas entre os desempenhos das progênies de um mesmo reprodutor nos diferentes estados variaram de 0,42 (Maranhão-Mato Grosso), 0,38 (Maranhão-Para) a 0,70 (Mato Grosso-Para) para P120; de 0,49 (Maranhão-Mato Grosso), 0,13 (Maranhão-Para) a 0,40 (Mato Grosso-Para) para P210. As menores correlações genéticas, em ambas as características estudadas, foram observadas entre Maranhão e Pará, estados com condições de ambiente mais contrastante. Estes resultados denotam a existência de interação genótipo-ambiente, tanto no peso aos 120 dias quanto no peso aos 210 dias de idade, o que influenciou diretamente a predição do valor genético dos reprodutores, resultando em classificação diferente de um mesmo touro em cada estado. Portanto, faz-se necessário mais bem estudar inclusão desta interação nos modelos de avaliação genética dos animais, pois a seleção e reprodução do melhor touro apresentarão impactos econômicos distintos em cada estado e influenciará a tomada de decisão dos criadores. Abstract in english This study was carried out to analyze genotype-environment interaction for maternal effect traits weights of Nellore cattle from Maranhão (MA), Mato Grosso (MT) and Pará (PA) States. It was used records of 37,032 animals provided by Genetic Improvement Program of Nellore (PMGRN-ANCP) collected betwe [...] en the years 1993 to 2010. The means and standard deviations for W120 to MA, MT and PA were 123.43 ± 17.06, 133.91 ± 19.62 and 130.07 ± 16.03kg and to W210 for the same States were 181.83 ± 34.15, 28.52 ± 194.73 and 189.76 ± 23.45kg, respectively. Genetic correlations estimative between the expected progeny difference for same sire were 0.42 (MA-MT), 0.38 (MA-PA) and 0.70 (MT-PA) for P120; 0.49 (MA-MT), 0.13 (MA-PA) and 0.40 (MT-PA) for P210. Lower genetic correlations in both traits were observed between Maranhão and Pará states, which presented greats environmental distinctions. These results showed genotype-environment interaction and reaffirm the current preoccupation with these interaction which can be effect the genetic evaluation of animals raised in this states.

  9. EFFECT OF MATERNAL DEPRIVATION ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN ORPHANAGE AND URBAN SLUM CHILDREN IN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourajit Routray*, Nijwm Mahilary and Rajkumar Paul

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the development of children living in orphanage with that of the children living in slum with their biological parents. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: 3 orphanages of Bhubaneswar, one orphanage of Cuttack and two slum area in Bhubaneswar. Subject and methods: Total 146 children were included in our study, 73 from orphanage and 73 from urban slum. The total number of homes visited in slum were 217, out of which 201 gave consent for the study, 89 met our inclusion criteria. 73 children were selected by simple random method. Each children were examined, height, weight was recorded and physical examination was done. Each caretaker in the orphanage and mothers in the slum were questioned thoroughly by interview using a predesigned pretested proforma. Development was assessed by DDST-II. Results: 73 Children 0-60 months were taken for the study from four different orphanages. Out of 73 children, total developmental delay was found in 37% of orphan children, 26% had global delay & 11% had isolated delay and 13.7% delay among the urban slum children, 4.1% had global delay and 9.6% had isolated delay. The caregiver to child ratio is 1:5 to 1:7 in orphanages. Conclusion: Developmental delay among children residing in orphanages are observed to be high as compared to children living in urban slum with their parents. Despite the availability of good health facilities, and adequate nutrition to the children living in orphanages, they suffer from developmental delay due to maternal care deprivation. The Government should open up more number of orphanages with more caregivers for better care of the individual orphan children.

  10. Maternity care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N H

    1988-04-01

    China's 1-child policy has intensified couple's desire for the safe delivery of a healthy infant and necessitated improvements in maternity care. Since the late 1970s, systematic maternity care has been available to women in China from early pregnancy to 42 days after delivery. In addition, over 50 major cities offer sophisticated perinatal care services, including prenatal intrauterine diagnosis and genetic consultations. The maternal mortality rate has declined from 15/1000 in 1949 to the present rate of 0.5/1000 while infant mortality dropped from about 200/1000 to 35/1000 in this same period. 15-20% of current deliveries are by cesarean section, often through the use of acupuncture which minimizes blood loss. To encourage rural women to deliver in hospitals, a 50% discount is provided for surgical costs. To encourage better infant care and raise the breast-feeding rate among working mothers, the Ministry of Labor and Personnel has proposed a 90-day maternity leave regulation. The Chinese Government pays a 5-yuan allowance to only children until they reach the age of 15 years and 1-child families are given priorities in kindergarten, school, housing, and employment assignments. China's well-organized maternity care network consists of 3 levels: on-the-street stations, clinics that keep detailed records on pregnant patients, and hospitals that handle high-risk pregnancies. PMID:3367797

  11. Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health

    OpenAIRE

    Garbarski, Dana; Witt, Whitney P

    2012-01-01

    While maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children’s future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse maternal physical and mental health outcomes. We hypothesize that poor child health may also increase the risk of poor maternal health outcomes through an interact...

  12. Efeito materno e paterno sobre as taxas de fertilização e eclosão em curimba (Prochilodus lineatus) / Maternal and paternal effect on fertilization and haching rate in curimba (Prochilodus lineatus)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    I.B., Allaman; R.T.F., Freitas; A.T.M., Viveiros; A.F., Nascimento; G.R., Oliveira; R.V., Reis Neto.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o quanto fêmeas e machos contribuem para a variação total das taxas de fertilização e de eclosão em curimba (Prochilodus lineatus). Utilizou-se sêmen criopreservado proveniente de cinco machos para fertilizar ovócitos de seis fêmeas em um esquema fatorial cruzado 5x6, totalizando 30 famíl [...] ias. Além das características reprodutivas dos machos e fêmeas, foram avaliadas as taxas de fertilização e eclosão para cômputo dos efeitos materno e paterno. Os componentes da variância foram estimados por meio da máxima verossimilhança restrita, sendo construídos intervalos Highest Posterior Density (HPD) para cada componente. Verificou-se que as fêmeas contribuíram muito mais para a variação total em relação aos machos para as taxas de fertilização e eclosão. Para a taxa de fertilização, as fêmeas contribuíram com 26,3% da variação total e os machos com 8,9%. Em relação à taxa de eclosão, as fêmeas contribuíram com 11,9% e os machos com 1,6%. Concluiu-se que houve efeito materno sobre as taxas de fertilização e eclosão e que o efeito paterno avaliado individualmente foi pouco expressivo ou até mesmo insignificante. Abstract in english The aim of this study was to evaluate how much females and males contribute to the total variation of reproductive traits such as fertilization and hatching rate in curimba Prochilodus lineatus. Cryopreserved semen from five males was used to fertilize eggs from six females in a cross-factorial 5x6, [...] totaling 30 families. In addition to the reproductive characteristics of males and females, fertilization and hatching rates were evaluated for computation of maternal and paternal effects. The variance components were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood, and the Highest Posterior Density (HPD) intervals were estimated for each component. The female contributed more to the total variation than males for the fertilization and hatching rates. The female contributed 26.3% of the total variation in the fertilization rate against 8.9% of ma